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Sample records for explosives detection ion

  1. Detection of explosives in hair using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jimmie C; Smith, James L; Kirschenbaum, Louis J; Marimganti, Suvarna; Vadlamannati, Sravanthi

    2008-05-01

    Conventional explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), nitroglycerin (NG), and ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN) sorbed to hair can be directly detected by an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) in E-mode (for explosives). Terrorist explosive, triacetone triperoxide (TATP), difficult to detect by IMS in E-mode, was detected in N-mode (for narcotics). Three modes of sample introduction to IMS vapor desorption unit were used: (i) placement of hair directly into the unit, (ii) swabbing of hair and placement of swabs (i.e., paper GE-IMS sample traps) into the unit, and (iii) acetonitrile extracts of hair positioned on sample traps and placed into the unit. TNT, NG, and EGDN were detected in E-mode by all three sample introduction methods. TATP could only be detected by the acetonitrile extraction method after exposure of the hair to vapor for 16 days because of lower sensitivity. With standard solutions, TATP detection in E-mode required about 10 times as much sample as EGDN (3.9 mug compared with 0.3 mug). IMS in N-mode detected TATP from hair by all three modes of sample introduction.

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  3. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  4. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  5. Stable luminescent metal-organic frameworks as dual-functional materials to encapsulate ln(3+) ions for white-light emission and to detect nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Bao, Shao-Juan; Li, Jing; Su, Zhong-Min; He, Wen-Wen; Fu, Qiang; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2015-04-06

    A stable porous carbazole-based luminescent metal-organic framework, NENU-522, was successfully constructed. It is extremely stable in air and acidic/basic aqueous solutions, which provides the strategy for luminescent material encapsulation of Ln(3+) ions with tunable luminescence for application in light emission. More importantly, Ln(3+)@NENU-522 can emit white light by encapsulating different molar ratios of Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions. Additionally, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 is found to be useful as a fluorescent indicator for the qualitative and quantitative detection of nitroaromatic explosives with different numbers of -NO2 groups, and the concentrations of complete quenching are about 2000, 1000, and 80 ppm for nitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, respectively. Meanwhile, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 displays high selectivity and recyclability in the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  6. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrovnikov Sergei M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT, hexogen (RDX, trotyl-hexogen (Comp B, octogen (HMX, and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  7. System for detecting nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting underground nuclear explosions is described that is comprised of an antenna located in the dielectric substance of a deep waveguide in the earth and adapted to detect low frequency electromagnetic waves generated by a nuclear explosion, the deep waveguide comprising the high conductivity upper sedimentary layers of the earth, the dielectric basement rock, and a high conductivity layer of basement rock due to the increased temperature thereof at great depths, and means for receiving the electromagnetic waves detected by said antenna means

  8. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  9. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  10. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  11. Explosive detection using infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, J.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2009-01-01

    Stand-off and extractive explosive detection methods for short distances are investigated using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. A quantum cascade laser (QCL) system for TATP-detection by open path absorption spectroscopy in the gas phase was developed. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m was achieved. For explosives with lower vapor pressure an extractive hollow fiber based measurement system was investigated. By thermal desorption gaseous TATP or TNT is introduced into a heated fiber. The small sample volume and a fast gas exchange rate enable fast detection. TNT and TATP detection levels below 100 ng are feasible even in samples with a realistic contaminant background.

  12. Current trends in explosive detection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caygill, J Sarah; Davis, Frank; Higson, Seamus P J

    2012-01-15

    The detection of explosives and explosive-related compounds has become a heightened priority in recent years for homeland security and counter-terrorism applications. There has been a huge increase in research within this area-through both the development of new, innovative detection approaches and the improvement of existing techniques. Developments for miniaturisation, portability, field-ruggedisation and improvements in stand-off distances, selectivity and sensitivity have been necessary to develop and improve techniques. This review provides a consolidation of information relating to recent advances in explosive detection techniques without being limited to one specific research area or explosive type. The focus of this review will be towards advances in the last 5 years, with the reader being referred to earlier reviews where appropriate. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Explosive Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices (INDs). The studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model results were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements are presented in this report. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another.

  14. Detection of Nuclear Explosions Using Infrasound Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    state-of-the- art wind-noise reduction systems, turbulent wind noise will prevent the detection of infrasonic signals from atmospheric explosions over...D.R., J.A. Vivas Veloso, P. Campus, M. Bell, T. Hoffmann, A. Langlois, P. Martysevich, E. Demirovic and J. Carvalho (2001). Detection of atmospheric

  15. Laser-Based Detection Methods for Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Photofragmentation-Fragment Detection (SPF-FD) Cabalo and Sausa introduced a technique for detection of explosives with low vapor pressure called SPF-FD (149...1999, 38, 6447. 149. Cabalo , J.; Sausa, R. Appl. Spectrosc. 2003, 57, 1196. 150. Claspy, P. C.; Pao, Y.-H.; Kwong, S.; Nodov, E. IEEE J. Quant

  16. Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. H. Seabury; A. J. Caffrey

    2006-04-01

    The feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices has been studied computationally, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Monte Carlo results, in turn were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements have been previously reported. In this report we describe measurements performed on actual explosives and compare the results with calculations. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another by PGNAA

  17. Canine detection odor signatures for explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marc; Johnston, J. M.; Cicoria, Matt; Paletz, E.; Waggoner, L. Paul; Edge, Cindy C.; Hallowell, Susan F.

    1998-12-01

    Dogs are capable of detecting and discriminating a number of compounds constituting a complex odor. However, they use only a few of these to recognize a substance. The focus of this research is to determine the compounds dogs learn to use in recognizing explosives. This is accomplished by training dogs under behavioral laboratory conditions to respond differentially on separate levers to 1) blank air, 2) a target odor, such as an explosive, and 3) all other odors (non-target odors). Vapor samples are generated by a serial dilution vapor generator whose operation and output is characterized by GC/MS. Once dogs learn this three-lever discrimination, testing sessions are conducted containing a number of probe trials in which vapor from constituent compounds of the target is presented. Which lever the dogs respond to on these probe trials indicates whether they can smell the compound at all (blank lever) or whether it smells like toe target odor (e.g., the explosive) or like something else. This method was conducted using TNT, C-4, and commercial dynamite. The data show the dogs' reactions to each of the constituent compounds tested for each explosive. Analysis of these data reveal the canine detection odor signature for these explosives.

  18. Pulsed White Spectrum Neutron Generator for Explosive Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is a critical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designed and fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set of parallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80-120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing

  19. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; Boisen, A.

    2011-06-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  20. Multi-sensor explosive detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, T.; Shea, P.M.; Sawa, Z.P.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an explosive detection system. It comprises a source of neutrons; a detector array comprising a plurality of gamma ray detectors, each of the gamma ray detectors providing a detection signal in the event a gamma ray is captured by the detector, and at least one neutron detector, the neutron detector providing a neutron detection signal in the event a neutron is captured by the neutron detector; means for irradiating an object being examined with neutrons from the neutron source and for positioning the detector array relative to the object so that gamma rays emitted from the elements within the object as a result of the neutron irradiation are detected by the gamma ray detectors of the detector array; and parallel distributed processing means responsive to the detection signals of the detector array for discriminating between objects carrying explosives and objects not carrying explosives, the parallel distributed processing means including an artificial neural system (ANS), the ANS having a parallel network of processors, each processor of the parallel network of processors, each processor of the parallel network of processors including means for receiving at least one input signal, and means for generating an output signal as a function of the at least one input signal

  1. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  2. Remote detection of explosives using trained canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.C.

    1983-03-01

    Use of dogs is a search method which combines high probability of detection, speed of search, and low cost. It was concluded that the canine could be used for explosive screening of personnel, but that it was imperative that the dog be in a position remote from employees and employee traffic. A study was made of the design of booths and air flow for this purpose. Results of tests and conclusions are given and discussed

  3. Explosives vapour identification in ion mobility spectrometry using a tunable laser ionization source: a comparison with conventional 63Ni ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Laser multiphoton ionization (MPI) is used to produce ions from explosive vapours at atmospheric pressure in air for analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). In the positive ion mode of detection, NO + ions, generated directly by multiphoton dissociation/ionization of the explosive compounds, show strong variation with laser wavelength. This provides a means of identifying the presence of nitro-containing compounds. Moreover, electrons formed in the MPI of gaseous components in the air carrier stream, primarily O 2 , are transferred via neutral molecular oxygen (O 2 ) to trace explosive vapour, forming negative ions which give rise to characteristic and identifiable ion mobility spectra. Further, negative ion mobility spectra of several explosive vapours are presented using conventional 63 Ni ionization and are compared qualitatively with the laser ionization approach. (author)

  4. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  5. Method and system for detecting explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID; Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-03-10

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  6. Advances in explosives analysis--part I: animal, chemical, ion, and mechanical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased substantially since the publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis (Moore and Goodpaster, Anal Bioanal Chem 395(2):245-246, 2009). Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. This part, Part I, reviews methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. Part II will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  7. Apparatus and method for detecting explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, B.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for use in situations such as airports to detect explosives hidden in containers (for eg. suitcases). The method involves the evaluation of the quantities of oxygen and nitrogen within the container by neutron activation analysis and the determination of whether these quantities exceed predetermined limits. The equipment includes a small sub-critical lower powered reactor for thermal (0.01 to 0.10 eV) neutron production, a radium beryllium primary source, a deuterium-tritium reactor as a high energy (> 1.06 MeV) neutron source and Geiger counter detector arrays. (UK)

  8. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J. [Quantum Magnetics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  9. Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    necessary. 2 Currently, there are a variety of techniques used to detect explosives: sniffing explosive vapors (e.g., fluorescence quenching and...tagging agents, impurities, reaction byproducts, plasticizers or decomposition products or enhancers such as propane in explosive devices may be more...by scintillators [10]. In this method, and similar to other bulk detection methods, the neutron source must be within inches or at most a few

  10. Hyperspectral requirements for detection of trace explosives agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schau, Harvey C.; Jennette, Bryan D.

    2006-05-01

    The ability to remotely detect explosive devices and explosive materials has generated considerable interest over the last several years. The study of remote sensing of explosives date back many decades but recent world events have forced the technology to respond to changing events and bring new technologies to the field in shorter development times than previously thought possible. Several applications have proven both desirable and illusive to date. Most notable is the desire to sense explosives within containers, sealed or otherwise. This requires a sensing device to penetrate the walls of the container, a difficult task when the container is steel or thick cement. Another is the desire to detect explosive vapors which escape from a container into the ambient air. This has been made difficult because explosives are generally formulated to have extremely low vapor pressure. (This has made many gas detection technique not strong candidates for explosive vapor detection due to the low vapor pressure of explosive materials [1].) Because of the many difficulties in a general explosive remote detection, we have attempted to bound the problem into a series of achievable steps with the first step a simple remote detection of TNT-bearing compounds. Prior to discussing our technology, we will first discuss our choice for attacking the problem in this manner.

  11. Development in the Detection and Identification of Explosive Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, A D

    1992-06-01

    In the past 2 decades, developments in the sensitivity and selectivity of instrument detectors have significantly improved the detection limits for explosives, particularly nitrated organic compounds. Significant improvements have also been made in clean up and recovery procedures for explosive residues. Methods which also have met the criterion of proven effectiveness in identifying explosive components in "real-world" residues from test explosions have been incorporated into systematic analysis protocols for explosive residues. This article first reviews developments in the application of both traditional and novel methods to analysis of unreacted explosives and explosive residues. Compounds used to formulate commercial, military, and "homemade" explosives are then cross-referenced to the analytical methods that have been specifically applied to them, both as pure chemicals and in explosive mixtures. The subsequent focus is on the combinations of methods used to systematically analyze and positively identify residues from improvised explosive devices, from handswabs derived from persons suspected of handling explosives, and from organic gunshot residue. Technology is available to positively identify virtually any unreacted explosive in residue, but no one method can detect all components of all explosives. Investigators and the courts are best served by well-equipped forensic science laboratories staffed with scientists who have gained experience by the successful analysis of post-blast residues from an explosives range and have comprehensive reference collections of physical material, analytical data, and literature. The greatest progress has been made with respect to nitrated organic compounds, but the new generation of commercial explosive slurries and emulsions which are primarily formulated with inorganic salts and non-nitrated organic compounds offer an ongoing challenge. Copyright © 1992 Central Police University.

  12. Photoluminescent Detection of Dissolved Underwater Trace Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tye Langston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A portable, rapid, and economical method for in situ trace explosive detection in aqueous solutions was demonstrated using photoluminescence. Using europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the reagent, dissolved nitroglycerin was fluorescently tagged and detected in seawater solutions without sample preparation, drying, or preconcentration. The chemical method was developed in a laboratory setting and demonstrated in a flow-through configuration using lightweight, inexpensive, commercial components by directly injecting the reagents into a continually flowing seawater stream using a small amount of organic solvent (approximately 8% of the total solution. Europium's vulnerability to vibrational fluorescence quenching by water provided the mode of detection. Without nitroglycerin in the seawater solution, the reagent's fluorescence was quenched, but when dissolved nitroglycerin was present, it displaced the water molecules from the europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone compound and restored fluorescence. This effort focused on developing a seawater sensor, but performance comparisons were made to freshwater. The method was found to perform better in freshwater and it was shown that certain seawater constituents (such as calcium have an adverse impact. However, the concentrations of these constituents are not expected to vary significantly from the natural seawater used herein.

  13. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  14. Terrorism and Drug Trafficking: Technologies for Detecting Explosives and Narcotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined information on explosives and narcotics detection technologies that are available or under development. This report discusses (1) funding for those technologies, (2) characteristics and limitations of avai...

  15. Neutron capture on nitrogen as a means of detecting explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    A research prototype was developed on the basis of neutron capture on nitrogen and is demonstrated to be able to detect parcel and letter bombs. Is the gamma radiation that is detected as an indication of the presence of nitrogen, and the probable presence of nitrogen-containing explosive. The conceptual design of the explosive detector and some experimental results are briefly presented. figs., ills

  16. Trace level detection of explosives in solution using leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Shida, Yasuo; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the detection of explosives in solution using thermal desorption technique at a temperature higher than Leidenfrost temperature of the solvent in combination with low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization. Leidenfrost temperature of a solvent is the temperature above which the solvent droplet starts levitation instead of splashing when placed on a hot metallic surface. During this desorption process, slow and gentle solvent evaporation takes place, which leads to the pre-concentration of less-volatile explosive molecules in the droplet and the explosive molecules are released at the last moment of droplet evaporation. The limits of detection for explosives studied by using this thermal desorption LTP ionization method varied in a range of 1 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) using a droplet volume of 20 μL (absolute sample amount 90-630 fmol). As LTP ionization method was applied and ion-molecule reactions took place in ambient atmosphere, various ion-molecule adduct species like [M+NO2](-), [M+NO3](-), [M+HCO3](-), [M+HCO4](-) were generated together with [M-H](-) peak. Each peak was unambiguously identified using 'Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer in negative ionization mode within 3 ppm deviation compared to its exact mass. This newly developed technique was successfully applied to detect four explosives contained in the pond water and soil sample with minor sample pre-treatment and the explosives were detected with ppb levels. The present method is simple, rapid and can detect trace levels of explosives with high specificity from solutions.

  17. SUERC AMS ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maden, C.; Anastasi, P. A. F.; Dougans, A.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Kitchen, R.; Klody, G.; Schnabel, C.; Sundquist, M.; Vanner, K.; Xu, S.

    2007-06-01

    In a short time Be, C, Al, Cl, Ca and I accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have been established on the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) 5 MV pelletron system at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC). While summarising the present performance of the system, this report will focus on the details of ion detection, which sample materials are used and the analytical procedures employed for each individual species during routine analysis. All rare isotope detection is with a single flexible detector and ion event analysis system, but switching of analysed species typically requires a detector reconfiguration. Configurations for routine 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 129I detection have been established and will be presented here. Notably, there has proven to be sufficient suppression of the isobaric interferences of 36Cl and 41Ca in the 5+ charge state using an argon gas stripper at a terminal voltage of 5.0 MV to allow for routine analysis of these isotopes.

  18. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.

    2011-01-01

    as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework...

  19. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  20. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  1. Bomb swab: Can trace explosive particle sampling and detection be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Danny; Zach, Raya; Matana, Yossef; Elia, Paz; Shustack, Shiran; Sharon, Yarden; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2017-11-01

    The marked increase in international terror in recent years requires the development of highly efficient methods to detect trace amounts of explosives at airports, border crossings and check points. The preferred analytical method worldwide is the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) that is capable of detecting most explosives at the nano-gram level. Sample collection for the IMS analysis is based on swabbing of a passenger's belongings to collect possible explosive residues. The present study examines a wide range of issues related to swab-based particle collection and analysis, in the hope of gaining deeper understanding into this technique that will serve to improve the detection process. The adhesion of explosive particles to three typical materials, plastic, metal and glass, were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that a strong contribution of capillary forces to adhesion on glass and metal surfaces renders these substrates more promising materials upon which to find and collect explosive residues. The adhesion of explosives to different swipe materials was also examined. Here we found that Muslin, Nomex ® and polyamide membrane surfaces are the most promising materials for use as swipes. Subsequently, the efficiency of multiple swipe use - for collecting explosive residues from a glass surface using Muslin, Nomex ® and Teflon™ swipes - was examined. The study suggests that swipes used in about 5-10 "sampling and analysis cycles" have higher efficiency as compared to new unused swipes. The reason for this behavior was found to be related to the increased roughness of the swipe surface following a few swab measurements. Lastly, GC-MS analysis was employed to examine the nature of contaminants collected by the three types of swipe. The relative amounts of different contaminants are reported. The existence and interference of these contaminants have to be considered in relation to the detection efficiency of the various explosives by the IMS

  2. Detecting and identifying underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, S.

    1996-01-01

    The monitoring of underground nuclear explosions involves, first determining that the signals have originated from a test site and if so, then a pattern recognition analysis is undertaken to determine whether the signals originate from an explosion rather than an earthquake. In this we are aided by seismic observations of previous explosions from each test site. To determine the origin of a signal use is first made of the two seismic arrays in central Australia. Each of these arrays consists of 20 spatially separated sensors (seismometers), and each of which can provide a preliminary estimate of the location of the source. In practice this is done automatically by inserting delays into the output of each of the sensors to compensate for a seismic signal taking a finite time to cross the array, and then adding the output of each sensor to form what are called 'array beams'. When the correct delays for a particular azimuth and wavespeed (corresponding to a particular source location) have been inserted, the signals recorded by each sensor will be in phase and the energy in the array beam will be a maximum. Because the seismic background noise at each sensor is not correlated, this beam forming also improves the signal-to-noise ratio. In this sense a seismic array is equivalent to other arrays of sensors - e.g. a radar antenna. Having determined that a signal originates from somewhere near a test site a more precise location can be obtained from the times that the signal arrives at different seismic stations

  3. Detecting and identifying underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, S. [Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Anzac Park, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Primary Industry

    1996-12-31

    The monitoring of underground nuclear explosions involves, first determining that the signals have originated from a test site and if so, then a pattern recognition analysis is undertaken to determine whether the signals originate from an explosion rather than an earthquake. In this we are aided by seismic observations of previous explosions from each test site. To determine the origin of a signal use is first made of the two seismic arrays in central Australia. Each of these arrays consists of 20 spatially separated sensors (seismometers), and each of which can provide a preliminary estimate of the location of the source. In practice this is done automatically by inserting delays into the output of each of the sensors to compensate for a seismic signal taking a finite time to cross the array, and then adding the output of each sensor to form what are called `array beams`. When the correct delays for a particular azimuth and wavespeed (corresponding to a particular source location) have been inserted, the signals recorded by each sensor will be in phase and the energy in the array beam will be a maximum. Because the seismic background noise at each sensor is not correlated, this beam forming also improves the signal-to-noise ratio. In this sense a seismic array is equivalent to other arrays of sensors - e.g. a radar antenna. Having determined that a signal originates from somewhere near a test site a more precise location can be obtained from the times that the signal arrives at different seismic stations

  4. Solid state gas sensors for detection of explosives and explosive precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yun

    The increased number of terrorist attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) over the past few years has made the trace detection of explosives a priority for the Department of Homeland Security. Considerable advances in early detection of trace explosives employing spectroscopic detection systems and other sensing devices have been made and have demonstrated outstanding performance. However, modern IEDs are not easily detectable by conventional methods and terrorists have adapted to avoid using metallic or nitro groups in the manufacturing of IEDs. Instead, more powerful but smaller compounds, such as TATP are being more frequently used. In addition, conventional detection techniques usually require large capital investment, labor costs and energy input and are incapable of real-time identification, limiting their application. Thus, a low cost detection system which is capable of continuous online monitoring in a passive mode is needed for explosive detection. In this dissertation, a thermodynamic based thin film gas sensor which can reliably detect various explosive compounds was developed and demonstrated. The principle of the sensors is based on measuring the heat effect associated with the catalytic decomposition of explosive compounds present in the vapor phase. The decomposition mechanism is complicated and not well known, but it can be affected by many parameters including catalyst, reaction temperature and humidity. Explosives that have relatively high vapor pressure and readily sublime at room temperature, like TATP and 2, 6-DNT, are ideal candidate for vapor phase detection using the thermodynamic gas sensor. ZnO, W2O 3, V2O5 and SnO2 were employed as catalysts. This sensor exhibited promising sensitivity results for TATP, but poor selectivity among peroxide based compounds. In order to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermodynamic sensor, a Pd:SnO2 nanocomposite was fabricated and tested as part of this dissertation. A

  5. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared.

  6. Rapid detection of sugar alcohol precursors and corresponding nitrate ester explosives using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P

    2015-04-21

    This work highlights the rapid detection of nitrate ester explosives and their sugar alcohol precursors by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) using an off-axis geometry. Demonstration of the effect of various parameters, such as ion polarity and in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) on the detection of these compounds is presented. Sensitivity of sugar alcohols and nitrate ester explosives was found to be greatest in negative ion mode with sensitivities ranging from hundreds of picograms to hundreds of nanograms, depending on the characteristics of the particular molecule. Altering the in-source CID potential allowed for acquisition of characteristic molecular ion spectra as well as fragmentation spectra. Additional studies were completed to identify the role of different experimental parameters on the sensitivity for these compounds. Variables that were examined included the DART gas stream temperature, the presence of a related compound (i.e., the effect of a precursor on the detection of a nitrate ester explosive), incorporation of dopant species and the role of the analysis surface. It was determined that each variable affected the response and detection of both sugar alcohols and the corresponding nitrate ester explosives. From this work, a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of individual sugar alcohols and corresponding nitrate ester explosives, or mixtures of the two, has been developed, providing a useful tool in the real-world identification of homemade explosives.

  7. Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC Curves for Explosives Detection Using Different Sampling and Detection Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimy Young

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reported for the first time are receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves constructed to describe the performance of a sorbent-coated disk, planar solid phase microextraction (PSPME unit for non-contact sampling of a variety of volatiles. The PSPME is coupled to ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs for the detection of volatile chemical markers associated with the presence of smokeless powders, model systems of explosives containing diphenylamine (DPA, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT and nitroglycerin (NG as the target analytes. The performance of the PSPME-IMS was compared with the widely accepted solid-phase microextraction (SPME, coupled to a GC-MS. A set of optimized sampling conditions for different volume containers (1–45 L with various sample amounts of explosives, were studied in replicates (n = 30 to determine the true positive rates (TPR and false positive detection rates (FPR for the different scenarios. These studies were obtained in order to construct the ROC curves for two IMS instruments (a bench-top and field-portable system and a bench top GC-MS system in low and high clutter environments. Both static and dynamic PSPME sampling were studied in which 10–500 mg quantities of smokeless powders were detected within 10 min of static sampling and 1 min of dynamic sampling.

  8. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives...... molecules adsorbed onto the substrate. The substrates were fabricated in a cleanroom process which only requires two steps to produce well controlled nano-sized high aspect ratio metal pillars. These substrates had superior chemical sensing performance in addition to a more cost effective fabrication...... process compared to existing commercial substrates. Therefore it is believed that these novel substrates will be able to make SERS more applicable in mobile explosives detection systems to be deployed in for example landmine clearance actions....

  9. Canine detection odor signatures for mine-related explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James M.; Williams, Marc; Waggoner, L. Paul; Edge, Cindy C.; Dugan, Regina E.; Hallowell, Susan F.

    1998-09-01

    Dogs are capable of detecting and discriminating a number of compounds constituting a complex odor. However, they use only a few of these to recognize a substance. The focus of this research is to determine the compounds dogs learn to use in recognizing explosives used in land mines. This is accomplished by training dogs under behavioral laboratory conditions to respond differentially on separate levers to (1) blank air, (2) a target odor such as an explosive, and (3) all other odors (non-target odors). Vapor samples are generated by a serial dilution vapor generator whose operation and output is characterized by GC/MS. Once dogs learn this three-lever discrimination, testing sessions are conducted containing a number of probe trials in which vapor from constituent compounds is presented. Which lever the dogs respond to on these probe trials indicates whether they can smell the compound at all (blank lever) or whether it smells like the target odor (e.g., the explosive) or like something else. This method was conducted using TNT and C-4. The data show the dogs' reactions to each of the constituent compounds tested for each explosive. Analysis of these data reveal the canine detection odor signature for these explosives.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by (14)N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D-D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 10(10) fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based γ-ray detectors to different explosives is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Explosives Detection Systems Employing Behaviorally Modified Rats as Sensory Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-18

    disciplines including physiology, behavioral science, electronics engineering , biochemistry and explosiles L technology. Unfortunately, space limitation...precludes significant discus- sion of the relative merits of Physico- Chemical , Electromagnetic (the existing explosives detecting techniques), and...was known to be 500 *70 milliseconds, a careful examination of the mid-abeissa region of the TO plot anFi may reveal smoe evidence of unusual

  12. A TNA explosives-detection system in airline baggage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, P.; Gozani, T. (Science Applications International Corp., Santa Clara, CA (USA)); Bozorgmanesh, H. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (USA))

    1990-12-20

    Existing technologies that are applied to explosives-detection in passenger baggage are briefly discussed. A system based on thermal-neutron analysis (TNA) is described. The actual performance of the system in the field on passenger bags is given. The application of the TNA in an integrated airport security system is discussed in view of the intense public debate on this issue. (orig.).

  13. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Explosive Detection Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    motor . A sketch of this experimental geometry is shown in Figure 4. 3. EXPLOSIVES DETECTION RESULTS The cart/explosive was stationary in the beam duing...sebacate(5.3%), Polyisobutylene(2.I%), Motor oil 1.6%); [Cl .82H3.54N2.4602.5 11 PETN: [C5H8N4012] Detasheet: PETN(85%), binder(15%) wool C4 .OOH6.69NI...operations per second (Mflops), is configured The backwatter method images organic materWs near as a parallel proceso with a very high Input/Output the

  14. Explosives detection with applications to landmines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Modern mines have been made difficult to detect by conventional means such as magnetic detection. The problem is not only that there is often only a small amount of metal in the mine but that the war zone may contain an enormous amount of metal pieces from other weapons. Thus the problem is not just one of detection, but of developing methods to discriminate between many kinds of background and clutter that are present. One of techniques is the use of fast neutrons to probe material with subsequent spectrometry of gamma rays produced by inelastic neutron interactions. Another approach is the use of an infrared camera to detect mines after heating soil with a large heater. Certain advantages has Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance to detect nitrogen in compounds such as TNT. Use of remote controlled mechanical devices to detonate mines can also be considered. It is important to note that no single device will solve the problem and therefore it will be more effective to build devices specific to problem

  15. Micro-calorimetric sensor for trace explosive particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Privorotskaya, N.; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; King, W. P.; Boisen, A.

    2010-04-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride bridge incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of DNT (2,4-Dinitrotoluene). The design of the senor is described and the temperature uniformity investigated using finite element modelings and Raman temperature measurements. The functionality is tested using two different kinds of explosive deposition techniques and calorimetric responses are obtained. Under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  16. Preliminary detection of explosive standard components with Laser Raman Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Presently, our section is leader of the ISOTREX project (Integrated System for On-line TRace EXplosives detection in solid, liquid and vapour state), funded in the frame of the PASR 2006 action (Preparatory Action on the enhancement of the European industrial potential in the field of Security Research Preparatory Action) of the 6. EC framework. ISOTREX project will exploit the capabilities of different laser techniques as LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), LPA (Laser Photo Acustic) and CRDS (Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy) to monitor explosive traces. In this frame, we extended our investigation also to the laser induced Raman effect spectroscopy, in order to investigate its capabilities and possible future integration. We analysed explosive samples in bulk solid phase, diluted liquid phase and as evaporated films over suitable substrate. In the following, we present the main results obtained, outlining preliminary conclusions [it

  17. Explosive Residue Detection by Laser Surface Photo-Fragmentation-Fragment Detection Spectroscopy. 2. In Situ and Real-Time Monitoring of RDX. HMX, CL20, and TNT, by an Improved Ion Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    RDX, HMX, CL20, and TNT, by an Improved Ion Probe by Jerry B. Cabalo and Rosario C. Sausa ARL-TR-3478 April 2005...In Situ and Real-time Monitoring of RDX, HMX, CL20, and TNT, by an Improved Ion Probe Jerry B. Cabalo and Rosario C. Sausa Weapons and Materials...TNT, by an Improved Ion Probe 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 622618H8011 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jerry B. Cabalo

  18. Electrochemical detection of ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jianfeng; Guo, Chun Xian; Hu, Fengping; Yu, Lei; Li, Chang Ming

    2011-01-10

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor has been fabricated to detect ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC). OMC was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Glassy carbon electrodes functionalized with OMC show high sensitivity of 62.7 μA cm(-2) per ppb towards 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). By comparison with other materials such as carbon nanotubes and ordered mesoporous silica, it is found that the high performance of OMC toward sensing TNT is attributed to its large specific surface area and fast electron transfer capability. As low as 0.2 ppb TNT, 1 ppb 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 1 ppb 1,3-dinitrobenzene can be detected on OMC based electrodes. This work renders new opportunities to detect ultratrace explosives for applications of environment protections and home securities against chemical warfare agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrochemical detection of ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Jianfeng; Guo Chunxian; Hu Fengping; Yu Lei; Li Changming

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor has been fabricated to detect ultratrace nitroaromatic explosives using ordered mesoporus carbon (OMC). OMC was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Glassy carbon electrodes functionalized with OMC show high sensitivity of 62.7 μA cm -2 per ppb towards 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). By comparison with other materials such as carbon nanotubes and ordered mesoporous silica, it is found that the high performance of OMC toward sensing TNT is attributed to its large specific surface area and fast electron transfer capability. As low as 0.2 ppb TNT, 1 ppb 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 1 ppb 1,3-dinitrobenzene can be detected on OMC based electrodes. This work renders new opportunities to detect ultratrace explosives for applications of environment protections and home securities against chemical warfare agents.

  20. Electrochemical Sensor for Explosives Precursors’ Detection in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloé Desmet

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although all countries are intensifying their efforts against terrorism and increasing their mutual cooperation, terrorist bombing is still one of the greatest threats to society. The discovery of hidden bomb factories is of primary importance in the prevention of terrorism activities. Criminals preparing improvised explosives (IE use chemical substances called precursors. These compounds are released in the air and in the waste water during IE production. Tracking sources of precursors by analyzing air or wastewater can then be an important clue for bomb factories’ localization. We are reporting here a new multiplex electrochemical sensor dedicated to the on-site simultaneous detection of three explosive precursors, potentially used for improvised explosive device preparation (hereafter referenced as B01, B08, and B15, for security disclosure reasons and to avoid being detrimental to the security of the counter-explosive EU action. The electrochemical sensors were designed to be disposable and to combine ease of use and portability in a screen-printed eight-electrochemical cell array format. The working electrodes were modified with different electrodeposited metals: gold, palladium, and platinum. These different coatings giving selectivity to the multi-sensor through a “fingerprint”-like signal subsequently analyzed using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Results are given regarding the detection of the three compounds in a real environment and in the presence of potentially interfering species.

  1. Two 3D metal-organic frameworks as multi-functional materials to detect Fe3+ ions and nitroaromatic explosives and to encapsulate Ln3+ ions for white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing; Xu, Jianing; Qi, Hui; Sun, Jing; Chai, Juan; Jia, Jia; Jing, Shubo; Fan, Yong; Wang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely {[Zn3(L)2(4,4‧-bipy)(DMF)2]·2H2O}n(1) and {[Cd3(L)2(4,4‧-bipy)(H2O)2].2DMF}n(2) (4,4‧-bipy = 4,4‧-bipyridine, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), were solvothermally prepared based on a rigid tricarboxylic acid 3-(3,5-dicarboxylphenyl)-5-(3-carboxylphenyl)-1-H-1,2,4-triazole (H3L). X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that 1 and 2 are isostructural and both emit blue light. Notably, 1 exhibits good luminescent sensing for nitro-containing compounds and Fe3+ ions. In addition, the emission colors of 1 can be tuned from yellow to white and to blue by encapsulating different mole ratios of Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions and changing the excitation wavelength. A white emission with the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.331, 0.337), which fall within the white-light region, emerges upon excitation at 340 nm.

  2. Improved thermal neutron activation sensor for detection of bulk explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.; Andrews, H. Robert; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Mosquera, Cristian M.

    2012-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives since 1994. First generation sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on the ILDS teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor anti-tank landmine detection systems. The first generation TNA could detect anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less in no more than a minute, but deeper mines and those significantly displaced horizontally required considerably longer times. Mines as deep as 30 cm could be detected with long counting times (1000 s). The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. This improved sensitivity can translate to either decreased counting times, decreased minimum detectable explosive quantities, increased maximum sensor-to-target displacement, or a trade off among all three. Experiments to characterize the performance of the latest generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and IEDs hidden in culverts were conducted during 2011. This paper describes the second generation system. The experimental setup and methodology are detailed and preliminary comparisons between the performance of first and second generation systems are presented.

  3. Remote laser drilling and sampling system for the detection of concealed explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, D.; Pschyklenk, L.; Theiß, C.; Holl, G.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of hazardous materials like explosives is a central issue in national security in the field of counterterrorism. One major task includes the development of new methods and sensor systems for the detection. Many existing remote or standoff methods like infrared or raman spectroscopy find their limits, if the hazardous material is concealed in an object. Imaging technologies using x-ray or terahertz radiation usually yield no information about the chemical content itself. However, the exact knowledge of the real threat potential of a suspicious object is crucial for disarming the device. A new approach deals with a laser drilling and sampling system for the use as verification detector for suspicious objects. Central part of the system is a miniaturised, diode pumped Nd:YAG laser oscillator-amplifier. The system allows drilling into most materials like metals, synthetics or textiles with bore hole diameters in the micron scale. During the drilling process, the hazardous material can be sampled for further investigation with suitable detection methods. In the reported work, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to monitor the drilling process and to classify the drilled material. Also experiments were carried out to show the system's ability to not ignite even sensitive explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The detection of concealed hazardous material is shown for different explosives using liquid chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry.

  4. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Larry; Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. - Highlights: ► This work responds to the need for standards for x-ray screening systems used to detect explosives. ► Described are new measurement tools to gage the performance and radiation safety of such systems. ► A more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders is argued.

  5. Improved method for the detection of TATP after explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, D; Levy, A; Shelef, R; Abramovich-Bar, S; Sonenfeld, D; Tamiri, T

    2004-09-01

    TATP in post explosion exhibits was reported earlier to be best recovered from vapor phase. A typical procedure includes its adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7, elution with acetonitrile and analysis by GC/MS. In this work, improved recovery of TATP from the vapor phase was achieved by SPME using PDMS/DVB fiber and immediate sampling to GC/MS. The recovery of TATP by SPME was compared with headspace and with adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7 by spiking onto filter paper put in a 100 mL beaker. The limit of detection of TATP was 6.4 ng in these conditions, few orders magnitude more than in the other tested methods. Recovery of TATP in the presence of various solvents was also studied. Acetone, water, and mixtures of water:alcohols (1:1) were found to reduce the recovery of TATP. Using SPME, TATP has been identified in dozens of post-explosion cases.

  6. Maintenance energy requirements of odor detection, explosive detection and human detection working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Rebecca A; Witzel, Angela L; Price, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Despite their important role in security, little is known about the energy requirements of working dogs such as odor, explosive and human detection dogs. Previous researchers have evaluated the energy requirements of individual canine breeds as well as dogs in exercise roles such as sprint racing. This study is the first to evaluate the energy requirements of working dogs trained in odor, explosive and human detection. This retrospective study evaluated twenty adult dogs who maintained consistent body weights over a six month period. During this time, the average energy consumption was [Formula: see text] or two times the calculated resting energy requirement ([Formula: see text]). No statistical differences were found between breeds, age or sex, but a statistically significant association (p = 0.0033, R-square = 0.0854) was seen between the number of searches a dog performs and their energy requirement. Based on this study's population, it appears that working dogs have maintenance energy requirements similar to the 1974 National Research Council's (NRC) maintenance energy requirement of [Formula: see text] (National Research Council (NRC), 1974) and the [Formula: see text] reported for young laboratory beagles (Rainbird & Kienzle, 1990). Additional research is needed to determine if these data can be applied to all odor, explosive and human detection dogs and to determine if other types of working dogs (tracking, search and rescue etc.) have similar energy requirements.

  7. The detection of improvised nonmilitary peroxide based explosives using a titania nanotube array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Mohapatra, Susanta K.; Misra, Mano; Mishra, Indu B.

    2009-02-01

    There is a critical need to develop an efficient, reliable and highly selective sensor for the detection of improvised nonmilitary explosives. This paper describes the utilization of functionalized titania nanotube arrays for sensing improvised organic peroxide explosives such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP). TATP forms complexes with titania nanotube arrays (prepared by anodization and sensitized with zinc ions) and thus affects the electron state of the nanosensing device, which is signaled as a change in current of the overall nanotube material. The response is rapid and a signal of five to eight orders of magnitude is observed. These nanotube array sensors can be used as hand-held miniaturized devices as well as large scale portable units for military and homeland security applications.

  8. The detection of bulk explosives using nuclear-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, R.E.; Gozani, T.; Seher, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986 we presented a rationale for the detection of bulk explosives based on nuclear techniques that addressed the requirements of civil aviation security in the airport environment. Since then, efforts have intensified to implement a system based on thermal neutron activation (TNA), with new work developing in fast neutron and energetic photon reactions. In this paper we will describe these techniques and present new results from laboratory and airport testing. Based on preliminary results, we contended in our earlier paper that nuclear-based techniques did provide sufficiently penetrating probes and distinguishable detectable reaction products to achieve the FAA operational goals; new data have supported this contention. The status of nuclear-based techniques for the detection of bulk explosives presently under investigation by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reviewed. These include thermal neutron activation (TNA), fast neutron activation (FNA), the associated particle technique, nuclear resonance absorption, and photoneutron activation. The results of comprehensive airport testing of the TNA system performed during 1987-88 are summarized. From a technical point of view, nuclear-based techniques now represent the most comprehensive and feasible approach for meeting the operational criteria of detection, false alarms, and throughput. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Free-surface microfluidics for detection of airborne explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhart, Carl; Piorek, Brian; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Lee, Seung Joon; Moskovits, Martin

    2008-11-01

    A novel microfluidic, remote-sensing, chemical detection platform has been developed for real-time sensing of airborne agents. The key enabling technology is a newly developed concept termed Free-Surface Fluidics (FSF), where one or more fluidic surfaces of a microchannel flow are confined by surface tension and exposed to the surrounding atmosphere. The result is a unique open channel flow environment that is driven by pressure through surface tension, and not subject to body forces, such as gravity. Evaporation and flow rates are controlled by microchannel geometry, surface chemistry and precisely-controlled temperature profiles. The free-surface fluidic architecture is combined with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to allow for real-time profiling of atmospheric species and detection of airborne agents. The aggregation of SERS nanoparticles is controlled using microfluidics, to obtain dimer nanoparticle clusters at known streamwise positions in the microchannel. These dimers form SERS hot-spots, which amplify the Raman signal by 8 -- 10 orders of magnitude. Results indicate that explosive agents such as DNT, TNT, RDX, TATP and picric acid in the surrounding atmosphere can be readily detected by the SERS system. Due to the amplification of the SERS system, explosive molecules with concentrations of parts per trillion can be detected, even in the presence of interferent molecules having six orders of magnitude higher concentration.

  10. Explosives detection using photoneutrons produced by X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yigang; Li, Yuanjing; Wang, Haidong; Li, Tiezhu; Wu, Bin

    2007-08-01

    The detection of explosives has become a critical issue after recent terrorist attacks. This paper describes research on explosives detection using photoneutrons from a photoneutron convertor that consists of 20 kg heavy water in an aluminum container whose shape was optimized to most effectively convert X-rays to photoneutrons. The X-rays were produced by a 9 MeV electron accelerator with an average electron current of 100 μA, resulted in a photoneutron yield of >10 11 n/s. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the radiation field is composed of X-ray pulses, fast neutron pulses and thermal neutrons. Both the X-ray and fast neutron pulses are 5 μs wide with a 300 Hz repetition frequency. The thermal neutron flux, which is higher than 10 4 n/cm 2/s, is essentially time invariant. A time shielding circuit was developed for the spectrometry system to halt the sampling process during the intense X-ray pulses. Paraffin, boron carbide and lead were used to protect the detector from interference from the X-rays, fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and background γ-rays coming from the system materials induced by photoneutrons. 5″×5″ NaI (Tl) scintillators were chosen as the detectors to detect the photoneutrons induced γ-rays from the inspected explosive simulant. Nitrogen (6.01 cps) 10.828 MeV γ-rays were detected with one detector from a 50 kg carbamide block placed 60 cm in front of the detector. A collimator was used to reduce the number of background 10.828 MeV γ-rays coming from the nitrogen in the air to improve the signal to background ratio from 0.136 to 1.81. A detector array of seven 5″×5″ NaI (Tl) detectors was used to measure the 2-D distributions of N and H in the sample. The combination of photoneutron analysis and X-ray imaging shows promise for enhancing explosives detection capabilities.

