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Sample records for explosives detection ion

  1. The ion mobility spectrometer for high explosive vapor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.J.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Phemto-Chem /SUP R/ Model 100 Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) operates in air and measures a number of explosive vapors at levels as low as partsper-trillion in seconds. The theory and operation of this instrument is discussed. The IMS inhales the vapor sample in a current of air and generates characteristic ions which are separated by time-of -ion drift in the atmospheric pressure gas. Quantitative results, using a dilution tunnel and standard signal generator with TNT, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, cyclohexanone, methylamine, octafluoronaphthalene and hexafluorobenzene, are given. Rapid sample treatment with sample concentrations, microprocessor signal readout and chemical identification, offer a realistic opportunity of rapid explosive vapor detection at levels down to 10 -14 parts by volume in air

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  3. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  4. Detection of nitro-based and peroxide-based explosives by fast polarity-switchable ion mobility spectrometer with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-05-29

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H](-) and [HMTD+H](+) could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP.

  5. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  6. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reber, Edward L.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Jewell, J. Keith; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Klinger, Jeffery B.

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004

  7. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)]. E-mail: reber@inel.gov; Blackwood, Larry G. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Edwards, Andrew J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Jewell, J. Keith [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Rohde, Kenneth W. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Seabury, Edward H. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Klinger, Jeffery B. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  8. Evaluation of false positive responses by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of trace explosives in complex samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L., E-mail: clcrawf@sandia.gov; Hill, H.H.

    2013-09-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First study to use (−)SESI-IM-TOFMS to analyze complex mixtures of personal care products. •The study demonstrated, by identifying mobility and mass interferents with explosive signatures, which, if used separately, neither IMS nor MS alone would prevent every false positive for explosives when detected in the presence of a complex sample matrix. •Ingredients in common household cleaning products were shown to either enhance or suppress the ionization of explosives in a SESI-IM-TOFMS analysis. •Mobility separation provided real-time separation of ion species that indicated overlapping isotope peak patterns -- Abstract: Secondary electrospray ionization-ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (SESI-IM-TOFMS) was used to evaluate common household products and food ingredients for any mass or mobility responses that produced false positives for explosives. These products contained ingredients which shared the same mass and mobility drift time ranges as the analyte ions for common explosives. The results of this study showed that the vast array of compounds in these products can cause either mass or mobility false positive responses. This work also found that two ingredients caused either enhanced or reduced ionization of the target analytes. Another result showed that an IMS can provide real-time separation of ion species that impede accurate mass identifications due to overlapping isotope peak patterns. The final result of this study showed that, when mass and mobility values were used to identify an ion, no false responses were found for the target explosives. The wider implication of these results is that the possibility exists for even greater occurrences of false responses from complex mixtures found in common products. Neither IMS nor MS alone can provide 100% assurance from false responses. IMS, due to its low cost, ease of operation, rugged reliability, high sensitivity and tunable selectivity, will remain

  9. System for detecting nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting underground nuclear explosions is described that is comprised of an antenna located in the dielectric substance of a deep waveguide in the earth and adapted to detect low frequency electromagnetic waves generated by a nuclear explosion, the deep waveguide comprising the high conductivity upper sedimentary layers of the earth, the dielectric basement rock, and a high conductivity layer of basement rock due to the increased temperature thereof at great depths, and means for receiving the electromagnetic waves detected by said antenna means

  10. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  11. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  12. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk [Sensor Tech Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H]{sup -} for TNT and DNT or [M]{sup ·-}. for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO]{sup -}. These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available.

  13. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk

    2013-01-01

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H] - for TNT and DNT or [M] ·- . for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO] - . These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available

  14. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  15. Explosives detection via fast neutron transmission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overley, J.C.; Chmelik, M.S.; Rasmussen, R.J.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Sieger, G.E.; Lefevre, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of a five-year project on detection of explosives in luggage is presented. Experimental methods are described. Explosive detection algorithms based on elemental distributions in a 5-dimensional space are also described. Single-blind tests of the method suggest that a false-alarm rate of 4% and a detection rate of 93% are possible. Improvements in the method are suggested. Measurements of neutron total cross sections for chlorine are presented

  16. Laser-based optical detection of explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrino, Paul M; Farrell, Mikella E

    2015-01-01

    Laser-Based Optical Detection of Explosives offers a comprehensive review of past, present, and emerging laser-based methods for the detection of a variety of explosives. This book: Considers laser propagation safety and explains standard test material preparation for standoff optical-based detection system evaluation Explores explosives detection using deep ultraviolet native fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, reflectometry, and hyperspectral imaging Examines photodissociation followed by laser-induced fluorescence, photothermal methods, cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry, and short-pulse laser-based techniques Describes the detection and recognition of explosives using terahertz-frequency spectroscopic techniques Each chapter is authored by a leading expert on the respective technology, and is structured to supply historical perspective, address current advantages and challenges, and discuss novel research and applications. Readers are left with an in-depth understa...

  17. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  18. Techniques for detecting explosives and contraband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourvopoulos, G.

    1994-01-01

    Because terrorism continues to be a societal threat, scientists are still searching for ways to identify concealed weapons that can be used in terrorist attacks. Explosives are singled out for particular attention because they can easily be shaped to look innocuous, and are still hard to detect. At present, there are three methods under development for the detection of explosives: X-ray imaging, vapour detection and nuclear techniques, and this article will concentrate on the latter. Since there is no single technology that can address all the questions concerning the detection of explosives and other illicit contraband, the philosophy that emerges is that of an integral system combining methodologies. Such a system could contain a nuclear technology device, a vapour detector, and an X-ray imaging device, all backed by an intelligence gathering system. In this paper methods are suggested for identifying explosives which may be used in terrorist attacks and for detecting concealed drugs. Techniques discussed are X-ray imaging, combining high and low energy x-ray machines, vapour detection using a ''sniffer'' to collect vapour samples then analysing the vapour by gas chromatography, chemiluminescence and mass spectroscopy and nuclear techniques. Nuclear techniques, such as neutron activation analysis, are discussed in detail but it is stressed that they need to be carried out at speed to eliminate disruption and delay at airports etc. (UK)

  19. Detection of bottled explosives by near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Sato-Akaba, Hideo

    2013-10-01

    Bottled liquids are not allowed through the security gate in the airport, because liquid explosives have been used by the terrorists. However, passengers have a lot of trouble if they cannot bring their own bottles. For example, a mother would like to carry her own milk in the airplane for her baby. Therefore the detection technology of liquid explosives should be developed as soon as possible. This paper shows that near infrared spectroscopy can detect bottled explosives quickly. The transmission method cannot deal with milk in the sense of liquid inspection. Here we examined the reflection method to the test of milk. The inspection method with light cannot make test for the metal can. We also use ultrasonic method to check metal can simultaneously in order to expand test targets.

  20. Pulsed White Spectrum Neutron Generator for Explosive Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is a critical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designed and fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set of parallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80-120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing

  1. Chemosensors for detection of nitroaromatic compounds (explosives)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyryanov, G. V.; Kopchuk, D. S.; Kovalev, I. S.; Nosova, E. V.; Rusinov, V. L.; Chupakhin, O. N.

    2014-09-01

    The key types of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for the detection of nitroaromatic compounds representing energetic substances (explosives) are analyzed. The coordination and chemical properties of these chemosensors and structural features of their complexes with nitroaromatic compounds are considered. The causes and methods for attaining high selectivity of recognition are demonstrated. The primary attention is paid to the use of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for visual detection of explosives of this class by colorimetric and photometric methods. Examples of using photo- and chemiluminescence for this purpose are described. A separate section is devoted to electrochemical methods of detection of nitroaromatic compounds. Data published from 2000 to 2014 are mainly covered. The bibliography includes 245 references.

  2. Chemosensors for detection of nitroaromatic compounds (explosives)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyryanov, G V; Kopchuk, D S; Rusinov, V L; Chupakhin, O N; Kovalev, I S; Nosova, E V

    2014-01-01

    The key types of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for the detection of nitroaromatic compounds representing energetic substances (explosives) are analyzed. The coordination and chemical properties of these chemosensors and structural features of their complexes with nitroaromatic compounds are considered. The causes and methods for attaining high selectivity of recognition are demonstrated. The primary attention is paid to the use of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for visual detection of explosives of this class by colorimetric and photometric methods. Examples of using photo- and chemiluminescence for this purpose are described. A separate section is devoted to electrochemical methods of detection of nitroaromatic compounds. Data published from 2000 to 2014 are mainly covered. The bibliography includes 245 references

  3. Multi-sensor explosive detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, T.; Shea, P.M.; Sawa, Z.P.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an explosive detection system. It comprises a source of neutrons; a detector array comprising a plurality of gamma ray detectors, each of the gamma ray detectors providing a detection signal in the event a gamma ray is captured by the detector, and at least one neutron detector, the neutron detector providing a neutron detection signal in the event a neutron is captured by the neutron detector; means for irradiating an object being examined with neutrons from the neutron source and for positioning the detector array relative to the object so that gamma rays emitted from the elements within the object as a result of the neutron irradiation are detected by the gamma ray detectors of the detector array; and parallel distributed processing means responsive to the detection signals of the detector array for discriminating between objects carrying explosives and objects not carrying explosives, the parallel distributed processing means including an artificial neural system (ANS), the ANS having a parallel network of processors, each processor of the parallel network of processors, each processor of the parallel network of processors including means for receiving at least one input signal, and means for generating an output signal as a function of the at least one input signal

  4. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of explosives detection systems. 1544.213...: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.213 Use of explosives detection systems. (a... explosives detection system approved by TSA to screen checked baggage on international flights. (b) Signs and...

  5. Remote detection of explosives using trained canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.C.

    1983-03-01

    Use of dogs is a search method which combines high probability of detection, speed of search, and low cost. It was concluded that the canine could be used for explosive screening of personnel, but that it was imperative that the dog be in a position remote from employees and employee traffic. A study was made of the design of booths and air flow for this purpose. Results of tests and conclusions are given and discussed

  6. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  7. Detection of explosives by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, F.D.; Buffler, A.; Allie, M.S.; Nchodu, M.R.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    1998-01-01

    For non-intrusive detection of hidden explosives or other contraband such as narcotics a fast neutron scattering analysis (FNSA) technique is proposed. An experimental arrangement uses a collimated, pulsed beam of neutrons directed at the sample. Scattered neutrons are detected by liquid scintillation counters at different scattering angles. A scattering signature is derived from two-parameter data, counts vs pulse height and time-of-flight measured for each element (H, C, N or O) at each of two scattering angles and two neutron energies. The elemental signatures are very distinctive and constitute a good response matrix for unfolding elemental components from the scattering signatures measured for different compounds

  8. Explosives vapour identification in ion mobility spectrometry using a tunable laser ionization source: a comparison with conventional 63Ni ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Laser multiphoton ionization (MPI) is used to produce ions from explosive vapours at atmospheric pressure in air for analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). In the positive ion mode of detection, NO + ions, generated directly by multiphoton dissociation/ionization of the explosive compounds, show strong variation with laser wavelength. This provides a means of identifying the presence of nitro-containing compounds. Moreover, electrons formed in the MPI of gaseous components in the air carrier stream, primarily O 2 , are transferred via neutral molecular oxygen (O 2 ) to trace explosive vapour, forming negative ions which give rise to characteristic and identifiable ion mobility spectra. Further, negative ion mobility spectra of several explosive vapours are presented using conventional 63 Ni ionization and are compared qualitatively with the laser ionization approach. (author)

  9. Ag-ZnO nanostructure for ANTA explosive molecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Sangani, L. D. Varma [Centre for Advanced Studies in Electronics Science and Technology, School of Physics, University of Hyderabad (India); Gaur, Anshu [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Sommarive9, Trento (Italy); Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad, E-mail: ahamed.vza@gmail.com [National Institute of Technology Andhra Pradesh, Tadepalliguem 534101, AP, India Phone : (+) 91-40-23134382, FAX: (+) 91-40-23010227 (India); Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Centre for Advanced Studies in Electronics Science and Technology, School of Physics, University of Hyderabad (India); National Institute of Technology Andhra Pradesh, Tadepalliguem 534101, AP, India Phone : (+) 91-40-23134382, FAX: (+) 91-40-23010227 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Ag/ZnO nanostructure for surface enhanced Raman scattering application in the detection of ANTA explosive molecule is demonstrated. A highly rough ZnO microstructure was achieved by rapid thermal annealing of metallic Zn film. Different thickness Ag nanostructures are decorated over these ZnO microstructures by ion beam sputtering technique. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies carried out over Ag/ZnO substrates have shown three orders higher enhancement compared to bare Ag nanostructure deposited on the same substrate. The reasons behind such huge enhancement are discussed based on the morphology of the sample.

  10. Apparatus and method for detecting explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, B.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for use in situations such as airports to detect explosives hidden in containers (for eg. suitcases). The method involves the evaluation of the quantities of oxygen and nitrogen within the container by neutron activation analysis and the determination of whether these quantities exceed predetermined limits. The equipment includes a small sub-critical lower powered reactor for thermal (0.01 to 0.10 eV) neutron production, a radium beryllium primary source, a deuterium-tritium reactor as a high energy (> 1.06 MeV) neutron source and Geiger counter detector arrays. (UK)

  11. Advances in neutron based bulk explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Strellis, Dan

    2007-08-01

    Neutron based explosive inspection systems can detect a wide variety of national security threats. The inspection is founded on the detection of characteristic gamma rays emitted as the result of neutron interactions with materials. Generally these are gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture and inelastic scattering reactions in most materials and fast and thermal neutron fission in fissile (e.g.235U and 239Pu) and fertile (e.g.238U) materials. Cars or trucks laden with explosives, drugs, chemical agents and hazardous materials can be detected. Cargo material classification via its main elements and nuclear materials detection can also be accomplished with such neutron based platforms, when appropriate neutron sources, gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron detectors and suitable decision algorithms are employed. Neutron based techniques can be used in a variety of scenarios and operational modes. They can be used as stand alones for complete scan of objects such as vehicles, or for spot-checks to clear (or validate) alarms indicated by another inspection system such as X-ray radiography. The technologies developed over the last two decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last few years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The advances range from the synchronous inspection of two sides of vehicles, increasing throughput and sensitivity and reducing imparted dose to the inspected object and its occupants (if any), to taking advantage of the neutron kinetic behavior of cargo to remove systematic errors, reducing background effects and improving fast neutron signals.

  12. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J. [Quantum Magnetics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  13. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives...

  14. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  15. Terrorism and Drug Trafficking: Technologies for Detecting Explosives and Narcotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined information on explosives and narcotics detection technologies that are available or under development. This report discusses (1) funding for those technologies, (2) characteristics and limitations of avai...

  16. Neutron capture on nitrogen as a means of detecting explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    A research prototype was developed on the basis of neutron capture on nitrogen and is demonstrated to be able to detect parcel and letter bombs. Is the gamma radiation that is detected as an indication of the presence of nitrogen, and the probable presence of nitrogen-containing explosive. The conceptual design of the explosive detector and some experimental results are briefly presented. figs., ills

  17. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.

    2011-01-01

    as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework...

  18. Trace level detection of explosives in solution using leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Shida, Yasuo; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the detection of explosives in solution using thermal desorption technique at a temperature higher than Leidenfrost temperature of the solvent in combination with low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization. Leidenfrost temperature of a solvent is the temperature above which the solvent droplet starts levitation instead of splashing when placed on a hot metallic surface. During this desorption process, slow and gentle solvent evaporation takes place, which leads to the pre-concentration of less-volatile explosive molecules in the droplet and the explosive molecules are released at the last moment of droplet evaporation. The limits of detection for explosives studied by using this thermal desorption LTP ionization method varied in a range of 1 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) using a droplet volume of 20 μL (absolute sample amount 90-630 fmol). As LTP ionization method was applied and ion-molecule reactions took place in ambient atmosphere, various ion-molecule adduct species like [M+NO2](-), [M+NO3](-), [M+HCO3](-), [M+HCO4](-) were generated together with [M-H](-) peak. Each peak was unambiguously identified using 'Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer in negative ionization mode within 3 ppm deviation compared to its exact mass. This newly developed technique was successfully applied to detect four explosives contained in the pond water and soil sample with minor sample pre-treatment and the explosives were detected with ppb levels. The present method is simple, rapid and can detect trace levels of explosives with high specificity from solutions.

  19. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  20. Application of factor analysis to the explosive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Joon; Song, Byung Chul; Im, Hee Jung; Kim, Won Ho; Cho, Jung Hwan

    2005-01-01

    The detection of explosive devices hidden in airline baggage is significant problem, particularly in view of the development of modern plastic explosives which can formed into various innocent-appearing shapes and which are sufficiently powerful that small quantities can destroy an aircraft in flight. Besides, the biggest difficulty occurs from long detection time required for the explosive detection system based on thermal neutron interrogation, which involves exposing baggage to slow neutrons having energy in the order of 0.025 eV. The elemental compositions of explosives can be determined by the Neutron Induced Prompt gamma Spectroscopy (NIPS) which has been installed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a tool for the detection of explosives in passenger baggage. In this work, the factor analysis has been applied to the NIPS system to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the prompt gamma spectrum for the detection of explosive hidden in a passenger's baggage, especially for the noisy prompt gamma spectrum obtained with short measurement time

  1. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  2. Detection of hidden explosives by fast neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinnian; Guo Junpeng; Luo Wenyun; Wang Chuanshan; Fang Xiaoming; Yu Tailiu

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the method and principle for detection of hidden explosive by fast neutron activation analysis (FNAA). The method of detection of explosives by FNAA has the specific properties of simple determination equipments, high reliability, and low detecting cost, and would be beneficial to the applicability and popularization in the field of protecting and securing nation. The contents of nitrogen and oxygen in four explosives, more then ten common materials and TNT samples covered with soil, were measured by FNAA. 14 MeV fast neutrons were generated from (d, t) reaction with a 400 kV Cockcroft Walton type accelerator. The two-dimension distributions for nitro- gen and oxygen counting rates per unit mass of determined matters were obtained, and the characteristic area of explosives and non-explosives can be defined. By computer aided pattern recognition, the samples were identified with low false alarm or omission rates. The Monte-Carlo simulation indicates that there is no any radiation at 15 m apart from neutron source and is safe for irradiation after 1 h. It is suggested that FNAA may be potential in remote controlling for detection hidden explosive system with multi-probe large array. (authors)

  3. The associated particle method explosives detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Li; Chen Yuan; Guo Haiping; Zheng Pu; Wang Xinhua; He Tie; Mu Yunfeng; Yang Xiaofei; Zhu Chuanxin

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the basic principle of associated alpha particles technique for explosives' inspection and the measurement system. The characteristic prompt gamma-rays come from water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, ammonium nitrate, melamine and simulated samples induced by D-T neutron from generator were gained by single alpha particles detector and gamma-ray detector. The complex gamma-ray spectra were deconvolved. The element ratio between the experiment and chemics molecular formula is agreement in 10%. (authors)

  4. Identification of homemade inorganic explosives by ion chromatographic analysis of post-blast residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Cameron; Shellie, Robert A; Potter, Oscar G; O'Reilly, John W; Hutchinson, Joseph P; Guijt, Rosanne M; Breadmore, Michael C; Hilder, Emily F; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R

    2008-02-29

    Anions and cations of interest for the post-blast identification of homemade inorganic explosives were separated and detected by ion chromatographic (IC) methods. The ionic analytes used for identification of explosives in this study comprised 18 anions (acetate, benzoate, bromate, carbonate, chlorate, chloride, chlorite, chromate, cyanate, fluoride, formate, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, phosphate, sulfate, thiocyanate and thiosulfate) and 12 cations (ammonium, barium(II), calcium(II), chromium(III), ethylammonium, magnesium(II), manganese(II), methylammonium, potassium(I), sodium(I), strontium(II), and zinc(II)). Two IC separations are presented, using suppressed IC on a Dionex AS20 column with potassium hydroxide as eluent for anions, and non-suppressed IC for cations using a Dionex SCS 1 column with oxalic acid/acetonitrile as eluent. Conductivity detection was used in both cases. Detection limits for anions were in the range 2-27.4ppb, and for cations were in the range 13-115ppb. These methods allowed the explosive residue ions to be identified and separated from background ions likely to be present in the environment. Linearity (over a calibration range of 0.05-50ppm) was evaluated for both methods, with r(2) values ranging from 0.9889 to 1.000. Reproducibility over 10 consecutive injections of a 5ppm standard ranged from 0.01 to 0.22% relative standard deviation (RSD) for retention time and 0.29 to 2.16%RSD for peak area. The anion and cation separations were performed simultaneously by using two Dionex ICS-2000 chromatographs served by a single autoinjector. The efficacy of the developed methods was demonstrated by analysis of residue samples taken from witness plates and soils collected following the controlled detonation of a series of different inorganic homemade explosives. The results obtained were also confirmed by parallel analysis of the same samples by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with excellent agreement being obtained.

  5. SUERC AMS ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maden, C.; Anastasi, P.A.F.; Dougans, A.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Kitchen, R.; Klody, G.; Schnabel, C.; Sundquist, M.; Vanner, K.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a short time Be, C, Al, Cl, Ca and I accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have been established on the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) 5 MV pelletron system at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC). While summarising the present performance of the system, this report will focus on the details of ion detection, which sample materials are used and the analytical procedures employed for each individual species during routine analysis. All rare isotope detection is with a single flexible detector and ion event analysis system, but switching of analysed species typically requires a detector reconfiguration. Configurations for routine 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca and 129 I detection have been established and will be presented here. Notably, there has proven to be sufficient suppression of the isobaric interferences of 36 Cl and 41 Ca in the 5+ charge state using an argon gas stripper at a terminal voltage of 5.0 MV to allow for routine analysis of these isotopes

  6. Film sputtering with ion mixing in a pulse explosion-emission ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Balalykin, N.I.; Sikolenko, V.V.; Orelovich, O.L.; Shirokov, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    A possibility is confirmed of obtaining mixed composition films from mutually nonsoluble metals in conditions when a film is irradiated with an ion beam in the process of deposition and afterwards with an electron beam. In the experiments was used an explosion-emission ion diode. The experiments showed a possibility of obtaining a new structural material-aluminium with titanium film. 12 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Detecting and identifying underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, S.

    1996-01-01

    The monitoring of underground nuclear explosions involves, first determining that the signals have originated from a test site and if so, then a pattern recognition analysis is undertaken to determine whether the signals originate from an explosion rather than an earthquake. In this we are aided by seismic observations of previous explosions from each test site. To determine the origin of a signal use is first made of the two seismic arrays in central Australia. Each of these arrays consists of 20 spatially separated sensors (seismometers), and each of which can provide a preliminary estimate of the location of the source. In practice this is done automatically by inserting delays into the output of each of the sensors to compensate for a seismic signal taking a finite time to cross the array, and then adding the output of each sensor to form what are called 'array beams'. When the correct delays for a particular azimuth and wavespeed (corresponding to a particular source location) have been inserted, the signals recorded by each sensor will be in phase and the energy in the array beam will be a maximum. Because the seismic background noise at each sensor is not correlated, this beam forming also improves the signal-to-noise ratio. In this sense a seismic array is equivalent to other arrays of sensors - e.g. a radar antenna. Having determined that a signal originates from somewhere near a test site a more precise location can be obtained from the times that the signal arrives at different seismic stations

  8. Detecting and identifying underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, S. [Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Anzac Park, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Primary Industry

    1996-12-31

    The monitoring of underground nuclear explosions involves, first determining that the signals have originated from a test site and if so, then a pattern recognition analysis is undertaken to determine whether the signals originate from an explosion rather than an earthquake. In this we are aided by seismic observations of previous explosions from each test site. To determine the origin of a signal use is first made of the two seismic arrays in central Australia. Each of these arrays consists of 20 spatially separated sensors (seismometers), and each of which can provide a preliminary estimate of the location of the source. In practice this is done automatically by inserting delays into the output of each of the sensors to compensate for a seismic signal taking a finite time to cross the array, and then adding the output of each sensor to form what are called `array beams`. When the correct delays for a particular azimuth and wavespeed (corresponding to a particular source location) have been inserted, the signals recorded by each sensor will be in phase and the energy in the array beam will be a maximum. Because the seismic background noise at each sensor is not correlated, this beam forming also improves the signal-to-noise ratio. In this sense a seismic array is equivalent to other arrays of sensors - e.g. a radar antenna. Having determined that a signal originates from somewhere near a test site a more precise location can be obtained from the times that the signal arrives at different seismic stations

  9. Real-time change detection for countering improvised explosive devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouw, van de D.W.J.M.; Rens, van K.; Lint, van R.H.; Jaspers, Egbert; With, de P.H.N.; Loce, R.P.; Saber, E.

    2014-01-01

    We explore an automatic real-time change detection system to assist military personnel during transport and surveillance, by detection changes in the environment with respect to a previous operation. Such changes may indicate the presence of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), which can then be

  10. NQR: From imaging to explosives and drugs detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osan, Tristan M.; Cerioni, Lucas M.C.; Forguez, Jose; Olle, Juan M.; Pusiol, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to present an overview of the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy capabilities for solid state imaging and detection of illegal substances, such as explosives and drugs. We briefly discuss the evolution of different NQR imaging techniques, in particular those involving spatial encoding which permit conservation of spectroscopic information. It has been shown that plastic explosives and other forbidden substances cannot be easily detected by means of conventional inspection techniques, such as those based on conventional X-ray technology. For this kind of applications, the experimental results show that the information inferred from NQR spectroscopy provides excellent means to perform volumetric and surface detection of dangerous explosive and drug compounds

  11. Observations on military exploitation of explosives detection technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Anthony A.; de Ruiter, C. J.; Ehlerding, Anneli; McFee, John E.; Svinsås, Eirik; van Rheenen, Arthur D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate and timely detection of explosives, energetic materials, and their associated compounds would provide valuable information to military commanders in a wide range of military operations: protection of fast moving convoys from mobile or static IED threats; more deliberate countermine and counter-IED operations during route or area clearance; and static roles such as hasty or deliberate checkpoints, critical infrastructure protection and support to public security. The detection of hidden explosive hazards is an extremely challenging problem, as evidenced by the fact that related research has been ongoing in many countries for at least seven decades and no general purpose solution has yet been found. Technologies investigated have spanned all major scientific fields, with emphasis on the physical sciences, life sciences, engineering, robotics, computer technology and mathematics. This paper will present a limited, operationally-focused overview of the current status of detection technologies. Emphasis will be on those technologies that directly detect the explosive hazard, as opposed to those that detect secondary properties of the threat, such as the casing, associated wires or electronics. Technologies that detect explosives include those based on nuclear radiation and terahertz radiation, as well as trace and biological detection techniques. Current research areas of the authors will be used to illustrate the practical applications.

  12. Rapid detection of sugar alcohol precursors and corresponding nitrate ester explosives using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P

    2015-04-21

    This work highlights the rapid detection of nitrate ester explosives and their sugar alcohol precursors by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) using an off-axis geometry. Demonstration of the effect of various parameters, such as ion polarity and in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) on the detection of these compounds is presented. Sensitivity of sugar alcohols and nitrate ester explosives was found to be greatest in negative ion mode with sensitivities ranging from hundreds of picograms to hundreds of nanograms, depending on the characteristics of the particular molecule. Altering the in-source CID potential allowed for acquisition of characteristic molecular ion spectra as well as fragmentation spectra. Additional studies were completed to identify the role of different experimental parameters on the sensitivity for these compounds. Variables that were examined included the DART gas stream temperature, the presence of a related compound (i.e., the effect of a precursor on the detection of a nitrate ester explosive), incorporation of dopant species and the role of the analysis surface. It was determined that each variable affected the response and detection of both sugar alcohols and the corresponding nitrate ester explosives. From this work, a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of individual sugar alcohols and corresponding nitrate ester explosives, or mixtures of the two, has been developed, providing a useful tool in the real-world identification of homemade explosives.

  13. A review of conventional explosives detection using active neutron interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, Z.D.; Kearfott, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional explosives are relatively easy to obtain and may cause massive harm to people and property. There are several tools employed by law enforcement to detect explosives, but these can be subverted. Active neutron interrogation is a viable alternative to those techniques, and includes: fast neutron analysis, thermal neutron analysis, pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis, neutron elastic scatter, and fast neutron radiography. These methods vary based on neutron energy and radiation detected. A thorough review of the principles behind, advantages, and disadvantages of the different types of active neutron interrogation is presented. (author)

  14. Detection of chemical explosives using multiple photon signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loschke, K.W.; Dunn, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A template-matching procedure to aid in rapid detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is being investigated. Multiple photon-scattered and photon-induced positron annihilation radiation responses are being used as part of a photon-neutron signature-based radiation scanning (SBRS) approach (see companion reference for description of the neutron component), in an attempt to detect chemical explosives at safe standoff distances. Many past and present photon interrogation methods are based on imaging. Imaging techniques seek to determine at high special resolution the internal structure of a target of interest. Our technique simply seeks to determine if an unknown target contains a detectable amount of chemical explosives by comparing multiple responses (signatures) that depend on both density and composition of portions of a target. In the photon component, beams of photons are used to create back-streaming signatures, which are dependent on the density and composition of part of the target being interrogated. These signatures are compared to templates, which are collections of the same signatures if the interrogated volume contained a significant amount of explosives. The signature analysis produces a figure-of-merit and a standard deviation of the figure-of-merit. These two metrics are used to filter safe from dangerous targets. Experiments have been conducted that show that explosive surrogates (fertilizers) can be distinguished from several inert materials using these photon signatures, demonstrating that these signatures can be used effectively to help IEDs

  15. A laser-based FAIMS detector for detection of ultra-low concentrations of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmalov, Artem E.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.; Sychev, Alexey V.; Tugaenko, Anton V.; Bogdanov, Artem S.; Perederiy, Anatoly N.; Spitsyn, Eugene M.

    2014-06-01

    A non-contact method for analyzing of explosives traces from surfaces was developed. The method is based on the laser desorption of analyzed molecules from the surveyed surfaces followed by the laser ionization of air sample combined with the field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The pulsed radiation of the fourth harmonic of a portable GSGG: Cr3+ :Nd3+ laser (λ = 266 nm) is used. The laser desorption FAIMS analyzer have been developed. The detection limit of the analyzer equals 40 pg for TNT. The results of detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are presented. It is shown that laser desorption of nitro-compounds from metals is accompanied by their surface decomposition. A method for detecting and analyzing of small concentrations of explosives in air based on the laser ionization and the FAIMS was developed. The method includes a highly efficient multipass optical scheme of the intracavity fourthharmonic generation of pulsed laser radiation (λ = 266 nm) and the field asymmetric ion mobility (FAIM) spectrometer disposed within a resonator. The ions formation and detection proceed inside a resonant cavity. The laser ion source based on the multi-passage of radiation at λ = 266 nm through the ionization region was elaborated. On the basis of the method the laser FAIMS analyzer has been created. The analyzer provides efficient detection of low concentrations of nitro-compounds in air and shows a detection limit of 10-14 - 10-15 g/cm3 both for RDX and TNT.

  16. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  17. A TNA explosives-detection system in airline baggage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, P.; Gozani, T. (Science Applications International Corp., Santa Clara, CA (USA)); Bozorgmanesh, H. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (USA))

    1990-12-20

    Existing technologies that are applied to explosives-detection in passenger baggage are briefly discussed. A system based on thermal-neutron analysis (TNA) is described. The actual performance of the system in the field on passenger bags is given. The application of the TNA in an integrated airport security system is discussed in view of the intense public debate on this issue. (orig.).

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by (14)N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D-D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 10(10) fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based γ-ray detectors to different explosives is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Explosives detection with applications to landmines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Modern mines have been made difficult to detect by conventional means such as magnetic detection. The problem is not only that there is often only a small amount of metal in the mine but that the war zone may contain an enormous amount of metal pieces from other weapons. Thus the problem is not just one of detection, but of developing methods to discriminate between many kinds of background and clutter that are present. One of techniques is the use of fast neutrons to probe material with subsequent spectrometry of gamma rays produced by inelastic neutron interactions. Another approach is the use of an infrared camera to detect mines after heating soil with a large heater. Certain advantages has Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance to detect nitrogen in compounds such as TNT. Use of remote controlled mechanical devices to detonate mines can also be considered. It is important to note that no single device will solve the problem and therefore it will be more effective to build devices specific to problem

  20. Preliminary detection of explosive standard components with Laser Raman Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Presently, our section is leader of the ISOTREX project (Integrated System for On-line TRace EXplosives detection in solid, liquid and vapour state), funded in the frame of the PASR 2006 action (Preparatory Action on the enhancement of the European industrial potential in the field of Security Research Preparatory Action) of the 6. EC framework. ISOTREX project will exploit the capabilities of different laser techniques as LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), LPA (Laser Photo Acustic) and CRDS (Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy) to monitor explosive traces. In this frame, we extended our investigation also to the laser induced Raman effect spectroscopy, in order to investigate its capabilities and possible future integration. We analysed explosive samples in bulk solid phase, diluted liquid phase and as evaporated films over suitable substrate. In the following, we present the main results obtained, outlining preliminary conclusions [it

  1. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Scharff, R. Jason; Moore, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared (∼750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  2. Electrochemical detection of ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang Jianfeng; Guo Chunxian; Hu Fengping [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and Center for Advanced Bionanosystems, Nanyang Technological University, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Yu Lei [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Li Changming, E-mail: ecmli@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and Center for Advanced Bionanosystems, Nanyang Technological University, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637457 (Singapore)

    2011-01-10

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor has been fabricated to detect ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporus carbon (OMC). OMC was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Glassy carbon electrodes functionalized with OMC show high sensitivity of 62.7 {mu}A cm{sup -2} per ppb towards 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). By comparison with other materials such as carbon nanotubes and ordered mesoporous silica, it is found that the high performance of OMC toward sensing TNT is attributed to its large specific surface area and fast electron transfer capability. As low as 0.2 ppb TNT, 1 ppb 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 1 ppb 1,3-dinitrobenzene can be detected on OMC based electrodes. This work renders new opportunities to detect ultratrace explosives for applications of environment protections and home securities against chemical warfare agents.

  3. Electrochemical Sensor for Explosives Precursors’ Detection in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloé Desmet

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although all countries are intensifying their efforts against terrorism and increasing their mutual cooperation, terrorist bombing is still one of the greatest threats to society. The discovery of hidden bomb factories is of primary importance in the prevention of terrorism activities. Criminals preparing improvised explosives (IE use chemical substances called precursors. These compounds are released in the air and in the waste water during IE production. Tracking sources of precursors by analyzing air or wastewater can then be an important clue for bomb factories’ localization. We are reporting here a new multiplex electrochemical sensor dedicated to the on-site simultaneous detection of three explosive precursors, potentially used for improvised explosive device preparation (hereafter referenced as B01, B08, and B15, for security disclosure reasons and to avoid being detrimental to the security of the counter-explosive EU action. The electrochemical sensors were designed to be disposable and to combine ease of use and portability in a screen-printed eight-electrochemical cell array format. The working electrodes were modified with different electrodeposited metals: gold, palladium, and platinum. These different coatings giving selectivity to the multi-sensor through a “fingerprint”-like signal subsequently analyzed using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Results are given regarding the detection of the three compounds in a real environment and in the presence of potentially interfering species.

  4. Simultaneous determination of inorganic anions and cations in explosive residues by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hong-Bo; Wang, Tian-Ran; Guo, Bao-Yuan; Hashi, Yuki; Guo, Can-Xiong; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2008-07-15

    A non-suppressed ion chromatographic method by connecting anion-exchange and cation-exchange columns directly was developed for the separation and determination of five inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, nitrite, and chlorate) and three cations (sodium, ammonium, and potassium) simultaneously in explosive residues. The mobile phase was composed of 3.5mM phthalic acid with 2% acetonitrile and water at flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. Under the optimal conditions, the eight inorganic ions were completely separated and detected simultaneously within 16 min. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the anions and cations were in the range of 50-100 microg/L and 150-320 microg/L, respectively, the linear correlation coefficients were 0.9941-0.9996, and the R.S.D. of retention time and peak area were 0.10-0.29% and 5.65-8.12%, respectively. The method was applied successfully to the analysis of the explosive samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Parameters of explosives detection through tagged neutron method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasaryan, Kh.E.; Batyaev, V.F.; Belichenko, S.G., E-mail: consul757@mail.ru; Bestaev, R.R.; Gavryuchenkov, A.V.; Karetnikov, M.D.

    2015-06-01

    The potentialities of tagged neutron method (TNM) for explosives detection are examined on the basis of an idealized geometrical model. The model includes ING-27 14 MeV neutron generator with a built-in α-detector, a LYSO γ-detector and samples of material to be identified of approximately 0.3 kg each: explosives imitators (trinitrotoluene - TNT, tetryl, RDX and ammonium nitrate), legal materials (sugar, water, silk and polyethylene). The samples were unshielded or shielded by a paper layer of various thicknesses. The experimental data were interpreted by numerical simulation using a Poisson distribution of signals with the statistical parameters defined experimentally. The detection parameters were obtained by a pattern classification theory and a Bayes classifier.

  6. [Determination of inorganic ions in explosive residues by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junhe; Guo, Baoyuan; Lin, Jin-Ming; Xu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Yuyou; Liu, Yao; Quan, Yangke; Lu, Xiaoming

    2008-11-01

    Five anions (chlorate, perchlorate, nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate) and two cations (ammonium and potassium) in explosive residues have been separated and determined by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with indirect ultraviolet detection. The electrolyte buffer for the cation separation was 10 mmol/L pyridine (pH 4.5) -3 mmol/L 18-crown-6-ether. Ammonium and potassium ions were baseline separated in less than 2.6 min with the detection limits of 0.10 mg/L and 0.25 mg/L (S/N = 3), respectively. The electrolyte buffer for the anion separation consisted of 40 mmol/L boric acid-1.8 mmol/L potassium dichromate-2 mmol/L sodium tetraborate (pH 8.6), and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) was used as electroosmotic flow modifier. All five anions were well separated in less than 4.6 min with the detection limit range of 0.10 - 1.85 mg/L (S/N = 3). The method was successfully used in real sample investigations to confirm the type of explosives.

  7. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Larry, E-mail: larry.hudson@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8460, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8460, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work responds to the need for standards for x-ray screening systems used to detect explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Described are new measurement tools to gage the performance and radiation safety of such systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders is argued.

  8. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Larry; Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. - Highlights: ► This work responds to the need for standards for x-ray screening systems used to detect explosives. ► Described are new measurement tools to gage the performance and radiation safety of such systems. ► A more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders is argued.

  9. Remote laser drilling and sampling system for the detection of concealed explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, D.; Pschyklenk, L.; Theiß, C.; Holl, G.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of hazardous materials like explosives is a central issue in national security in the field of counterterrorism. One major task includes the development of new methods and sensor systems for the detection. Many existing remote or standoff methods like infrared or raman spectroscopy find their limits, if the hazardous material is concealed in an object. Imaging technologies using x-ray or terahertz radiation usually yield no information about the chemical content itself. However, the exact knowledge of the real threat potential of a suspicious object is crucial for disarming the device. A new approach deals with a laser drilling and sampling system for the use as verification detector for suspicious objects. Central part of the system is a miniaturised, diode pumped Nd:YAG laser oscillator-amplifier. The system allows drilling into most materials like metals, synthetics or textiles with bore hole diameters in the micron scale. During the drilling process, the hazardous material can be sampled for further investigation with suitable detection methods. In the reported work, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to monitor the drilling process and to classify the drilled material. Also experiments were carried out to show the system's ability to not ignite even sensitive explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The detection of concealed hazardous material is shown for different explosives using liquid chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry.

  10. Digital micromirror devices in Raman trace detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimtoft, Martin; Svanqvist, Mattias; Ågren, Matilda; Nordberg, Markus; Östmark, Henric

    2016-05-01

    Imaging Raman spectroscopy based on tunable filters is an established technique for detecting single explosives particles at stand-off distances. However, large light losses are inherent in the design due to sequential imaging at different wavelengths, leading to effective transmission often well below 1 %. The use of digital micromirror devices (DMD) and compressive sensing (CS) in imaging Raman explosives trace detection can improve light throughput and add significant flexibility compared to existing systems. DMDs are based on mature microelectronics technology, and are compact, scalable, and can be customized for specific tasks, including new functions not available with current technologies. This paper has been focusing on investigating how a DMD can be used when applying CS-based imaging Raman spectroscopy on stand-off explosives trace detection, and evaluating the performance in terms of light throughput, image reconstruction ability and potential detection limits. This type of setup also gives the possibility to combine imaging Raman with non-spatially resolved fluorescence suppression techniques, such as Kerr gating. The system used consists of a 2nd harmonics Nd:YAG laser for sample excitation, collection optics, DMD, CMOScamera and a spectrometer with ICCD camera for signal gating and detection. Initial results for compressive sensing imaging Raman shows a stable reconstruction procedure even at low signals and in presence of interfering background signal. It is also shown to give increased effective light transmission without sacrificing molecular specificity or area coverage compared to filter based imaging Raman. At the same time it adds flexibility so the setup can be customized for new functionality.

  11. Detection of explosive remnants of war by neutron thermalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, F.D., E-mail: frank.brooks@uct.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Drosg, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien A-1090 (Austria); Smit, F.D.; Wikner, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2012-01-15

    The HYDAD-D landmine detector () has been modified and field-tested for 17 months in a variety of soil conditions. Test objects containing about the same mass of hydrogen (20 g) as small explosive remnants of war, such as antipersonnel landmines, were detected with efficiency 100% when buried at cover depths up to 10 cm. The false alarm rate under the same conditions was 9%. Plots of detection efficiency versus false alarm rate are presented. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new version of the HYDAD-D antipersonnel landmine detector is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Field tests were carried out for 17 months under different conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dummy antipersonnel mines were detected with 100% efficiency at cover depths up to 10 cm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results are presented as plots of landmine detection efficiency versus false alarm rate.

  12. The detection of improvised nonmilitary peroxide based explosives using a titania nanotube array sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano; Mishra, Indu B

    2009-01-01

    There is a critical need to develop an efficient, reliable and highly selective sensor for the detection of improvised nonmilitary explosives. This paper describes the utilization of functionalized titania nanotube arrays for sensing improvised organic peroxide explosives such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP). TATP forms complexes with titania nanotube arrays (prepared by anodization and sensitized with zinc ions) and thus affects the electron state of the nanosensing device, which is signaled as a change in current of the overall nanotube material. The response is rapid and a signal of five to eight orders of magnitude is observed. These nanotube array sensors can be used as hand-held miniaturized devices as well as large scale portable units for military and homeland security applications.