  11. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  12. Wireless system for explosion detection in underground structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhradze, M.; Bochorishvili, N.; Akhvlediani, I.; Kukhalashvili, D.; Kalichava, I.; Mataradze, E.

    2009-06-01

    Considering the growing threat of terrorist or accidental explosions in underground stations, underground highway and railway sections improvement of system for protecting people from explosions appears urgent. Current automatic protective devices with blast identification module and blast damping absorbers of various designs as their basic elements cannot be considered effective. Analysis revealed that low reliability of blast detection and delayed generation of start signal for the activation of an absorber are the major disadvantages of protective devices. Besides the transmission of trigger signal to an energy absorber through cable communication reduces the reliability of the operation of protective device due to a possible damage of electric wiring under blast or mechanical attack. This paper presents the outcomes of the studies conducted to select accurate criteria for blast identification and to design wireless system of activation of defensive device. The results of testing of blast detection methods (seismic, EMP, optical, on overpressure) showed that the proposed method, which implies constant monitoring of overpressure in terms of its reliability and response speed, best meets the requirements. Proposed wireless system for explosions identification and activation of protective device consists of transmitter and receiver modules. Transmitter module contains sensor and microprocessor equipped with blast identification software. Receiver module produces activation signal for operation of absorber. Tests were performed in the underground experimental base of Mining Institute. The time between the moment of receiving signal by the sensor and activation of absorber - 640 microsecond; distance between transmitter and receiver in direct tunnel - at least 150m; in tunnel with 900 bending - 50m. This research is sponsored by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division in the framework of "Science for Peace".

  13. Detection of plastic explosives by thermic neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacidume, Leo R.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X. da

    2000-01-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the potentiality of the neutron radiography technique, allied to the computerized tomography by transmission, to both detect and visualize plastic explosive samples in several hidden conditions, using a simple scanner as a digitalisation instrument. Each tomographic essay was obtained in the J-9 channel of the Argonauta Research Reactor of IEN/CNEN, in groups of six neutron radiographic projections, performed with an angular increment of 30 in a period of time of 30 minutes for each projection. Two groups of tomographic reconstructions were generated, distinguished by the digitalisation process of the interested lines in the reconstruction plane coming from the projection groups, utilizing a scanner and a microdensitometer, respectively. The reconstruction of the bi-dimensional image of the transverse section, in relation to this plane, was processed making use of the Image reconstruction algorithmic of an image based on the maximum entropy principle (ARIEM). From the qualitative analysis of the images, we conclude that the neutron radiographic system was able to detect the explosive sample in a satisfactory way while the quantitative analysis confirmed the application effectiveness of a scanner to acquire the projection dates whose objective is only a reconnaissance. (author)

  14. Maintenance energy requirements of odor detection, explosive detection and human detection working dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Mullis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite their important role in security, little is known about the energy requirements of working dogs such as odor, explosive and human detection dogs. Previous researchers have evaluated the energy requirements of individual canine breeds as well as dogs in exercise roles such as sprint racing. This study is the first to evaluate the energy requirements of working dogs trained in odor, explosive and human detection. This retrospective study evaluated twenty adult dogs who maintained consistent body weights over a six month period. During this time, the average energy consumption was $136\\pm 38~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$136±38kcal⋅BWkg0.75 or two times the calculated resting energy requirement ($\\mathrm{RER}=70~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$RER=70kcal⋅BWkg0.75. No statistical differences were found between breeds, age or sex, but a statistically significant association (p = 0.0033, R-square = 0.0854 was seen between the number of searches a dog performs and their energy requirement. Based on this study’s population, it appears that working dogs have maintenance energy requirements similar to the 1974 National Research Council’s (NRC maintenance energy requirement of $132~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$132kcal⋅BWkg0.75 (National Research Council (NRC, 1974 and the $139\\pm 42~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$139±42kcal⋅BWkg0.75 reported for young laboratory beagles (Rainbird & Kienzle, 1990. Additional research is needed to determine if these data can be applied to all odor, explosive and human detection dogs and to determine if other types of working dogs (tracking, search and rescue etc. have similar energy requirements.

  15. Ion chromatography-mass spectrometry: a review of recent technologies and applications in forensic and environmental explosives analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Leon; Gilchrist, Elizabeth

    2014-01-02

    The development and application of ion chromatography (IC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is discussed herein for the quantitative determination of low-order explosives-related ionic species in environmental and forensic sample types. Issues relating to environmental explosives contamination and the need for more confirmatory IC-MS based applications in forensic science are examined. In particular, the compatibility of a range of IC separation modes with MS detection is summarised along with the analytical challenges that have been overcome to facilitate determinations at the ng-μg L(-1) level. Observed trends in coupling IC to inductively coupled plasma and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry form a particular focus. This review also includes a discussion of the relative performance of reported IC-MS methods in comparison to orthogonal ion separation-based, spectrometric and spectroscopic approaches to confirmatory detection of low-order explosives. Finally, some promising areas for future research are highlighted and discussed with respect to potential IC-MS applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  17. Detection of drugs and plastic explosives using neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br; Crispim, V.R; Silva, A.X. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@com.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    The unique ability of neutrons to image certain elements and isotopes that are either completely undetectable or poorly detected by other Non-Destructive-Assay (NDA) methods makes neutron radiography an important tool for the NDA community. Neutron radiography, like other imaging techniques takes a number of different forms (i.e. / that is film, radioscopic, transfer methods, tomography, etc.) In this work report the Neutron Tomography System developed, which will allow inspections NDA of samples with high efficiency, in terms of minors measure time and the result analysis, and the application for detection of drugs and plastic explosives, which is very important for the combat to the terrorism and drug trafficking. The neutron tomography system developed is third generation. Therefore a rotary table driven by a step motor connected to a computerized motion control system has been installed at the sample position. In parallel to this a suitable electronic imaging device has been designed and can be controlled by a computer in order to synchronize the software the detector and of the rotary table with the aim of an automation of measurements. To obtain 2D tomography image, a system with an electronic imaging system for producing real time neutron radiography. Images are processing digital for cancel random noise effects and to optimize spatial resolution. Finally, using a (ARIEN) algorithm reconstruction of tomography images by finite element maximum entropy. The system was installed adjacent to the exit of the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta Reactor in the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) - which is an organ of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN - Brazil).The Argonauta reactor operates at 340 watts, being that the characteristics of the neutron beam on the plane of the image: thermal neutron flux 4,46 x10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s. In the tomography assays, several encapsulated samples of paste, rock and cocaine powder and plastic explosives devices

  18. Determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions by ''Coulomb-explosion'' techniques with fast (MeV) molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ion beams in thin foils suggest a novel alternative approach to the determination of molecular ion structures. In this article we review some recent high-resolution studies on the interactions of fast molecular ion beams with solid and gaseous targets and indicate how such studies may be applied to the problem of determining molecular ion structures. The main features of the Coulomb explosion of fast-moving molecular ion projectiles and the manner in which Coulomb-explosion techniques may be applied to the problem (difficult to attack by more conventional means) of determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions has been described in this paper. Examples have been given of early experiments designed to elicit structure information. The techniques are still in their infancy, and it is to be expected that as both the technology and the analysis are refined, the method will make valuable contributions to the determination of molecular ion structures

  19. Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for standoff explosives detection : LDRD 138733 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Linker, Kevin Lane

    2009-09-01

    Continued acts of terrorism using explosive materials throughout the world have led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially technologies that have a potential for remote or standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the benefit of the possible use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff explosives detection equipment. Standoff detection of explosives is currently one of the most difficult problems facing the explosives detection community. Increased domestic and troop security could be achieved through the remote detection of explosives. An effective remote or standoff explosives detection capability would save lives and prevent losses of mission-critical resources by increasing the distance between the explosives and the intended targets and/or security forces. Many sectors of the US government are urgently attempting to obtain useful equipment to deploy to our troops currently serving in hostile environments. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the potential benefits of utilizing quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff detection systems. This report documents the potential opportunities that Sandia National Laboratories can contribute to the field of QCL development. The following is a list of areas where SNL can contribute: (1) Determine optimal wavelengths for standoff explosives detection utilizing QCLs; (2) Optimize the photon collection and detection efficiency of a detection system for optical spectroscopy; (3) Develop QCLs with broader wavelength tunability (current technology is a 10% change in wavelength) while maintaining high efficiency; (4) Perform system engineering in the design of a complete detection system and not just the laser head; and (5) Perform real-world testing with explosive materials with commercial prototype detection systems.

  20. Using Gunshot Detection Systems to Fight Explosive Fishing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showen, R. L.; Dunson, J. C.; Woodman, G.; Christopher, S.; Wilson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Blast fishing (using explosives to catch fish) causes extensive damage to coral reefs, especially in the Coral Triangle in Southeast Asia. Subsistence fishermen and larger consortiums, often with criminal links, throw an explosive into a school of fish, killing all sea life within range. This unsustainable practice is becoming more prevalent, and threatens the protein supply of as many as a billion people. Ending blast fishing will require combined technical and societal methods aimed at both deterring the practice, and catching those responsible. Our work aims to significantly improve enforcement. We are re-purposing SST's ShotSpotter gunshot detection system, (trusted and valued by police around the world), substituting hydrophones for the present microphones. Using multilateration and trained human reviewers, the system can give prompt blast alerts, location data, and acoustic waveforms to law enforcement officials. We hope to establish a prototype system in Malaysia in 2015, and have already secured governmental approvals for installation and tests with local law enforcement. The Scubazoo media firm in Malaysia is working with resorts, dive operations, and celebrity sponsors, and is planning to produce videos to illustrate the severity of the problem to both governments and the public. Because there is little hard data concerning the prevalence of blast fishing in either marine protected areas or open waters, the system can also indicate to the world the actual blast rates and patterns of use. The Teng Hoi environmental NGO in Hong Kong showed in 2004 that acoustic waves from typical bombs propagate on the order of 20 km, so an underwater locator system with a small number of sensors can feasibly cover a sizable coral region. Our present plans are to mount sensors on piers, buoys, and boats, but if possible we would also like to integrate with other existing acoustic arrays to strengthen the fight against blast fishing.

  1. Multi-colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives in gas and liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives. The tec......In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives....... This sensor array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable....

  2. Chemicapacitive microsensors for detection of explosives and TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Hobson, Stephen T.; Cemalovic, Sabina; Mlsna, Todd E.

    2005-10-01

    Seacoast Science develops chemical sensors that use polymer-coated micromachined capacitors to measure the dielectric permittivity of an array of selectively absorbing materials. We present recent results demonstrating the sensor technology's capability to detect components in explosives and toxic industrial chemicals. These target chemicals are detected with functionalized polymers or network materials, chosen for their ability to adsorb chemicals. When exposed to vapors or gases, the permittivity of these sorbent materials changes depending on the strength of the vapor-sorbent interaction. Sensor arrays made of ten microcapacitors on a single chip have been previously shown to detect vapors of organic compounds (chemical warfare agents, industrial solvents, fuels) and inorganic gases (SO2, CO2, NO2). Two silicon microcapacitor structures were used, one with parallel electrode plates and the other with interdigitated "finger-like" electrodes. The parallel-plates were approximately 300 μm wide and separated by 750 nm. The interdigitated electrodes were approximately 400 μm long and were elevated above the substrate to provide faster vapor access. Eight to sixteen of these capacitors are fabricated on chips that are 5 x 2 mm and are packaged in less than 50 cm3 with supporting electronics and batteries, all weighing less than 500 grams. The capacitors can be individually coated with different materials creating a small electronic nose that produces different selectivity patterns in response to different chemicals. The resulting system's compact size, low-power consumption and low manufacturing costs make the technology ideal for integration into various systems for numerous applications.

  3. Photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays for bulk explosives detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, J.E.; Faust, A.A.; Pastor, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    To date, the most successful nuclear methods to confirm the presence of bulk explosives have been radiative thermal neutron capture (thermal neutron activation) and prompt radiative emission following inelastic fast neutron scattering (fast neutron analysis). This paper proposes an alternative: photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays. If monoenergetic gamma rays whose energies exceed the threshold for neutron production are incident on a given isotope, the emitted neutrons have a spectrum consisting of one or more discrete energies and the spectrum can be used as a fingerprint to identify the isotope. A prototype compact gamma-ray generator is proposed as a suitable source and a commercially available 3 He ionization chamber is proposed as a suitable spectrometer. Advantages of the method with respect to the previously mentioned ones may include simpler spectra and low inherent natural neutron background. Its drawbacks include a present lack of suitable commercially available photon sources, induced neutron backgrounds and low detection rates. This paper describes the method, including kinematics, sources, detectors and geometries. Simulations using a modified Geant4 Monte Carlo modelling code are described and results are presented to support feasibility. Further experiments are recommended

  4. Stand-off laser Raman spectroscopy and its advancement in explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-run; Xue, Bin; Li, Yi-zhe; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The explosives detection has been a hot and difficult issue in the field of security it is particularly important to detect explosives quickly and reliably. There are many methods to detect explosives currently, stand-off Raman spectroscopy is one of the most promising and practical technologies, this technique can be used for non-contact and nondestructive detection, ensure the safety of attendants, at the same time the precision and speed of detection are also very high and be characterized by rapid response. This paper mainly gives an account of the fundamental principle of Raman spectroscopy, as well as recount major challenges of Standoff Laser Raman Spectroscopy applied in explosives detection and corresponding solutions. From the perspective of the system, this paper sums up related theories and techniques of the excitation laser and telescopic system etc.. Ultimately, a brief analysis and summary of the development trend of this technology is given.

  5. Detection Dynamics Of Nitrogen Based Explosive Quantities In Selected Cylindrical Containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngusha Tavershima Almighty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental set up for examining the variation of detection intensity with explosive quantity has been studied. Containers made from ceramic carbon steel wood and HDPE were filled with explosive masses ranging from 10 kg to 500 kg and irradiated by a 14.1 MeV point isotropic neutron source. The resulting gamma photons were analyzed for their C N and O composition and the sum computed to yield a quantity known as the material quotient MQ. Examination of MQ values indicates an initial increase in detection intensity with increasing explosive quantity. Saturation is however reached at an explosive quantity of about 25kg where detection intensity reduces with further increase in explosive quantity. Effects of variation in explosive quantity appeared to be more pronounced for explosives contained in HDPE and wooden containers and least pronounced for those in steel containers. Source-detector configuration was identified as a major factor affecting effective detection of large masses of explosives.

  6. Explosives trace detection in the process of biometrical fingerprint identification for access control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertseva, Elena V.; Savin, Andrey V.

    2007-02-01

    A method for trace detection of explosives on the surface of biometric fingerprint scanner is proposed and its sensitivity explored. The method is based on attenuated total reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy. The detection limit is about several microgram and the detectivity increases with the wavelength used for scanning. The advantages of the proposed method include high selectivity and thus low false alarm level, applicability to low vapor pressure explosives and low cost.

  7. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  8. Detection of Atmospheric Explosions at IMS Monitoring Stations using Infrasound Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christie, Douglas R; Kennett, Brian L; Tarlowski, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Work is continuing on the development of infrasound techniques that can be used to improve detection, location and discrimination capability for atmospheric nuclear explosions at International Monitoring System (IMS...

  9. 4. International symposium on analysis and detection of explosives, Jerusalem (Israel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    From all the presentations given at the 4. International Symposium on Analysis and Detection of Explosives (September 7-10, 1992, Jerusalem, Israel), three were considered in INIS scope and separately indexed

  10. Terrorism and Drug Trafficking: Responsibilities for Developing Explosives and Narcotics Detection Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report discusses (1) the roles, responsibilities, and authority of : agencies that establish policy, provide funds or oversee funding requests, : and develop explosives and narcotics detection technologies; : (2) mechanisms used to coordinate th...

  11. Detecting Weak Explosions at Local Distances by Fusing Multiple Geophysical Phenomenologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nemzek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arrowsmith, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Comprehensive explosion monitoring requires the technical capability to identify certain signatures at low signal strengths. For particularly small, evasively conducted explosions, conventional monitoring methods that use single geophysical phenomenologies may produce marginal or absent detections. To address this challenge, we recorded coincident acoustic, seismic and radio-frequency emissions during the above-ground detonation of ~ 2-12 kg solid charges and assessed how waveform data could be fused to increase explosion-screening capability. Our data provided identifiable explosion signatures that we implemented as template-events in multichannel correlation detectors to search for similar, matching waveforms. We thereby observed that these highly sensitive correlation detectors missed explosive events when applied separately to data streams that were heavily contaminated with noise and signal clutter. By then adding the p-values of these statistics through Fisher’s combined probability test, we correctly identified the explosion signals at thresholds consistent with the false alarm rates of the correlation detectors. This resulting Fisher test thereby provided high-probability detections, zero false alarms, and higher theoretical detection capability. We conclude that inclusion of these fusion methods in routine monitoring operations will likely lower both detection thresholds for small explosions, while reducing false attribution rates.

  12. MEMS-based Porous Silicon Preconcentrators Filled with Carbopack-B for Explosives Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Camara , El Hadji Malik; James , Franck; Breuil , Philippe; Pijolat , Christophe; Briand , Danick; De Rooij , Nicolaas F

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we report the detection of explosive compounds using a miniaturized gas preconcentrator (μGP) made of porous silicon (PS) filled in with Carbopack B as an adsorbent material. The μGP includes also a platinum heater patterned at the backside and fluidic connectors sealed on the glass cover. Our μGP is designed and optimized through fluidic and thermal simulations for meeting the requirements of trace explosives detection. The thermal mass of the device was...

  13. Research on data auto-analysis algorithms in the explosive detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haidong; Li Yuanjing; Yang Yigang; Li Tiezhu; Chen Boxian; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly describe some auto-analysis algorithms in explosive detection system with TNA method. These include the auto-calibration algorithm when disturbed by other factors, MCA auto-calibration algorithm with calibrated spectrum, the auto-fitting and integral of hydrogen and nitrogen elements data. With these numerical algorithms, the authors can automatically and precisely analysis the gamma-spectra and ultimately achieve the explosive auto-detection. (authors)

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE POSSIBILITY OF UTALIZATION OF HONEY BEES IN EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Ćosović Bajić, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    The fact that honey bees can detect explosive is widely known since late ’90, particularly when US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) solicited in 1999 proposals on Control led Biological and Biomimetic Systems. The honey of honey bees was known and approved in Croatia in 1994, 1997, 1999, 2002, as the sensitive indicator of the nuclear pollution (after Chernobyl). The application of the honey bees for the detection of the explosive and the land mines was treated in several ...

  15. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace vapor detection and standoff detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Current sensor technologies, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats. PAS is one of the more flexible IR spectroscopy variants, and that flexibility allows for the construction of sensors that are designed for specific tasks. PAS is well suited for trace detection of gaseous and condensed media. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. We will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures in relation to our ultimate goal of a universal compact chemical sensor platform. Finally, expanding on our previously reported photoacoustic detection of condensed phase samples, we are investigating standoff photoacoustic chemical detection of these materials. We will discuss the evaluation of a PAS sensor that has been designed around increasing operator safety during detection and identification of explosive materials by performing sensing operations at a standoff distance. We investigate a standoff variant of PAS based upon an interferometric sensor by examining the characteristic absorption spectra of explosive hazards collected at 1 m.

  16. Trace detection of explosives with low vapor emissions by laser surface photofragmentation-fragment detection spectroscopy with an improved ionization probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabalo, Jerry; Sausa, Rosario

    2005-02-20

    Trace explosive residues are measured in real time by surface laser photofragmentation-fragment detection (SPF-FD) spectroscopy at ambient conditions. A 248-nm laser photofragments the target residue on a substrate, and a 226-nm laser ionizes the resulting NO fragment by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization by means of its A-X (0, 0) transitions near 226 nm. We tested two probes on selected explosives and modeled their electric field in the presence of a substrate with an ion optics simulation program. The limits of detection range from 1 to 15 ng/cm2 (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) at 1 atm and 298 K and depend on the electrode orientation and mechanism for NO formation.

  17. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Explosives Detection Using Magnetic and Nuclear Resonance Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) a highly promising new technique for bulk explosives detection: relatively inexpensive, more compact than NMR, but with considerable selectivity. Since the NQR frequency is insensitive to long-range variations in composition, mixing explosives with other materials, such as the plasticizers in plastic explosives, makes no difference. The NQR signal strength varies linearly with the amount of explosive, and is independent of its distribution within the volume monitored. NQR spots explosive types in configurations missed by the X-ray imaging method. But if NQR is so good, why it is not used everywhere? Its main limitation is the low signal-to-noise ratio, particularly with the radio-frequency interference that exists in a field environment, NQR polarization being much weaker than that from an external magnetic field. The distinctive signatures are there, but are difficult to extract from the noise. In addition, the high selectivity is partly a disadvantage, as it is hard to bui...

  18. Nonlinear structures: Explosive, soliton, and shock in a quantum electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Haas, F.; Ali, S.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies are performed for the nonlinear structures (explosive, solitons, and shock) in quantum electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation method is employed to the quantum hydrodynamical equations and the Poisson equation, obtaining extended quantum Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. The latter has been solved using the generalized expansion method to obtain a set of analytical solutions, which reflects the possibility of the propagation of various nonlinear structures. The relevance of the present investigation to the white dwarfs is highlighted.

  19. Effects of oral administration of metronidazole and doxycycline on olfactory capabilities of explosives detection dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Eileen K; Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Angle, T Craig; Behrend, Ellen N; Moore, George E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of oral administration of metronidazole or doxycycline on olfactory function in explosives detection (ED) dogs. ANIMALS 18 ED dogs. PROCEDURES Metronidazole was administered (25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h for 10 days); the day prior to drug administration was designated day 0. Odor detection threshold was measured with a standard scent wheel and 3 explosives (ammonium nitrate, trinitrotoluene, and smokeless powder; weight, 1 to 500 mg) on days 0, 5, and 10. Lowest repeatable weight detected was recorded as the detection threshold. There was a 10-day washout period, and doxycycline was administered (5 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h for 10 days) and the testing protocol repeated. Degradation changes in the detection threshold for dogs were assessed. RESULTS Metronidazole administration resulted in degradation of the detection threshold for 2 of 3 explosives (ammonium nitrate and trinitrotoluene). Nine of 18 dogs had a degradation of performance in response to 1 or more explosives (5 dogs had degradation on day 5 or 10 and 4 dogs had degradation on both days 5 and 10). There was no significant degradation during doxycycline administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Degradation in the ability to detect odors of explosives during metronidazole administration at 25 mg/kg, PO, every 12 hours, indicated a potential risk for use of this drug in ED dogs. Additional studies will be needed to determine whether lower doses would have the same effect. Doxycycline administered at the tested dose appeared to be safe for use in ED dogs.

  20. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the research project 'Xsense' at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT and TNT, and identification of volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air...... a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and volatile organic compound. Such sensing technology can be used to screen for relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas phase. This sensor...

  1. Solitary, explosive and periodic solutions for electron acoustic solitary waves with non-thermal hot ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, S. A.; Abulwafa, E. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Abd-El-Hamid, H. M.

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made for electron acoustic waves propagating in a system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma consists of a cold electron fluid and ions with two different temperatures in which the hot ions obey the non-thermal distribution. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equation for small but finite amplitude electrostatic waves. It is found that the presence of the energetic population of non-thermal hot ions δ, initial normalized equilibrium density of low temperature ions μ and the ratio of temperatures of low temperature ions to high temperature ions β do not only significantly modify the basic properties of solitary structure, but also change the polarity of the solitary profiles. At the critical hot ions density, the KdV equation is not appropriate for describing the system. Hence, a new set of stretched coordinates is considered to derive the modified KdV equation. In the vicinity of the critical hot ions density, neither KdV nor modified KdV equation is appropriate for describing the electron acoustic waves. Therefore, a further modified KdV equation is derived. An algebraic method with computerized symbolic computation, which greatly exceeds the applicability of the existing tanh, extended tanh methods in obtaining a series of exact solutions of the various KdV-type equations, is used here. Numerical studies have been reveals different solutions e.g., bell-shaped solitary pulses, singular solitary "blowup" solutions, Jacobi elliptic doubly periodic wave, Weierstrass elliptic doubly periodic type solutions, in addition to explosive pulses. The results of the present investigation may be applicable to some plasma environments, such as Earth's magnetotail region.

  2. Trace Detection of RDX, HMX and PETN Explosives Using a Fluorescence Spot Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Helin; Bunes, Benjamin R; Wu, Na; Xu, Miao; Yang, Xiaomei; Yu, Li; Zang, Ling

    2016-05-05

    1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), the major components in plastic explosives, pose a significant threat to public safety. A quick, sensitive, and low-cost detection method for these non-volatile explosives is eagerly demanded. Here we present a fluo-spot approach, which can be employed for in situ detection of trace amount of explosives. The sensor molecule is a charge-transfer fluorophore, DCM, which is strongly fluorescent in its pristine state, but non-fluorescent after the quick reaction with NO2· (or NO2(+)) generated from the UV photolysis of RDX, HMX (or PETN). When fabricated within silica gel TLC plate, the fluo-spot sensor features high sensitivity owing to the large surface area and porous structure of the substrate. The sensor reaction mechanism was verified by various experimental characterizations, including chromatography, UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, MS and (1)H NMR spectrometry. The fluo-spot also demonstrated high selectivity towards RDX, HMX and PETN, as no significant fluorescence quenching was observed for other chemical compounds including common nitro-aromatic explosives and inorganic oxidative compounds. The DCM sensor can also be used as an economical spray kit to directly spot the explosives by naked eyes, implying great potential for quick, low-cost trace explosives detection.

  3. Multichannel Discriminative Detection of Explosive Vapors with an Array of Nanofibrous Membranes Loaded with Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaofeng Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The multichannel fluorescent sensor array based on nanofibrous membranes loaded with ZnS quantum dots (QDs was created and demonstrated for the discriminative detection of explosives. The synergistic effect of the high surface-to-volume ratio of QDs, the good permeability of nanofibrous membranes and the differential response introduced by surface ligands was played by constructing the sensing array using nanofibrous membranes loaded with ZnS QDs featuring several surface ligands. Interestingly, although the fluorescence quenching of the nanofibrous membranes is not linearly related to the exposure time, the fingerprint of each explosive at different times is very similar in shape, and the fingerprints of the three explosives show different shapes. Three saturated vapors of nitroaromatic explosives could be reliably detected and discriminated by the array at room temperature. This work is the first step toward devising a monitoring system for explosives in the field of public security and defense. It could, for example, be coupled with the technology of image recognition and large data analysis for a rapid diagnostic test of explosives. This work further highlights the power of differential, multichannel arrays for the rapid and discriminative detection of a wide range of chemicals.

  4. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  5. Merging Infrasound and Electromagnetic Signals as a Means for Nuclear Explosion Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Joseph; Lipshtat, Azi; Kesar, Amit S.; Pistinner, Shlomo; Ben Horin, Yochai

    2016-04-01

    The infrasound monitoring network of the CTBT consists of 60 stations. These stations are capable of detecting atmospheric events, and may provide approximate location within time scale of a few hours. However, the nature of these events cannot be deduced from the infrasound signal. More than two decades ago it was proposed to use the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) as a means of discriminating nuclear explosion from other atmospheric events. An EMP is a unique signature of nuclear explosion and is not detected from chemical ones. Nevertheless, it was decided to exclude the EMP technology from the official CTBT verification regime, mainly because of the risk of high false alarm rate, due to lightning electromagnetic pulses [1]. Here we present a method of integrating the information retrieved from the infrasound system with the EMP signal which enables us to discriminate between lightning discharges and nuclear explosions. Furthermore, we show how spectral and other characteristics of the electromagnetic signal emitted from a nuclear explosion are distinguished from those of lightning discharge. We estimate the false alarm probability of detecting a lightning discharge from a given area of the infrasound event, and identifying it as a signature of a nuclear explosion. We show that this probability is very low and conclude that the combination of infrasound monitoring and EMP spectral analysis may produce a reliable method for identifying nuclear explosions. [1] R. Johnson, Unfinished Business: The Negotiation of the CTBT and the End of Nuclear Testing, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, 2009.

  6. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field screening methods and analysis of explosives in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avolio, J.; DeBono, R.; Radwanski, P. [Barringer Instruments Inc., New Providence, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The rapid on-site and lab analysis of soil samples contaminated with DNT, TNT, and RDX is explored with IMS detection and various sample preparation methods. Field screening for explosives is presently time consuming and generates considerable amounts of additional chemical wastes. The field method is also limited in the number of different explosives that can be analyzed. The use of a Barringer Instruments IONSCAN IMS system, which is comprised of a thermal desorption sample introduction system directly plumbed to the IMS reaction region and drift tube assembly permits novel methods of sample prep and sample introduction to be employed. Direct sampling, sample salvation, and sample extraction are all investigated and reported. Benefits of utilizing an IONSCAN in the analysis of soil samples is the ability to simultaneously analyze up to 18 analytes in each sample in 4.8 seconds! Therefore it is feasible to analyze for degradation products as well as the target parent explosive compounds. 10 PPM or better limits of detection are achieved with this methodology and an IONSCAN for DNT, TNT, and RDX. Based on these preliminary results this work is being continued in both the lab and on-site with soil and water samples.

  7. Improved explosive collection and detection with rationally assembled surface sampling materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Bays, J. Timothy; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Addleman, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Sampling and detection of trace explosives is a key analytical process in modern transportation safety. In this work we have explored some of the fundamental analytical processes for collection and detection of trace level explosive on surfaces with the most widely utilized system, thermal desorption IMS. The performance of the standard muslin swipe material was compared with chemically modified fiberglass cloth. The fiberglass surface was modified to include phenyl functional groups. When compared to standard muslin, the phenyl functionalized fiberglass sampling material showed better analyte release from the sampling material as well as improved response and repeatability from multiple uses of the same swipe. The improved sample release of the functionalized fiberglass swipes resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity. Various physical and chemical properties were systematically explored to determine optimal performance. The results herein have relevance to improving the detection of other explosive compounds and potentially to a wide range of other chemical sampling and field detection challenges.

  8. Potentials and limits of mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C.; Sharma, A. K.; Willer, U.; Burgmeier, J.; Braunschweig, B.; Schade, W.; Blaser, S.; Hvozdara, L.; Müller, A.; Holl, G.

    2008-09-01

    Optical methods are well-established for trace gas detection in many applications, such as industrial process control or environmental sensing. Consequently, they gain much interest in the discussion of sensing methods for counterterrorism, e.g., the detection of explosives. Explosives as well as their decomposition products possess strong absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region between λ=5 and 11 μm. In this report we present two different laser spectroscopic approaches based on quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operating at wavelengths around λ=5 and 8 μm, respectively. Stand-off configuration for the remote detection of nitro-based explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, TNT) and a fiber coupled sensor device for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are discussed.

  9. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-05

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s.

  10. Headspace-GC/MS detection of TATP traces in post-explosion debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambouli, A; El Bouri, A; Bouayoun, T; Bellimam, M A

    2004-12-02

    In this study, we describe a HS-GC/MS method as a new analytical technique for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) traces in samples from post-explosion debris. We evaluate the optimum parameters for the analysis of this product with lowliness thermal decomposition and for the detection of TATP lesser than nanogram (.1 ng) level.

  11. Detection of explosive vapour using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Ahmad, S. R.

    2009-11-01

    A commercially available nano-structured gold substrate was used for activating surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Raman spectra of the vapour of explosive material, triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), at trace concentrations produced from adsorbed molecules on such surfaces have been studied. Prominent Raman lines of the explosive molecular species were recorded at a sample temperature of ˜35°C, which is near to human body temperature. For this study, the concentration of the adsorbed TATP molecules on the nano-structured surface was varied by heating the sample to different temperatures and exposing the substrate to the sample vapour for different lengths of time. The intensities of the Raman lines have been found to increase with the increase in temperature and also with the increase in the duration of exposure for a fixed temperature. However, as expected, the Raman intensities have been found to saturate at higher temperatures and longer exposures. These saturation effects of the strengths of the Raman lines in the SERS of TATP vapour have been investigated in this paper. The results indicate that the optimisation for vapour deposition on the surface could be a crucial factor for any quantitative estimate of the concentration of the molecular species adsorbed on the nano-structured substrates.

  12. Negative electrospray ionization on porous supporting tips for mass spectrometric analysis: electrostatic charging effect on detection sensitivity and its application to explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Melody Yee-Man; Man, Sin-Heng; Che, Chi-Ming; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2014-03-21

    The simplicity and easy manipulation of a porous substrate-based ESI-MS technique have been widely applied to the direct analysis of different types of samples in positive ion mode. However, the study and application of this technique in negative ion mode are sparse. A key challenge could be due to the ease of electrical discharge on supporting tips upon the application of negative voltage. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of supporting materials, including polyester, polyethylene and wood, on the detection sensitivity of a porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS technique. By using nitrobenzene derivatives and nitrophenol derivatives as the target analytes, it was found that the hydrophobic materials (i.e., polyethylene and polyester) with a higher tendency to accumulate negative charge could enhance the detection sensitivity towards nitrobenzene derivatives via electron-capture ionization; whereas, compounds with electron affinities lower than the cut-off value (1.13 eV) were not detected. Nitrophenol derivatives with pKa smaller than 9.0 could be detected in the form of deprotonated ions; whereas polar materials (i.e., wood), which might undergo competitive deprotonation with the analytes, could suppress the detection sensitivity. With the investigation of the material effects on the detection sensitivity, the porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS method was developed and applied to the direct detection of two commonly encountered explosives in complex samples.

  13. Standoff detection of explosive substances at distances of up to 150 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anadi; Von der Porten, Steven; Patel, C Kumar N

    2010-04-10

    We report detection and identification of trace quantities of explosives at standoff distances up to 150 m with high sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 70) and high selectivity. The technique involves illuminating the target object with laser radiation at a wavelength that is strongly absorbed by the target. The resulting temperature rise is observed by remotely monitoring the increased blackbody radiation from the sample. An unambiguous determination of the target, TNT, in soil samples collected from an explosives test site in China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station is achieved through the use of a tunable CO(2) laser that scans over the absorption fingerprint of the target explosives. The theoretical analysis supports the observation and indicates that, with optimized detectors and data processing algorithms, the measurement capability can be improved significantly, permitting rapid standoff detection of explosives at distances approaching 1 km. The detection sensitivity varies as R(-2) and, thus, with the availability of high power, room-temperature, tunable mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared quantum cascade lasers, this technology may play an important role in screening personnel and their belongings at short distances, such as in airports, for detecting and identifying explosives material residue on persons.

  14. Real-world particulate explosives test coupons for optical detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Viet; Papantonakis, Michael; Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher; McGill, R. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Trace or residue explosives detection typically involves examining explosives found as solid particles on a solid substrate. Different optical spectroscopy techniques are being developed to detect these explosives in situ by probing how light interacts with the surface bound particles of explosives. In order to evaluate these technologies it is important to have available suitable test coupons coated with particles of explosives. When fabricating test coupons to evaluate detection performance or help train a detection algorithm, it is important to use realistic test coupons and consider how the physicochemical properties of the explosives particles, related chemicals, and substrate may affect the spectra produced or signal intensities observed. Specific features of interest include surface fill factor, particle sizes, areal density, degree of particle contact with a substrate and any other chemicals in addition to the explosives and substrate. This level of complexity highlights the need to fabricate test coupons which mimic "real world" particle coated surfaces. With respect to metrics derived from fingerprints, we compare the properties of test coupons fabricated by sieving and inkjetting for ammonium nitrate, TNT, RDX, and sucrose on stainless steel, automotive painted steel, glass and polyethylene substrates. Sieving provides a random distribution of particles, allows fractionation of relevant particle sizes and allows relevant surface fill factors to be achieved. Inkjetting provides precise control of aerial density but because of complications related to solvent-substrate interactions, relevant fill factors and particle sizes are difficult to achieve. In addition, we introduce a custom image analysis technique, NRL ParticleMath, developed to characterize and quantify particle loadings on test coupons.

  15. Thermal explosion hazards on 18650 lithium ion batteries with a VSP2 adiabatic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhu, Can-Yong; Wang, Yih-Wen; Shu, Chi-Min; Chang, Jian-Chuang; Wu, Hung-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Thermal abuse behaviors relating to adiabatic runaway reactions in commercial 18650 lithium ion batteries (LiCoO 2 ) are being studied in an adiabatic calorimeter, vent sizing package 2 (VSP2). We select four worldwide battery producers, Sony, Sanyo, Samsung and LG, and tested their Li-ion batteries, which have LiCoO 2 cathodes, to determine their thermal instabilities and adiabatic runaway features. The charged (4.2 V) and uncharged (3.7 V) 18650 Li-ion batteries are tested using a VSP2 with a customized stainless steel test can to evaluate their thermal hazard characteristics, such as the initial exothermic temperature (T 0 ), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), the pressure rise rate (dP/dt), the pressure-temperature profiles and the maximum temperature (T max ) and pressure (P max ). The T max and P max of the charged Li-ion battery during the runaway reaction reach 903.0 o C and 1565.9 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge), respectively. This result leads to a thermal explosion, and the heat of reaction is 26.2 kJ. The thermokinetic parameters of the reaction of LiCoO 2 batteries are also determined using the Arrhenius model. The thermal reaction mechanism of the Li-ion battery (pack) proved to be an important safety concern for energy storage. Additionally, use of the VSP2 to classify the self-reactive ratings of the various Li-ion batteries demonstrates a new application of the adiabatic calorimetric methodology.

  16. Thermal explosion hazards on 18650 lithium ion batteries with a VSP2 adiabatic calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhu, Can-Yong; Wang, Yih-Wen; Shu, Chi-Min; Chang, Jian-Chuang; Wu, Hung-Chun

    2011-08-15

    Thermal abuse behaviors relating to adiabatic runaway reactions in commercial 18650 lithium ion batteries (LiCoO(2)) are being studied in an adiabatic calorimeter, vent sizing package 2 (VSP2). We select four worldwide battery producers, Sony, Sanyo, Samsung and LG, and tested their Li-ion batteries, which have LiCoO(2) cathodes, to determine their thermal instabilities and adiabatic runaway features. The charged (4.2V) and uncharged (3.7 V) 18650 Li-ion batteries are tested using a VSP2 with a customized stainless steel test can to evaluate their thermal hazard characteristics, such as the initial exothermic temperature (T(0)), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), the pressure rise rate (dP/dt), the pressure-temperature profiles and the maximum temperature (T(max)) and pressure (P(max)). The T(max) and P(max) of the charged Li-ion battery during the runaway reaction reach 903.0°C and 1565.9 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge), respectively. This result leads to a thermal explosion, and the heat of reaction is 26.2 kJ. The thermokinetic parameters of the reaction of LiCoO(2) batteries are also determined using the Arrhenius model. The thermal reaction mechanism of the Li-ion battery (pack) proved to be an important safety concern for energy storage. Additionally, use of the VSP2 to classify the self-reactive ratings of the various Li-ion batteries demonstrates a new application of the adiabatic calorimetric methodology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Network coverage of the IMS noble gas component to detect nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeppner, Michael [Institut fuer Friedensforschung und Sicherheitspolitik an der Universitaet Hamburg, Beim Schlump 83, 20144 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The noble gas component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is supposed to detect radioxenon fission products from nuclear explosions and thereby deliver proof of the nuclear character of suspicious events. In this work an approach is presented to determine the network coverage of the IMS {sup 133}Xe component. Various parameters that influence the network coverage are identified and included. The global radioxenon background from legitimate facilities has been simulated and the resulting impact on the IMS noble gas component calculated. From this background a station-specific detection criterion has been deducted. Furthermore, emissions from underground as well as surface test explosions of 1kt devices have been simulated for each grid point and time step of one year. The percentage of detectable nuclear explosions has been calculated and analysed for geographical and temporal variances.

  18. Thin film sensor materials for detection of Nitro-Aromatic explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdasi, Dipali; Mudhalwadkar, Rohini

    2018-03-01

    Many countries have experienced terrorist activities and innocent people have suffered. Timely detection of explosives can avoid this situation. This paper targets the detection of Nitrobenzene and Nitrotoluene, which are nitroaromatic compounds possessing explosive properties. As direct sensors for detecting these compounds are not available, Polyaniline based thin film sensors doped with palladium are developed using the spin coating technique. The response of the developed sensors is observed for varying concentrations of explosives. It is observed that zinc oxide based sensor is more sensitive to Nitrotoluene exhibiting a relative change in resistance of 0.78. The tungsten oxide sensor is more sensitive to Nitrobenzene with a relative change in resistance of 0.48. The sensor performance is assessed by measuring the response and recovery time. The cross sensitivity of the sensors is evaluated for ethanol, acetone and methanol which was observed as very low.

  19. Multi-Phenomenology Explosion Monitoring (Multi-PEM). Signal Detection. Research to target smaller sources for tomorrow’s missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-12

    This a guide on how to detect and identify explosions from various sources. For example, nuclear explosions produce acoustic, optical, and EMP outputs. Each signal can be buried in noise, but fusing detection statistics from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic signals results in clear detection otherwise unobtainable.

  20. Bayesian Integration and Characterization of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Christine M.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Bader, Sydney P.; Ewing, Robert G.; Fahey, Albert J.; Atkinson, David A.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-02-25

    Key elements regarding the use of non-radioactive ionization sources will be presented as related to explosives detection by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. Various non-radioactive ionization sources will be discussed along with associated ionization mechanisms pertaining to specific sample types.

  1. Sensitive detection of nitro aromatic explosives using novel polythiophene nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathi, Soumitra; Venkataraman, B. Harihara; Kokil, Akshay; Li, Lian; Venkataraman, Dhandapani; Kumar, Jayant; CenterAdvanced Materials Team; University of Massachusetts Lowell Team; University of Massachusetts Amherst Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescent polythiophene nanoparticles were fabricated by surfactant assisted mini emulsion technique. The size distribution of the synthesized nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The synthesized nanoparticles were also characterized using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Strong two-photon induced fluorescence was observed from these nanoparticles using 800 nm pulses from a femto second laser. The fluorescence response of these nanoparticles to nitro-aromatic explosives 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in solution was investigated at different concentrations of the analytes. Strong fluorescence quenching was observed using both one photon and two-photon excitation source. The Stern Volmer constant is also higher.

  2. Optimization of biological and instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines, SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Kenneth G.; Harper, Ross J.; Perr, Jeannette M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive study and comparison is underway using biological detectors and instrumental methods for the rapid detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILR) and high explosives. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) has been demonstrated to be an effective sampling method helping to identify active odor signature chemicals used by detector dogs to locate forensic specimens as well as a rapid pre-concentration technique prior to instrumental detection. Common ignitable liquids and common military and industrial explosives have been studied including trinitrotoluene, tetryl, RDX, HMX, EGDN, PETN and nitroglycerine. This study focuses on identifying volatile odor signature chemicals present, which can be used to enhance the level and reliability of detection of ILR and explosives by canines and instrumental methods. While most instrumental methods currently in use focus on particles and on parent organic compounds, which are often involatile, characteristic volatile organics are generally also present and can be exploited to enhance detection particularly for well-concealed devices. Specific examples include the volatile odor chemicals 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone, which are readily available in the headspace of the high explosive composition C-4; whereas, the active chemical cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) is not. The analysis and identification of these headspace 'fingerprint' organics is followed by double-blind dog trials of the individual components using certified teams in an attempt to isolate and understand the target compounds to which dogs are sensitive. Studies to compare commonly used training aids with the actual target explosive have also been undertaken to determine their suitability and effectiveness. The optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) is detailed including interface development

  3. Multi-colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives in gas and liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostesha, N.; Alstrøm, T. S.; Johnsen, C.; Nielsen, K. A.; Jeppesen, J. O.; Larsen, J.; Boisen, A.; Jakobsen, M. H.

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives. The technology is based on an array of chemoselective compounds immobilized on a solid support. Upon exposure to the analyte in suspicion the colorimetric array changes color. Each chosen compound reacts chemo-selectively with analytes of interest. A change in a color signature indicates the presence of unknown explosives and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We are working towards the selection of compounds that undergo color changes in the presence of explosives and VOCs, as well as the development of an immobilization method for the molecules. Digital imaging of the colorimetric array before and after exposure to the analytes creates a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and VOCs. Such sensing technology can be used for screening relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas and liquid phases. This sensor array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable.

  4. Detection of explosives at trace levels by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, V.; Palucci, A.; Jovicevic, S.; Carapanese, M.; Poggi, C.; Buono, E.

    2010-04-01

    In order to realize a compact instrument for detection of explosive at trace levels, LIBS was applied on residues from different explosives and potentially interfering materials. The residues were simply placed on aluminum support and the measurements were performed in air. Spectral line intensities from the characteristic atoms/molecules and their ratios, are strongly varying from one sampling point to another. The reasons for such variations were studied and explained, allowing establishing a suitable procedure for material recognition. Correct classification was always obtained for five types of explosives, while for TATP, nitroglycerine, DNT and EGDN this occurred only for very thin residues. In all the cases, the estimated detection threshold is between 0.1 ng and 1 ng.

  5. Explosion Seismology: Capabilities and limitations of long-range methods for detecting and recognizing explosions are discussed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, E W

    1965-01-22

    I have tried to describe some current research trends in seismology which are specifically directed toward solving the problem of detecting, locating, and identifying underground nuclear explosions. Attention has been directed specifically toward problems which arise in efforts to obtain information at distances in excess of 2500 kilometers. The main scientific advantage which accrues from working at such distances is that the seismic signals suffer minimal distortion by the geological complexities of the earth. Extrapolation of the data to the question of an international test ban is not within the scope of this article. Suffice it to note that all of the parameters must, in the final resort, be resolved in terms of probabilities. In some cases the seismological probabilities can be estimated with reasonable degrees of accuracy, but the future of the test ban question depends not only on seismology but on such questions as inspection and what probabilities are acceptable.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Vapor Analysis for Improving Explosives Detection Canine Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-10

    ionization (SESI), 8,19-21 dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI), 21,22 selected-ion-flow-tube ( SIFT ), 23,24 and proton transfer reaction...sensors in addition to as service teams, will improve training efficiency and opera- tional performance. In support of canine training, the Department of...for both materials, but transfer efficiency into the source may be poor. Instrument response also saturat- ed when analyzing cyclohexanone. These

  7. In-source collision induced dissociation of inorganic explosives for mass spectrometric signature detection and chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward

    2015-09-10

    The trace detection, bulk quantification, and chemical imaging of inorganic explosives and components was demonstrated utilizing in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) coupled with laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The incorporation of in-source CID provided direct control over the extent of adduct and cluster fragmentation as well as organic noise reduction for the enhanced detection of both the elemental and molecular ion signatures of fuel-oxidizer mixtures and other inorganic components of explosive devices. Investigation of oxidizer molecular anions, specifically, nitrates, chlorates, and perchlorates, identified that the optimal in-source CID existed at the transition between fragmentation of the ionic salt bonds and molecular anion bonds. The chemical imaging of oxidizer particles from latent fingerprints was demonstrated, including both cation and anion components in positive and negative mode mass spectrometry, respectively. This investigation demonstrated LDI-MS with in-source CID as a versatile tool for security fields, as well as environmental monitoring and nuclear safeguards, facilitating the detection of elemental and molecular inorganic compounds at nanogram levels. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  9. Ground Penetrating Radar : Ultra-wideband radars for improvised explosive devices and landmine detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarovoy, A.

    2008-01-01

    For last two decades Ultra-Wideband Ground Penetrating Radars seemed to be a useful tool for detection and classification of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However limitations of radar technology considerably limited operational use of these radars. Recent research at TU Delft

  10. Determination of Peroxide-Based Explosives Using Liquid Chromatography with On-Line Infrared Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Edelmann, Andrea; Quintas, Guillermo; Lendl, Bernhard; Karst, U.

    2006-01-01

    A nondestructive analytical method for peroxide-based explosives determination in solid samples is described. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in combination with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection is used for the analysis of triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and

  11. Metal-organic polyhedra-coated si nanowires for the sensitive detection of trace explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Anping; Zhu, Wei; Shang, Jin; Klootwijk, Johan H.; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Surface-modified silicon nanowire-based field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) have proven to be a promising platform for molecular recognition in miniature sensors. In this work, we present a novel nanoFET/device for the sensitive and selective detection of explosives based on affinity layers of

  12. A Luminescent Nanocrystal Marker for the Selective and Ultrasensitive Detection of Explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, Shyam; Grana Suarez, Laura; Verboom, Willem; Mahalingam, V.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    We developed a luminescent probe for the selective and sensitive detection of an explosive, i.e., picric acid (PA), based on the luminescence quenching of CeIII and TbIII co-doped Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals. A new colloidal synthesis route at low temperature (80 °C) was developed to synthesize the

  13. Xsense: using nanotechnology to combine detection methods for high sensitivity handheld explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Kostesha, Natalie; Bosco, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to produce a handheld explosives sensor the Xsense project has been initiated at the Technical University of Denmark in collaboration with a number of partners. Using micro- and nano technological approaches it will be attempted to integrate four detection principles into a single de...

  14. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  15. Noble Gas Migration Experiment to Support the Detection of Underground Nuclear Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Khris B.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Woods, Vincent T.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Lowrey, Justin D.; Lukins, Craig D.; Suarez, Reynold; Humble, Paul H.; Ellefson, Mark D.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Zhong, Lirong; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Emer, Dudley; Biegalski, S.

    2016-03-01

    A Noble Gas Migration Experiment (NGME) funded by the National Center for Nuclear Security and conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory and National Security Technology provided critical on-site inspection (OSI) information related to the detection of an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) event using noble gas signatures.

  16. Detection of explosive as an indicator of landmines: BIOSENS project methodology and field tests in Southeast Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, Stephen; Eng, Lars; Gardhagen, Peter; Berg, Anders

    2005-06-01

    The IST-2000-25348-BIOSENS project carried out a number of studies to assess the use of explosive detection technology for humanitarian demining. This paper presents sampling/collection technology developed, test methodology and results including comparisons with dogs and soil sampling. Findings are presented in terms of the detection of explosive from mines in the environment and demining.

  17. Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis for Detecting Explosives-related Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, Mark E; Venzin, Alexander M

    2012-11-14

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are interested in developing a standardized testing procedure for determining the performance of candidate detection systems. This document outlines a potential method for judging detection system performance as well as determining if combining the information from a legacy system with a new system can signicantly improve performance. In this document, performance corresponds to the Neyman-Pearson criterion applied to the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves of the detection systems in question. A simulation was developed to investigate how the amount of data provided by the vendor in the form of the ROC curve eects the performance of the combined detection system. Furthermore, the simulation also takes into account the potential eects of correlation and how this information can also impact the performance of the combined system.

  18. Remote detection of gas markers of artificial explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, B. G.; Klimkin, A. V.; Kuryak, A. N.; Osipov, K. Yu.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.

    2015-11-01

    At the recent years, the increasing interest to laser methods of detection of harmful and dangerous admixtures in the open atmosphere is observed. In this work, experimental results are given of remote detection of acetone vapors, which is the marker of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), with the use of the frequency-pulse 13C16O2 laser with generation line at 11.2 μm.

  19. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent...... progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in...

  20. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostesha, N. V.; Alstrøm, T. S.; Johnsen, C.; Nilesen, K. A.; Jeppesen, J. O.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, M. H.; Boisen, A.

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of the research project 'Xsense' at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT and TNT, and identification of volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air. The technology is based on an array of chemo-responsive dyes immobilized on a solid support. Upon exposure to the analyte in suspicion the dye array changes color. Each chosen dye reacts chemo selectively with analytes of interest. A change in a color signature indicates the presence of unknown explosives and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We are working towards the selection of dyes that undergo color changes in the presence of explosives and VOCs, as well as the development of an immobilization method for the molecules. Digital imaging of the dye array before and after exposure to the analytes creates a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and volatile organic compound. Such sensing technology can be used to screen for relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas phase. This sensor array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable.

  1. Neutron-based techniques for detection of explosives and drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Kiraly, B; Csikai, J

    2001-01-01

    Systematic measurements were carried out on the possible use of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons combined with the thermal neutron reflection method for the identification of land mines and illicit drugs via he detection of H, C, N, and O elements as their major constituents. While ur present results show that these methods are capable of indicating the anomalies in bulky materials and observation of the major elements, e termination of the exact atom fractions needs further investigation.

  2. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Explosives and chemical warfare agents - detection and analysis with PTR-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulzer, Philipp; Juerschik, Simone; Jaksch, Stefan; Jordan, Alfons; Hanel, Gernot; Hartungen, Eugen; Seehauser, Hans; Maerk, Lukas; Haidacher, Stefan; Schottkowsky, Ralf [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Petersson, Fredrik [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    We utilized a recently developed high sensitivity PTR-MS instrument equipped with a high resolution time-of-flight mass analyzer for detailed investigations on explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). We show that with this so called PTR-TOF 8000 it is possible to identify solid explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, PETN and Semtex A) by analyzing the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces. As the mentioned solid explosives possess very low vapor pressures, the main challenge for detecting them in the gas phase is to provide an instrument with a sufficient sensitivity. CWAs on the other side have very high vapor pressures but are difficult to identify unambiguously as their nominal molecular masses are usually comparably small and therefore hard to distinguish from harmless everyday-compounds (e.g. mustard gas: 159 g/mol). In the present work we demonstrate that we can detect a broad range of dangerous substances, ranging from the CWA mustard gas to the explosive HMX.

  4. Detecting Surface Changes from an Underground Explosion in Granite Using Unmanned Aerial System Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Coppersmith, Ryan T.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swanson, Erika M.; Cooley, James A.

    2017-08-01

    Efficient detection and high-fidelity quantification of surface changes resulting from underground activities are important national and global security efforts. In this investigation, a team performed field-based topographic characterization by gathering high-quality photographs at very low altitudes from an unmanned aerial system (UAS)-borne camera platform. The data collection occurred shortly before and after a controlled underground chemical explosion as part of the United States Department of Energy's Source Physics Experiments (SPE-5) series. The high-resolution overlapping photographs were used to create 3D photogrammetric models of the site, which then served to map changes in the landscape down to 1-cm-scale. Separate models were created for two areas, herein referred to as the test table grid region and the nearfield grid region. The test table grid includes the region within 40 m from surface ground zero, with photographs collected at a flight altitude of 8.5 m above ground level (AGL). The near-field grid area covered a broader area, 90-130 m from surface ground zero, and collected at a flight altitude of 22 m AGL. The photographs, processed using Agisoft Photoscan® in conjunction with 125 surveyed ground control point targets, yielded a 6-mm pixel-size digital elevation model (DEM) for the test table grid region. This provided the ≤3 cm resolution in the topographic data to map in fine detail a suite of features related to the underground explosion: uplift, subsidence, surface fractures, and morphological change detection. The near-field grid region data collection resulted in a 2-cm pixel-size DEM, enabling mapping of a broader range of features related to the explosion, including: uplift and subsidence, rock fall, and slope sloughing. This study represents one of the first works to constrain, both temporally and spatially, explosion-related surface damage using a UAS photogrammetric platform; these data will help to advance the science of

  5. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO3, a solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO3, solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N as 500 nM.

  6. Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2012-05-01

    Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

  7. Analysis of an explosion accident of nitrogen trichloride in a waste liquid containing ammonium ion and platinum black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken; Akiyoshi, Miyako; Ishizaki, Keiko; Sato, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    2014-08-15

    Five liters of sodium hypochlorite aqueous solution (12 mass%) was poured into 300 L of liquid waste containing ammonium ion of about 1.8 mol/L in a 500 L tank in a plant area; then, two minutes later the solution exploded with a flash on March 30th, 2005. The tank cover, the fluorescent lamp and the air duct were broken by the blast wave. Thus, we have conducted 40 runs of laboratory-scale explosion tests under various conditions (solution concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 and NaClO, temperatures, Pt catalysts, pH, etc.) to investigate the causes for such an explosion. When solutions of ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite are mixed in the presence of platinum black, explosions result. This is ascribable to the formation of explosive nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). In the case where it is necessary to mix these 2 solutions (ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite) in the presence of platinum black, the following conditions would reduce a probability of explosion; the initial concentration of NH4(+) should be less than 3 mol/L and the pH should be higher than 6. The hypochlorite solution (in 1/10 in volume) to be added at room temperature is recommended to be less than 0.6 mol/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Amine-functionalized diatom frustules: a platform for specific and sensitive detection of nitroaromatic explosive derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Viji; Thomas, Neethi; Anthuvan, Allen Joseph; Nagamony, Ponpandian; Chinnuswamy, Viswanathan

    2017-12-14

    In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a proof of concept for the detection of nitroaromatic explosive derivatives through the photoluminescence (PL) quenching process using functionalized diatom frustules as a sensing platform. The diatom frustules are composed of nanostructured, highly porous biogenic silica material and emit strong, visible blue PL upon UV excitation. PL-active biosilica was isolated from the marine diatom Nitzschia sp. and was amine-functionalized to develop a sensing platform. Functionalized diatom frustules were further characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope and a series of spectroscopic methods. When nitroaromatic compounds were bound to the functionalized diatom frustules biosilica, the PL intensity from the functionalized biosilica was partially quenched due to the electrophilic nature of the nitro (-NO) groups. The quenching process confirmed the Meisenheimer complex formation and was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and time-resolved photoluminescence studies. The developed platform was further evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity, and the limit of detection (LOD) of the assay was determined as 1 μM for a series of nitroaromatic explosive compounds. In conclusion, the developed sensing platform will have great utility in the development of on-site detection platforms for sensitive detection of warfare explosive nitroaromatic compounds from the environment.

  9. In situ trace detection of peroxide explosives by desorption electrospray ionization and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Hernandez-Soto, Heriberto; Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-03-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is used for the rapid (bond, forming a distonic ion. This is followed by elimination of a fragment of 30 mass units, shown to be the expected neutral molecule, formaldehyde, in the case of HMTD, but shown by isotopic labeling experiments to be ethane in the cases of TATP and TrATrP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support the suggested fragmentation mechanisms for the complexes. Binding energies of Na+ of 40.2 and 33.1 kcal/mol were calculated for TATP-Na(+) and HMTD-Na(+) complexes, suggesting a strong interaction between the peroxide groups and the sodium ion. Increased selectivity is obtained either by MS/MS or by doping the spray solvent with additives that produce the lithium and potassium complexes of TATP, HMTD, and TrATrP. Addition of dopants into the solvent spray increased the signal intensity by an order of magnitude. When pure alcohol or aqueous hydrogen peroxide was used as the spray solvent, the (HMTD + Na)+ complex was able to bind a molecule of alcohol (methanol or ethanol) or hydrogen peroxide, providing additional characteristic ions to increase the selectivity of analysis. DESI also allowed the rapid detection of peroxide explosives in complex matrixes such as diesel fuel and lubricants using single or multiple cation additives (Na(+), K(+), and Li(+), and NH4(+)) in the spray solvent. Low-nanogram detection limits were achieved for HMTD, TrATrP, and TATP in these complex matrixes. The DESI response was linear over 3 orders of magnitude for HMTD and TATP on paper surfaces (1-5000 ng), and quantification of both peroxide explosives from paper gave precisions (RSD) of less than 3%. The use of pure water and compressed air as the DESI spray solution and nebulizing gas, respectively, showed similar ionization efficiencies to those obtained using methanol/water mixtures and nitrogen gas (the typical choices). An alternative ambient method, desorption atmospheric pressure chemical

  10. Development of graphene nanoplatelet embedded polymer microcantilever for vapour phase explosive detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Prasenjit; Pandey, Swapnil; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a graphene based strain sensor has been reported for explosive vapour detection applications by exploiting the piezoresistive property of graphene. Instead of silicon based cantilevers, a low cost polymeric micro-cantilever platform has been used to fabricate this strain sensor by embedding the graphene nanoplatelet layer inside the beam. The fabricated devices were characterized for their mechanical and electromechanical behaviour. This device shows a very high gauge factor which is around ∼144. Also the resonant frequency of these cantilevers is high enough such that the measurements are not affected by environmental noise. These devices have been used in this work for reliable detection of explosive vapours such as 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene down to parts-per-billion concentrations in ambient conditions.

  11. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  12. Security training symposium: Meeting the challenge: Firearms and explosives recognition and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    These conference proceedings have been prepared in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Security Training Symposium on Meeting the Challenge -- Firearms and Explosives Recognition and Detection,'' November 28 through 30, 1989, in Bethesda, Maryland. This document contains the edited transcripts of the guest speakers. It also contains some of the speakers' formal papers that were distributed and some of the slides that were shown at the symposium (Appendix A).

  13. Advanced ion chromatograph detects low MEA levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, S. (Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc., Anacortes, WA (US)); Palladino, D. (Beckmann Instruments Inc., Westbury, N.Y. (US))

    1990-01-22

    Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc. is using an advanced method of ion chromatography at its Puget Sound refinery in Anacortes, Wash., to detect and measure monoethanolamine (MEA) in process effluent water at low-ppm levels. The method reported in this article is electronically suppressed, single-column, ion chromatography (SCIC). The method was selected for use in this service subsequent to successful use to improve titrimetric analysis of wash water, where low-ppm ranges of chlorides needed to be measured. SCIC was also able to detect halides of other constituents, such as bromides and iodides. The advanced method can measure precisely very low levels of both monoethanolamine and ammonia, and it assists in locating the sources that allow the contaminants to escape into the wastewater stream. In these analyses, the SCIC unit operated in less than one third the time of automatic titrimetry and other wet chemistry methods available in the laboratory. It also proved to be more economical than conventional chemically suppressed ion chromatography (CSIC).

  14. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials

  15. Position-adaptive explosive detection concepts for swarming micro-UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmic, Rastko R.; Mitra, Atindra

    2008-04-01

    We have formulated a series of position-adaptive sensor concepts for explosive detection applications using swarms of micro-UAV's. These concepts are a generalization of position-adaptive radar concepts developed for challenging conditions such as urban environments. For radar applications, this concept is developed with platforms within a UAV swarm that spatially-adapt to signal leakage points on the perimeter of complex clutter environments to collect information on embedded objects-of-interest. The concept is generalized for additional sensors applications by, for example, considering a wooden cart that contains explosives. We can formulate system-of-systems concepts for a swarm of micro-UAV's in an effort to detect whether or not a given cart contains explosives. Under this new concept, some of the members of the UAV swarm can serve as position-adaptive "transmitters" by blowing air over the cart and some of the members of the UAV swarm can serve as position-adaptive "receivers" that are equipped with chem./bio sensors that function as "electronic noses". The final objective can be defined as improving the particle count for the explosives in the air that surrounds a cart via development of intelligent position-adaptive control algorithms in order to improve the detection and false-alarm statistics. We report on recent simulation results with regard to designing optimal sensor placement for explosive or other chemical agent detection. This type of information enables the development of intelligent control algorithms for UAV swarm applications and is intended for the design of future system-of-systems with adaptive intelligence for advanced surveillance of unknown regions. Results are reported as part of a parametric investigation where it is found that the probability of contaminant detection depends on the air flow that carries contaminant particles, geometry of the surrounding space, leakage areas, and other factors. We present a concept of position

  16. Application of neutron/gamma transport codes for the design of explosive detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Shayer, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of neutron and gamma transport codes to the design of nuclear techniques for detecting concealed explosives material are discussed. The methodology of integrating radiation transport computations in the development, optimization and analysis phases of these new technologies is discussed. Transport and Monte Carlo codes are used for proof of concepts, guide the system integration, reduce the extend of experimental program and provide insight into the physical problem involved. The paper concentrates on detection techniques based on thermal and fast neutron interactions in the interrogated object. (authors). 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  17. Highly sensitive detection of explosive triacetone triperoxide by an In2O3 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Wei-De; Chen, Lu-Ya

    2010-08-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is one of the most sensitive known explosives and can be easily synthesized using the commonly available chemicals acetone and hydrogen peroxide, but is difficult to be detected. In this study, In2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by a glucose-assisted solvothermal method at 120 °C for 18 h. The gas sensor based on In2O3 nanoparticles exhibits a high response, fast response and recovery, a wide detecting range of 0.50-500 mg, good stability and excellent stability to TATP.

  18. Use of canines for explosives detection in the personnel access control function at a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Results of experiments in the use of canines for explosive detection are discussed. Results of the experiments show that the tests identified the training and environmental problems associated with the use of macrosmatic animals in this environment. There may be more problems discovered in subsequent programs, but it is felt that the major problems were identified. The encouraging thing is that the identified problems are solvable by fairly straightforward adjustments in the training and environmental areas. It appears that canines in the personnal search application can achieve a better than 95% probability of detection, with a false alarm rate of less that 5% and an average per person search time of 20 seconds.

  19. Detection of Nitroaromatic Explosives Using an Electrical- Electrochemical and Optical Hybrid Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Aguilar, Alvaro

    In today's world there is a great need for sensing methods as tools to provide critical information to solve today's problems in security applications. Real time detection of trace chemicals, such as explosives, in a complex environment containing various interferents using a portable device that can be reliably deployed in a field has been a difficult challenge. A hybrid nanosensor based on the electrochemical reduction of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and the interaction of the reduction products with conducting polymer nanojunctions in an ionic liquid was fabricated. The sensor simultaneously measures the electrochemical current from the reduction of TNT and the conductance change of the polymer nanojunction caused from the reduction product. The hybrid detection mechanism, together with the unique selective preconcentration capability of the ionic liquid, provides a selective, fast, and sensitive detection of TNT. The sensor, in its current form, is capable of detecting parts per trillion level TNT in the presence of various interferents within a few minutes. A novel hybrid electrochemical-colorimetric (EC-C) sensing platform was also designed and fabricated to meet these challenges. The hybrid sensor is based on electrochemical reactions of trace explosives, colorimetric detection of the reaction products, and unique properties of the explosives in an ionic liquid (IL). This approach affords not only increased sensitivity but also selectivity as evident from the demonstrated null rate of false positives and low detection limits. Using an inexpensive webcam a detection limit of part per billion in volume (ppbV) has been achieved and demonstrated selective detection of explosives in the presence of common interferences (perfumes, mouth wash, cleaners, petroleum products, etc.). The works presented in this dissertation, were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS, 2009) and Nano Letters (2010), won first place in the National Defense Research

  20. Use of canines for explosives detection in the personnel access control function at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Results of experiments in the use of canines for explosive detection are discussed. Results of the experiments show that the tests identified the training and environmental problems associated with the use of macrosmatic animals in this environment. There may be more problems discovered in subsequent programs, but it is felt that the major problems were identified. The encouraging thing is that the identified problems are solvable by fairly straightforward adjustments in the training and environmental areas. It appears that canines in the personnal search application can achieve a better than 95% probability of detection, with a false alarm rate of less that 5% and an average per person search time of 20 seconds

  1. Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne

    This Ph.D. thesis titled “Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection” is a part of the strategic research project “Miniaturized sensors for explosives detection in air” funded by the Danish Agency for Science and Technology...... before the sensor responses can be applied to supervised learning algorithms. The technologies used for sensing consist of Calorimetry, Cantilevers, Chemoselective compounds, Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. Each of the sensors have their own strength and weaknesses...... and Gaussian Processes. Often, there is no tradition for using these methods in the communities of the prescribed sensors. Here, a method of too much complexity is often undesired so it is a balance when to utilize more sophisticated methods. For this reason, an array of methods that only discriminate between...

  2. Novel Concept of Frequency-Combs Interferometric Spectroscopy in the Mid-IR for Significantly Enhanced Detection of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    spectroscopy in the mid- ir for significantly enhanced detection of explosives" . For technical questions, please contact Dr. Vodopyanov at vodopyanov...spectroscopy in the mid- IR for significantly enhanced detection of explosives Sb. GRANT NUMBER N0001 4-14-1 -0447 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Our work over the reporting period has resulted in the demonstration of high performance spectroscopic sensor based on mid- IR

  3. Improved efficiency access control equipment and explosive, weapons and drug abuse detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A.; Milford, A.; Woollven, J.

    1985-01-01

    The second generation portal explosives detector has been designed with increased detection capability and convenience in service. The method of detection and performance relative to the first generation is described. A novel method of auto-calibration and self diagnosis is described and results are discussed. Improvements in convenience of operation have been achieved and operating space and costs reduced by combining metal detection capability, together with explosives detection. This allows both alarm signal and diagnostic outputs to be combined on a single remote panel in the guard room, and reduces the number of guards needed to man the access control. This type of access control is entirely a defensive measure against attack but a further additional feature is proposed which will also check the state of mind of all personnel passing through the check point. Any person suffering from the effect of narcotic or alcohol will be detected by their inability to reproduce their normal signature. A new method of signature analysis in five dimensions is described together with proposals for integrating the check without increasing the time in the test area. Some recent results on the effects of alcohol on signature reproduction is given.

  4. Increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of gas sensors for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Daniel

    Over the past decade, the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has increased, domestically and internationally, highlighting a growing need for a method to quickly and reliably detect explosive devices in both military and civilian environments before the explosive can cause damage. Conventional techniques have been successful in explosive detection, however they typically suffer from enormous costs in capital equipment and maintenance, costs in energy consumption, sampling, operational related expenses, and lack of continuous and real-time monitoring. The goal was thus to produce an inexpensive, portable sensor that continuously monitors the environment, quickly detects the presence of explosive compounds and alerts the user. In 2012, here at URI, a sensor design was proposed for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The design entailed a thermodynamic gas sensor that measures the heat of decomposition between trace TATP vapor and a metal oxide catalyst film. The sensor was able to detect TATP vapor at the part per million level (ppm) and showed great promise for eventual commercial use, however, the sensor lacked selectivity. Thus, the specific objective of this work was to take the original sensor design proposed in 2012 and to make several key improvements to advance the sensor towards commercialization. It was demonstrated that a sensor can be engineered to detect TATP and ignore the effects of interferent H2O2 molecules by doping SnO2 films with varying amounts of Pd. Compared with a pure SnO2 catalyst, a SnO2, film doped with 8 wt. % Pd had the highest selectivity between TATP and H2O2. Also, at 12 wt. % Pd, the response to TATP and H2O2 was enhanced, indicating that sensitivity, not only selectivity, can be increased by modifying the composition of the catalyst. An orthogonal detection system was demonstrated. The platform consists of two independent sensing mechanisms, one thermodynamic and one conductometric, which take measurements from

  5. Using of acoustic technologies for detection of explosives in gas, liquid and solid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valyaev, A. N.; Yanushkevich, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Some industrial nuclear power objects are very attractive for the realization of radiological and chemical terrorism acts with using of explosives. Although up today this type of terrorism is not revealed itself, but the problem of detection of explosives at these objects is becoming very actual one, for example, in connection with the implementation of the urgent decommissioning of nuclear powered vessels. Such decommissioning includes the utilization the dangerous radioactive and chemical elements, contained in submarines and vessels. This actual problem is existed not only in Russia, but also in abroad. It is noticed that catastrophes at these objects will have in addition the great negative mental effect on population of all over the world, as it was after the Chernobyl accident. The using of the modern nuclear physics methods for detection and analysis of explosives is connected with the following difficulties: (1) we have to have the unique and the expensive equipment; (2) the special preparation of sample probes; (3) a long time is often necessary for analysis; (4) the high qualification of service personal is needed. We proposed to use for these purposes the complex of acoustic techniques, that are based on the high sensitivity of acoustic characteristics of any matter to their physical and chemical properties.Any acoustic signal has the following main parameters: (1) frequency (ω); (2) amplitude of pressure (ρ); (3) wave and amplitude bands; (4) velocity of acoustic wave propagation (sound velocity) (C); (5) space and temporal signal evolution, that is determined by the values of coefficients of temporal attenuation (α), space adsorption (β) and sound dispersion on obstacles and impurities. Our acoustic analysis is included the determination of C, α and β values for solid and liquid explosives. The exact measurements of these parameters and their dependences from frequency and temperature are conducted in the special acoustic cells, that

  6. Ion-Selective Detection with Glass Nanopipette for Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, T.; Son, J. W.; Kang, E. J.; Deng, X. L.; Kawai, T.; Lee, S.-W.; Park, B. H.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a method to probe local ion concentration with glass nanopipette in which poly(vinyl chloride) membrane containing ionophore for separate ion detection is prepared. Here we demonstrate how ion-selective detections are available for living cells such as HeLa cell, rat vascular myocyte, and neuron cell.

  7. Detecting and Cataloging Global Explosive Volcanism Using the IMS Infrasound Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, R. S.; Green, D. N.; LE Pichon, A.; Fee, D.; Shearer, P. M.; Mialle, P.; Ceranna, L.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are among the most powerful sources of infrasound observed on earth, with recordings routinely made at ranges of hundreds to thousands of kilometers. These eruptions can also inject large volumes of ash into heavily travelled aviation corridors, thus posing a significant societal and economic hazard. Detecting and counting the global occurrence of explosive volcanism helps with progress toward several goals in earth sciences and has direct applications in volcanic hazard mitigation. This project aims to build a quantitative catalog of global explosive volcanic activity using the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network. We are developing methodologies to search systematically through IMS infrasound array detection bulletins to identify signals of volcanic origin. We combine infrasound signal association and source location using a brute-force, grid-search, cross-bearings approach. The algorithm corrects for a background prior rate of coherent infrasound signals in a global grid. When volcanic signals are identified, we extract metrics such as location, origin time, acoustic intensity, signal duration, and frequency content, compiling the results into a catalog. We are testing and validating our method on several well-known case studies, including the 2009 eruption of Sarychev Peak, Kuriles, the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, and the 2015 eruption of Calbuco, Chile. This work represents a step toward the goal of integrating IMS data products into global volcanic eruption early warning and notification systems. Additionally, a better characterization of volcanic signal detection helps improve understanding of operational event detection, discrimination, and association capabilities of the IMS network.

  8. Remote detection of weak aftershocks of the DPRK underground explosions using waveform cross correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, R.; Rozhkov, M.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I. O.; Sanina, I.

    2017-12-01

    Association of weak seismic signals generated by low-magnitude aftershocks of the DPRK underground tests into event hypotheses represent a challenge for routine automatic and interactive processing at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, due to the relatively low station density of the International Monitoring System (IMS) seismic network. Since 2011, as an alternative, the IDC has been testing various prototype techniques of signal detection and event creation based on waveform cross correlation. Using signals measured by seismic stations of the IMS from DPRK explosions as waveform templates, the IDC detected several small (estimated mb between 2.2 and 3.6) seismic events after two DPRK tests conducted on September 9, 2016 and September 3, 2017. The obtained detections were associated with reliable event hypothesis and then used to locate these events relative to the epicenters of the DPRK explosions. We observe high similarity of the detected signals with the corresponding waveform templates. The newly found signals also correlate well between themselves. In addition, the values of the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) estimated using the traces of cross correlation coefficients, increase with template length (from 5 s to 150 s), providing strong evidence in favour of their spatial closeness, which allows interpreting them as explosion aftershocks. We estimated the relative magnitudes of all aftershocks using the ratio of RMS amplitudes of the master and slave signal in the cross correlation windows characterized by the highest SNR. Additional waveform data from regional non-IMS stations MDJ and SEHB provide independent validation of these aftershock hypotheses. Since waveform templates from any single master event may be sub-efficient at some stations, we have also developed a method of joint usage of the DPRK and the biggest aftershocks templates to build more robust event hypotheses.

  9. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Photon and neutron interrogation techniques for chemical explosives detection in air cargo: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkle, Robert C.; White, Timothy A.; Miller, Erin A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Collins, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning cargo transported via aircraft ('air cargo') for explosive threats is a problem that presently lacks a comprehensive technical solution. While chemical explosives detection in the baggage-scanning domain has a rich history that sheds light on potential solutions, air cargo differs in several important ways, and thus one cannot look to the present array of technologies. Some contemporary solutions, such as trace analysis, are not readily applied to cargo because of sampling challenges while the larger geometry of air cargo makes others less effective. This review article examines an array of interrogation techniques using photons and neutrons as incident particles. We first present a summary of the signatures and observables chemical explosives provide and review how they have been exploited in baggage scanning. Following this review is a description of the challenges posed by the air-cargo application space. After considering sources of photons and neutrons, we describe methods focused on transmission imaging, sub-surface examination, and elemental characterization. It is our goal to expand the understanding of each method's technical promise while largely deferring questions that revolve around footprint, safety, and conduct of operations. Our overarching intent is that a comprehensive understanding of potential techniques will foster the development of a comprehensive solution.

  11. Detection of explosives on the surface of banknotes by Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana R; Correa, Deleon N; Zacca, Jorge J; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Poppi, Ronei J

    2015-02-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology using Raman hyperspectral imaging and chemometric methods for identification of pre- and post-blast explosive residues on banknote surfaces. The explosives studied were of military, commercial and propellant uses. After the acquisition of the hyperspectral imaging, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the pure spectra and the distribution of the corresponding image constituents. The performance of the methodology was evaluated by the explained variance and the lack of fit of the models, by comparing the ICA recovered spectra with the reference spectra using correlation coefficients and by the presence of rotational ambiguity in the ICA solutions. The methodology was applied to forensic samples to solve an automated teller machine explosion case. Independent component analysis proved to be a suitable method of resolving curves, achieving equivalent performance with the multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method. At low concentrations, MCR-ALS presents some limitations, as it did not provide the correct solution. The detection limit of the methodology presented in this study was 50 μg cm(-2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, F.J.O.; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials.

  13. Micro-calorimetric sensor for vapor phase explosive detection with optimized heat profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Olsen, J.; Privorotskaya, N.

    2010-01-01

    A heater design, used in a micro-calorimetric sensor, has been optimized for temperature uniformity in order to increase the sensitivity and reliability of detection of trace amounts of explosives. In this abstract the design, fabrication and characterization is described. The performance...... of the novel heater design is characterized by measuring the temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) values and by mapping the temperature distribution using Raman spectroscopy. The new heater design is seen to have increased the temperature uniformity by a factor of 2.3....

  14. Micro-calorimetric sensor for vapour phase explosive detection with optimized heat profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A heater design, used in a micro-calorimetric sensor, has been optimized for temperature uniformity and the sensor has been used for detection of trace amounts of explosives. In this abstract the design, characterization and functionality is described. The performance of the novel heater design...... is characterized by measuring the temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) values and by mapping the temperature distribution using Raman spectroscopy. The new heater design has increased the temperature uniformity and calorimetric measurements on DNT (2,4-Dinitrotoluene) show more reproducible and better...

  15. Inadequate peak expiratory flow meter characteristics detected by a computerised explosive decompression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, M.R.; Atkins, P.R.; Pedersen, O.F.

    2003-01-01

    Methods: The dynamic response of mini-Wright (MW), Vitalograph (V), TruZone (TZ), MultiSpiro (MS) and pneumotachograph (PT) flow meters was tested by delivering two differently shaped flow-time profiles from a computer controlled explosive decompression device fitted with a fast response solenoid.......1) and 257 (39.2), respectively, and at ≈200 l/min they were 51 (23.9) and 1 (0.5). All the meters met ATS accuracy requirements when tested with their waveforms. Conclusions: An improved method for testing the dynamic response of flow meters detects marked overshoot (underdamping) of TZ and MS responses...

  16. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21945-970, Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)], E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X. [DNC/Poli, PEN COPPE CT, UFRJ Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21941-972, Caixa Postal 68509, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials.

  17. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, F J O; Crispim, V R; Silva, A X

    2010-06-01

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anomaly detection ensemble fusion for buried explosive material detection in forward looking infrared imaging for addressing diurnal temperature variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Derek T.; Stone, Kevin; Keller, James M.; Rose, John

    2012-06-01

    In prior work, we describe multiple image space anomaly detection algorithms for the identification of buried explosive materials in forward looking long wave infrared imagery. That work is extended here and focus is placed on improved detection with respect to diurnal temperature variation. An ensemble of shape and size independent image space anomaly detection algorithms are investigated. Specifically, anomalies are identified according to change and blob detection. This anomaly evidence is aggregated and targets are found using an ensemble of trainable size-contrast filters and weighted mean shift clustering. In addition, the blob detector makes use of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization for image enhancement. Experimental results are shown based on field data measurements from a U.S. Army test site.

  19. Speciation from photon to ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.

    2001-01-01

    New analytical techniques allowing to perform speciation in the framework of the nuclear fuel cycle are more and more needed. Among them, several laser-based analytical techniques present several advantages (non intrusive). Hence, Thermal Lensing (TL)/Photoacoustic (LIPAS), Time Resolved selective, sensitive Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) have been used for actinides/lanthanides interaction and speciation studies in inorganic and organic matrices, Laser Ablation-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-OES or LIBS) for direct studies on solids, liquids,... where in situ measurements (elemental or isotopic) are mandatory. In complementary to these photon-based methods, new ion detection methods such as ElectroSpray-Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) seems promising for speciation studies. Principle, advantages and limitations as well as results obtained and trends for these different methods will be presented. (author)

  20. Detection of Nitroaromatic and Peroxide Explosives in Air Using Infrared Spectroscopy: QCL and FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo C. Pacheco-Londoño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for processing spectroscopic information using a chemometrics-based analysis was designed and implemented in the detection of highly energetic materials (HEMs in the gas phase at trace levels. The presence of the nitroaromatic HEM 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT and the cyclic organic peroxide triacetone triperoxide (TATP in air was detected by chemometrics-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy. Several infrared experimental setups were tested using traditional heated sources (globar, modulated and nonmodulated FT-IR, and quantum cascade laser- (QCL- based dispersive IR spectroscopy. The data obtained from the gas phase absorption experiments in the midinfrared (MIR region were used for building the chemometrics models. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA was used to generate pattern recognition schemes for trace amounts of explosives in air. The QCL-based methodology exhibited a better capacity of discrimination for the detected presence of HEM in air compared to other methodologies.