  13. The detection of improvised nonmilitary peroxide based explosives using a titania nanotube array sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano; Mishra, Indu B

    2009-02-18

    There is a critical need to develop an efficient, reliable and highly selective sensor for the detection of improvised nonmilitary explosives. This paper describes the utilization of functionalized titania nanotube arrays for sensing improvised organic peroxide explosives such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP). TATP forms complexes with titania nanotube arrays (prepared by anodization and sensitized with zinc ions) and thus affects the electron state of the nanosensing device, which is signaled as a change in current of the overall nanotube material. The response is rapid and a signal of five to eight orders of magnitude is observed. These nanotube array sensors can be used as hand-held miniaturized devices as well as large scale portable units for military and homeland security applications.

  14. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  15. Detection of plastic explosives using thermal neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacidume, Leo Ryoske

    1999-12-01

    The work aims to demonstrate the potentiality of the neutron radiography technique, allied to the computerized tomography by transmission, to both detect and visualize plastic explosive samples in several hidden conditions, using a simple scanner as a digitalisation instrument. Each tomographic essay was obtained in the J-9 channel of the Argonauta Research Reactor of IEN/CNEN, in groups of six neutron radiographic projections, performed with an angular increment of 30 deg C, in a period of time of 30 minutes for each projection. Two groups of tomographic reconstructions were generated, distinguished by the digitalisation process of the interested lines in the reconstruction plane coming from the projection groups, utilization a scanner and a microdensitometer, respectively. The reconstruction of the bi-dimensional image of the transverse section, in relation to this plane, was processed making use of the Image Reconstruction Algorithmic of an Image based on the Maximum Entropy principle (ARIEM). From the qualitative analysis of the images, we conclude that the neutron radiographic system was able to detect the explosive sample in a satisfactory way while the quantitative analysis confirmed the application effectiveness of a scanner to acquire the projection dates whose objective is only a reconnaissance. (author)

  16. Detection of plastic explosives by thermic neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacidume, Leo R.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X. da

    2000-01-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the potentiality of the neutron radiography technique, allied to the computerized tomography by transmission, to both detect and visualize plastic explosive samples in several hidden conditions, using a simple scanner as a digitalisation instrument. Each tomographic essay was obtained in the J-9 channel of the Argonauta Research Reactor of IEN/CNEN, in groups of six neutron radiographic projections, performed with an angular increment of 30 in a period of time of 30 minutes for each projection. Two groups of tomographic reconstructions were generated, distinguished by the digitalisation process of the interested lines in the reconstruction plane coming from the projection groups, utilizing a scanner and a microdensitometer, respectively. The reconstruction of the bi-dimensional image of the transverse section, in relation to this plane, was processed making use of the Image reconstruction algorithmic of an image based on the maximum entropy principle (ARIEM). From the qualitative analysis of the images, we conclude that the neutron radiographic system was able to detect the explosive sample in a satisfactory way while the quantitative analysis confirmed the application effectiveness of a scanner to acquire the projection dates whose objective is only a reconnaissance. (author)

  17. Portal monitoring for detecting fissile materials and chemical explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, D.

    1992-01-01

    The portal monitoring of pedestrians, packages, equipment, and vehicles entering or leaving areas of high physical security has been common for many years. Many nuclear facilities rely on portal monitoring to prevent the theft or diversion of plutonium and highly enriched uranium. At commercial airports, portals are used to prevent firearms and explosives from being smuggled onto airplanes. An August 1989 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulation requires US airlines to screen luggage on international flights for chemical explosives. This paper reports that portal monitoring is now being introduced into arms-control agreements. Because some of the portal-monitoring equipment that would be useful in verifying arms-control agreements is already widely used as part of the physical security systems at nuclear facilities and commercial airports, the authors review these uses of portal monitoring, as well as its role in verifying the INF treaty. Then the authors survey the major types of portal-monitoring equipment that would be most useful in detecting nuclear warheads or fissile material

  18. Ion chromatography-mass spectrometry: a review of recent technologies and applications in forensic and environmental explosives analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Leon; Gilchrist, Elizabeth

    2014-01-02

    The development and application of ion chromatography (IC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is discussed herein for the quantitative determination of low-order explosives-related ionic species in environmental and forensic sample types. Issues relating to environmental explosives contamination and the need for more confirmatory IC-MS based applications in forensic science are examined. In particular, the compatibility of a range of IC separation modes with MS detection is summarised along with the analytical challenges that have been overcome to facilitate determinations at the ng-μg L(-1) level. Observed trends in coupling IC to inductively coupled plasma and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry form a particular focus. This review also includes a discussion of the relative performance of reported IC-MS methods in comparison to orthogonal ion separation-based, spectrometric and spectroscopic approaches to confirmatory detection of low-order explosives. Finally, some promising areas for future research are highlighted and discussed with respect to potential IC-MS applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of drugs and plastic explosives using neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br; Crispim, V.R; Silva, A.X. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@com.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    The unique ability of neutrons to image certain elements and isotopes that are either completely undetectable or poorly detected by other Non-Destructive-Assay (NDA) methods makes neutron radiography an important tool for the NDA community. Neutron radiography, like other imaging techniques takes a number of different forms (i.e. / that is film, radioscopic, transfer methods, tomography, etc.) In this work report the Neutron Tomography System developed, which will allow inspections NDA of samples with high efficiency, in terms of minors measure time and the result analysis, and the application for detection of drugs and plastic explosives, which is very important for the combat to the terrorism and drug trafficking. The neutron tomography system developed is third generation. Therefore a rotary table driven by a step motor connected to a computerized motion control system has been installed at the sample position. In parallel to this a suitable electronic imaging device has been designed and can be controlled by a computer in order to synchronize the software the detector and of the rotary table with the aim of an automation of measurements. To obtain 2D tomography image, a system with an electronic imaging system for producing real time neutron radiography. Images are processing digital for cancel random noise effects and to optimize spatial resolution. Finally, using a (ARIEN) algorithm reconstruction of tomography images by finite element maximum entropy. The system was installed adjacent to the exit of the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta Reactor in the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) - which is an organ of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN - Brazil).The Argonauta reactor operates at 340 watts, being that the characteristics of the neutron beam on the plane of the image: thermal neutron flux 4,46 x10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s. In the tomography assays, several encapsulated samples of paste, rock and cocaine powder and plastic explosives devices

  20. Detection of drugs and plastic explosives using neutron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, F.J.O.; Crispim, V.R; Silva, A.X.

    2007-01-01

    The unique ability of neutrons to image certain elements and isotopes that are either completely undetectable or poorly detected by other Non-Destructive-Assay (NDA) methods makes neutron radiography an important tool for the NDA community. Neutron radiography, like other imaging techniques takes a number of different forms (i.e. / that is film, radioscopic, transfer methods, tomography, etc.) In this work report the Neutron Tomography System developed, which will allow inspections NDA of samples with high efficiency, in terms of minors measure time and the result analysis, and the application for detection of drugs and plastic explosives, which is very important for the combat to the terrorism and drug trafficking. The neutron tomography system developed is third generation. Therefore a rotary table driven by a step motor connected to a computerized motion control system has been installed at the sample position. In parallel to this a suitable electronic imaging device has been designed and can be controlled by a computer in order to synchronize the software the detector and of the rotary table with the aim of an automation of measurements. To obtain 2D tomography image, a system with an electronic imaging system for producing real time neutron radiography. Images are processing digital for cancel random noise effects and to optimize spatial resolution. Finally, using a (ARIEN) algorithm reconstruction of tomography images by finite element maximum entropy. The system was installed adjacent to the exit of the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta Reactor in the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) - which is an organ of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN - Brazil).The Argonauta reactor operates at 340 watts, being that the characteristics of the neutron beam on the plane of the image: thermal neutron flux 4,46 x10 5 n/cm 2 s. In the tomography assays, several encapsulated samples of paste, rock and cocaine powder and plastic explosives devices. (author)

  1. Neutron-based techniques for detection of explosives and drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, B.; Olah, L.; Csikai, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron reflection, scattering and transmission methods combined with the detection of characteristic gamma rays have an increasing role in the identification of hidden explosives, illicit drugs and other contraband materials. There are about 100 million land mines buried in some 70 countries. Among the abandoned anti-personnel land mines (APL) certain types have low mass (about 100 g) and contain little or no metal. Therefore, these plastic APL cannot be detected by the usual metal detectors. The IAEA Physics Section has organized a CRP in 1999 for the development of novel methods in order to speed up the removing process of APL. The transportation of illicit drugs has shown an increasing trend during the last decade. Developments of fast, non-destructive interrogation methods are required for the inspection of cargo containers, trucks and airline baggage. The major constituents of plastic APL and drugs are H, C, N and O which can be identified by the different neutron interactions. The atom fractions of these elements, in particular the C/O, C/N and C/H ratios, are quite different for drugs and explosives as compared to other materials used to hide them. Recently, we have carried out systematic measurements and calculations on the neutron fields from the 9 Be(d,n), 2 H(d,n), 252 Cf and Pu-Be sources passing through different bulky samples, on the possible use of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons in elemental analysis and on the advantages and limitations of the thermal neutron reflection method in the identification of land mines and illicit drugs. The measured spectral shapes of neutrons were compared with the calculated results using the MCNP-4A and MCNP-4B codes. (author)

  2. Contraband detection technological complex with ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrish, Yu.N.; Svistunov, Yu.A.; Sidorov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The contraband detection technological complex (CDTC) to detect explosives, fission materials, and vegetable drugs is proposed. Our approach employs the pulsed neutron source. The CDTC employs the rf linac to provide a beam of deuterons of 1 or 3.5 MeV, which impinge upon a target giving birth pulsed neutron flow. Explosives are identified by the matrix detection system with gamma registration under interaction of neutron on N, O, C nuclei. Experimental verification of main principles of matrix detection system is presented

  3. Electron stereodynamics in coulomb explosion of molecules by slow highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Atsushi; Ohyama-Yamaguchi, Tomoko

    2008-01-01

    The three-center Coulombic over-the-barrier model is developed for Coulomb explosion of a homonuclear diatomic molecule in collisions with a slow (∼10 eV/amu) highly charged ion. A conventional two-step picture of multiple electron transfer followed by Coulomb explosion is far from appropriate because the molecule sets out to dissociate before the incident ion approaches the closest distance. We treat the formation of a quasi-molecule and its decay into the three moving atomic ions. Charge-asymmetric population between fragment ions observed in a triple-coincidence measurement is suggested to reflect the bond elongation during a collision. Collisions of Kr 8+ + N 2 are analyzed. (author)

  4. Identity confirmation of drugs and explosives in ion mobility spectrometry using a secondary drift gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Abu B; Hill, Herbert H

    2007-10-15

    This work demonstrated the potential of using a secondary drift gas of differing polarizability from the primary drift gas for confirmation of a positive response for drugs or explosives by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The gas phase mobilities of response ions for selected drugs and explosives were measured in four drift gases. The drift gases chosen for this study were air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide providing a range of polarizability and molecular weights. Four other drift gases (helium, neon, argon and sulfur hexafluoride) were also investigated but design limitations of the commercial instrument prevented their use for this application. When ion mobility was plotted against drift gas polarizability, the resulting slopes were often unique for individual ions, indicating that selectivity factors between any two analytes varied with the choice of drift gas. In some cases, drugs like THC and heroin, which are unresolved in air or nitrogen, were well resolved in carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide.

  5. Review of stopping power and Coulomb explosion for molecular ion in plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqiu Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our theoretical studies for stopping power of energetic heavy ion, diatomic molecular ions and small clusters penetrating through plasmas. As a relevant research field for the heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HICF, we lay the emphasis on the dynamic polarization and correlation effects of the constituent ion within the molecular ion and cluster for stopping power in order to disclose the role of the vicinage effect on the Coulomb explosion and energy deposition of molecules and clusters in plasma. On the other hand, as a promising scheme for ICF, both a strong laser field and an intense ion beam are used to irradiate a plasma target. So the influence of a strong laser field on stopping power is significant. We discussed a large range of laser and plasma parameters on the coulomb explosion and stopping power for correlated-ion cluster and C60 cluster. Furthermore, in order to indicate the effects of different cluster types and sizes on the stopping power, a comparison is made for hydrogen and carbon clusters. In addition, the deflection of molecular axis for diatomic molecules during the Coulomb explosion is also given for the cases both in the presence of a laser field and laser free. Finally, a future experimental scheme is put forward to measure molecular ion stopping power in plasmas in Xi'an Jiaotong University of China. Keywords: Molecules, Stopping power, Coulomb explosion, Vicinage effect, Laser, PACS Codes: 34.50.Bw, 52.40.Mj, 61.85.+p, 34.50.Dy

  6. Using Gunshot Detection Systems to Fight Explosive Fishing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showen, R. L.; Dunson, J. C.; Woodman, G.; Christopher, S.; Wilson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Blast fishing (using explosives to catch fish) causes extensive damage to coral reefs, especially in the Coral Triangle in Southeast Asia. Subsistence fishermen and larger consortiums, often with criminal links, throw an explosive into a school of fish, killing all sea life within range. This unsustainable practice is becoming more prevalent, and threatens the protein supply of as many as a billion people. Ending blast fishing will require combined technical and societal methods aimed at both deterring the practice, and catching those responsible. Our work aims to significantly improve enforcement. We are re-purposing SST's ShotSpotter gunshot detection system, (trusted and valued by police around the world), substituting hydrophones for the present microphones. Using multilateration and trained human reviewers, the system can give prompt blast alerts, location data, and acoustic waveforms to law enforcement officials. We hope to establish a prototype system in Malaysia in 2015, and have already secured governmental approvals for installation and tests with local law enforcement. The Scubazoo media firm in Malaysia is working with resorts, dive operations, and celebrity sponsors, and is planning to produce videos to illustrate the severity of the problem to both governments and the public. Because there is little hard data concerning the prevalence of blast fishing in either marine protected areas or open waters, the system can also indicate to the world the actual blast rates and patterns of use. The Teng Hoi environmental NGO in Hong Kong showed in 2004 that acoustic waves from typical bombs propagate on the order of 20 km, so an underwater locator system with a small number of sensors can feasibly cover a sizable coral region. Our present plans are to mount sensors on piers, buoys, and boats, but if possible we would also like to integrate with other existing acoustic arrays to strengthen the fight against blast fishing.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Vapor Analysis for Improving Explosives Detection Canine Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Explosives are typically encoun- tered as hidden or wrapped in a packaged material. The in- strument was used to determine an odor exfiltration point...from a packaged explosive. A sample of C4 wrapped in plastic was analyzed by monitoring cyclohexanone. Signal was observed to increase whenever...explosives. This method makes intuitive sense because handlers cannot see odors, so their intention is used as a surrogate for whether or not an

  8. Determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions by ''Coulomb-explosion'' techniques with fast (MeV) molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ion beams in thin foils suggest a novel alternative approach to the determination of molecular ion structures. In this article we review some recent high-resolution studies on the interactions of fast molecular ion beams with solid and gaseous targets and indicate how such studies may be applied to the problem of determining molecular ion structures. The main features of the Coulomb explosion of fast-moving molecular ion projectiles and the manner in which Coulomb-explosion techniques may be applied to the problem (difficult to attack by more conventional means) of determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions has been described in this paper. Examples have been given of early experiments designed to elicit structure information. The techniques are still in their infancy, and it is to be expected that as both the technology and the analysis are refined, the method will make valuable contributions to the determination of molecular ion structures

  9. Multi-colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives in gas and liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives. The tec......In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives...... to the analytes creates a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and VOCs. Such sensing technology can be used for screening relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas and liquid phases....... This sensor array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable....

  10. Pulse explosion ion beam source with one pulse regime supply for surface modification of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    A variant of explosion ion beam source with one positive pulse supply for surface modification of materials is described. Ion source consists of vacuum diode and pulse generator Arcadiev-Marx type. Residual gas pressure was p∼5x10 -5 torr in the diode. The sort of ions was fixed by materials initiator anode plasma. The produce carbon ions a carbon-fibrous initiator is used for niobium and titanium-niobium-titanium cable with picking copper matrix. The ions density current regulation is realized by by change of diode gap in the correspondence with Child-Langmuir law. For carbon ions the current density is j∼6A/cm 2 for voltage U∼100kV and j∼32A/cm 2 for voltage U∼300 kV. 7 refs.; 1 fig

  11. Chemicapacitive microsensors for detection of explosives and TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Hobson, Stephen T.; Cemalovic, Sabina; Mlsna, Todd E.

    2005-10-01

    Seacoast Science develops chemical sensors that use polymer-coated micromachined capacitors to measure the dielectric permittivity of an array of selectively absorbing materials. We present recent results demonstrating the sensor technology's capability to detect components in explosives and toxic industrial chemicals. These target chemicals are detected with functionalized polymers or network materials, chosen for their ability to adsorb chemicals. When exposed to vapors or gases, the permittivity of these sorbent materials changes depending on the strength of the vapor-sorbent interaction. Sensor arrays made of ten microcapacitors on a single chip have been previously shown to detect vapors of organic compounds (chemical warfare agents, industrial solvents, fuels) and inorganic gases (SO2, CO2, NO2). Two silicon microcapacitor structures were used, one with parallel electrode plates and the other with interdigitated "finger-like" electrodes. The parallel-plates were approximately 300 μm wide and separated by 750 nm. The interdigitated electrodes were approximately 400 μm long and were elevated above the substrate to provide faster vapor access. Eight to sixteen of these capacitors are fabricated on chips that are 5 x 2 mm and are packaged in less than 50 cm3 with supporting electronics and batteries, all weighing less than 500 grams. The capacitors can be individually coated with different materials creating a small electronic nose that produces different selectivity patterns in response to different chemicals. The resulting system's compact size, low-power consumption and low manufacturing costs make the technology ideal for integration into various systems for numerous applications.

  12. Sorbent Film-Coated Passive Samplers for Explosives Vapour Detection Part A: Materials Optimisation and Integration with Analytical Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEneff, Gillian L; Murphy, Bronagh; Webb, Tony; Wood, Dan; Irlam, Rachel; Mills, Jim; Green, David; Barron, Leon P

    2018-04-11

    A new thin-film passive sampler is presented as a low resource dependent and discrete continuous monitoring solution for explosives-related vapours. Using 15 mid-high vapour pressure explosives-related compounds as probes, combinations of four thermally stable substrates and six film-based sorbents were evaluated. Meta-aramid and phenylene oxide-based materials showed the best recoveries from small voids (~70%). Analysis was performed using liquid chromatography-high resolution accurate mass spectrometry which also enabled tentative identification of new targets from the acquired data. Preliminary uptake kinetics experiments revealed plateau concentrations on the device were reached between 3-5 days. Compounds used in improvised explosive devices, such as triacetone triperoxide, were detected within 1 hour and were stably retained by the sampler for up to 7 days. Sampler performance was consistent for 22 months after manufacture. Lastly, its direct integration with currently in-service explosives screening equipment including ion mobility spectrometry and thermal desorption mass spectrometry is presented. Following exposure to several open environments and targeted interferences, sampler performance was subsequently assessed and potential interferences identified. High-security building and area monitoring for concealed explosives using such cost-effective and discrete passive samplers can add extra assurance to search routines while minimising any additional burden on personnel or everyday site operation.

  13. In-source collision induced dissociation of inorganic explosives for mass spectrometric signature detection and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Thomas P., E-mail: thomas.forbes@nist.gov; Sisco, Edward

    2015-09-10

    The trace detection, bulk quantification, and chemical imaging of inorganic explosives and components was demonstrated utilizing in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) coupled with laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The incorporation of in-source CID provided direct control over the extent of adduct and cluster fragmentation as well as organic noise reduction for the enhanced detection of both the elemental and molecular ion signatures of fuel-oxidizer mixtures and other inorganic components of explosive devices. Investigation of oxidizer molecular anions, specifically, nitrates, chlorates, and perchlorates, identified that the optimal in-source CID existed at the transition between fragmentation of the ionic salt bonds and molecular anion bonds. The chemical imaging of oxidizer particles from latent fingerprints was demonstrated, including both cation and anion components in positive and negative mode mass spectrometry, respectively. This investigation demonstrated LDI-MS with in-source CID as a versatile tool for security fields, as well as environmental monitoring and nuclear safeguards, facilitating the detection of elemental and molecular inorganic compounds at nanogram levels. - Highlights: • In-source CID enhanced detection of elemental inorganics up to 1000-fold. • In-source CID optimization of polyatomic oxidizers enhanced detection up to 100-fold. • Optimal CID identified at transition from breaking ionic salt to molecular anion bonds. • Trace detection of inorganic explosives at nanogram levels was demonstrated. • Oxidizer particles were chemically imaged directly from latent fingerprints.

  14. Detection Dynamics Of Nitrogen Based Explosive Quantities In Selected Cylindrical Containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngusha Tavershima Almighty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental set up for examining the variation of detection intensity with explosive quantity has been studied. Containers made from ceramic carbon steel wood and HDPE were filled with explosive masses ranging from 10 kg to 500 kg and irradiated by a 14.1 MeV point isotropic neutron source. The resulting gamma photons were analyzed for their C N and O composition and the sum computed to yield a quantity known as the material quotient MQ. Examination of MQ values indicates an initial increase in detection intensity with increasing explosive quantity. Saturation is however reached at an explosive quantity of about 25kg where detection intensity reduces with further increase in explosive quantity. Effects of variation in explosive quantity appeared to be more pronounced for explosives contained in HDPE and wooden containers and least pronounced for those in steel containers. Source-detector configuration was identified as a major factor affecting effective detection of large masses of explosives.

  15. Explosives trace detection in the process of biometrical fingerprint identification for access control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertseva, Elena V.; Savin, Andrey V.

    2007-02-01

    A method for trace detection of explosives on the surface of biometric fingerprint scanner is proposed and its sensitivity explored. The method is based on attenuated total reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy. The detection limit is about several microgram and the detectivity increases with the wavelength used for scanning. The advantages of the proposed method include high selectivity and thus low false alarm level, applicability to low vapor pressure explosives and low cost.

  16. Detection of explosives on the basis of TNA-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, A.N.; Kozlovskij, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of applying the counting efficiency methods in the algorithm of the arrangement program intended for searching the explosive substances through the neutron radiation analysis method is discussed. The capture radiation spectra registered on the real facility model, and the response calculational functions for the 6 and 10.9 MeV quanta are presented. The possibility of applying the considered methods in the task of the explosive substances identification is described [ru

  17. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, R.L.; Dunn, W.L.; Heider, S.; Matthew, C.; Yang, X.

    2012-01-01

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of “signatures” obtained from a test target to a collection of “templates”, sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8 L and larger. - Highlights: ► Signature-based radiation-scanning techniques applied to detection of explosives. ► Nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples served as surrogate explosive samples. ► Signatures of a target compared to collections of templates of surrogate explosives. ► Figure-of-merit determined for neutron and neutron-induced gamma-ray signatures. ► Discrimination of surrogate explosive from inert samples of 3.8 L and larger.

  18. Interpenetrated Binary Supramolecular Nanofibers for Sensitive Fluorescence Detection of Six Classes of Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhu, Qijian; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Chen; Che, Yanke; Zhao, Jincai

    2018-04-03

    In this work, we develop a sequential self-assembly approach to fabricate interpenetrated binary supramolecular nanofibers consisting of carbazole oligomer 1-cobalt(II) (1-Co 2+ ) coordination nanofibers and oligomer 2 nanofibers for the sensitive detection of six classes of explosives. When exposed to peroxide explosives (e.g., H 2 O 2 ), Co 2+ in 1-Co 2+ coordination nanofibers can be reduced to Co + that can transfer an electron to the excited 2 nanofibers and thereby quench their fluorescence. On the other hand, when exposed to the other five classes of explosives, the excited 2 nanofibers can transfer an electron to explosives to quench their fluorescence. On the basis of the distinct fluorescence quenching mechanisms, six classes of explosives can be sensitively detected. Herein, we provide a new strategy to design broad-band fluorescence sensors for a rich identification of threats.

  19. 4. International symposium on analysis and detection of explosives, Jerusalem (Israel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    From all the presentations given at the 4. International Symposium on Analysis and Detection of Explosives (September 7-10, 1992, Jerusalem, Israel), three were considered in INIS scope and separately indexed

  20. Terrorism and Drug Trafficking: Responsibilities for Developing Explosives and Narcotics Detection Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report discusses (1) the roles, responsibilities, and authority of : agencies that establish policy, provide funds or oversee funding requests, : and develop explosives and narcotics detection technologies; : (2) mechanisms used to coordinate th...

  1. Detection of Atmospheric Explosions at IMS Monitoring Stations using Infrasound Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christie, Douglas R; Kennett, Brian L; Tarlowski, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Work is continuing on the development of infrasound techniques that can be used to improve detection, location and discrimination capability for atmospheric nuclear explosions at International Monitoring System (IMS...

  2. Detecting Weak Explosions at Local Distances by Fusing Multiple Geophysical Phenomenologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nemzek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arrowsmith, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Comprehensive explosion monitoring requires the technical capability to identify certain signatures at low signal strengths. For particularly small, evasively conducted explosions, conventional monitoring methods that use single geophysical phenomenologies may produce marginal or absent detections. To address this challenge, we recorded coincident acoustic, seismic and radio-frequency emissions during the above-ground detonation of ~ 2-12 kg solid charges and assessed how waveform data could be fused to increase explosion-screening capability. Our data provided identifiable explosion signatures that we implemented as template-events in multichannel correlation detectors to search for similar, matching waveforms. We thereby observed that these highly sensitive correlation detectors missed explosive events when applied separately to data streams that were heavily contaminated with noise and signal clutter. By then adding the p-values of these statistics through Fisher’s combined probability test, we correctly identified the explosion signals at thresholds consistent with the false alarm rates of the correlation detectors. This resulting Fisher test thereby provided high-probability detections, zero false alarms, and higher theoretical detection capability. We conclude that inclusion of these fusion methods in routine monitoring operations will likely lower both detection thresholds for small explosions, while reducing false attribution rates.

  3. MEMS-based Porous Silicon Preconcentrators Filled with Carbopack-B for Explosives Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Camara , El Hadji Malik; James , Franck; Breuil , Philippe; Pijolat , Christophe; Briand , Danick; De Rooij , Nicolaas F

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we report the detection of explosive compounds using a miniaturized gas preconcentrator (μGP) made of porous silicon (PS) filled in with Carbopack B as an adsorbent material. The μGP includes also a platinum heater patterned at the backside and fluidic connectors sealed on the glass cover. Our μGP is designed and optimized through fluidic and thermal simulations for meeting the requirements of trace explosives detection. The thermal mass of the device was...

  4. Research on data auto-analysis algorithms in the explosive detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haidong; Li Yuanjing; Yang Yigang; Li Tiezhu; Chen Boxian; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly describe some auto-analysis algorithms in explosive detection system with TNA method. These include the auto-calibration algorithm when disturbed by other factors, MCA auto-calibration algorithm with calibrated spectrum, the auto-fitting and integral of hydrogen and nitrogen elements data. With these numerical algorithms, the authors can automatically and precisely analysis the gamma-spectra and ultimately achieve the explosive auto-detection. (authors)

  5. Multi-Source Fusion for Explosive Hazard Detection in Forward Looking Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    California, United States Paper Title: Voxel-space radar signal processing for side attack explosive ballistic detection Publication Status: 1-Published...documentation. 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211...R-0012. The aim of this research is to improve the U.S. Army’s ability to detect landmines and explosive hazards in different scenarios using

  6. False alarm rates of liquid explosives detection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzhongova, E.; Anderson, D.; Ruiter, J. de; Novakovic, V.; Ruiz Oses, M.

    2017-01-01

    Restrictions on the carriage of liquids, aerosol, and gels (LAGs) by airline passengers have been in place since November 2006, following the discovery of a terrorist plot involving homemade liquid explosives to be used on transatlantic flights (Wikipedia, 2006). Restrictions on the carriage of LAGs

  7. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Explosives Detection Using Magnetic and Nuclear Resonance Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) a highly promising new technique for bulk explosives detection: relatively inexpensive, more compact than NMR, but with considerable selectivity. Since the NQR frequency is insensitive to long-range variations in composition, mixing explosives with other materials, such as the plasticizers in plastic explosives, makes no difference. The NQR signal strength varies linearly with the amount of explosive, and is independent of its distribution within the volume monitored. NQR spots explosive types in configurations missed by the X-ray imaging method. But if NQR is so good, why it is not used everywhere? Its main limitation is the low signal-to-noise ratio, particularly with the radio-frequency interference that exists in a field environment, NQR polarization being much weaker than that from an external magnetic field. The distinctive signatures are there, but are difficult to extract from the noise. In addition, the high selectivity is partly a disadvantage, as it is hard to bui...

  9. Sensor Technology Assessment for Ordnance and Explosive Waste Detection and Location. Revision B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    249 A ppendices ................................................................................................ 255 Appendix A...military purposes. Dogs. noted for their acute sense of smell, provide a quick and effective method for OEW detection. Explosive munitions in or out of...odor, which the dog detects through its acute sense of smell. They are also trained to detect and respond to visual clues such as metal or plastic

  10. Deposition of carbon nitride films by vacuum ion diode with explosive emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S.A.; Perry, A.J. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark (United States); Elkind, A.; Kalmukov, A.

    1997-10-31

    Carbon nitride films were synthesized using a novel technique based on the pulsed high voltage ion/electron diode with explosive emission (pulsed voltage 200-700 kV pulsed current 100-500 Acm{sup -2} (ions) 150-2000 Acm{sup -2} (electrons)). The method and its novel features are discussed as well as its application to the formation of the crystalline {beta}-phase in C{sub 3}N{sub 4} films. Mixed elemental nitrogen and carbon films are formed by sequential deposition then subjected to ion and/or electron beam mixing to synthesize the C{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. The experimental conditions used for this pulsed process are described and the efficiency of the method for nitrogen incorporation is demonstrated. The results presented indicate that {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} crystallites are formed in an amorphous matrix. (orig.) 20 refs.

  11. Instant detection and identification of concealed explosive-related compounds: Induced Stokes Raman versus infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif; El-Sherif, Ashraf F

    2017-01-01

    The instant detection of explosives and explosive-related compounds has become an urgent priority in recent years for homeland security and counter-terrorism applications. Modern techniques should offer enhancement in selectivity, sensitivity, and standoff distances. Miniaturisation, portability, and field-ruggedisation are crucial requirements. This study reports on instant and standoff identification of concealed explosive-related compounds using customized Raman technique. Stokes Raman spectra of common explosive-related compounds were generated and spectrally resolved to create characteristic finger print spectra. The scattered Raman emissions over the band 400:2000cm -1 were compared to infrared absorption using FTIR. It has been demonstrated that the two vibrational spectroscopic techniques were opposite and completing each other. Molecular vibrations with strong absorption in infrared (those involve strong change in dipole moments) induced weak signals in Raman and vice versa. The tailored Raman offered instant detection, high sensitivity, and standoff detection capabilities. Raman demonstrated characteristic fingerprint spectra with stable baseline and sharp intense peaks. Complete correlations of absorption/scattered signals to certain molecular vibrations were conducted to generate an entire spectroscopic profile of explosive-related compounds. This manuscript shades the light on Raman as one of the prevailing technologies for instantaneous detection of explosive-related compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C

    2010-01-01

    a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and volatile organic compound. Such sensing technology can be used to screen for relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas phase. This sensor......In the framework of the research project 'Xsense' at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT and TNT, and identification of volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air...

  13. An empirical fast-neutron technique for detection of explosive-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.A.; Lord, P.M.; Bot, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method for detecting explosives in airport baggage using fast-neutron scattering and transmission measurements is presented. Ammonium nitrate (a commercial fertilizer) is used in the laboratory to simulate an explosive-like substance. The measurements are combined in Cartesian maps of normalized pairs of measurements. The existence of fertilizer manifests itself in these maps within a distinct region which is not significantly altered by the presence of surrounding materials. Monte Carlo simulations further confirm this phenomenon. (orig.)

  14. Multichannel Discriminative Detection of Explosive Vapors with an Array of Nanofibrous Membranes Loaded with Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaofeng Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The multichannel fluorescent sensor array based on nanofibrous membranes loaded with ZnS quantum dots (QDs was created and demonstrated for the discriminative detection of explosives. The synergistic effect of the high surface-to-volume ratio of QDs, the good permeability of nanofibrous membranes and the differential response introduced by surface ligands was played by constructing the sensing array using nanofibrous membranes loaded with ZnS QDs featuring several surface ligands. Interestingly, although the fluorescence quenching of the nanofibrous membranes is not linearly related to the exposure time, the fingerprint of each explosive at different times is very similar in shape, and the fingerprints of the three explosives show different shapes. Three saturated vapors of nitroaromatic explosives could be reliably detected and discriminated by the array at room temperature. This work is the first step toward devising a monitoring system for explosives in the field of public security and defense. It could, for example, be coupled with the technology of image recognition and large data analysis for a rapid diagnostic test of explosives. This work further highlights the power of differential, multichannel arrays for the rapid and discriminative detection of a wide range of chemicals.

  15. Improved explosive collection and detection with rationally assembled surface sampling materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Bays, J. Timothy; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Addleman, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Sampling and detection of trace explosives is a key analytical process in modern transportation safety. In this work we have explored some of the fundamental analytical processes for collection and detection of trace level explosive on surfaces with the most widely utilized system, thermal desorption IMS. The performance of the standard muslin swipe material was compared with chemically modified fiberglass cloth. The fiberglass surface was modified to include phenyl functional groups. When compared to standard muslin, the phenyl functionalized fiberglass sampling material showed better analyte release from the sampling material as well as improved response and repeatability from multiple uses of the same swipe. The improved sample release of the functionalized fiberglass swipes resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity. Various physical and chemical properties were systematically explored to determine optimal performance. The results herein have relevance to improving the detection of other explosive compounds and potentially to a wide range of other chemical sampling and field detection challenges.

  16. Detection of explosives and illicit drugs using neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, B. E-mail: kiralyb@tigris.klte.hu; Sanami, T.; Doczi, R.; Csikai, J

    2004-01-01

    A procedure developed for the determination of the flux perturbation factor required for the thermal neutron activation analysis of bulky samples of unknown composition has been extended for epithermal neutrons using hydrogenous and graphite moderators. Measurements on the diffusion and backscattering of thermal neutrons in soil components were carried out for the development of novel nuclear methods in order to speed up the humanitarian demining process. Results obtained for the diffusion length were checked by MCNP-4C calculations. In addition, the effect of the weight and density of the explosives on the observation of the anomaly in the reflected thermal neutrons was examined by using different dummy landmines.

  17. Automated detection of cavities present in the high explosive filler of artillery shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, R.P.; Janney, D.H.; Breedlove, J.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Initial research has been conducted into the use of digital image analysis techniques for automated detection and characterization of piping cavities present in the high explosive (HE) filler region of 105-mm artillery shells. Experimental work utilizing scene segmentation techniques followed by a sequential similarity detection algorithm for cavitation detection have yielded promising initial results. This work is described with examples of computer-detected defects

  18. Explosives detection through fast-neutron time-of-flight attenuation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overley, J.C.; Chmelik, M.S.; Rasmussen, R.J.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Computer simulations have been used to devise an algorithm for detection of explosives in luggage which is based upon measured projected number densities of H, C, N, and O. Other elements are lumped together as projection X. Dependence on luggage-thickness is reduced by normalizing the projection for each element by the total. Normalization constrains projections to a 4-dimensional space. Distributions of nonexplosive (N) and explosive (E) situations are generated by sorting results of simulations into bins in that 4-space. A detection matrix element, given by the ratio E/(N+E) for each bin, is addressed by a measurement. For a realistic distribution of the numbers and types of luggage materials, the plastic explosive RDX, at 10% of suitcase thickness, can be detected in a single pixel with 85% reliability and a false alarm rate of 3%. (orig.)

  19. Thin film sensor materials for detection of Nitro-Aromatic explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdasi, Dipali; Mudhalwadkar, Rohini

    2018-03-01

    Many countries have experienced terrorist activities and innocent people have suffered. Timely detection of explosives can avoid this situation. This paper targets the detection of Nitrobenzene and Nitrotoluene, which are nitroaromatic compounds possessing explosive properties. As direct sensors for detecting these compounds are not available, Polyaniline based thin film sensors doped with palladium are developed using the spin coating technique. The response of the developed sensors is observed for varying concentrations of explosives. It is observed that zinc oxide based sensor is more sensitive to Nitrotoluene exhibiting a relative change in resistance of 0.78. The tungsten oxide sensor is more sensitive to Nitrobenzene with a relative change in resistance of 0.48. The sensor performance is assessed by measuring the response and recovery time. The cross sensitivity of the sensors is evaluated for ethanol, acetone and methanol which was observed as very low.

  20. Explosive-Emission Plasma Dynamics in Ion Diode in Double-Pulse Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushkarev, Alexander I.; Isakova, Yulia I.

    2011-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of explosive-emission plasma dynamics in an ion diode with self-magnetic insulation are presented. The investigations were accomplished at the TEMP-4M accelerator set in a mode of double pulse formation. Plasma behaviour in the anode-cathode gap was analyzed according to both the current-voltage characteristics of the diode (time resolution of 0.5 ns) and thermal imprints on a target (spatial resolution of 0.8 mm). It was shown that when plasma formation at the potential electrode was complete, and up until the second (positive) pulse, the explosive-emission plasma expanded across the anode-cathode gap with a speed of 1.3±0.2 cm/μs. After the voltage polarity at the potential electrode was reversed (second pulse), the plasma erosion in the anode-cathode gap (similar to the effect of a plasma opening switch) occurred. During the generation of an ion beam the size of the anode-cathode gap spacing was determined by the thickness of the plasma layer on the potential electrode and the layer thickness of the electrons drifting along the grounded electrode. (15th asian conference on electrical discharge)

  1. The development of pulsed ion sources with explosive ions emission for deposition of films and coatings with ion and electron mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of pulsed ion sources with explosive ion emission for deposition of films and coatings with ion and electron mixing is considered in the report. The deposition of films and coatings with high hardness and high resistance on the basis using this source on the working voltage 50--100 kV is presented. The deposition of TiB(2), W and other films is discussed and comparison with other results. The experimental results of pulsed electron/ion mixing are considered. The main characteristics of these films and coating are considered. The cluster mechanism of deposition of films and coatings are discussed. The main question of structure of these films on the basis of surface cluster fractal structure is suggested and discussed. The study of structure of these films showed the new kind of structure of these films and coatings

  2. Automatic calibration of spectrometer's tracts of installation for detecting of explosive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajkin, A.I.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Kozlovskij, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Calibration of the facility, representing the spectrometer and intended for the explosive substances detection on various objects is considered. The above work is based on the method of the neutron-radiation analysis. Brief description of the operational prototype, the basic characteristics, the capturing radiation background spectrum with a sample of the nitrogen-containing substance and the example of the calibration straight line are presented. The method of control sums and advantages of its application at the facilities for the explosive substances detection are considered [ru

  3. Optimization of biological and instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines, SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Kenneth G.; Harper, Ross J.; Perr, Jeannette M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive study and comparison is underway using biological detectors and instrumental methods for the rapid detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILR) and high explosives. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) has been demonstrated to be an effective sampling method helping to identify active odor signature chemicals used by detector dogs to locate forensic specimens as well as a rapid pre-concentration technique prior to instrumental detection. Common ignitable liquids and common military and industrial explosives have been studied including trinitrotoluene, tetryl, RDX, HMX, EGDN, PETN and nitroglycerine. This study focuses on identifying volatile odor signature chemicals present, which can be used to enhance the level and reliability of detection of ILR and explosives by canines and instrumental methods. While most instrumental methods currently in use focus on particles and on parent organic compounds, which are often involatile, characteristic volatile organics are generally also present and can be exploited to enhance detection particularly for well-concealed devices. Specific examples include the volatile odor chemicals 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone, which are readily available in the headspace of the high explosive composition C-4; whereas, the active chemical cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) is not. The analysis and identification of these headspace 'fingerprint' organics is followed by double-blind dog trials of the individual components using certified teams in an attempt to isolate and understand the target compounds to which dogs are sensitive. Studies to compare commonly used training aids with the actual target explosive have also been undertaken to determine their suitability and effectiveness. The optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) is detailed including interface development

  4. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.J.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory prototype system has been developed for the experimental evaluation of an explosives detection technique based on nuclear resonance absorption of gamma rays in nitrogen. Major subsystems include a radiofrequency quadrupole proton accelerator and associated beam transport system, a high-power gamma-ray production target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection system, and an image- processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported

  5. Thermal explosion hazards on 18650 lithium ion batteries with a VSP2 adiabatic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhu, Can-Yong [Doctoral Program, Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology (NYUST), 123, University Rd., Sec. 3, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Yih-Wen, E-mail: g9410825@yuntech.edu.tw [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, 79-9, Sha-Luen-Hu, Xi-Zhou-Li, Houlong, Miaoli 35664, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shu, Chi-Min [Doctoral Program, Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology (NYUST), 123, University Rd., Sec. 3, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Jian-Chuang; Wu, Hung-Chun [Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), Rm. 222, Bldg. 77, 2F, 195, Sec. 4, Chung Hsing Rd., Chutung, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-08-15

    Thermal abuse behaviors relating to adiabatic runaway reactions in commercial 18650 lithium ion batteries (LiCoO{sub 2}) are being studied in an adiabatic calorimeter, vent sizing package 2 (VSP2). We select four worldwide battery producers, Sony, Sanyo, Samsung and LG, and tested their Li-ion batteries, which have LiCoO{sub 2} cathodes, to determine their thermal instabilities and adiabatic runaway features. The charged (4.2 V) and uncharged (3.7 V) 18650 Li-ion batteries are tested using a VSP2 with a customized stainless steel test can to evaluate their thermal hazard characteristics, such as the initial exothermic temperature (T{sub 0}), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), the pressure rise rate (dP/dt), the pressure-temperature profiles and the maximum temperature (T{sub max}) and pressure (P{sub max}). The T{sub max} and P{sub max} of the charged Li-ion battery during the runaway reaction reach 903.0 {sup o}C and 1565.9 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge), respectively. This result leads to a thermal explosion, and the heat of reaction is 26.2 kJ. The thermokinetic parameters of the reaction of LiCoO{sub 2} batteries are also determined using the Arrhenius model. The thermal reaction mechanism of the Li-ion battery (pack) proved to be an important safety concern for energy storage. Additionally, use of the VSP2 to classify the self-reactive ratings of the various Li-ion batteries demonstrates a new application of the adiabatic calorimetric methodology.