  1. Analytical detection of explosives and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Bishu; Petersson, Fredrik; Juerschik, Simone [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann D. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Watts, Peter; Mayhew, Chris A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 4TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This work demonstrates the extremely favorable features of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the detection and identification of solid explosives, chemical warfare agent simulants and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs in real time. Here, we report the use of PTR-TOF, for the detection of explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, trinitrobenzene) and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs (e.g., ecstasy, morphine, heroin, ethcathinone, 2C-D). For all substances, the protonated parent ion (as we used H{sub 3}O{sup +} as a reagent ion) could be detected, providing a high level of confidence in their identification since the high mass resolution allows compounds having the same nominal mass to be separated. We varied the E/N from 90 to 220 T{sub d} (1 T{sub d}=10{sup -17} Vcm{sup -1}). This allowed us to study fragmentation pathways as a function of E/N (reduced electric field). For a few compounds rather unusual E/N dependencies were also discovered.

  2. Detection and mapping of trace explosives on surfaces under ambient conditions using multiphoton electron extraction spectroscopy (MEES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shisong; Vinerot, Nataly; Fisher, Danny; Bulatov, Valery; Yavetz-Chen, Yehuda; Schechter, Israel

    2016-08-01

    Multiphoton electron extraction spectroscopy (MEES) is an analytical method in which UV laser pulses are utilized for extracting electrons from solid surfaces in multiphoton processes under ambient conditions. Counting the emitted electrons as a function of laser wavelength results in detailed spectral features, which can be used for material identification. The method has been applied to detection of trace explosives on a variety of surfaces. Detection was possible on dusty swabs spiked with explosives and also in the standard dry-transfer contamination procedure. Plastic explosives could also be detected. The analytical limits of detection (LODs) are in the sub pmole range, which indicates that MEES is one of the most sensitive detection methods for solid surface under ambient conditions. Scanning the surface with the laser allows for its imaging, such that explosives (as well as other materials) can be located. The imaging mode is also useful in forensic applications, such as detection of explosives in human fingerprints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Training and deployment of honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacy, Philip J.; Bender, Susan; Bromenshenk, Jerry; Henderson, Colin; Bender, Gary

    2002-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been collaborating with the University of Montana's (UM) engineered honeybee colony research under DARPA's Controlled Biological and Biomimetric Systems (CBBS) program. Prior work has shown that the monitoring of contaminants that are returned to a hive by honeybees (Apis mellifera) provides a rapid, inexpensive method to assess chemical distributions and environmental impacts. Members from a single colony make many tens of thousands of foraging trips per day over areas as large as 2 km2. During these foraging trips, the insects are in direct contact with most environmental media (air, water, plants, and soil) and, in the process, encounter contaminants in gaseous, liquid and particulate form. These contaminants are carried back to the hive where analysis can be conveniently conducted. Three decades of work by UM and other investigators has demonstrated that honeybees can effectively and rapidly screen large areas for the presence of a wide array of chemical contaminants and for the effects of exposures to these chemicals. Recently, UM has been exploring how bee-based environmental measurements can be used to quantify risks to humans or ecosystems. The current DARPA program extends this work to the training of honeybees to actively search for contaminants such as the explosive residue being released by buried landmines. UM developed the methods to train bees to detect explosives and chemical agent surrogates. Sandia provided the explosives expertise, test facilities, electronics support, and state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation. We will present an overview of the training procedures, test parameters employed, and a summary of the results of field trials that were performed in Montana and at DARPA field trials in San Antonio, TX. Data showing the detection limits of the insects will be included.

  4. Detection of plastic explosives by thermic neutron radiography; Deteccao de explosivos plasticos por neutrongrafia termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacidume, Leo R.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X. da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the potentiality of the neutron radiography technique, allied to the computerized tomography by transmission, to both detect and visualize plastic explosive samples in several hidden conditions, using a simple scanner as a digitalisation instrument. Each tomographic essay was obtained in the J-9 channel of the Argonauta Research Reactor of IEN/CNEN, in groups of six neutron radiographic projections, performed with an angular increment of 30 in a period of time of 30 minutes for each projection. Two groups of tomographic reconstructions were generated, distinguished by the digitalisation process of the interested lines in the reconstruction plane coming from the projection groups, utilizing a scanner and a microdensitometer, respectively. The reconstruction of the bi-dimensional image of the transverse section, in relation to this plane, was processed making use of the Image reconstruction algorithmic of an image based on the maximum entropy principle (ARIEM). From the qualitative analysis of the images, we conclude that the neutron radiographic system was able to detect the explosive sample in a satisfactory way while the quantitative analysis confirmed the application effectiveness of a scanner to acquire the projection dates whose objective is only a reconnaissance. (author)

  5. Detection of plastic explosives using thermal neutron radiography; Deteccao de explosivos plasticos por neutrongrafia termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacidume, Leo Ryoske

    1999-12-01

    The work aims to demonstrate the potentiality of the neutron radiography technique, allied to the computerized tomography by transmission, to both detect and visualize plastic explosive samples in several hidden conditions, using a simple scanner as a digitalisation instrument. Each tomographic essay was obtained in the J-9 channel of the Argonauta Research Reactor of IEN/CNEN, in groups of six neutron radiographic projections, performed with an angular increment of 30 deg C, in a period of time of 30 minutes for each projection. Two groups of tomographic reconstructions were generated, distinguished by the digitalisation process of the interested lines in the reconstruction plane coming from the projection groups, utilization a scanner and a microdensitometer, respectively. The reconstruction of the bi-dimensional image of the transverse section, in relation to this plane, was processed making use of the Image Reconstruction Algorithmic of an Image based on the Maximum Entropy principle (ARIEM). From the qualitative analysis of the images, we conclude that the neutron radiographic system was able to detect the explosive sample in a satisfactory way while the quantitative analysis confirmed the application effectiveness of a scanner to acquire the projection dates whose objective is only a reconnaissance. (author)

  6. Xsense: using nanotechnology to combine detection methods for high sensitivity handheld explosives detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael S.; Kostesha, Natalie; Bosco, Filippo; Olsen, Jesper K.; Johnsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Kent A.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Alstrøm, Tommy S.; Larsen, Jan; Jakobsen, Mogens H.; Thundat, Thomas; Boisen, Anja

    2010-04-01

    In an effort to produce a handheld explosives sensor the Xsense project has been initiated at the Technical University of Denmark in collaboration with a number of partners. Using micro- and nano technological approaches it will be attempted to integrate four detection principles into a single device. At the end of the project, the consortium aims at having delivered a sensor platform consisting of four independent detector principles capable of detecting concentrations of TNT at sub parts-per-billion (ppb) concentrations and with a false positive rate less than 1 parts-per-thousand. The specificity, sensitivity and reliability are ensured by the use of clever data processing , surface functionalisation and nanostructured sensors and sensor surfaces.

  7. Joint analysis of infrasound and seismic signals by cross wavelet transform: detection of Mt. Etna explosive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cannata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prompt detection of explosive volcanic activity is crucial since this kind of activity can release copious amounts of volcanic ash and gases into the atmosphere, causing severe dangers to aviation. In this work, we show how the joint analysis of seismic and infrasonic data by wavelet transform coherence (WTC can be useful to detect explosive activity, significantly enhancing its recognition that is normally done by video cameras and thermal sensors. Indeed, the efficiency of these sensors can be reduced (or inhibited in the case of poor visibility due to clouds or gas plumes. In particular, we calculated the root mean square (RMS of seismic and infrasonic signals recorded at Mt. Etna during 2011. This interval was characterised by several episodes of lava fountains, accompanied by lava effusion, and minor strombolian activities. WTC analysis showed significantly high values of coherence between seismic and infrasonic RMS during explosive activity, with infrasonic and seismic series in phase with each other, hence proving to be sensitive to both weak and strong explosive activity. The WTC capability of automatically detecting explosive activity was compared with the potential of detection methods based on fixed thresholds of seismic and infrasonic RMS. Finally, we also calculated the cross correlation function between seismic and infrasonic signals, which showed that the wave types causing such seismo-acoustic relationship are mainly incident seismic and infrasonic waves, likely with a common source.

  8. Classification-aware dimensionality reduction methods for explosives detection using multi-energy x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Limor; Ishwar, Prakash; Karl, W. C.; Pien, Homer

    2011-03-01

    Multi-Energy X-ray Computed Tomography (MECT) is a non-destructive scanning technology in which multiple energyselective measurements of the X-ray attenuation can be obtained. This provides more information about the chemical composition of the scanned materials than single-energy technologies and potential for more reliable detection of explosives. We study the problem of discriminating between explosives and non-explosives using low-dimensional features extracted from the high-dimensional attenuation versus energy curves of materials. We study various linear dimensionality reduction methods and demonstrate that the detection performance can be improved by using more than two features and when using features different than the standard photoelectric and Compton coefficients. This suggests the potential for improved detection performance relative to conventional dual-energy X-ray systems.

  9. Real-time detection and characterization of nuclear explosion using broadband analyses of regional seismic stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, T.; Madlazim

    2018-01-01

    This preliminary study aims to propose a new method of real-time detection and characterization of nuclear explosions by analyzing broadband seismic waveforms acquired from a network of regional seismic stations. Signal identification generated by a nuclear test was differentiated from natural sources of either earthquakes or other natural seismo-tectonic events by verifying crucial parameters, namely source depth, type of first motion, and P-wave domination of the broadband seismic wavesunder consideration. We examined and analyzed a recently hypothetical nuclear test performed by the North Koreangovernment that occurred on September 3, 2017 as a vital point to study. From spectral analyses, we found that the source of corresponding signals associated with detonations of the latest underground nuclear test was at a much shallower depth below the surface relatively compared with that of natural earthquakes, the suspected nuclear explosions produced compressional waves with radially directed outward from the source for their first motions, and the waves were only dominated by P-components. The results are then discussed in the context of potential uses of the proposed methodology for human-induced disaster early warning system and/or the need of rapid response purposes for minimizing the disaster risks.

  10. Remote detection of buried explosives by fluorescent and bioluminescent microbial sensors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Shimshon; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Zohar, Cheinat; Rabinovitz, Zahi; Nussinovitch, Amos; Kabessa, Yossi; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2017-06-01

    Current landmine detection methodologies are not much different in principle from those employed 75 years ago, in that they require actual presence in the minefield, with obvious risks to personnel and equipment. Other limitations include an extremely large ratio of false positives, as well as a very limited ability to detect non-metallic landmines. In this lecture a microbial-based solution for the remote detection of buried landmines described. The small size requirements, rapid responses and sensing versatility of bacterial bioreporters allow their integration into diverse types of devices, for laboratory as well as field applications. The relative ease by which molecular sensing and reporting elements can be fused together to generate dose-dependent quantifiable physical (luminescent, fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical) responses to pre-determined conditions allows the construction of diverse classes of sensors. Over the last two decades we and others have employed this principle to design and construct microbial bioreporter strains for the sensitive detection of (a) specific chemicals of environmental concern (heavy metals, halogenated organics etc.) or (b) their deleterious biological effects on living systems (such as toxicity or genotoxicity). In many of these cases, additional molecular manipulations beyond the initial sensor-reporter fusion may be highly beneficial for enhancing the performance of the engineered sensor systems. This presentation highlights several of the approaches we have adopted over the years to achieve this aim, while focusing on the application of live cell microbeads for the remote detection of buried landmines and other explosive devices.

  11. Innovative concept for a major breakthrough in atmospheric radioactive xenon detection for nuclear explosion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Petit, G; Cagniant, A; Morelle, M; Gross, P; Achim, P; Douysset, G; Taffary, T; Moulin, C

    The verification regime of the comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT) is based on a network of three different waveform technologies together with global monitoring of aerosols and noble gas in order to detect, locate and identify a nuclear weapon explosion down to 1 kt TNT equivalent. In case of a low intensity underground or underwater nuclear explosion, it appears that only radioactive gases, especially the noble gas which are difficult to contain, will allow identification of weak yield nuclear tests. Four radioactive xenon isotopes, 131m Xe, 133m Xe, 133 Xe and 135 Xe, are sufficiently produced in fission reactions and exhibit suitable half-lives and radiation emissions to be detected in atmosphere at low level far away from the release site. Four different monitoring CTBT systems, ARIX, ARSA, SAUNA, and SPALAX™ have been developed in order to sample and to measure them with high sensitivity. The latest developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is likely to be drastically improved in detection sensitivity (especially for the metastable isotopes) through a higher sampling rate, when equipped with a new conversion electron (CE)/X-ray coincidence spectrometer. This new spectrometer is based on two combined detectors, both exhibiting very low radioactive background: a well-type NaI(Tl) detector for photon detection surrounding a gas cell equipped with two large passivated implanted planar silicon chips for electron detection. It is characterized by a low electron energy threshold and a much better energy resolution for the CE than those usually measured with the existing CTBT equipments. Furthermore, the compact geometry of the spectrometer provides high efficiency for X-ray and for CE associated to the decay modes of the four relevant radioxenons. The paper focus on the design of this new spectrometer and presents spectroscopic performances of a prototype based on recent results achieved from both radioactive xenon standards and air sample

  12. Detection of explosives (in particular landmines) by low-cost methods. Final report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Advisory Group Meeting was to put together experts from several areas of explosives (landmines) detection, both nuclear and non-nuclear, to generate ideas which might lead to development of a low-cost method for detection of explosives (in particular landmines), or to a modification of existing methods. The discussions included nuclear, acoustic, radar, infrared, x-ray, and nuclear quadrupole resonance methods for localizing and characterizing landmines. Many technologies are still under laboratory development. This document includes 8 contributed papers, each of them was indexed and abstracted

  13. A new method of explosive detection based on dual-energy X-ray technology and forward-scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kun; Li Jianmin

    2004-01-01

    Based on dual-energy X-ray technology combined with forward-scattering, a brand new explosive detection method is presented. Dual-energy technology can give the information on the effective atomic number (Z eff ) of an irradiated component, while the intensity of the forward scattered photons can reveal the density information according to our research. Therefore, the existence of the explosive can be effectively identified by combining these two characteristic quantities. Compared with the earlier inspection approaches, the new one has a series of particular advantages, such as high detection rate, low false alarm rate, automatic alarm and so forth. The project is ongoing. (authors)

  14. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  15. The sensitivity studies of a landmine explosive detection system based on neutron backscattering using Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hamda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a Monte Carlo simulation of a landmine detection system, using the MCNP5 code, for the detection of concealed explosives such as trinitrotoluene and cyclonite. In portable field detectors, the signal strength of backscattered neutrons and gamma rays from thermal neutron activation is sensitive to a number of parameters such as the mass of explosive, depth of concealment, neutron moderation, background soil composition, soil porosity, soil moisture, multiple scattering in the background material, and configuration of the detection system. In this work, a detection system, with BF3 detectors for neutrons and sodium iodide scintillator for g-rays, is modeled to investigate the neutron signal-to-noise ratio and to obtain an empirical formula for the photon production rate Ri(n,γ= SfGfMf(d,m from radiative capture reactions in constituent nuclides of trinitrotoluene. This formula can be used for the efficient landmine detection of explosives in quantities as small as ~200 g of trinitrotoluene concealed at depths down to about 15 cm. The empirical formula can be embedded in a field programmable gate array on a field-portable explosives' sensor for efficient online detection.

  16. Detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using thermal response of suspended microfabricated bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan Harry

    2008-01-01

    Here we present a thermophysical technique that is capable of differentiating vapor phase adsorbed explosives from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual species of common explosive vapors. This technique utilizes pairs of suspended microfabricated silicon bridges...... that can be heated in a controlled fashion. The differential thermal response of the bridges with and without adsorbed explosive vapor shows unique and reproducible characteristics depending on the nature of the adsorbed explosives. The tunable heating rate method described here is capable of providing...... unique signals for subnanogram quantities of adsorbed explosives within 50 ms. (C) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.G.

    1990-08-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs

  18. RETRACTED: Fast neutron interrogation system development for the detection of explosive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Cheul Muu; Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Tae Joo; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Em, V. T.; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Uk

    2009-06-01

    This article has been removed at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and Authors. Please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). Reason: this article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and authors as it contains serious errors. This proceedings paper did not fully provide readers with the whole process of the experiment because of page limitations. This short paper resulted in prejudiced texts as well as absurd figures in regard with public information of detecting explosive materials against terrorism. The authors will revise the paper after a comprehensive discussion with the co-authors before resubmitting formally an article to NIMA.

  19. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1990-08-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on THz for CBRN and Explosives Detection and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Shulika, Oleksiy

    2017-01-01

    This work is intended to jointly address the development, realization and applications of emitters and detectors of terahertz (THz-0.3 THz up to 10 THz) and their application to diagnostics of CBRN effects and detection of explosives and CBRN. Hazardous substances typically exhibit rotational and vibrational transitions in this region, hence giving access to spectroscopic analysis of a large variety of molecules which play a key role in security as well as various other areas, e.g. air pollution, climate research, industrial process control, agriculture, food industry, workplace safety and medical diagnostics can be monitored by sensing and identifying them via THz (0.3 to 10 THz) and mid infrared (MIR-10 THz to 100 THz) absorption “finger prints”. Most plastics, textiles and paper are nearly transparent for THz radiation.

  1. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Detection of Explosives Residues: A Review of Recent Advances, Challenges, and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    light. In this case, thermal damage occurs when the tissues are heated to the point where proteins are denatured , either at the retina for near-infrared...were enhanced. LIBS-LIF has been used to improve the limits of detection of heavy metals in soil [98] and remote detection of several metallic ...held metal detectors or thin, tapered prodding devices, LIBS is capable of detecting plastic and metal landmine casings and any explosive material in

  2. Charge states of ions traversing thin carbon foils inferred from 7 MeV C2+ Coulomb explosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1984-01-01

    The charge state of fast C + ions is assumed to reach some equilibrium value within a few atomic layers after entering a thin carbon stripping foil and then maintain that average charge state while passing through the rest of the foil. The final distribution of different charge states is then assumed to occur at or near the exit surface of the foil by various pickup and stripping processes. Experimentally, the final charge state distribution is easily measured; however, the average charge state inside the foil is difficult to measure in any direct way. This paper describes the experimental method and results of measuring this internal average charge state for 3.5 MeV carbon ions by utilizing the Coulomb explosion of 7 MeV C 2 + molecular ions. The interesting result is that the internal average charge state is 4.2+-x, and the final charge state distribution is not established at the exit surface of the foil, but beyond, approximately 100 A, a distance comparable to the foil thickness in this measurement

  3. Charge states of ions traversing thin carbon foils inferred from 7 MeV C2+ Coulomb explosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1986-01-01

    The charge state of fast C + ions is assumed to reach some equilibrium value within a few atomic layers after entering a thin carbon stripping foil and then maintain that average charge state while passing through the rest of the foil. The final distribution of different charge states is then assumed to occur at or near the exist surface of the foil by various pickup and stripping processes. Experimentally, the final charge state distribution is easily measured; however, the average charge state inside the foil is difficult to measure in any direct way. This paper describes the experimental method and results of measuring this internal average charge state for 3.5 MeV carbon ions by utilizing the Coulomb explosion of 7 MeV C 2 + molecular ions. The interesting result is that the internal average charge state is 4.2 +/- x, and the final charge state distribution is not established at the exit surface of the foil, but beyond, approximately 100 a, a distance comparable to the foil thickness in this measurement. 1 reference, 6 figures

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  5. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Standoff Detection of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Instrumentation All Fourier transform infrared ( FTIR ) absorbance spectra were collected using a Thermo Scientific Nicolet 6700 FTIR spectrometer...state of the sample. In general, photothermal methods are classified as indirect methods for detection of trace optical absorbance , because the...excitation source is absorbed at a characteristic rate by each sample and leads to a unique response that enables spectroscopy. After illumination

  6. Ion Source Development for Ultratrace Detection of Uranium and Thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Batchelder, Jon Charles [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A hot-cavity surface ionization source and a hot-cavity laser ion source are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The work is motivated by the need for more efficient ion sources for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials and sample sizes of 20 - 40 g of U or Th. For the surface source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. Three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms is studied and an ionization efficiency of 8.7% has been obtained with the laser ion source. The positive ion sources promise more than an order of magnitude more efficient than conventional Cs-sputter negative ion sources used for AMS. In addition, the laser ion source is highly selective and effective in suppressing interfering and ions. Work is in progress to improve the efficiencies of both positive ion sources.

  7. Detection systems for radioactive ion beams; Systeme de detection en ions radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savajols, H

    2002-07-01

    Two main methods are used to produce radioactive ion beams: -) the ISOL method (isotope separation on-line) in which the stable beam interacts with a thick target, the reaction products diffuse outside the target and are transferred to a source where they are ionized, a mass separator and a post-accelerator drive the selected radioactive ions to the right energy; -) the in-flight fragmentation method in which the stable beam interacts with a thin target, the reaction products are emitted from the target with a restricted angular distribution and a velocity close to that of the incident beam, the experimenter has to take advantage from the reaction kinetics to get the right particle beam. Characteristic time is far longer with the ISOL method but the beam intensity is much better because of the use of a post-accelerator. In both cases, the beam intensity is lower by several orders of magnitude than in the case of a stable beam. This article presents all the constraints imposed by radioactive beams to the detection systems of the reaction products and gives new technical solutions according to the type of nuclear reaction studied. (A.C.)

  8. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  9. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuemei; Zheng Jian; Lv Yongjie; Chen Yangqin

    2007-01-01

    A 63 Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  10. Explosives standoff detection using Raman spectroscopy: from bulk towards trace detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Anna; Wallin, Sara; Östmark, Henric; Ehlerding, Anneli; Johansson, Ida; Nordberg, Markus; Ellis, Hanna; Al-Khalili, Ahmed

    2010-04-01

    This paper gives a brief overview on our latest progress in the area of standoff detection. Standoff Raman measurements from 200 m and 470 m distance have been performed on bulk amounts of TATP and AN respectively, the former through a double sided window, the latter under heavy rain. Resonance Raman measurements on TNT, DNT and NM vapors in the ppm concentration regime are presented, showing resonance enhancement in the range of 2 200 (NM) to 57 000 (TNT) as compared to 532 nm Raman cross sections. Finally, the application of hyper spectral Raman imaging is described, exemplified by the resolution of four different samples (sulphur, AN, DNT, and TNT) in the form of 5 mm wide discs in one single image.

  11. Extended adaptive mutation operator for training an explosive hazard detection prescreener in forward looking infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravinder; Price, Stanton R.; Anderson, Derek T.

    2015-05-01

    A big challenge with forward looking (FL), versus downward looking, sensors mounted on a ground vehicle for explosive hazard detection (EHD) is they "see everything", on and off road. Even if a technology such as road detection is used, we still have to find and subsequently discriminate targets versus clutter on the road and often road side. When designing an automatic detection system for FL-EHD, we typically make use of a prescreener to identify regions of interest (ROI) instead of searching for targets in an inefficient brute force fashion by extracting complicated features and running expensive classifiers at every possible translation, rotation and scale. In this article, we explore the role of genetic algorithms (GAs), specifically with respect to a new adaptive mutation operator, for learning the parameters of a FL-EHD prescreener in FL infrared (FLIR) imagery. The proposed extended adaptive mutation (eAM) algorithm is driven by fitness similarities in the chromosome population. Currently, our prescreener consists of many free parameters that are empirically chosen by a researcher. The parameters are learned herein using the proposed optimization technique and the performance of the system is measured using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on data obtained from a U.S. Army test site that includes a variety of target types buried at varying depths and from different times of day. The proposed technique is also applied to numerous synthetic fitness landscapes to further assess the effectiveness of the eAM algorithm. Results show that the new adaptive mutation technique converges faster to a better solution than a GA with fixed mutation.

  12. Element Synthesis Calculations for Stellar Explosions: Robust Uncertainties, Sensitivities, and Radioactive Ion Beam Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Starrfield, Sumner [Arizona State University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Guidry, Mike W [ORNL; Smith, Donald L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2004-12-01

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  13. Element synthesis calculations for stellar explosions: robust uncertainties, sensitivities, and radioactive ion beam measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hix, W. Raphael [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parete-Koon, Suzanne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dessieux, Luc [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ma, Zhanwen [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Starrfield, Sumner [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bardayan, Daniel W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guidry, Michael W. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Smith, Donald L. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blackmon, Jeffery C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-12-27

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  14. Seismic detection of increased degassing before Kīlauea's 2008 summit explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica H; Poland, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The 2008 explosion that started a new eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, was not preceded by a dramatic increase in earthquakes nor inflation, but was associated with increases in SO2 emissions and seismic tremor. Here we perform shear wave splitting analysis on local earthquakes spanning the onset of the eruption. Shear wave splitting measures seismic anisotropy and is traditionally used to infer changes in crustal stress over time. We show that shear wave splitting may also vary due to changes in volcanic degassing. The orientation of fast shear waves at Kīlauea is usually controlled by structure, but in 2008 showed changes with increased SO2 emissions preceding the start of the summit eruption. This interpretation for changing anisotropy is supported by corresponding decreases in Vp/Vs ratio. Our result demonstrates a novel method for detecting changes in gas flux using seismic observations and provides a new tool for monitoring under-instrumented volcanoes.

  15. Influence of metal substrates on the detection of explosive residues with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a promising approach for explosive residue detection, but several limitations to its widespread use remain. One issue is that the emission spectra of the residues are dependent on the substrate composition because some of the substrate is usually entrained in the laser-induced plasma and the laser-material interaction can be significantly affected by the substrate type. Here, we have demonstrated that despite the strong spectral variation in cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) residues applied to various metal substrates, classification of the RDX residue independent of substrate type is feasible. Several approaches to improving the chemometric models based on partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) have been described: classifying the RDX residue spectra together in one class independent of substrate, using selected emission intensities and ratios to increase the true positive rate (TPR) and decrease the false positive rate (FPR), and fusing the results from two PLS-DA models generated using the full broadband spectra and selected intensities and ratios. The combination of these approaches resulted in a TPR of 97.5% and a FPR of 1.0% for RDX classification on metal substrates.

  16. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T. F. (Tai-Sen F.); Kwan, T. J. T. (Thomas J. T.)

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype. The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use an accelerator and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the requirements on the storage ring(s) with external gamma-ray-production target for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scatters with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron-cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reasonable parameter values indicate that it is possible to use no more than a few storage rings per inspection station in a practical NRA luggage inspection complex having more than ten inspection stations.

  17. A review of X-ray explosives detection techniques for checked baggage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, K.; Bradley, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, the security focus for civil aviation has shifted from hijacking in the 1980s, towards deliberate sabotage. X-ray imaging provides a major tool in checked baggage inspection, with various sensitive techniques being brought to bear in determining the form, and density of items within luggage as well as other material dependent parameters. This review first examines the various challenges to X-ray technology in securing a safe system of passenger transportation. An overview is then presented of the various conventional and less conventional approaches that are available to the airline industry, leading to developments in state-of-the-art imaging technology supported by enhanced machine and observer-based decision making principles. - Highlights: ► Contemporary review of X-ray explosives detection techniques for checked baggage. ► Post 9/11 challenges to X-ray technology and screening are considered. ► State-of-the-art imaging technology and decision making principles described.

  18. A Novel Immunoreagent for the Specific and Sensitive Detection of the Explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Weller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Triacetone triperoxide (TATP is a primary explosive, which was used in various terrorist attacks in the past. For the development of biosensors, immunochemical µ-TAS, electronic noses, immunological test kits, or test strips, the availability of antibodies of high quality is crucial. Recently, we presented the successful immunization of mice, based on the design, synthesis, and conjugation of a novel TATP derivative. Here, the long-term immunization of rabbits is shown, which resulted in antibodies of extreme selectivity and more than 1,000 times better affinity in relation to the antibodies from mice. Detection limits below 10 ng L−1 (water were achieved. The working range covers more than four decades, calculated from a precision profile. The cross-reactivity tests revealed an extraordinary selectivity of the antibodies—not a single compound could be identified as a relevant cross-reactant. The presented immunoreagent might be a major step for the development of highly sensitive and selective TATP detectors particularly for security applications.

  19. A Novel Immunoreagent for the Specific and Sensitive Detection of the Explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Maria Astrid; Panne, Ulrich; Weller, Michael G

    2011-07-07

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is a primary explosive, which was used in various terrorist attacks in the past. For the development of biosensors, immunochemical µ-TAS, electronic noses, immunological test kits, or test strips, the availability of antibodies of high quality is crucial. Recently, we presented the successful immunization of mice, based on the design, synthesis, and conjugation of a novel TATP derivative. Here, the long-term immunization of rabbits is shown, which resulted in antibodies of extreme selectivity and more than 1,000 times better affinity in relation to the antibodies from mice. Detection limits below 10 ng L-1 (water) were achieved. The working range covers more than four decades, calculated from a precision profile. The cross-reactivity tests revealed an extraordinary selectivity of the antibodies-not a single compound could be identified as a relevant cross-reactant. The presented immunoreagent might be a major step for the development of highly sensitive and selective TATP detectors particularly for security applications.

  20. Use of artificial neural networks in drug and explosive detection through tomographic images with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2009-01-01

    The artificial neural network technique was used to identify drugs and plastic explosives, from a tomography composed by a set of six neutrongraphic projections obtained in real time. Bidimensional tomographic images of samples of drugs, explosives and other materials, when digitally processed, yield the characteristic spectra of each type of material. The information contained in those spectra was then used for ANN training, the best images being obtained when the multilayer perceptron model, the back-propagation training algorithm and the Cross-validation interruption criterion were used. ANN showed to be useful in forecasting presence of drugs and explosives hitting a rate of success above 97 %. (author)

  1. Functionalisation of the hinge region in receptor molecules for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2003-01-01

    The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  3. Gas explosions and thermal runaways during external heating abuse of commercial lithium-ion graphite-LiCoO2 cells at different levels of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Bertilsson, Simon; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2018-01-01

    Commercial 6.8 Ah lithium-ion cells with different ageing/status have been abused by external heating in an oven. Prior to the abuse test, selected cells were aged either by C/2 cycling up to 300 cycles or stored at 60 °C. Gas emissions were measured by FTIR and three separate vents were identified, two well before the thermal runaway while the third occurred simultaneously with the thermal runaway releasing heavy smoke and gas. Emissions of toxic carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphorous oxyfluoride (POF3) were detected in the third vent, regardless if there was a fire or not. All abused cells went into thermal runaway and emitted smoke and gas, the working cells also released flames as well as sparks. The dead cells were however less reactive but still underwent thermal runaway. For about half of the working cells, for all levels of cycle ageing, ignition of the accumulated battery released gases occurred about 15 s after the thermal runaway resulting in a gas explosion. The thermal runaway temperature, about 190 °C, varied somewhat for the different cell ageing/status where a weak local minimum was found for cells cycled between 100 and 200 times.

  4. Background Effects on Jet Detection in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukerman, Alexander; Hughes, Charles; Krobatch, Thomas; Matyja, Adam; Nattrass, Christine; Neuhas, James; Sorensen, Soren; Witt, Will

    2017-09-01

    Heavy ion collisions performed at the LHC and RHIC at large energy scales produce a liquid of quarks and gluons known as a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Jets, which are collimated bunches of particles emitted from highly energetic partons, are produced at the early stages of these collisions, and can provide information about the properties of the QGP. Partonic energy loss in the medium can by quantified by measurements of fragmentation functions. However, the high background energies resulting from emissions uncorrelated to the initial hard scatterings in the heavy ion collisions place limitations on jet detection methods and fragmentation measurements. For the purpose of investigating the limitations on these current jet detection methods we generated a heavy ion background based on charged hadron data. We explore the behavior of a jet finding algorithm with our generated background to examine how the presence of a heavy ion background may affect the measurements of jet properties.

  5. Accelerator-Detector Complex for Photonuclear Detection of Hidden Explosives Final Report CRADA No. TC2065.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brothers, L. J. [Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., Covington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort by Lawrence Livermore National Security (formerly the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., and the following Russian Institutes: P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Innovative Technologies Center.(AUO CIT), Central Design Bureau-Almas (CDB Almaz), Moscow Instrument Automation Research Institute, and Institute for High Energy Physics (IBEP) to develop equipment and procedures for detecting explosive materials concealed in airline checked baggage and cargo.

  6. APTS and rGO co-functionalized pyrenated fluorescent nanonets for representative vapor phase nitroaromatic explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Linjuan; Zu, Baiyi; Yang, Zheng; Cao, Hongyu; Zheng, Xuefang; Dou, Xincun

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives.For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Vapor pressure of TNT and its analogues, fluorescence quenching kinetics, fluorescence quenching efficiencies and additional SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04960d

  7. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  8. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  10. Detection of gold cluster ions by ion-to-ion conversion using a CsI-converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.-T.; Novilkov, A.C.; Obnorskii, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Gold cluster ions in the m/z range of 10 4 -2 x 10 6 u were produced by bombarding a thin film of gold with 252 Cf-fission fragments. The gold covering a C-Al substrate formed islets having a mean diameter of 44 A. Their size- and mass-distribution was determined by means of electron microscopy. The main task was to measure the m/z distribution of the cluster ions ejected from the sample surface. For this purpose we built a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, which could be used as a linear TOF instrument or, alternatively, as a tandem-TOF instrument being equipped with an ion-to-ion converter. Combining the results obtained in both modes, it turned out that the linear TOF instrument equipped with micro-channel plates had a mean detection efficiency for 20 keV cluster ions of about 40%. In the tandem mode, the cluster ions hit a CsI converter with energies of 40z keV (z = charge state), from where secondary ions - mainly Cs + and (CsI) n Cs + cluster ions - were ejected. These ions were used to measure the TOF spectrum of the gold cluster ions. The detection efficiency of the cluster ions was found to vary in the available mass range from 99.7% to 96.5%. The complete mass distribution between 4 x 10 4 and 4 x 10 6 u was determined and compared with the corresponding mass distribution of the gold islets covering the substrate. (orig.)

  11. Raman detection of improvised explosive device (IED) material fabricated using drop-on-demand inkjet technology on several real world surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mikella E.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The requirement to detect hazardous materials (i.e., chemical, biological, and explosive) on a host of materials has led to the development of hazard detection systems. These new technologies and their capabilities could have immediate uses for the US military, national security agencies, and environmental response teams in efforts to keep people secure and safe. In particular, due to the increasing use by terrorists, the detection of common explosives and improvised explosive device (IED) materials have motivated research efforts toward detecting trace (i.e., particle level) quantities on multiple commonly encountered surfaces (e.g., textiles, metals, plastics, natural products, and even people). Non-destructive detection techniques can detect trace quantities of explosive materials; however, it can be challenging in the presence of a complex chemical background. One spectroscopic technique gaining increased attention for detection is Raman. One popular explosive precursor material is ammonium nitrate (AN). The material AN has many agricultural applications, however it can also be used in the fabrication of IEDs or homemade explosives (HMEs). In this paper, known amounts of AN will be deposited using an inkjet printer into several different common material surfaces (e.g., wood, human hair, textiles, metals, plastics). The materials are characterized with microscope images and by collecting Raman spectral data. In this report the detection and identification of AN will be demonstrated.

  12. Internal short circuit and accelerated rate calorimetry tests of lithium-ion cells: Considerations for methane-air intrinsic safety and explosion proof/flameproof protection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubaniewicz, Thomas H; DuCarme, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studied the potential for lithium-ion cell thermal runaway from an internal short circuit in equipment for use in underground coal mines. In this third phase of the study, researchers compared plastic wedge crush-induced internal short circuit tests of selected lithium-ion cells within methane (CH 4 )-air mixtures with accelerated rate calorimetry tests of similar cells. Plastic wedge crush test results with metal oxide lithium-ion cells extracted from intrinsically safe evaluated equipment were mixed, with one cell model igniting the chamber atmosphere while another cell model did not. The two cells models exhibited different internal short circuit behaviors. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4 ) cell model was tolerant to crush-induced internal short circuits within CH 4 -air, tested under manufacturer recommended charging conditions. Accelerating rate calorimetry tests with similar cells within a nitrogen purged 353-mL chamber produced ignitions that exceeded explosion proof and flameproof enclosure minimum internal pressure design criteria. Ignition pressures within a 20-L chamber with 6.5% CH 4 -air were relatively low, with much larger head space volume and less adiabatic test conditions. The literature indicates that sizeable lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl 2 ) primary (non rechargeable) cell ignitions can be especially violent and toxic. Because ignition of an explosive atmosphere is expected within explosion proof or flameproof enclosures, there is a need to consider the potential for an internal explosive atmosphere ignition in combination with a lithium or lithium-ion battery thermal runaway process, and the resulting effects on the enclosure.

  13. Multiparticle Simulations of Quadrupolar Ion Detection in an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell with Four Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Joshua A.; Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.; Kharchenko, Andriy; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The current paradigm in FT-ICR cell design is to approximate the ideal three-dimensional quadratic trapping potential as closely as possible to maintain ion cloud spatial coherence and achieve long transients, either with hyperbolically shaped electrodes, shimming electrodes, or by dynamic harmonization. In sharp contrast, the FT-ICR analyzer cell with four narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) introduces significant anharmonic terms to the trapping potential. This analyzer cell is capable of quadrupolar detection by which one can measure a signal that is close to the unperturbed cyclotron frequency. This is far less sensitive to trapping potential and space charge shifts than the reduced cyclotron frequency measured in conventional ICR cells. The quadrupolar mode of ion detection in NADEL cells has been examined previously by SIMION simulations of ion clouds with up to 500 ions per simulation. Here, the behavior of the NADEL analyzer cell is examined through particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which allows us to examine the behavior of large populations (tens of thousands) of ions with space charge considerations, and to calculate the induced charge on the NADEL detection electrodes, and thus the transient signal. PIC simulations confirm a unique spatial distribution of the ions, with a coherent motion that results in long transient signals. Dependence of the ion cloud and image current signal on cell design, ion energy, and magnetron radius are examined. Coalescence effects are compared with those found in a dynamically harmonized cell. The insensitivity of the measured cyclotron frequency to space-charge is demonstrated both with simulations and experimentally. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Multiparticle Simulations of Quadrupolar Ion Detection in an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell with Four Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Joshua A; Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O; Kharchenko, Andriy; Amster, I Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The current paradigm in FT-ICR cell design is to approximate the ideal three-dimensional quadratic trapping potential as closely as possible to maintain ion cloud spatial coherence and achieve long transients, either with hyperbolically shaped electrodes, shimming electrodes, or by dynamic harmonization. In sharp contrast, the FT-ICR analyzer cell with four narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) introduces significant anharmonic terms to the trapping potential. This analyzer cell is capable of quadrupolar detection by which one can measure a signal that is close to the unperturbed cyclotron frequency. This is far less sensitive to trapping potential and space charge shifts than the reduced cyclotron frequency measured in conventional ICR cells. The quadrupolar mode of ion detection in NADEL cells has been examined previously by SIMION simulations of ion clouds with up to 500 ions per simulation. Here, the behavior of the NADEL analyzer cell is examined through particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which allows us to examine the behavior of large populations (tens of thousands) of ions with space charge considerations, and to calculate the induced charge on the NADEL detection electrodes, and thus the transient signal. PIC simulations confirm a unique spatial distribution of the ions, with a coherent motion that results in long transient signals. Dependence of the ion cloud and image current signal on cell design, ion energy, and magnetron radius are examined. Coalescence effects are compared with those found in a dynamically harmonized cell. The insensitivity of the measured cyclotron frequency to space-charge is demonstrated both with simulations and experimentally. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Continued development of a portable widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Klueva, Oksana; Tomas, David

    2014-05-01

    Passive, standoff detection of chemical, explosive and narcotic threats employing widefield, shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) continues to gain acceptance in defense and security fields. A robust and user-friendly portable platform with such capabilities increases the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to personnel. In 2013 ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) introduced Aperio, a handheld sensor, using real-time SWIR HSI for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics. That SWIR HSI system employed a liquid-crystal tunable filter for real-time automated detection and display of threats. In these proceedings, we report on a next generation device called VeroVision™, which incorporates an improved optical design that enhances detection performance at greater standoff distances with increased sensitivity and detection speed. A tripod mounted sensor head unit (SHU) with an optional motorized pan-tilt unit (PTU) is available for precision pointing and sensor stabilization. This option supports longer standoff range applications which are often seen at checkpoint vehicle inspection where speed and precision is necessary. Basic software has been extended to include advanced algorithms providing multi-target display functionality, automatic threshold determination, and an automated detection recipe capability for expanding the library as new threats emerge. In these proceedings, we report on the improvements associated with the next generation portable widefield SWIR HSI sensor, VeroVision™. Test data collected during development are presented in this report which supports the targeted applications for use of VeroVision™ for screening residue and bulk levels of explosive and drugs on vehicles and personnel at checkpoints as well as various applications for other secure areas. Additionally, we highlight a forensic application of the technology for assisting forensic

  16. Location and detection of explosive-contaminated human fingerprints on distant targets using standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, P.; Gaona, I.; Moros, J.; Laserna, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of explosive-contaminated human fingerprints constitutes an analytical challenge of high significance in security issues and in forensic sciences. The use of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor working at 31 m distance to the target, fitted with 2D scanning capabilities and designed for capturing spectral information from laser-induced plasmas of fingerprints is presented. Distribution chemical maps based on Na and CN emissions are used to locate and detect chloratite, DNT, TNT, RDX and PETN residues that have been deposited on the surface of aluminum and glass substrates. An effectiveness of 100% on fingerprints detection, regardless the substrate scanned, is reached. Environmental factors that affect the prevalence of the fingerprint LIBS response are discussed. - Highlights: • Explosive remnants left behind by fingerprints have been detected from afar. • Operating in scanning mode, LIBS boasts high ability to locate traces over a surface. • Effectiveness in trace detection plainly depends on the scanning spatial resolution. • The detection capability of LIBS shrinks as the fingerprints deteriorate over time

  17. Sensitive detection of black powder by stand-alone ion mobility spectrometer with chlorinated hydrocarbon modifiers in drift gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xixi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Chuang; Peng, Liying; Wen, Meng; Qu, Tuanshuai; Wang, Zhenxin; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for selective and sensitive detection of black powder by adding chlorinated hydrocarbons in the drift gas instead of changing the structure of conventional ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The function of chloride modifiers was to substitute Cl(-)(H₂O)n for [O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n)] in the drift region so as to avoid the overlap between O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n) and sulfur ion peaks. Among CH₂Cl₂, CHCl₃ and CCl₄, CCl₄ was chosen as the modifier due to the best peak-to-peak resolution and stability towards the fluctuation of modifier concentration. With 1.4 ppm CCl₄ as the modifier, the minimum detectable quantity of 0.1 ng for sulfur was achieved. Moreover, this method showed the ability for detection of common explosives at sub-nanogram level, such as black powder (BP), ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). In summary, this method requiring no configuration modification has high sensitivity and selectivity, and consumes trace amount of modifier. And these characteristics make it easy to be adopted in current deployed IMS to detect black powder explosives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Highly sensitive detection of explosive triacetone triperoxide by an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wenhui; Zhang Weide; Chen Luya, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn [Nano Science Research Center, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-08-06

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is one of the most sensitive known explosives and can be easily synthesized using the commonly available chemicals acetone and hydrogen peroxide, but is difficult to be detected. In this study, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a glucose-assisted solvothermal method at 120 deg. C for 18 h. The gas sensor based on In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles exhibits a high response, fast response and recovery, a wide detecting range of 0.50-500 mg, good stability and excellent stability to TATP.

  19. A CdZnTe array for the detection of explosives in baggage by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction signatures at multiple scatter angles

    CERN Document Server

    Malden, C H

    2000-01-01

    CdZnTe detectors were used to collect energy-dispersive diffraction spectra at a range of scatter angles, from sheets of explosives hidden in baggage. It is shown that the combined information from these 'signatures' can be used to determine whether an explosive sample is present or not. The geometrical configuration of the collimation and the position of the baggage within the scanner must be taken into careful consideration when optimising the capabilities of such a system. The CdZnTe array lends itself well to the detection of explosives in baggage since multiple signals may be collected simultaneously providing more rapid detection than achieved using a single detector.

  20. Aging of civil explosives (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam-La Haye, E.L.M.; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Hoen, C. 't; Krämer, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    For the Dutch MoD and police, TNO composed sets with different kinds of civil explosives to train their detection dogs. The manufacturer of these explosives guarantees several years of stability of these explosives. These sets of explosives are used under different conditions, like temperature and

  1. Aerobic Transformation of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by Escherichia coli and Its Implications for the Detection of Trace Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, Benjamin; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Hazan, Carina; Belkin, Shimshon

    2018-02-15

    DNT (2,4-dinitrotoluene), a volatile impurity in military-grade 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-based explosives, is a potential tracer for the detection of buried landmines and other explosive devices. We have previously described an Escherichia coli bioreporter strain engineered to detect traces of DNT and have demonstrated that the yqjF gene promoter, the sensing element of this bioreporter, is induced not by DNT but by at least one of its transformation products. In the present study, we have characterized the initial stages of DNT biotransformation in E. coli , have identified the key metabolic products in this reductive pathway, and demonstrate that the main DNT metabolite that induces yqjF is 2,4,5-trihydroxytoluene. We further show that E. coli cannot utilize DNT as a sole carbon or nitrogen source and propose that this compound is metabolized in order to neutralize its toxicity to the cells. IMPORTANCE The information provided in this article sheds new light both on the microbial biodegradability of nitroaromatic compounds and on the metabolic capabilities of E. coli By doing so, it also clarifies the pathway leading to the previously unexplained induction of the E. coli yqjF gene by 2,4-dinitrotoluene, an impurity that accompanies 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-based explosives. Our improved understanding of these processes will serve to molecularly enhance the performance of a previously described microbial bioreporter of buried landmines and other explosive devices, in which the yqjF gene promoter serves as the sensing element. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, J.S.; Davies, J.A.; Siegele, R.; Wallace, S.G.; Zelenitsky, D.

    1996-01-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as 209 Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass ≤100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  3. Explosives tester with heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Eckels, Joel [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Whipple, Richard E [Livermore, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  4. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  5. Validation of a Miniaturized Spectrometer for Trace Detection of Explosives by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Almaviva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS measurements of some common military explosives were performed with a table-top micro-Raman system integrated with a Serstech R785 miniaturized device, comprising a spectrometer and detector for near-infrared (NIR laser excitation (785 nm. R785 was tested as the main component of a miniaturized SERS detector, designed for in situ and stand-alone sensing of molecules released at low concentrations, as could happen in the case of traces of explosives found in an illegal bomb factory, where solid microparticles of explosives could be released in the air and then collected on the sensor’s surface, if placed near the factory, as a consequence of bomb preparation. SERS spectra were obtained, exciting samples in picogram quantities on specific substrates, starting from standard commercial solutions. The main vibrational features of each substance were clearly identified also in low quantities. The amount of the sampled substance was determined through the analysis of scanning electron microscope images, while the spectral resolution and the detector sensitivity were sufficiently high to clearly distinguish spectra belonging to different samples with an exposure time of 10 s. A principal component analysis procedure was applied to the experimental data to understand which are the main factors affecting spectra variation across different samples. The score plots for the first three principal components show that the examined explosive materials can be clearly classified on the basis of their SERS spectra.

  6. New challenges and insights in the detection and spectral identification of organic explosives by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, P.; Dona, A.; Tobaria, L.M.; Laserna, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    With the objective of detection and identification of explosives, different organic compounds, including aromatic nitrocompounds, RDX, anthracene, 2,4-diaminotoluene (DAT), 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline (MNA) and pentaerythritol (PENT) have been analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). To avoid the secondary ionization and to discriminate between the spectral contribution due to air from that of the compound in the plasma generated in air, the emission signatures from atomic lines (C at 247.9 nm, H at 656.3 nm, N at 746.8 nm and O at 777.2 nm) and molecular bands (CN at 388.3 nm and C 2 at 516.5 nm) have been investigated in plasmas generated in air and in helium. The different possible pathways leading to the observation of molecular emissions have been studied, together with a discussion of the most useful tools for the explosives discrimination. Moreover, the effect of the laser fluence on the atomic and molecular emissions and their relationship with the oxygen balance of an organic explosive is presented.

  7. New challenges and insights in the detection and spectral identification of organic explosives by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, P.; Dona, A.; Tobaria, L.M.; Laserna, J.J., E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2011-01-15

    With the objective of detection and identification of explosives, different organic compounds, including aromatic nitrocompounds, RDX, anthracene, 2,4-diaminotoluene (DAT), 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline (MNA) and pentaerythritol (PENT) have been analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). To avoid the secondary ionization and to discriminate between the spectral contribution due to air from that of the compound in the plasma generated in air, the emission signatures from atomic lines (C at 247.9 nm, H at 656.3 nm, N at 746.8 nm and O at 777.2 nm) and molecular bands (CN at 388.3 nm and C{sub 2} at 516.5 nm) have been investigated in plasmas generated in air and in helium. The different possible pathways leading to the observation of molecular emissions have been studied, together with a discussion of the most useful tools for the explosives discrimination. Moreover, the effect of the laser fluence on the atomic and molecular emissions and their relationship with the oxygen balance of an organic explosive is presented.

  8. Detection of lost alpha particle by concealed lost ion probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A; Isobe, M; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M

    2010-10-01

    Full orbit-following calculation is performed for the final orbit of the lost alpha particles, showing some orbits escaping from the last closed flux surface could be detected by a concealed lost ion probe (CLIP) installed under the shadow of the original first wall surface. While both passing and trapped orbits hit the same wall panel, detecting a trapped orbit by the CLIP is easier than detecting passing orbits. Whether the final orbit is detected or not is determined by the position of the reflection point. The CLIP successfully detects the trapped orbits, which are reflected before they hit to a first wall. Then the pitch angles of the orbits at the CLIP are close to and smaller than 90°. Optimization of the position of the CLIP in terms of broader detection window is investigated.

  9. Metal-coated silicon nanopillars with large Raman enhancement for explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Boisen, Anja

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a quick and easy method for producing relatively large areas of nanostructured substrate that enhances the Raman effect. Standard semiconductor processing techniques are used, hence it is possible to narrowly control the parameters of the fabrication process to create free standing silicon nanopillars with controlled aspect ratios and spacing. The silicon nanopillars are coated by thin films of silver and/or gold to create Raman active surfaces. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has numerous applications in chemical sensing, with high sensitivity and fast analysis speed seen as the main advantages. We show how these novel substrates can be used in an explosives sensor. Under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these SERS substrates coupled with commercially available microspectrometers will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  10. Understanding Chemical Sensitivity and Surface Response in Detecting Trace Levels of Explosives Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    of urea that were moving on a baggage conveyor past the interrogation region. The speed of the conveyor belt was 0.5 m s−1 and given the...off systems . For example, although cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRLS) has the sensitivity to detect explosives in the gas phase [Fidric et...tensor of the system , χ(2), and Ej(ω1) and Ek(ω2) are the j’th and k’th Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release, distribution

  11. A quantitative method to detect explosives and selected semivolatiles in soil samples by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapper-Gowdy, M.; Dermirgian, J.; Robitaille, G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a novel Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method that can be used to rapidly screen soil samples from potentially hazardous waste sites. Samples are heated in a thermal desorption unit and the resultant vapors are collected and analyzed in a long-path gas cell mounted in a FTIR. Laboratory analysis of a soil sample by FTIR takes approximately 10 minutes. This method has been developed to identify and quantify microgram concentrations of explosives in soil samples and is directly applicable to the detection of selected volatile organics, semivolatile organics, and pesticides

  12. Fluorescent signaling based on sulfoxide profluorophores: application to the visual detection of the explosive TATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashikhin, Sergey; Finney, Nathaniel S

    2008-10-01

    The first visual fluorescence-based assay for the peroxide explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is described. The assay is based on a conceptually new fluorescence signaling mechanism, in which nonemissive pyrenyl sulfoxide profluorophores are oxidized to visibly emissive pyrenyl sulfones. Although not without limitations, these first-generation fluorescent probes can provide a visual response to ca. 100 nmol of TATP. In addition, the success of this assay suggests the potential for broader application of aryl sulfoxides in fluorescent chemosensing.

  13. Detecting and modeling persistent self-potential anomalies from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKague, H.L.; Kansa, E.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Self-potential anomalies are naturally occurring, nearly stationary electric fields that are detected by measuring the potential difference between two points on (or in) the ground. SP anomalies arise from a number of causes: principally electrochemical reactions, and heat and fluid flows. SP is routinely used to locate mineral deposits, geothermal systems, and zones of seepage. This paper is a progress report on our work toward detecting explosion-related SP signals at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in understanding the physics of these anomalies that persist and continue changing over periods of time that range from months to years. As background, we also include a brief description of how SP signals arise, and we mention their use in other areas such as exploring for geothermal resources and locating seepage through dams. Between the years 1988 and 1991, we surveyed the areas around seven underground nuclear tests for persistent SP anomalies. We not only detected anomalies, but we also found that various phenomena could be contributing to them and that we did not know which of these were actually occurring. We analyzed our new data with existing steady state codes and with a newly developed time-dependent thermal modeling code. Our results with the new code showed that the conductive decay of the thermal pulse from an underground nuclear test could produce many of the observed signals, and that others are probably caused by movement of fluid induced by the explosion. 25 refs

  14. An Electrochemical Sensor Based on Novel Ion Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Selective Detection of Lead Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghanei-Motlagh

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the novel surface ion-imprinted polymer (IIP particles were prepared and applied as a electrode modifier in stripping voltammetric detection of lead(II ion. A carbon paste electrode (CPE modified with IIP nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs was used for accumulation of toxic lead ions. Various factors that govern on electrochemical signals including carbon paste composition, pH of the preconcentration solution, supporting electrolyte, stirring time, reduction potential and time were studied in detail. The best electrochemical response for Pb(II ions was obtained with a paste composition of 7% (w/w of lead IIP, 10% MWCNTs, 53% (w/w of graphite powder and 30% (w/w of paraffin oil using a solution of 0.1 mol L-1 acetat buffer solution (pH=4.5 with a extraction time of 15 min. A sensitive response for Pb(II ions in the concentration range of 3 to 55 µg L-1 was achived. The proposed electrochemical sensor showed low detection limit (0.5 µg L-1, remarkable selectivity and good reproducibility (RSD = 3.1%. Determination of lead(II content in different environmental water samples was also realized adopting graphite furnace atomic absorptions spectrometry (GF-AAS and the obtained results were satisfactory.

  15. Concept Study of Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stolarczyk, Larry

    1998-01-01

    ...) cannot detect non-metallic mines and detection sensitivity degrades in magnetic soil. Because metal detection sensitivity can be increased to detect low metal content in some non-metallic mines, some alarms significantly increase...

  16. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  17. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  18. Effects of nanodiamonds of explosive synthesis on the skin of experimental animals locally exposed to cobalt and chrome ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorenkov, V I; Vasil'eva, E Yu; Puzyr', A P; Bondar', V S

    2014-12-01

    Experiments in vivo demonstrated the protective effect of modified nanodiamonds on guinea pig skin after local exposure cobalt ions, but not chrome ions. The observed differences are determined by different adsorption of these ions by nanodiamonds: in vitro experiments showed that nanodiamonds adsorbed cobalt ions, but not chrome ions from water solutions. The perspectives of using modified nanodiamonds as a new adsorbent for prevention of allergic contact dermatitis induced by ions of bivalent metals are discussed.

  19. Concealed explosive detection on personnel using a wideband holographic millimeter-wave imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1996-06-01

    A novel wideband millimeter-wave imaging system is presently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that will allow rapid inspection of personnel for concealed explosives, handguns, or other threats. Millimeter-wavelength electromagnetic waves are effective for this application since they readily penetrate common clothing materials, while being partially reflected from the person under surveillance as well as any concealed items. To form an image rapidly, a linear array of 128 antennas is used to electronically scan over a horizontal aperture of 0.75 meters, while the linear array is mechanically swept over a vertical aperture of 2 meters. At each point over this 2-D aperture, coherent wideband data reflected from the target is gathered using wide-beamwidth antennas. The data is recorded coherently, and reconstructed (focused) using an efficient image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. This algorithm works in the near-field of both the target and the scanned aperture and preserves the diffraction limited resolution of less than one-wavelength. The wide frequency bandwidth is used to provide depth resolution, which allows the image to be fully focused over a wide range of depths, resulting in a full 3-D image. This is not possible in a normal optical (or quasi-optical) imaging system. This system has been extensively tested using concealed metal and plastic weapons, and has recently been tested using real plastic explosives (C-4 and RDX) and simulated liquid explosives concealed on personnel. Millimeter-waves do not penetrate the human body, so it is necessary to view the subject from several angles in order to fully inspect for concealed weapons. Full animations containing 36 - 72 frames recorded from subjects rotated by 5 - 10 degrees, have been found to be extremely useful for rapid, effective inspection of personnel.

  20. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  1. QCM-nanomagnetic beads biosensor for lead ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingli; Cui, Haixia; Xiong, Xingliang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Ying; Shen, Jia; Luo, Yiting; Chen, Longcong

    2018-01-15

    As lead poses a serious threat to humans even in small amounts, all kinds of lead detection sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity are being constantly improved and put forward. In this report, a novel, simple and label-free quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor is proposed for detecting lead ions (Pb 2+ ). The biosensor takes full advantage of the high specificity of GR-5 DNAzyme to Pb 2+ and the high sensitivity of QCM. In particular, nanomagnetic beads (NMBs) are used as a novel and effective mean of signal amplification in the biosensor because of their mass and their ability to enhance the inductive effect, which are very beneficial for both higher sensitivity and a lower detection limit. In practice, GR-5 DNAzyme, innovatively combined with NMBs, was modified on the gold electrode of the QCM through gold-sulfur self-assembly. When the electrode was exposed to Pb 2+ solution, DNAzyme was severed into two parts at the RNA site (rA), along with the release of NMBs, which caused a great increase in frequency shift of the QCM electrode. Finally, a perfect linear correlation between the logarithm of Pb 2+ concentration and the change in frequency was obtained from 1 pM to 50 nM, with a detection limit as low as 0.3 pM. Moreover, the biosensor shows both an average recovery of 97 ± 6% in a drinking water sample and an excellent specificity for Pb 2+ compared with other metal ions.

  2. Phosphorimaging detection and quantitation for isotopic ion flux assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Richard W; Daly, John W

    2005-07-15

    A 96-well-microplate-based ion flux method utilizing readily available autoradiographic phosphorimaging detection is described. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated (22)Na influx in four cultured cell lines provided satisfactory concentration-response data for epibatidine and several other nicotinic agonists. The data were consistent with data obtained using standard 6-well assays. Assays for nicotinic-receptor-mediated (86)Rb efflux produced data similar to data obtained with the (22)Na influx assay. However, assays for (45)Ca influx were not successful, although (45)Ca was readily detected and quantified. Voltage-gated sodium channel-mediated (22)Na influx in a neuroblastoma cell line allowed assay of the effects of such sodium channel activators as batrachotoxin and a pumiliotoxin B/scorpion venom combination. Phosphorimaging detection allows for reliable beta counting of up to 1,200 simultaneous samples with excellent sensitivity and is amenable for application to high-throughput screening.

  3. Techniques for the detection of photodesorbed negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.E.; Schweitzer, E.L.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Hurych, Z.; Soukiassian, P.; Bakshi, M.H.; Bommannavar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the direct observation of H - ions released from a Cs-dosed W(100) crystal by photon-stimulated desorption (PSD). This study utilized the 3m toroidal grating monochromator beamline at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Synchrotron Radiation Center. The main technical problem to be overcome in such experiments is the large background from photoemitted electrons which dominate the weak anion signal by many orders of magnitude. The solution ultimately employed utilized both magnetic suppression of photoelectrons and time-of-flight (TOF) mass separation. No internal modifications to the basic cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) were required. We are not aware of any previous reports of the detection of negative ions released from surfaces via photon bombardment, with the exception of high flux laser experiments, in which plasma formation is involved in the ionization process. 16 refs., 3 figs

  4. Monte Carlo design of a system for the detection of explosive materials and analysis of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, P. L.; Medina C, D.; Rodriguez I, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    The problems associated with insecurity and terrorism have forced to designing systems for detecting nuclear materials, drugs and explosives that are installed on roads, ports and airports. Organic materials are composed of C, H, O and N; similarly the explosive materials are manufactured which can be distinguished by the concentration of these elements. Its elemental composition, particularly the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen, allow distinguish them from other organic substances. When these materials are irradiated with neutrons nuclear reactions (n, γ) are produced, where the emitted photons are ready gamma rays whose energy is characteristic of each element and its abundance allows estimating their concentration. The aim of this study was designed using Monte Carlo methods a system with neutron source, gamma rays detector and moderator able to distinguish the presence of Rdx and urea. In design were used as moderators: paraffin, light water, polyethylene and graphite; as detectors were used HPGe and the NaI(Tl). The design that showed the best performance was the moderator of light water and HPGe, with a source of 241 AmBe. For this design, the values of ambient dose equivalent around the system were calculated. (Author)

  5. Thermodynamics of explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Neergaard, Gregers; Bondorf, Jakob P.; Mishustin, Igor N.

    2000-01-01

    We present our first attempts to formulate a thermodynamics-like description of explosions. The motivation is partly a fundamental interest in non-equilibrium statistical physics, partly the resemblance of an explosion to the late stages of a heavy-ion collision. We perform numerical simulations on a microscopic model of interacting billiard-ball like particles, and we analyse the results of such simulations trying to identify collective variables describing the degree of equilibrium during t...

  6. Demonstrated Wavelength Portability of Raman Reference Data for Explosives and Chemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Raman spectroscopy continues to evolve, questions arise as to the portability of Raman data: dispersive versus Fourier transform, wavelength calibration, intensity calibration, and in particular the frequency of the excitation laser. While concerns about fluorescence arise in the visible or ultraviolet, most modern (portable systems use near-infrared excitation lasers, and many of these are relatively close in wavelength. We have investigated the possibility of porting reference data sets from one NIR wavelength system to another: We have constructed a reference library consisting of 145 spectra, including 20 explosives, as well as sundry other compounds and materials using a 1064 nm spectrometer. These data were used as a reference library to evaluate the same 145 compounds whose experimental spectra were recorded using a second 785 nm spectrometer. In 128 cases of 145 (or 88.3% including 20/20 for the explosives, the compounds were correctly identified with a mean “hit score” of 954 of 1000. Adding in criteria for when to declare a correct match versus when to declare uncertainty, the approach was able to correctly categorize 134 out of 145 spectra, giving a 92.4% accuracy. For the few that were incorrectly identified, either the matched spectra were spectroscopically similar to the target or the 785 nm signal was degraded due to fluorescence. The results indicate that imported data recorded at a different NIR wavelength can be successfully used as reference libraries, but key issues must be addressed: the reference data must be of equal or higher resolution than the resolution of the current sensor, the systems require rigorous wavelength calibration, and wavelength-dependent intensity response should be accounted for in the different systems.

  7. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  8. An angle-sensitive detection system for scattered heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganz, R E; Bär, R; Bethge, Klaus; Bokemeyer, H; Folger, H; Samek, M; Salabura, P; Schwalm, D; Stiebing, K E

    1999-01-01

    A compact detection system for heavy ions scattered in collisions at the Coulomb barrier is presented. This system, consisting of four identical, low-pressure Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) modules with two sensitive layers each, was built to operate in an ultra-high-vacuum environment inside the EPoS II solenoid spectrometer at GSI Darmstadt. The detector covers polar angles between 20 deg. and 70 deg. with respect to the beam axis, and about 80% of 2 pi in azimuthal angle. Segmented cathodes and a delay-line read-out allow for a determination of both angles with a precision of delta THETA approx 0.7 deg. in polar and delta PHI approx 1.5 deg. in azimuthal angle, respectively. The system has been proven to be capable of handling instantaneous rates of up to 5x10 sup 5 detected ions per second per module. It neither exhibits the degradation of detection efficiency nor loss in resolution over a 500 h period of a 6 MeV/u sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U+ sup 1 sup 8 sup 1 Ta measurement at average luminosities of 8...

  9. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae; An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field

  10. Development of an Analytical Method for Explosive Residues in Soil,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    pesticides from spiked dry (1983) compared acetone, acetonitrile, methylene chlo- soil using an ultrasonic probe, an ultrasonic bath and ride-methanol... photodegradation of tion on XAD-4 resin, extraction using ethyl acetate, and the explosive-forming nitrite ion, which is detected by determination by GC on a

  11. Trapped-Ion State Detection through Coherent Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    8–10], the ions behave like a classical driven harmonic oscillator with resonant driving force, F (i)(t) = F (i) 0 cos(ωM t+ φM ), where F (i) 0 is...the trap axis. We detect the induced harmonic motion by observing the Mg+ ion’s oscillating velocity and resulting Doppler-shift as modulation of the...the Al+ state. To demonstrate this method, we experimentally dis- tinguish Zeeman substates of the Al+ 1S0 ground state. The applied static magnetic

  12. Real-time, wide-area hyperspectral imaging sensors for standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Tazik, Shawna; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the detection and analysis of targets located within complex backgrounds. HSI can detect threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have size, weight, and power limitations that prohibit their use for field-portable and/or real-time applications. Current generation systems commonly provide an inefficient area search rate, require close proximity to the target for screening, and/or are not capable of making real-time measurements. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of real-time, wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize shortwave infrared (SWIR) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. SWIR HSI sensors provide wide-area imagery with at or near real time detection speeds. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focusing on sensor design and detection results.

  13. Towards single Ce ion detection in a bulk crystal for the development of a single-ion qubit readout scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was concerned with investigating the relevant spectroscopic properties of Ce ions randomly doped in an Y2SiO5 crystal at low temperatures (around 4 K), in order to develop a technique and an experimental set-up to detect the fluorescence photons emitted by a single Ce ion. The aim of the work was to determine whether a single Ce ion (referred to as the readout ion) can be used as a local probe to sense the quantum state of a neighbouring single-ion qubit via ...

  14. Flow injection analysis of organic peroxide explosives using acid degradation and chemiluminescent detection of released hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Zakaria, Philip; Guijt, Rosanne; Macka, Mirek; Dicinoski, Greg; Breadmore, Michael; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of acid degradation of organic peroxides into hydrogen peroxide in a pneumatically driven flow injection system with chemiluminescence reaction with luminol and Cu(2+) as a catalyst (FIA-CL) was investigated for the fast and sensitive detection of organic peroxide explosives (OPEs). The target OPEs included hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and methylethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP). Under optimised conditions maximum degradations of 70% and 54% for TATP and HMTD, respectively were achieved at 162 µL min(-1), and 9% degradation for MEKP at 180 µL min(-1). Flow rates were precisely controlled in this single source pneumatic pressure driven multi-channel FIA system by model experiments on mixing of easily detectable component solutions. The linear range for detection of TATP, HMTD and H2O2 was 1-200 µM (r(2)=0.98-0.99) at both flow rates, while that for MEKP was 20-200 µM (r(2)=0.97) at 180 µL min(-1). The detection limits (LODs) obtained were 0.5 µM for TATP, HMTD and H2O2 and 10 µM for MEKP. The detection times varied from 1.5 to 3 min in this FIA-CL system. Whilst the LOD for H2O2 was comparable with those reported by other investigators, the LODs and analysis times for TATP and HMTD were superior, and significantly, this is the first time the detection of MEKP has been reported by FIA-CL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitive detection of plastic explosives with self-assembled monolayer-coated microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, L. A.; Boiadjiev, V.; Hawk, J. E.; Thundat, T.

    2003-08-01

    We report the detection of 10-30 parts-per-trillion levels of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine within 20 s of exposure to a silicon microcantilever with its gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. These measurements correspond to a limit of detection of a few fg.

  16. Sensor Technology Assessment for Ordnance and Explosive Waste Detection and Location. Revision B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    201) 867-2191 Key Contact: Arthur Stout Description AGEMA (formerly AGA) has been building infrared systems since the early 1960’s, which it claims is...34It couldn’t detect a bolt from the air, but could detect a Toyota engine." Because they are just now ending their research phase, the fiber optic

  17. Evaluation of the uncertainty in the azimuth calculation for the detection and localization of atmospheric nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Low-frequency acoustic signal below about 1 Hz can travel for hundreds or thousands of kilometers through in the Earth atmosphere. If a source produces infrasonic energy, it can be detected by a remote sensor. Atmospheric strong explosions as the nuclear detonation contains low-frequency components that can travel long distances with measurable signal levels. This fact can be useful for detection and localization of clandestine events. The international regime on the non-proliferation of nuclear requires the ability to detect, localize, and discriminate nuclear events on a global scale. Monitoring systems such as the Inter national Monitoring System (I.M.S.) rely on several sensor technologies to perform these functions. The current I.M.S. infra sound system design includes a network of low-frequency atmospheric acoustic sensor arrays, which contribute primarily to the detection and localization of atmospheric nuclear events. There have been observed differences between the azimuth measurements and the true directions of the sources of infra sound waves in artificial and natural events such as explosive eruptions of strong volcanoes. The infra sound waves are reflected in stratospheric and thermospheric layers near 50 km and 120 km in height respectively. The azimuth deviation is affected by meteorological disturbances in the troposphere and stratosphere. This paper describe new elements to obtain the uncertainty in the azimuth calculation of arrival wave plane passing across of a not plane array of infra sound sensors. It also presents a 3D computation of infra sound propagation and estimation of the azimuth deviation using the zonal horizontal wind model and M.S.I.S.E.-90 model of the upper atmosphere to obtain temperature, density and concentration of the principal components of the air for altitudes of up to 120 km. Deviations of up to 12 degrees in the azimuth were obtained, depending on the location of the source of infra sound, the point of measurement and

  18. Marine Sample Exploitation Project: estimates regarding the sensitivity and technology for the detection of nuclear explosion debris in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The report discusses the possibility of detecting a small nuclear explosion in which most of the fission products are released to the ocean. The use of marine plankton as bioaccumulators is proposed to deal with the problem of dilution. 7 refs

  19. Chemical and explosive detections using photo-acoustic effect and quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choa, Fow-Sen

    2013-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) effect is a sensitive spectroscopic technique for chemical sensing. In recent years, with the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), significant progress has been achieved for PA sensing applications. Using high-power, tunable mid-IR QCLs as laser sources, PA chemical sensor systems have demonstrated parts-pertrillion- level detection sensitivity. Many of these high sensitivity measurements were demonstrated locally in PA cells. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor for more than 41 feet distance using a quantum cascade laser and a microphone with acoustic reflectors. We also further demonstrated solid phase TNT detections at a standoff distance of 8 feet. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. Standoff detection of gas samples with calibrated concentration of 2.3 ppm was achieved at a detection distance of more than 2 feet. An extended detection distance up to 14 feet was observed for a higher gas concentration of 13.9 ppm. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated that the signal and noise spectra of the 4 microphone/4 reflector system with a combined SNR of 12.48 dB. For the 16-microphone and one reflector case, an SNR of 17.82 was achieved. These successful chemical sensing demonstrations will likely create new demands for widely tunable QCLs with ultralow threshold (for local fire-alarm size detection systems) and high-power (for standoff detection systems) performances.

  20. Application of mid-infrared cavity-ringdown spectroscopy to trace explosives vapor detection using a broadly tunable (6-8 μm) optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M. W.; Provencal, R. A.; Owano, T. G.; Paldus, B. A.; Kachanov, A.; Vodopyanov, K. L.; Hunter, M.; Coy, S. L.; Steinfeld, J. I.; Arnold, J. T.

    A novel instrument, based on cavity-ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), has been developed for trace gas detection. The new instrument utilizes a widely tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO), which incorporates a zinc-germanium-phosphide (ZGP) crystal that is pumped at 2.8 μm by a 25-Hz Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The resultant mid-IR beam profile is nearly Gaussian, with energies exceeding 200 μJ/pulse between 6 and 8 μm, corresponding to a quantum conversion efficiency of approximately 35%. Vapor-phase mid-infrared spectra of common explosives (TNT, TATP, RDX, PETN and Tetryl) were acquired using the CRDS technique. Parts-per-billion concentration levels were readily detected with no sample preconcentration. A collection/flash-heating sequence was implemented in order to enhance detection limits for ambient air sampling. Detection limits as low as 75 ppt for TNT are expected, with similar concentration levels for the other explosives.

  1. Colorimetric-based detection of TNT explosives using functionalized silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idros, Noorhayati; Ho, Man Yi; Pivnenko, Mike; Qasim, Malik M; Xu, Hua; Gu, Zhongze; Chu, Daping

    2015-06-03

    This proof-of-concept study proposes a novel sensing mechanism for selective and label-free detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). It is realized by surface chemistry functionalization of silica nanoparticles (NPs) with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES). The primary amine anchored to the surface of the silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NH2) acts as a capturing probe for TNT target binding to form Meisenheimer amine-TNT complexes. A colorimetric change of the self-assembled (SAM) NP samples from the initial green of a SiO2-NH2 nanoparticle film towards red was observed after successful attachment of TNT, which was confirmed as a result of the increased separation between the nanoparticles. The shift in the peak wavelength of the reflected light normal to the film surface and the associated change of the peak width were measured, and a merit function taking into account their combined effect was proposed for the detection of TNT concentrations from 10-12 to 10-4 molar. The selectivity of our sensing approach is confirmed by using TNT-bound nanoparticles incubated in AptamerX, with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and toluene used as control and baseline, respectively. Our results show the repeatable systematic color change with the TNT concentration and the possibility to develop a robust, easy-to-use, and low-cost TNT detection method for performing a sensitive, reliable, and semi-quantitative detection in a wide detection range.

  2. Experimental design of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for detection of illicit drug and explosive material using neutron generator accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono

    2010-01-01

    The background of the research is based on increasing bom events and growing drug trade happened in the last decade, as well as the limitation of the available detection technique. In order to answer the background of the research, the experimental design of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) using fast neutron 14 MeV is carried out. This technique is very sensitive to detect light elements such as C, N and O which are the main compositions of illicit drug and explosive material. The main components of a PGNAA consist of neutron generator accelerator, neutron detection based on alpha associate technique using semiconductor detector, shielding and collimator of neutron, nuclear instrument of time correlated alpha-gamma, conveyer system for delivering samples. In this paper the function and design requirement of each components of PGNAA are described. In designing of PGNAA technique, it is done by simulation using MCNP to predict the need of values of neutron flux and counting time of a sample. Grafit and nitroglycerin are used as simulation samples for one element C and multi elemental C, Nand O. The simulation result using grafit diameter sample of 5 cm (equivalent to 1.12 kg) with simulation particles nps of 2x10 9 , the distance between neutron source and sample of 1 m, showed that the probability to detect C element at gamma energy of 4.43 MeV is 5x10 -8 per second. It can be concluded that to obtain 5000 counts at neutron flux of 10 8 n/cm 2 .s from neutron generator accelerator in order to get relative error of 1 %, the counting time of 100 s is needed. (author)

  3. Detection of explosives and other illicit materials by a single nanosecond neutron pulses — Monte Carlo simulation of the detection process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewski, R.; Wiącek, U.; Dworak, D.; Drozdowicz, K.; Gribkov, V.

    2012-07-01

    Recent progress in the development of a Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects (explosives and other illicit materials) by means of measuring elastically and non-elastically scattered neutrons is presented. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having durations of the order of few nanoseconds, generated by a dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or a deuterium-tritium mixture as a working gas. A very short duration of the neutron pulse, as well as its high brightness and mono-chromaticity allows using time-of-flight methods with bases of about few meters to distinguish signals from neutrons scattered by different elements. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the scattered neutron field from several compounds (explosives and everyday use materials) are presented. The MCNP5 code has been used to get information on the angular and energy distributions of neutrons scattered by the above mentioned compounds assuming the initial neutron energies to be equal to 2.45 MeV (DD) and 14 MeV (DT). A new input has been elaborated that allows modeling not only a spectrum of the neutrons scattered at different angles but also their time history from the moment of generation up to the detection. Such an approach allows getting approximate signals registered by hypothetic scintillator + photomultipler probes placed at various distances from the scattering object, demonstrating principal capability of the method to identify an elemental content of the inspected objects. The extensive computations reveled also several limitations of the proposed method, namely: low number of neutrons reaching detector system, distortions and interferences of scattered neutron signals etc. Further more, preliminary results of the MCNP modeling of the hidden fissile materials detection process are presented.

  4. Detection of explosives and other illicit materials by a single nanosecond neutron pulses — Monte Carlo simulation of the detection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklaszewski, R; Wiącek, U; Dworak, D; Drozdowicz, K; Gribkov, V

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects (explosives and other illicit materials) by means of measuring elastically and non-elastically scattered neutrons is presented. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having durations of the order of few nanoseconds, generated by a dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or a deuterium-tritium mixture as a working gas. A very short duration of the neutron pulse, as well as its high brightness and mono-chromaticity allows using time-of-flight methods with bases of about few meters to distinguish signals from neutrons scattered by different elements. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the scattered neutron field from several compounds (explosives and everyday use materials) are presented. The MCNP5 code has been used to get information on the angular and energy distributions of neutrons scattered by the above mentioned compounds assuming the initial neutron energies to be equal to 2.45 MeV (DD) and 14 MeV (DT). A new input has been elaborated that allows modeling not only a spectrum of the neutrons scattered at different angles but also their time history from the moment of generation up to the detection. Such an approach allows getting approximate signals registered by hypothetic scintillator + photomultipler probes placed at various distances from the scattering object, demonstrating principal capability of the method to identify an elemental content of the inspected objects. The extensive computations reveled also several limitations of the proposed method, namely: low number of neutrons reaching detector system, distortions and interferences of scattered neutron signals etc. Further more, preliminary results of the MCNP modeling of the hidden fissile materials detection process are presented.

  5. Luminescent metal-organic framework-functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites and the reversible detection of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Ha; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2013-08-01

    Achieving both high specificity and sensitivity are essential for gas phase chemical detection systems. Recent implementation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have shown great success in separation and storage systems for specific gas molecules. By implementing a MOF structure comprised of Zn2+ coordinated trans-stilbene derivatives, a gas responsive material has been created which exhibits a high photoluminescence quantum yield, offering new opportunities for chemical sensors. Here, we reveal a nanocomposite material, assembled from azobenzene functionalized graphene oxide and stilbene-MOF, that is capable of luminescent quenching by explosive gases. This unique system displays selectivity to dinitrotoluene (71% quenching) over trinitrotoluene (20% quenching) with sub ppm sensitivity and response times of less than a minute. We show that this implementation of a graphene-based MOF composite provides a unique strategy in the development of molecularly well-defined materials having rapid, reversible, and gas selective fluorescent quenching capabilities. This opens the way for new advances in the assembly of low density frameworks using isomerization suppressed materials.Achieving both high specificity and sensitivity are essential for gas phase chemical detection systems. Recent implementation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have shown great success in separation and storage systems for specific gas molecules. By implementing a MOF structure comprised of Zn2+ coordinated trans-stilbene derivatives, a gas responsive material has been created which exhibits a high photoluminescence quantum yield, offering new opportunities for chemical sensors. Here, we reveal a nanocomposite material, assembled from azobenzene functionalized graphene oxide and stilbene-MOF, that is capable of luminescent quenching by explosive gases. This unique system displays selectivity to dinitrotoluene (71% quenching) over trinitrotoluene (20% quenching) with sub ppm sensitivity and

  6. Highly stable and luminescent layered hybrid materials for sensitive detection of TNT explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang-Nan; Wang, Kang; Wang, Feng-Bin; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-04-21

    Self-assembly is an effective way to fabricate optical molecular materials. However, this strategy usually changes the nanoenvironment surrounding fluorescence molecules, yielding low luminescence efficiency. Herein, we report the intercalation of a ruthenium polypyridine (Ru) complex into the interlayer galleries of layered double hydroxides (LDHs), forming a Ru/LDH hybrid. The Ru complex exists as an ordered monolayer state, and the hybrid exhibits high thermal and photo stability. Its luminescence efficiency and lifetime are increased by ∼1.7 and ∼1 times, respectively, compared to those of free molecules. We constructed a Ru/LDH sensing platform based on a fluorescence quenching effect for highly sensitive detection of TNT with a detection limit of 4.4 μM.

  7. Luminescent metal-organic frameworks for chemical sensing and explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhichao; Deibert, Benjamin J; Li, Jing

    2014-08-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a unique class of crystalline solids comprised of metal cations (or metal clusters) and organic ligands that have shown promise for a wide variety of applications. Over the past 15 years, research and development of these materials have become one of the most intensely and extensively pursued areas. A very interesting and well-investigated topic is their optical emission properties and related applications. Several reviews have provided a comprehensive overview covering many aspects of the subject up to 2011. This review intends to provide an update of work published since then and focuses on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of MOFs and their possible utility in chemical and biological sensing and detection. The spectrum of this review includes the origin of luminescence in MOFs, the advantages of luminescent MOF (LMOF) based sensors, general strategies in designing sensory materials, and examples of various applications in sensing and detection.

  8. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senesac, Larry R.; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective...... layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate...