  6. Thermal explosion hazards on 18650 lithium ion batteries with a VSP2 adiabatic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhu, Can-Yong; Wang, Yih-Wen; Shu, Chi-Min; Chang, Jian-Chuang; Wu, Hung-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Thermal abuse behaviors relating to adiabatic runaway reactions in commercial 18650 lithium ion batteries (LiCoO 2 ) are being studied in an adiabatic calorimeter, vent sizing package 2 (VSP2). We select four worldwide battery producers, Sony, Sanyo, Samsung and LG, and tested their Li-ion batteries, which have LiCoO 2 cathodes, to determine their thermal instabilities and adiabatic runaway features. The charged (4.2 V) and uncharged (3.7 V) 18650 Li-ion batteries are tested using a VSP2 with a customized stainless steel test can to evaluate their thermal hazard characteristics, such as the initial exothermic temperature (T 0 ), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), the pressure rise rate (dP/dt), the pressure-temperature profiles and the maximum temperature (T max ) and pressure (P max ). The T max and P max of the charged Li-ion battery during the runaway reaction reach 903.0 o C and 1565.9 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge), respectively. This result leads to a thermal explosion, and the heat of reaction is 26.2 kJ. The thermokinetic parameters of the reaction of LiCoO 2 batteries are also determined using the Arrhenius model. The thermal reaction mechanism of the Li-ion battery (pack) proved to be an important safety concern for energy storage. Additionally, use of the VSP2 to classify the self-reactive ratings of the various Li-ion batteries demonstrates a new application of the adiabatic calorimetric methodology.

  7. Design and construction of an explosive detection system by Tna methods, using 252Cf radioisotope source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakkoli Farsouli, A.

    1999-01-01

    Bombs concealed in luggage have threatened human life and property throughout the world's traffic. The plastic explosives could not checked by the X-ray detecting device. Thermal Neutron Activation method has been tested in the present work for non-destructive detection of explosives. A radioisotope neutron source 252 Cf and two gamma spectroscopy systems have been used as a tool to find explosives, regardless of the bomb's shape and the packing materials. The MCNP code has been used to design the neutronic section of the system. The measured thermal neutron fluxes by the gold foils in some location of the system were in good agreement with those data obtained by the MCNP code. Also, detection limits for nitrogen in various counting times were measured. The measurements show that the system is capable to detect 417 gr of HMX explosive material (158 gr nitrogen) by 10 minutes of counting time. To modify the system and to decrease the detection limits some opinions are given

  8. Bayesian Integration and Characterization of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Christine M.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Bader, Sydney P.; Ewing, Robert G.; Fahey, Albert J.; Atkinson, David A.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-02-25

    Key elements regarding the use of non-radioactive ionization sources will be presented as related to explosives detection by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. Various non-radioactive ionization sources will be discussed along with associated ionization mechanisms pertaining to specific sample types.

  9. Determination of Peroxide-Based Explosives Using Liquid Chromatography with On-Line Infrared Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Edelmann, Andrea; Quintas, Guillermo; Lendl, Bernhard; Karst, U.

    2006-01-01

    A nondestructive analytical method for peroxide-based explosives determination in solid samples is described. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in combination with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection is used for the analysis of triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and

  10. Xsense: using nanotechnology to combine detection methods for high sensitivity handheld explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Kostesha, Natalie; Bosco, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to produce a handheld explosives sensor the Xsense project has been initiated at the Technical University of Denmark in collaboration with a number of partners. Using micro- and nano technological approaches it will be attempted to integrate four detection principles into a single de...

  11. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  12. Automated detection and cataloging of global explosive volcanism using the International Monitoring System infrasound network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Green, David N.; Le Pichon, Alexis; Shearer, Peter M.; Fee, David; Mialle, Pierrick; Ceranna, Lars

    2017-04-01

    We experiment with a new method to search systematically through multiyear data from the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network to identify explosive volcanic eruption signals originating anywhere on Earth. Detecting, quantifying, and cataloging the global occurrence of explosive volcanism helps toward several goals in Earth sciences and has direct applications in volcanic hazard mitigation. We combine infrasound signal association across multiple stations with source location using a brute-force, grid-search, cross-bearings approach. The algorithm corrects for a background prior rate of coherent unwanted infrasound signals (clutter) in a global grid, without needing to screen array processing detection lists from individual stations prior to association. We develop the algorithm using case studies of explosive eruptions: 2008 Kasatochi, Alaska; 2009 Sarychev Peak, Kurile Islands; and 2010 Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. We apply the method to global IMS infrasound data from 2005-2010 to construct a preliminary acoustic catalog that emphasizes sustained explosive volcanic activity (long-duration signals or sequences of impulsive transients lasting hours to days). This work represents a step toward the goal of integrating IMS infrasound data products into global volcanic eruption early warning and notification systems. Additionally, a better understanding of volcanic signal detection and location with the IMS helps improve operational event detection, discrimination, and association capabilities.

  13. Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis for Detecting Explosives-related Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, Mark E; Venzin, Alexander M

    2012-11-14

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are interested in developing a standardized testing procedure for determining the performance of candidate detection systems. This document outlines a potential method for judging detection system performance as well as determining if combining the information from a legacy system with a new system can signicantly improve performance. In this document, performance corresponds to the Neyman-Pearson criterion applied to the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves of the detection systems in question. A simulation was developed to investigate how the amount of data provided by the vendor in the form of the ROC curve eects the performance of the combined detection system. Furthermore, the simulation also takes into account the potential eects of correlation and how this information can also impact the performance of the combined system.

  14. Coulomb-explosion technique for determining geometrical structures of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Traditional experimental techniques (e.g. studies on photon absorption or emission) for determining the sterochemical structures of neutral molecules are extremeley difficult to apply to molecular ions because of problems in obtaining a sufficient spatial density of the ions to be studied. Recent high-resolution measurements on the energy and angle distributions of the fragments produced when fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams from an electrostatic accelerator dissociate (Coulomb explode) in thin foils and in gases, offer promising possibilities for deducing the sterochemical structures of the molecular ions constituting the incident beams. Bond lengths have been determined in this way for several diatomic projectiles (H 2+ , HeH + , CH + , NH + , OH + , N 2+ , O 2+ , etc.) with an accuracy of approx. 0.01 A. H 3+ has been demonstrated (for the first time) to be equilateral triangular and the interproton distance measured. Measurements on single fragments from CO 2+ , N 2 O + , C 3 H 3+ , and CH/sub n/ + have revealed the gross structures of the projectiles. An apparatus has recently been constructed at Argonne to permit precise measurements on fragments in coincidence. The apparatus has been tested on a known structure (OH 2+ ). The O-H bond length was found to be 1.0 +- 0.04 A and the H-O-H bond angle was measured as 110 --- 2 0 . These values are in excellent agreement with those found in optical experiments (0.999 A and 110.5 0 ). This Coulomb explosion technique can be expected to be refined in accuracy and to be extended to a wide range of molecular ions whose structures are inaccessible by other means

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents by low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanqi; Liang, Miao; Li, Zhen; Shu, Jinian; Yang, Bo; Xu, Ce; Zou, Yao

    2016-08-15

    On-spot monitoring of threat agents needs high sensitive instrument. In this study, a low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometer (LPPI-MS) was employed to detect trace amounts of vapor-phase explosives and chemical warfare agent mimetics under ambient conditions. Under 10-s detection time, the limits of detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene, nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, and dimethyl methyl phosphonate were 30, 0.5, 4, and 1 parts per trillion by volume, respectively. As compared to those obtained previously with PI mass spectrometric techniques, an improvement of 3-4 orders of magnitude was achieved. This study indicates that LPPI-MS will open new opportunities for the sensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent...... progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in......-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti-warfare...

  17. Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne

    of sensors, as the sensors are designed to provide robust and reliable measurements. That means, the sensors are designed to have repeated measurement clusters. Sensor fusion is presented for the sensor based on chemoselective compounds. An array of color changing compounds are handled and in unity they make......This Ph.D. thesis titled “Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection” is a part of the strategic research project “Miniaturized sensors for explosives detection in air” funded by the Danish Agency for Science and Technology...... emanated by explosives and drugs, similar to an electronic nose. To evaluate sensor responses a data processing and evaluation pipeline is required. The work presented herein focuses on the feature extraction, feature representation and sensor accuracy. Thus the primary aim of this thesis is twofold...

  18. A Photoluminescence-Based Field Method for Detection of Traces of Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Roland Menzel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a photoluminescence-based field method for detecting traces of explosives. In its standard version, the method utilizes a commercially available color spot test kit for treating explosive traces on filter paper after swabbing. The colored products are fluorescent under illumination with a laser that operates on three C-size flashlight batteries and delivers light at 532 nm. In the fluorescence detection mode, by visual inspection, the typical sensitivity gain is a factor of 100. The method is applicable to a wide variety of explosives. In its time-resolved version, intended for in situ work, explosives are tagged with europium complexes. Instrumentation-wise, the time-resolved detection, again visual, can be accomplished in facile fashion. The europium luminescence excitation utilizes a laser operating at 355 nm. We demonstrate the feasibility of CdSe quantum dot sensitization of europium luminescence for time-resolved purposes. This would allow the use of the above 532 nm laser.

  19. Trace detection of explosive materials in air cargo containers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jezierska, M.M.; Spreen, J.S.; Ruiter, J.C. de; Koomen, G.C.M.; Slegt, M.

    2011-01-01

    At the request of the National Coordinator for Counterterrorism in the Netherlands a research project called “Security through innovation - risk-oriented detection in a drive-through set-up” has been carried out by TNO Defense, Security and Safety (TNO) and by Dutch Customs. In 2009 and 2010, a

  20. Neutron-based techniques for detection of explosives and drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, B.; Olah, L.; Csikai, J. E-mail: csikai@falcon.phys.klte.hu

    2001-06-01

    Systematic measurements were carried out on the possible use of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons combined with the thermal neutron reflection method for the identification of land mines and illicit drugs via he detection of H, C, N, and O elements as their major constituents. While ur present results show that these methods are capable of indicating the anomalies in bulky materials and observation of the major elements, e termination of the exact atom fractions needs further investigation.

  1. Neutron-based techniques for detection of explosives and drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Kiraly, B; Csikai, J

    2001-01-01

    Systematic measurements were carried out on the possible use of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons combined with the thermal neutron reflection method for the identification of land mines and illicit drugs via he detection of H, C, N, and O elements as their major constituents. While ur present results show that these methods are capable of indicating the anomalies in bulky materials and observation of the major elements, e termination of the exact atom fractions needs further investigation.

  2. Chemical Microsensors For Detection Of Explosives And Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoguang; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-11-13

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a layer of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bonded to said substrate, said layer of a cyclodextrin derivative adapted for the inclusion of selected compounds, e.g., nitro-containing organic compounds, therewith. Such an article can be a chemical microsensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the nitro-containing organic compound.

  3. SWAN - Detection of explosives by means of fast neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierlik, M., E-mail: m.gierlik@ncbj.gov.pl; Borsuk, S.; Guzik, Z.; Iwanowska, J.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Korolczuk, S.; Kozłowski, T.; Krakowski, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Swiderski, L.; Szeptycka, M.; Szewiński, J.; Urban, A.

    2016-10-21

    In this work we report on SWAN, the experimental, portable device for explosives detection. The device was created as part of the EU Structural Funds Project “Accelerators & Detectors” (POIG.01.01.02-14-012/08-00), with the goal to increase beneficiary's expertise and competencies in the field of neutron activation analysis. Previous experiences and budged limitations lead toward a less advanced design based on fast neutron interactions and unsophisticated data analysis with the emphasis on the latest gamma detection and spectrometry solutions. The final device has been designed as a portable, fast neutron activation analyzer, with the software optimized for detection of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. SWAN's performance in the role of explosives detector is elaborated in this paper. We demonstrate that the unique features offered by neutron activation analysis might not be impressive enough when confronted with practical demands and expectations of a generic homeland security customer.

  4. SWAN - Detection of explosives by means of fast neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierlik, M.; Borsuk, S.; Guzik, Z.; Iwanowska, J.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Korolczuk, S.; Kozłowski, T.; Krakowski, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Swiderski, L.; Szeptycka, M.; Szewiński, J.; Urban, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on SWAN, the experimental, portable device for explosives detection. The device was created as part of the EU Structural Funds Project “Accelerators & Detectors” (POIG.01.01.02-14-012/08-00), with the goal to increase beneficiary's expertise and competencies in the field of neutron activation analysis. Previous experiences and budged limitations lead toward a less advanced design based on fast neutron interactions and unsophisticated data analysis with the emphasis on the latest gamma detection and spectrometry solutions. The final device has been designed as a portable, fast neutron activation analyzer, with the software optimized for detection of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. SWAN's performance in the role of explosives detector is elaborated in this paper. We demonstrate that the unique features offered by neutron activation analysis might not be impressive enough when confronted with practical demands and expectations of a generic homeland security customer.

  5. The use of triangle diagram in the detection of explosive and illicit drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudac, Davorin; Baricevic, Martina; Obhodas, Jasmina; Franulovic, Andrej; Valkovic, Vladivoj

    2010-04-01

    A tagged neutron inspection system has been used for the detection of explosive and illicite drugs. Simulant of the RDX explosive was measured in different environments and its gamma ray spectra were compared with the gamma ray spectra of benign materials like paper, sugar and rise. "Fingerprint" of the RDX simulant was found by detecting the nitrogen as well as by making the triangle plot which coordinates show the carbon and oxygen content and density. Density was obtained by measuring the intensity of the transmited tagged neutrons. Hence, the presence of the simulant can be confirmed by using two different methods. The possibility of using the triangle plot for detection of illicit drugs like heroin, cocain and marihuana is also discused.

  6. Explosives and chemical warfare agents - detection and analysis with PTR-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulzer, Philipp; Juerschik, Simone; Jaksch, Stefan; Jordan, Alfons; Hanel, Gernot; Hartungen, Eugen; Seehauser, Hans; Maerk, Lukas; Haidacher, Stefan; Schottkowsky, Ralf [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Petersson, Fredrik [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    We utilized a recently developed high sensitivity PTR-MS instrument equipped with a high resolution time-of-flight mass analyzer for detailed investigations on explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). We show that with this so called PTR-TOF 8000 it is possible to identify solid explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, PETN and Semtex A) by analyzing the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces. As the mentioned solid explosives possess very low vapor pressures, the main challenge for detecting them in the gas phase is to provide an instrument with a sufficient sensitivity. CWAs on the other side have very high vapor pressures but are difficult to identify unambiguously as their nominal molecular masses are usually comparably small and therefore hard to distinguish from harmless everyday-compounds (e.g. mustard gas: 159 g/mol). In the present work we demonstrate that we can detect a broad range of dangerous substances, ranging from the CWA mustard gas to the explosive HMX.

  7. Detecting Surface Changes from an Underground Explosion in Granite Using Unmanned Aerial System Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Coppersmith, Ryan T.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swanson, Erika M.; Cooley, James A.

    2017-08-01

    Efficient detection and high-fidelity quantification of surface changes resulting from underground activities are important national and global security efforts. In this investigation, a team performed field-based topographic characterization by gathering high-quality photographs at very low altitudes from an unmanned aerial system (UAS)-borne camera platform. The data collection occurred shortly before and after a controlled underground chemical explosion as part of the United States Department of Energy's Source Physics Experiments (SPE-5) series. The high-resolution overlapping photographs were used to create 3D photogrammetric models of the site, which then served to map changes in the landscape down to 1-cm-scale. Separate models were created for two areas, herein referred to as the test table grid region and the nearfield grid region. The test table grid includes the region within 40 m from surface ground zero, with photographs collected at a flight altitude of 8.5 m above ground level (AGL). The near-field grid area covered a broader area, 90-130 m from surface ground zero, and collected at a flight altitude of 22 m AGL. The photographs, processed using Agisoft Photoscan® in conjunction with 125 surveyed ground control point targets, yielded a 6-mm pixel-size digital elevation model (DEM) for the test table grid region. This provided the ≤3 cm resolution in the topographic data to map in fine detail a suite of features related to the underground explosion: uplift, subsidence, surface fractures, and morphological change detection. The near-field grid region data collection resulted in a 2-cm pixel-size DEM, enabling mapping of a broader range of features related to the explosion, including: uplift and subsidence, rock fall, and slope sloughing. This study represents one of the first works to constrain, both temporally and spatially, explosion-related surface damage using a UAS photogrammetric platform; these data will help to advance the science of

  8. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A.; Peters, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by ''electronic collimation'' (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs

  9. Mesoporous aluminium organophosphonates: a reusable chemsensor for the detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongdong; Yu, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of explosives is in high demand for homeland security and public safety. In this work, electron-rich of anthracene functionalized mesoporous aluminium organophosphonates (En-AlPs) were synthesized by a one-pot condensation process. The mesoporous structure and strong blue emission of En-AlPs were confirmed by the N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy images and fluorescence spectra. The materials En-AlPs can serve as sensitive chemosensors for various electron deficient nitroderivatives, with the quenching constant and the detection limit up to 1.5×10 6 M −1 and 0.3 ppm in water solution. More importantly, the materials can be recycled for many times by simply washed with ethanol, showing potential applications in explosives detection. - Graphical abstract: Electron-rich of anthracene functionalized mesoporous aluminium organophosphonates can serve as sensitive and recycled chemosensors for nitroderivatives with the quenching constant up to 1.5×10 6 M −1 in water solution. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Anthracene functionalized mesoporous aluminium organophosphonates were synthesized. • The materials serve as sensitive chemosensors for nitroderivatives. • The materials can be recycled for many times by simply washed with ethanol. • The materials show potential applications in explosives detection.

  10. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and metal ions detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The spectrochemical analysis is based on the interaction of radiation with the chemical species and depends on their nature, having pi, sigma or electrons, or d and f electrons, UV. Visible spectrophotometry has been used extensively in the detection and determination of both organics and inorganics. In UV detection the sensitivity is proportional to the bath length and the excitation coefficient of the given sample. It may be insensitive to many species unless these are converted to UV, absorbing derivatives. The technique has been applied for the monitoring of the effluents from HPLC, as chlorides or other complexes of various elements in this article the utility of HCl as reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of the metal ions like Al(III), As(III,IV), Ba(II), Cd(II), Ca(II) Ce(III), Cs(i), Cr(III,VI), Co(II), Cu(II), Dy(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Au(III), Hf(IV), Ho(III), In(III), Fe(III), La(III), Pb(II), Lu (III), Mg(II), Mn(II), Hg(II), Mo(VI), Ni(II), Pd(II), Pt(IV), K(I), Pr(III), Re(VII), Ru(IV), Sm(III), Sc(III), Ag(I), Sr(II) Te(III), Th(IV), Sn(II,IV), Ti(III,IV), W(VI), U(VI), V(IV,V), Yb(III), Zn(II) AND Zr(IV) Ions i.e. for meta ions from d of the most of these metal ions has been found sufficient permit their detection in HPLC. Their molar absorptive have also been reported. Reference has also been provided to post column derivatization of some metal ions from d and f block elements for their detection in HPLC. (author) 12 figs.; 6 tabs.; 27 refs

  11. Colorimetric Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Identification of Chemical Weapons and Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Michael J; Burks, Raychelle M; Atwater, Jordyn; Lukowicz, Rachel M; Williams, Pat; Holmes, Andrea E

    2017-03-04

    There is a significant demand for devices that can rapidly detect chemical-biological-explosive (CBE) threats on-site and allow for immediate responders to mitigate spread, risk, and loss. The key to an effective reconnaissance mission is a unified detection technology that analyzes potential threats in real time. In addition to reviewing the current state of the art in the field, this review illustrates the practicality of colorimetric arrays composed of sensors that change colors in the presence of analytes. This review also describes an outlook toward future technologies, and describes how they could possibly be used in areas such as war zones to detect and identify hazardous substances.

  12. Development of graphene nanoplatelet embedded polymer microcantilever for vapour phase explosive detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Prasenjit; Pandey, Swapnil; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a graphene based strain sensor has been reported for explosive vapour detection applications by exploiting the piezoresistive property of graphene. Instead of silicon based cantilevers, a low cost polymeric micro-cantilever platform has been used to fabricate this strain sensor by embedding the graphene nanoplatelet layer inside the beam. The fabricated devices were characterized for their mechanical and electromechanical behaviour. This device shows a very high gauge factor which is around ∼144. Also the resonant frequency of these cantilevers is high enough such that the measurements are not affected by environmental noise. These devices have been used in this work for reliable detection of explosive vapours such as 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene down to parts-per-billion concentrations in ambient conditions.

  13. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  14. Security training symposium: Meeting the challenge: Firearms and explosives recognition and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    These conference proceedings have been prepared in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Security Training Symposium on Meeting the Challenge -- Firearms and Explosives Recognition and Detection,'' November 28 through 30, 1989, in Bethesda, Maryland. This document contains the edited transcripts of the guest speakers. It also contains some of the speakers' formal papers that were distributed and some of the slides that were shown at the symposium (Appendix A).

  15. Laser methods for detecting explosive residues on surfaces of distant objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, L A [Institute of Cryptography, Communications and Informatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-31

    The basic methods of laser spectroscopy that are used for standoff detection and identification of explosive traces in the form of particles on the surfaces of objects tested under real or close-toreal conditions are briefly considered. The advantages and drawbacks of all methods are discussed and their characteristics are compared. Particular attention has been given to the prospects of development and practical implementation of the technologies discussed and justification of their most preferred applications. (review)

  16. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  17. Microcantilever technology for law enforcement and anti-terrorism applications: chemical, biological, and explosive material detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. D.; Rogers, B.; Whitten, R.

    2005-05-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, compactness, low cost, low power-consumption, scalability, and versatility of microcantilever sensors make this technology among the most promising solutions for detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as explosives. The University of Nevada, Reno, and Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc (NNTS) are currently developing a microcantilever-based detection system that will measure trace concentrations of explosives, toxic chemicals, and biological agents in air. A baseline sensor unit design that includes the sensor array, electronics, power supply and air handling has been created and preliminary demonstrations of the microcantilever platform have been conducted. The envisioned device would measure about two cubic inches, run on a small watch battery and cost a few hundred dollars. The device could be operated by untrained law enforcement personnel. Microcantilever-based devices could be used to "sniff out" illegal and/or hazardous chemical and biological agents in high traffic public areas, or be packaged as a compact, low-power system used to monitor cargo in shipping containers. Among the best detectors for such applications at present is the dog, an animal which is expensive, requires significant training and can only be made to work for limited time periods. The public is already accustomed to explosives and metal detection systems in airports and other public venues, making the integration of the proposed device into such security protocols straightforward.

  18. Investigation of common fluorophores for the detection of nitrated explosives by fluorescence quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, Melissa S.; McGuffin, Victoria L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that nitrated explosives may be detected by fluorescence quenching of pyrene and related compounds. The use of pyrene, however, invokes numerous health and waste disposal hazards. In the present study, ten safer fluorophores are identified for quenching detection of target nitrated compounds. Initially, Stern-Volmer constants are measured for each fluorophore with nitrobenzene and 4-nitrotoluene to determine the sensitivity of the quenching interaction. For quenching constants greater than 50 M -1 , sensitivity and selectivity are investigated further using an extended set of target quenchers. Nitromethane, nitrobenzene, 4-nitrotoluene, and 2,6-dinitrotoluene are chosen to represent nitrated explosives and their degradation products; aniline, benzoic acid, and phenol are chosen to represent potential interfering compounds. Among the fluorophores investigated, purpurin, malachite green, and phenol red demonstrate the greatest sensitivity and selectivity for nitrated compounds. Correlation of the quenching rate constants for these fluorophores to Rehm-Weller theory suggests an electron-transfer quenching mechanism. As a result of the large quenching constants, purpurin, malachite green, and phenol red are the most promising for future detection of nitrated explosives via fluorescence quenching

  19. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of explosives and drugs and nuclear and CW materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Peters, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed-portal requirements for nondestructive detection, including monitoring of contraband explosives, drugs, and weapon materials, and treaty verification of sealed munitions. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutron generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in explosives, drugs, and chemical warfare agents, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from detection times of the gamma rays and alpha-particles yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs. The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Surveillance systems based on APSTNG technology can avoid the large physical size, high capital and operating expenses, and reliability problems associated with complex accelerators

  20. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO3, a solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO3, solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N as 500 nM.

  1. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2008-09-15

    Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO₃, a solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N) for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO₃, solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV) we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N) as 500 nM.

  2. Characterization Of Commonly Encountered Explosives Using Highfield Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled With Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    symptoms depending on the relative concentration, even leading to death.32 2.4. Instrument Settings Both positive and negative ions can be formed...Detection Technology, pp. 619-633, 1992. 7. Osorio, Celia ; Gomez, Lewis M.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Castro, Miguel E., Time-of- flight Mass Spectroscopy...vol. 15, pp. 1950-1952. 34. Federal Facilities Assessment Branch, Public Health Assessment, US Army Umatilla Depot Activity, Centers for Disease

  3. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials

  4. Application of neutron/gamma transport codes for the design of explosive detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Shayer, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of neutron and gamma transport codes to the design of nuclear techniques for detecting concealed explosives material are discussed. The methodology of integrating radiation transport computations in the development, optimization and analysis phases of these new technologies is discussed. Transport and Monte Carlo codes are used for proof of concepts, guide the system integration, reduce the extend of experimental program and provide insight into the physical problem involved. The paper concentrates on detection techniques based on thermal and fast neutron interactions in the interrogated object. (authors). 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  5. Use of canines for explosives detection in the personnel access control function at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Results of experiments in the use of canines for explosive detection are discussed. Results of the experiments show that the tests identified the training and environmental problems associated with the use of macrosmatic animals in this environment. There may be more problems discovered in subsequent programs, but it is felt that the major problems were identified. The encouraging thing is that the identified problems are solvable by fairly straightforward adjustments in the training and environmental areas. It appears that canines in the personnal search application can achieve a better than 95% probability of detection, with a false alarm rate of less that 5% and an average per person search time of 20 seconds

  6. Use of canines for explosives detection in the personnel access control function at a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Results of experiments in the use of canines for explosive detection are discussed. Results of the experiments show that the tests identified the training and environmental problems associated with the use of macrosmatic animals in this environment. There may be more problems discovered in subsequent programs, but it is felt that the major problems were identified. The encouraging thing is that the identified problems are solvable by fairly straightforward adjustments in the training and environmental areas. It appears that canines in the personnal search application can achieve a better than 95% probability of detection, with a false alarm rate of less that 5% and an average per person search time of 20 seconds.

  7. Device for Detection of Explosives, Nuclear and Other Hazardous Materials in Luggage and Cargo Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Evsenin, Alexey; Gorshkov, Igor; Osetrov, Oleg; Vakhtin, Dmitry

    2009-12-01

    Device for detection of explosives, radioactive and heavily shielded nuclear materials in luggage and cargo containers based on Nanosecond Neutron Analysis/Associated Particles Technique (NNA/APT) is under construction. Detection module consists of a small neutron generator with built-in position-sensitive detector of associated alpha-particles, and several scintillator-based gamma-ray detectors. Explosives and other hazardous chemicals are detected by analyzing secondary high-energy gamma-rays from reactions of fast neutrons with materials inside a container. The same gamma-ray detectors are used to detect unshielded radioactive and nuclear materials. An array of several neutron detectors is used to detect fast neutrons from induced fission of nuclear materials. Coincidence and timing analysis allows one to discriminate between fission neutrons and scattered probing neutrons. Mathematical modeling by MCNP5 and MCNP-PoliMi codes was used to estimate the sensitivity of the device and its optimal configuration. Comparison of the features of three gamma detector types—based on BGO, NaI and LaBr3 crystals is presented.

  8. Improved efficiency access control equipment and explosive, weapons and drug abuse detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, A.; Milford, A.; Woollven, J.

    1985-01-01

    The second generation portal explosives detector has been designed with increased detection capability and convenience in service. The method of detection and performance relative to the first generation is described. A novel method of auto-calibration and self diagnosis is described and results are discussed. Improvements in convenience of operation have been achieved and operating space and costs reduced by combining metal detection capability, together with explosives detection. This allows both alarm signal and diagnostic outputs to be combined on a single remote panel in the guard room, and reduces the number of guards needed to man the access control. This type of access control is entirely a defensive measure against attack but a further additional feature is proposed which will also check the state of mind of all personnel passing through the check point. Any person suffering from the effect of narcotic or alcohol will be detected by their inability to reproduce their normal signature. A new method of signature analysis in five dimensions is described together with proposals for integrating the check without increasing the time in the test area. Some recent results on the effects of alcohol on signature reproduction is given

  9. Device for Detection of Explosives, Nuclear and Other Hazardous Materials in Luggage and Cargo Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Evsenin, Alexey; Osetrov, Oleg; Vakhtin, Dmitry; Gorshkov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Device for detection of explosives, radioactive and heavily shielded nuclear materials in luggage and cargo containers based on Nanosecond Neutron Analysis/Associated Particles Technique (NNA/APT) is under construction. Detection module consists of a small neutron generator with built-in position-sensitive detector of associated alpha-particles, and several scintillator-based gamma-ray detectors. Explosives and other hazardous chemicals are detected by analyzing secondary high-energy gamma-rays from reactions of fast neutrons with materials inside a container. The same gamma-ray detectors are used to detect unshielded radioactive and nuclear materials. An array of several neutron detectors is used to detect fast neutrons from induced fission of nuclear materials. Coincidence and timing analysis allows one to discriminate between fission neutrons and scattered probing neutrons. Mathematical modeling by MCNP5 and MCNP-PoliMi codes was used to estimate the sensitivity of the device and its optimal configuration. Comparison of the features of three gamma detector types--based on BGO, NaI and LaBr 3 crystals is presented.

  10. Increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of gas sensors for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Daniel

    Over the past decade, the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has increased, domestically and internationally, highlighting a growing need for a method to quickly and reliably detect explosive devices in both military and civilian environments before the explosive can cause damage. Conventional techniques have been successful in explosive detection, however they typically suffer from enormous costs in capital equipment and maintenance, costs in energy consumption, sampling, operational related expenses, and lack of continuous and real-time monitoring. The goal was thus to produce an inexpensive, portable sensor that continuously monitors the environment, quickly detects the presence of explosive compounds and alerts the user. In 2012, here at URI, a sensor design was proposed for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The design entailed a thermodynamic gas sensor that measures the heat of decomposition between trace TATP vapor and a metal oxide catalyst film. The sensor was able to detect TATP vapor at the part per million level (ppm) and showed great promise for eventual commercial use, however, the sensor lacked selectivity. Thus, the specific objective of this work was to take the original sensor design proposed in 2012 and to make several key improvements to advance the sensor towards commercialization. It was demonstrated that a sensor can be engineered to detect TATP and ignore the effects of interferent H2O2 molecules by doping SnO2 films with varying amounts of Pd. Compared with a pure SnO2 catalyst, a SnO2, film doped with 8 wt. % Pd had the highest selectivity between TATP and H2O2. Also, at 12 wt. % Pd, the response to TATP and H2O2 was enhanced, indicating that sensitivity, not only selectivity, can be increased by modifying the composition of the catalyst. An orthogonal detection system was demonstrated. The platform consists of two independent sensing mechanisms, one thermodynamic and one conductometric, which take measurements from

  11. Using of acoustic technologies for detection of explosives in gas, liquid and solid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valyaev, A. N.; Yanushkevich, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Some industrial nuclear power objects are very attractive for the realization of radiological and chemical terrorism acts with using of explosives. Although up today this type of terrorism is not revealed itself, but the problem of detection of explosives at these objects is becoming very actual one, for example, in connection with the implementation of the urgent decommissioning of nuclear powered vessels. Such decommissioning includes the utilization the dangerous radioactive and chemical elements, contained in submarines and vessels. This actual problem is existed not only in Russia, but also in abroad. It is noticed that catastrophes at these objects will have in addition the great negative mental effect on population of all over the world, as it was after the Chernobyl accident. The using of the modern nuclear physics methods for detection and analysis of explosives is connected with the following difficulties: (1) we have to have the unique and the expensive equipment; (2) the special preparation of sample probes; (3) a long time is often necessary for analysis; (4) the high qualification of service personal is needed. We proposed to use for these purposes the complex of acoustic techniques, that are based on the high sensitivity of acoustic characteristics of any matter to their physical and chemical properties.Any acoustic signal has the following main parameters: (1) frequency (ω); (2) amplitude of pressure (ρ); (3) wave and amplitude bands; (4) velocity of acoustic wave propagation (sound velocity) (C); (5) space and temporal signal evolution, that is determined by the values of coefficients of temporal attenuation (α), space adsorption (β) and sound dispersion on obstacles and impurities. Our acoustic analysis is included the determination of C, α and β values for solid and liquid explosives. The exact measurements of these parameters and their dependences from frequency and temperature are conducted in the special acoustic cells, that

  12. Remote detection of weak aftershocks of the DPRK underground explosions using waveform cross correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, R.; Rozhkov, M.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I. O.; Sanina, I.

    2017-12-01

    Association of weak seismic signals generated by low-magnitude aftershocks of the DPRK underground tests into event hypotheses represent a challenge for routine automatic and interactive processing at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, due to the relatively low station density of the International Monitoring System (IMS) seismic network. Since 2011, as an alternative, the IDC has been testing various prototype techniques of signal detection and event creation based on waveform cross correlation. Using signals measured by seismic stations of the IMS from DPRK explosions as waveform templates, the IDC detected several small (estimated mb between 2.2 and 3.6) seismic events after two DPRK tests conducted on September 9, 2016 and September 3, 2017. The obtained detections were associated with reliable event hypothesis and then used to locate these events relative to the epicenters of the DPRK explosions. We observe high similarity of the detected signals with the corresponding waveform templates. The newly found signals also correlate well between themselves. In addition, the values of the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) estimated using the traces of cross correlation coefficients, increase with template length (from 5 s to 150 s), providing strong evidence in favour of their spatial closeness, which allows interpreting them as explosion aftershocks. We estimated the relative magnitudes of all aftershocks using the ratio of RMS amplitudes of the master and slave signal in the cross correlation windows characterized by the highest SNR. Additional waveform data from regional non-IMS stations MDJ and SEHB provide independent validation of these aftershock hypotheses. Since waveform templates from any single master event may be sub-efficient at some stations, we have also developed a method of joint usage of the DPRK and the biggest aftershocks templates to build more robust event hypotheses.

  13. Detection of explosives on the surface of banknotes by Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana R; Correa, Deleon N; Zacca, Jorge J; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Poppi, Ronei J

    2015-02-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology using Raman hyperspectral imaging and chemometric methods for identification of pre- and post-blast explosive residues on banknote surfaces. The explosives studied were of military, commercial and propellant uses. After the acquisition of the hyperspectral imaging, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the pure spectra and the distribution of the corresponding image constituents. The performance of the methodology was evaluated by the explained variance and the lack of fit of the models, by comparing the ICA recovered spectra with the reference spectra using correlation coefficients and by the presence of rotational ambiguity in the ICA solutions. The methodology was applied to forensic samples to solve an automated teller machine explosion case. Independent component analysis proved to be a suitable method of resolving curves, achieving equivalent performance with the multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method. At low concentrations, MCR-ALS presents some limitations, as it did not provide the correct solution. The detection limit of the methodology presented in this study was 50 μg cm(-2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dye@bio-MOF-1 Composite as a Dual-Emitting Platform for Enhanced Detection of a Wide Range of Explosive Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Tian, Li; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Shiqiang; Wang, Peng; Liang, Yun; Zhang, Wanlin; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Guangtao

    2017-06-14

    By incorporating a cationic dye within a metal-organic framework (MOF) through an ion-exchange process, a responsive dye@bio-MOF-1 composite has been synthesized, serving as a dual-emitting platform for enhanced detection of different kinds of nitro-explosives, especially nitroalkanes, nitramines, and nitrate esters. The dye@bio-MOF-1 composite was constructed with free amines on their well-defined cavities, which is essential for the capture of explosives into their confined nanospace. It was observed that the encapsulation of explosives into the constructed dye@bio-MOF-1 composite could dramatically alter the luminescent properties of the dyes as well as the MOF skeletons owing to the size exclusivity and confinement-induced effect. For nitroaromatics, the dye@bio-MOF-1 composite exhibits turn-off responses via fluorescence quenching. Unexpectedly, the composite shows unique turn-on responses for aliphatic nitro-organics via confinement-induced enhancement, demonstrating enhanced ability to detecting different kinds of explosives selectively in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the dye@bio-MOF-1 film was facilely fabricated, making the chemical sensing more convenient and easier to realize the discrimination of the targeted explosives. The dual tunable responses indicate that dye@bio-MOF-1 composites are favorable materials for molecular sensing. On the basis of the host-guest properties of the constructed dye@bio-MOF-1 composite, our work can be further extended to sensing specific analytes with remarkable turn-on sensing properties, in particular those difficult to recognize with conventional methods.

  15. Inadequate peak expiratory flow meter characteristics detected by a computerised explosive decompression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, M.R.; Atkins, P.R.; Pedersen, O.F.

    2003-01-01

    Methods: The dynamic response of mini-Wright (MW), Vitalograph (V), TruZone (TZ), MultiSpiro (MS) and pneumotachograph (PT) flow meters was tested by delivering two differently shaped flow-time profiles from a computer controlled explosive decompression device fitted with a fast response solenoid.......1) and 257 (39.2), respectively, and at ≈200 l/min they were 51 (23.9) and 1 (0.5). All the meters met ATS accuracy requirements when tested with their waveforms. Conclusions: An improved method for testing the dynamic response of flow meters detects marked overshoot (underdamping) of TZ and MS responses...

  16. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21945-970, Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)], E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X. [DNC/Poli, PEN COPPE CT, UFRJ Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21941-972, Caixa Postal 68509, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials.

  17. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, F.J.O.; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials.

  18. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Fuente, A.; Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Pearson, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1 0 -0 0 line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH 3 D + . The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH 3 D + as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1 0 -0 0 transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 ± 6 MHz (3σ), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10 12 cm –2 . Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH 2 D, we derive N(NH 4 + ) ≅ 2.6 × 10 13 cm –2 , i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10 –11 .

  19. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B. [Deparment of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, A. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apdo. 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Roueff, E. [Luth, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8102, Place J. Janssen F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 Avenue de lObservatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Pearson, J., E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MC 168-314, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  20. Graphene oxide-based optical biosensor functionalized with peptides for explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-06-15

    A label-free optical biosensor was constructed with biofunctionalized graphene oxide (GO) for specific detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). By chemically binding TNT-specific peptides with GO, the biosensor gained unique optoelectronic properties and high biological sensitivity, with transducing bimolecular bonding into optical signals. Through UV absorption detection, increasing absorbance responses could be observed in presence of TNT at different concentrations, as low as 4.40×10(-9) mM, and showed dose-dependence and stable behavior. Specific responses of the biosensor were verified with the corporation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT), which had similar molecular structure to TNT. Thus, with high sensitivity and selectivity, the biosensor provided a convenient approach for detection of explosives as miniaturizing and integrating devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Analytical detection of explosives and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Bishu; Petersson, Fredrik; Juerschik, Simone [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann D. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Watts, Peter; Mayhew, Chris A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 4TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This work demonstrates the extremely favorable features of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the detection and identification of solid explosives, chemical warfare agent simulants and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs in real time. Here, we report the use of PTR-TOF, for the detection of explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, trinitrobenzene) and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs (e.g., ecstasy, morphine, heroin, ethcathinone, 2C-D). For all substances, the protonated parent ion (as we used H{sub 3}O{sup +} as a reagent ion) could be detected, providing a high level of confidence in their identification since the high mass resolution allows compounds having the same nominal mass to be separated. We varied the E/N from 90 to 220 T{sub d} (1 T{sub d}=10{sup -17} Vcm{sup -1}). This allowed us to study fragmentation pathways as a function of E/N (reduced electric field). For a few compounds rather unusual E/N dependencies were also discovered.

  3. Detection systems for radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savajols, H.

    2002-01-01

    Two main methods are used to produce radioactive ion beams: -) the ISOL method (isotope separation on-line) in which the stable beam interacts with a thick target, the reaction products diffuse outside the target and are transferred to a source where they are ionized, a mass separator and a post-accelerator drive the selected radioactive ions to the right energy; -) the in-flight fragmentation method in which the stable beam interacts with a thin target, the reaction products are emitted from the target with a restricted angular distribution and a velocity close to that of the incident beam, the experimenter has to take advantage from the reaction kinetics to get the right particle beam. Characteristic time is far longer with the ISOL method but the beam intensity is much better because of the use of a post-accelerator. In both cases, the beam intensity is lower by several orders of magnitude than in the case of a stable beam. This article presents all the constraints imposed by radioactive beams to the detection systems of the reaction products and gives new technical solutions according to the type of nuclear reaction studied. (A.C.)

  4. Speciation from photon to ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.

    2001-01-01

    New analytical techniques allowing to perform speciation in the framework of the nuclear fuel cycle are more and more needed. Among them, several laser-based analytical techniques present several advantages (non intrusive). Hence, Thermal Lensing (TL)/Photoacoustic (LIPAS), Time Resolved selective, sensitive Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) have been used for actinides/lanthanides interaction and speciation studies in inorganic and organic matrices, Laser Ablation-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-OES or LIBS) for direct studies on solids, liquids,... where in situ measurements (elemental or isotopic) are mandatory. In complementary to these photon-based methods, new ion detection methods such as ElectroSpray-Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) seems promising for speciation studies. Principle, advantages and limitations as well as results obtained and trends for these different methods will be presented. (author)

  5. Ion creation, ion focusing, ion/molecule reactions, ion separation, and ion detection in the open air in a small plastic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Zane; Wei, Pu; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-07

    A method is presented in which ions are generated and manipulated in the ambient environment using polymeric electrodes produced with a consumer-grade 3D printer. The ability to focus, separate, react, and detect ions in the ambient environment is demonstrated and the data agree well with simulated ion behaviour.

  6. Convolutional neural network based side attack explosive hazard detection in three dimensional voxel radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockner, Blake; Veal, Charlie; Dowdy, Joshua; Anderson, Derek T.; Williams, Kathryn; Luke, Robert; Sheen, David

    2018-04-01

    The identification followed by avoidance or removal of explosive hazards in past and/or present conflict zones is a serious threat for both civilian and military personnel. This is a challenging task as variability exists with respect to the objects, their environment and emplacement context, to name a few factors. A goal is the development of automatic or human-in-the-loop sensor technologies that leverage signal processing, data fusion and machine learning. Herein, we explore the detection of side attack explosive hazards (SAEHs) in three dimensional voxel space radar via different shallow and deep convolutional neural network (CNN) architectures. Dimensionality reduction is performed by using multiple projected images versus the raw three dimensional voxel data, which leads to noteworthy savings in input size and associated network hyperparameters. Last, we explore the accuracy and interpretation of solutions learned via random versus intelligent network weight initialization. Experiments are provided on a U.S. Army data set collected over different times, weather conditions, target types and concealments. Preliminary results indicate that deep learning can perform as good as, if not better, than a skilled domain expert, even in light of limited training data with a class imbalance.

  7. Real-time detection and characterization of nuclear explosion using broadband analyses of regional seismic stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, T.; Madlazim

    2018-01-01

    This preliminary study aims to propose a new method of real-time detection and characterization of nuclear explosions by analyzing broadband seismic waveforms acquired from a network of regional seismic stations. Signal identification generated by a nuclear test was differentiated from natural sources of either earthquakes or other natural seismo-tectonic events by verifying crucial parameters, namely source depth, type of first motion, and P-wave domination of the broadband seismic wavesunder consideration. We examined and analyzed a recently hypothetical nuclear test performed by the North Koreangovernment that occurred on September 3, 2017 as a vital point to study. From spectral analyses, we found that the source of corresponding signals associated with detonations of the latest underground nuclear test was at a much shallower depth below the surface relatively compared with that of natural earthquakes, the suspected nuclear explosions produced compressional waves with radially directed outward from the source for their first motions, and the waves were only dominated by P-components. The results are then discussed in the context of potential uses of the proposed methodology for human-induced disaster early warning system and/or the need of rapid response purposes for minimizing the disaster risks.

  8. Infrared photothermal imaging spectroscopy for detection of trace explosives on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; Andrew McGill, R

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a technique for the standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photothermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, which are tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral, and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes at standoff on relevant substrates is critical for security applications but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes a series of PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate, and sucrose on steel, polyethylene, glass, and painted steel panels. We demonstrate detection at surface mass loadings comparable with fingerprint depositions ( 10μg/cm2 to 100μg/cm2) from an area corresponding to a single pixel within the thermal image.

  9. Automation in airport security X-ray screening of cabin baggage: Examining benefits and possible implementations of automated explosives detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättenschwiler, Nicole; Sterchi, Yanik; Mendes, Marcia; Schwaninger, Adrian

    2018-10-01

    Bomb attacks on civil aviation make detecting improvised explosive devices and explosive material in passenger baggage a major concern. In the last few years, explosive detection systems for cabin baggage screening (EDSCB) have become available. Although used by a number of airports, most countries have not yet implemented these systems on a wide scale. We investigated the benefits of EDSCB with two different levels of automation currently being discussed by regulators and airport operators: automation as a diagnostic aid with an on-screen alarm resolution by the airport security officer (screener) or EDSCB with an automated decision by the machine. The two experiments reported here tested and compared both scenarios and a condition without automation as baseline. Participants were screeners at two international airports who differed in both years of work experience and familiarity with automation aids. Results showed that experienced screeners were good at detecting improvised explosive devices even without EDSCB. EDSCB increased only their detection of bare explosives. In contrast, screeners with less experience (tenure automated decision provided better human-machine detection performance than on-screen alarm resolution and no automation. This came at the cost of slightly higher false alarm rates on the human-machine system level, which would still be acceptable from an operational point of view. Results indicate that a wide-scale implementation of EDSCB would increase the detection of explosives in passenger bags and automated decision instead of automation as diagnostic aid with on screen alarm resolution should be considered. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Innovative concept for a major breakthrough in atmospheric radioactive xenon detection for nuclear explosion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Petit, G.; Cagniant, A.; Gross, P.; Achim, P.; Douysset, G.; Taffary, T.; Moulin, C.; Morelle, M.

    2013-01-01

    The verification regime of the comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT) is based on a network of three different waveform technologies together with global monitoring of aerosols and noble gas in order to detect, locate and identify a nuclear weapon explosion down to 1 kt TNT equivalent. In case of a low intensity underground or underwater nuclear explosion, it appears that only radioactive gases, especially the noble gas which are difficult to contain, will allow identification of weak yield nuclear tests. Four radioactive xenon isotopes, 131m Xe, 133m Xe, 133 Xe and 135 Xe, are sufficiently produced in fission reactions and exhibit suitable half-lives and radiation emissions to be detected in atmosphere at low level far away from the release site. Four different monitoring CTBT systems, ARIX, ARSA, SAUNA, and SPALAX TM have been developed in order to sample and to measure them with high sensitivity. The latest developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is likely to be drastically improved in detection sensitivity (especially for the metastable isotopes) through a higher sampling rate, when equipped with a new conversion electron (CE)/X-ray coincidence spectrometer. This new spectrometer is based on two combined detectors, both exhibiting very low radioactive background: a well-type NaI(Tl) detector for photon detection surrounding a gas cell equipped with two large passivated implanted planar silicon chips for electron detection. It is characterized by a low electron energy threshold and a much better energy resolution for the CE than those usually measured with the existing CTBT equipments. Furthermore, the compact geometry of the spectrometer provides high efficiency for X-ray and for CE associated to the decay modes of the four relevant radioxenons. The paper focus on the design of this new spectrometer and presents spectroscopic performances of a prototype based on recent results achieved from both radioactive xenon standards and air sample

  11. A new method of explosive detection based on dual-energy X-ray technology and forward-scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kun; Li Jianmin

    2004-01-01

    Based on dual-energy X-ray technology combined with forward-scattering, a brand new explosive detection method is presented. Dual-energy technology can give the information on the effective atomic number (Z eff ) of an irradiated component, while the intensity of the forward scattered photons can reveal the density information according to our research. Therefore, the existence of the explosive can be effectively identified by combining these two characteristic quantities. Compared with the earlier inspection approaches, the new one has a series of particular advantages, such as high detection rate, low false alarm rate, automatic alarm and so forth. The project is ongoing. (authors)

  12. Detection of explosives (in particular landmines) by low-cost methods. Final report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Advisory Group Meeting was to put together experts from several areas of explosives (landmines) detection, both nuclear and non-nuclear, to generate ideas which might lead to development of a low-cost method for detection of explosives (in particular landmines), or to a modification of existing methods. The discussions included nuclear, acoustic, radar, infrared, x-ray, and nuclear quadrupole resonance methods for localizing and characterizing landmines. Many technologies are still under laboratory development. This document includes 8 contributed papers, each of them was indexed and abstracted

  13. The sensitivity studies of a landmine explosive detection system based on neutron backscattering using Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hamda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a Monte Carlo simulation of a landmine detection system, using the MCNP5 code, for the detection of concealed explosives such as trinitrotoluene and cyclonite. In portable field detectors, the signal strength of backscattered neutrons and gamma rays from thermal neutron activation is sensitive to a number of parameters such as the mass of explosive, depth of concealment, neutron moderation, background soil composition, soil porosity, soil moisture, multiple scattering in the background material, and configuration of the detection system. In this work, a detection system, with BF3 detectors for neutrons and sodium iodide scintillator for g-rays, is modeled to investigate the neutron signal-to-noise ratio and to obtain an empirical formula for the photon production rate Ri(n,γ= SfGfMf(d,m from radiative capture reactions in constituent nuclides of trinitrotoluene. This formula can be used for the efficient landmine detection of explosives in quantities as small as ~200 g of trinitrotoluene concealed at depths down to about 15 cm. The empirical formula can be embedded in a field programmable gate array on a field-portable explosives' sensor for efficient online detection.

  14. Quartz crystal microbalance sensor using ionophore for ammonium ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Yasuhiro; Takano, Kosuke; Citterio, Daniel; Suzuki, Koji; Shiratori, Seimei

    2012-01-01

    Ionophore-based quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) ammonium ion sensors with a detection limit for ammonium ion concentrations as low as 2.2 microM were fabricated. Ionophores are molecules, which selectively bind a particular ion. In this study, one of the known ionophores for ammonium, nonactin, was used to detect ammonium ions for environmental in-situ monitoring of aquarium water for the first time. To fabricate the sensing films, poly(vinyl chloride) was used as the matrix for the immobilization of nonactin. Furthermore, the anionic additive, tetrakis (4-chlorophenyl) borate potassium salt and the plasticizer dioctyl sebacate were used to enhance the sensor properties. The sensor allowed detecting ammonium ions not only in static solution, but also in flowing water. The sensor showed a nearly linear response with the increase of the ammonium ion concentration. The QCM resonance frequency increased with the increase of ammonium ion concentration, suggesting a decreasing weight of the sensing film. The detailed response mechanism could not be verified yet. However, from the results obtained when using a different plasticizer, nitrophenyl octyl ether, it is considered that this effect is caused by the release of water molecules. Consequently, the newly fabricated sensor detects ammonium ions by discharge of water. It shows high selectivity over potassium and sodium ions. We conclude that the newly fabricated sensor can be applied for detecting ammonium ions in aquarium water, since it allows measuring low ammonium ion concentrations. This sensor will be usable for water quality monitoring and controlling.

  15. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1990-08-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.G.

    1990-08-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs

  17. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on THz for CBRN and Explosives Detection and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Shulika, Oleksiy

    2017-01-01

    This work is intended to jointly address the development, realization and applications of emitters and detectors of terahertz (THz-0.3 THz up to 10 THz) and their application to diagnostics of CBRN effects and detection of explosives and CBRN. Hazardous substances typically exhibit rotational and vibrational transitions in this region, hence giving access to spectroscopic analysis of a large variety of molecules which play a key role in security as well as various other areas, e.g. air pollution, climate research, industrial process control, agriculture, food industry, workplace safety and medical diagnostics can be monitored by sensing and identifying them via THz (0.3 to 10 THz) and mid infrared (MIR-10 THz to 100 THz) absorption “finger prints”. Most plastics, textiles and paper are nearly transparent for THz radiation.

  18. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tai-Sen

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype.* The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use a cyclotron and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the storage ring requirements for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scattering with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reas...

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the remote detection of explosives at level of fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaviva, S.; Palucci, A.; Lazic, V.; Menicucci, I.; Nuvoli, M.; Pistilli, M.; De Dominicis, L.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of the application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of some common military explosives and theirs precursors deposited on white varnished car's external and black car's internal or external plastic. The residues were deposited by an artificial silicon finger, to simulate material manipulation by terrorists when preparing a car bomb, leaving traces of explosives on the parts of a car. LIBS spectra were acquired by using a first prototype laboratory stand-off device, developed in the framework of the EU FP7 313077 project EDEN (End-user driven DEmo for CBRNe). The system operates at working distances 8-30 m and collects the LIBS in the spectral range 240-840 nm. In this configuration, the target was moved precisely in X-Y direction to simulate the scanning system, to be implemented successively. The system is equipped with two colour cameras, one for wide scene view and another for imaging with a very high magnification, capable to discern fingerprints on a target. The spectral features of each examined substance were identified and compared to those belonging to the substrate and the surrounding air, and those belonging to possible common interferents. These spectral differences are discussed and interpreted. The obtained results show that the detection and discrimination of nitro-based compounds like RDX, PETN, ammonium nitrate (AN), and urea nitrate (UN) from organic interfering substances like diesel, greasy lubricants, greasy adhesives or oils in fingerprint concentration, at stand-off distance of some meters or tenths of meters is feasible.

  20. Portable standoff Raman system for fast detection of homemade explosives through glass, plastic, and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Acosta, Tayro E.; Porter, John N.; Lucey, Paul G.; Bates, David E.

    2012-06-01

    The University of Hawaii has been developing portable remote Raman systems capable of detecting chemicals in daylight from a safe standoff distance. We present data on standoff detection of chemicals used in the synthesis of homemade explosives (HME) using a portable standoff Raman system utilizing an 8-inch telescope. Data show that good-quality Raman spectra of various hazardous chemicals such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, sulfur, nitrobenzene, benzene, acetone, various organic and inorganic chemicals etc. could be easily obtained from remote distances, tested up to 120 meters, with a single-pulse laser excitation and with detection time less than 1 μs. The system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser source (532 nm, 100 mJ/pulse, 15 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) capable of firing a single or double pulse. The double-pulse configuration also allows the system to perform standoff LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) at 50 m range. In the standoff Raman detection, the doublepulse sequence simply doubles the signal to noise ratio. Significant improvement in the quality of Raman spectra is observed when the standoff detection is made with 1s integration time. The system uses a 50-micron slit and has spectral resolution of 8 cm-1. The HME chemicals could be easily detected through clear and brown glass bottles, PP and HDPE plastic bottles, and also through fluorescent plastic water bottles. Standoff Raman detection of HME chemical from a 10 m distance through non-visible concealed bottles in plastic bubble wrap packaging is demonstrated with 1 s integration time. Possible applications of the standoff Raman system for homeland security and environmental monitoring are discussed.

  1. Detection of nitro-organic and peroxide explosives in latent fingermarks by DART- and SALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Frederick; Seviour, John; Lim, Angelina Yimei; Elumbaring-Salazar, Cheryl Grace; Loke, Jason; Ma, Jan

    2012-09-10

    The ability of two mass spectrometric methods, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) and direct analysis in real time (DART-MS), to detect the presence of seven common explosives (six nitro-organic- and one peroxide-type) in spiked latent fingermarks has been examined. It was found that each explosive could be detected with nanogram sensitivity for marks resulting from direct finger contact with a glass probe by DART-MS or onto stainless steel target plates using SALDI-TOF-MS for marks pre-dusted with one type of commercial black magnetic powder. These explosives also could be detected in latent marks lifted from six common surfaces (paper, plastic bag, metal drinks can, wood laminate, adhesive tape and white ceramic tile) whereas no explosive could be detected in equivalent pre-dusted marks on the surface of a commercial lifting tape by the DART-MS method due to high background interference from the tape material. The presence of TNT and Tetryl could be detected in pre-dusted latent fingermarks on a commercial lifting tape for up to 29 days sealed and stored under ambient conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of explosives in traces by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Differences from organic interferents and conditions for a correct classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazic, V.; Palucci, A.; Jovicevic, S.; Carpanese, M.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim to study and to improve LIBS capability for detecting residues of energetic compounds in air surrounding, nine types of explosives and some potential interferents, placed in small quantities on a metallic support, were interrogated by a laser. Shot-to-shot behavior of the line intensities relative to the sample constituents was studied. The detected plasma was not stoichiometric and the line intensities, as well as their ratios, were changing even for an order of magnitude from one sampling point to another, particularly in the case of aromatic compounds. We explained some sources of such LIBS signal's behavior and this allowed us to establish a data processing procedure, which leads to a good linearization among the data sets. In this way, it was possible to determine some real differences between the LIBS spectra from explosives and interferents, and to correlate them with molecular formulas, with some known pathways for the molecule's decomposition and with successive chemical reactions in the plasma. Number spectral parameters, which distinguish the each studied explosive from other organic materials, were also determined and compared with previously published results relative to percentages of correct classifications for the same explosives. Experimental conditions for reliable recognition of the explosives by LIBS in air are also suggested, together with the parameters that should be considered or discarded from the classification procedure.

  3. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosive detection system using a D-D generator and Nal (Tl) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevallos R, L. E.; Guzman G, K. A.; Gallego, E.; Garcia F, G.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    The detection of hidden explosive material is very important for national security. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP6, several proposed configurations of a detection system with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) generator, in conjunction with NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated to intercept hidden explosives. The response of the system to various explosive samples such as Rdx and ammonium nitrate are analyzed as the main components of home-military explosives. The D-D generator produces fast neutrons of 2.5 MeV in a maximum field of 10 10 n/s (Dd-110) which is surrounded with high density polyethylene in order to thermalized the fast neutrons making them interact with the sample inspected, giving rise to the emission of gamma rays that generates a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it, being able in this way to determine its chemical composition and identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate the admissible operation dose, with thicknesses of lead and borated polyethylene, in order to place it at some point of the Laboratory of Neutron Measurements of the Polytechnic University of Madrid where the shielding is optimal. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for the explosives inspection. (Author)

  4. Preparation of Dithizone Functionalized Polystyrene for Detecting Heavy Metal Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeon Ho; Kim, Younghun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Colorimetric sensors were usually used to detect specific metal ions using selective color change of solutions. While almost organic dye in colorimetric sensors detected single molecule, dithizone (DTZ) solution could be separately detected above 5 kinds of heavy metal ions by the change of clear color. Namely, DTZ could be used as multicolorimetric sensors. However, DTZ was generally used as aqueous type and paper/pellet-type DTZ was not reported yet. Therefore, in this work, polystyrene (PS) was prepared to composite with DTZ and then DTZ/PS pellet was obtained, which was used to selectively detect 10 kinds of heavy metal ions. When 10 ppm of Hg and Co ions was exposed in DTZ/PS pellets, clear color change was revealed. It is noted that DTZ/PS pellet could be used in detecting of heavy metal ion as dry type.

  5. Automated High-Speed Video Detection of Small-Scale Explosives Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Robert; Guymon, Clint

    2013-06-01

    Small-scale explosives sensitivity test data is used to evaluate hazards of processing, handling, transportation, and storage of energetic materials. Accurate test data is critical to implementation of engineering and administrative controls for personnel safety and asset protection. Operator mischaracterization of reactions during testing contributes to either excessive or inadequate safety protocols. Use of equipment and associated algorithms to aid the operator in reaction determination can significantly reduce operator error. Safety Management Services, Inc. has developed an algorithm to evaluate high-speed video images of sparks from an ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) machine to automatically determine whether or not a reaction has taken place. The algorithm with the high-speed camera is termed GoDetect (patent pending). An operator assisted version for friction and impact testing has also been developed where software is used to quickly process and store video of sensitivity testing. We have used this method for sensitivity testing with multiple pieces of equipment. We present the fundamentals of GoDetect and compare it to other methods used for reaction detection.

  6. Detection of explosive substances by tomographic inspection using neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahmand, M.; Boston, A.J.; Grint, A.N.; Nolan, P.J.; Joyce, M.J.; Mackin, R.O.; D'Mellow, B.; Aspinall, M.; Peyton, A.J.; Silfhout, R. van

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the detection and identification of hazardous materials has become increasingly important. This work discusses research and development of a technique which is capable of detecting and imaging hidden explosives. It is proposed to utilise neutron interrogation of the substances under investigation facilitating the detection of emitted gamma radiation and scattered neutrons. Pulsed fast neutron techniques are attractive because they can be used to determine the concentrations of the light elements (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) which can be the primary components of explosive materials. Using segmented High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors and digital pulse processing [R.J. Cooper, G. Turk, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, J. Simpson, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Position Sensitive Detectors, Nuclear Instruments and Methods A, in press; I. Lazarus, D.E. Appelbe, A. J. Boston, P.J. Coleman-Smith, J.R. Cresswell, M. Descovich, S.A.A. Gros, M. Lauer, J. Norman, C.J. Pearson, V.F.E. Pucknell, J.A. Sampson, G. Turk, J.J. Valiente-Dobon, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 51 (2004) 1353; R.J. Cooper, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.N. Grint, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, D.P. Scraggs, G. Turk, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Application, 2006. ] the scatter path of incident photons can be reconstructed to determine the origin of the gamma-rays without the need for mechanical collimation by applying the Compton camera principle [V. Schonfelder, A. Hirner, K. Schneider, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 107 (1973) 385; R.W. Todd, J.M. Nightingale, D.B. Everett, Nature 251 (1974) 132. ]. In addition, it is proposed to utilise the scattered neutrons which recoil from the materials being assayed, detecting them with a fast

  7. Carbon nanotubes-based chemiresistive immunosensor for small molecules: detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miso; Cella, Lakshmi N; Chen, Wilfred; Myung, Nosang V; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2010-12-15

    In recent years, there has been a growing focus on use of one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires, as transducer elements for label-free chemiresistive/field-effect transistor biosensors as they provide label-free and high sensitivity detection. While research to-date has elucidated the power of carbon nanotubes- and other 1-D nanostructure-based field effect transistors immunosensors for large charged macromolecules such as proteins and viruses, their application to small uncharged or charged molecules has not been demonstrated. In this paper we report a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-based chemiresistive immunosensor for label-free, rapid, sensitive and selective detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), a small molecule. The newly developed immunosensor employed a displacement mode/format in which SWNTs network forming conduction channel of the sensor was first modified with trinitrophenyl (TNP), an analog of TNT, and then ligated with the anti-TNP single chain antibody. Upon exposure to TNT or its derivatives the bound antibodies were displaced producing a large change, several folds higher than the noise, in the resistance/conductance of SWNTs giving excellent limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor detected between 0.5 ppb and 5000 ppb TNT with good selectivity to other nitroaromatic explosives and demonstrated good accuracy for monitoring TNT in untreated environmental water matrix. We believe this new displacement format can be easily generalized to other one-dimensional nanostructure-based chemiresistive immuno/affinity-sensors for detecting small and/or uncharged molecules of interest in environmental monitoring and health care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency-scanning MALDI linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I-Chung; Lin, Jung Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the first report on the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection by frequency scan. We designed, installed, and tested this radio frequency (RF) scan linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its associated electronics to dramatically extend the mass region to be detected. The RF circuit can be adjusted from 300 to 10 kHz with a set of operation amplifiers. To trap the ions produced by MALDI, a high pressure of helium buffer gas was employed to quench extra kinetic energy of the heavy ions produced by MALDI. The successful detection of the singly charged secretory immunoglobulin A ions indicates that the detectable mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of this system can reach ~385 000 or beyond.

  9. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Standoff Detection of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    construction of sensors that are designed for specific tasks. PAS is well suited for trace detection of gaseous and condensed media. Recent research has...The TLV for chemical substances is defined as a concentration in air , typically for inhalation or skin exposure. For acetone , the TLV is 250 ppm...12 pt) The findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized

  10. The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2014-01-01

    The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model

  11. Polymer nanocomposite nanomechanical cantilever sensors: material characterization, device development and application in explosive vapour detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seena, V; Fernandes, Avil; Ramgopal Rao, V; Pant, Prita; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an optimized and highly sensitive piezoresistive SU-8 nanocomposite microcantilever sensor and its application for detection of explosives in vapour phase. The optimization has been in improving its electrical, mechanical and transduction characteristics. We have achieved a better dispersion of carbon black (CB) in the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistor and arrived at an optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration by performing a systematic mechanical and electrical characterization of polymer nanocomposites. Mechanical characterization of SU-8/CB nanocomposite thin films was performed using the nanoindentation technique with an appropriate substrate effect analysis. Piezoresistive microcantilevers having an optimum carbon black concentration were fabricated using a design aimed at surface stress measurements with reduced fabrication process complexity. The optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration has resulted in an improved sensitivity, low device variability and low noise level. The resonant frequency and spring constant of the microcantilever were found to be 22 kHz and 0.4 N m -1 respectively. The devices exhibited a surface stress sensitivity of 7.6 ppm (mN m -1 ) -1 and the noise characterization results support their suitability for biochemical sensing applications. This paper also reports the ability of the sensor in detecting TNT vapour concentration down to less than six parts per billion with a sensitivity of 1 mV/ppb.

  12. Polymer nanocomposite nanomechanical cantilever sensors: material characterization, device development and application in explosive vapour detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seena, V; Fernandes, Avil; Ramgopal Rao, V [Centre for Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Pant, Prita [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Mukherji, Soumyo, E-mail: seenapradeep@iitb.ac.in, E-mail: rrao@ee.iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bio-engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-07-22

    This paper reports an optimized and highly sensitive piezoresistive SU-8 nanocomposite microcantilever sensor and its application for detection of explosives in vapour phase. The optimization has been in improving its electrical, mechanical and transduction characteristics. We have achieved a better dispersion of carbon black (CB) in the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistor and arrived at an optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration by performing a systematic mechanical and electrical characterization of polymer nanocomposites. Mechanical characterization of SU-8/CB nanocomposite thin films was performed using the nanoindentation technique with an appropriate substrate effect analysis. Piezoresistive microcantilevers having an optimum carbon black concentration were fabricated using a design aimed at surface stress measurements with reduced fabrication process complexity. The optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration has resulted in an improved sensitivity, low device variability and low noise level. The resonant frequency and spring constant of the microcantilever were found to be 22 kHz and 0.4 N m{sup -1} respectively. The devices exhibited a surface stress sensitivity of 7.6 ppm (mN m{sup -1}){sup -1} and the noise characterization results support their suitability for biochemical sensing applications. This paper also reports the ability of the sensor in detecting TNT vapour concentration down to less than six parts per billion with a sensitivity of 1 mV/ppb.

  13. Polymer nanocomposite nanomechanical cantilever sensors: material characterization, device development and application in explosive vapour detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seena, V; Fernandes, Avil; Pant, Prita; Mukherji, Soumyo; Rao, V Ramgopal

    2011-07-22

    This paper reports an optimized and highly sensitive piezoresistive SU-8 nanocomposite microcantilever sensor and its application for detection of explosives in vapour phase. The optimization has been in improving its electrical, mechanical and transduction characteristics. We have achieved a better dispersion of carbon black (CB) in the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistor and arrived at an optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration by performing a systematic mechanical and electrical characterization of polymer nanocomposites. Mechanical characterization of SU-8/CB nanocomposite thin films was performed using the nanoindentation technique with an appropriate substrate effect analysis. Piezoresistive microcantilevers having an optimum carbon black concentration were fabricated using a design aimed at surface stress measurements with reduced fabrication process complexity. The optimal range of 8-9 vol% CB concentration has resulted in an improved sensitivity, low device variability and low noise level. The resonant frequency and spring constant of the microcantilever were found to be 22 kHz and 0.4 N m(-1) respectively. The devices exhibited a surface stress sensitivity of 7.6 ppm (mN m(-1))(-1) and the noise characterization results support their suitability for biochemical sensing applications. This paper also reports the ability of the sensor in detecting TNT vapour concentration down to less than six parts per billion with a sensitivity of 1 mV/ppb.

  14. Applications of Monte Carlo technique in the detection of explosives, narcotics and fissile material using neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Amar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Roy, Tushar; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P.S.; Shukla, Mayank

    2009-01-01

    The problem of illicit trafficking of explosives, narcotics or fissile materials represents a real challenge to civil security. Neutron based detection systems are being actively explored worldwide as a confirmatory tool for applications in the detection of explosives either hidden inside a vehicle or a cargo container or buried inside soil. The development of a system and its experimental testing is a tedious process and to develop such a system each experimental condition needs to be theoretically simulated. Monte Carlo based methods are used to find an optimized design for such detection system. In order to design such systems, it is necessary to optimize source and detector system for each specific application. The present paper deals with such optimization studies using Monte Carlo technique for tagged neutron based system for explosives and narcotics detection hidden in a cargo and landmine detection using backscatter neutrons. We will also discuss some simulation studies on detection of fissile material and photo-neutron source design for applications on cargo scanning. (author)

  15. Detection of land mines by amplified fluorescence quenching of polymer films: a man-portable chemical sniffer for detection of ultratrace concentrations of explosives emanating from land mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Grone, Marcus J.; Cumming, Colin J.; Fisher, Mark E.; Fox, Michael J.; Jacob, Sheena; Reust, Dennis; Rockley, Mark G.; Towers, Eric

    2000-08-01

    The explosive charge within a landmine is the source for a mixture of chemical vapors that form a distinctive 'chemical signature' indicative of a landmine. The concentration of these compounds in the air over landmines is extremely low, well below the minimum detection limits of most field- portable chemical sensors. Described in this paper is a man- portable landmine detection system that has for the first time demonstrated the ability to detect landmines by direct sensing of the vapors of signature compounds in the air over landmines. The system utilizes fluorescent polymers developed by collaborators at the MIT. The sensor can detect ultra-trace concentrations of TNT vapor and other nitroaromatic compounds found in many landmine explosives. Thin films of the polymers exhibit intense fluorescence, but when exposed to vapors of nitroaromatic explosives the intensity of the light emitted from the films decreases. A single molecule of TNT binding to a receptor site quenches the fluorescence from many polymer repeat units, increasing the sensitivity by orders of magnitude. A sensor prototype has been develop that response in near real-time to low femtogram quantities of nitroaromatic explosives. The prototype is portable, lightweight, has low power consumption, is simple to operate, and is relatively inexpensive. Simultaneous field testing of the sensor and experienced canine landmine detection teams was recently completed. Although the testing was limited in scope, the performance of the senor met or exceeded that of the canines against buried landmines.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  17. Detection of Materials Used for Improvised Explosive Devices Employing D-T (14 MeV) Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, Anurag; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Das, Basanta

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased use of improvised explosive devices (IED), especially for human targets. One of the substances used in these devices is ammonium nitrate. Since this IED substance also contains elements - hydrogen (H), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), oxygen (O). The elemental density (of H, C, O, and N) and elemental density ratio (C/O, N/O, H/N etc) can be used to differentiate it from other substances. Neutrons based techniques are one of the methods for non-destructive these elemental characterization. For our experiments we are using two sealed neutron tubes. First tubes can produce 10 8 (maximum) D-T neutrons in ∼0.8 μs pulse and 100 (maximum) pulses can be generated per second. Second tube can produce (maximum) 10 10 D-T neutrons/s. The neutron output can be pulsed. Pulses of 1.5 μs duration and pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz to 10 kHz can be obtained. D-T neutrons pulses are impinged on ammonium nitrate samples (0.5 to 1.5 kg) and resultant gamma rays (prompt and due to activation) are recorded using sodium iodide (NaI) and bismuth germanium orthosilicate (BGO) scintillation detectors. To facilitate recording of high count rate a 2 GS/s high speed digitizer with large on board memory and high transfer rate has been used (instead of conventional multi channel analyzer). Preliminary results and analysis will be presented at the conference. To further refine the technique we are also developing a D-T neutron generator with associated particle detection facility. For this system we have already developed a penning ion source and a 140 kV battery operated SMPS. (author)

  18. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices by analysis of postblast residues using portable capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and indirect photometric detection with a light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Joseph P; Evenhuis, Christopher J; Johns, Cameron; Kazarian, Artaches A; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Miroslav; Hilder, Emily F; Guijt, Rosanne M; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-09-15

    A commercial portable capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument has been used to separate inorganic anions and cations found in postblast residues from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) of the type used frequently in terrorism attacks. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the type of explosive used. The CE instrument was modified for use with an in-house miniaturized light-emitting diode (LED) detector to enable sensitive indirect photometric detection to be employed for the detection of 15 anions (acetate, benzoate, carbonate, chlorate, chloride, chlorite, cyanate, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, phosphate, sulfate, thiocyanate, thiosulfate) and 12 cations (ammonium, monomethylammonium, ethylammonium, potassium, sodium, barium, strontium, magnesium, manganese, calcium, zinc, lead) as the target analytes. These ions are known to be present in postblast residues from inorganic IEDs constructed from ammonium nitrate/fuel oil mixtures, black powder, and chlorate/perchlorate/sugar mixtures. For the analysis of cations, a blue LED (470 nm) was used in conjunction with the highly absorbing cationic dye, chrysoidine (absorption maximum at 453 nm). A nonaqueous background electrolyte comprising 10 mM chrysoidine in methanol was found to give greatly improved baseline stability in comparison to aqueous electrolytes due to the increased solubility of chrysoidine and its decreased adsorption onto the capillary wall. Glacial acetic acid (0.7% v/v) was added to ensure chrysoidine was protonated and to enhance separation selectivity by means of complexation with transition metal ions. The 12 target cations were separated in less than 9.5 min with detection limits of 0.11-2.30 mg/L (calculated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The anions separation system utilized a UV LED (370 nm) in conjunction with an aqueous chromate electrolyte (absorption maximum at 371 nm) consisting of 10 mM chromium(VI) oxide and 10 mM sodium chromate, buffered with 40 mM tris

  19. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T. F. (Tai-Sen F.); Kwan, T. J. T. (Thomas J. T.)

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype. The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use an accelerator and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the requirements on the storage ring(s) with external gamma-ray-production target for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scatters with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron-cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reasonable parameter values indicate that it is possible to use no more than a few storage rings per inspection station in a practical NRA luggage inspection complex having more than ten inspection stations.

  20. A Novel Immunoreagent for the Specific and Sensitive Detection of the Explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Weller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Triacetone triperoxide (TATP is a primary explosive, which was used in various terrorist attacks in the past. For the development of biosensors, immunochemical µ-TAS, electronic noses, immunological test kits, or test strips, the availability of antibodies of high quality is crucial. Recently, we presented the successful immunization of mice, based on the design, synthesis, and conjugation of a novel TATP derivative. Here, the long-term immunization of rabbits is shown, which resulted in antibodies of extreme selectivity and more than 1,000 times better affinity in relation to the antibodies from mice. Detection limits below 10 ng L−1 (water were achieved. The working range covers more than four decades, calculated from a precision profile. The cross-reactivity tests revealed an extraordinary selectivity of the antibodies—not a single compound could be identified as a relevant cross-reactant. The presented immunoreagent might be a major step for the development of highly sensitive and selective TATP detectors particularly for security applications.

  1. Detection of Explosives in a Dynamic Marine Environment Using a Moored TNT Immunosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A field demonstration and longevity assessment for long-term monitoring of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT in a marine environment using an anti-TNT microfluidic immunosensor is described. The TNT immunosensor is comprised of a microfluidic device with 39 parallel microchannels (2.5 cm × 250 µm × 500 µm, L × W × D fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate (PMMA, then chemically functionalized with antibodies possessing a high affinity for TNT. Synthesized fluorescence reporter complexes used in a displacement-based assay format were used for TNT identification. For field deployment the TNT immunosensor was configured onto a submersible moored steel frame along with frame controller, pumps and TNT plume generator and deployed pier side for intermittent plume sampling of TNT (1h increments. Under varying current and tidal conditions trace levels of TNT in natural seawater were detected over an extended period (>18 h. Overnight operation and data recording was monitored via a web interface.

  2. A Novel Immunoreagent for the Specific and Sensitive Detection of the Explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Maria Astrid; Panne, Ulrich; Weller, Michael G

    2011-07-07

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is a primary explosive, which was used in various terrorist attacks in the past. For the development of biosensors, immunochemical µ-TAS, electronic noses, immunological test kits, or test strips, the availability of antibodies of high quality is crucial. Recently, we presented the successful immunization of mice, based on the design, synthesis, and conjugation of a novel TATP derivative. Here, the long-term immunization of rabbits is shown, which resulted in antibodies of extreme selectivity and more than 1,000 times better affinity in relation to the antibodies from mice. Detection limits below 10 ng L-1 (water) were achieved. The working range covers more than four decades, calculated from a precision profile. The cross-reactivity tests revealed an extraordinary selectivity of the antibodies-not a single compound could be identified as a relevant cross-reactant. The presented immunoreagent might be a major step for the development of highly sensitive and selective TATP detectors particularly for security applications.

  3. Development of a plug-type IMS-MS instrument and its applications in resolving problems existing in in-situ detection of illicit drugs and explosives by IMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenxia; Sun, Tangqiang; Zhao, Jianan; Wang, Di; Zhang, Zhongxia; Yu, Wenlian

    2018-07-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) which acts as a rapid analysis technique is widely used in the field detection of illicit drugs and explosives. Due to limited separation abilities of the pint-sized IMS challenges and problems still exist regarding high false positive and false negative responses due to the interference of the matrix. In addition, the gas-phase ion chemistry and special phenomena in the IMS spectra, such one substance showing two peaks, were not identified unambiguously. In order to explain or resolve these questions, in this paper, an ion mobility spectrometry was coupled to a mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). A commercial IMS is embedded in a custom-built ion chamber shell was attached to the mass spectrometer. The faraday plate of IMS was fabricated with a hole for the ions to passing through to the mass spectrometer. The ion transmission efficiency of IMS-MS was optimized by optimizing the various parameters, especially the distance between the faraday plate and the cone of mass spectrum. This design keeps the integrity of the two original instruments and the mass spectrometry still works with multimode ionization source (i.e., IMS-MS, ESI-MS, APCI-MS modes). The illicit drugs and explosive samples were analyzed by the IMS-MS with 63 Ni source. The results showed that the IMS-MS is of high sensitivity. The ionization mechanism of the illicit drug and explosive samples with 63 Ni source were systematically studied. In addition, the interferent which interfered the detection of cocaine was identified as dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by this platform. The reason why the acetone solution of amphetamine showed two peaks was explained. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of artificial neural networks in drug and explosive detection through tomographic images with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2009-01-01

    The artificial neural network technique was used to identify drugs and plastic explosives, from a tomography composed by a set of six neutrongraphic projections obtained in real time. Bidimensional tomographic images of samples of drugs, explosives and other materials, when digitally processed, yield the characteristic spectra of each type of material. The information contained in those spectra was then used for ANN training, the best images being obtained when the multilayer perceptron model, the back-propagation training algorithm and the Cross-validation interruption criterion were used. ANN showed to be useful in forecasting presence of drugs and explosives hitting a rate of success above 97 %. (author)

  5. Single ion hit detection set-up for the Zagreb ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. W.; Karlušić, M.; Jakšić, M.

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation of materials by heavy ions accelerated in MV tandem accelerators may lead to the production of latent ion tracks in many insulators and semiconductors. If irradiation is performed in a high resolution microprobe facility, ion tracks can be ordered by submicrometer positioning precision. However, full control of the ion track positioning can only be achieved by a reliable ion hit detection system that should provide a trigger signal irrespectively of the type and thickness of the material being irradiated. The most useful process that can be utilised for this purpose is emission of secondary electrons from the sample surface that follows the ion impact. The status report of the set-up presented here is based on the use of a channel electron multiplier (CEM) detector mounted on an interchangable sample holder that is inserted into the chamber in a close geometry along with the sample to be irradiated. The set-up has been tested at the Zagreb ion microprobe for different ions and energies, as well as different geometrical arrangements. For energies of heavy ions below 1 MeV/amu, results show that efficient (100%) control of ion impact can be achieved only for ions heavier than silicon. The successful use of the set-up is demonstrated by production of ordered single ion tracks in a polycarbonate film and by monitoring fluence during ion microbeam patterning of Foturan glass.

  6. Gas phase detection of explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, Gudrun; Hürttlen, Jürgen; Pontius, Heike; Hartlieb, Kerstin; Krause, Horst

    2007-05-15

    Fast, reliable and inexpensive analytical techniques for trace detection of explosive components are in high demand. Our approach is to develop specific sensor coating materials based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Despite the known inhibition of radical polymerisations by nitro groups and the known shrinkage of the polymer lattice during/after drying we were able to synthesize particulate MIPs by suspension polymerisation as well as thin MIP coatings by direct surface polymerisation on quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). The best method to purify the porous beads was Soxhlet extraction followed by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE with sc-CO2) at mild conditions (150 bar, 50 degrees C). At least a removal of >99.7% of the template was achieved. Performance tests of TNT imprinted polymer beads showed that acrylamide (AA) and more pronounced also methacrylic acid (MAA) possessed an enhanced adsorption tendency for gaseous TNT. An adsorption of 2,4-DNT, dinitrotoluene, by these MIPs was not detected. Using 2,4-DNT as template and methacrylamide, MAAM, a positive imprint effect for gaseous 2,4-DNT was achieved with no measurable cross-sensitivity for 2,4,6-TNT. The thin MIP coatings directly synthesized on the QCMs showed thicknesses of 20 to up to 500 nm. Preliminary screening experiments were performed for five different monomers and three different solvents (acetonitrile, chloroform and dimethylformamide). Best adsorption properties for TNT vapour until now showed a PAA-MIP synthesized with chloroform. Direct measurements of the mass attachment, respectively frequency decrease of the coated QCMs during vapour treatment showed a TNT-uptake of about 150 pg per microg MIP per hour. Results look worthy for further studies.

  7. Detection systems for radioactive ion beams; Systeme de detection en ions radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savajols, H

    2002-07-01

    Two main methods are used to produce radioactive ion beams: -) the ISOL method (isotope separation on-line) in which the stable beam interacts with a thick target, the reaction products diffuse outside the target and are transferred to a source where they are ionized, a mass separator and a post-accelerator drive the selected radioactive ions to the right energy; -) the in-flight fragmentation method in which the stable beam interacts with a thin target, the reaction products are emitted from the target with a restricted angular distribution and a velocity close to that of the incident beam, the experimenter has to take advantage from the reaction kinetics to get the right particle beam. Characteristic time is far longer with the ISOL method but the beam intensity is much better because of the use of a post-accelerator. In both cases, the beam intensity is lower by several orders of magnitude than in the case of a stable beam. This article presents all the constraints imposed by radioactive beams to the detection systems of the reaction products and gives new technical solutions according to the type of nuclear reaction studied. (A.C.)

  8. Detection of chloride ion concentration using chronopotentiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is reported for the electrochemical measurement of chloride ions using chronopotentiometry. A current pulse is applied at the Ag/AgCl working electrode and the potential change is measured with respect to another identical Ag/AgCl electrode in the bulk electrolyte.

  9. Functionalisation of the hinge region in receptor molecules for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2003-01-01

    The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuemei, Zhu; Jian, Zheng [The Third Research Inst. of Ministry of Public Security, Shanghai (China); Yongjie, Lv; Yangqin, Chen [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Optical and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, East China Normal Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2007-10-15

    A {sup 63}Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  11. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuemei; Zheng Jian; Lv Yongjie; Chen Yangqin

    2007-01-01

    A 63 Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  12. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  13. Accelerator-Detector Complex for Photonuclear Detection of Hidden Explosives Final Report CRADA No. TC2065.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brothers, L. J. [Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., Covington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort by Lawrence Livermore National Security (formerly the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., and the following Russian Institutes: P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Innovative Technologies Center.(AUO CIT), Central Design Bureau-Almas (CDB Almaz), Moscow Instrument Automation Research Institute, and Institute for High Energy Physics (IBEP) to develop equipment and procedures for detecting explosive materials concealed in airline checked baggage and cargo.

  14. Detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform for photothermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This manuscript describes the results of recent tests regarding standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform. We are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more microfabricated IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Increased sensitivity to explosives and selectivity between different analyte types is achieved by narrow bandpass IR filters in the collection path. We have previously demonstrated the technique at several meters of stand-off distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated. Analytes tested here include RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate and sucrose. The substrates tested in this current work include metal, plastics, glass and painted car panels.

  15. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  16. Continued development of a portable widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Klueva, Oksana; Tomas, David

    2014-05-01

    Passive, standoff detection of chemical, explosive and narcotic threats employing widefield, shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) continues to gain acceptance in defense and security fields. A robust and user-friendly portable platform with such capabilities increases the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to personnel. In 2013 ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) introduced Aperio, a handheld sensor, using real-time SWIR HSI for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics. That SWIR HSI system employed a liquid-crystal tunable filter for real-time automated detection and display of threats. In these proceedings, we report on a next generation device called VeroVision™, which incorporates an improved optical design that enhances detection performance at greater standoff distances with increased sensitivity and detection speed. A tripod mounted sensor head unit (SHU) with an optional motorized pan-tilt unit (PTU) is available for precision pointing and sensor stabilization. This option supports longer standoff range applications which are often seen at checkpoint vehicle inspection where speed and precision is necessary. Basic software has been extended to include advanced algorithms providing multi-target display functionality, automatic threshold determination, and an automated detection recipe capability for expanding the library as new threats emerge. In these proceedings, we report on the improvements associated with the next generation portable widefield SWIR HSI sensor, VeroVision™. Test data collected during development are presented in this report which supports the targeted applications for use of VeroVision™ for screening residue and bulk levels of explosive and drugs on vehicles and personnel at checkpoints as well as various applications for other secure areas. Additionally, we highlight a forensic application of the technology for assisting forensic

  17. Gas explosions and thermal runaways during external heating abuse of commercial lithium-ion graphite-LiCoO2 cells at different levels of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Bertilsson, Simon; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2018-01-01

    Commercial 6.8 Ah lithium-ion cells with different ageing/status have been abused by external heating in an oven. Prior to the abuse test, selected cells were aged either by C/2 cycling up to 300 cycles or stored at 60 °C. Gas emissions were measured by FTIR and three separate vents were identified, two well before the thermal runaway while the third occurred simultaneously with the thermal runaway releasing heavy smoke and gas. Emissions of toxic carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphorous oxyfluoride (POF3) were detected in the third vent, regardless if there was a fire or not. All abused cells went into thermal runaway and emitted smoke and gas, the working cells also released flames as well as sparks. The dead cells were however less reactive but still underwent thermal runaway. For about half of the working cells, for all levels of cycle ageing, ignition of the accumulated battery released gases occurred about 15 s after the thermal runaway resulting in a gas explosion. The thermal runaway temperature, about 190 °C, varied somewhat for the different cell ageing/status where a weak local minimum was found for cells cycled between 100 and 200 times.