  9. Improving Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detection Methods for Trace Forensics and Military Field Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-11

    explosives detection. The previously mentioned terrorist events coupled with continuing media attention concerning vulnerabilities, lead to the...Cyclotol RDX+TNT DBX TNT+RDX+AN+AL HTA -3 HMX+TNT+AL Pentolite PETN+TNT PTX-1 RDX+TNT+Tetryl PTX-2 RDX+TNT+PETN Tetryol TNT+Tetryl

  10. Fluorescent probes for detection of picric acid explosive: A greener approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Sudesna; Gogoi, Bedanta; Sen Sarma, Neelotpal, E-mail: neelot@iasst.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Green materials with advantages of low cost and high sensitivity are important from the perspective of human health, environment and homeland security. Herein, we have reported two cost effective modified biomaterials as fluorophores for detection of Picric acid in aqueous state. The biomaterials Scutellarin–Hispiduloside and Curcumin have been modified with green solvent glycerol for Picric acid detection in aqueous solution. The limit of detection for Picric acid by Scutellarin–Hispiduloside–glycerol and Curcumin–glycerol are 9.1×10{sup −8} M and 6.03×10{sup −8} M respectively. These luminescence based sensors have also been able to detect Picric acid in real samples with high efficiency. The fluorescence quenching efficiency of Scutellarin–Hispiduloside–glycerol has been found to be 99% while that for Curcumin–glycerol, it is 88.9% for 0.5 µM Picric acid in aqueous state. In both the cases, the quenching is governed by FRET between the fluorophore and the quencher and the FRET efficiency has been found to be 0.968 and 0.792 respectively. In addition, both the systems show excellent selectivity towards PA in presence of other nitroaromatic compounds and are also statistically accessible. The utilization of readily available cheap biomaterials without using multistep protocol for synthesis and devoid of any kind of sophisticated equipments for the processs further enhances the utility of the method. - Highlights: • Environmentally benign systems – Scutellarin, Hispiduloside and curcumin with green solvent glycerol – have been used for Picric acid sensing. • The method is simple and cost effective with a detection limit for CIG and CG found to be 9.1×10−8 M and 6.03×10−8 M of PA respectively. • Both the sensing systems were found to be highly selective for Picric acid in the presence of structurally similar compounds. • The quenching occurs by FRET between the fluorophore and the quencher and the FRET efficiency is determined

  11. Coordination polymer-derived nano-sized zinc ferrite with excellent performance in nitro-explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Debal Kanti; Mahata, Partha

    2017-08-29

    Herein, a mixed metal coordination polymer, {(H 2 pip)[Zn 1/3 Fe 2/3 (pydc-2,5) 2 (H 2 O)]·2H 2 O} 1 {where H 2 pip = piperazinediium and pydc-2,5 = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate}, was successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal technique. To confirm the structure and phase purity of 1, single crystals of an isomorphous pure Fe compound, {(H 2 pip)[Fe(pydc-2,5) 2 (H 2 O)]·2H 2 O} 1a, were synthesized based on similar synthetic conditions. Single crystal X-ray data of 1a confirmed the one-dimensional anionic metal-organic coordination polymer hydrogen bonded with protonated piprazine (piperazinediium) and lattice water molecules. The phase purity of 1 and 1a were confirmed via powder X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 was systematically characterized using IR, TGA, SEM, and EDX elemental mapping analysis. Compound 1 was used as a single source precursor for the preparation of nano-sized ZnFe 2 O 4 via thermal decomposition. The as-obtained ZnFe 2 O 4 was fully characterized using PXRD, SEM, TEM, and EDX elemental mapping analysis. It was found that ZnFe 2 O 4 was formed in its pure form with particle size in the nano-dimension. The aqueous dispersion of nano-sized ZnFe 2 O 4 exhibits a strong emission at 402 nm upon excitation at 310 nm. This emissive property was employed for luminescence-based detection of nitroaromatic explosives in an aqueous medium through luminescence quenching for the first time. Importantly, selective detections have been observed for phenolic nitroaromatics based on differential luminescence quenching behaviour along with a detection limit of 57 ppb for 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) in water.

  12. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosives detection system made up with a D-D neutron generator and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos Robalino, Lenin E; García Fernández, Gonzalo Felipe; Gallego, Eduardo; Guzmán-García, Karen A; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2018-02-17

    Detection of hidden explosives is of utmost importance for homeland security. Several configurations of an Explosives Detection System (EDS) to intercept hidden threats, made up with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) compact neutron generator and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated using MCNP6 code. The system's response to various samples of explosives, such as RDX and Ammonium Nitrate, is analysed. The D-D generator is able to produce fast neutrons with 2.5 MeV energy in a maximum yield of 10 10 n/s. It is surrounded by high-density polyethylene to thermalize the fast neutrons and to optimize interactions with the sample inspected, whose emission of gamma rays gives a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it. This procedure allows to determine its chemical composition and to identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate its thicknesses depending on the admissible dose of operation, using lead and polyethylene. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for explosives inspection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rational Design of Peptide-Functionalized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for Specific Detection of TNT Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a rationally-designed 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT binding peptide derived from an amino acid sequence of the complementarity-determining region (CDR of an anti-TNT monoclonal antibody was used for TNT detection based on a maleimide-functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor. By antigen-docking simulation and screening, the TNT binding candidate peptides were obtained as TNTHCDR1 derived from the heavy chain of CDR1, TNTHCDR2 derived from CDR2, and TNTHCDR3 from CDR3 of an anti-TNT antibody. The binding events between candidate peptides and TNT were evaluated using the SPR sensor by direct determination based on the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES surface. The TNT binding peptide was directly immobilized on the maleimide-functionalized sensor chip surface from N-γ-maleimidobutyryl-oxysuccinimide ester (GMBS. The results demonstrated that peptide TNTHCDR3 was identified and selected as a TNT binding peptide among the other two candidate peptides. Five kinds of TNT analogues were also investigated to testify the selectivity of TNT binding peptide TNTHCDR3. Furthermore, the results indicated that the APTES-GMBS-based SPR sensor chip procedure featured a great potential application for the direct detection of TNT.

  14. Microphotonic sensors for the rapid detection of the presence of explosive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2002-02-01

    A first generation, microphotonic sensor for rapid (10 ms response time) measurement of vapors from the hydrocarbon-based fuels JP-8, DF-2, and gasoline has been developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. This sensor is based upon a previously reported laser mixing technique that uses two tunable diode lasers emitting in the near-infrared spectral region to measure concentrations of gases having unstructured absorption spectra. The fiber-mixed laser beam consists of two wavelengths, one of which is absorbed by the fuel vapor, and one of which is not absorbed. By sinusoidally modulating the power of the two lasers at the same frequency but 180 degrees out of phase, a sinusoidal signal is generated at the detector (when the target gas is present in the line of sight). The signal amplitude, measured using standard phase sensitive detection techniques, is proportional to fuel vapor concentration. A second generation sensor, designed to measure the full envelope of the first overtone C-H vibrations in middle distillate fuels is currently being developed. Both sensors are described. Limits of detection using the first generation sensor are reported for vapors of the three fuels studied.

  15. Fusion of iECO image descriptors for buried explosive hazard detection in forward-looking infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stanton R.; Anderson, Derek T.; Havens, Timothy C.

    2015-05-01

    Data fusion is a powerful theory that often leads to significant performance gain and/or improved robustness of a given solution. In this article, we explore how fusion can be used to advance our previously established improved Evolutionary COnstructed (iECO) image descriptor framework. The goal of iECO is to learn a diverse set of individuals (variable length chromosome in a genetic algorithm). Each iECO individual encodes a unique composition of different low-level image transformations in the context of a high-level image descriptor. Herein, we investigate multiple kernel (MK) aggregation and MK learning (MKL) for "feature-level" fusion of iECO chromosomes. Specifically, we explore MKL group lasso (MKLGL) and we put forth a new way to directly assign kernel weights from a measure defined on the kernel matrices. The proposed work is presented in the context of buried explosive hazard detection (EHD) in forward looking (FL) imagery. Experiments are reported using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on data from a U.S. Army test site that contains multiple target and clutter types, burial depths and times of day. We demonstrate that MK support vector machine (MKSVM) classification outperform single kernel SVM (SKSVM) classification and our weight assignment procedure generalizes well and outperforms MKLGL for EHD in FLIR.

  16. Detecting yocto (10-24) newton forces with trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a calibrated measurement of 174 Yoctonewton using a cloud of 60 9 Be+ ion confined in a Penning ion trap. These measurements suggest that ion traps may form the basis of a new class of ultrasensitive deployable force sensors....

  17. Detection of the spectroscopic signatures of explosives and their degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Vivian; Cabanzo, Andrea; Baez, Bibiana; Correa, Sandra; Irrazabal, Maik; Briano, Julio G.; Castro, Miguel E.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2005-06-01

    Detection and removal of antipersonnel and antitank landmines is a great challenge and a worldwide enviromental and humanitarian problem. Sensors tuned on the spectroscopic signature of the chemicals released from mines are a potential solution. Enviromental factors (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall precipitation, wind, sun irradiation, pressure, etc.) as well as soil characteristics (water content, compaction, porosity, chemical composition, particle size distribution, topography, vegetation, etc), have a direct impact on the fate and transport of the chemicals released from landmines. Chemicals such as TNT, DNT and their degradation products, are semi-volatile, and somewhat soluble in water. Also, they may adsorb strongly to soil particles, and are susceptible to degradation by microorganisms, light, or chemical agents. Here we show an experimental procedure to quantify the effect of the above variables on the spectroscopic signature. A number of soil tanks under controlled conditions are used to study the effect of temperature, water content, relative humidity and light radiation.

  18. Trace explosives detection using photo-thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS): theory, modeling, and detection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Papantonakis, Michael R.; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    We are developing a technology for stand-off detection based on photo-thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). In this approach, one or more infrared (IR) quantum cascade lasers are tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed at the sample while an IR focal plane array is used to image the subsequent thermal emissions. In this paper we present recent advances in the theory and numerical modeling of photo-thermal imaging and spectroscopy of particulates on flat substrates. We compare the theoretical models with experimental data taken on our mobile cart-based PT-IRIS system. Synthetic data of the photo-thermal response was calculated for a wide range of analytes, substrates, particle sizes, and analyte mass loadings using their known thermo-physical and optical properties. These synthetic data sets can now be generated quickly and were used to accelerate the development of detection algorithms. The performance of detection algorithms will also be discussed.

  19. Detection of explosives and other illicit materials by a single nanosecond neutron pulses - Monte-Carlo simulations of the detection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklaszewski, R.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Dworak, D.; Gribkov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects (explosives and other illicit materials) by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method is based on the well know fact that nuclide-specific information is present in the scattered neutron field. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of few nanoseconds, generated by a dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with a pure deuterium or deuterium-tritium mixture as a working gas. Very short duration of the neutron pulse, its high brightness and mono-chromaticity allow to use the time-of-flight method with bases of about few meters to distinguish signals from neutrons scattered by different elements. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the scattered neutron field from several compounds (explosives and everyday use materials) are presented in the paper. The MCNP5 code has been used to get information on the angular and energy distributions of the neutrons scattered by the above mentioned compounds assuming the initial neutron energy equal to 2.45 MeV (D-D). A new input has been elaborated that allows the modelling of not only a spectrum of the neutrons scattered at different angles but also their time history from the moment of generation up to detection. Such an approach allows getting approximate signals as registered by scintillator + photomultiplier probes placed at various distances from the scattering object, demonstrating a principal capability of the method to identify an elemental content of the inspected objects. Preliminary results of the MCNP modelling of the interrogation process of the airport luggage containing several illicit objects are presented as well. (authors)

  20. Underground Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    Chile (1960, mb = 9.4), and Anchorage (1964, mb = 9.1). In the 21st century Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (mb = 9.3) occurred on December 26, 2004 caused a...explosion source mechanism is less complex than the earthquake source mechanism. Therefore, the waves produced by explosions have more impulsive first...Seismic waves generated by nuclear and chemical explosions are comparable with natural earthquakes in their intensity and (for industrial chemical

  1. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  2. The performance of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for liquid explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Paul W.; Maskall, Guy; Bonthron, Stuart; Bloomfield, Matthew; Tombling, Craig; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Aviation security requirements adopted in 2014 require liquids to be screened at most airports throughout Europe, North America and Australia. Cobalt's unique Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS™) technology has proven extremely effective at screening liquids, aerosols and gels (LAGS) with extremely low false alarm rates. SORS is compatible with a wide range of containers, including coloured, opaque or clear plastics, glass and paper, as well as duty-free bottles in STEBs (secure tamper-evident bags). Our award-winning Insight range has been specially developed for table-top screening at security checkpoints. Insight systems use our patented SORS technology for rapid and accurate chemical analysis of substances in unopened non-metallic containers. Insight100M™ and the latest member of the range - Insight200M™ - also screen metallic containers. Our unique systems screen liquids, aerosols and gels with the highest detection capability and lowest false alarm rates of any ECAC-approved scanner, with several hundred units already in use at airports including eight of the top ten European hubs. This paper presents an analysis of real performance data for these systems.

  3. Percolation under noise: Detecting explosive percolation using the second-largest component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viles, Wes; Ginestet, Cedric E.; Tang, Ariana; Kramer, Mark A.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of distinguishing between different rates of percolation under noise. A statistical model of percolation is constructed allowing for the birth and death of edges as well as the presence of noise in the observations. This graph-valued stochastic process is composed of a latent and an observed nonstationary process, where the observed graph process is corrupted by type-I and type-II errors. This produces a hidden Markov graph model. We show that for certain choices of parameters controlling the noise, the classical (Erdős-Rényi) percolation is visually indistinguishable from a more rapid form of percolation. In this setting, we compare two different criteria for discriminating between these two percolation models, based on the interquartile range (IQR) of the first component's size, and on the maximal size of the second-largest component. We show through data simulations that this second criterion outperforms the IQR of the first component's size, in terms of discriminatory power. The maximal size of the second component therefore provides a useful statistic for distinguishing between different rates of percolation, under physically motivated conditions for the birth and death of edges, and under noise. The potential application of the proposed criteria for the detection of clinically relevant percolation in the context of applied neuroscience is also discussed.

  4. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications - a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+.

  5. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    OpenAIRE

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2015-01-01

    The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off) the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectiv...

  6. Development of sensitive holographic devices for physiological metal ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabad-e.-Gul; Martin, Suzanne; Cassidy, John; Naydenova, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The development of selective alkali metal ions sensors in particular is a subject of significant interest. In this respect, the level of blood electrolytes, particularly H+, Na+, K+ and Cl- , is widely used to monitor aberrant physiologies associated with pulmonary emphysema, acute and chronic renal failure, heart failure, diabetes. The sensors reported in this paper are created by holographic recording of surface relief structures in a self-processing photopolymer material. The structures are functionalized by ionophores dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DC) and tetraethyl 4-tert-butylcalix[4]arene (TBC) in plasticised polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. Interrogation of these structures by light allows indirect measurements of chemical analytes' concentration in real time. We present results on the optimisation and testing of the holographic sensor. A self-processing acrylamide-based photopolymer was used to fabricate the required photonic structures. The performance of the sensors for detection of K+ and Na+ was investigated. It was observed that the functionalisation with DC provides a selective response of the devices to K+ over Na+ and TBC coated surface structures are selectively sensitive to Na+. The sensor responds to Na+ within the physiological ranges. Normal levels of Na+ and K+ in human serum lie within the ranges 135-148mM and 3.5-5.3 mM respectively.

  7. Lanthanide ions-doped SrMoO4 microcrystals: Synthesis, characterizations, luminescence, and detection of Fe3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyong; Han, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shiqi; Liang, Danyang; Wang, Dan; Lu, Guoxin; Jia, Guang

    A facile and green synthetic method for the synthesis of a Ln3+(Eu, Tb)-doped SrMoO4 (SMO) microcrystals were developed using an environment-friendly low temperature hydrothermal method assisting with phenol formaldehyde resin (PFr). The microcrystals show narrow distribution and uniform particle size, and strong red and green emissions from Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions, and it is selectively quenched upon addition Fe3+ ions, thus making the microcrystals as a potential Fe3+ ions sensing material, and the detection limit is nearly micromole level.

  8. Secondary electron emission from boron-doped diamond under ion impact: Applications in single-ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, T.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Prawer, S.; Legge, G.J.; Butler, J.E.; Vestyck, D.J. , Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The secondary electron emission from a 2 μm thick boron-doped diamond film under ion (4.6 endash 7.7 MeV He + )impact is reported. The yield under ions impact is found to be remarkably high, stable over a period of many months, and independent of which side of the film (i.e., growth or substrate side) is exposed to the ion flux. By taking advantage of the high secondary-electron yield, the passage of each ion through the film could be detected with an efficiency of close to 100%, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest efficiency recorded to date for any thin-film window. This finding has an immediate application in single-ion irradiation systems where a thin vacuum window is required to allow extraction of an ion beam from the vacuum into air and at the same time offer 100% efficiency for the detection of the passage of the ion through the window. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  10. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  11. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  12. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Lead Ions in Drinking Water Based on a Strip Immunosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlai Xu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have first developed a rapid and sensitive strip immunosensor based on two heterogeneously-sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs probes for the detection of trace lead ions in drinking water. The sensitivity was 4-fold higher than that of the conventional LFA under the optimized conditions. The visual limit of detection (LOD of the amplified method for qualitative detection lead ions was 2 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 0.19 ng/mL using a scanning reader. The method suffered from no interference from other metal ions and could be used to detect trace lead ions in drinking water without sample enrichment. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 96% to 103%. As the detection method could be accomplished within 15 min, this method could be used as a potential tool for preliminary monitoring of lead contamination in drinking water.

  13. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Determination of trimethylselenonium ion in urine by ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jessen, K.D.; Kristensen, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    The selenium species selenite, selenate, selenomethionine (SeMet), and trimethylselenonium iodide (TMSe+) were separated in aqueous solution by ion chromatography. The separation was performed on an Ionpac CS5 cation exchange column by elution with 10 mM oxalic acid and 20 mM potassium sulphate, p......-eluted with the selenate signal. The calibration curve was linear in the range 5-50 mu g l(-1) TMSe+ determined by spiking a urine pool. The precision at the 30 mu g l(-1) level was 1.9%. The limit of detection and determination were 0.8 and 2.6 mu g l(-1), respectively. All calculation are based on the Se-82 isotope....... In urine, a large interference was observed close to the retention time of TMSe+ when monitoring the Se-78 isotope. The interference was ascribed to the sodium content of the urine. Thus, the Se-82 isotope should be used for selenium speciation in urine on this chromatographic system. Urine samples from...

  16. Tentative detection of the nitrosylium ion in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC-INTA, Ctra. de Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Bailleux, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR 8523 CNRS, Université Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Alekseev, E. [Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Krasnoznamennaya ul. 4, Kharkov 61002 (Ukraine); Fuente, A.; Bachiller, R. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Apdo. 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Roueff, E. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8112. Place J. Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Treviño-Morales, S. P. [Instituto de Radio Astronomía Milimétrica (IRAM), Avenida Divina Pastora 7, Local 20, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Lefloch, B. [UJF-Grenoble/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2014-11-01

    We report the tentative detection in space of the nitrosylium ion, NO{sup +}. The observations were performed toward the cold dense core Barnard 1-b. The identification of the NO{sup +} J = 2-1 line is supported by new laboratory measurements of NO{sup +} rotational lines up to the J = 8-7 transition (953207.189 MHz), which leads to an improved set of molecular constants: B {sub 0} = 59597.1379(62) MHz, D {sub 0} = 169.428(65) kHz, and eQq {sub 0}(N) = –6.72(15) MHz. The profile of the feature assigned to NO{sup +} exhibits two velocity components at 6.5 and 7.5 km s{sup –1}, with column densities of 1.5 × 10{sup 12} and 6.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, respectively. New observations of NO and HNO, also reported here, allow us to estimate the following abundance ratios: X(NO)/X(NO{sup +}) ≅ 511, and X(HNO)/X(NO{sup +}) ≅ 1. This latter value provides important constraints on the formation and destruction processes of HNO. The chemistry of NO{sup +} and other related nitrogen-bearing species is investigated by the means of a time-dependent gas phase model which includes an updated chemical network according to recent experimental studies. The predicted abundance for NO{sup +} and NO is found to be consistent with the observations. However, that of HNO relative to NO is too high. No satisfactory chemical paths have been found to explain the observed low abundance of HNO. HSCN and HNCS are also reported here with an abundance ratio of ≅ 1. Finally, we have searched for NNO, NO{sub 2}, HNNO{sup +}, and NNOH{sup +}, but only upper limits have been obtained for their column density, except for the latter for which we report a tentative 3σ detection.

  17. Bulk and trace detection of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide using quantum cascade laser technology - a tool for identifying improvised explosive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Ruth; Normand, Erwan; McCulloch, Michael; Black, Paul; Howieson, Iain; Lewis, Colin; Foulger, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The type of explosive materials used in terrorist activities has seen a gradual shift from those that are commonly manufactured but difficult to obtain, such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and nitroglycerine (NG), to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) made from substances that are more readily available. This shift has placed an emphasis on development of instruments capable of detecting IEDs and their precursors, which are often small, volatile molecules well suited to detection through mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy. Two such examples are ammonia, a breakdown product of ammonium nitrate and urea nitrate, and hydrogen peroxide, an efficient oxidiser used in the production of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethyl triperoxide diamine (HMTD). At this meeting in 2007 we presented results of a hydrogen peroxide detection portal utilising quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology. This trace detection system has since undergone significant development to improve sensitivity and selectivity, and the results of this will be presented alongside those of a similar system configured for bulk detection of ammonia. Detection of ammonia produced from the breakdown of ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated, both on the optical bench and in a walkthrough portal. This research has been supported by the UK government.

  18. "Click and Screen" Technology for the Detection of Explosives on Human Hands by a Portable MicroNIR-Chemometrics Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risoluti, Roberta; Gregori, Adolfo; Schiavone, Sergio; Materazzi, Stefano

    2018-03-13

    Portable near-infrared spectroscopy (MicroNIR) coupled with chemometrics was investigated for the first time as a new tool for the on-site analysis of explosives on human hands. A novel, entirely on-site approach based on the use of a particular miniaturized NIR spectrometer was developed and validated in cooperation with the Scientific Investigation Department (Carabinieri RIS) of Rome. Spectra from 25 volunteers were acquired in the NIR region in reflectance mode, and a prediction model was optimized on the basis of chemometric tools. The results demonstrated the capability of the MicroNIR-Chemometrics approach to correctly identify explosives from hands and not be affected by the complexity and variability of the matrix. This study has shown that the MicroNIR-Chemometrics approach can be considered a useful, fast, nondestructive tool identifying the manipulation of explosives in real forensic cases.

  19. A compact quadrupole ion filter for helium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A compact quadrupole ion filter was conceived and constructed for optimum performance at the mass four region of the mass spectra. It was primarely designed for geological applications in the measurements of helium of soil-gases. The whole ion filter structure is 15 cm long by 3.5 cm diameter, including ion source and collecting plate. The sensitivity to helium is of the order of 10 - 2 A.torr - 1 measured at a total pressure of 6x10 - 6 torr and resolution 6. The system can be easily adapted to work as a dynamic residual gas analyser for other purposes. (Author) [pt

  20. Advances in explosives analysis--part II: photon and neutron methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245-246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. This part, Part II, will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  1. Label-free histamine detection with nanofluidic diodes through metal ion displacement mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez Hoyos, Patricio; Duznovic, Ivana; Nasir, Saima; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    [EN] We design and characterize a nanofluidic device for the label-free specific detection of histamine neurotransmitter based on a metal ion displacement mechanism. The sensor consists of an asymmetric polymer nanopore fabricated via ion track-etching technique. The nanopore sensor surface having metal-nitrilotriacetic (NTA-Ni2+) chelates is obtained by covalent coupling of native carboxylic acid groups with N-alpha,N-alpha-bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (BCML), followed by exposure to Ni2+ ion...

  2. Novel ion exchange chromatographic method using conductimetric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, H.; Stevens, T.S.; Bauman, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Ion exchange resins have a well known ability to provide excellent separation of ions, but the automated analysis of the eluted species is often frustrated by the presence of the background electrolyte used for elution. A novel combination of resins succeeded in neutralizing or suppressing this background without significantly affecting the species being analyzed which in turn permits the use of a conductivity cell as a universal and very sensitive monitor of all ionic species either cationic or anionic. Using this technique, automated analytical schemes were devised for Li + , Na + , K + , Rb + , Cs + , NH 4 + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , F - , Cl - , Br - , I - , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , SO 4 2- , SO 3 2- , PO 4 3- and many amines, quaternary ammonium compounds, and organic acids. Elution time can take as little as 1.0 min/ion and is typically 3 min/ion. Ions were determined in a diversity of backgrounds, e.g., waste streams, various local-surface waters, blood serum, urine, and fruit juices. (U.S.)

  3. Integrated ion imprinted polymers-paper composites for selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Chen, Ying [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Zhao, Xiaoya [Hubei Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of PRC, No.588 Qingtaidadao Road, Hubei, 430022, Wuhan (China); Liu, Jiafa [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Jing, Tao, E-mail: jingtao@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China)

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • IIPs are first grafted on the low-cost A4 print paper to develop an integrated paper-based device. • As an imprinted composite, the adsorption capacity is 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor is more than 3.0. • As an analytical method, the limit of detection is 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. • Based on the water quality standards, it could be used to determine Cd(II) ions in drinking water. - Abstract: Paper-based sensor is a new alternative technology to develop a portable, low-cost, and rapid analysis system in environmental chemistry. In this study, ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) using cadmium ions as the template were directly grafted on the surface of low-cost print paper based on the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. It can be applied as a recognition element to selectively capture the target ions in the complex samples. The maximum adsorption capacity of IIPs composites was 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor was more than 3.0. Then, IIPs-paper platform could be also applied as a detection element for highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions without complex sample pretreatment and expensive instrument, due to the selective recognition, formation of dithizone-cadmium complexes and light transmission ability. Under the optimized condition, the linear range was changed from 1 to 100 ng mL{sup –1} and the limit of detection was 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. The results were in good agreement with the classic ICP-MS method. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be developed for detection of other heavy metals by designing of new IIPs.

  4. Highly selective fluorescent probe for the detection of tin (IV) Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Leiming; Yang, Jing; Wang, Qiusheng; Zeng, Lintao

    2014-01-01

    A novel fluorescent compound, 7-diethylamino-3-(2'-(1H-imidazo[4,5-b]phenazine)yl)coumarin (DIPC), was synthesized and employed as a fluorescent probe for detecting tin (IV) ion. Upon addition of tin (IV) ion to the solution of DIPC in DMSO–water (9:1, v/v), DIPC exhibited a considerable red-shift in its absorption spectrum and a decrease in fluorescence intensity. These changes result from tin (IV) ion binding to carbonyl oxygen of coumarin and nitrogen of imidazole, reflecting an enhanced ICT process from N,N-diethylamino unit to imidazole unit. The tin (IV) ion selective response was clearly observed by the naked eye through color change. We also studied the bioimaging application of DIPC for detecting tin (IV) ion in Hela cells. And a significant decrease of the fluorescence from the intracellular area was observed. -- Highlights: • We synthesized a novel coumarin derivative (DIPC). • DIPC was used to detect tin (IV) ion selectively. • The detection process was studied upon UV–vis and fluorescence spectrum. • We studied the bioimaging application of DIPC for detecting Sn 4+ ion in cells

  5. Ion-pair reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection for analysis of ultraviolet transparent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Cook, Kenneth S; Littlepage, Eric; Cundy, John; Mangalathillam, Ratish; Jones, Michael T

    2015-08-21

    This paper describes the use of an anionic ion-pair reagent (IPR) to impove the ultraviolet (UV) detection and hydrophobic retention of polar and UV transparent cations. Anionic IPR added to the mobile phase forms an ion-pair with cations. Formation of the ion-pair causes a redshift in the absorption wavength, making it possible for direct UV detection of UV-inactive cations. The ion-pairs with increased hydrophobicity were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). Different perfluorinated caboxylic acids (trifluoroacetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid, nonafluoropentanoic acid) were evaluted as IPR in the separation and detection of the common cations sodium, ammonium and Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris). The effects of the IPR type and concentration on separation and detection have been investigated to understand the separation and detection mechanisms. The optimal separation and detection condtions were attained with mobile phase containing 0.1% nonafluoropentanoic acid and with the UV detection at 210nm. UV detection and charged aerosol detection (CAD) were compared in the quantitation of the cations. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of sodium and Tris with UV detection is comparable to that by CAD. The LOQ of ammonium with UV detection (1ppm or 3ng) is about 20-fold lower than that (20ppm or 60ng) by CAD. The RPLC-UV method was used to monitor ammonium clearance during ultrafiltration and diafiltration in the manfucaturing of biopharmceutical drug substance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G.; Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of 7 Li, 16 O, 32 S and 35 Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the 6,7 Li+ 27 Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V B ≤E≤2.0V B ). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

  7. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo [Decontamination and Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taek Seung, E-mail: tslee@cnu.ac.kr [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive {sup 60}Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  8. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo; Lee, Taek Seung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive 60 Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  9. Investigation of peptide based surface functionalization for copper ions detection using an ultrasensitive mechanical microresonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Rasmussen, Jakob Lyager

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of developing a portable label-free sensor for multi arrayed detection of heavy metals in drinking water, we present a mechanical resonator-based copper ions sensor, which uses a recently synthesized peptide Cysteine–Glycine–Glycine–Histidine (CGGH) and the l-Cysteine (Cys) peptide...... devices to detect a concentration of 10μM of copper in water, we regenerate the surface by removing the copper ions from the functionalization layer using EDTA....

  10. Position-sensitive ion detection in precision Penning trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eitel, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)], E-mail: g.eitel@aia.rwth-aachen.de; Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Czasch, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dworschak, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); George, S. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jagutzki, O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Nagy, Sz. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rodriguez, D. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Smorra, C. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-21

    A commercial, position-sensitive ion detector was used for the first time for the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron resonance detection technique in Penning trap mass spectrometry. In this work, the characteristics of the detector and its implementation in a Penning trap mass spectrometer will be presented. In addition, simulations and experimental studies concerning the observation of ions ejected from a Penning trap are described. This will allow for a precise monitoring of the state of ion motion in the trap.

  11. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Daniel Arulraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectively. From the plot, the nature of the fluorescence quenching was confirmed as static quenching. An important feature of our chemosensor is high selectivity towards the determination of silver ion in aqueous solution over the other competitive metal ions. The detection limit of the sensor achieved 5 fM for Ag+ ion, which is superior to all previously reported chemosensors. The NMR and FT-IR studies were also carried out to support the complex formation between thionine and Ag+ ion. The practicality of the proposed chemosensor for determination of Ag+ ion was carried in untreated water samples.

  12. Solvent-Free Off-On Detection of the Improvised Explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP) with Fluorogenic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Gredilla, Patricia; García-Calvo, José; Cuevas, José V; Torroba, Tomás; Pablos, Jesús-Luis; García, Félix C; García, José-Miguel; Zink-Lorre, Nathalie; Font-Sanchis, Enrique; Sastre-Santos, Ángela; Fernández-Lázaro, Fernando

    2017-10-09

    A fluorogenic perylenediimide-functionalized polyacrylate capable of generating color and fluorescence changes in the presence of triacetone triperoxide TATP), an improvised explosive used in terrorist attacks, under solvent-free, solid-state conditions has been developed. The material works by accumulating volatile TATP until it reaches a threshold; therefore, triggering colorimetric and fluorescent responses. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Detection of negative ions in glow discharge mass spectrometry for analysis of solid specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Molchan, Igor S.; Tauziede, C.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for elemental and molecular analysis of halogen-containing samples by glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry, consisting of detection of negative ions from a pulsed RF glow discharge in argon. Analyte signals are mainly extracted from the afterglow regime...... of the discharge, where the cross section for electron attachment increases. The formation of negative ions from sputtering of metals and metal oxides is compared with that for positive ions. It is shown that the negative ion signals of F(-) and TaO(2)F(-) are enhanced relative to positive ion signals and can...... be used to study the distribution of a tantalum fluoride layer within the anodized tantala layer. Further, comparison is made with data obtained using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, where elemental fluorine can only be detected using a neon plasma. The ionization mechanisms responsible...

  14. Metal ion detection with oligo(ethylene glycol) monolayer-modified gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangzhao; Yang, Bin; Lu, Zhiqiang; Xia, Sijing; Feng, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Anning; Zhu, Jin

    2011-11-01

    Two colorimetric sensors of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with different oligo(ethylene glycol)-containing organic molecules have been developed to detect metal ions by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) extinction spectroscopy. These sensors display different responses to some metal ions. One exhibits high selectivity for Hg2+ over a variety of competitive metal ions and the other one can respond to a multitude of metal ions. These differences might result from the different functionalized end groups of the modified molecules. Coordination effect, pH response, and ionic strength were investigated to understand the mechanism of the responses to metal ions. The results suggested that the colorimetric responses were mainly induced by the coordination effect of the modified organic molecules and the removing of the modified organic molecules caused by metal ions.

  15. Analysis of anionic post-blast residues of low explosives from soil samples of forensic interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umi Kalthom ahmad; Tze, O.S.

    2011-01-01

    The growing threats and terrorist activities in recent years have urged the need for rapid and accurate forensic investigation on post-blast samples. The analysis of explosives and their degradation products in soils are important to enable forensic scientist to identify the explosives used in the bombing and establish possible links to their likely origin. Anions of interest for post-blast identification of low explosives were detected and identified using ion chromatography (IC). IC separations of five anions (Cl - , NO 2 - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , SCN - ) employed a Metrosep Anion Dual 2 column with carbonate eluent. The anions were separated within 17 minutes. Sampling of post blast residues was carried out in Rompin, Pahang. The post-blast explosive residues were extracted from soil samples collected at the seat of three simulated explosion points. The homemade explosives comprised of black powder of various amounts (100 g, 150 g and 200 g) packed in small plastic sauce bottles. In black powder standard, three anions (Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- ) were identified. However, low amounts of nitrite (NO 2 - ) were found present in post-blast soil samples. The amounts of anions were generally found to be decreased with decreasing amount of black powder explosive used. The anions analysis was indicative that nitrates were being used as one of the black powder explosive ingredients. (author)

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here ma...

  17. Monocrystalline Diamond for Ions Detection at Low and High Fluxes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Cannavo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 8 (2017), s. 3384-3391 ISSN 0018-9383 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : diamond * energy resolution * ion detector * laser-generated plasma * time of flight Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 2.605, year: 2016

  18. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  19. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  20. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-12-12

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s)...

  2. Investigation of the Behavioral Characteristics of Dogs Purpose-Bred and Prepared to Perform Vapor Wake® Detection of Person-Borne Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Lazarowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized detector dogs are increasingly being utilized for the detection of modern threats. The Vapor Wake® (VW dog was developed to create a dog phenotype ideally suited for detecting hand-carried and body-worn explosives. VW dogs (VWDs are trained to sample and alert to target odors in the aerodynamic wakes of moving persons, which entrains vapor and small particles from the person. The behavioral characteristics necessary for dogs to be successfully trained and employed for the application of VW are a distinct subset of the desired general characteristics of dogs used for detection tasks due to the dynamic nature of moving targets. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral characteristics of candidate detector dogs to determine the particular qualities that set apart VW-capable dogs from others. We assessed 146 candidate detector dogs from a VW breeding and training program. Dogs received identical puppy development and foundational odor training and underwent performance evaluations at 3, 6, 10, and 12 months old, after which they were sold for service. Dogs were categorized based on their final outcome of the training program, independently determined by private vendors, corresponding to three groups: dogs successfully sold for VW, dogs sold for standard explosives detection, and dogs that failed to be placed in any type of detector dog service (Washouts. Comparisons of behavioral evaluations between the groups were made across domains pertaining to search-related behaviors (Performance, reactions to novel stimuli (Environmental, and overall ease of learning new tasks (Trainability. Comparisons were also made at each evaluation to determine any early emergence of differences. VWDs scored significantly higher on Performance characteristics compared to standard explosives detection dogs (EDDs and Washouts. However, Environmental characteristics did not differentiate VWDs from EDDs, though scores on these measures were

  3. A Study of a QCM Sensor Based on TiO2 Nanostructures for the Detection of NO2 and Explosives Vapours in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procek, Marcin; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Maciak, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with investigations concerning the construction of sensors based on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) containing a TiO2 nanostructures sensor layer. A chemical method of synthesizing these nanostructures is presented. The prepared prototype of the QCM sensing system, as well as the results of tests for detecting low NO2 concentrations in an atmosphere of synthetic air have been described. The constructed NO2 sensors operate at room temperature, which is a great advantage, because resistance sensors based on wide gap semiconductors often require much higher operation temperatures, sometimes as high as 500 °C. The sensors constructed by the authors can be used, among other applications, in medical and chemical diagnostics, and also for the purpose of detecting explosive vapours. Reactions of the sensor to nitroglycerine vapours are presented as an example of its application. The influence of humidity on the operation of the sensor was studied. PMID:25912352

  4. Enzyme-based Colorimetric and Potentiometric Biosensor for Detecting Pb (II Ions in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Kaur

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study a simple colorimetric and potentiometric biosensor based on urease inhibition by Pb (II ions for its estimation in milk samples. Urease immobilized on nylon membrane by hydrosol gel method was used as the biocomponent to demonstrate the metal effect on the enzyme activity using phenol red as the pH indicator. A lower limit detection of 38.6µm was achieved in the milk and the enzyme membranes were stable for more than two months at 4ºC. In potentiometric approach, response of an ion selective electrode (ISE to changing ammonium ion concentration as a consequence of urease inhibition by Pb (II ions was explored to achieve a detection limit of 9.66 µm. Lead specificity was attained by means of masking agents 1,10 - phenanthroline and sodium potassium tartarate. Validation of the developed biosensors was carried out with spiked milk samples.

  5. Characterization of ANFO explosive by high accuracy ESI(±)-FTMS with forensic identification on real samples by EASI(-)-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Franco, Marcos Fernado; Santos, Jandyson Machado; Melendez-Perez, Jose J; de Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) is an explosive used in many civil applications. In Brazil, ANFO has unfortunately also been used in criminal attacks, mainly in automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. In this paper, we describe a detailed characterization of the ANFO composition and its two main constituents (diesel and a nitrate explosive) using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry performed on an FT-ICR-mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI(±)-FTMS) in both the positive and negative ion modes. Via ESI(-)-MS, an ion marker for ANFO was characterized. Using a direct and simple ambient desorption/ionization technique, i.e., easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), in a simpler, lower accuracy but robust single quadrupole mass spectrometer, the ANFO ion marker was directly detected from the surface of banknotes collected from ATM explosion theft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Raman spectroscopy for the detection of explosives and their precursors on clothing in fingerprint concentration: a reliable technique for security and counterterrorism issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaviva, S.; Botti, S.; Cantarini, L.; Palucci, A.; Puiu, A.; Schnuerer, F.; Schweikert, W.; Romolo, F. S.

    2013-10-01

    In this work we report the results of RS measurements on some common military explosives and some of the most common explosives precursors deposited on clothing fabrics, both synthetic and natural, such as polyester, leather and denim cotton at concentration comparable to those obtained from a single fingerprint. RS Spectra were obtained using an integrated portable Raman system equipped with an optical microscope, focusing the light of a solid state GaAlAs laser emitting at 785 nm. A maximum exposure time of 10 s was used, focusing the beam in a 45 μm diameter spot on the sample. The substances were deposited starting from commercial solutions with a Micropipetting Nano-Plotter, ideal for generating high-quality spots by non-contact dispensing of sub-nanoliter volumes of liquids, in order to simulate a homogeneous stain on the fabric surface. Images acquired with a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope provided further details of the deposition process showing single particles of micrometric volume trapped or deposited on the underlying tissues. The spectral features of each substance was clearly identified and discriminated from those belonging to the substrate fabric or from the surrounding fluorescence. Our results show that the application of RS using a microscope-based apparatus can provide interpretable Raman spectra in a fast, in-situ analysis, directly from explosive particles of some μm3 as the ones that it could be found in a single fingerprint, despite the contribution of the substrate, leaving the sample completely unaltered for further, more specific and propaedeutic laboratory analysis. The same approach can be envisaged for the detection of other illicit substances like drugs.