  18. An explosive-emitter cathode produced using the heavy ion track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akap'ev, G.N.; Korenev, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    A cathode based on thin metallic foils with a homogeneous needle surface is described. The cathode was manufactured using the heavy ion track technique which permits the production of cathodes with an unlimited area and a needle density ranging from about 10 3 to 10 9 needles per cm 2 . An electron gun using this type of cathode has a current of 200-900 A and an energy of 100-300 keV. The cross section of the electron beam is fairly uniform. It is shown that needle emitters of similar shape and size play the principal role in forming a homogeneous cathode plasma

  19. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehayias, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a 'signature' of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min - compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives - but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly

  20. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  1. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  2. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  3. Internal short circuit and accelerated rate calorimetry tests of lithium-ion cells: Considerations for methane-air intrinsic safety and explosion proof/flameproof protection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubaniewicz, Thomas H; DuCarme, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studied the potential for lithium-ion cell thermal runaway from an internal short circuit in equipment for use in underground coal mines. In this third phase of the study, researchers compared plastic wedge crush-induced internal short circuit tests of selected lithium-ion cells within methane (CH 4 )-air mixtures with accelerated rate calorimetry tests of similar cells. Plastic wedge crush test results with metal oxide lithium-ion cells extracted from intrinsically safe evaluated equipment were mixed, with one cell model igniting the chamber atmosphere while another cell model did not. The two cells models exhibited different internal short circuit behaviors. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4 ) cell model was tolerant to crush-induced internal short circuits within CH 4 -air, tested under manufacturer recommended charging conditions. Accelerating rate calorimetry tests with similar cells within a nitrogen purged 353-mL chamber produced ignitions that exceeded explosion proof and flameproof enclosure minimum internal pressure design criteria. Ignition pressures within a 20-L chamber with 6.5% CH 4 -air were relatively low, with much larger head space volume and less adiabatic test conditions. The literature indicates that sizeable lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl 2 ) primary (non rechargeable) cell ignitions can be especially violent and toxic. Because ignition of an explosive atmosphere is expected within explosion proof or flameproof enclosures, there is a need to consider the potential for an internal explosive atmosphere ignition in combination with a lithium or lithium-ion battery thermal runaway process, and the resulting effects on the enclosure.

  4. Detection of gold cluster ions by ion-to-ion conversion using a CsI-converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.-T.; Novilkov, A.C.; Obnorskii, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Gold cluster ions in the m/z range of 10 4 -2 x 10 6 u were produced by bombarding a thin film of gold with 252 Cf-fission fragments. The gold covering a C-Al substrate formed islets having a mean diameter of 44 A. Their size- and mass-distribution was determined by means of electron microscopy. The main task was to measure the m/z distribution of the cluster ions ejected from the sample surface. For this purpose we built a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, which could be used as a linear TOF instrument or, alternatively, as a tandem-TOF instrument being equipped with an ion-to-ion converter. Combining the results obtained in both modes, it turned out that the linear TOF instrument equipped with micro-channel plates had a mean detection efficiency for 20 keV cluster ions of about 40%. In the tandem mode, the cluster ions hit a CsI converter with energies of 40z keV (z = charge state), from where secondary ions - mainly Cs + and (CsI) n Cs + cluster ions - were ejected. These ions were used to measure the TOF spectrum of the gold cluster ions. The detection efficiency of the cluster ions was found to vary in the available mass range from 99.7% to 96.5%. The complete mass distribution between 4 x 10 4 and 4 x 10 6 u was determined and compared with the corresponding mass distribution of the gold islets covering the substrate. (orig.)

  5. Coulomb explosion of “hot spot”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreshkin, V. I., E-mail: oreshkin@ovpe.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electrons, SB, RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, E. V. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chaikovsky, S. A. [Institute of High Current Electrons, SB, RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics, UD, RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Artyomov, A. P. [Institute of High Current Electrons, SB, RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed, and the estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  6. Coulomb explosion of “hot spot”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Oreshkin, E. V.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed, and the estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  7. Complementary scattered and recoiled ion data from TOF-E heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Stannard, W.B.; Bubb, I.F.; Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N.; Siegele, R.

    1998-01-01

    The advantage of Time of Flight and Energy (ToF-E) Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HIERDA) over Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis is its mass and energy dispersive capabilities. The mass resolution of ToF-E HIERDA deteriorates for very heavy elements. The limitation is related to the poor energy resolution of Si detectors for heavy ions. While the energy spectra from ToF-E HIERDA data are normally used to extract depth profiles, this work discusses the benefits of using the time spectra of both the recoiled and the scattered ions for depth profiling. The simulation of the complementary scattered and recoiled ion time spectra improves depth profiling and reduced current limitations when dealing with very heavy ions, such as Pt, Bi, Ta. (authors)

  8. A quantitative method to detect explosives and selected semivolatiles in soil samples by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapper-Gowdy, M.; Dermirgian, J.; Robitaille, G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a novel Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method that can be used to rapidly screen soil samples from potentially hazardous waste sites. Samples are heated in a thermal desorption unit and the resultant vapors are collected and analyzed in a long-path gas cell mounted in a FTIR. Laboratory analysis of a soil sample by FTIR takes approximately 10 minutes. This method has been developed to identify and quantify microgram concentrations of explosives in soil samples and is directly applicable to the detection of selected volatile organics, semivolatile organics, and pesticides

  9. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, J.S.; Davies, J.A.; Siegele, R.; Wallace, S.G.; Zelenitsky, D.

    1996-01-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as 209 Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass ≤100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  10. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: A Review of Applied Explosive Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    ammonium nitrate (AN)), and explosive primers and propellants ( potassium chlorate and ammonium perchlorate...trinitrotoulene, DNT = 2,4-dinitrotoluene, PETN = pentaerythritol tetranitrate, TATP = triacetone triperoxide, AN = ammonium nitrate, KClO3 = potassium chlorate ...Sucrose C12H22O11 Precursor Material Chlorate KClO3, NH4ClO4 Primer, Propellant Note: EGDM = ethylene glycol dinitrate, TNT = 2,4,6

  11. Fast neutron sensor for detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, Vladivoj; Sudac, Davorin; Matika, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Once the presence of the anomaly on the bottom of the shallow coastal sea water has been confirmed it is necessary to establish if it contains explosive or chemical warfare charge. We propose that this be performed by using neutron sensor installed within an underwater vessel. When positioned above the object, or to its side, the system can inspect the object for the presence of the threat materials by using alpha particle tagged neutrons from the sealed tube d+t neutron generator.

  12. Fast neutron sensor for detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkovic, Vladivoj [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: valkovic@irb.hr; Sudac, Davorin [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Matika, Dario [Institute for Researches and Development of Defense Systems, Ilica 256b, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-04-15

    Once the presence of the anomaly on the bottom of the shallow coastal sea water has been confirmed it is necessary to establish if it contains explosive or chemical warfare charge. We propose that this be performed by using neutron sensor installed within an underwater vessel. When positioned above the object, or to its side, the system can inspect the object for the presence of the threat materials by using alpha particle tagged neutrons from the sealed tube d+t neutron generator.

  13. Detecting and modeling persistent self-potential anomalies from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKague, H.L.; Kansa, E.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Self-potential anomalies are naturally occurring, nearly stationary electric fields that are detected by measuring the potential difference between two points on (or in) the ground. SP anomalies arise from a number of causes: principally electrochemical reactions, and heat and fluid flows. SP is routinely used to locate mineral deposits, geothermal systems, and zones of seepage. This paper is a progress report on our work toward detecting explosion-related SP signals at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in understanding the physics of these anomalies that persist and continue changing over periods of time that range from months to years. As background, we also include a brief description of how SP signals arise, and we mention their use in other areas such as exploring for geothermal resources and locating seepage through dams. Between the years 1988 and 1991, we surveyed the areas around seven underground nuclear tests for persistent SP anomalies. We not only detected anomalies, but we also found that various phenomena could be contributing to them and that we did not know which of these were actually occurring. We analyzed our new data with existing steady state codes and with a newly developed time-dependent thermal modeling code. Our results with the new code showed that the conductive decay of the thermal pulse from an underground nuclear test could produce many of the observed signals, and that others are probably caused by movement of fluid induced by the explosion. 25 refs

  14. Comparison of spatial frequency domain features for the detection of side attack explosive ballistics in synthetic aperture acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Josh; Anderson, Derek T.; Luke, Robert H.; Ball, John E.; Keller, James M.; Havens, Timothy C.

    2016-05-01

    Explosive hazards in current and former conflict zones are a threat to both military and civilian personnel. As a result, much effort has been dedicated to identifying automated algorithms and systems to detect these threats. However, robust detection is complicated due to factors like the varied composition and anatomy of such hazards. In order to solve this challenge, a number of platforms (vehicle-based, handheld, etc.) and sensors (infrared, ground penetrating radar, acoustics, etc.) are being explored. In this article, we investigate the detection of side attack explosive ballistics via a vehicle-mounted acoustic sensor. In particular, we explore three acoustic features, one in the time domain and two on synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) beamformed imagery. The idea is to exploit the varying acoustic frequency profile of a target due to its unique geometry and material composition with respect to different viewing angles. The first two features build their angle specific frequency information using a highly constrained subset of the signal data and the last feature builds its frequency profile using all available signal data for a given region of interest (centered on the candidate target location). Performance is assessed in the context of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on cross-validation experiments for data collected at a U.S. Army test site on different days with multiple target types and clutter. Our preliminary results are encouraging and indicate that the top performing feature is the unrolled two dimensional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of SAA beamformed imagery.

  15. Concept Study of Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stolarczyk, Larry

    1998-01-01

    ...) cannot detect non-metallic mines and detection sensitivity degrades in magnetic soil. Because metal detection sensitivity can be increased to detect low metal content in some non-metallic mines, some alarms significantly increase...

  16. Detection of high mass cluster ions sputtered from Bi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, A; Hewitt, R W; Slusser, G J; Baitinger, W E; Cooks, R G; Winograd, N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Delgass, W N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA); Varon, A; Devant, G [Societe RIBER, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1976-12-01

    The technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed to detect Bi/sup 3 +/ ions and associated oxides Bi/sub 3/Osub(x)sup(+)(x=1 to 4) from a Bi foil. Using a 3 keV Ar/sup +/ ion primary beam of 5x10/sup -7/ A/cm/sup 2/, mass resolution to nearly 700 with the requisite sensitivity has been achieved. The Bi surface was also monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). The presence of a weak O 1s peak at 532.7 eV and a strong SIMS Bi/sup 3 +/ peak is interpreted to mean that the oxygen is weakly incorporated into the Bi lattice without disrupting metal-metal bonds.

  17. A portable and autonomous multichannel fluorescence detector for on-line and in situ explosive detection in aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yunhong; Wang, Qi; Liu, Taihong; Wang, Lingling; Li, Jia; Fang, Yu

    2012-11-21

    A multichannel fluorescence detector used to detect nitroaromatic explosives in aqueous phase has been developed, which is composed of a five-channel sample-sensor unit, a measurement and control unit, a microcontroller, and a communication unit. The characteristics of the detector as developed are mainly embedded in the sensor unit, and each sensor consists of a fluorescent sensing film, a light emitting diode (LED), a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), and an optical module with special bandpass optical filters. Due to the high sensitivity of the sensing film, the small size and low cost of LED and MPPC, the developed detector not only has a better detecting performance and small size, but also has a very low cost - it is an alternative to the device made with an expensive high power lamp and photomultiplier tube. The wavelengths of the five sensors covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum, 370-640 nm, and thereby it possesses the potential to detect a variety of explosives and other hazardous materials in aqueous phase. An additional function of the detector is its ability to function via a wireless network, by which the data recorded by the detector can be sent to the host computer, and at the same time the instructions can be sent to the detector from the host computer. By means of the powerful computing ability of the host computer, and utilizing the classical principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm, effective classification of the analytes is achieved. Furthermore, the detector has been tested and evaluated using NB, PA, TNT and DNT as the analytes, and toluene, benzene, methanol and ethanol as interferent compounds (concentration various from 10 and 60 μM). It has been shown that the detector can detect the four nitroaromatics with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  18. An Electrochemical Sensor Based on Novel Ion Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Selective Detection of Lead Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghanei-Motlagh

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the novel surface ion-imprinted polymer (IIP particles were prepared and applied as a electrode modifier in stripping voltammetric detection of lead(II ion. A carbon paste electrode (CPE modified with IIP nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs was used for accumulation of toxic lead ions. Various factors that govern on electrochemical signals including carbon paste composition, pH of the preconcentration solution, supporting electrolyte, stirring time, reduction potential and time were studied in detail. The best electrochemical response for Pb(II ions was obtained with a paste composition of 7% (w/w of lead IIP, 10% MWCNTs, 53% (w/w of graphite powder and 30% (w/w of paraffin oil using a solution of 0.1 mol L-1 acetat buffer solution (pH=4.5 with a extraction time of 15 min. A sensitive response for Pb(II ions in the concentration range of 3 to 55 µg L-1 was achived. The proposed electrochemical sensor showed low detection limit (0.5 µg L-1, remarkable selectivity and good reproducibility (RSD = 3.1%. Determination of lead(II content in different environmental water samples was also realized adopting graphite furnace atomic absorptions spectrometry (GF-AAS and the obtained results were satisfactory.

  19. Effects of nanodiamonds of explosive synthesis on the skin of experimental animals locally exposed to cobalt and chrome ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorenkov, V I; Vasil'eva, E Yu; Puzyr', A P; Bondar', V S

    2014-12-01

    Experiments in vivo demonstrated the protective effect of modified nanodiamonds on guinea pig skin after local exposure cobalt ions, but not chrome ions. The observed differences are determined by different adsorption of these ions by nanodiamonds: in vitro experiments showed that nanodiamonds adsorbed cobalt ions, but not chrome ions from water solutions. The perspectives of using modified nanodiamonds as a new adsorbent for prevention of allergic contact dermatitis induced by ions of bivalent metals are discussed.

  20. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  1. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  2. Monte Carlo design of a system for the detection of explosive materials and analysis of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, P. L.; Medina C, D.; Rodriguez I, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    The problems associated with insecurity and terrorism have forced to designing systems for detecting nuclear materials, drugs and explosives that are installed on roads, ports and airports. Organic materials are composed of C, H, O and N; similarly the explosive materials are manufactured which can be distinguished by the concentration of these elements. Its elemental composition, particularly the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen, allow distinguish them from other organic substances. When these materials are irradiated with neutrons nuclear reactions (n, γ) are produced, where the emitted photons are ready gamma rays whose energy is characteristic of each element and its abundance allows estimating their concentration. The aim of this study was designed using Monte Carlo methods a system with neutron source, gamma rays detector and moderator able to distinguish the presence of Rdx and urea. In design were used as moderators: paraffin, light water, polyethylene and graphite; as detectors were used HPGe and the NaI(Tl). The design that showed the best performance was the moderator of light water and HPGe, with a source of 241 AmBe. For this design, the values of ambient dose equivalent around the system were calculated. (Author)

  3. Demonstrated Wavelength Portability of Raman Reference Data for Explosives and Chemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Raman spectroscopy continues to evolve, questions arise as to the portability of Raman data: dispersive versus Fourier transform, wavelength calibration, intensity calibration, and in particular the frequency of the excitation laser. While concerns about fluorescence arise in the visible or ultraviolet, most modern (portable systems use near-infrared excitation lasers, and many of these are relatively close in wavelength. We have investigated the possibility of porting reference data sets from one NIR wavelength system to another: We have constructed a reference library consisting of 145 spectra, including 20 explosives, as well as sundry other compounds and materials using a 1064 nm spectrometer. These data were used as a reference library to evaluate the same 145 compounds whose experimental spectra were recorded using a second 785 nm spectrometer. In 128 cases of 145 (or 88.3% including 20/20 for the explosives, the compounds were correctly identified with a mean “hit score” of 954 of 1000. Adding in criteria for when to declare a correct match versus when to declare uncertainty, the approach was able to correctly categorize 134 out of 145 spectra, giving a 92.4% accuracy. For the few that were incorrectly identified, either the matched spectra were spectroscopically similar to the target or the 785 nm signal was degraded due to fluorescence. The results indicate that imported data recorded at a different NIR wavelength can be successfully used as reference libraries, but key issues must be addressed: the reference data must be of equal or higher resolution than the resolution of the current sensor, the systems require rigorous wavelength calibration, and wavelength-dependent intensity response should be accounted for in the different systems.

  4. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  5. Detection of Nonvolatile Inorganic Oxidizer-Based Explosives from Wipe Collections by Infrared Thermal Desorption-Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward; Staymates, Matthew

    2018-05-07

    Infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) was coupled with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) for the detection of both inorganic and organic explosives from wipe collected samples. This platform generated discrete and rapid heating rates that allowed volatile and semivolatile organic explosives to thermally desorb at relatively lower temperatures, while still achieving elevated temperatures required to desorb nonvolatile inorganic oxidizer-based explosives. IRTD-DART-MS demonstrated the thermal desorption and detection of refractory potassium chlorate and potassium perchlorate oxidizers, compounds difficult to desorb with traditional moderate-temperature resistance-based thermal desorbers. Nanogram to sub-nanogram sensitivities were established for analysis of a range of organic and inorganic oxidizer-based explosive compounds, with further enhancement limited by the thermal properties of the most common commercial wipe materials. Detailed investigations and high-speed visualization revealed conduction from the heated glass-mica base plate as the dominant process for heating of the wipe and analyte materials, resulting in thermal desorption through boiling, aerosolization, and vaporization of samples. The thermal desorption and ionization characteristics of the IRTD-DART technique resulted in optimal sensitivity for the formation of nitrate adducts with both organic and inorganic species. The IRTD-DART-MS coupling and IRTD in general offer promising explosive detection capabilities to the defense, security, and law enforcement arenas.

  6. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  7. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E.N.M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  8. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  9. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  10. A metal-organic framework based on nanosized hexagonal channels as fluorescent indicator for detection of nitroaromatic explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xin-Long; Su, Zhong-Min

    2018-02-01

    A novel Zn-MOF (metal organic framework) [Zn3(NTB)2(DMA)2]·12DMA (NTB = 4,4‧,4″-nitrilotrisbenzoic acid; DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide) (1) was obtained under solvothermal condition. The resulted MOF which is based on {Zn3} SBU displays an interesting (3,6)-connected three-dimensional net with nanosized, hexagonal channels. Additionally, 1 can be a useful fluorescent indicator for the detection of nitroaromatic explosives qualitatively and quantitatively via a strong quenching effect, especially for picric acid (PA). With increasing - NO2 groups, energy transfer from the electron-donating framework to high electron deficiency becomes more, making the effect of fluorescence quenching more obvious. The result demonstrates that the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) is responsible for the emission quenching.

  11. Ion sensors based on novel fiber organic electrochemical transistors for lead ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuedan; Zhou, Zhou; Qing, Xing; Zhong, Weibing; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Fiber organic electrochemical transistors (FECTs) based on polypyrrole and nanofibers have been prepared for the first time. FECTs exhibited excellent electrical performances, on/off ratios up to 10(4) and low applied voltages below 2 V. The ion sensitivity behavior of the fiber organic electrochemical transistors was investigated. It exhibited that the transfer curve of FECTs shifted to lower gate voltage with increasing cations concentration, the sensitivity reached to 446 μA/dec in the 10(-5)-10(-2) M Pb(2+) concentration range. The ion selective properties of the FECTs have also been systematically studied for the detection of potassium, calcium, aluminum, and lead ions. The devices with different cations showed great difference in response curves. It was suitable for selectively monitoring Pb(2+) with respect to other cations. The results indicated FECTs were very effective for electrochemical sensing of lead ion, which opened a promising perspective for wearable electronics in healthcare and biological application. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of fiber organic electrochemical transistors based on polypyrrole and nanofibers for ion sensing.

  12. Portable Multispectral Colorimeter for Metallic Ion Detection and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Mauro S; Jaimes, Ruth F V V; Borysow, Walter; Gomes, Osmar F; Salcedo, Walter J

    2017-07-28

    This work deals with a portable device system applied to detect and classify different metallic ions as proposed and developed, aiming its application for hydrological monitoring systems such as rivers, lakes and groundwater. Considering the system features, a portable colorimetric system was developed by using a multispectral optoelectronic sensor. All the technology of quantification and classification of metallic ions using optoelectronic multispectral sensors was fully integrated in the embedded hardware FPGA ( Field Programmable Gate Array) technology and software based on virtual instrumentation (NI LabView ® ). The system draws on an indicative colorimeter by using the chromogen reagent of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). The results obtained with the signal processing and pattern analysis using the method of the linear discriminant analysis, allows excellent results during detection and classification of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Fe(III) and Ni(II) ions, with almost the same level of performance as for those obtained from the Ultravioled and visible (UV-VIS) spectrophotometers of high spectral resolution.

  13. Portable Multispectral Colorimeter for Metallic Ion Detection and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro S. Braga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a portable device system applied to detect and classify different metallic ions as proposed and developed, aiming its application for hydrological monitoring systems such as rivers, lakes and groundwater. Considering the system features, a portable colorimetric system was developed by using a multispectral optoelectronic sensor. All the technology of quantification and classification of metallic ions using optoelectronic multispectral sensors was fully integrated in the embedded hardware FPGA ( Field Programmable Gate Array technology and software based on virtual instrumentation (NI LabView®. The system draws on an indicative colorimeter by using the chromogen reagent of 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN. The results obtained with the signal processing and pattern analysis using the method of the linear discriminant analysis, allows excellent results during detection and classification of Pb(II, Cd(II, Zn(II, Cu(II, Fe(III and Ni(II ions, with almost the same level of performance as for those obtained from the Ultravioled and visible (UV-VIS spectrophotometers of high spectral resolution.

  14. Real-time, wide-area hyperspectral imaging sensors for standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Tazik, Shawna; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the detection and analysis of targets located within complex backgrounds. HSI can detect threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have size, weight, and power limitations that prohibit their use for field-portable and/or real-time applications. Current generation systems commonly provide an inefficient area search rate, require close proximity to the target for screening, and/or are not capable of making real-time measurements. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of real-time, wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize shortwave infrared (SWIR) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. SWIR HSI sensors provide wide-area imagery with at or near real time detection speeds. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focusing on sensor design and detection results.

  15. Techniques for the detection of photodesorbed negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.E.; Schweitzer, E.L.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Hurych, Z.; Soukiassian, P.; Bakshi, M.H.; Bommannavar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the direct observation of H - ions released from a Cs-dosed W(100) crystal by photon-stimulated desorption (PSD). This study utilized the 3m toroidal grating monochromator beamline at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Synchrotron Radiation Center. The main technical problem to be overcome in such experiments is the large background from photoemitted electrons which dominate the weak anion signal by many orders of magnitude. The solution ultimately employed utilized both magnetic suppression of photoelectrons and time-of-flight (TOF) mass separation. No internal modifications to the basic cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) were required. We are not aware of any previous reports of the detection of negative ions released from surfaces via photon bombardment, with the exception of high flux laser experiments, in which plasma formation is involved in the ionization process. 16 refs., 3 figs

  16. Detection of explosive cough events in audio recordings by internal sound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, B M; Mendes, L; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Carvalho, P; Paiva, R P

    2017-07-01

    We present a new method for the discrimination of explosive cough events, which is based on a combination of spectral content descriptors and pitch-related features. After the removal of near-silent segments, a vector of event boundaries is obtained and a proposed set of 9 features is extracted for each event. Two data sets, recorded using electronic stethoscopes and comprising a total of 46 healthy subjects and 13 patients, were employed to evaluate the method. The proposed feature set is compared to three other sets of descriptors: a baseline, a combination of both sets, and an automatic selection of the best 10 features from both sets. The combined feature set yields good results on the cross-validated database, attaining a sensitivity of 92.3±2.3% and a specificity of 84.7±3.3%. Besides, this feature set seems to generalize well when it is trained on a small data set of patients, with a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and tested on a bigger data set of mostly healthy subjects: a sensitivity of 93.4% and a specificity of 83.4% are achieved in those conditions. These results demonstrate that complementing the proposed feature set with a baseline set is a promising approach.

  17. Less is more: Avoiding the LIBS dimensionality curse through judicious feature selection for explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Myakalwar, Ashwin; Spegazzini, Nicolas; Zhang, Chi; Kumar Anubham, Siva; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Barman, Ishan; Kumar Gundawar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic advantages, translation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for material identification has been often impeded by the lack of robustness of developed classification models, often due to the presence of spurious correlations. While a number of classifiers exhibiting high discriminatory power have been reported, efforts in establishing the subset of relevant spectral features that enable a fundamental interpretation of the segmentation capability and avoid the ‘curse of dimensionality’ have been lacking. Using LIBS data acquired from a set of secondary explosives, we investigate judicious feature selection approaches and architect two different chemometrics classifiers –based on feature selection through prerequisite knowledge of the sample composition and genetic algorithm, respectively. While the full spectral input results in classification rate of ca.92%, selection of only carbon to hydrogen spectral window results in near identical performance. Importantly, the genetic algorithm-derived classifier shows a statistically significant improvement to ca. 94% accuracy for prospective classification, even though the number of features used is an order of magnitude smaller. Our findings demonstrate the impact of rigorous feature selection in LIBS and also hint at the feasibility of using a discrete filter based detector thereby enabling a cheaper and compact system more amenable to field operations. PMID:26286630

  18. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae; An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field

  19. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop [Wooju Communication and Technology Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field.

  20. Sensitive detection of plastic explosives with self-assembled monolayer-coated microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, L. A.; Boiadjiev, V.; Hawk, J. E.; Thundat, T.

    2003-08-01

    We report the detection of 10-30 parts-per-trillion levels of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine within 20 s of exposure to a silicon microcantilever with its gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. These measurements correspond to a limit of detection of a few fg.

  1. Evaluation of the uncertainty in the azimuth calculation for the detection and localization of atmospheric nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Low-frequency acoustic signal below about 1 Hz can travel for hundreds or thousands of kilometers through in the Earth atmosphere. If a source produces infrasonic energy, it can be detected by a remote sensor. Atmospheric strong explosions as the nuclear detonation contains low-frequency components that can travel long distances with measurable signal levels. This fact can be useful for detection and localization of clandestine events. The international regime on the non-proliferation of nuclear requires the ability to detect, localize, and discriminate nuclear events on a global scale. Monitoring systems such as the Inter national Monitoring System (I.M.S.) rely on several sensor technologies to perform these functions. The current I.M.S. infra sound system design includes a network of low-frequency atmospheric acoustic sensor arrays, which contribute primarily to the detection and localization of atmospheric nuclear events. There have been observed differences between the azimuth measurements and the true directions of the sources of infra sound waves in artificial and natural events such as explosive eruptions of strong volcanoes. The infra sound waves are reflected in stratospheric and thermospheric layers near 50 km and 120 km in height respectively. The azimuth deviation is affected by meteorological disturbances in the troposphere and stratosphere. This paper describe new elements to obtain the uncertainty in the azimuth calculation of arrival wave plane passing across of a not plane array of infra sound sensors. It also presents a 3D computation of infra sound propagation and estimation of the azimuth deviation using the zonal horizontal wind model and M.S.I.S.E.-90 model of the upper atmosphere to obtain temperature, density and concentration of the principal components of the air for altitudes of up to 120 km. Deviations of up to 12 degrees in the azimuth were obtained, depending on the location of the source of infra sound, the point of measurement and

  2. Multiple scattering problems in heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Stannard, W.B.; Bubb, I.F.; Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N.; Siegele, R.

    1998-01-01

    A number of groups use Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HIERDA) to study materials science problems. Nevertheless, there is no standard methodology for the analysis of HIERDA spectra. To overcome this deficiency we have been establishing codes for 2-dimensional data analysis. A major problem involves the effects of multiple and plural scattering which are very significant, even for quite thin (∼100 nm) layers of the very heavy elements. To examine the effects of multiple scattering we have made comparisons between the small-angle model of Sigmund et al. and TRIM calculations. (authors)

  3. Surface Coatings as Xenon Diffusion Barriers for Improved Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon detection systems, used within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). One type of radioxenon detection systems used in this context is the Swedish SAUNA system. This system uses a cylindrical plastic scintillator cell to measure the beta decay from radioxenon isotopes. The detector cell also acts as a container...

  4. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  5. Colorimetric-based detection of TNT explosives using functionalized silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idros, Noorhayati; Ho, Man Yi; Pivnenko, Mike; Qasim, Malik M; Xu, Hua; Gu, Zhongze; Chu, Daping

    2015-06-03

    This proof-of-concept study proposes a novel sensing mechanism for selective and label-free detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). It is realized by surface chemistry functionalization of silica nanoparticles (NPs) with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES). The primary amine anchored to the surface of the silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NH2) acts as a capturing probe for TNT target binding to form Meisenheimer amine-TNT complexes. A colorimetric change of the self-assembled (SAM) NP samples from the initial green of a SiO2-NH2 nanoparticle film towards red was observed after successful attachment of TNT, which was confirmed as a result of the increased separation between the nanoparticles. The shift in the peak wavelength of the reflected light normal to the film surface and the associated change of the peak width were measured, and a merit function taking into account their combined effect was proposed for the detection of TNT concentrations from 10-12 to 10-4 molar. The selectivity of our sensing approach is confirmed by using TNT-bound nanoparticles incubated in AptamerX, with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and toluene used as control and baseline, respectively. Our results show the repeatable systematic color change with the TNT concentration and the possibility to develop a robust, easy-to-use, and low-cost TNT detection method for performing a sensitive, reliable, and semi-quantitative detection in a wide detection range.

  6. Effect of the neutral charge fraction in the Coulomb explosion of H2+ ions through aluminum foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, Cristian D.; Abril, Isabel; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Lantschner, Gerardo H.; Eckardt, Juan C.; Arista, Netor R.

    2002-01-01

    The Coulomb explosion of the proton fragments dissociated from H 2 + molecules moving through thin aluminum foils has been studied by means of their energy spectra, measured in the forward direction, and by computer simulations. The covered energy range goes from 25 to 100 keV/u. Estimations of the neutral charge fraction of the fragments inside the foil have been obtained by comparison of the experimental energy spectra with the computer simulations

  7. Effect of the neutral charge fraction in the Coulomb explosion of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions through aluminum foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Cristian D. E-mail: cdenton@fis.utfsm.cl; Abril, Isabel; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Lantschner, Gerardo H.; Eckardt, Juan C.; Arista, Netor R

    2002-06-01

    The Coulomb explosion of the proton fragments dissociated from H{sub 2}{sup +} molecules moving through thin aluminum foils has been studied by means of their energy spectra, measured in the forward direction, and by computer simulations. The covered energy range goes from 25 to 100 keV/u. Estimations of the neutral charge fraction of the fragments inside the foil have been obtained by comparison of the experimental energy spectra with the computer simulations.

  8. Design and fabrication of optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives based on fluorescence quenching of phenol red immobilized poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ali Reza; Ghazanchayi, Behnam

    2016-04-01

    The present study developed a new optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives in liquid phase. The method is based on the fluorescence quenching of phenol red as fluorophore in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane in the presence of nitroaromatic explosives as quenchers, e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 4-nitrotoluene (4-NT), 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and nitrobenzene (NB). For chemical immobilization of phenol red in PVA, phenol red reacted with formaldehyde to produce hydroxymethyl groups and then attached to PVA membrane through the hydroxymethyl groups. The optical sensor showed strong quenching of nitroaromatic explosives. A Stern-Volmer graph for each explosive was constructed and showed that the range of concentration from 5.0 × 10(-6) to 2.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) was linear for each explosive and sensitivity varied as TNB >TNT>2,4-DNT>NB>4-NT. The response time of the sensor was within 1 min. The proposed sensor showed good reversibility and reproducibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Concept Study of Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-20

    surface feature removal can be achieved in LMR images. Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Solicitation Topic 97T006 Mufi -Sensor Detection...divided by the applied voltage. This is mathematically given by: 00 Y-I-G+jB = 1o+2E’. COS m4; m1l 1-1 = j120 72(+a) where G = the input conductance...of detector operation that are incorporated into a mathematical algorithm to convert detector impedance characteristics into recognizable indicators

  10. Detection and identification of explosives and illicit drugs using neutron based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, A.; Csikai, J.; Debrecen University,

    2011-01-01

    Some methods developed in collaboration between the ATOMKI and IEP for bulk hydrogen analysis and for the detection and identification of illicit drugs are presented. Advantages and limitations of neutron techniques (reflection, transmission, elastic and inelastic scatterings, leakage spectra and angular yields of Be(d,n), Pu-Be, D-D, D-T and 252 Cf neutrons transmitted from thick samples, effects of hidden materials) are discussed. (author)

  11. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senesac, Larry R.; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective...... layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate...

  12. Fluorescent probes for detection of picric acid explosive: A greener approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Sudesna; Gogoi, Bedanta; Sen Sarma, Neelotpal, E-mail: neelot@iasst.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Green materials with advantages of low cost and high sensitivity are important from the perspective of human health, environment and homeland security. Herein, we have reported two cost effective modified biomaterials as fluorophores for detection of Picric acid in aqueous state. The biomaterials Scutellarin–Hispiduloside and Curcumin have been modified with green solvent glycerol for Picric acid detection in aqueous solution. The limit of detection for Picric acid by Scutellarin–Hispiduloside–glycerol and Curcumin–glycerol are 9.1×10{sup −8} M and 6.03×10{sup −8} M respectively. These luminescence based sensors have also been able to detect Picric acid in real samples with high efficiency. The fluorescence quenching efficiency of Scutellarin–Hispiduloside–glycerol has been found to be 99% while that for Curcumin–glycerol, it is 88.9% for 0.5 µM Picric acid in aqueous state. In both the cases, the quenching is governed by FRET between the fluorophore and the quencher and the FRET efficiency has been found to be 0.968 and 0.792 respectively. In addition, both the systems show excellent selectivity towards PA in presence of other nitroaromatic compounds and are also statistically accessible. The utilization of readily available cheap biomaterials without using multistep protocol for synthesis and devoid of any kind of sophisticated equipments for the processs further enhances the utility of the method. - Highlights: • Environmentally benign systems – Scutellarin, Hispiduloside and curcumin with green solvent glycerol – have been used for Picric acid sensing. • The method is simple and cost effective with a detection limit for CIG and CG found to be 9.1×10−8 M and 6.03×10−8 M of PA respectively. • Both the sensing systems were found to be highly selective for Picric acid in the presence of structurally similar compounds. • The quenching occurs by FRET between the fluorophore and the quencher and the FRET efficiency is determined

  13. Ion trace detection algorithm to extract pure ion chromatograms to improve untargeted peak detection quality for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, San-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-03-03

    Able to detect known and unknown metabolites, untargeted metabolomics has shown great potential in identifying novel biomarkers. However, elucidating all possible liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) ion signals in a complex biological sample remains challenging since many ions are not the products of metabolites. Methods of reducing ions not related to metabolites or simply directly detecting metabolite related (pure) ions are important. In this work, we describe PITracer, a novel algorithm that accurately detects the pure ions of a LC/TOF-MS profile to extract pure ion chromatograms and detect chromatographic peaks. PITracer estimates the relative mass difference tolerance of ions and calibrates the mass over charge (m/z) values for peak detection algorithms with an additional option to further mass correction with respect to a user-specified metabolite. PITracer was evaluated using two data sets containing 373 human metabolite standards, including 5 saturated standards considered to be split peaks resultant from huge m/z fluctuation, and 12 urine samples spiked with 50 forensic drugs of varying concentrations. Analysis of these data sets show that PITracer correctly outperformed existing state-of-art algorithm and extracted the pure ion chromatograms of the 5 saturated standards without generating split peaks and detected the forensic drugs with high recall, precision, and F-score and small mass error.

  14. External Second Gate, Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Parametric Optimization for Detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E. Tarver

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. [1] In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. [2] The problem with conventional (signal averaging IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives. With external second gate, Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters (scan time and sampling rate to increase the spectral resolution to reduce false alarms and improve the sensitivity for early warning and contamination avoidance. In addition, with FT-IMS the entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a seven-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  15. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosives detection system made up with a D-D neutron generator and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos Robalino, Lenin E; García Fernández, Gonzalo Felipe; Gallego, Eduardo; Guzmán-García, Karen A; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2018-02-17

    Detection of hidden explosives is of utmost importance for homeland security. Several configurations of an Explosives Detection System (EDS) to intercept hidden threats, made up with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) compact neutron generator and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated using MCNP6 code. The system's response to various samples of explosives, such as RDX and Ammonium Nitrate, is analysed. The D-D generator is able to produce fast neutrons with 2.5 MeV energy in a maximum yield of 10 10 n/s. It is surrounded by high-density polyethylene to thermalize the fast neutrons and to optimize interactions with the sample inspected, whose emission of gamma rays gives a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it. This procedure allows to determine its chemical composition and to identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate its thicknesses depending on the admissible dose of operation, using lead and polyethylene. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for explosives inspection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microphotonic sensors for the rapid detection of the presence of explosive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2002-02-01

    A first generation, microphotonic sensor for rapid (10 ms response time) measurement of vapors from the hydrocarbon-based fuels JP-8, DF-2, and gasoline has been developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. This sensor is based upon a previously reported laser mixing technique that uses two tunable diode lasers emitting in the near-infrared spectral region to measure concentrations of gases having unstructured absorption spectra. The fiber-mixed laser beam consists of two wavelengths, one of which is absorbed by the fuel vapor, and one of which is not absorbed. By sinusoidally modulating the power of the two lasers at the same frequency but 180 degrees out of phase, a sinusoidal signal is generated at the detector (when the target gas is present in the line of sight). The signal amplitude, measured using standard phase sensitive detection techniques, is proportional to fuel vapor concentration. A second generation sensor, designed to measure the full envelope of the first overtone C-H vibrations in middle distillate fuels is currently being developed. Both sensors are described. Limits of detection using the first generation sensor are reported for vapors of the three fuels studied.

  17. Detection of the spectroscopic signatures of explosives and their degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Vivian; Cabanzo, Andrea; Baez, Bibiana; Correa, Sandra; Irrazabal, Maik; Briano, Julio G.; Castro, Miguel E.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2005-06-01

    Detection and removal of antipersonnel and antitank landmines is a great challenge and a worldwide enviromental and humanitarian problem. Sensors tuned on the spectroscopic signature of the chemicals released from mines are a potential solution. Enviromental factors (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall precipitation, wind, sun irradiation, pressure, etc.) as well as soil characteristics (water content, compaction, porosity, chemical composition, particle size distribution, topography, vegetation, etc), have a direct impact on the fate and transport of the chemicals released from landmines. Chemicals such as TNT, DNT and their degradation products, are semi-volatile, and somewhat soluble in water. Also, they may adsorb strongly to soil particles, and are susceptible to degradation by microorganisms, light, or chemical agents. Here we show an experimental procedure to quantify the effect of the above variables on the spectroscopic signature. A number of soil tanks under controlled conditions are used to study the effect of temperature, water content, relative humidity and light radiation.

  18. Picomolar detection limits with current-polarized Pb2+ ion-selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergel, E; Gyurcsányi, R E; Tóth, K; Lindner, E

    2001-09-01

    Minor ion fluxes across ion-selective membranes bias submicromolar activity measurements with conventional ion-selective electrodes. When ion fluxes are balanced, the lower limit of detection is expected to be dramatically improved. As proof of principle, the flux of lead ions across an ETH 5435 ionophore-based lead-selective membrane was gradually compensated by applying a few nanoamperes of galvanostatic current. When the opposite ion fluxes were matched, and the undesirable leaching of primary ions was eliminated, Nernstian response down to 3 x 10(-12) M was achieved.

  19. Detection of explosives and other illicit materials by a single nanosecond neutron pulses - Monte-Carlo simulations of the detection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklaszewski, R.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Dworak, D.; Gribkov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects (explosives and other illicit materials) by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method is based on the well know fact that nuclide-specific information is present in the scattered neutron field. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of few nanoseconds, generated by a dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with a pure deuterium or deuterium-tritium mixture as a working gas. Very short duration of the neutron pulse, its high brightness and mono-chromaticity allow to use the time-of-flight method with bases of about few meters to distinguish signals from neutrons scattered by different elements. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the scattered neutron field from several compounds (explosives and everyday use materials) are presented in the paper. The MCNP5 code has been used to get information on the angular and energy distributions of the neutrons scattered by the above mentioned compounds assuming the initial neutron energy equal to 2.45 MeV (D-D). A new input has been elaborated that allows the modelling of not only a spectrum of the neutrons scattered at different angles but also their time history from the moment of generation up to detection. Such an approach allows getting approximate signals as registered by scintillator + photomultiplier probes placed at various distances from the scattering object, demonstrating a principal capability of the method to identify an elemental content of the inspected objects. Preliminary results of the MCNP modelling of the interrogation process of the airport luggage containing several illicit objects are presented as well. (authors)

  20. Percolation under noise: Detecting explosive percolation using the second-largest component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viles, Wes; Ginestet, Cedric E.; Tang, Ariana; Kramer, Mark A.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of distinguishing between different rates of percolation under noise. A statistical model of percolation is constructed allowing for the birth and death of edges as well as the presence of noise in the observations. This graph-valued stochastic process is composed of a latent and an observed nonstationary process, where the observed graph process is corrupted by type-I and type-II errors. This produces a hidden Markov graph model. We show that for certain choices of parameters controlling the noise, the classical (Erdős-Rényi) percolation is visually indistinguishable from a more rapid form of percolation. In this setting, we compare two different criteria for discriminating between these two percolation models, based on the interquartile range (IQR) of the first component's size, and on the maximal size of the second-largest component. We show through data simulations that this second criterion outperforms the IQR of the first component's size, in terms of discriminatory power. The maximal size of the second component therefore provides a useful statistic for distinguishing between different rates of percolation, under physically motivated conditions for the birth and death of edges, and under noise. The potential application of the proposed criteria for the detection of clinically relevant percolation in the context of applied neuroscience is also discussed.

  1. The performance of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for liquid explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Paul W.; Maskall, Guy; Bonthron, Stuart; Bloomfield, Matthew; Tombling, Craig; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Aviation security requirements adopted in 2014 require liquids to be screened at most airports throughout Europe, North America and Australia. Cobalt's unique Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS™) technology has proven extremely effective at screening liquids, aerosols and gels (LAGS) with extremely low false alarm rates. SORS is compatible with a wide range of containers, including coloured, opaque or clear plastics, glass and paper, as well as duty-free bottles in STEBs (secure tamper-evident bags). Our award-winning Insight range has been specially developed for table-top screening at security checkpoints. Insight systems use our patented SORS technology for rapid and accurate chemical analysis of substances in unopened non-metallic containers. Insight100M™ and the latest member of the range - Insight200M™ - also screen metallic containers. Our unique systems screen liquids, aerosols and gels with the highest detection capability and lowest false alarm rates of any ECAC-approved scanner, with several hundred units already in use at airports including eight of the top ten European hubs. This paper presents an analysis of real performance data for these systems.

  2. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  3. Donor free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  4. A route to explosive large-scale magnetic reconnection in a super-ion-scale current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available How to trigger magnetic reconnection is one of the most interesting and important problems in space plasma physics. Recently, electron temperature anisotropy (αeo=Te⊥/Te|| at the center of a current sheet and non-local effect of the lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI that develops at the current sheet edges have attracted attention in this context. In addition to these effects, here we also study the effects of ion temperature anisotropy (αio=Ti⊥/Ti||. Electron anisotropy effects are known to be helpless in a current sheet whose thickness is of ion-scale. In this range of current sheet thickness, the LHDI effects are shown to weaken substantially with a small increase in thickness and the obtained saturation level is too low for a large-scale reconnection to be achieved. Then we investigate whether introduction of electron and ion temperature anisotropies in the initial stage would couple with the LHDI effects to revive quick triggering of large-scale reconnection in a super-ion-scale current sheet. The results are as follows. (1 The initial electron temperature anisotropy is consumed very quickly when a number of minuscule magnetic islands (each lateral length is 1.5~3 times the ion inertial length form. These minuscule islands do not coalesce into a large-scale island to enable large-scale reconnection. (2 The subsequent LHDI effects disturb the current sheet filled with the small islands. This makes the triggering time scale to be accelerated substantially but does not enhance the saturation level of reconnected flux. (3 When the ion temperature anisotropy is added, it survives through the small island formation stage and makes even quicker triggering to happen when the LHDI effects set-in. Furthermore the saturation level is seen to be elevated by a factor of ~2 and large-scale reconnection is achieved only in this case. Comparison with two-dimensional simulations that exclude the LHDI effects confirms that the saturation level

  5. Detecting yocto (10-24) newton forces with trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a calibrated measurement of 174 Yoctonewton using a cloud of 60 9 Be+ ion confined in a Penning ion trap. These measurements suggest that ion traps may form the basis of a new class of ultrasensitive deployable force sensors....

  6. Stellar explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.

    1987-01-01

    What is the energy source and which physical processes are powerful enough to generate this explosion which scatters the star. The knowledge progress of very dense matter allows the scenario reconstitution. An instability in the star core which is developing during milliseconds is the cause of this explosion [fr

  7. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  8. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications - a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+.

  9. Development of sensitive holographic devices for physiological metal ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabad-e.-Gul; Martin, Suzanne; Cassidy, John; Naydenova, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The development of selective alkali metal ions sensors in particular is a subject of significant interest. In this respect, the level of blood electrolytes, particularly H+, Na+, K+ and Cl- , is widely used to monitor aberrant physiologies associated with pulmonary emphysema, acute and chronic renal failure, heart failure, diabetes. The sensors reported in this paper are created by holographic recording of surface relief structures in a self-processing photopolymer material. The structures are functionalized by ionophores dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DC) and tetraethyl 4-tert-butylcalix[4]arene (TBC) in plasticised polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. Interrogation of these structures by light allows indirect measurements of chemical analytes' concentration in real time. We present results on the optimisation and testing of the holographic sensor. A self-processing acrylamide-based photopolymer was used to fabricate the required photonic structures. The performance of the sensors for detection of K+ and Na+ was investigated. It was observed that the functionalisation with DC provides a selective response of the devices to K+ over Na+ and TBC coated surface structures are selectively sensitive to Na+. The sensor responds to Na+ within the physiological ranges. Normal levels of Na+ and K+ in human serum lie within the ranges 135-148mM and 3.5-5.3 mM respectively.

  10. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    OpenAIRE

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2015-01-01

    The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off) the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectiv...

  11. Ultrashort laser-pulse diagnostics for detection of ordering within an ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Lenisa, P.; Mariotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    A novel diagnostic method to detect ordering within one-dimensional ion beams in a storage ring is presented. The ions are simultaneously excited by a ultrashort pulsed laser (≅1 ps) at two different locations along the beam and fluorescence is detected by a group of four photomultipliers. Correlation in fluorescence signals is a firm indication that the ion beam has an ordered structure. (orig.)

  12. Trace detection of organic compounds in complex sample matrixes by single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry: real-time detection of security-relevant compounds and online analysis of the coffee-roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Kürten, Andreas; Hölzer, Jasper; Mitschke, Stefan; Mühlberger, Fabian; Sklorz, Martin; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas; Pütz, Michael; Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Schultze, Rainer; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    An in-house-built ion trap mass spectrometer combined with a soft ionization source has been set up and tested. As ionization source, an electron beam pumped vacuum UV (VUV) excimer lamp (EBEL) was used for single-photon ionization. It was shown that soft ionization allows the reduction of fragmentation of the target analytes and the suppression of most matrix components. Therefore, the combination of photon ionization with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) capability of an ion trap yields a powerful tool for molecular ion peak detection and identification of organic trace compounds in complex matrixes. This setup was successfully tested for two different applications. The first one is the detection of security-relevant substances like explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agents. One test substance from each of these groups was chosen and detected successfully with single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (SPI-ITMS) MS/MS measurements. Additionally, first tests were performed, demonstrating that this method is not influenced by matrix compounds. The second field of application is the detection of process gases. Here, exhaust gas from coffee roasting was analyzed in real time, and some of its compounds were identified using MS/MS studies.

  13. Femtosecond Laser Fabricated Ag@Au and Cu@Au Alloy Nanoparticles for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Based Trace Explosives Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moram Sree Satya Bharati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present results from our detailed studies on the fabrication of Ag@Au and Cu@Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs using the femtosecond laser ablation in liquid technique. The NPs were obtained by ablating the pure Ag, Cu targets (bulk in HAuCl4 (5 mM solution. The absorption properties of the obtained NPs colloids were characterized using UV-Visible absorption spectrometer and their size, shape, and crystallinity were investigated using the XRD, FESEM and TEM techniques. The fabricated NPs were utilized for sensing of explosive molecules such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PA, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT and a common dye methylene blue (MB using the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS technique. The detection limit in terms of weight was as low as few nano-grams in the case of nitroaromatic explosive compounds (PA, DNT and few picograms in the case of a common dye molecule (MB. Typical enhancement factors achieved were estimated to be ~104, ~105, and ~107, respectively, for PA, DNT, and MB. The significance of the present work lies in exploring the performance of the prepared NPs being used as SERS substrates for explosives detection using a portable Raman instrument. Such capability enables one to carry the spectrometer to the point of interest in the field and evaluate any hazardous samples within a short period of time.

  14. Near infrared optical biosensor based on peptide functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrids for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2018-06-01

    A near infrared (NIR) optical biosensor based on peptide functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) hybrids for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive detection was developed. The TNT binding peptide was directly anchored on the sidewall of the SWCNTs using the π-π interaction between the aromatic amino acids and SWCNTs, forming the peptide-SWCNTs hybrids for near infrared absorption spectra measurement. The evidence of the morphology of peptide-SWCNTs hybrids was obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results demonstrated that peptide-SWCNTs hybrids based NIR optical biosensor exhibited sensitive and highly selective for TNT explosive determination, addressing a promising optical biosensor for security application. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  16. Microwave receivers for fast-ion detection in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtula, V.

    2012-02-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are to determine fundamental properties of a millimeter wave radiometer used to detect radiation associated with dynamics of fast ions and to investigate possibilities for improvements and new designs. The detection of fast ions is based on a principle called collective Thomson scattering (CTS). The Danish CTS group has been involved in fusion plasma experiments for more than 10 years and the future plans will most probably include the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current CTS systems designed by the Danish group are specified for the frequency range from 100 to 110 GHz. In this thesis we follow the path of the radiation from a fusion plasma to the data acquisition unit. Firstly, the scattered radiation passes through the quasi-optical system. Quasi-optical elements required to be installed on the high field side (HFS) on the ITER are assessed. For the ITER HFS receiver we have designed and measured the quasi-optical components that form a transmission link between the plasma and the radio frequency (RF) electronics. This HFS receiver is required to resolve the near parallel velocity components created by the alpha particles. Secondly, the radiation will encounter the RF part. This part is not yet designed for ITER, but instead the solution is addressed to the CTS receiver installed at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG).We have put effort to thoroughly examine and evaluate the performance of the receiver components and the receiver as an assembled unit. We have measured and analyzed all the receiver components starting from the two notch filters to the fifty square-law detector diodes. The receiver sensitivity is calculated from the system measurements and compared with the expected sensitivity based on the individual component measurements. Besides the system considerations we have also studied improvements of two critical components of the receiver. The first component is the notch filter, which is needed to block

  17. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sheath-lens probe for negative ion detection in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamate, E.; Sugai, H.; Takai, O.; Ohe, K.

    2004-01-01

    A method that allows easy and inexpensive detection of negative ions is introduced. The method is based upon the electrostatic lens effect of the sheath layer evolving to a positively biased planar probe that focuses the negative charges to distinct regions on the surface. Trajectories of negative ions inside the sheath are obtained after computing the potential and electric field distribution by solving in three dimensions the nonlinear Poisson equation. The negative ions' flux to square and disk probes is developed in Ar/SF 6 and O 2 plasmas. The method allows negative ion detection with sensitivity higher than that of Langmuir probes

  1. A compact quadrupole ion filter for helium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A compact quadrupole ion filter was conceived and constructed for optimum performance at the mass four region of the mass spectra. It was primarely designed for geological applications in the measurements of helium of soil-gases. The whole ion filter structure is 15 cm long by 3.5 cm diameter, including ion source and collecting plate. The sensitivity to helium is of the order of 10 - 2 A.torr - 1 measured at a total pressure of 6x10 - 6 torr and resolution 6. The system can be easily adapted to work as a dynamic residual gas analyser for other purposes. (Author) [pt

  2. Investigation of magnetically self-insulated effect in an ion diode with an explosive emission potential electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, J. I.; Saltimakov, M. S.; Sazonov, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a magnetically self-insulated effect in an ion diode in bipolar-pulse mode are presented. The investigations were accomplished at the TEMP-4M accelerator by formation of a first negative pulse (100 ns, 150-200 kV) and a second positive pulse (80 ns, 200-300 kV) [G. E. Remnev et al., Surf. Coat. Technol. 114, 206 (1999)]. Plasma behavior in the anode-cathode gap was analyzed according to the current-voltage characteristics of the diode with a time resolution of 0.5 ns. It is shown that during the discrete emissive surface mode, the magnetic field influence on plasma dynamics is slight. During the space charge limitation mode, the current-voltage characteristics of the diode are well-described by the Child-Langmuir ratio. The drift speed of electrons in the diode exceeds 80 mm/ns and the effect of magnetic insulation is insignificant. It was discovered, when plasma formation at the potential electrode is complete and up until the second positive pulse that the plasma speed is constant and equals to 1.3±0.2 cm/μs. After the voltage polarity at the potential electrode changes (second pulse), plasma breakup at the anode-cathode gap takes place. The impedance of the diode begins to increase and, when the total current is more than 30 kA, the diode impedance exceeds the calculated values by more than three times. The energy efficiency and limiting characteristics of the magnetically self-insulated diode are determined.

  3. Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G.; Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of 7 Li, 16 O, 32 S and 35 Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the 6,7 Li+ 27 Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V B ≤E≤2.0V B ). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

  4. Integrated ion imprinted polymers-paper composites for selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Chen, Ying [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Zhao, Xiaoya [Hubei Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of PRC, No.588 Qingtaidadao Road, Hubei, 430022, Wuhan (China); Liu, Jiafa [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Jing, Tao, E-mail: jingtao@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China)

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • IIPs are first grafted on the low-cost A4 print paper to develop an integrated paper-based device. • As an imprinted composite, the adsorption capacity is 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor is more than 3.0. • As an analytical method, the limit of detection is 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. • Based on the water quality standards, it could be used to determine Cd(II) ions in drinking water. - Abstract: Paper-based sensor is a new alternative technology to develop a portable, low-cost, and rapid analysis system in environmental chemistry. In this study, ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) using cadmium ions as the template were directly grafted on the surface of low-cost print paper based on the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. It can be applied as a recognition element to selectively capture the target ions in the complex samples. The maximum adsorption capacity of IIPs composites was 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor was more than 3.0. Then, IIPs-paper platform could be also applied as a detection element for highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions without complex sample pretreatment and expensive instrument, due to the selective recognition, formation of dithizone-cadmium complexes and light transmission ability. Under the optimized condition, the linear range was changed from 1 to 100 ng mL{sup –1} and the limit of detection was 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. The results were in good agreement with the classic ICP-MS method. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be developed for detection of other heavy metals by designing of new IIPs.

  5. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  6. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo; Lee, Taek Seung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive 60 Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  7. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo [Decontamination and Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taek Seung, E-mail: tslee@cnu.ac.kr [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive {sup 60}Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  8. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Daniel Arulraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectively. From the plot, the nature of the fluorescence quenching was confirmed as static quenching. An important feature of our chemosensor is high selectivity towards the determination of silver ion in aqueous solution over the other competitive metal ions. The detection limit of the sensor achieved 5 fM for Ag+ ion, which is superior to all previously reported chemosensors. The NMR and FT-IR studies were also carried out to support the complex formation between thionine and Ag+ ion. The practicality of the proposed chemosensor for determination of Ag+ ion was carried in untreated water samples.

  9. Highly Sensitive and Selective Potassium Ion Detection Based on Graphene Hall Effect Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqi Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ ion is an important biological substance in the human body and plays a critical role in the maintenance of transmembrane potential and hormone secretion. Several detection techniques, including fluorescent, electrochemical, and electrical methods, have been extensively investigated to selectively recognize K+ ions. In this work, a highly sensitive and selective biosensor based on single-layer graphene has been developed for K+ ion detection under Van der Pauw measurement configuration. With pre-immobilization of guanine-rich DNA on the graphene surface, the graphene devices exhibit a very low limit of detection (≈1 nM with a dynamic range of 1 nM–10 μM and excellent K+ ion specificity against other alkali cations, such as Na+ ions. The origin of K+ ion selectivity can be attributed to the fact that the formation of guanine-quadruplexes from guanine-rich DNA has a strong affinity for capturing K+ ions. The graphene-based biosensors with improved sensing performance for K+ ion recognition can be applied to health monitoring and early disease diagnosis.

  10. Investigation of the Behavioral Characteristics of Dogs Purpose-Bred and Prepared to Perform Vapor Wake® Detection of Person-Borne Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Lazarowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized detector dogs are increasingly being utilized for the detection of modern threats. The Vapor Wake® (VW dog was developed to create a dog phenotype ideally suited for detecting hand-carried and body-worn explosives. VW dogs (VWDs are trained to sample and alert to target odors in the aerodynamic wakes of moving persons, which entrains vapor and small particles from the person. The behavioral characteristics necessary for dogs to be successfully trained and employed for the application of VW are a distinct subset of the desired general characteristics of dogs used for detection tasks due to the dynamic nature of moving targets. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral characteristics of candidate detector dogs to determine the particular qualities that set apart VW-capable dogs from others. We assessed 146 candidate detector dogs from a VW breeding and training program. Dogs received identical puppy development and foundational odor training and underwent performance evaluations at 3, 6, 10, and 12 months old, after which they were sold for service. Dogs were categorized based on their final outcome of the training program, independently determined by private vendors, corresponding to three groups: dogs successfully sold for VW, dogs sold for standard explosives detection, and dogs that failed to be placed in any type of detector dog service (Washouts. Comparisons of behavioral evaluations between the groups were made across domains pertaining to search-related behaviors (Performance, reactions to novel stimuli (Environmental, and overall ease of learning new tasks (Trainability. Comparisons were also made at each evaluation to determine any early emergence of differences. VWDs scored significantly higher on Performance characteristics compared to standard explosives detection dogs (EDDs and Washouts. However, Environmental characteristics did not differentiate VWDs from EDDs, though scores on these measures were

  11. Investigation of the Behavioral Characteristics of Dogs Purpose-Bred and Prepared to Perform Vapor Wake® Detection of Person-Borne Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowski, Lucia; Haney, Pamela Sue; Brock, Jeanne; Fischer, Terry; Rogers, Bart; Angle, Craig; Katz, Jeffrey S; Waggoner, L Paul

    2018-01-01

    Specialized detector dogs are increasingly being utilized for the detection of modern threats. The Vapor Wake ® (VW) dog was developed to create a dog phenotype ideally suited for detecting hand-carried and body-worn explosives. VW dogs (VWDs) are trained to sample and alert to target odors in the aerodynamic wakes of moving persons, which entrains vapor and small particles from the person. The behavioral characteristics necessary for dogs to be successfully trained and employed for the application of VW are a distinct subset of the desired general characteristics of dogs used for detection tasks due to the dynamic nature of moving targets. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral characteristics of candidate detector dogs to determine the particular qualities that set apart VW-capable dogs from others. We assessed 146 candidate detector dogs from a VW breeding and training program. Dogs received identical puppy development and foundational odor training and underwent performance evaluations at 3, 6, 10, and 12 months old, after which they were sold for service. Dogs were categorized based on their final outcome of the training program, independently determined by private vendors, corresponding to three groups: dogs successfully sold for VW, dogs sold for standard explosives detection, and dogs that failed to be placed in any type of detector dog service (Washouts). Comparisons of behavioral evaluations between the groups were made across domains pertaining to search-related behaviors (Performance), reactions to novel stimuli (Environmental), and overall ease of learning new tasks (Trainability). Comparisons were also made at each evaluation to determine any early emergence of differences. VWDs scored significantly higher on Performance characteristics compared to standard explosives detection dogs (EDDs) and Washouts. However, Environmental characteristics did not differentiate VWDs from EDDs, though scores on these measures were significantly

  12. Monocrystalline Diamond for Ions Detection at Low and High Fluxes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Cannavo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 8 (2017), s. 3384-3391 ISSN 0018-9383 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : diamond * energy resolution * ion detector * laser-generated plasma * time of flight Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 2.605, year: 2016

  13. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  14. Determination of trimethylselenonium ion in urine by ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jessen, K.D.; Kristensen, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    The selenium species selenite, selenate, selenomethionine (SeMet), and trimethylselenonium iodide (TMSe+) were separated in aqueous solution by ion chromatography. The separation was performed on an Ionpac CS5 cation exchange column by elution with 10 mM oxalic acid and 20 mM potassium sulphate, p...

  15. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s)...

  16. Characterization of ANFO explosive by high accuracy ESI(±)-FTMS with forensic identification on real samples by EASI(-)-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Franco, Marcos Fernado; Santos, Jandyson Machado; Melendez-Perez, Jose J; de Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) is an explosive used in many civil applications. In Brazil, ANFO has unfortunately also been used in criminal attacks, mainly in automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. In this paper, we describe a detailed characterization of the ANFO composition and its two main constituents (diesel and a nitrate explosive) using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry performed on an FT-ICR-mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI(±)-FTMS) in both the positive and negative ion modes. Via ESI(-)-MS, an ion marker for ANFO was characterized. Using a direct and simple ambient desorption/ionization technique, i.e., easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), in a simpler, lower accuracy but robust single quadrupole mass spectrometer, the ANFO ion marker was directly detected from the surface of banknotes collected from ATM explosion theft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900, Sichuan Province (China); Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuo@cqut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Li, Weiyi, E-mail: weiyili@mail.xhu.edu.cn [School of Science, Xihua University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065 (China); Wang, Xiaolin, E-mail: xlwang@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900, Sichuan Province (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel AIE fluorescent sensor for the detection of uranyl has been developed. • TPE-T is capable of visually distinguish UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} among many metals owing to the AIE phenomenon. • TPE-T showed a wide effective pH range, high selectivity and good anti-interference qualities. • TPE-T showed good accuracy in the determination of uranyl in river water. - Abstract: A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  18. Ionoluminescence analysis of glass scintillators and application to single-ion-hit real-time detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Akihito, E-mail: yokoyama.akihito@jaea.go.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kada, Wataru [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimada, Keisuke; Yokoata, Yuya; Miura, Kenta; Hanaizumi, Osamu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we propose and test a real-time detection system for single-ion hits using mega-electronvolt (MeV)-heavy ions. The system was constructed using G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, as well as an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera combined with an inverted microscope with a 10× objective lens. Commercially available G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, which have been reported to exhibit strong photoluminescence at 489, 543, 585, and 622 nm as a result of the Tb{sup 3+} f–f transition, were employed for highly accurate ionized particle detection. The EMCCD camera had a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels, each with a size of 16 μm × 16 μm, and a maximum linear gain of 8 × 10{sup 5} electrons. For 260-MeV Ne, 3 ion hits/s were detected by our system. The intensity of the ionoluminescence (IL) peak induced by the heavy ions was 140 times the noise intensity. In contrast, the luminous diameter at the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in both the horizontal and vertical directions was calculated to be approximately 4.5 μm. These results suggest that our detection system can accurately detect single-ion hits with a diameter of the order of 1 μm.

  19. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  20. Enzyme-based Colorimetric and Potentiometric Biosensor for Detecting Pb (II Ions in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Kaur

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study a simple colorimetric and potentiometric biosensor based on urease inhibition by Pb (II ions for its estimation in milk samples. Urease immobilized on nylon membrane by hydrosol gel method was used as the biocomponent to demonstrate the metal effect on the enzyme activity using phenol red as the pH indicator. A lower limit detection of 38.6µm was achieved in the milk and the enzyme membranes were stable for more than two months at 4ºC. In potentiometric approach, response of an ion selective electrode (ISE to changing ammonium ion concentration as a consequence of urease inhibition by Pb (II ions was explored to achieve a detection limit of 9.66 µm. Lead specificity was attained by means of masking agents 1,10 - phenanthroline and sodium potassium tartarate. Validation of the developed biosensors was carried out with spiked milk samples.

  1. [Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Detection of Cobalt Ions by Silver Triangular Nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-qing; Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Liu, Chao-juan; Cao, Qiu-e; Ding, Zhong-tao

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors studied fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon between silver triangular nanoplates and bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G fluorescence complex, and established a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions. We found that when increasing the silver triangular nanoplates added to certain concentrations of fluorescent bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G complex, the fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G would be quenched up to 80% due to the FRET between the quencher and donor. However, in the presence of cobalt ions, the disassociation of the fluorescent complex from silver triangular nanoplates occurred and the fluorescence of the Rhodamine 6G recovered. The recovery of fluorescence intensity rate (I/I0) has a good relationship with the cobalt ion concentration (cCO2+) added. Thus, the authors developed a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions based on the FRET of silver triangular nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G.

  2. An Electrochemical Sensor Based on Nanostructured Hollandite-type Manganese Oxide for Detection of Potassium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S. Lima

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The participation of cations in redox reactions of manganese oxides provides an opportunity for development of chemical sensors for non-electroactive ions. A sensor based on a nanostructured hollandite-type manganese oxide was investigated for voltammetric detection of potassium ions. The detection is based on the measurement of anodic current generated by oxidation of Mn(III to Mn(IV at the surface of the electrode and the subsequent extraction of the potassium ions into the hollandite structure. In this work, an amperometric procedure at an operating potential of 0.80 V (versus SCE is exploited for amperometric monitoring. The current signals are linearly proportional to potassium ion concentration in the range 4.97 × 10−5 to 9.05 × 10−4 mol L−1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997.

  3. Multiple-channel detection of cellular activities by ion-sensitive transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Satoru; Shimada, Hideto; Motoyama, Yumi

    2018-04-01

    An ion-sensitive field-effect transistor to record cellular activities was demonstrated. This field-effect transistor (bio transistor) includes cultured cells on the gate insulator instead of gate electrode. The bio transistor converts a change in potential underneath the cells into variation of the drain current when ion channels open. The bio transistor has high detection sensitivity to even minute variations in potential utilizing a subthreshold swing region. To open ion channels, a reagent solution (acetylcholine) was added to a human-originating cell cultured on the bio transistor. The drain current was successfully decreased with the addition of acetylcholine. Moreover, we attempted to detect the opening of ion channels using a multiple-channel measurement circuit containing several bio transistors. As a consequence, the drain current distinctly decreased only after the addition of acetylcholine. We confirmed that this measurement system including bio transistors enables to observation of cellular activities sensitively and simultaneously.

  4. A mass spectrometer based explosives trace detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, Andrey; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Hanold, Karl; Syage, Jack A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we describe the application of mass spectrometry (MS) to the detection of trace explosives. We begin by reviewing the issue of explosives trace detection (ETD) and describe the method of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative to existing technologies. Effective security screening devices must be accurate (high detection and low false positive rate), fast and cost effective (upfront and operating costs). Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the most commonly deployed method for ETD devices. Its advantages are compact size and relatively low price. For applications requiring a handheld detector, IMS is an excellent choice. For applications that are more stationary (e.g., checkpoint and alternatives to IMS are available. MS is recognized for its superior performance with regard to sensitivity and specificity, which translate to lower false negative and false positive rates. In almost all applications outside of security where accurate chemical analysis is needed, MS is usually the method of choice and is often referred to as the gold standard for chemical analysis. There are many review articles and proceedings that describe detection technologies for explosives. 1,2,3,4 Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Mass spectrometry (MS): MS offers high levels of sensitivity and specificity compared to other technologies for chemical detection. Its traditional disadvantages have been high cost and complexity. Over the last few years, however, the economics have greatly improved and MS is now capable of routine and automated operation. Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS): 5 MS-ETD Screening System IMS is similar in concept to MS except that the ions are dispersed by gas-phase viscosity and not by molecular weight. The main advantage of IMS is that it does not use a vacuum system, which greatly reduces the size, cost, and complexity

  5. Detection of Sn(II) ions via quenching of the fluorescence of carbon nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yazid, S.N.A.; Chin, S.F.; Pang, S.C.; Ng, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report that fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) can act as an optical probe for quantifying Sn(II) ions in aqueous solution. C-dots are synthesized by carbonization and surface oxidation of preformed sago starch nanoparticles. Their fluorescence is significantly quenched by Sn(II) ions, and the effect can be used to determine Sn(II) ions. The highest fluorescence intensity is obtained at a concentration of 1.75 mM of C-dots in aqueous solution. The probe is highly selective and hardly interfered by other ions. The quenching mechanism appears to be predominantly of the static (rather than dynamic) type. Under optimum conditions, there is a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and Sn(II) ions concentration up to 4 mM, and with a detection limit of 0.36 μM. (author)

  6. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of Cu2+ ion based on catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Li, Bowei; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-02-15

    As an essential element, copper ion (Cu(2+)) plays important roles in human beings for its participation in diverse metabolic processes as a cofactor and/or a structural component of enzymes. However, excessive uptake of Cu(2+) ion gives rise to the risk of certain diseases. So, it is important to develop simple ways to monitor and detect Cu(2+) ion. In this study, a simple, facile colorimetric sensor for the ultrasensitive determination of Cu(2+) ion was developed based on the following principle: L-cysteine and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) could be conjugated to form the yellow product 2,4-dinitrophenylcysteine (DNPC), which was measurable at 355nm; however, upon addition of Cu(2+) ion, the absorbance of DNPC would be decreased owing to the Cu(2+) ion catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cystine in the presence of O2. Thus, the colorimetric detection of Cu(2+) ion could be achieved. The optimal pH, buffer, temperature and incubation time for the colorimetric sensor were obtained of pH 6.8 in 0.1M HEPES solution, 90 °C and 50 min, respectively. A good linearity within the range of 0.8-10 nM (r = 0.996) was attained, with a high detectability up to 0.5nM. Analyses of Cu(2+) ion in drinking water, lake water, seawater and biological samples were carried out and the method performances were found to agree well with that obtained by ICP-MS. The developed simple colorimetric sensor proved applicable for Cu(2+) ion determination in real samples with high sensitivity and selectivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modified graphene oxide sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of nitrate ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wen; Mura, Stefania; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-10-01

    Nitrate ions is a very common contaminant in drinking water and has a significant impact on the environment, necessitating routine monitoring. Due to its chemical and physical properties, it is hard to directly detect nitrate ions with high sensitivity in a simple and inexpensive manner. Herein with amino group modified graphene oxide (GO) as a sensing element, we show a direct and ultra-sensitive method to detect nitrate ions, at a lowest detected concentration of 5 nM in river water samples, much lower than the reported methods based on absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, unlike the reported strategies based on absorption spectroscopy wherein the nitrate concentration is determined by monitoring an increase in aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), our method evaluates the concentration of nitrate ions based on reduction in aggregation of GNPs for monitoring in real samples. To improve sensitivity, several optimizations were performed, including the assessment of the amount of modified GO required, concentration of GNPs and incubation time. The detection methodology was characterized by zeta potential, TEM and SEM. Our results indicate that an enrichment of modified GO with nitrate ions contributed to excellent sensitivity and the entire detection procedure could be completed within 75 min with only 20 μl of sample. This simple and rapid methodology was applied to monitor nitrate ions in real samples with excellent sensitivity and minimum pretreatment. The proposed approach paves the way for a novel means to detect anions in real samples and highlights the potential of GO based detection strategy for water quality monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection system for the identification of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, Daniel H.; Arazi, Andres; Achterberg, Erhard; Capurro, Oscar A.; Fernandez Niello, Jorge O.; Ferrero, Armando M. J.; Liberman, Rosa G.; Marti, Guillermo V.; Pacheco, Alberto J.; Ramirez, Marcelo C.; Testoni, Jorge E.

    1999-01-01

    The TANDAR laboratory has a magnetic spectrometer as one of its detection facilities. This device allows the separation of incident particles according to the relation between their lineal momentum and their charge state. To complete this identification there are two alternatives: 1) A system of three detectors consisting of a multiwire detector, an ionization chamber and scintillators; 2) A segmented anode ionization chamber. (author)

  9. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  10. Hydrothermal growth of CuO nanoleaf structures, and their mercuric ion detection application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibupoto, Z H; Khun, K; Willander, M

    2014-09-01

    Mercury is the hazardous heavy metal ion for the environment and the human being therefore its determination is very important and herein we describe the development of mercury ion sensor on the CuO nanoleaf like nanostructures using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant as template for the growth by hydrothermal growth method. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study has shown high density and good crystal quality of the fabricated CuO nanostructures respectively. The presented mercury ion sensor has detected the wide range of 1.0 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-1) M mercury ion concentrations with an acceptable Nernstian behaviour and a sensitivity of 30.1 ± 0.6 mV/decade. The proposed mercury ion sensor exhibited low detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-8) M and also a fast response time of less than 5 s. In addition, the presented mercury ion sensor has shown an excellent repeatability, reproducibility, stability and selectivity. Moreover, the mercury ion selective electrode based on CuO nanoleaves was tested as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration.

  11. Quadrature detection for the separation of the signals of positive and negative ions in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweikhard, Lutz; Drader, Jared J.; Shi, Stone D.-H.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    Positive and negative ions may be confined simultaneously in a nested open cylindrical Malmberg-Penning trap. However, ion charge sign cannot be distinguished by conventional dipolar (linearly-polarized) detection with a single pair of opposed electrodes. Here, the signals from each of two orthogonal pairs of opposed detection electrodes are acquired simultaneously and stored as real and imaginary parts of mathematically complex data. Complex Fourier transformation yields separate spectra for positive and negative ions. For a fullerene sample, experimental quadrature detection yields C 60 + and C 60 - signals separated by ∼1440 u rather than by the mass of two electrons, ∼0.001 u in conventional dipolar detection

  12. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A review on various electrochemical techniques for heavy metal ions detection with different sensing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, BabanKumar; Kumar, Tejinder; Thakur, Ritula; Rana, Shakshi; Singh, Inderbir

    2017-08-15

    Heavy metal ions are non-biodegradable and contaminate most of the natural resources occurring in the environment including water. Some of the heavy metals including Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Arsenic (As), Chromium (Cr) and Cadmium (Cd) are considered to be highly toxic and hazardous to human health even at trace levels. This leads to the requirement of fast, accurate and reliable techniques for the detection of heavy metal ions. This review presents various electrochemical detection techniques for heavy metal ions those are user friendly, low cost, provides on-site and real time monitoring as compared to other spectroscopic and optical techniques. The categorization of different electrochemical techniques is done on the basis of different types of detection signals generated due to presence of heavy metal ions in the solution matrix like current, potential, conductivity, electrochemical impedance, and electrochemiluminescence. Also, the recent trends in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions with various types of sensing platforms including metals, metal films, metal oxides, nanomaterials, carbon nano tubes, polymers, microspheres and biomaterials have been evoked. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  15. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  16. Bayesian Integration and Classification of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Christine M; Kelly, Ryan T; Alexander, Liz; Newburn, Matt; Bader, Sydney; Ewing, Robert G; Fahey, Albert J; Atkinson, David A; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-04-05

    Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used for characterization and identification of unique signatures from a series of 18 Composition C-4 plastic explosives. The samples were obtained from various commercial and military sources around the country. Positive and negative ion TOF-SIMS data were acquired directly from the C-4 residue on Si surfaces, where the positive ion mass spectra obtained were consistent with the major composition of organic additives, and the negative ion mass spectra were more consistent with explosive content in the C-4 samples. Each series of mass spectra was subjected to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach which serves to first find the areas of maximum variance within different classes of C-4 and subsequently to classify unknown samples based on correlations between the unknown data set and the original data set (often referred to as a training data set). This method was able to successfully classify test samples of C-4, though with a limited degree of certainty. The classification accuracy of the method was further improved by integrating the positive and negative ion data using a Bayesian approach. The TOF-SIMS data was combined with a second analytical method, LA-ICPMS, which was used to analyze elemental signatures in the C-4. The integrated data were able to classify test samples with a high degree of certainty. Results indicate that this Bayesian integrated approach constitutes a robust classification method that should be employable even in dirty samples collected in the field.

  17. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  18. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions associated with pneumonia (parapneumonic effusions are one of the most common causes of exudative pleural effusions in the world. Approximately 20 to 40% of patients hospitalized with pneumonia will have an accompanying pleural effusion. The term 'Explosive pleuritis' was originally described by Braman and Donat in 1986 as pleural effusions developing within hours of admission. We report a 38 years old male patient with minimal pleural effusion which progressed rapidly within one day to involve almost whole of the hemithorax. There were multiple loculations on ultrasonography of thorax. Pleural fluid was sero-sanguinous and revealed gram positive diplococcic. The patient improved with antibiotics and pigtail catheter drainage.

  19. Development of a noise reduction program of a prompt gamma spectrum based on principal component analysis for an explosive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Hee; Im, Hee Jung; Song, Byung ChoI; Park, Yong Joon; Kim, Won Ho; Cho, Jung Hwan

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates a developed program to reduce noises of a prompt gamma-ray spectrum measured by irradiating neutrons into baggage. The noises refer to random variations mainly caused by electrical fluctuations and also by a measurement time. Especially, since the short measurement time yields such a noisy spectrum in which its special peak can not be observed, it is necessary to extract its characteristic signals from the spectrum to identify an explosive hidden in luggage. Principal component analysis(PCA) that is a multivariate statistical technique is closely related to singular value decomposition(SVD). The SVD-based PCA decreases the noise by reconstructing the spectrum after determining the number of principal components corresponding important signals based on the history data that sufficiently describe its population. In this study, we present a visualized program of the above procedure using the MATLAB 7.04 programming language. When our program is started, it requires an arbitrary measured spectrum to be reduced and history spectra as input files. If user selects the files with menu, our program automatically carries out the PCA procedure and provides its noise-reduced spectrum plot as well as the original spectrum plot into an output window. In addition, user can obtain signal-to-noise ratio of an interesting peak by defining the peak and noise ranges with menu

  20. Threat detection of liquid explosives and precursors from their x-ray scattering pattern using energy dispersive detector technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Lyksborg, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) can be applied for identification of liquid threats in luggage scanning in security applications. To define the instrumental design, the framework for data reduction and analysis and test the performance of the threat detection in various scenarios....... Initial testing of the threat detection algorithms with this data set indicate the feasibility of detection levels of > 95 % true positive with

  1. Calibration method for ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Valery

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the calibration of the ion mobility spectrometer has been developed. This article describes the working principle, advantages and disadvantages of the calibration method operating in the mode of explosives detection. This method is most suitable for use in portable detectors, due to the small weight, small size parameters and low power consumption.

  2. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  3. A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe for highly selective detection of ferric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Sun, Mingtai; Zhang, Zhongping; Wang, Suhua

    2013-02-15

    A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe was synthesized and characterized. It exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity towards Fe(3+) ion. This fluorescent probe is photostable, water soluble and pH insensitive. The limit of detection is found to be 0.62 μM. These properties make it a good fluorescent probe for Fe(3+) ion detection in both chemical and biological systems. Spike recovery test confirms its practical application in tap water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of negative ions in glow discharge mass spectrometry for analysis of solid specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Molchan, Igor S.; Tauziede, C.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for elemental and molecular analysis of halogen-containing samples by glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry, consisting of detection of negative ions from a pulsed RF glow discharge in argon. Analyte signals are mainly extracted from the afterglow regime...... be used to study the distribution of a tantalum fluoride layer within the anodized tantala layer. Further, comparison is made with data obtained using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, where elemental fluorine can only be detected using a neon plasma. The ionization mechanisms responsible...... for the formation of negative ions in glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry are briefly discussed....

  5. Limitations to depth resolution in high-energy, heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Palmer, G.R.; Ophel, T.R.; Timmers, H.

    1998-01-01

    The depth resolution of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis was examined for Al and Co thin films ranging in thickness from 100 to 400 nm. Measurements were performed with 154 MeV Au ions as the incident beam, and recoils were detected using a gas ionisation detector. Energy spectra were extracted for the Al and Co recoils and the depth resolution determined as a function of film thickness from the width of the high- and low- energy edges. These results were compared with theoretical estimates calculated using the computer program DEPTH. (authors)

  6. High-energy elastic recoil detection heavy ions for light element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goppelt-Langer, P.; Yamamoto, S.; Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Naramoto, H.

    1994-01-01

    The detection of light and medium heavy elements in not homogeneous solids is a severe problem in ion beam analysis. Heavy elements can be detected by the well established Rutherford backscattering technique (RBS). In a homogeneous host material most impurities can be easily analyzed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Some isotopes ( 3 He, 6 Li, 10 B) can be measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using thermal neutrons inducing (n, p) or (n, α) reactions. Others can be detected by energetic ion beams by nuclear reactions (e.g. 15 N( 1 H, αγ) 12 C for analysis of hydrogen). A high content of H, D or T can be also determined by elastic recoil detection using an energetic He beam. The latter technique has been developed to a universal method for detection of light and heavy elements in any target, using a high energetic heavy ion beam and a detector system, which is able to identify the recoils and delivers energy and position of the particles. (author)

  7. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    In a number of published articles the toxic effect of silver(I) ions on aquatic organisms is described. Silver(I) ions in aquatic environment are stable in a wide range of pH. Under alkali pH AgOH and Ag(OH)2- can be formed. However, in water environment there are many compounds to interact with silver(I) ions. The most important ones are chloride anions, which forms insoluble precipitate with silver(I) ions (AgCl). The insoluble silver containing compounds do not pose any threat to aquatic organisms. Toxicity of silver ions is probably caused by their very good affinity to nucleic acids and also proteins. The binding into active enzyme site leads to the expressive enzyme reaction inhibition. Silver(I) ions are into living environment introduced thanks to anthropogenic activities. They easily contaminate atmosphere as well as aquatic environment or soils. Several authors described using of carbon electrode as working electrode for determination of silver. Recently, we have suggested heavy metal biosensor based on interaction of metal ions with low molecular mass protein called metallothionein (MT), which was adsorbed on the surface of hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The biosensor was successfully used for detection of cadmium(II) and zinc(II) ions, cisplatin, cisplatin-DNA adducts and palladium(II) ions. Due to the convincing results with MT as biological component we report on suggesting of heavy metal biosensor based on immobilization of metallothionein (MT) on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) via MT-antibodies. Primarily we studied of basic electrochemical behaviour of MT at surface of carbon paste electrode by using of square wave voltammetry (SWV). Detection limit (3 S/N) for MT was evaluated as 0.1 μg/ml. After that we have evaluated the electroactivity of MT at surface of SWV, we aimed our attention on the way of capturing of MT on the surface of CPE. We choose antibody against MT obtained from chicken eggs for these purposes. Antibodies

  8. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Explosive and pollutant TNP detection by structurally flexible SOFs: DFT-D3, TD-DFT study and in vitro recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pritam [Surface Engineering & Tribology Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Burdwan, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Chemistry Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 32, West Bengal (India); Roy, Partha [Chemistry Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 32, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Ananta [Chemistry Department, Burdwan Raj College, The University of Burdwan, West Bengal (India); Jana, Saibal [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Murmu, Naresh Chandra [Surface Engineering & Tribology Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Burdwan, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti [Department of Microbiology, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713104 (India); Banerjee, Priyabrata, E-mail: pr_banerjee@cmeri.res.in [Surface Engineering & Tribology Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Burdwan, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research at CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI), Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India)

    2017-05-15

    Explosive and Pollutant Nitro Aromatics (epNACs) like 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) has been detected from various surface water specimens by luminescent Schiff base Organic Frameworks (SOFs) by fluorometric method. Fluorescence intensity of the receptor SOFs have been quenched in presence of TNP due to RET and ICT, which has been confirmed through solid and solution level spectroscopic studies like FT-IR, {sup 1}H-NMR, fluorescence titration. Modern DFT (DFT-D3) calculations of the possible host guest conformers have been performed for exploration of plausible route of interaction between receptor and epNACs. The outcome of theoretical calculations is in line with experimental findings where TNP and receptor conformation mimic parallel displaced type π- π interaction. TD-DFT has been executed with both receptor and receptor ···TNP adduct, the fluorescence quenching is in line with experimental outcome. Limit of TNP detection has been found as low as 5 μM with 2.97×10{sup 4} M{sup -1} as binding constant. In real time stepping, TNP as mutagenic agent for aquatic life has been detected inside prokaryotic cells like candidia albicans in ppm level.