  7. Label-free histamine detection with nanofluidic diodes through metal ion displacement mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Duznovic, Ivana; Nasir, Saima; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We design and characterize a nanofluidic device for the label-free specific detection of histamine neurotransmitter based on a metal ion displacement mechanism. The sensor consists of an asymmetric polymer nanopore fabricated via ion track-etching technique. The nanopore sensor surface having metal-nitrilotriacetic (NTA-Ni 2+ ) chelates is obtained by covalent coupling of native carboxylic acid groups with N α ,N α -bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (BCML), followed by exposure to Ni 2+ ion solution. The BCML immobilization and subsequent Ni 2+ ion complexation with NTA moieties change the surface charge concentration, which has a significant impact on the current-voltage (I-V) curve after chemical modification of the nanopore. The sensing mechanism is based on the displacement of the metal ion from the NTA-Ni 2+ chelates. When the modified pore is exposed to histamine solution, the Ni 2+ ion in NTA-Ni 2+ chelate recognizes histamine through a metal ion coordination displacement process and formation of stable Ni-histamine complexes, leading to the regeneration of metal-free NTA groups on the pore surface, as shown in the current-voltage characteristics. Nanomolar concentrations of the histamine in the working electrolyte can be detected. On the contrary, other neurotransmitters such as glycine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine do not provoke significant changes in the nanopore electronic signal due to their inability to displace the metal ion and form a stable complex with Ni 2+ ion. The nanofluidic sensor exhibits high sensitivity, specificity and reusability towards histamine detection and can then be used to monitor the concentration of biological important neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of alkylmethylphosphonic acids on leaf surfaces by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1995-01-01

    Detection of environmental degradation products of nerve agents directly from the surface of plant leaves using static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is demonstrated. Pinacolylmethylphosphonic acid (PMPA), isopropylmethylphosphonic acid (IMPA), and ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA) were spiked from aqueous solutions onto philodendron leaves prior to analysis by static SIMS. Fragment ions were observed in the anion SIMS spectra from all three compounds at m/z 63, 77, 79, and 95, which are attributed to PO[sub 2][sup [minus

  9. Detection of AU(III) ions using a poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-coated QCM sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Hideaki; Kitamura, Eri; Seida, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    A polymer-coated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor has been developed for the detection of Au(III) ions in a HCl aqueous solution. Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (poly(DMAA)) gel was used as a sensing material. The poly(DMAA) gel adsorbs Au(III) ions in the HCl aqueous solution, whereas it is inactive toward most other metal ions. The equilibrium adsorption of Au(III) ions onto the poly(DMAA) gel can be expressed by the Henry-type isotherm. The oscillation behavior of the poly(DMAA)-coated QCM sensor was investigated, and linear relationships between the resonance frequency shift and the concentration of Au(III) ions were obtained for concentrations of less than 0.032 mol/m(3) (6.3 mg/m(3)) in the single and multicomponent metal systems. The poly(DMAA)-coated QCM sensor detects Au(III) ions successfully with high selectivity and sensitivity even in the presence of other metal ions and organic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Piezoelectric detection of ion pairs between sulphonate and catecholamines for flow injection analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Z; Long, X; Zhang, M

    1999-03-01

    Fundamentals of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection were investigated experimentally and theoretically for the adsorption of dodecyl phenylsulfonate and interfacial ion-pair formation with epinephrine and l-dopa on silver electrode of quartz crystal microbalance. The influences of sulfonate concentration and operating parameters on the frequency response were demonstrated and provided the possibility for the discriminating determination of mixtures. The selected system of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection was applied to the determination of epinephrine and l-dopa. Calibration curves were linear in ranges 4.00-850 and 3.50-730 mug ml(-1), with detection limits of 1.22 and 1.05 mug ml(-1) and sampling frequencies of 120 samples h(-1), for epinephrine and l-dopa, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily applied to the determination of catecholamines in pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Silica Nanoparticle-Enhanced Fluorescent Sensor Array for Heavy Metal Ions Detection in Colloid Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Juanjuan; Li, Junyao; Xu, Wang; Wang, Lu; Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Chang, Young-Tae

    2018-02-06

    Sensitivity and detection limit are two vital factors that affect fluorophores-based sensing and imaging system. However, it remains a challenge to improve the sensitivity and detection limit of fluorophores, largely due to their limited response and photophysical properties. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach to enhance the sensitivity and detection limit of probes using silica nanoparticles, also known as silica nanoparticles-enhanced fluorescence (SiEF). SiEF can drastically improve the fluorescence intensities and detection limit of fluorophores. A SiEF-improved fluorescent sensor array for rapid and sensitive identification of different heavy metal ions is achieved, and a 3D spatial dispersion graph is obtained based on the SiEF-improved fluorescent sensor array, which provides a lower concentration dependent pattern than fluorophores alone, allowing qualitative, quantitative, and sensitive detection of heavy metal ions. Furthermore, with UV lamp irradiation of the sensor-metal ion mixtures, the output signals enable direct visual of heavy metal ions with low concentration. Thus, the SiEF approach provides a simple and practical strategy for fluorescent probes to improve their sensitivity and detection limit in analytes sensing.

  12. Calibration method for ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Valery

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the calibration of the ion mobility spectrometer has been developed. This article describes the working principle, advantages and disadvantages of the calibration method operating in the mode of explosives detection. This method is most suitable for use in portable detectors, due to the small weight, small size parameters and low power consumption.

  13. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  14. Anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel approach for facile and rapid detection of heavy metal ions using anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified test strips is demonstrated. By intercalating Fe(CN)6(4-) or S(2-) anions into the interlayers of LDHs on the filter paper, various heavy metal ions can be easily detected based on the color change before and after reaction between the anions and the heavy metal ions. Upon the dropping of heavy metal ions solutions to the test strips, the colors of the test strips changed instantly, which can be easily observed by naked eyes. With the decrease of the concentration, the color depth changed obviously. The lowest detection concentration can be up to 1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Due to the easily intercalation of anions into the interlayer of the LDHs on test trips, this procedure provides a general method for the construction of LDHs modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions. The stability of the prepared test strips is investigated. Furthermore, all the results were highly reproducible. The test strips may have potential applications in environmental monitoring fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A review on various electrochemical techniques for heavy metal ions detection with different sensing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, BabanKumar; Kumar, Tejinder; Thakur, Ritula; Rana, Shakshi; Singh, Inderbir

    2017-08-15

    Heavy metal ions are non-biodegradable and contaminate most of the natural resources occurring in the environment including water. Some of the heavy metals including Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Arsenic (As), Chromium (Cr) and Cadmium (Cd) are considered to be highly toxic and hazardous to human health even at trace levels. This leads to the requirement of fast, accurate and reliable techniques for the detection of heavy metal ions. This review presents various electrochemical detection techniques for heavy metal ions those are user friendly, low cost, provides on-site and real time monitoring as compared to other spectroscopic and optical techniques. The categorization of different electrochemical techniques is done on the basis of different types of detection signals generated due to presence of heavy metal ions in the solution matrix like current, potential, conductivity, electrochemical impedance, and electrochemiluminescence. Also, the recent trends in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions with various types of sensing platforms including metals, metal films, metal oxides, nanomaterials, carbon nano tubes, polymers, microspheres and biomaterials have been evoked. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  17. Detecting remotely triggered microseismicity around Changbaishan Volcano following nuclear explosions in North Korea and large distant earthquakes around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoming; Li, Chenyu; Peng, Zhigang; Li, Xuemei; Wu, Jing

    2017-05-01

    We conduct a systematic survey on locally triggered earthquakes by large distant earthquakes in Changbaishan Volcano, an active intraplate volcano on the border between China and North Korea. We examine waveforms of distant earthquakes recorded at broadband station Changbaishan (CBS) near the volcano with estimated dynamic stresses over 5 kPa between 2000 and 2016. Out of 26 selected distant earthquakes, three of them show positive evidence of triggering during large-amplitude surface waves. The earthquakes that had positive or possible evidences of triggering generated larger long-period surface waves, indicating that they are more efficient in triggering microseismicity. In addition, since 2006 North Korea has conducted five underground nuclear explosion (UNE) tests only 140 km away from Changbaishan Volcano. By systematically examining waveforms of these UNEs recorded at station CBS, we find that none of them have triggered microearthquakes in Changbaishan Volcano.

  18. Bayesian Integration and Classification of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Christine M; Kelly, Ryan T; Alexander, Liz; Newburn, Matt; Bader, Sydney; Ewing, Robert G; Fahey, Albert J; Atkinson, David A; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-04-05

    Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used for characterization and identification of unique signatures from a series of 18 Composition C-4 plastic explosives. The samples were obtained from various commercial and military sources around the country. Positive and negative ion TOF-SIMS data were acquired directly from the C-4 residue on Si surfaces, where the positive ion mass spectra obtained were consistent with the major composition of organic additives, and the negative ion mass spectra were more consistent with explosive content in the C-4 samples. Each series of mass spectra was subjected to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach which serves to first find the areas of maximum variance within different classes of C-4 and subsequently to classify unknown samples based on correlations between the unknown data set and the original data set (often referred to as a training data set). This method was able to successfully classify test samples of C-4, though with a limited degree of certainty. The classification accuracy of the method was further improved by integrating the positive and negative ion data using a Bayesian approach. The TOF-SIMS data was combined with a second analytical method, LA-ICPMS, which was used to analyze elemental signatures in the C-4. The integrated data were able to classify test samples with a high degree of certainty. Results indicate that this Bayesian integrated approach constitutes a robust classification method that should be employable even in dirty samples collected in the field.

  19. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  20. Limitations to depth resolution in high-energy, heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Palmer, G.R.; Ophel, T.R.; Timmers, H.

    1998-01-01

    The depth resolution of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis was examined for Al and Co thin films ranging in thickness from 100 to 400 nm. Measurements were performed with 154 MeV Au ions as the incident beam, and recoils were detected using a gas ionisation detector. Energy spectra were extracted for the Al and Co recoils and the depth resolution determined as a function of film thickness from the width of the high- and low- energy edges. These results were compared with theoretical estimates calculated using the computer program DEPTH. (authors)

  1. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    In a number of published articles the toxic effect of silver(I) ions on aquatic organisms is described. Silver(I) ions in aquatic environment are stable in a wide range of pH. Under alkali pH AgOH and Ag(OH)2- can be formed. However, in water environment there are many compounds to interact with silver(I) ions. The most important ones are chloride anions, which forms insoluble precipitate with silver(I) ions (AgCl). The insoluble silver containing compounds do not pose any threat to aquatic organisms. Toxicity of silver ions is probably caused by their very good affinity to nucleic acids and also proteins. The binding into active enzyme site leads to the expressive enzyme reaction inhibition. Silver(I) ions are into living environment introduced thanks to anthropogenic activities. They easily contaminate atmosphere as well as aquatic environment or soils. Several authors described using of carbon electrode as working electrode for determination of silver. Recently, we have suggested heavy metal biosensor based on interaction of metal ions with low molecular mass protein called metallothionein (MT), which was adsorbed on the surface of hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The biosensor was successfully used for detection of cadmium(II) and zinc(II) ions, cisplatin, cisplatin-DNA adducts and palladium(II) ions. Due to the convincing results with MT as biological component we report on suggesting of heavy metal biosensor based on immobilization of metallothionein (MT) on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) via MT-antibodies. Primarily we studied of basic electrochemical behaviour of MT at surface of carbon paste electrode by using of square wave voltammetry (SWV). Detection limit (3 S/N) for MT was evaluated as 0.1 μg/ml. After that we have evaluated the electroactivity of MT at surface of SWV, we aimed our attention on the way of capturing of MT on the surface of CPE. We choose antibody against MT obtained from chicken eggs for these purposes. Antibodies

  3. Coordination ability determined transition metal ions substitution of Tb in Tb-Asp fluorescent nanocrystals and a facile ions-detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jiazhi; Ma, Baojin; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Shicai; Kong, Ying; Du, Min; Han, Lin; Wang, Jianjun; Sang, Yuanhua; Liu, Hong

    2018-04-11

    Although the synthesis and fluorescent properties of lanthanide-amino acid complex nanostructures have been investigated extensively, limited studies have been reported on metal ions' substitution ability for the lanthanide ions in the complex and their effect on the fluorescent property. In this study, taking biocompatible Tb-aspartic acid (Tb-Asp) complex nanocrystals as a model, the substitution mechanism of metal ions, particularly transition metals, for Tb ions in Tb-Asp nanocrystals and the change in the fluorescent property of the Tb-Asp nanocrystals after substitution were systematically investigated. The experimental results illustrated that metal ions with higher electronegativity, higher valence, and smaller radius possess stronger ability for Tb ions' substitution in Tb-Asp nanocrystals. Based on the effect of substituting ions' concentration on the fluorescent property of Tb-Asp, a facile method for copper ions detection with high sensitivity was proposed by measuring the fluorescent intensity of Tb-Asp nanocrystals' suspensions containing different concentrations of copper ions. The good biocompatibility, great convenience of synthesis and sensitive detection ability make Tb-Asp nanocrystals a very low cost and effective material for metal ions detection, which also opens a new door for practical applications of metal-Asp coordinated nanocrystals.

  4. Selective gas-chromatographic detection using an ion-selective electrode-II Selective detection of fluorine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, T; Ichise, M; Seo, Y

    1972-04-01

    Components in samples are separated on a gas chromatography column using hydrogen as carrier gas. The individual components from the column are passed through a platinum tube heated at 1000 degrees , where they undergo hydrogenolysis, and fluorine compounds are converted into hydrogen fluoride. The hydrogen fluoride is dissolved in a slow stream of an absorption solution, and the fluoride ion concentration in the resulting solution is monitored in a flow-cell with a fluoride ion electrode. The potentiometric output of the cell is converted into a signal, which is proportional to the concentration of fluoride ion, by an antilogarithmic converter, and recorded. The response of the detector to fluorine compounds was about 10,000 times that to an equal quantity of other organic compounds, and 5 x 10(-11) mole of fluorobenzene could be detected.

  5. Application of micro beam PIXE to detection of titanium ion release from dental and orthopaedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ektessabi, A.M.; Otsuka, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Albrektsson, T.; Sennerby, L.; Johansson, C.

    1994-01-01

    In the past two decades the utilization of dental and orthopaedic implants in reconstructive surgery has been spread widely. Most of these implants are inserted in the corrosive environment of the human body for long periods of time. The level of dissolution, release, and transport of metal ions as a result of corrosion of these materials are not fully known at present. We report the results of application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy to detect release of titanium from titanium and titanium alloy implants inserted in the tibiae of rabbits for three months. It was found that titanium ions could be detected in the surrounding tissues, with high precision, as a gradient from the implant surface and in higher amounts in the bone tissue as compared with the soft tissues. It is concluded that application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy for detection of metal ion release, and distribution of the released material around the implants with high special resolution and accuracy may be used to further investigate the mechanism of metal release, and the relation between surface micromorphology and corrosion resistance of the implant materials. (author)

  6. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-15

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn(2+) ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn(2+) ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn(2+) ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn(2+)] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn(2+) ions reveal the concentration of Mn(2+) ions in solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  8. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep K Sharma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to describe the clinical and computed tomography features of 'explosive pleuritis', an entity first named by Braman and Donat in 1986, and to propose a case definition. A case report of a previously healthy, 45-year-old man admitted to hospital with acute onset pleuritic chest pain is presented. The patient arrived at the emergency room at 15:00 in mild respiratory distress; the initial chest x-ray revealed a small right lower lobe effusion. The subsequent clinical course in hospital was dramatic. Within 18 h of admission, he developed severe respiratory distress with oxygen desaturation to 83% on room air and dullness of the right lung field. A repeat chest x-ray, taken the morning after admission, revealed complete opacification of the right hemithorax. A computed tomography scan of the thorax demonstrated a massive pleural effusion with compression of pulmonary tissue and mediastinal shift. Pleural fluid biochemical analysis revealed the following concentrations: glucose 3.5 mmol/L, lactate dehydrogenase 1550 U/L, protein 56.98 g/L, amylase 68 U/L and white blood cell count 600 cells/mL. The pleural fluid cultures demonstrated light growth of coagulase-negative staphylococcus and viridans streptococcus, and very light growth of Candida albicans. Cytology was negative for malignant cells. Thoracotomy was performed, which demonstrated a loculated parapneumonic effusion that required decortication. The patient responded favourably to the empirical administration of intravenous levofloxacin and ceftriaxone, and conservative surgical methods in the management of the empyema. This report also discusses the patient's rapidly progressing pleural effusion and offers a potential case definition for explosive pleuritis. Explosive pleuritis is a medical emergency defined by the rapid development of a pleural effusion involving more than 90% of the hemithorax over 24 h, which causes compression of pulmonary tissue and

  9. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Detected by Kaguya and Geotail in the Earth's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Nishino, Masaki N.; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi

    2018-02-01

    Narrowband electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves first discovered by the Apollo 15 and 16 Lunar Surface Magnetometers were surveyed in the magnetic field data obtained by the Kaguya satellite at an altitude of ˜100 km above the Moon in the tail lobe and plasma sheet boundary layer of the Earth's magnetosphere. The frequencies of the waves were typically 0.7 times the local proton cyclotron frequency, and 75% of the waves were left hand polarized with respect to the background magnetic field. They had a significant compressional component and comprised several discrete packets. They were detected on the dayside, nightside, and above the terminator of the Moon, irrespective of the lunar magnetic anomaly, or the magnetic connection to the lunar surface. The waves with the same characteristics were detected by Geotail in the absence of the Moon in the magnetotail. The most likely energy source of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is the ring beam ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  10. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Rudnicka, Joanna; Mochalski, Pawe; Agapiou, Agapios; Statheropoulos, Milt; Amann, Anton; Buszewski, Bogusaw

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the detection of human urine as an indication of human presence during urban search and rescue operations in collapsed buildings. To this end, IMS with a radioactive ionization source and a multicapillary column was used to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from human urine. A study involving a group of 30 healthy volunteers resulted in the selection of seven volatile species, na...

  11. Electroanalytical detection of CrVI and CrIII ions using a novel microbial sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakaran, D.C.; Riotte, Jean; Sivry, Y.; Subramanian, S.

    2017-01-01

    A microbial sensor, namely carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with Citrobacter freundii (Cf-CPE) has been developed for the detection of hexavalent (Cr(VI)) and trivalent (Cr(III)) chromium present in aqueous samples using voltammetry, an electroanalytical technique. The biosensor developed, demonstrated about a twofold higher performance as compared to the bare CPE for the chosen ions. Using cyclic voltammetry and by employing the fabricated Cf-CPE, the lowest limit of detection (LLOD) of...

  12. Charge Transfer Based Colorimetric Detection of Silver Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Choul; Kim, Kwang Seob; Choi, Soon Kyu; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jae Wook [Dong-A Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We have demonstrated the colorimetric chemosensor for detection of Ag{sup +} via formation of nanoparticles which is based on the intramolecular CT interaction between the electron-rich (2,6-dialkoxynaphthalene; Np) moiety and the electron-deficient (methyl viologen; MV{sup 2+}) moiety of a single sensor molecule. Under irradiation of light, Ag{sup +} was reduced to very small silver nanoparticle by CT interaction in the presence of OEGs as flexible recognition moiety of Ag{sup +} and stabilizer for Ag nanoparticles, thus Ag nanoparticles resulted to reddish brown in the color change of sensor solution, gradually. Therefore, the charge-transfer interaction between an electron-deficient and an electron-rich units existing at a sensor molecule can be regarded as a new and efficient method to construct various colorimetric chemosensors. Donor.acceptor interactions or charge transfer (CT) interactions are an important class of non-covalent interactions and have been widely exploited in self-assembling systems. Beyond molecular chemistry, supramolecular chemistry aims at constituting highly complex, functional chemical systems from components held together by intermolecular forces. Chemosensors are the molecules of abiotic origin that bind selectively and reversibly with the analyte with concomitant change in one or more properties of the system. The recognition and signaling of ionic and neutral species of varying complexity is one of the most intensively studied areas of contemporary supramolecular chemistry.

  13. Fluorescent porous film modified polymer optical fiber via "click" chemistry: stable dye dispersion and trace explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiajun; Lv, Ling; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2015-01-14

    In this paper, we report a facile strategy to fabricate fluorescent porous thin film on the surface of U-bent poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber (U-bent POF) in situ via "click" polymerization for vapor phase sensing of explosives. Upon irradiation of evanescent UV light transmitting within the fiber under ambient condition, a porous film (POSS-thiol cross-linking film, PTCF) is synthesized on the side surface of the fiber by a thiol-ene "click" reaction of vinyl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS-V8) and alkane dithiols. When vinyl-functionalized porphyrin, containing four allyl substituents at the periphery, is added into precursors for the polymerization, fluorescence porphyrin can be covalently bonded into the cross-linked network of PTCF. This "fastened" way reduces the aggregation-induced fluorescence self-quenching of porphyrin and enhances the physicochemical stability of the porous film on the surface of U-bent POF. Fluorescent signals of the PTCF/U-bent POF probe made by this method exhibit high fluorescence quenching toward trace TNT and DNT vapor and the highest fluorescence quenching efficiency is observed for 1, 6-hexanedimercaptan-based film. In addition, because of the presence of POSS-V8 with multi cross-linkable groups, PTCF exhibits well-organized pore network and stable dye dispersion, which not only causes fast and sensitive fluorescence quenching against vapors of nitroaromatic compounds, but also provides a repeatability of the probing performance.

  14. Ultra-sensitive direct detection of silver ions via Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinsung; Lee, Sangmyung; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-10-15

    Nanotoxicity is receiving great importance due to its potential impact on human health and environment and due to rapid development in the field of nanoscale research and industry. Herein, we report the Kelvin probe force microscope (KPPM)-based nanotoxicity material detection using surface potential difference. In general, it is difficult to measure the size of ion (Ag(+)) using a conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) because of the limited resolution. In this study, we have demonstrated that KPFM is capable of ultra-sensitive detection of silver ion with silver specific DNA by a single droplet. Furthermore, the measured surface potentials for Ag+ and DNA binding enable the detection performance for a practical sample that is general drinking water. Remarkably, the KPFM based silver ion detection enables an insight into the coordination chemistry, which plays an important role in early detection of toxicity. This implies that KPFM based detection system opens a new avenue for water testing sensor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a new spectral technique for quantitative detection of metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Havva Tumay; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Grabchev, Ivo; Tamer, Ugur

    2013-12-01

    Four newly synthesized poly (propylene amine) dendrimers from first and second generation modified with 1,8-naphthalimide units in the dendrimer periphery have been investigated as ligands for the detection of heavy metal ions (Al(3+), Sb(2+), As(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Calibration curves were established for all metal ions between the concentration ranges of 1 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-4) M. It has been shown that these dendrimers can be coordinated, especially with different metal ions. Using dendrimer molecules and silver colloids at the same time allowed us to obtain an SERS signal from the abovementioned metal ions at very low concentrations. Principle component analysis (PCA) analysis was also applied to the collected SERS data. Four different PCA models were developed to accomplish the discrimination of five metal ions, which interacted with each of the four dendrimer molecules, separately. A detailed investigation was performed in the present study to provide the basis of a new approach for heavy metal detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-15

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag(+) ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg(2+) ions. Interaction with Hg(2+) ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg(2+) ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R(2) value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100ppm Hg(2+) concentration. Hg(2+) ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg(2+) detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Explosive signatures: Pre & post blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Evan Thomas

    Manuscripts 1 and 2 of this dissertation both involve the pre-blast detection of trace explosive material. The first manuscript explores the analysis of human hair as an indicator of exposure to explosives. Field analysis of hair for trace explosives is quick and non-invasive, and could prove to be a powerful linkage to physical evidence in the form of bulk explosive material. Individuals tested were involved in studies which required handling or close proximity to bulk high explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX. The second manuscript reports the results of research in the design and application of canine training aids for non-traditional, peroxide-based explosives. Organic peroxides such as triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine (HMTD) can be synthesized relatively easily with store-bought ingredients and have become popular improvised explosives with many terrorist groups. Due to the hazards of handling such sensitive compounds, this research established methods for preparing training aids which contained safe quantities of TATP and HMTD for use in imprinting canines with their characteristic odor. Manuscripts 3 and 4 of this dissertation focus on research conducted to characterize pipe bombs during and after an explosion (post-blast). Pipe bombs represent a large percentage of domestic devices encountered by law enforcement. The current project has involved the preparation and controlled explosion of over 90 pipe bombs of different configurations in order to obtain data on fragmentation patterns, fragment velocity, blast overpressure, and fragmentation distance. Physical data recorded from the collected fragments, such as mass, size, and thickness, was correlated with the relative power of the initial device. Manuscript 4 explores the microstructural analysis of select pipe bomb fragments. Shock-loading of the pipe steel led to plastic deformation and work hardening in the steel grain structure as evidenced by optical microscopy and

  18. Detection of Internal Short Circuit in Lithium Ion Battery Using Model-Based Switching Model Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwan Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of an internal short circuit (ISCr in a Li-ion battery can prevent it from undergoing thermal runaway, and thereby ensure battery safety. In this paper, a model-based switching model method (SMM is proposed to detect the ISCr in the Li-ion battery. The SMM updates the model of the Li-ion battery with ISCr to improve the accuracy of ISCr resistance R I S C f estimates. The open circuit voltage (OCV and the state of charge (SOC are estimated by applying the equivalent circuit model, and by using the recursive least squares algorithm and the relation between OCV and SOC. As a fault index, the R I S C f is estimated from the estimated OCVs and SOCs to detect the ISCr, and used to update the model; this process yields accurate estimates of OCV and R I S C f . Then the next R I S C f is estimated and used to update the model iteratively. Simulation data from a MATLAB/Simulink model and experimental data verify that this algorithm shows high accuracy of R I S C f estimates to detect the ISCr, thereby helping the battery management system to fulfill early detection of the ISCr.

  19. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  20. DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence polarization for the sensitive detection of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Wang, Shuangli; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Liu, Yufang

    2018-04-05

    Despite their practical applications, Ag + ions are environmental pollutants and affect human health. So the effective detection methods of Ag + ions are imperative. Herein, we developed a simple, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective fluorescence polarization sensor for Ag + detection in aqueous solution using thiol-DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this sensing strategy, Ag + ions can specifically interact with a cytosine-cytosine (CC) mismatch in DNA duplexes and form stable metal-mediated cytosine-Ag + -cytosine (C-Ag + -C) base pairs. The formation of the C-Ag + -C complex results in evident changes in the molecular volume and fluorescence polarization signal. To achieve our aims, we prepared two complementary DNA strands containing C-base mismatches (probe A: 5'-SH-A 10 -TACCACTCCTCAC-3' and probe B: 5'-TCCTCACCAGTCCTA-FAM-3'). The stable hybridization between probe A and probe B occurs with the formation of the C-Ag + -C complex in the presence of Ag + ions, leading to obvious fluorescence quenching in comparison to the system without AuNP enhancement. The assay can be used to identify nanomolar levels of Ag + within 6 min at room temperature, and has extremely high specificity for Ag + , even in the presence of higher concentrations of interfering metal ions. Furthermore, the sensor was successfully applied to the detection of Ag + ions in environmental water samples and showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity, implying its promising application in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Palladium Nanoparticle Incorporated Porous Activated Carbon: Electrochemical Detection of Toxic Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Madhu, Rajesh; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2016-01-20

    A facile method has been developed for fabricating selective and sensitive electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic metal ions, which invokes incorporation of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on porous activated carbons (PACs). The PACs, which were derived from waste biomass feedstock (fruit peels), possess desirable textural properties and porosities favorable for dispersion of Pd NPs (ca. 3-4 nm) on the graphitic PAC substrate. The Pd/PAC composite materials so fabricated were characterized by a variety of different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, gas physisorption/chemisorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman, Fourier-transform infrared, and X-ray photon spectroscopies. The Pd/PAC-modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were exploited as electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic heavy metal ions, viz., Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), which showed superior performances for both individual as well as simultaneous detections. For simultaneous detection of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), a linear response in the ion concentration range of 0.5-5.5, 0.5-8.9, 0.5-5.0, and 0.24-7.5 μM, with sensitivity of 66.7, 53.8, 41.1, and 50.3 μA μM(-1) cm(-2), and detection limit of 41, 50, 66, and 54 nM, respectively, was observed. Moreover, the Pd/PAC-modified GCEs also show perspective applications in detection of metal ions in real samples, as illustrated in this study for a milk sample.

  2. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  3. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were observed in the mass spectral responses of these compounds. A global optimum temperature of 350 °C for the by-products investigated here enabled single nanogram to sub nanogram trace detection. Matrix effects were examined through a series of mixtures containing one or more compounds (sugar alcohol precursors, by-products, and/or explosives) across a range of mass loadings. The explosives MS responses experienced competitive ionization in the presence of all by-products. The magnitude of this influence corresponded to both the degree of by-product nitration and the relative mass loading of the by-product to the explosive. This work provides a characterization of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester synthesis, including matrix effects and potential challenges that might arise from the trace detection of homemade explosives (HMEs) containing impurities. Detection and understanding of HME impurities and complex mixtures may provide valuable information for the screening and sourcing of homemade nitrate ester explosives. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Underground Nuclear Testing: Comparison with Seismic and Associated Explosion Source Phenomenological Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jahnke, G.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection of anthrop......The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection...... of conventional multispectral satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER) to detect changes over wide areas.We chose the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, for a case study because of the large amount of available ground truth information. The analysis is based on the multivariate alteration...

  5. "Evaluation of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of mitragynine in kratom products".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenffinger, Nathan; Ritchie, Melissa; Ruth, Ashley; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie

    2017-02-05

    An ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method was developed for the rapid detection of mitragynine, the most abundant alkaloid in Mitragyna speciosa also known as kratom. The peak corresponding to the mitragynine protonated ion exhibited a reduced ion mobility of 0.95±0.00014cm 2 /(Vs), and the mitragynine limit of detection using IMS was 0.5ng. The IMS method was applied to the analysis of 15 commercial samples suspected of containing kratom. IMS results were compared to those obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the same samples. Mitragynine was conclusively detected in 14 of 15 samples using LC-MS/MS and 13 of 15 samples using IMS. The discrepancy between methods reflected the fact that one sample contained mitragynine at a concentration below the IMS detection limit. This study demonstrates the utility of IMS for the rapid screening of products containing kratom as well as the scientific reliability of the IMS screening method, which was demonstrated by comparing the IMS results to the confirmatory results obtained using LC-MS/MS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) modified electrode for detection of lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindino, Cleber Antonio; Casagrande, Marcella; Peiter, Andreia; Ribeiro, Caroline [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Toledo, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports the use of an electrode modified with poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) for detecting lithium ions. These ions are present in drugs used for treating bipolar disorder and that requires periodical monitoring of the concentration of lithium in blood serum. Poly({omicron}-methoxyaniline) was obtained electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry on the surface of a gold electrode. The results showed that the electrode modified with a conducting polymer responded to lithium ions in the concentration range of 1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}. The results also confirmed that the performance of the modified electrode was comparable to that of the standard method (atomic emission spectrophotometry). (author)

  7. Poly(ο-methoxyaniline) modified electrode for detection of lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindino, Cleber Antonio; Casagrande, Marcella; Peiter, Andreia; Ribeiro, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an electrode modified with poly(ο-methoxyaniline) for detecting lithium ions. These ions are present in drugs used for treating bipolar disorder and that requires periodical monitoring of the concentration of lithium in blood serum. Poly(ο-methoxyaniline) was obtained electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry on the surface of a gold electrode. The results showed that the electrode modified with a conducting polymer responded to lithium ions in the concentration range of 1 x 10 -5 to 1 x 10 -4 mol L -1 . The results also confirmed that the performance of the modified electrode was comparable to that of the standard method (atomic emission spectrophotometry). (author)

  8. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  9. Threat detection of liquid explosives and precursors from their x-ray scattering pattern using energy dispersive detector technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Lyksborg, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) can be applied for identification of liquid threats in luggage scanning in security applications. To define the instrumental design, the framework for data reduction and analysis and test the performance of the threat detection in various scenarios...

  10. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Shuyan, E-mail: shuyangao@htu.cn; Jia Xiaoxia; Chen Yanli [Henan Normal University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science (China)

    2013-01-15

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag{sup +}/Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg{sup 2+}/Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+} (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg{sup 2+} ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg{sup 2+} ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg{sup 2+} ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg{sup 2+} ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg{sup 2+} ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  11. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuyan; Jia, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag+/Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg2+/Hg2 2+ (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg2+ ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg2+ ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg2+ ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg2+ ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg2+ ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  12. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuyan; Jia Xiaoxia; Chen Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag + /Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg 2+ /Hg 2 2+ (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg 2+ ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg 2+ ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg 2+ ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg 2+ ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg 2+ ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  13. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Ralph L; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-05-06

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species.

  14. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph L. Stoop

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs based on silicon (Si nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species.

  15. Selective Detection of Mercury (II) Ion Using Nonlinear Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Singh, Anant Kumar; Rai, Uma Shanker; Yu, Eugene; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with heavy metal ions has been an important concern throughout the world for decades. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury in environmental samples, this article demonstrates for the first time that nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of MPA–HCys–PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution, with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and selectivity over competing analytes. The hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity increases 10 times after the addition of 20 ppm Hg2+ ions to modified gold nanoparticle solution. The mechanism for HRS intensity change has been discussed in detail using particle size-dependent NLO properties as well as a two-state model. Our results show that the HRS assay for monitoring Hg(II) ions using MPA–HCys–PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles has excellent selectivity over alkali, alkaline earth (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+), and transition heavy metal ions (Pb2+, Pb+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+). PMID:18517205

  16. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, N; Adams, D P; Hodges, V C; Vasile, M J; Michael, J R; Kotula, P G

    2008-06-11

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si(3)N(4) and W/Si(3)N(4) to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz M Abdi

    Full Text Available A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+ and Hg(2+ ions. The Pb(2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+ compared to Hg(2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  18. Conjugated Polymer based sensor for detecting explosives such as RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Anandkathir, Robinson; Kumar, Jayant

    2009-03-01

    Conjugated polymers are an important class of materials and have attracted great scientific interests because of their unique optical and electrical properties. Synthesis of various conjugated polymers has been reported for detecting DNT and TNT. Here, for the first time, we report the synthesis and characterization of a conjugated polymer based on thiophene, Poly[2-(3-thienyl)ethanol n-butoxycarbonylmethylurethane] (PURET), for the detection of RDX via fluorescence quenching. The incorporation of judiciously chosen bulky butoxycarbonylmethyl urethane side group in the back bone of polythiophene reduces the aggregation, improves the solubility of the polymer in the organic solvents and quantum yield of fluorescence. We have observed a 15 % decrease of fluorescence in 60 sec in thin films of PURET exposed to the saturated vapor of RDX at room temperature. The large exciton diffusion length and interaction between side group and the quencher molecule are believed to be the reasons for enhanced RDX detection. Sensitivity below 5 parts per trillion (ppt) has been demonstrated for RDX at room temperature. The effect of nanostructures (electrospun nanofibers and stamped 1 D periodic pattern) on sensitivity and response time will also be discussed.

  19. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  20. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Resolution of Ion Mobility Spectra for the Detection of Hazardous Substances in Real Sampling Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoliu, I.; Kalms, A.; Pardo, A.; Pomareda, V.; Marco, S.; Goebel, J.; Kessler, M.; Mueller, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the possibilities offered by a blind source separation method such Multivariate Curve Resolution- Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of Ion Mobility Spectra (IMS). Two security applications are analyzed in this context: the detection of TNT both in synthetic and real samples. Results obtained show the possibilities offered by the direct analysis of the drift time spectra when an appropriate resolution method is used.

  2. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  3. Chemical profiling of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, G.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop analytical methods for the chemical profiling of explosives. Current methodologies for the forensic analysis of explosives focus on identification of the explosive material. However, chemical profiling of explosives becomes increasingly important, as

  4. Histidine–dialkoxyanthracene dyad for selective and sensitive detection of mercury ions

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Sachin

    2017-12-18

    Histidine-dialkoxyanthracene (HDA) was synthesised as a turn off type fluorescent sensor for fast and sensitive detection of mercury ions (Hg2+) in aqueous media. The two histidine moieties act as ‘claws’ to selectively complex Hg2+. The binding ratio of HDA to Hg2+ was 1:1 (metal-to-ligand ratio). The association constant for Hg2+ towards the receptor HDA obtained from Benesi–Hildebrand plot was found to be 3.22 × 104 M−1 with detection limit as low as 4.7 nM (0.94 μg/L).

  5. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg 2+ , Ag + , Cu 2+ and Pb 2+ . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Colorimetric detection of trace copper ions based on catalytic leaching of silver-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Tingting; Chen, Lingxin; Chen, Zhaopeng; Wang, Yunqing; Chen, Ling; Li, Jinhua

    2011-11-01

    A colorimetric, label-free, and nonaggregation-based silver coated gold nanoparticles (Ag/Au NPs) probe has been developed for detection of trace Cu(2+) in aqueous solution, based on the fact that Cu(2+) can accelerate the leaching rate of Ag/Au NPs by thiosulfate (S(2)O(3)(2-)). The leaching of Ag/Au NPs would lead to dramatic decrease in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption as the size of Ag/Au NPs decreased. This colorimetric strategy based on size-dependence of nanoparticles during their leaching process provided a highly sensitive (1.0 nM) and selective detection toward Cu(2+), with a wide linear detection range (5-800 nM) over nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The cost-effective probe allows rapid and sensitive detection of trace Cu(2+) ions in water samples, indicating its potential applicability for the determination of copper in real samples.

  7. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88 Sr + ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  8. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R, E-mail: ozeri@weizmann.ac.il [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  9. Towards the Detection of Explosive Taggants: Microwave and Millimetre-Wave Gas-Phase Spectroscopies of 3-Nitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Kleiner, Isabelle; Goubet, Manuel; Bteich, Sabath; Mouret, Gael; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Meerts, W Leo; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-01-12

    The monitoring of gas-phase mononitrotoluenes is crucial for defence, civil security and environmental interests because they are used as taggant for TNT detection and in the manufacturing of industrial compounds such as dyestuffs. In this study, we have succeeded to measure and analyse at high-resolution a room temperature rotationally resolved millimetre-wave spectrum of meta-nitrotoluene (3-NT). Experimental and theoretical difficulties have been overcome, in particular, those related to the low vapour pressure of 3-NT and to the presence of a CH 3 internal rotation in an almost free rotation regime (V 3 =6.7659(24) cm -1 ). Rotational spectra have been recorded in the microwave and millimetre-wave ranges using a supersonic jet Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer (T rot <10 K) and a millimetre-wave frequency multiplication chain (T=293 K), respectively. Spectral analysis of pure rotation lines in the vibrational ground state and in the first torsional excited state supported by quantum chemistry calculations permits the rotational energy of the molecule, the hyperfine structure due to the 14 N nucleus, and the internal rotation of the methyl group to be characterised. A line list is provided for future in situ detection. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Selective detection of Mg2+ ions via enhanced fluorescence emission using Au–DNA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Basu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs have attracted a great deal of research interest for various applications in biosensing. AuNPs have strong binding capability to the phosphate and sugar groups in DNA, rendering unique physicochemical properties for detection of metal ions. The formation of Au–DNA nanocomposites is evident from the observed changes in the optical absorption, plasmon band, zeta potential, DLS particle size distribution, as well as TEM and AFM surface morphology analysis. Circular dichroism studies also revealed that DNA-functionalized AuNP binding caused a conformational change in the DNA structure. Due to the size and shape dependent plasmonic interactions of AuNPs (33–78 nm with DNA, the resultant Au–DNA nanocomposites (NCs exhibit superior fluorescence emission due to chemical binding with Ca2+, Fe2+ and Mg2+ ions. A significant increase in fluorescence emission (λex = 260 nm of Au–DNA NCs was observed after selectively binding with Mg2+ ions (20–800 ppm in an aqueous solution where a minimum of 100 ppm Mg2+ ions was detected based on the linearity of concentration versus fluorescence intensity curve (λem = 400 nm. The effectiveness of Au–DNA nanocomposites was further verified by comparing the known concentration (50–120 ppm of Mg2+ ions in synthetic tap water and a real life sample of Gelusil (300–360 ppm Mg2+, a widely used antacid medicine. Therefore, this method could be a sensitive tool for the estimation of water hardness after careful preparation of a suitably designed Au–DNA nanostructure.

  11. Towards the Development of a Low-Cost Device for the Detection of Explosives Vapors by Fluorescence Quenching of Conjugated Polymers in Solid Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana M. Martelo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated polymers (CPs have proved to be promising chemosensory materials for detecting nitroaromatic explosives vapors, as they quickly convert a chemical interaction into an easily-measured high-sensitivity optical output. The nitroaromatic analytes are strongly electron-deficient, whereas the conjugated polymer sensing materials are electron-rich. As a result, the photoexcitation of the CP is followed by electron transfer to the nitroaromatic analyte, resulting in a quenching of the light-emission from the conjugated polymer. The best CP in our studies was found to be poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl-co-bithiophene] (F8T2. It is photostable, has a good absorption between 400 and 450 nm, and a strong and structured fluorescence around 550 nm. Our studies indicate up to 96% quenching of light-emission, accompanied by a marked decrease in the fluorescence lifetime, upon exposure of the films of F8T2 in ethyl cellulose to nitrobenzene (NB and 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB vapors at room temperature. The effects of the polymeric matrix, plasticizer, and temperature have been studied, and the morphology of films determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal fluorescence microscopy. We have used ink jet printing to produce sensor films containing both sensor element and a fluorescence reference. In addition, a high dynamic range, intensity-based fluorometer, using a laser diode and a filtered photodiode was developed for use with this system.

  12. Metal-Free Poly-Cycloaddition of Activated Azide and Alkynes toward Multifunctional Polytriazoles: Aggregation-Induced Emission, Explosive Detection, Fluorescent Patterning, and Light Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongwei; He, Benzhao; Quan, Changyun; Zheng, Chao; Deng, Haiqin; Hu, Rongrong; Zhao, Zujin; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The metal-free click polymerization (MFCP) of activated alkynes and azides or activated azide and alkynes have been developed into powerful techniques for the construction of polytriazoles without the obsession of metallic catalyst residues problem. However, the MFCP of activated azides and alkynes is rarely applied in preparation of functional polytriazoles. In this paper, soluble multifunctional polytriazoles (PIa and PIb) with high weight-average molecular weights (M w up to 32 000) are prepared via the developed metal-free poly-cycloaddition of activated azide and alkynes in high yields (up to 90%). The resultant PIa and PIb are thermally stable, and show aggregation-induced emission characteristics, enabling their aggregates to detect explosives with superamplification effect. Moreover, thanks to their containing aromatic rings and polar moieties, PIa and PIb exhibit high refractive indices. In addition, they can also be cross-linked upon UV irradiation to generate 2D fluorescent patterning due to their remaining azide groups and containing ester groups. Thus, these multifunctional polytriazoles are potentially applicable in the optoelectronic and sensing fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Novel Approach to Detect Accelerated Aged and Surface-Mediated Degradation in Explosives by UPLC-ESI-MS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beppler, Christina L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A new approach was created for studying energetic material degradation. This approach involved detecting and tentatively identifying non-volatile chemical species by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with multivariate statistical data analysis that form as the CL-20 energetic material thermally degraded. Multivariate data analysis showed clear separation and clustering of samples based on sample group: either pristine or aged material. Further analysis showed counter-clockwise trends in the principal components analysis (PCA), a type of multivariate data analysis, Scores plots. These trends may indicate that there was a discrete shift in the chemical markers as the went from pristine to aged material, and then again when the aged CL-20 mixed with a potentially incompatible material was thermally aged for 4, 6, or 9 months. This new approach to studying energetic material degradation should provide greater knowledge of potential degradation markers in these materials.