  10. Effect of oblique incidence on silver nanomaterials fabricated in water via ultrafast laser ablation for photonics and explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Podagatlapalli, G. [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Hamad, Syed [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Ahamad Mohiddon, Md. [Centre for Nanotechnology University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Venugopal Rao, S., E-mail: svrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: •Effect of non-zero angle of incidence on ps ablation of Ag investigated. •Ag colloids were evaluated by TEM, UV–vis absorption spectra and fs-DFWM. •30° incident angle provided Ag NPs of small size with higher yields. •FESEM, AFM, Raman data revealed the fabrication of Ag nanostructures. •Utility of Ag nanostructures surfaces for multiple SERS studies demonstrated. -- Abstract: Picosecond (ps) laser ablation of silver (Ag) substrate submerged in double distilled water was performed at 800 nm for different angles of incidence of 5°, 15°, 30° and 45°. Prepared colloidal solutions were characterized through transmission electron microscopy, UV absorption spectroscopy to explore their morphologies and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties. Third order nonlinear optical (NLO) characterization of colloids was performed using degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) technique with ∼40 fs laser pulses at 800 nm and the NLO coefficients were obtained. Detailed analysis of the data obtained from colloidal solutions suggested that superior results in terms of yield, sizes of the NPs, SPR peak position were achieved for ablation performed at 30° incident angle. Surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of Rhodamine 6G from nanostructured substrates were investigated using excitation wavelengths of 532 and 785 nm. In both the cases substrates prepared at 30° incident angle exhibited superior enhancement in the Raman signatures with a best enhancement factor achieved being >10{sup 8}. SERS of an explosive molecule 5-amino, 3-nitro, -1H-1,2,4-nitrozole (ANTA) was also demonstrated from these nanostructured substrates. Multiple usage of Ag nanostructures for SERS studies revealed that structures prepared at 30° incident angle provided superior performance amongst all.

  11. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

    1982-06-22

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

  12. Explosions in Landau Vlasov dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.; Cussol, D.; Gregoire, C.; Boilley, D.; Pi, M.; Schuck, P.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1988-01-01

    A microscopic study of the quasi-fusion/explosion transition is presented in the framework of Landau-Vlasov simulations of intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions (bombarding energies between 10 and 100 MeV/A). A detailed analysis in terms of the Equation of State of the system is performed. In agreement with schematic models we find that the composite nuclear system formed in the collision does explode when it stays long enough in the mechanically unstable region (spinodal region). Quantitative estimates of the explosion threshold are given for central symmetric reactions (Ca+Ca and Ar+Ti). The effect of the nuclear matter compressibility modulus is discussed

  13. Glassy carbon electrode modified with polyanilne/ethylenediamine for detection of copper ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Harshada K.; Deshmukh, Megha A.; Bodkhe, Gajanan A.; Shirsat, Mahendra D.

    2018-05-01

    Increasing water pollution is having high concern, since it creates the threats to all leaving organisms of existence. Industrial sewages have not only polluted the main stream lines of water, also the ground level water is having serious contaminations. Heavy metal ions are the pollutants which are not degradable and can be accumulated on living things ultimately the excess accumulation results into the serious concerns. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the sensors which can detect the heavy metal ions up to its maximum contamination limits. Conducting polymers are the materials which possess large application spectra. This investigation reports the electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) for modification of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Ethylenediamine (EDA) - chelating ligand used for the modification of polyaniline so as to inculcate the selectivity toward copper ions Cu (II). The electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used for the study of redox characteristics of PANI and influence of EDA modification. The result of CV has shown the reduced oxidation and reduction peak currents after modification indicating the domination of EDA. GCE modified with PANI/EDA was then employed for the detection of divalent copper ions and have shown the affinity toward Cu ions. The detection limit achieved was equal to 10mg/lit.

  14. Dual-peak electrogenerated chemiluminescence of carbon dots for iron ions detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjia; Xue, Zhenjie; Luo, Dan; Yu, Wei; Guo, Zhihui; Wang, Tie

    2014-06-17

    Carbon dots (CDs) have rigorously been investigated on their unique fluorescent properties but rarely their electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) behavior. We are here to report a dual-peak ECL system of CDs, one at -2.84 V (ECL-1) and the other at -1.71 V (ECL-2) during the cyclic sweep between -3.0 and 3.0 V at scan rate of 0.2 V s(-1) in 0.1 M tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) ethanol solution, which is more efficiency to distinguish metallic ions than single-peak ECL. The electron transfer reaction between individual electrochemically reduced nanocrystal species and coreactants led to ECL-1, in which the electron injected to the conduction band of CDs in the cathodic process. Ion annihilation reactions induced direct formation of exciplexes that produced another ECL signal, ECL-2. ECL-1 showed higher sensitivity to the surrounding environment than ECL-2 and thus was used for ECL detection of metallic ions. Herein, we can serve as an internal standard method to detect iron ions. A linear relationship of the intensity ratio R of ECL-1 and ECL-2 to iron ions was observed in the concentration extending from 5 × 10(-6) to 8 × 10(-5) M with a detection limit of 7 × 10(-7) M.

  15. Application of micro beam PIXE to detection of titanium ion release from dental and orthopaedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ektessabi, A.M.; Otsuka, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Albrektsson, T.; Sennerby, L.; Johansson, C.

    1994-01-01

    In the past two decades the utilization of dental and orthopaedic implants in reconstructive surgery has been spread widely. Most of these implants are inserted in the corrosive environment of the human body for long periods of time. The level of dissolution, release, and transport of metal ions as a result of corrosion of these materials are not fully known at present. We report the results of application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy to detect release of titanium from titanium and titanium alloy implants inserted in the tibiae of rabbits for three months. It was found that titanium ions could be detected in the surrounding tissues, with high precision, as a gradient from the implant surface and in higher amounts in the bone tissue as compared with the soft tissues. It is concluded that application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy for detection of metal ion release, and distribution of the released material around the implants with high special resolution and accuracy may be used to further investigate the mechanism of metal release, and the relation between surface micromorphology and corrosion resistance of the implant materials. (author)

  16. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots for the detection of mercury ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yusha; Mei, Jing; Bai, Jianliang; Chen, Xu; Ren, Lili

    2018-05-01

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots has been synthesized via bonding rhodamine B hydrazide to the carbon dots surface by an amide reaction. The ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor showed only a single blue fluorescence emission around 450 nm. While, as mercury ion was added, due to the open-ring of rhodamine moiety bonded on the CDs surface, the orange emission of the open-ring rhodamine would increase obviously according to the concentration of mercury ion, resulting in the distinguishable dual emissions at 450 nm and 575 nm under a single 360 excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots we prepared is more sensitive to qualitative and semi-quantitative detection of mercury ion in the range of 0–100 μM, because fluorescence changes gradually from blue to orange emission under 365 nm lamp with the increasing of mercury ion in the tested solution.

  17. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  18. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-15

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn(2+) ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn(2+) ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn(2+) ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn(2+)] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn(2+) ions reveal the concentration of Mn(2+) ions in solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The potential application of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films for heavy ion irradiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huang-Chin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Chen, Shih-Show [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Department of Information Technology and Mobile Communication, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, I-Nan; Chang, Ching-Lin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Guo, Jinghua [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    The potential of utilizing the ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) films for detecting the Au-ion irradiation was investigated. When the fluence for Au-ion irradiation is lower than the critical value (f{sub c}= 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) the turn-on field for electron field emission (EFE) process of the UNCD films decreased systematically with the increase in fluence that is correlated with the increase in sp{sup 2}-bonded phase ({pi}{sup *}-band in EELS) due to the Au-ion irradiation. The EFE properties changed irregularly, when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation exceeds this critical value. The transmission electron microscopic microstructural examinations, in conjunction with EELS spectroscopic studies, reveal that the structural change preferentially occurred in the diamond-to-Si interface for the samples experienced over critical fluence of Au-ion irradiation, viz. the crystalline SiC phase was induced in the interfacial region and the thickness of the interface decreased. These observations implied that the UNCD films could be used as irradiation detectors when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation does not exceed such a critical value.

  20. Recoil separators for radiative capture using radioactive ion beams. Recent advances and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Chris [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Greife, Uwe; Hager, Ulrike [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiative capture reactions involving the fusion of hydrogen or helium are ubiquitous in the stellar history of the universe, and are some of the most important reactions in the processes that govern nucleosynthesis and energy generation in both static and explosive scenarios. However, radiative capture reactions pose some of the most difficult experimental challenges due to extremely small cross sections. With the advent of recoil separators and techniques in inverse kinematics, it is now possible to measure radiative capture reactions on very short-lived radioactive nuclei, and in the presence of high experimental backgrounds. In this paper we review the experimental needs for making measurements of astrophysical importance on radiative capture reactions. We also review some of the important historical advances in the field of recoil separators as well as describe current techniques and performance milestones, including descriptions of some of the separators most recently working at radioactive ion beam facilities, such as DRAGON at TRIUMF and the DRS at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. We will also summarize some of the scientific highlight measurements at the RIB facilities. (orig.)

  1. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non-Polar Solvents by using Conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseda, Kazuya; Kokado, Kenta; Sada, Kazuki

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride ( TBACl ) ion-pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso -octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole ( CP ), which is a well-known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP , the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non-polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non-polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion-paired salt as well as a free anion in non-polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP - Cl ) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion-pairing constant ( K ip ) than TBACl in non-polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli-responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces.

  2. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Detected by Kaguya and Geotail in the Earth's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Nishino, Masaki N.; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi

    2018-02-01

    Narrowband electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves first discovered by the Apollo 15 and 16 Lunar Surface Magnetometers were surveyed in the magnetic field data obtained by the Kaguya satellite at an altitude of ˜100 km above the Moon in the tail lobe and plasma sheet boundary layer of the Earth's magnetosphere. The frequencies of the waves were typically 0.7 times the local proton cyclotron frequency, and 75% of the waves were left hand polarized with respect to the background magnetic field. They had a significant compressional component and comprised several discrete packets. They were detected on the dayside, nightside, and above the terminator of the Moon, irrespective of the lunar magnetic anomaly, or the magnetic connection to the lunar surface. The waves with the same characteristics were detected by Geotail in the absence of the Moon in the magnetotail. The most likely energy source of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is the ring beam ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  3. A turn-on fluorescent rhodamine-acyl hydrazide for selective detection of Cu"2"+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung Won; Jeong, Hyuk; Lee, Min Hee

    2017-01-01

    We present a rhodamine-based probe that can detect Cu"2"+ ions via Cu"2"+-promoted hydrolysis in aqueous solutions. In solution, the probe is non-fluorescent and colorless, but gives a strong fluorescence at 586 nm and shows a color change to pink on the addition of Cu"2"+ ions. We demonstrate that the rhodamine-based probe undergoes Cu"2"+-promoted hydrolysis with a moderate reaction time (within 3 min) and provides a fluorescence off–on change, even in the presence of other competitive metal ions. The rhodamine-based probe shows a linear correlation between increasing fluorescence at 586 nm and the Cu"2"+ concentration, and can detect Cu"2"+ at nanomolar levels (10 nM) in CH_3CN:H_2O (v/v, 90:10)

  4. Nanoneedle transistor-based sensors for the selective detection of intracellular calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Donghee; Park, Sung Young; Kim, Byeongju; Koh, Jun Tae; Kim, Tae Hyun; An, Sangmin; Jang, Doyoung; Kim, Gyu Tae; Jhe, Wonho; Hong, Seunghun

    2011-05-24

    We developed a nanoneedle transistor-based sensor (NTS) for the selective detection of calcium ions inside a living cell. In this work, a single-walled carbon nanotube-based field effect transistor (swCNT-FET) was first fabricated at the end of a glass nanopipette and functionalized with Fluo-4-AM probe dye. The selective binding of calcium ions onto the dye molecules altered the charge state of the dye molecules, resulting in the change of the source-drain current of the swCNT-FET as well as the fluorescence intensity from the dye. We demonstrated the electrical and fluorescence detection of the concentration change of intracellular calcium ions inside a HeLa cell using the NTS.

  5. End point detection in ion milling processes by sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.; Dorian, M.; Tabei, M.; Elsea, A.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic optical emission from the sputtered material during ion milling processes can provide an unambiguous indication of the presence of the specific etched species. By monitoring the intensity of a representative emission line, the etching process can be precisely terminated at an interface. Enhancement of the etching end point is possible by using a dual-channel photodetection system operating in a ratio or difference mode. The installation of the optical detection system to an existing etching chamber has been greatly facilitated by the use of optical fibers. Using a commercial ion milling system, experimental data for a number of etching processes have been obtained. The result demonstrates that sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy offers many advantages over other techniques in detecting the etching end point of ion milling processes

  6. Charge Transfer Based Colorimetric Detection of Silver Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Choul; Kim, Kwang Seob; Choi, Soon Kyu; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jae Wook [Dong-A Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We have demonstrated the colorimetric chemosensor for detection of Ag{sup +} via formation of nanoparticles which is based on the intramolecular CT interaction between the electron-rich (2,6-dialkoxynaphthalene; Np) moiety and the electron-deficient (methyl viologen; MV{sup 2+}) moiety of a single sensor molecule. Under irradiation of light, Ag{sup +} was reduced to very small silver nanoparticle by CT interaction in the presence of OEGs as flexible recognition moiety of Ag{sup +} and stabilizer for Ag nanoparticles, thus Ag nanoparticles resulted to reddish brown in the color change of sensor solution, gradually. Therefore, the charge-transfer interaction between an electron-deficient and an electron-rich units existing at a sensor molecule can be regarded as a new and efficient method to construct various colorimetric chemosensors. Donor.acceptor interactions or charge transfer (CT) interactions are an important class of non-covalent interactions and have been widely exploited in self-assembling systems. Beyond molecular chemistry, supramolecular chemistry aims at constituting highly complex, functional chemical systems from components held together by intermolecular forces. Chemosensors are the molecules of abiotic origin that bind selectively and reversibly with the analyte with concomitant change in one or more properties of the system. The recognition and signaling of ionic and neutral species of varying complexity is one of the most intensively studied areas of contemporary supramolecular chemistry.

  7. Investigation of peptide based surface functionalization for copper ions detection using an ultrasensitive mechanical microresonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Rasmussen, Jakob Lyager

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of developing a portable label-free sensor for multi arrayed detection of heavy metals in drinking water, we present a mechanical resonator-based copper ions sensor, which uses a recently synthesized peptide Cysteine–Glycine–Glycine–Histidine (CGGH) and the l-Cysteine (Cys) peptide...

  8. Testing of a Micro Faraday Cup Array for Ion Detection in SIMS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lorinčík, Jan; Denton, M. B.; Sperline, R. P.; Young, E. T.; Williams, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 6 (2011), s. 1050-1057 ISSN 0003-2719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Faraday cup * SIMS * Capacitance transimpedance amplifier * Ion detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.016, year: 2011

  9. Explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-04-01

    An explosive composition containing ammonium nitrate consists of (1) from 40 to 75 Pt. by wt of particulate ammonium nitrate, (2) from 20 to 35 Pt. by wt of a solution selected from the group consisting of aqueous magnesium nitrate, aqueous ammonium nitrate and aqueous ammoniacal ammonium nitrate; and (3) at least 2 Pt. by wt of a setting agent selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metal oxides, zinc oxide, lead monoxide, calcined dolomitic limestone, anhydrous calcium sulfate, anhydrous magnesium sulfate, anhydrous sodium tetrapyrophosphate and anhydrous sodium thiosulfate. The setting agent is further characterized in setting the composition to a solid material which contains solvent used in the liquid phase. (Abstract only - original article not available from T.U.)

  10. Explosive composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slykhouse, T E

    1968-05-09

    An ammonium nitrate explosive composition is characterized in that it contains from 40 to 75 parts by wt of particulate ammonium nitrate, from 20 to 35 parts by wt of a solution selected from the group consisting of aqueous magnesium nitrate, aqueous ammonium nitrate, and aqueous ammoniacal ammonium nitrate. It also contains at least 2 parts by wt of a setting agent selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metal oxides, zinc oxide, lead monoxide, calcined dolomitic limestone, substantially anhydrous calcium sulfate, substantially anhydrous magnesium sulfate, substantially anhydrous sodium tetrapyrophosphate and substantially anhydrous sodium thiosulfate. The setting agent is further characterized in that it sets the composition to a solid material which contains solvent used in the liquid phase. (12 claims)

  11. Slurry explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-08-23

    A slurry explosive is comprised of (1) a composition consisting of ammonium nitrate or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkali metal nitrate; or an alkaline earth metal nitrate; or an alkali metal nitrate and an alkaline earth metal nitrate; at least one member selected from the group consisting of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, aluminum, smokeless powder and fuels; and water; (2) 0.1 to 2.0% of guar gum; (3) between 0% and 0.3% of a sodium, potassium, calcium or magnesium borate; and greater than 0% but not more than 20% of hexamethylene tetramine; and (4) 0.02 to 2.0% of antimony potassium tartarate, antimony trioxide, antimony trisulfide or a mixture of these antimony compounds, % by wt.

  12. Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Underground Nuclear Testing: Comparison with Seismic and Associated Explosion Source Phenomenological Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jahnke, G.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection of anthrop......The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection...... of conventional multispectral satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER) to detect changes over wide areas.We chose the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, for a case study because of the large amount of available ground truth information. The analysis is based on the multivariate alteration...

  13. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ..., including non-cap sensitive slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting.... Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive liquids. Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing... powder. [[Page 64247

  14. Acquisition of electrical signals using commercial electronic components for detection system of Lead ion in distilled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiyanto; Yasin, M.; Rusydi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Development of lead ion detection systems is expected to have an advantage in terms of simplicity of the device and easy for concentration analysis of a lead ion with very high performance. One important part of lead ion detection systems are electrical signal acquisition parts. The electrical signal acquisition part uses the main electronic components: non inverting op-amplifier, instrumentation amplifier, multiplier circuit and logarithmic amplifier. Here will be shown the performance of lead ion detection systems when the existing electrical signal processors use commercial electronic components. The results that can be drawn from this experimental were the lead ion sensor that has been developed can be used to detect lead ions with a sensitivity of 10.48 mV/ppm with the linearity 97.11% and had a measurement range of 0.1 ppm to 80 ppm.

  15. Explosive coalescence of magnetic islands and explosive particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.I.

    1985-07-01

    An explosive reconnection process associated with the nonlinear evolution of the coalescence instability is found through studies of the electromagnetic particle simulation and the magnetohydrodynamic particle simulation. The explosive coalescence is a process of magnetic collapse, in which we find the magnetic and electrostatic field energies and temperatures (ion temperature in the coalescing direction, in particular) explode toward the explosion time t 0 as (t 0 - t)/sup -8/3/, (t 0 - t) -4 , and (t 0 - t)/sup -8/3/, respectively for a canonical case. Single-peak, double-peak, and triple-peak structures of magnetic energy, temperature, and electrostatic energy, respectively, are observed on the simulation as overshoot amplitude oscillations and are theoretically explained. The heuristic model of Brunel and Tajima is extended to this explosive coalescence in order to extract the basic process. Since the explosive coalescence exhibits self-similarity, a temporal universality, we theoretically search for a self-similar solution to the two-fluid plasma equations

  16. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were observed in the mass spectral responses of these compounds. A global optimum temperature of 350 °C for the by-products investigated here enabled single nanogram to sub nanogram trace detection. Matrix effects were examined through a series of mixtures containing one or more compounds (sugar alcohol precursors, by-products, and/or explosives) across a range of mass loadings. The explosives MS responses experienced competitive ionization in the presence of all by-products. The magnitude of this influence corresponded to both the degree of by-product nitration and the relative mass loading of the by-product to the explosive. This work provides a characterization of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester synthesis, including matrix effects and potential challenges that might arise from the trace detection of homemade explosives (HMEs) containing impurities. Detection and understanding of HME impurities and complex mixtures may provide valuable information for the screening and sourcing of homemade nitrate ester explosives. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  18. Detection of Internal Short Circuit in Lithium Ion Battery Using Model-Based Switching Model Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwan Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of an internal short circuit (ISCr in a Li-ion battery can prevent it from undergoing thermal runaway, and thereby ensure battery safety. In this paper, a model-based switching model method (SMM is proposed to detect the ISCr in the Li-ion battery. The SMM updates the model of the Li-ion battery with ISCr to improve the accuracy of ISCr resistance R I S C f estimates. The open circuit voltage (OCV and the state of charge (SOC are estimated by applying the equivalent circuit model, and by using the recursive least squares algorithm and the relation between OCV and SOC. As a fault index, the R I S C f is estimated from the estimated OCVs and SOCs to detect the ISCr, and used to update the model; this process yields accurate estimates of OCV and R I S C f . Then the next R I S C f is estimated and used to update the model iteratively. Simulation data from a MATLAB/Simulink model and experimental data verify that this algorithm shows high accuracy of R I S C f estimates to detect the ISCr, thereby helping the battery management system to fulfill early detection of the ISCr.

  19. Detection of mercury(II) ions using colorimetric gold nanoparticles on paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Hua; Chen, Wei-Yu; Yen, Yu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2014-07-15

    An on-field colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a paper-based analytical platform was investigated for mercury ion (Hg(2+)) detection at water sources. By utilizing thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry, label-free detection oligonucleotide sequences were attached to unmodified gold nanoparticles to provide rapid mercury ion sensing without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other costly labeled probe preparation processes. Not only is this strategy's sensing mechanism specific toward Hg(2+), rather than other metal ions, but also the conformational change in the detection oligonucleotide sequences introduces different degrees of AuNP aggregation that causes the color of AuNPs to exhibit a mixture variance. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment and minimize the power requirement for data analysis and transmission, the color variance of multiple detection results were transferred and concentrated on cellulose-based paper analytical devices, and the data were subsequently transmitted for the readout and storage of results using cloud computing via a smartphone. As a result, a detection limit of 50 nM for Hg(2+) spiked pond and river water could be achieved. Furthermore, multiple tests could be performed simultaneously with a 40 min turnaround time. These results suggest that the proposed platform possesses the capability for sensitive and high-throughput on-site mercury pollution monitoring in resource-constrained settings.

  20. DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence polarization for the sensitive detection of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Wang, Shuangli; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Liu, Yufang

    2018-04-05

    Despite their practical applications, Ag + ions are environmental pollutants and affect human health. So the effective detection methods of Ag + ions are imperative. Herein, we developed a simple, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective fluorescence polarization sensor for Ag + detection in aqueous solution using thiol-DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this sensing strategy, Ag + ions can specifically interact with a cytosine-cytosine (CC) mismatch in DNA duplexes and form stable metal-mediated cytosine-Ag + -cytosine (C-Ag + -C) base pairs. The formation of the C-Ag + -C complex results in evident changes in the molecular volume and fluorescence polarization signal. To achieve our aims, we prepared two complementary DNA strands containing C-base mismatches (probe A: 5'-SH-A 10 -TACCACTCCTCAC-3' and probe B: 5'-TCCTCACCAGTCCTA-FAM-3'). The stable hybridization between probe A and probe B occurs with the formation of the C-Ag + -C complex in the presence of Ag + ions, leading to obvious fluorescence quenching in comparison to the system without AuNP enhancement. The assay can be used to identify nanomolar levels of Ag + within 6 min at room temperature, and has extremely high specificity for Ag + , even in the presence of higher concentrations of interfering metal ions. Furthermore, the sensor was successfully applied to the detection of Ag + ions in environmental water samples and showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity, implying its promising application in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Coatings that Protect Plasmonic Structures for Materials Characterization and Detection and Identification of Chemical, Biological and Explosive Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    require the rough metal films that result from dewetting , the silver films for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and XR study were made thick...enough to avoid dewetting , since smooth, planar films were needed for those techniques. The preparation conditions for these flat samples were the same...spectroscopy (XPS) and AFM. While TERS and SERS- based detection techniques require the rough metal films that result from dewetting , the silver 4 films

  2. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  3. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  4. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  5. Ambient Pressure Laser Desorption—Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Fast and Reliable Detection of Explosives, Drugs, and Their Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Reiss

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast and reliable information is crucial for first responders to draw correct conclusions at crime scenes. An ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD mass spectrometer is introduced for this scenario, which enables detecting substances on surfaces without sample pretreatment. It is especially useful for substances with low vapor pressure and thermolabile ones. The APLD allows for the separation of desorption and ionization into two steps and, therefore, both can be optimized separately. Within this work, an improved version of the developed system is shown that achieves limits of detection (LOD down to 500 pg while remaining fast and flexible. Furthermore, realistic scenarios are applied to prove the usability of this system in real-world issues. For this purpose, post-blast residues of a bomb from the Second World War were analyzed, and the presence of PETN was proven without sample pretreatment. In addition, the analyzable substance range could be expanded by various drugs and drug precursors. Thus, the presented instrumentation can be utilized for an increased number of forensically important compound classes without changing the setup. Drug precursors revealed a LOD ranging from 6 to 100 ng. Drugs such as cocaine hydrochloride, heroin, (3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA hydrochloride, and others exhibit a LOD between 10 to 200 ng.

  6. Towards the Detection of Explosive Taggants: Microwave and Millimetre-Wave Gas-Phase Spectroscopies of 3-Nitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Kleiner, Isabelle; Goubet, Manuel; Bteich, Sabath; Mouret, Gael; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Meerts, W Leo; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-01-12

    The monitoring of gas-phase mononitrotoluenes is crucial for defence, civil security and environmental interests because they are used as taggant for TNT detection and in the manufacturing of industrial compounds such as dyestuffs. In this study, we have succeeded to measure and analyse at high-resolution a room temperature rotationally resolved millimetre-wave spectrum of meta-nitrotoluene (3-NT). Experimental and theoretical difficulties have been overcome, in particular, those related to the low vapour pressure of 3-NT and to the presence of a CH 3 internal rotation in an almost free rotation regime (V 3 =6.7659(24) cm -1 ). Rotational spectra have been recorded in the microwave and millimetre-wave ranges using a supersonic jet Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer (T rot <10 K) and a millimetre-wave frequency multiplication chain (T=293 K), respectively. Spectral analysis of pure rotation lines in the vibrational ground state and in the first torsional excited state supported by quantum chemistry calculations permits the rotational energy of the molecule, the hyperfine structure due to the 14 N nucleus, and the internal rotation of the methyl group to be characterised. A line list is provided for future in situ detection. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Poly(o-methoxyaniline modified electrode for detection of lithium ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Antonio Lindino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of an electrode modified with poly(o-methoxyaniline for detecting lithium ions. These ions are present in drugs used for treating bipolar disorder and that requires periodical monitoring of the concentration of lithium in blood serum. Poly(o-methoxyaniline was obtained electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry on the surface of a gold electrode. The results showed that the electrode modified with a conducting polymer responded to lithium ions in the concentration range of 1 x 10-5 to 1 x 10-4 mol L-1 . The results also confirmed that the performance of the modified electrode was comparable to that of the standard method (atomic emission spectrophotometry.

  8. Poly(ο-methoxyaniline) modified electrode for detection of lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindino, Cleber Antonio; Casagrande, Marcella; Peiter, Andreia; Ribeiro, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an electrode modified with poly(ο-methoxyaniline) for detecting lithium ions. These ions are present in drugs used for treating bipolar disorder and that requires periodical monitoring of the concentration of lithium in blood serum. Poly(ο-methoxyaniline) was obtained electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry on the surface of a gold electrode. The results showed that the electrode modified with a conducting polymer responded to lithium ions in the concentration range of 1 x 10 -5 to 1 x 10 -4 mol L -1 . The results also confirmed that the performance of the modified electrode was comparable to that of the standard method (atomic emission spectrophotometry). (author)

  9. Poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) modified electrode for detection of lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindino, Cleber Antonio; Casagrande, Marcella; Peiter, Andreia; Ribeiro, Caroline [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Toledo, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports the use of an electrode modified with poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) for detecting lithium ions. These ions are present in drugs used for treating bipolar disorder and that requires periodical monitoring of the concentration of lithium in blood serum. Poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) was obtained electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry on the surface of a gold electrode. The results showed that the electrode modified with a conducting polymer responded to lithium ions in the concentration range of 1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}. The results also confirmed that the performance of the modified electrode was comparable to that of the standard method (atomic emission spectrophotometry). (author)

  10. Transmitted ion energy loss distributions to detect cluster formation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selen, L.J.M.; Loon, A. van; IJzendoorn, L.J. van; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    2002-01-01

    The energy loss distribution of ions transmitted through a 5.7±0.2 μm thick Si crystal was measured and simulated with the Monte Carlo channeling simulation code FLUX. A general resemblance between the measured and simulated energy loss distributions was obtained after incorporation of an energy dependent energy loss in the simulation program. The energy loss calculations are used to investigate the feasibility to detect the presence of light element dopant clusters in a host crystal from the shape of the energy loss distribution, with transmission ion channeling. A curved crystal structure is used as a model for a region in the host crystal with clusters. The presence of the curvature does have a large influence on the transmitted energy distribution, which offers the possibility to determine the presence of dopant clusters in a host crystal with transmission ion channeling

  11. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  12. Metal-Free Poly-Cycloaddition of Activated Azide and Alkynes toward Multifunctional Polytriazoles: Aggregation-Induced Emission, Explosive Detection, Fluorescent Patterning, and Light Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongwei; He, Benzhao; Quan, Changyun; Zheng, Chao; Deng, Haiqin; Hu, Rongrong; Zhao, Zujin; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The metal-free click polymerization (MFCP) of activated alkynes and azides or activated azide and alkynes have been developed into powerful techniques for the construction of polytriazoles without the obsession of metallic catalyst residues problem. However, the MFCP of activated azides and alkynes is rarely applied in preparation of functional polytriazoles. In this paper, soluble multifunctional polytriazoles (PIa and PIb) with high weight-average molecular weights (M w up to 32 000) are prepared via the developed metal-free poly-cycloaddition of activated azide and alkynes in high yields (up to 90%). The resultant PIa and PIb are thermally stable, and show aggregation-induced emission characteristics, enabling their aggregates to detect explosives with superamplification effect. Moreover, thanks to their containing aromatic rings and polar moieties, PIa and PIb exhibit high refractive indices. In addition, they can also be cross-linked upon UV irradiation to generate 2D fluorescent patterning due to their remaining azide groups and containing ester groups. Thus, these multifunctional polytriazoles are potentially applicable in the optoelectronic and sensing fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Novel Approach to Detect Accelerated Aged and Surface-Mediated Degradation in Explosives by UPLC-ESI-MS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beppler, Christina L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A new approach was created for studying energetic material degradation. This approach involved detecting and tentatively identifying non-volatile chemical species by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with multivariate statistical data analysis that form as the CL-20 energetic material thermally degraded. Multivariate data analysis showed clear separation and clustering of samples based on sample group: either pristine or aged material. Further analysis showed counter-clockwise trends in the principal components analysis (PCA), a type of multivariate data analysis, Scores plots. These trends may indicate that there was a discrete shift in the chemical markers as the went from pristine to aged material, and then again when the aged CL-20 mixed with a potentially incompatible material was thermally aged for 4, 6, or 9 months. This new approach to studying energetic material degradation should provide greater knowledge of potential degradation markers in these materials.

  14. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuyan; Jia, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag+/Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg2+/Hg2 2+ (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg2+ ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg2+ ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg2+ ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg2+ ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg2+ ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  15. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuyan; Jia Xiaoxia; Chen Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag + /Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg 2+ /Hg 2 2+ (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg 2+ ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg 2+ ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg 2+ ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg 2+ ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg 2+ ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  16. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Shuyan, E-mail: shuyangao@htu.cn; Jia Xiaoxia; Chen Yanli [Henan Normal University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science (China)

    2013-01-15

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag{sup +}/Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg{sup 2+}/Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+} (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg{sup 2+} ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg{sup 2+} ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg{sup 2+} ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg{sup 2+} ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg{sup 2+} ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  17. Real-time detection of metal ions using conjugated polymer composite papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Kwon, Oh Seok; Huh, Yang-Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2014-09-21

    Cellulose, a natural polymeric material, has widespread technical applications because of its inherent structural rigidity and high surface area. As a conjugated polymer, polypyrrole shows practical potential for a diverse and promising range of future technologies. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the real-time detection and removal of metal ions with polypyrrole/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers in solution. Simply, the conjugated polymer papers had different chemical/physical properties by applying different potentials to them, which resulted in differentiable response patterns and adsorption efficiencies for individual metal ions. First, large-area PPCL papers with a diameter of 5 cm were readily obtained via vapor deposition polymerization. The papers exhibited both mechanical flexibility and robustness, in which polypyrrole retained its redox property perfectly. The ability of the PPCL papers to recognize metal ions was examined in static and flow cells, in which real-time current change was monitored at five different applied potentials (+1, +0.5, 0, -0.5, and -1 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Distinguishable signals in the PPCL paper responses were observed for individual metal ions through principal component analysis. Particularly, the PPCL papers yielded unique signatures for three metal ions, Hg(ii), Ag(i), and Cr(iii), even in a real sample, groundwater. The sorption of metal ions by PPCL papers was examined in the flow system. The PPCL papers had a greatly superior adsorption efficiency for Hg(ii) compared to that of the other metal ions. With the strong demand for the development of inexpensive, flexible, light-weight, and environmentally friendly devices, the fascinating characteristics of these PPCL papers are likely to provide good opportunities for low-cost paper-based flexible or wearable devices.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz M Abdi

    Full Text Available A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+ and Hg(2+ ions. The Pb(2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+ compared to Hg(2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  19. State of health detection for Lithium ion batteries in photovoltaic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.M.; Chan, W.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► DC resistances of batteries. ► Fuzzy logic inference. ► SOH detection for battery. - Abstract: In many photovoltaic systems, rechargeable batteries are required to even out irregularities in solar irradiation. However, the health conditions of the batteries are crucial for the reliability of the overall system. In this paper, the equivalent DC resistances of Lithium ion battery cells of various health conditions during charging under different temperatures have been collected and the relationships between equivalent DC resistance, health condition and working temperature have been identified. The equivalent DC resistance can easily be obtained during the charging period of a battery by switching off the charging current periodically for a very short duration of time. A simple and effective battery charger with state of health (SOH) detection for Lithium ion battery cell has been developed based on the identified equivalent DC resistance. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed SOH determination scheme.

  20. Naked eye and smartphone applicable detection of toxic mercury ions using fluorescent carbon nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    BAÇ, BURCU; GENÇ, RÜKAN

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan passivated carbon nanodots (C-Dots$_{CHIT})$ were synthesized from expired molasses via a simple and green thermal synthesis procedure. As-synthesized C-Dots were nitrogen-doped (NC-Dots$_{CHIT})$ by posttreatment with liquid ammonia and used as nanoprobes for fluorometric detection of mercury ions (Hg(II)$_{aq.})$. Fluorescence response of NC-Dots$_{CHIT}$ in the presence of mercury was evaluated and compared with that of the polyethylene glycol passivated C-Dots$_{PEG}$. This sensi...

  1. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Histidine–dialkoxyanthracene dyad for selective and sensitive detection of mercury ions

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Sachin

    2017-12-18

    Histidine-dialkoxyanthracene (HDA) was synthesised as a turn off type fluorescent sensor for fast and sensitive detection of mercury ions (Hg2+) in aqueous media. The two histidine moieties act as ‘claws’ to selectively complex Hg2+. The binding ratio of HDA to Hg2+ was 1:1 (metal-to-ligand ratio). The association constant for Hg2+ towards the receptor HDA obtained from Benesi–Hildebrand plot was found to be 3.22 × 104 M−1 with detection limit as low as 4.7 nM (0.94 μg/L).

  3. N-Dansyl-N`-ethylthiourea for the fluorometric detection of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, M.; Sandor, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst.

    1996-11-01

    N-Dansyl-N`-ethylthiourea (DET) forms fluorescent chelates with a large number of heavy metal ions. The influence of the pH-value on the luminescence of DET and its metal chelates was investigated. The addition of Cu(II) to DET causes a bathochromic shift of the emission maximum, which is linearly dependent on the Cu(II) concentration. Low detection limits and a wide linear range of detection are achieved by HPLC using RP 18 columns as stationary phase. Also presented are first measurements of fluorescence decay times of the ligand as well as some complexes. (orig.) With 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Simultaneous fluorescent detection of multiple metal ions based on the DNAzymes and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Wen; Wu, Hong; Liu, Xingyan; Fu, Min; Jiang, Jiaolai; Du, Yunfeng; Yang, Lizhu; Huang, Yu

    2017-09-15

    A novel fluorescent detection strategy for simultaneous detection of Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Mg 2+ based on DNAzyme branched junction structure with three kinds of DNAzymes and graphene oxide (GO) was presented. Three fluorophores labeled DNA sequences consisted with enzyme-strand (E-DNA) and substrate strand (S-DNA) were annealed to form DNAzyme branched junction structure. In the presence of target metal ion, the DNAzyme was activated to cleave the fluorophore labeled S-DNA. The S-DNA fragments were released and adsorbed onto GO surface to quench the fluorescent signal. The detection limit was calculated to be 1 nM for Cu 2+ , 200 nM for Mg 2+ , and 0.3 nM for Pb 2+ , respectively. This strategy was successfully used for simultaneous detection of Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ and Pb 2+ in human serum. Moreover, it had potential application for simultaneous detection of multiple metal ions in environmental and biological samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88 Sr + ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  6. Colorimetric detection of trace copper ions based on catalytic leaching of silver-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Tingting; Chen, Lingxin; Chen, Zhaopeng; Wang, Yunqing; Chen, Ling; Li, Jinhua

    2011-11-01

    A colorimetric, label-free, and nonaggregation-based silver coated gold nanoparticles (Ag/Au NPs) probe has been developed for detection of trace Cu(2+) in aqueous solution, based on the fact that Cu(2+) can accelerate the leaching rate of Ag/Au NPs by thiosulfate (S(2)O(3)(2-)). The leaching of Ag/Au NPs would lead to dramatic decrease in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption as the size of Ag/Au NPs decreased. This colorimetric strategy based on size-dependence of nanoparticles during their leaching process provided a highly sensitive (1.0 nM) and selective detection toward Cu(2+), with a wide linear detection range (5-800 nM) over nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The cost-effective probe allows rapid and sensitive detection of trace Cu(2+) ions in water samples, indicating its potential applicability for the determination of copper in real samples.

  7. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R, E-mail: ozeri@weizmann.ac.il [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  8. Ions generated from uranyl nitrate solutions by electrospray ionization (ESI) and detected with Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasilis, Sofie; Somogyi, Arpád; Herrmann, Kristin; Pemberton, Jeanne E

    2006-02-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of uranyl nitrate solutions generates a wide variety of positively and negatively charged ions, including complex adducts of uranyl ions with methoxy, hydroxy, and nitrate ligands. In the positive ion mode, ions detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry are sensitive to instrumental tuning parameters such as quadrupole operating frequency and trapping time. Positive ions correspond to oligomeric uranyl nitrate species that can be characterized as having a general formula of [(UO(2))(n)(A)(m)(CH(3)OH)(s)](+) or [(UO(2))(n)(O)(A)(m)(CH(3)OH)(s)](+) with n = 1-4, m = 1-7, s = 0 or 1, and A = OH, NO(3), CH(3)O or a combination of these, although the formation of NO(3)-containing species is preferred. In the negative ion mode, complexes of the form [(UO(2))(NO(3))(m)](-) (m = 1-3) are detected, although the formation of the oxo-containing ions [(UO(2))(O)(n)(NO(3))(m)](-) (n = 1-2, m = 1-2) and the hydroxy-containing ions [(UO(2))(OH)(n)(NO(3))(m)](-) (n = 1-2, m = 0-1) are also observed. The extent of coordinative unsaturation of both positive and negative ions can be determined by ligand association/exchange and H/D exchange experiments using D(2)O and CD(3)OD as neutral reaction partners in the gas-phase. Positive ions are of varying stability and reactivity and may fragment extensively upon collision with D(2)O, CD(3)OD and N(2) in sustained off-resonance irradiation/collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) experiments. Electron-transfer reactions, presumably occurring during electrospray ionization but also in SORI-CID, can result in reduction of U(VI) to U(V) and perhaps even U(IV).

  9. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  10. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  11. Selective detection of Mg2+ ions via enhanced fluorescence emission using Au–DNA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Basu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs have attracted a great deal of research interest for various applications in biosensing. AuNPs have strong binding capability to the phosphate and sugar groups in DNA, rendering unique physicochemical properties for detection of metal ions. The formation of Au–DNA nanocomposites is evident from the observed changes in the optical absorption, plasmon band, zeta potential, DLS particle size distribution, as well as TEM and AFM surface morphology analysis. Circular dichroism studies also revealed that DNA-functionalized AuNP binding caused a conformational change in the DNA structure. Due to the size and shape dependent plasmonic interactions of AuNPs (33–78 nm with DNA, the resultant Au–DNA nanocomposites (NCs exhibit superior fluorescence emission due to chemical binding with Ca2+, Fe2+ and Mg2+ ions. A significant increase in fluorescence emission (λex = 260 nm of Au–DNA NCs was observed after selectively binding with Mg2+ ions (20–800 ppm in an aqueous solution where a minimum of 100 ppm Mg2+ ions was detected based on the linearity of concentration versus fluorescence intensity curve (λem = 400 nm. The effectiveness of Au–DNA nanocomposites was further verified by comparing the known concentration (50–120 ppm of Mg2+ ions in synthetic tap water and a real life sample of Gelusil (300–360 ppm Mg2+, a widely used antacid medicine. Therefore, this method could be a sensitive tool for the estimation of water hardness after careful preparation of a suitably designed Au–DNA nanostructure.

  12. HPLC/EC (High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Electrochemical Detection) Studies of Selected Explosive Components, Nitroanilines, and Nitrophenols with Dual Electrode Electrochemical Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    advantage of HPLC/EC for the separation and detection of electroactive species is well documented in the literature (1-5). It has been demonstrated that...Zorbax, Alltech Spherisorb or BAS Biophase columns. The injection valve was a Rheodyne Model 7120 fitted with a 20 pL loop and mounted vertically for

  13. Development of sputter ion pump based SG leak detection system for Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, B.; Sureshkumar, K.V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Development and commissioning of SG leak detection system for FBTR. ► Development of Robust method of using sputter ion pump based system. ► Modifications for improving reliability and availability. ► On line injection of hydrogen in sodium during reactor operation. ► Triplication of the SG leak detection system. - Abstract: The Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt, loop type sodium cooled fast reactor built at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam as a fore-runner to the second stage of Indian nuclear power programme. The reactor design is based on the French reactor Rapsodie with several modifications which include the provision of a steam-water circuit and turbo-generator. FBTR uses sodium as the coolant in the main heat transport medium to transfer heat from the reactor core to the feed water in the tertiary loop for producing superheated steam, which drives the turbo-generator. Sodium and water flow in shell and tube side respectively, separated by thin-walls of the ferritic steel tubes of the once-through steam generator (SG). Material defects in these tubes can lead to leakage of water into sodium, resulting in sodium water reactions leading to undesirable consequences. Early detection of water or steam leaks into sodium in the steam generator units of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) is an important requirement from safety and economic considerations. The SG leak in FBTR is detected by Sputter Ion Pump (SIP) based Steam Generator Leak Detection (SGLD) system and Thermal Conductivity Detector (TCD) based Hydrogen in Argon Detection (HAD) system. Many modifications were carried out in the SGLD system for the reactor operation to improve the reliability and availability. This paper details the development and the acquired experience of SIP based SGLD system instrumentation for real time hydrogen detection in sodium for FBTR.

  14. A Simple Analytical Model for Predicting the Detectable Ion Current in Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Corona Discharge Ionization Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar Thomas; Kobelt, Tim; Spehlbrink, Hauke; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Corona discharge ionization sources are often used in ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) when a non-radioactive ion source with high ion currents is required. Typically, the corona discharge is followed by a reaction region where analyte ions are formed from the reactant ions. In this work, we present a simple yet sufficiently accurate model for predicting the ion current available at the end of this reaction region when operating at reduced pressure as in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) or most IMS-MS instruments. It yields excellent qualitative agreement with measurement results and is even able to calculate the ion current within an error of 15%. Additional interesting findings of this model are the ion current at the end of the reaction region being independent from the ion current generated by the corona discharge and the ion current in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) growing quadratically when scaling down the length of the reaction region. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Photoelectrochemical detection of copper ions by modulating the growth of CdS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyte, Ruta; Barroso, Javier; Díez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Saa, Laura; Möller, Marco; Pavlov, Valeri

    2017-09-15

    We discovered that copper ions (Cu 2+ ) catalyze the oxidation of cysteine (CSH) by oxygen (O 2 ) to modulate the growth of CSH-capped cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs). This new chemical process was applied to sensitive fluorogenic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection of Cu 2+ ions in real samples of mineral and tap water using the photocatalytic activity of the resulting NPs. Disposable screen-printed electrodes (SPCEs) modified with electroactive polyvinylpyridine bearing osmium complex (Os-PVP) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed for PEC analytical system. CdS NPs formed during the assay photocatalyze oxidation of 1-thioglycerol (TG) upon application of 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl to SPCEs. Os-PVP complex mediated the electron transfer between the electrode surface and CdS NPs. We proved that our assays did not suffer from interference from other ions accompanying Cu 2+ and the sensitivity of our assays covers the European Union standard limit of Cu 2+ ions in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Highly sensitive colour change system within slight differences in metal ion concentrations based on homo-binuclear complex formation equilibrium for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Keigo; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kudo, Yuki; Endo, Masatoshi; Yokota, Fumihiko; Shida, Junichi; Yotsuyanagi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A new technique of expressing slight differences in metal ion concentrations by clear difference in colour was established for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions. The proposed method is based on rapid change of the mole fraction of the homo-binuclear complex (M 2 L) about a ligand in a narrow range of the total metal ion concentration (M T ) in a small excess, in case the second metal ion is bound to the reagent molecule which can bind two metal ions. Theoretical simulations showed that the highly sensitive colour change within slight differences in metal ion concentrations would be realized under the following conditions: (i) both of the stepwise formation constants of complex species are sufficiently large; (ii) the stepwise formation constant of the 1:1 complex (ML) is larger than that of M 2 L; and (iii) the absorption spectrum of M 2 L is far apart from the other species in the visible region. Furthermore, the boundary of the colour region in M T would be readily controlled by the total ligand concentration (L T ). Based on this theory, the proposed model was verified with the 3,3'-bis[bis(carboxymethyl)amino]methyl derivatives of sulphonephthalein dyes such as xylenol orange (XO), methylthymol blue (MTB), and methylxylenol blue (MXB), which can bind two metal ions at both ends of a π-electron conjugated system. The above-mentioned model was proved with the iron(III)-XO system at pH 2. In addition, MTB and MXB were suitable reagents for the visual threshold detection of trivalent metal ions such as iron(III), aluminium(III), gallium(III) and indium(III) ion in slightly acidic media. The proposed method has been applied successfully as a screening test for aluminium(III) ion in river water sampled at the downstream area of an old mine

  17. Fast Thermal Runaway Detection for Lithium-Ion Cells in Large Scale Traction Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal runaway of single cells within a large scale lithium-ion battery is a well-known risk that can lead to critical situations if no counter measures are taken in today’s lithium-ion traction batteries for battery electric vehicles (BEVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. The United Nations have published a draft global technical regulation on electric vehicle safety (GTR EVS describing a safety feature to warn passengers in case of a thermal runaway. Fast and reliable detection of faulty cells undergoing thermal runaway within the lithium-ion battery is therefore a key factor in battery designs for comprehensive passenger safety. A set of various possible sensors has been chosen based on the determined cell thermal runaway impact. These sensors have been tested in different sized battery setups and compared with respect to their ability of fast and reliable thermal runaway detection and their feasibility for traction batteries.

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Pyridyl thiourea Derivatives As Ionophores For Cu(II) Ion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Mohd Khairul; Mohd Faizuddin Abu Hasan; Adibah Izzati Daud; Adibah Izzati Daud; Hafiza Mohamed Zuki; Ku Halim Ku Bulat; Maisara Abdul Kadir

    2016-01-01

    Copper (II) ion chemical sensors based on pyridine-thiourea derivatives; N-pyridyl-N ' -(biphenyl-4-carbonyl)thiourea (L1), and N-pyridyl-N ' -(3,5-dimethy oxybenzoyl)thiourea (L2) were synthesised, characterised, and studied as ionophores in the form of thin-films PVC membranes. The ionophores exhibited good responses towards copper (II) ion over the concentration range of 2 x 10 -4 to 10 x 10 -4 M with a limit of detection 1.34 x 10 -5 to 1.48 x 10 -5 M. The proposed sensors L1 and L2 revealed good performance in term of reproducibility and regeneration of the ionophores with low relative standard deviation (RSD) values 4.17 % and 2.74 % respectively. Besides, quantum chemical calculation performed using Gaussian 09 program indicated the oxygen (O) atom from carbonyl moiety (C=O) was the most favourite reactive site and mainly responsible for ionophore Cu(II) interaction. The obtained data revealed pyridine-thiourea derivatives offered great potential as ionophore for the detection of Cu (II) ion. (author)

  19. Supersensitive fingerprinting of explosives by chemically modified nanosensors arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Amir; Havivi, Ehud; Shacham, Ronen; Hahamy, Ehud; Leibovich, Ronit; Pevzner, Alexander; Krivitsky, Vadim; Davivi, Guy; Presman, Igor; Elnathan, Roey; Engel, Yoni; Flaxer, Eli; Patolsky, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    The capability to detect traces of explosives sensitively, selectively and rapidly could be of great benefit for applications relating to civilian national security and military needs. Here, we show that, when chemically modified in a multiplexed mode, nanoelectrical devices arrays enable the supersensitive discriminative detection of explosive species. The fingerprinting of explosives is achieved by pattern recognizing the inherent kinetics, and thermodynamics, of interaction between the chemically modified nanosensors array and the molecular analytes under test. This platform allows for the rapid detection of explosives, from air collected samples, down to the parts-per-quadrillion concentration range, and represents the first nanotechnology-inspired demonstration on the selective supersensitive detection of explosives, including the nitro- and peroxide-derivatives, on a single electronic platform. Furthermore, the ultrahigh sensitivity displayed by our platform may allow the remote detection of various explosives, a task unachieved by existing detection technologies.

  20. A novel fluorescent probe (dtpa-bis(cytosine)) for detection of Eu(III) in rare earth metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ren, Peipei; Liu, Guanhong; Song, Youtao; Bu, Naishun; Wang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescent probe, dtpa-bis(cytosine), was designed and synthesized for detecting europium (Eu3 +) ion. Upon addition of Eu3 + ions into the dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity can strongly be enhanced. Conversely, adding other rare earth metal ions, such as Y3 +, Ce3 +, Pr3 +, Nd3 +, Sm3 +, Gd3 +, Tb3 +, Dy3 +, Ho3 +, Er3 +, Yb3 + and Lu3 +, into dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity is decreased slightly. Some parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity of dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution in the presence of Eu3 + ions were investigated, including solution pH value, Eu3 + ion concentration and interfering substances. The detection mechanism of Eu3 + ion using dtpa-bis(cytosine) as fluorescent probe was proposed. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence emission intensities of EuIII-dtpa-bis(cytosine) at 375 nm in the concentration range of 0.50 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1-5.00 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1 of Eu3 + ion display a better linear relationship. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined as 8.65 × 10- 7 mol • L- 1 and the corresponding correlation coefficient (R2) of the linear equation is 0.9807. It is wished that the proposed method could be applied for sensitively and selectively detecting Eu3 + ion.

  1. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  2. Dansyl Based "Turn-On" Fluorescent Sensor for Cu2+ Ion Detection and the Application to Living Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasomphan, Weerachai; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Smanmoo, Srung

    2017-11-01

    A new "turn-on" fluorescent chemosensor based on dansyl derivative was prepared for Cu 2+ ion sensing. Hydroxyl, imine and azomethine groups in Schiff base derived compound 1 were deliberately introduced for facilitating the binding of Cu 2+ ion. Of screen metal ions, compound 1 showed a high degree of selectivity toward Cu 2+ ion. Other interfering metal ions did not affect the fluorescence intensity of compound 1, except Hg 2+ and Fe 3+ ions exhibited a significant degree of fluorescence quenching. Upon binding of Cu 2+ ion, compound 1 displayed a chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) resulting in increasing of the fluorescence intensity. The molecular optimized geometry indicated the binding ratio between compound 1 and Cu 2+ ion at 1:1 with the binding constant of 1.68 × 10 - 7 M - 1 . The optimized condition for sensing ability of compound 1 with a detection limit of 5 × 10 - 7 M was found at the physiological pH 7.2 with the excitation wavelength of 366 nm. Due to no cytotoxicity and good photophysical properties, compound 1 was extended its application for the detection of Cu 2+ ion in Vero cells. Compound 1 could be potentially used as an intracellular fluorescent chemosensor for tracking Cu 2+ ion. Graphical Abstract.

  3. Magnetic detection of mercuric ion using giant magnetoresistance-based biosensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Klein, Todd; Feng, Yinglong; Li, Qin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy employing a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor and DNA chemistry for the detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)). This assay takes advantages of high sensitivity and real-time signal readout of GMR biosensor and high selectivity of thymine-thymine (T-T) pair for Hg(2+). The assay has a detection limit of 10 nM in both buffer and natural water, which is the maximum mercury level in drinking water regulated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The magnitude of the dynamic range for Hg(2+) detection is up to three orders (10 nM to 10 μM). Herein, GMR sensing technology is first introduced into a pollutant monitoring area. It can be foreseen that the GMR biosensor could become a robust contender in the areas of environmental monitoring and food safety testing.

  4. Highly sensitive detection of lead(II) ion using multicolor CdTe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, W.; Zhang, C.; Gao, Q.; Li, H.

    2012-01-01

    Multicolor and water-soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized with thioglycolic acid (TGA) as stabilizer. These QDs have a good size distribution, display high fluorescence quantum yield, and can be applied to the ultrasensitive detection of Pb(II) ion by virtue of their quenching effect. The size of the QDs exerts a strong effect on sensitivity, and quenching of luminescence is most effective for the smallest particles. The quenching mechanism is discussed. Fairly selective detection was accomplished by utilizing QDs with a diameter of 1. 6 nm which resulted in a detection limit of 4. 7 nmol L -1 concentration of Pb(II). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Pb(II) in spinach and citrus leaves, and the results are in good agreement with those obtained with atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  5. Investigation of the chemical explosion of an ion exchange resin column and resulting americium contamination of personnel in the 242-Z building, August 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-19

    As a result of an explosion in the Waste Treatment Facility, 242-Z Building, 200 West Area of the Hanford Reservation on August 30, 1976, the Manager of the Richland Operations Office (RL), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), appointed an ERDA Committee to conduct a formal investigation and to prepare a report on their findings of this occurrence. The Committee was instructed to conduct the investigation in accordance with ERDAMC 0502, insofar as circumstances would permit, to cover and explain technical elements of the casual sequence(s) of the occurrence, and to describe management systems which should have or could have prevented the occurrence. This report is the result of the investigation and presents the conclusions of the review.

  6. A rhodamine B-based fluorescent sensor toward highly selective mercury (II) ions detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-04-01

    This work presented the design, syntheses and photophysical properties of a rhodamine B-based fluorescence probe, which exhibited a sensitive and selective recognition towards mercury (II). The chemosensor RA (Rhodamine- amide- derivative) contained a 5-aminoisophthalic acid diethyl ester and a rhodamine group, and the property of spirolactone of this chemosensor RA was detected by X-ray crystal structure analyses. Chemosensor RA afforded turn-on fluorescence enhancement and displayed high brightness for Hg(2+), which leaded to the opening of the spirolactone ring and consequently caused the appearance of strong absorption at visible range, moreover, the obvious and characteristic color changed from colorless to pink was observed. We envisioned that the chemosensor RA exhibited a considerable specificity with two mercury (II) ions which was attributed to the open of spirolactone over other interference metal ions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles stabilized with C-phycocyanin and for fluorimetric detection of copper ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nana; Hou, Yanhua; Lu, Zongbao; Yu, Huatong; Wang, Quanfu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, C-phycocyanin as protective agent, AgNO3 as raw material and NaBH4 as reducing agent synthesized C-phycocyanin-Ag nanoparticles (PC-AgNPs). The synthesis conditions of PC-AgNPs were determined by optimization. The maximum UV absorption peak of PC-AgNPs at 400 nm. The fluorescence excitation wavelength was 580 nm and the emission wavelength was 625 nm. PC-AgNPs was spherical in transmission electron microscope and the particles sizes were about 10-25 nm. In addition, fluorescence quenching was observed after adding copper ions to PC-AgNPs, which indicated that PC-AgNPs has potential applications in the detection of copper ions in diverse water environment.

  8. Detection of metal ions by atomic emission spectroscopy from liquid-electrode discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jian; Yu Jing; Li Jun; Wang Jianping; Ying Yibin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the discharge ignited in a capillary connecting two beakers filled with electrolyte solution is investigated. During the experiment, an external electrical voltage is applied through two platinum electrodes dipped in the beakers. A gas bubble forms inside the capillary when the applied voltage is higher than 1000 V. Since the beakers are tilted slightly, after generation, the bubble moves slowly to the uphill outlet of the capillary due to buoyancy. When the bubble reaches the end of the capillary, it cracks and a bright discharge is ignited. The emission spectra of the discharge plasma are related to the metal ions dissolved in the solution and thus can be used for metal ion detection. An application of the system to measurement of water hardness is shown

  9. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  11. Development of a Compton camera for online ion beam range verification via prompt γ detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldawood, S. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Liprandi, S.; Marinsek, T.; Bortfeldt, J.; Lang, C.; Lutter, R.; Dedes, G.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); Maier, L.; Gernhaeuser, R. [TU Munich, Garching (Germany); Kolff, H. van der [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); TU Delft (Netherlands); Castelhano, I. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Schaart, D.R. [TU Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    Precise and preferably online ion beam range verification is a mandatory prerequisite to fully exploit the advantages of hadron therapy in cancer treatment. An imaging system is being developed in Garching aiming to detect promptγ rays induced by nuclear reactions between the ion beam and biological tissue. The Compton camera prototype consists of a stack of six customized double-sided Si-strip detectors (DSSSD, 50 x 50 mm{sup 2}, 0.5 mm thick, 128 strips/side) acting as scatterer, while the absorber is formed by a monolithic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator crystal (50 x 50 x 30 mm{sup 3}) read out by a position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier (Hamamatsu H9500). The on going characterization of the Compton camera properties and its individual components both offline in the laboratory as well as online using proton beam are presented.

  12. Better to detect nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, Bob

    1987-01-01

    In a 150 km 2 reserve just west of Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories, three GSC employees operate one of the most sensitive seismic arrays in existence for locating ground movement around the world. The array station is staffed year round despite the harsh climate. Since 1963 the Yellowknife seismic array has contributed data which will significantly aid international efforts to achieve a nuclear test ban treaty

  13. Quaternary ammonium promoted ultra selective and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion in water and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ji, Yuzhuo; Tang, Xinjing

    2014-10-21

    Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probes with a quaternary ammonium moiety have been rationally designed and developed for fast and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion (F(-) from NaF, not TBAF) in aqueous solution and living cells. With the sequestration effect of quaternary ammonium, the detection time was less than 2 min and the detection limit of fluoride ion was as low as 0.57 ppm that is among the lowest detection limits in aqueous solutions of many fluoride fluorescence probes in the literature.

  14. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N; Cohen, D D [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P; Walker, S [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H; Hult, M [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M; Zaring, C [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P.; Walker, S. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H.; Hult, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Enhanced detection of explosives by turn-on resonance Raman upon host-guest complexation in solution and the solid state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witlicki, Edward H.; Bähring, Steffen; Johnsen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    complexation occur via a mechanism of resonance between the 785 nm laser line and the strongly absorbing charge-transfer chromophore arising from the complex between electron-donating TTF-C[4]P and electron-accepting nitroaromatic explosives. The addition of chloride forms the Cl-·TTF-C[4]P complex resetting......The recognition of nitroaromatic explosives by a tetrakis-tetrathiafulvalene-calix[4]pyrrole receptor (TTF-C[4]P) yields a "turn on" and fingerprinting response in the resonance Raman scattering observed in solution and the solid state. Intensity changes in nitro vibrations with analyte...

  17. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 36, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman); Boonruang, Sakoolkan, E-mail: sakoolkan.boonruang@nectec.or.th, E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th [Photonics Technology Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), 112 Thailand Science Park, PathumThani 12120 (Thailand); Mohammed, Waleed S., E-mail: sakoolkan.boonruang@nectec.or.th, E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th [Center of Research in Optoelectronics, Communication and Control Systems (BUCROCCS), School of Engineering, Bangkok University, PathumThani 12120 (Thailand); Dutta, Joydeep [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, SE-164 40 Kista, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  18. An azine based sensor for selective detection of Cu2 + ions and its copper complex for sensing of phosphate ions in physiological conditions and in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Karishma; Kumar, Sumit; Kumar, Vipan; Kaur, Jeevanjot; Arora, Saroj; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A simple and cost effective unsymmetrical azine based Schiff base, 5-diethylamino-2-[(2-hydroxy-benzylidene)hydrazonomethyl]-phenol (1) was synthesized which selectively detect Cu2 + ions in the presence of other competitive ions through ;naked eye; in physiological conditions (EtOH-buffer (1:1, v/v, HEPES 10 mM, pH = 7.4)). The presence of Cu2 + induce color change from light yellow green to yellow with the appearance of a new band at 450 nm in UV-Vis spectra of Schiff base 1. The fluorescence of Schiff base 1 (10 μM) was quenched completely in the presence of 2.7 equiv. of Cu2 + ions. Sub-micromolar limit of detection (LOD = 3.4 × 10- 7 M), efficient Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV = 1.8 × 105 L mol- 1) and strong binding constant (log Kb = 5.92) has been determined with the help of fluorescence titration profile. Further, 1 - Cu2 + complex was employed for the detection of phosphate ions (PO43 -, HPO42 - and H2PO4-) at micromolar concentrations in EtOH-buffer of pH 7.4 based on fluorescence recovery due to the binding of Cu2 + with phosphate ions. Solubility at low concentration in aqueous medium, longer excitation (406 nm) and emission wavelength (537 nm), and biocompatibility of Schiff base 1 formulates its use in live cell imaging.

  19. Detection of heavy metal ions in drinking water using a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzani, Erica S; Zhang, Haiqian; Chen, Wilfred; Tao, Nongjian

    2005-03-01

    We have built a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface is divided into a reference and sensing areas, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. In the presence of metal ions, the differential signal changes due to specific binding of the metal ions onto the sensing area coated with properly selected peptides, which provides an accurate real-time measurement and quantification of the metal ions. Selective detection of Cu2+ and Ni2+ in the ppt-ppb range was achieved by coating the sensing surface with peptides NH2-Gly-Gly-His-COOH and NH2-(His)6-COOH. Cu2+ in drinking water was tested using this sensor.

  20. A model of heavy ion detection in physical and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Track structure theory (the Katz model) and its application to the detection of heavy ions in physical and biological systems are reviewed. Following the use of a new corrected formula describing the radial distribution of average dose around the path of a heavy ion, based on results of Monte Carlo calculations and on results of experimental measurements, better agreement is achieved between model calculations and experimentally measured relative effectiveness, for enzymatic and viral systems, for the Fricke dosemeter and for alanine and thermoluminescent (TDL-700) dosemeters irradiated with beams of heavy charged particles. From experimentally measured RBE dependences for survival and frequency of neoplastic transformations in a mammalian cell culture irradiated with beams of energetic heavy ions, values of model parameters for these biological endpoints have been extracted, and a model extrapolation to the low-dose region performed. Results of model calculations are then compared with evaluations of the lung cancer hazard in populations exposed to radon and its progeny. The model can be applied to practical phenomenological analysis of radiation damage in solid-state systems and to dosimetry of charged particle and fast neutron beams using a variety of detectors. The model can also serve as a guide in building more basic models of the action of ionizing radiation with physical and biological systems and guide of development of models of radiation risk more relevant than that used presently. 185 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  1. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  2. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtipalo, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Airmodus Ltd., Finland, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J. [Airmodus Ltd., Finland, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Attoui, M. [University Paris Est Creteil, University Paris-Diderot, LISA, UMR CNRS 7583 (France); Worsnop, D. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) and Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  3. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mikkilä, J.; Vanhanen, J.; Attoui, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  4. Detection of Individual Molecules and Ions by Carbon Nanotube-Based Differential Resistive Pulse Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ran; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Li, Dongqing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of sensing single molecules and cations by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based differential resistive pulse sensing (RPS) technique on a nanofluidic chip. A mathematical model for multichannel RPS systems is developed to evaluate the CNT-based RPS signals. Individual cations, rhodamine B dye molecules, and ssDNAs are detected successfully with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Differentiating ssDNAs with 15 and 30 nucleotides are achieved. The experimental results also show that translocation of negatively charged ssDNAs through a CNT decreases the electrical resistance of the CNT channel, while translocation of positively charged cations and rhodamine B molecules increases the electrical resistance of the CNT. The CNT-based nanofluidic device developed in this work provides a new avenue for single-molecule/ion detection and offers a potential strategy for DNA sequencing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Thermochemistry of mixed explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janney, J.L.; Rogers, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In order to predict thermal hazards of high-energy materials, accurate kinetics constants must be determined. Predictions of thermal hazards for mixtures of high-energy materials require measurements on the mixtures, because interactions among components are common. A differential-scanning calorimeter (DSC) can be used to observe rate processes directly, and isothermal methods enable detection of mechanism changes. Rate-controlling processes will change as components of a mixture are depleted, and the correct depletion function must be identified for each specific stage of a complex process. A method for kinetics measurements on mixed explosives can be demonstrated with Composition B is an approximately 60/40 mixture of RDX and TNT, and is an important military explosive. Kinetics results indicate that the mator process is the decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT with a perturbation caused by interaction between the two components. It is concluded that a combination of chemical kinetics and experimental self-heating procedures provides a good approach to the production of predictive models for thermal hazards of high-energy materials. Systems involving more than one energy-contributing component can be studied. Invalid and dangerous predictive models can be detected by a failure of agreement between prediction and experiment at a specific size, shape, and density. Rates of thermal decomposition for Composition B appear to be modeled adequately for critical-temperature predictions with the following kinetics constants: E = 180.2 kJ mole -1 and Z = 4.62 X 10 16 s -1

  6. Specifically colorimetric recognition of calcium, strontium, and barium ions using 2-mercaptosuccinic acid-functionalized gold nanoparticles and its use in reliable detection of calcium ion in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yong; Xu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xiurong

    2011-10-07

    A colorimetric probe based on 2-mercaptosuccinic acid-functionalized gold nanoparticles has been developed to exhibit selectivity towards Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+) ions over other metallic cations under specified conditions and finds its practical application in detecting Ca(2+) levels in water.

  7. 27 CFR 555.180 - Prohibitions relating to unmarked plastic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... unmarked plastic explosives. 555.180 Section 555.180 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.180 Prohibitions relating to unmarked plastic explosives. (a) No person shall manufacture any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent. (b) No person...

  8. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non‐Polar Solvents by using Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseda, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBACl) ion‐pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso‐octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (CP), which is a well‐known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP, the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non‐polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non‐polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion‐paired salt as well as a free anion in non‐polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP–Cl) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion‐pairing constant (K ip) than TBACl in non‐polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli‐responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces. PMID:29610717

  9. Human telomeric G-quadruplex formation and highly selective fluorescence detection of toxic strontium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Konggang; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-03-01

    Strontium ions play important roles in biological systems. The inhalation of strontium can cause severe respiratory difficulties, anaphylactic reaction and extreme tachycardia. Strontium can replace calcium in organisms, inhibit normal calcium absorption and induce strontium "rickets" in childhood. Thus, the development of sensitive and selective methods for the determination of trace amounts of Sr(2+) in aqueous media is of considerable importance for environmental and human health protection. A number of methodologies, such as X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and instrumental thermal neutron activation analysis, have been reported. However, these methods are somewhat complex, costly, time consuming and, especially, need special instruments. Thus, the design of convenient and inexpensive approaches for the sensitive and selective detection of Sr(2+) with rapid, easy manipulation is in ever-increasing demand. To the best of our knowledge, using DNA conformational change to detect Sr(2+) has not yet been reported. Herein we utilized thiazole orange (TO) as a signal reporter to devise a simple Sr(2+) detection assay based on Sr(2+) induced human telomeric DNA conformational change in the presence of SWNTs. The limit of detection is 10 nM Sr(2+) (0.87 μg L(-1)), far below 4 mg L(-1), the U.S. Federal threshold in drinking water defined by the U.S. EPA.

  10. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  11. Liquid crystal based optical platform for the detection of Pb2+ ions using NiFe2O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehra, Saman; Gul, Iftikhar Hussain; Hussain, Zakir

    2018-06-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and real time detection protocol was developed for Pb2+ ions in water using liquid crystals (LCs). In this method, NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Crystallite size, morphological, functional groups and magnetization studies were confirmed using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques, respectively. The nanoparticles were mono dispersed with average particle size of 20 ± 2 nm. The surfactant stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were incubated in liquid crystal based sensor system for the detection of Pb+2 ions. The bright to dark transition of LC was observed through optical microscope. When this system was further immersed with a solution containing Pb2+ ions, it caused homeotropic to planar orientation of LC. This interaction is attributed to the presence of abundant hydroxyl groups in such as M-OH, Fe-OH on the surface of spinel ferrites nanoparticles. These groups interact with metal ions at aqueous interface, causing disruption in LCs orientation giving bright texture. This sensor showed higher selectivity towards Pb2+ ions. The detection limit was estimated to be 100 ppb. The cheap and effective protocol reported here should make promising development of LC based sensor for lead ion detection.

  12. Liquid crystal based optical platform for the detection of Pb2+ ions using NiFe2O4 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Zehra

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive, selective and real time detection protocol was developed for Pb2+ ions in water using liquid crystals (LCs. In this method, NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Crystallite size, morphological, functional groups and magnetization studies were confirmed using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques, respectively. The nanoparticles were mono dispersed with average particle size of 20 ± 2 nm. The surfactant stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were incubated in liquid crystal based sensor system for the detection of Pb+2 ions. The bright to dark transition of LC was observed through optical microscope. When this system was further immersed with a solution containing Pb2+ ions, it caused homeotropic to planar orientation of LC. This interaction is attributed to the presence of abundant hydroxyl groups in such as M-OH, Fe-OH on the surface of spinel ferrites nanoparticles. These groups interact with metal ions at aqueous interface, causing disruption in LCs orientation giving bright texture. This sensor showed higher selectivity towards Pb2+ ions. The detection limit was estimated to be 100 ppb. The cheap and effective protocol reported here should make promising development of LC based sensor for lead ion detection. Keywords: Chemical co-precipitation method, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Liquid crystals, Nanoparticles, Sensor, X-ray diffraction

  13. Direct determination of recoil ion detection efficiency for coincidence time-of-flight studies of molecular fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Carnes, K.D.; Ginther, S.G.; Johnson, D.T.; Norris, P.J.; Weaver, O.L.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular fragmentation of diatomic and small polyatomic molecules caused by fast ion impact has been studied. The evaluation of the cross sections of the different fragmentation channels depends strongly on the recoil ion detection efficiency, ε r (single ions proportional to ε r , and ion pairs to ε 2 r , etc.). A method is suggested for the direct determination of this detection efficiency. This method is based on the fact that fast H + + CH 4 collisions produce C 2+ fragments only in coincidence with H + and H + 2 fragments, that is, there is a negligible number of C 2+ singles, if any. The measured yield of C 2+ singles is therefore due to events in which the H + m of the H + m + C 2+ ion pair was not detected and thus is proportional to 1 - ε r . Methane fragmentation caused by 1 MeV proton impact is used to evaluate directly the recoil ion detection efficiency and to demonstrate the method of deriving the cross sections of all breakup channels. (orig.)

  14. Highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution based on PEG-coated ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Surinder K; Salaria, Khushboo; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-03-15

    Using polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs), a novel and highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution has been presented. ZnS NPs have been used to develop efficient luminescence sensor which exhibits high reproducibility and stability with the lowest limit of detection of 1.29×10(-6) mol L(-1). The observed limit of detection of the fabricated sensor is ~6 times lower than maximum value of cyanide permitted by United States Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water (7.69×10(-6) mol L(-1)). The interfering studies show that the developed sensor possesses good selectivity for cyanide ion even in presence of other coexisting ions. Importantly, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which demonstrates the utilization of PEG- coated ZnS NPs for efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution. This work demonstrates that rapidly synthesized ZnS NPs can be used to fabricate efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry of Potential By-Products from Homemade Nitrate Ester Explosive Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were ...

  16. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, Ryan [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Sohail, Manzar [Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Queensland 4556 (Australia); Ogden, Mark I.; Mocerino, Mauro [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Pretsch, Ernö [ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), Universitätstrasse 16, CH-8092, Zürich (Switzerland); De Marco, Roland, E-mail: rdemarc1@usc.edu.au [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Queensland 4556 (Australia)

    2014-12-03

    Highlights: • Tuning of metal binding cavities in thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Novel calixarene-based ionophores with improved selectivity for thallium(I). • Sandwich membrane characterization of thallium(I) binding in novel calixarenes. • Improved selectivity and sensitivity with novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Solid contact ion-selective electrodes for novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. - Abstract: Three new calixarene Tl{sup +} ionophores have been utilized in Tl{sup +} ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10{sup −2}–10{sup −6} M TlNO{sub 3} with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (log β{sub IL}) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} with moderate selectivity against Pb{sup 2+}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, H{sup +}, K{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Cs{sup +}, noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8 nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)–poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA–PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4 mV decade

  17. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, Ryan; Sohail, Manzar; Ogden, Mark I.; Mocerino, Mauro; Pretsch, Ernö; De Marco, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tuning of metal binding cavities in thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Novel calixarene-based ionophores with improved selectivity for thallium(I). • Sandwich membrane characterization of thallium(I) binding in novel calixarenes. • Improved selectivity and sensitivity with novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Solid contact ion-selective electrodes for novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. - Abstract: Three new calixarene Tl + ionophores have been utilized in Tl + ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10 −2 –10 −6 M TlNO 3 with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (log β IL ) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn 2+ , Ca 2+ , Ba 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ and Al 3+ with moderate selectivity against Pb 2+ , Li + , Na + , H + , K + , NH 4 + and Cs + , noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8 nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)–poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA–PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4 mV decade −1 and a lower detection limit of 30.2 nM. Due to the presence of an undesirable

  18. Seismic waves travel-time curve, basing on the results of signal detection from chemical explosions detonated at Semipalatinsk Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlova, N.N.; Aristova, I.L.; Germanova, T.I.

    2001-01-01

    A large amount of digital seismic data from the permanent and temporary seismic stations was acquired in the result of detonation of large chemical explosions at Semipalatinsk Test Site. All the records were collected, systematized and processed, and databases were created. Travel-time curves for regional Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg waves were created and compared with the ones used in routine earthquake processing practice. (author)

  19. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  20. Nuclear explosives and hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P

    1971-10-01

    A nuclear explosive 12 in. in diam and producing very little tritium is feasible in France. Such a device would be well adapted for contained nuclear explosions set off for the purpose of hydrocarbon storage or stimulation. The different aspects of setting off the explosive are reviewed. In the particular case of gas storage in a nuclear cavity in granite, it is demonstrated that the dose of irradiation received is extremely small. (18 refs.)

  1. Chernobyl explosion bombshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.; Arnott, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is suggested that the explosion at the Chernobyl-4 reactor in April 1986 was a nuclear explosion. The evidence for this is examined. The sequence of events at Chernobyl is looked at to see if the effects were like those from a nuclear explosion. The question of whether a United Kingdom reactor could go prompt critical is discussed. It is concluded that prompt criticality excursions are possible, but the specific Chernobyl sequence is impossible. (UK)

  2. On-line detection of small radioactive ions by capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klunder, G.L.; Andrews, J.E. Jr.; Russo, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Worldwide environmental interests have placed a great demand on developing techniques for rapid characterization of contaminated soil and groundwater. Detection of radioactive contaminants is necessary for monitoring effluents from nuclear processes or to assure proper long term storage of radioactive waste. The authors have been investigating the chemistry required to separate representative radioactive small cations and anions by capillary electrophoresis. In order to evaluate the separation chemistry, detection of stable isotopes of the representative ions was achieved by indirect absorption for cations and direct absorption for anions. Several buffer systems which have been considered in the optimization of the separations will be discussed. The authors have designed and tested two on-line radioactivity detectors for capillary electrophoresis. An on-line solid state CdTe detector was constructed for this study and a scintillation detector has been designed using a high gain photodiode light sensor. Different scintillation materials have been tested. Comparison of the detectors, design considerations, efficiency and limits of detection will be presented

  3. Investigation of iron current measurement to detect combustion quality; Ion denryu ni yoru nensho jotai kenshutsu no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, K; Mogi, K [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The possibility and problems were investigated in detecting the combustion quality by means of ion current measured at the spark plug. The ion current has two peaks during one combustion stroke; first peak is generated by flame around the spark plug just after ignition and second one appears with the rise in temperature of burned gases. As the result of investigations, it was confirmed that the first ion peak might be useful to forecast the combustion quality, but it would be hard to practice owing to the spark duration. And the second peak offered the information of combustion chamber pressure. 4 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  5. Development of a superconducting transition edge thermometer for calorimetric detection of heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, J; Boehmer, W; Egelhof, P; Henning, W; Kienlin, A v [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany) Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1991-10-01

    A low temperature bolometer for the calorimetric detection of heavy ions was constructed and tested. An aluminium thin-film microstrip, patterned in a meander-line structure by photolithographic techniques, serves as superconducting transition edge thermometer on a sapphire absorber. A transition width {delta}T of the thermometer of the order of some mK, and a resistance of up to R{sub c} = 60 k{Omega} at the working point (T{sub c} {approx equal} 1.5 K) is achieved. In tests with {alpha}-particles signals of typically 1 V pulseheight after the preamplifier and decaytimes around hundred {mu}s were observed. For 5.5 MeV {alpha}-particles the measured energy resolution is {Delta}E = 50 keV, corresponding to a temperature resolution of about 1 {mu}K. First measurements were performed with {sup 20}Ne ions (E = 116 MeV). The dependence of the pulseheight and the FWHM on the working point were investigated and qualitatively explained. The best energy resolution was {Delta}E = 2.6 MeV; most probably the present limitations are determined by the temperature stabilization. (orig.).

  6. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  7. Precision mass measurements using the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Karthein, Jonas

    This thesis presents the implementation and improvement of the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (PI-ICR) detection technique at the ISOLTRAP experiment, located at the ISOLDE / CERN, with the purpose of on-line high-precision and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Extensive simulation studies were performed with the aim of improving the phase-imaging resolution and finding the optimal position for detector placement. Following the outcome of these simulations, the detector was moved out of a region of electric-field distortion and closer to the center of the Penning trap, showing a dramatic improvement in the quality and reproducibility of the phase-imaging measurements. A new image reconstitution and analysis software for the MCP-PS detector was written in Python and ROOT and introduced in the framework of PI-ICR mass measurements. The state of the art in the field of time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance measurements is illustrated through an analysis of on-line measurements of the mirror nuclei $...

  8. Detection of lead(II) ions with a DNAzyme and isothermal strand displacement signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenying; Yang, Yue; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Qingfeng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Fangyuan; Yu, Cong

    2014-03-15

    A DNAzyme based method for the sensitive and selective quantification of lead(II) ions has been developed. A DNAzyme that requires Pb(2+) for activation was selected. An RNA containing DNA substrate was cleaved by the DNAzyme in the presence of Pb(2+). The 2',3'-cyclic phosphate of the cleaved 5'-part of the substrate was efficiently removed by Exonuclease III. The remaining part of the single stranded DNA (9 or 13 base long) was subsequently used as the primer for the strand displacement amplification reaction (SDAR). The method is highly sensitive, 200 pM lead(II) could be easily detected. A number of interference ions were tested, and the sensor showed good selectivity. Underground water samples were also tested, which demonstrated the feasibility of the current approach for real sample applications. It is feasible that our method could be used for DNAzyme or aptazyme based new sensing method developments for the quantification of other target analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure–function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch. PMID:24662763

  10. New EDTA determination method based on ion chromatography with suppressed conductimetric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergy Patzay; Yahya Ramadan; Csilla Tonko

    2014-01-01

    A novel direct method for the determination of EDTA in alkaline radioactive evaporator residue solution was developed and validated based on ion chromatography with suppressed conductimetric detection and anion exchange columns (A Supp 4, 4 mm × 250 mm and A Supp 5, 4 mm × 150 mm). The yttrium-EDTA complex resulted one single chromatographic peak in the eluent and allowed the correct determination of EDTA in an alkaline, high concentration radioactive waste water. Depending on coexisting substances, suitable eluent is 10.0 mM carbonate buffer/pH 10.6 or 10.75 (t R ,Y-EDTA = 7.01 and 6.4 min, respectively). For 10.0 mM carbonate buffer/pH 10.6 and isocratic flow rate of 1.0 cm 3 /min, a linear calibration curve was obtained from 5 to 40 mg/dm 3 (r > 0.999) EDTA. Good resolution was achieved from commonly coexisting anions (chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulphate, phosphate, bromide and citrate). The developed simple ion chromatographic method was applied for the assay of EDTA in various radioactive alkaline solutions. (author)

  11. Sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions by fluorescent Ag nanoclusters synthesized via a hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Fang, Zheng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-09-01

    An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a reusable detection method for Cu2+. Furthermore, the different quenching phenomena caused by the two metals ions such as changes in visible colour, shifts of UV absorbance peaks and changes in size of Ag NCs make it easy to distinguish between them. Therefore the easily synthesized fluorescent Ag NCs may have great potential as Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions sensors.An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a

  12. Hardware/Software Codesign in a Compact Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Subsurface Contaminant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribb MollyM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A field-programmable-gate-array-(FPGA- based data acquisition and control system was designed in a hardware/software codesign environment using an embedded Xilinx Microblaze soft-core processor for use with a subsurface ion mobility spectrometer (IMS system, designed for detection of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs. An FPGA is used to accelerate the digital signal processing algorithms and provide accurate timing and control. An embedded soft-core processor is used to ease development by implementing nontime critical portions of the design in software. The design was successfully implemented using a low-cost, off-the-shelf Xilinx Spartan-III FPGA and supporting digital and analog electronics.

  13. New detection system and signal processing for the tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Malaquias, A.; Fernandes, H.

    2012-01-01

    The tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) operates with a multiple cell array detector (MCAD) that allows for the plasma density and the plasma density fluctuations measurements simultaneously at different sampling volumes across the plasma. To improve the capability of the plasma density fluctuations investigations, a new detection system and new signal conditioning amplifier have been designed and tested. The improvements in MCAD design are presented which allow for nearly complete suppression of the spurious plasma background signal by applying a biasing potential onto special electrodes incorporated into MCAD. The new low cost and small size transimpedance amplifiers are described with the parameters of 400 kHz, 10 7 V/A, 0.4 nA of RMS noise, adequate for the plasma density fluctuations measurements.

  14. New detection system and signal processing for the tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, R B; Nedzelskiy, I S; Malaquias, A; Fernandes, H

    2012-10-01

    The tokamak ISTTOK havy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) operates with a multiple cell array detector (MCAD) that allows for the plasma density and the plasma density fluctuations measurements simultaneously at different sampling volumes across the plasma. To improve the capability of the plasma density fluctuations investigations, a new detection system and new signal conditioning amplifier have been designed and tested. The improvements in MCAD design are presented which allow for nearly complete suppression of the spurious plasma background signal by applying a biasing potential onto special electrodes incorporated into MCAD. The new low cost and small size transimpedance amplifiers are described with the parameters of 400 kHz, 10(7) V/A, 0.4 nA of RMS noise, adequate for the plasma density fluctuations measurements.

  15. New detection system and signal processing for the tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Malaquias, A.; Fernandes, H. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    The tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) operates with a multiple cell array detector (MCAD) that allows for the plasma density and the plasma density fluctuations measurements simultaneously at different sampling volumes across the plasma. To improve the capability of the plasma density fluctuations investigations, a new detection system and new signal conditioning amplifier have been designed and tested. The improvements in MCAD design are presented which allow for nearly complete suppression of the spurious plasma background signal by applying a biasing potential onto special electrodes incorporated into MCAD. The new low cost and small size transimpedance amplifiers are described with the parameters of 400 kHz, 10{sup 7} V/A, 0.4 nA of RMS noise, adequate for the plasma density fluctuations measurements.

  16. Detection of Cadmium Ion by Evanescent Wave Based Chitosan Coated Optical Fiber Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, I; Edy, S S; Saputra, B A; Aji, M P; Susanto; Kurdi, O

    2017-01-01

    Evanescent wave based-optical fiber sensor to detect cadmium ion is proposed. Chitosan was used by using the dip-coating method. The sensor was fabricated in U-bent shape. U-bent optical sensor at aconcentration of 2ppm and 5ppm had asensitivity of 0.2067 dBm/ppm and -0.7995 dBm/ppm, respectively. At a level of 2ppm - 5ppm, the optical sensor has a linear response with asensitivity of -0.283 dBm/ppm. The sensor takes 9.5 minutes to reach steady stateat aconcentration of 1 ppm. Atalevel of 2ppm - 5ppm, the sensor takes 5 minutes to 10.45 minutes to reach steady state. (paper)

  17. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets[I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas[2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study[3] has been

  18. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Zeng Fang; Wu Shuizhu; Su Junhua; Zhao Jianqing; Tong Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu 2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu 2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu 2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu 2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu 2+ /PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu 2+ detection is 1 μM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ∼30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu 2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Zn 2+ , Hg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ and Pb 2+ ). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  19. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-09

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu(2+) in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu(2+) ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu(2+) ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu(2+) ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu(2+)/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu(2+) detection is 1 microM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of approximately 30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu(2+) ion among the metal ions examined (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Pb(2+)). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  20. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu2+/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu2+ detection is 1 µM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ~30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Pb2+). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.