  14. Highly Selective Hg (II Ion Detection Based on Linear Blue-Shift of the Maximum Absorption Wavelength of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of detecting Hg (II ion with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs is developed in this contribution. When Hg (II ions were added into AgNPs solution, the solution displayed rapid color change and blue shift of the maximum absorption wavelength (Δλ, which was in proportion to the Hg (II ion concentration over the range of 2.0 × 10−7–6.0 × 10−6 mol/L, with detection limit (3σ of 6.6 × 10−9 mol/L. Under the same experimental conditions, other metal ions did not interfere. Thus, we propose a rapid, simple and highly selective method for detecting Hg (II ion.

  15. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Ting; Qu, Fei; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II) ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II) ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibit...

  16. Photoelectrochemical detection of copper ions by modulating the growth of CdS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyte, Ruta; Barroso, Javier; Díez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Saa, Laura; Möller, Marco; Pavlov, Valeri

    2017-09-15

    We discovered that copper ions (Cu 2+ ) catalyze the oxidation of cysteine (CSH) by oxygen (O 2 ) to modulate the growth of CSH-capped cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs). This new chemical process was applied to sensitive fluorogenic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection of Cu 2+ ions in real samples of mineral and tap water using the photocatalytic activity of the resulting NPs. Disposable screen-printed electrodes (SPCEs) modified with electroactive polyvinylpyridine bearing osmium complex (Os-PVP) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed for PEC analytical system. CdS NPs formed during the assay photocatalyze oxidation of 1-thioglycerol (TG) upon application of 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl to SPCEs. Os-PVP complex mediated the electron transfer between the electrode surface and CdS NPs. We proved that our assays did not suffer from interference from other ions accompanying Cu 2+ and the sensitivity of our assays covers the European Union standard limit of Cu 2+ ions in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P

    2014-02-18

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  18. Development of sputter ion pump based SG leak detection system for Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, B.; Sureshkumar, K.V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Development and commissioning of SG leak detection system for FBTR. ► Development of Robust method of using sputter ion pump based system. ► Modifications for improving reliability and availability. ► On line injection of hydrogen in sodium during reactor operation. ► Triplication of the SG leak detection system. - Abstract: The Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt, loop type sodium cooled fast reactor built at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam as a fore-runner to the second stage of Indian nuclear power programme. The reactor design is based on the French reactor Rapsodie with several modifications which include the provision of a steam-water circuit and turbo-generator. FBTR uses sodium as the coolant in the main heat transport medium to transfer heat from the reactor core to the feed water in the tertiary loop for producing superheated steam, which drives the turbo-generator. Sodium and water flow in shell and tube side respectively, separated by thin-walls of the ferritic steel tubes of the once-through steam generator (SG). Material defects in these tubes can lead to leakage of water into sodium, resulting in sodium water reactions leading to undesirable consequences. Early detection of water or steam leaks into sodium in the steam generator units of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) is an important requirement from safety and economic considerations. The SG leak in FBTR is detected by Sputter Ion Pump (SIP) based Steam Generator Leak Detection (SGLD) system and Thermal Conductivity Detector (TCD) based Hydrogen in Argon Detection (HAD) system. Many modifications were carried out in the SGLD system for the reactor operation to improve the reliability and availability. This paper details the development and the acquired experience of SIP based SGLD system instrumentation for real time hydrogen detection in sodium for FBTR.

  19. Paper-Based Sensor Chip for Heavy Metal Ion Detection by SWSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal ion pollution problems have had a terrible influence on human health and the environment. Therefore, the monitoring of heavy metal ions is of great practical significance. In this paper, an electrochemical three-electrode system was fabricated and integrated on nitrocellulose membrane (NC by the use of magnetron sputtering technology, which exhibited a uniform arrangement of porous structure without further film modification. This paper-based sensor chip was used for Cu2+ detection by square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV. Within the ranges of 5~200 μg·L−1 and 200~1000 μg·L−1, it showed good linearity of 99.58% and 98.87%, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 μg·L−1. On the basis of satisfying the detection requirements (10 μg·L−1, the integrated sensor was small in size and inexpensive in cost. Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and Bi3+ were also detected by this paper-based sensor chip with good linearity.

  20. New data about dielectric breakdown counters on the MOS-structure base for heavy ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    The fabrication technology of dielectric break-down counters based on a MOS structure and designed to record heavy ions is described. To produce counters use was made of low-resistant n-Si. The MOS structure was obtained by the method of thermal growing of a layer of SiO 2 having a thickness of 1400 A on a chemically polished surface of the sample with further spraying of a forward aluminium electrode with a thickness of 500 A. One Si sample accomodated several counters. The rear electrode consisting in a layer of Al was common to all counters. By using the above-mentioned technology dielectric breakdown counters have been produced with a total area of the sensitive surface of up to 110 cm 2 . Results of investigations of such important counter characteristics as the detection efficiency, stability, reliability and reproducibility of counting characteristics in the process of counter fabrication are given. It has been found that the detection efficiency constitutes approximately 100%. The value of specific energy losses in SiO 2 , at which detection of heavy ions is still possible, is equal to 22+-2 MeVxcm 2 /mg. The maximum service life of counters in detecting fission fragments constituted approximately 3x10 cm -2 . The results of multi-day tests of breakdown detectors showed good stability of their counting characteristics and efficiency

  1. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibited two absorption peaks at 275 and 630 nm, respectively. The effects of parameters such as polyethyleneimine concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and the most suitable medium for the reaction were investigated. A linear relationship (R2 = 0.9997 between absorbance and the concentration of copper(II ion was found at the maximum absorption peak of 275 nm in the concentration range of 2–400 μM. The detection limit for copper(II ion was 566 nM. The response of polyethyleneimine toward different metal ions was investigated, and polyethyleneimine displayed a high selectivity for the copper(II ion among the metal ions examined. This biocompatible and sensitive sensor may find applications in copper(II ion detection in environmental and biological processes.

  2. Iron oxide nanostructured electrodes for detection of copper(II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J G M; Souza, J R; Letti, C J; Soler, M A G; Morais, P C; Pereira-da-Silva, M A; Paterno, L G

    2014-09-01

    Iron oxide nanostructured (ION) electrodes were assembled layer-by-layer onto ITO-coated glass substrates and their structure, morphology, and electrochemical properties were investigated, the latter aiming at the development of a chemical sensor for Cu2+. The electrodes were built by immersing the substrate alternately into an aqueous colloidal suspension of positively charged magnetite nanoparticles (np-Fe3O4, 8 nm) and an aqueous solution of anionic sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS). The adsorbed amount of both materials was monitored ex-situ by UV-vis spectroscopy and it was found to increase linearly with the number of deposition cycles. The resulting films feature a densely-packed structure of magnetite nanoparticles, as suggested by AFM and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of electrodes immersed in acetate buffer (pH 4.6) displayed three electrochemical events that were tentatively ascribed to the reduction of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide to magnetite, reduction of maghemite to magnetite, and finally oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. The effect of np-Fe3O4/PSS bilayers on the ION electrode performance was to increase the anodic and cathodic currents produced during electrochemical oxidation-reduction of the Fe(CN)(3-/4-) redox couple. With more bilayers, the ION electrode provided higher anodic/cathodic currents. Moreover, the redox couple exhibited a quasi-reversible behavior at the ION electrode as already observed with other working electrode systems. Fitting of voltammetry data provided the apparent electron transfer constants, which were found to be higher in ION electrodes for both redox couples (Fe(CN)(3-/4-) and Cu(2+/0)). By means of differential pulsed anodic stripping voltammetry, the ION electrodes were found to respond linearly to the presence of Cu2+ in aqueous samples in the range between 1.0 and 8.0 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) and displayed a limit of detection of 0.3 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1). The sensitivity was - 0.6μA/μmol x L

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Pyridyl thiourea Derivatives As Ionophores For Cu(II) Ion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Mohd Khairul; Mohd Faizuddin Abu Hasan; Adibah Izzati Daud; Adibah Izzati Daud; Hafiza Mohamed Zuki; Ku Halim Ku Bulat; Maisara Abdul Kadir

    2016-01-01

    Copper (II) ion chemical sensors based on pyridine-thiourea derivatives; N-pyridyl-N ' -(biphenyl-4-carbonyl)thiourea (L1), and N-pyridyl-N ' -(3,5-dimethy oxybenzoyl)thiourea (L2) were synthesised, characterised, and studied as ionophores in the form of thin-films PVC membranes. The ionophores exhibited good responses towards copper (II) ion over the concentration range of 2 x 10 -4 to 10 x 10 -4 M with a limit of detection 1.34 x 10 -5 to 1.48 x 10 -5 M. The proposed sensors L1 and L2 revealed good performance in term of reproducibility and regeneration of the ionophores with low relative standard deviation (RSD) values 4.17 % and 2.74 % respectively. Besides, quantum chemical calculation performed using Gaussian 09 program indicated the oxygen (O) atom from carbonyl moiety (C=O) was the most favourite reactive site and mainly responsible for ionophore Cu(II) interaction. The obtained data revealed pyridine-thiourea derivatives offered great potential as ionophore for the detection of Cu (II) ion. (author)

  4. Fast Thermal Runaway Detection for Lithium-Ion Cells in Large Scale Traction Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal runaway of single cells within a large scale lithium-ion battery is a well-known risk that can lead to critical situations if no counter measures are taken in today’s lithium-ion traction batteries for battery electric vehicles (BEVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. The United Nations have published a draft global technical regulation on electric vehicle safety (GTR EVS describing a safety feature to warn passengers in case of a thermal runaway. Fast and reliable detection of faulty cells undergoing thermal runaway within the lithium-ion battery is therefore a key factor in battery designs for comprehensive passenger safety. A set of various possible sensors has been chosen based on the determined cell thermal runaway impact. These sensors have been tested in different sized battery setups and compared with respect to their ability of fast and reliable thermal runaway detection and their feasibility for traction batteries.

  5. A novel fluorescent probe (dtpa-bis(cytosine)) for detection of Eu(III) in rare earth metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ren, Peipei; Liu, Guanhong; Song, Youtao; Bu, Naishun; Wang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescent probe, dtpa-bis(cytosine), was designed and synthesized for detecting europium (Eu3 +) ion. Upon addition of Eu3 + ions into the dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity can strongly be enhanced. Conversely, adding other rare earth metal ions, such as Y3 +, Ce3 +, Pr3 +, Nd3 +, Sm3 +, Gd3 +, Tb3 +, Dy3 +, Ho3 +, Er3 +, Yb3 + and Lu3 +, into dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity is decreased slightly. Some parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity of dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution in the presence of Eu3 + ions were investigated, including solution pH value, Eu3 + ion concentration and interfering substances. The detection mechanism of Eu3 + ion using dtpa-bis(cytosine) as fluorescent probe was proposed. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence emission intensities of EuIII-dtpa-bis(cytosine) at 375 nm in the concentration range of 0.50 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1-5.00 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1 of Eu3 + ion display a better linear relationship. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined as 8.65 × 10- 7 mol • L- 1 and the corresponding correlation coefficient (R2) of the linear equation is 0.9807. It is wished that the proposed method could be applied for sensitively and selectively detecting Eu3 + ion.

  6. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  7. Detection of copper ions in drinking water using the competitive adsorption of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Wang, Wei; Ren, Hao; Chae, Junseok

    2014-07-15

    Heavy metal ions, i.e., Cu(2+), are harmful to the environment and our health. In order to detect them, and circumvent or alleviate the weaknesses of existing detecting technologies, we contrive a unique Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor combined with competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman effect. This approach adopts native proteins (albumin) as bio-receptors that interact with Cu(2+) to be denatured. Denaturation disrupts the conformation of albumin so that it weakens its affinity to adsorb on the sensing surface. Through the competitive adsorption between the denatured albumins and the native ones, the displacement occurs adjacent to the sensing surface, and this process is real-time monitored by SPR, a surface-sensitive label-free biosensor. The affinities of native albumin is significantly higher than that of denatured albumin, demonstrated by measured KD of native and denatured albumin to gold surafce, 5.8±0.2×10(-5) M and 5.4±0.1×10(-4) M, respectively. Using our biosensor, Cu(2+) with concentration down to 0.1mg/L is detected in PBS, tap water, deionized water, and bottled water. The SPR biosensor is characterized for 5 different heavy metal ions, Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+), most common heavy metal ions found in tap water. At the maximum contaminant level (MCL) suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the SPR biosensor produces 13.5±0.4, 1.5±0.4, 0, 0, and 0 mDeg, respectively, suggesting the biosensor may be used to detect Cu(2+) in tap water samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A highly selective and fast-response fluorescent probe based on Cd-MOF for the visual detection of Al3+ ion and quantitative detection of Fe3+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui; Chen, Zhihengyu; Fu, Xin; Yang, Boyi; Li, Hui; Su, Jian; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A new luminescent Cd(II)-based metal-organic framework, [Cd(PAM)(4-bpdb)1.5]·DMF (Cd-MOF, PAM = 4,4‧-methylenebis(3-hydroxy-2-naphthalene-carboxylic acid) and 4-bpdb = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene) was successfully synthesized by solvothermal synthesis method. The Cd-MOF reveals excellent luminescence property which can selectively detect Al3+ and Fe3+ ions among other interfering metal ions. The detection limit is 0.56 μM for Al3+ ion in aqueous solutions, and it is obvious lower than the maximum standard of Al3+ ion in drinking water of 7.41 μM which is defined by the WHO. More importantly, the Cd-MOF shows an obvious luminescent color change from yellow to blue under the UV lamp irradiation at 365 nm with the dropping of Al3+ ion, which can make it apply to the visual detection. And, the detection based on the test paper was explored for the first time. In addition, the Cd-MOF can also be used for quantitative detecting Fe3+ ion, and the LOD for Fe3+ ion can be as low as 0.3 μM which is lower than most reported MOFs. It is worth noting that Fe3+ and Al3+ ions can not interfere with each other. These properties make it become an excellent luminescence sensor for the detection of Al3+ and Fe3+ ions.

  9. Silver(I Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes―Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Krizkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip or 10 nM (carbon pencil. Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I ions (0, 5 and 10 μM on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells during a fourday exposition was investigated. Silver(I ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM on guppies (Poecilia reticulata. Content of Ag(I increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes.

  10. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Development of a Compton camera for online ion beam range verification via prompt γ detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldawood, S. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Liprandi, S.; Marinsek, T.; Bortfeldt, J.; Lang, C.; Lutter, R.; Dedes, G.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); Maier, L.; Gernhaeuser, R. [TU Munich, Garching (Germany); Kolff, H. van der [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); TU Delft (Netherlands); Castelhano, I. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Schaart, D.R. [TU Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    Precise and preferably online ion beam range verification is a mandatory prerequisite to fully exploit the advantages of hadron therapy in cancer treatment. An imaging system is being developed in Garching aiming to detect promptγ rays induced by nuclear reactions between the ion beam and biological tissue. The Compton camera prototype consists of a stack of six customized double-sided Si-strip detectors (DSSSD, 50 x 50 mm{sup 2}, 0.5 mm thick, 128 strips/side) acting as scatterer, while the absorber is formed by a monolithic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator crystal (50 x 50 x 30 mm{sup 3}) read out by a position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier (Hamamatsu H9500). The on going characterization of the Compton camera properties and its individual components both offline in the laboratory as well as online using proton beam are presented.

  12. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  13. TLC surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adduct ions in TLC-MALDI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Ferrazza, Ruggero; Anesi, Andrea; Guella, Graziano; Franceschi, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    Direct coupling of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allows fast and detailed characterization of a large variety of analytes. The use of this technique, however, presents great challenges in semiquantitative applications because of the complex phenomena occurring at the TLC surface. In our laboratory, we recently observed that the ion intensities of several alkali adduct ions were significantly different between the top and interior layer of the TLC plate. This indicates that the integrity of the TLC surface can have an important effect on the reproducibility of TLC- MALDI analyses. Graphical Abstract MALDI imaging reveals that surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adductions in TLC-MALDI.

  14. Investigation of the chemical explosion of an ion exchange resin column and resulting americium contamination of personnel in the 242-Z building, August 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-19

    As a result of an explosion in the Waste Treatment Facility, 242-Z Building, 200 West Area of the Hanford Reservation on August 30, 1976, the Manager of the Richland Operations Office (RL), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), appointed an ERDA Committee to conduct a formal investigation and to prepare a report on their findings of this occurrence. The Committee was instructed to conduct the investigation in accordance with ERDAMC 0502, insofar as circumstances would permit, to cover and explain technical elements of the casual sequence(s) of the occurrence, and to describe management systems which should have or could have prevented the occurrence. This report is the result of the investigation and presents the conclusions of the review.

  15. Naked-eye and Selective Detection of Mercury (II Ions in Mixed Aqueous Media Using a Cellulose-based Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Veciana

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A test paper for high-selectivity detecting Hg2+ ions in mixed acetonitrile-watersolutions has been achieved using a bis(ferrocenyl azine, as chromogenic chemosensormolecule, and a solid cellulose fibre, as a substrate. Depending on the amount of mercuryions in contact with the detecting molecule a spectacular color change in the celluloseindicator is produced, being possible to determine the concentration of Hg2+ ions either bynaked eye or spectroscopically.

  16. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  17. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Part 2: Hyphenated Methods and Effects of Experimental Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separat...

  18. Visual detection of trace lead ion based on aptamer and silver staining nano-metal composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Hong; Wang, Hai-Bo; Fang, Bi-Yun; Tan, Fang; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, visual detection of trace lead ion was established by aptamer and silver staining. The basic strategy was that aminated PS2.M aptamer was immobilized onto slide and formed stable G-quadruplex structure. PbS was generated by adding S 2- , and it catalyzed subsequent silver staining reaction, through the silver staining amplification effect, the slide presented visible ash black. The gray value of slide after silver staining was analyzed and the semi-quantitative detection of Pb 2+ in solution was realized. The results showed that optical darkness ratio (ODR) and logarithmic value of Pb 2+ concentration had a good linear relationship (R 2  = 0.951) over the range of 0.5-10 μM. In addition, there was no obvious interference of other common metal ions for the detection, indicating that this method presented outstanding selectivity. And it was also used for qualitative and semi-quantitative determination of Pb 2+ in soil sample successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Naked-eye detection of potassium ions in a novel gold nanoparticle aggregation-based aptasensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Mahboube; Hosseini, Morteza; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we studied the feasibility of interaction among gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a cationic dye in an aptasensor system for the detection of potassium ions. The presence and absence of potassium in the solution was distinguishable by different colors (between orange and green) appeared after reaction. Cationic dye (Y5GL) acts as a new aggregator for AuNP-based sensors which changes the aggregated AuNP solution color from blue-purple to green. In the presence of K+ ions, the aptamer dissociated from the surface of the AuNP so that free AuNPs and cationic dye make the solution green. The aptasensor showed that the analytical linear range was from 10 nM to 50 mM and the detection limit was 4.4 nM. Also, we examined the practicality of this method on a simple paper based platform. The linear range of the colorimetric paper sensor covered of K+ concentration from 10 μM to 40 mM and the detection limit of 6.2 μM was obtained. The selectivity of AuNP aggregation-based sensor improved by the use of cationic dye. Rapidity, simplicity, high sensitivity and excellent selectivity made this assay suitable for practical determination of K+ in real urine samples.

  20. Simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple tumor markers using metal ions tagged immunocolloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Teng; Jia, Xinle; Chen, Xia; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a sandwich-format electrochemical immunosensor has been fabricated in the aim of simultaneous detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) using metal ions tagged immunocolloidal gold nanocomposites as signal tags. The capture anti-CEA and anti-AFP were immobilized onto the chitosan-Au nanoparticles (CHIT-AuNPs) membrane modified glassy carbon electrode through glutaraldehyde (GA). The metal ion labels could be detected directly through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) without metal pre-concentration, and the distinct voltammetric peaks had a close relationship with each sandwich-type immunoreaction. Under the optimized conditions, the multiplexed immunoassay exhibited good sensitivity and selectivity for the simultaneous determination of CEA and AFP with linear ranges of 0.01-50 ng mL(-1). The detection limits for CEA and AFP are 4.6 pg mL(-1) and 3.1 pg mL(-1), respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of AFP and CEA levels in clinical serum samples, and the results were in good agreement with standard enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This approach gives a promising simple and sensitive immunoassay strategy for clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P.; Walker, S. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H.; Hult, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Heavy-ion elastic-recoil detection analysis of doped-silica films for integrated photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijers, T.D.M.; Timmers, H.; Gaff, K.; Ophel, T.R.; Elliman, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    Photosensitive silica films, in which a permanent refractive index change is induced by exposure to ultra-violet (UV) light, are of interest for the fabrication of integrated photonic devices and circuits. Such films, consisting of Ge- and Sn-doped silica, are being fabricated at the Australian National University (ANU) by a plasma assisted deposition technique known as Helicon Assisted Reactive Evaporation (HARE). The initial refractive index of these films is related to their stoichiometry and can be altered further by controlled exposure to UV light . Contaminants introduced into the films during deposition can degrade their optical properties and are therefore also of interest. Hydrogen is of particular concern as it causes optical absorption in the wavelength range of interest for communications applications (1.3-1.5μm). High-energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis enables the detection of a broad range of elements with almost constant sensitivity. A variety of recoil detection systems have been developed for this purpose, including time-of-flight systems, magnetic spectrometers, and quadrupole spectrometers. However, these are often restricted to small acceptance solid angles. Beam-induced sample modification, such as hydrogen release, can therefore be a serious limitation. The use of a position sensitive gas ionization detector overcomes these limitations for a range of import ant applications by operating with a large solid angle and correcting the kinematic energy spread of the ions over large acceptance angles to provide ≤1% energy resolution. In this study, heavy-ion ERD employing a novel position sensitive gas ionization detector is used to characterize the composition, thickness, uniformity and hydrogen content of Ge- and Sn- doped silica films. The technique is shown to provide this information in a single measurement

  3. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  4. Micro-Capillary Coatings Based on Spiropyran Polymeric Brushes for Metal Ion Binding, Detection, and Release in Continuous Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishling Dunne

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro-capillaries, capable of light-regulated binding and qualitative detection of divalent metal ions in continuous flow, have been realised through functionalisation with spiropyran photochromic brush-type coatings. Upon irradiation with UV light, the coating switches from the passive non-binding spiropyran form to the active merocyanine form, which binds different divalent metal ions (Zn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, as they pass through the micro-capillary. Furthermore, the merocyanine visible absorbance spectrum changes upon metal ion binding, enabling the ion uptake to be detected optically. Irradiation with white light causes reversion of the merocyanine to the passive spiropyran form, with simultaneous release of the bound metal ion from the micro-capillary coating.

  5. [Detection of metal ions in water solution by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang-lai; Fu, Yuan-xia; Li, Ying; Lu, Yuan; Cui, Zhi-feng; Zheng, Rong-er

    2008-09-01

    Environmental concerns about the hazardous heavy metals in seawaters have been greatly increased in these years. To evaluate the potential application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to on-line toxic metals pollution monitoring in ocean, some experimental investigations with LIBS technique to detect metal ions in CuSO4 and Pb(NO3)2 water solutions have been carried out in our laboratory. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and repetition frequency of 10 Hz was utilized to generate plasma on a flowing liquid surface. The ensuing plasma emission was coupled by a quartz lens to a double grating monochromator and recorded with a PMT in conjunction with a computer controlled boxcar integrator. The temporal characteristic of the laser induced plasma and the power dependence of LIBS signal were investigated. The operation condition was improved with the optimal ablation pulse energy and the delay time for LIBS signal detection. The ablation location was varied to achieve better LIBS signal. The optimized ablation location for lead was found to be different from that for copper due to the breakdown of the ambient air. The detection limit of metal ion in water solution under the optimized operation conditions was found to be 31 ppm for copper and 50 ppm for lead. The experimental results proved that the flexibility of LIBS has the potential to be applied to the detection of toxic metals in seawaters, but the limits of detection for each element should be improved further to make a practical application of LIBS in this field.

  6. An azine based sensor for selective detection of Cu2 + ions and its copper complex for sensing of phosphate ions in physiological conditions and in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Karishma; Kumar, Sumit; Kumar, Vipan; Kaur, Jeevanjot; Arora, Saroj; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A simple and cost effective unsymmetrical azine based Schiff base, 5-diethylamino-2-[(2-hydroxy-benzylidene)hydrazonomethyl]-phenol (1) was synthesized which selectively detect Cu2 + ions in the presence of other competitive ions through ;naked eye; in physiological conditions (EtOH-buffer (1:1, v/v, HEPES 10 mM, pH = 7.4)). The presence of Cu2 + induce color change from light yellow green to yellow with the appearance of a new band at 450 nm in UV-Vis spectra of Schiff base 1. The fluorescence of Schiff base 1 (10 μM) was quenched completely in the presence of 2.7 equiv. of Cu2 + ions. Sub-micromolar limit of detection (LOD = 3.4 × 10- 7 M), efficient Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV = 1.8 × 105 L mol- 1) and strong binding constant (log Kb = 5.92) has been determined with the help of fluorescence titration profile. Further, 1 - Cu2 + complex was employed for the detection of phosphate ions (PO43 -, HPO42 - and H2PO4-) at micromolar concentrations in EtOH-buffer of pH 7.4 based on fluorescence recovery due to the binding of Cu2 + with phosphate ions. Solubility at low concentration in aqueous medium, longer excitation (406 nm) and emission wavelength (537 nm), and biocompatibility of Schiff base 1 formulates its use in live cell imaging.

  7. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  8. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  9. Simultaneous determination of potassium and nitrate ions in mouthwashes using sequential injection analysis with potentiometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, N; Irazu, E; Araújo, A N; Montenegro, M C B S M; Pérez-Olmos, R

    2008-06-01

    Two methods for the determination of potassium nitrate in mouthwashes, used against dentin hypersensitivity, have been simultaneously implemented in an sequence injection analysis (SIA) system. In addition to in-line dilution of the samples, the equipment simultaneously detected potassium and nitrate using two tubular potentiometric detectors, selective to each ion, providing a real-time assessment of the quality of the results. Both determinations were shown to be precise and accurate and the obtained results do not statistically differ from those furnished by applying the AES and HPLC reference methods.

  10. A model of heavy ion detection in physical and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Track structure theory (the Katz model) and its application to the detection of heavy ions in physical and biological systems are reviewed. Following the use of a new corrected formula describing the radial distribution of average dose around the path of a heavy ion, based on results of Monte Carlo calculations and on results of experimental measurements, better agreement is achieved between model calculations and experimentally measured relative effectiveness, for enzymatic and viral systems, for the Fricke dosemeter and for alanine and thermoluminescent (TDL-700) dosemeters irradiated with beams of heavy charged particles. From experimentally measured RBE dependences for survival and frequency of neoplastic transformations in a mammalian cell culture irradiated with beams of energetic heavy ions, values of model parameters for these biological endpoints have been extracted, and a model extrapolation to the low-dose region performed. Results of model calculations are then compared with evaluations of the lung cancer hazard in populations exposed to radon and its progeny. The model can be applied to practical phenomenological analysis of radiation damage in solid-state systems and to dosimetry of charged particle and fast neutron beams using a variety of detectors. The model can also serve as a guide in building more basic models of the action of ionizing radiation with physical and biological systems and guide of development of models of radiation risk more relevant than that used presently. 185 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  11. Specifically colorimetric recognition of calcium, strontium, and barium ions using 2-mercaptosuccinic acid-functionalized gold nanoparticles and its use in reliable detection of calcium ion in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yong; Xu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xiurong

    2011-10-07

    A colorimetric probe based on 2-mercaptosuccinic acid-functionalized gold nanoparticles has been developed to exhibit selectivity towards Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+) ions over other metallic cations under specified conditions and finds its practical application in detecting Ca(2+) levels in water.

  12. Material interface detection based on secondary electron images for focused ion beam machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Hang-Eun; Lee, Won-Sup; Jun, Martin B G; Park, No-Cheol; Min, Byung-Kwon

    2018-01-01

    A method for interface detection is proposed for focused ion beam (FIB) processes of multilayered targets. As multilayers have emerged as promising structures for nanodevices, the FIB machining of multilayers has become a challenging issue. We proposed material interface detection by monitoring secondary electron (SE) images captured during the FIB process. The average of the gray-levels and the skewness coefficient of gray-level histograms of the SE images were evaluated to recognize endpoints for the FIB processes. The FIB process control with the proposed method was demonstrated by fabricating the nanostructures on the multilayered target without thickness information. It was also demonstrated on a curved surface. Grooves with a desired depth into the target and an aperture as an opening window were precisely fabricated by the FIB process control. The proposed strategy of the FIB process can be used for complex substrates such as curved or flexible targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  14. Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontidean, Ibolya; Ahlqvist, Josefin; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred; Bae, Weon; Mehra, Rajesh K; Mortari, Alessia; Csöregi, Elisabeth

    2003-05-01

    A novel capacitance biosensor based on synthetic phytochelatins for sensitive detection of heavy metals is described. Synthetic phytochelatin (Glu-Cys)(20)Gly (EC20) fused to the maltose binding domain protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for construction of the biosensor. The new biosensor was able to detect Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions in concentration range of 100 fM-10 mM, and the order of sensitivity was S(Zn)>S(Cu)>S(Hg)>S(Cd) congruent with S(Pb). The biological sensing element of the sensor could be regenerated using EDTA and the storage stability of the biosensor was 15 days.

  15. Detection of Individual Molecules and Ions by Carbon Nanotube-Based Differential Resistive Pulse Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ran; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Li, Dongqing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of sensing single molecules and cations by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based differential resistive pulse sensing (RPS) technique on a nanofluidic chip. A mathematical model for multichannel RPS systems is developed to evaluate the CNT-based RPS signals. Individual cations, rhodamine B dye molecules, and ssDNAs are detected successfully with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Differentiating ssDNAs with 15 and 30 nucleotides are achieved. The experimental results also show that translocation of negatively charged ssDNAs through a CNT decreases the electrical resistance of the CNT channel, while translocation of positively charged cations and rhodamine B molecules increases the electrical resistance of the CNT. The CNT-based nanofluidic device developed in this work provides a new avenue for single-molecule/ion detection and offers a potential strategy for DNA sequencing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. PAR immobilized colorimetric fiber for heavy metal ion detection and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Zhang, Lianhai; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenqin

    2010-05-15

    A new wearable colorimetric fiber for heavy metal ion detection and adsorption has been synthesized by first aminating a commercially available polyacrylonitrile fiber with ethylenediamine and then covalently immobilizing 4-(2-pyridylazo)-1,3-benzenediol (PAR) on the modified fiber through a Mannich reaction. The fiber was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction spectra (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy, and its acid exchange capacity, colorimetric properties, response speed, selectivity, reusability, photostability and adsorption capacity were investigated. In neutral aqueous solutions, the PAR immobilized fiber responds selectively to heavy metal ions, such as Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) with a color change from red-orange to dark-brown. Its visual detection limit for Pb(2+) is 1 x 10(-6)mol/L. Moreover, the selectivity increases with a decrease in pH, i.e. at pH 3.0, it shows a color change only for Hg(2+) and Cu(2+). This fiber also shows excellent reusability (>50 times), high photostability (>30 days under direct exposure to sunlight) and high adsorption capacity for Hg(2+) (0.74 mmol/g). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  18. PAR immobilized colorimetric fiber for heavy metal ion detection and adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guowei; Zhang Lianhai; Li Zhiwei [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Tianjin University, No. 92 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang Wenqin, E-mail: wqzhang@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Tianjin University, No. 92 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-05-15

    A new wearable colorimetric fiber for heavy metal ion detection and adsorption has been synthesized by first aminating a commercially available polyacrylonitrile fiber with ethylenediamine and then covalently immobilizing 4-(2-pyridylazo)-1,3-benzenediol (PAR) on the modified fiber through a Mannich reaction. The fiber was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction spectra (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy, and its acid exchange capacity, colorimetric properties, response speed, selectivity, reusability, photostability and adsorption capacity were investigated. In neutral aqueous solutions, the PAR immobilized fiber responds selectively to heavy metal ions, such as Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} with a color change from red-orange to dark-brown. Its visual detection limit for Pb{sup 2+} is 1 x 10{sup -6} mol/L. Moreover, the selectivity increases with a decrease in pH, i.e. at pH 3.0, it shows a color change only for Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}. This fiber also shows excellent reusability (>50 times), high photostability (>30 days under direct exposure to sunlight) and high adsorption capacity for Hg{sup 2+} (0.74 mmol/g).

  19. Thermal runaway detection of cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion battery under quasi-static loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Muhammad; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Elkady, Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on state of charge (SOC) dependent mechanical failure analysis of 18650 lithium-ion battery to detect signs of thermal runaway. Quasi-static loading conditions are used with four test protocols (Rod, Circular punch, three-point bend and flat plate) to analyse the propagation of mechanical failures and failure induced temperature changes. Finite element analysis (FEA) is used to model single battery cell with the concentric layered formation which represents a complete cell. The numerical simulation model is designed with solid element formation where stell casing and all layers followed the same formation, and fine mesh is used for all layers. Experimental work is also performed to analyse deformation of 18650 lithium-ion cell. The numerical simulation model is validated with experimental results. Deformation of cell mimics thermal runaway and various thermal runaway detection strategies are employed in this work including, force-displacement, voltage-temperature, stress-strain, SOC dependency and separator failure. Results show that cell can undergo severe conditions even with no fracture or rupture, these conditions may slow to develop but they can lead to catastrophic failures. The numerical simulation technique is proved to be useful in predicting initial battery failures, and results are in good correlation with the experimental results.

  20. Detection of Hg2+ Metal Ions Using Silver Nanoparticles Stabilized by Gelatin and Tween-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Sulistiawaty

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction method using glucose as reducing agent for precursor AgNO3. This research was aimed at comparing the stability and performance of silver nanoparticles with stabilizer gelatin (Gelatin-AgNPs and tween-20 (Tween-AgNPs produced from the synthesis to the silver nanoparticles without stabilizer, and applying the Gelatin-AgNPs and Tween-AgNPs to detect heavy metal in water sample. The silver nanoparticles produced were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. From measurement of UV-Vis spectrophotometer, the absorbance wavelength of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs appeared in range 411 nm, Gelatin-AgNPs in 417 nm, and Tween-AgNPs in 420 nm. The identification using TEM showed the average size for each AgNPs, Gelatin-AgNPs, and Tween-AgNPs was 11.73, 9.68, and 17.54 nm, respectively. The result showed that Gelatin-AgNPs has better stability compared to Tween-AgNPs. The reaction of Gelatin-AgNPs and Tween-AgNPs with several ions showed color changes of Gelatin-AgNPs and Tween-AgNPs occurred only on addition to Hg2+ metal ions solution. Based on the experiment of Hg2+ metal ions determination this method has limit of detection of 0.45 mg/L for Gelatin-AgNPs and 0.13 mg/L for Tween-AgNPs.

  1. Citrate-capped quantum dots of CdSe for the selective photometric detection of silver ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingole, Pravin P.; Abhyankar, Rajiv M.; Prasad, B.L.V.; Haram, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    A simple strategy for the synthesis of water soluble, luminescent, citrate-capped CdSe quantum dots (Q-CdSe) and their applications to selective detection of silver ions are described. The steady state photoluminescence (PL) spectra show single, narrow emission band at ca. 554 nm without any contribution from the trap states. The effect of various ions including physiologically important metal ions (viz. K + , Ca 2+ , Fe 3+ , Zn 2+ , Mg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ag + , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ ), on the PL intensity of citrate-capped Q-CdSe has been studied. Among these, selective luminescence quenching with Ag + ion was found to be predominant. Under the optimum conditions, the response was linear between 1.7 and 18 μM. The quenching constant K SV was found to be ca. 3.4 x 10 5 M -1 . The mechanism of photoluminescence quenching of Q-CdSe by metal ions (Ag + ) is also discussed. Based on these studies, the potential use of Q-CdSe as a luminescent probe for the selective detection of silver ion has been proposed. -- Graphical abstract: A simple strategy for the synthesis of water soluble, luminescent, citrate-capped quantum dots of CdSe (Q-CdSe) has been developed. The effect of various ions including physiologically important metal ions (viz. K + , Ca 2+ , Fe 3+ , Zn 2+ , Mg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ag + , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ ), on the luminescence intensity of citrate-capped Q-CdSe has been studied. Among these, a significant luminescence quenching only by Ag + ions was observed which suggests the potential use of Q-CdSe as a luminescent sensor for the selective optical detection of silver ions in a physiological condition.

  2. Direct determination of recoil ion detection efficiency for coincidence time-of-flight studies of molecular fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Carnes, K. D.; Ginther, S. G.; Johnson, D. T.; Norris, P. J.; Weaver, O. L.

    1993-06-01

    Molecular fragmentation of diatomic and small polyatomic molecules caused by fast ion impact has been studied. The evaluation of the cross sections of the different fragmentation channels depends strongly on the recoil ion detection efficiency, ɛ r (single ions proportional to ɛ r, and ion pairs to ɛ r2, etc.). A method is suggested for the direct determination of this detection efficiency. This method is based on the fact that fast H + + CH 4 collisions produce C 2+ fragments only in coincidence with H + and H +2 fragments, that is, there is a negligible number of C 2+ singles, if any. The measured yield of C 2+ singles is therefore due to events in which the H +m of the H +m +C 2+ ion pair was not detected and thus is proportional to 1-ɛ r. Methane fragmentation caused by 1 MeV proton impact is used to evaluate directly the recoil ion detection efficiency and to demonstrate the method of deriving the cross sections of all breakup channels.

  3. Detection of fuel release in a nuclear accident: a method for preconcentration and isolation of reactor-borne (239)Np using ion-specific extraction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Brett L; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Steinhauser, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Although actinides are the most informative elements with respect to the nature of a nuclear accident, plutonium analysis is complicated by the background created by fallout from atmospheric nuclear explosions. Therefore, we propose (239)Np, a short-lived actinide that emits several γ rays, as a preferred proxy. The aim of this study was to screen ion specific extraction chromatography resins (RE-, TEVA-, UTEVA-, TRU-, and Actinide-Resin) for the highest possible recovery and separation of trace amounts of (239)Np from samples with large activities of fission products such as radiocesium, radioiodine, and, most importantly, radiotellurium, the latter of which causes spectral interference in gamma spectrometry through overlapping peaks with (239)Np. The investigated environmental media for these separations were aqueous solutions simulating rainwater and soil. Spiked samples containing (239)Np and the aforementioned volatile radionuclides were separated through extraction chromatographic columns to ascertain the most effective means of separating (239)Np from other fission products for detection by gamma spectroscopy. We propose a method for nuclear accident preparedness based on the use of Eichrom's RE-Resin. The proposed method was found most effective for isolating (239)Np from interfering radionuclides in both aqueous solution and soil using 8 M HNO3 as the loading solution and H2O as the eluent. The RE-Resin outperforms the more commonly used TEVA-Resin because the TEVA-Resin showed a higher affinity for interfering radiotellurium and radioiodine.

  4. Radial Flow Assay Using Gold Nanoparticles and Rolling Circle Amplification to Detect Mercuric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tai-Yong; Lim, Min-Cheol; Woo, Min-Ah

    2018-01-01

    A novel colorimetric assay employing oligonucleotide-conjugated gold nanoparticle (AuNP probes) and rolling circle amplification (RCA) was developed for simple detection of mercuric ions (Hg2+). The thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) coordination chemistry makes our detection system selective for Hg2+. In the presence of Hg2+, the thymine 12-mer oligonucleotide is unable to act as a primer for RCA due to the formation of T-Hg2+-T before the RCA reaction. However, in the absence of Hg2+, DNA coils as RCA products are generated during the RCA reaction, and is further labeled with AuNP probes. Colorimetric signals that depend on the amount of DNA coil-AuNP probe complexes were generated by drop-drying the reaction solution on nitrocellulose-based paper. As the reaction solution spread radially because of capillary action, the complexes formed a concentric red spot on the paper. The colorimetric signals of the red spots were rapidly measured with a portable spectrophotometer and determined as the ΔE value, which indicates the calculated color intensity. Our assay displays great linearity (detection limit: 22.4 nM), precision, and reproducibility, thus demonstrating its utility for Hg2+ quantification in real samples. We suggest that our simple, portable, and cost-effective method could be used for on-site Hg2+ detections. PMID:29389877

  5. Human telomeric G-quadruplex formation and highly selective fluorescence detection of toxic strontium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Konggang; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-03-01

    Strontium ions play important roles in biological systems. The inhalation of strontium can cause severe respiratory difficulties, anaphylactic reaction and extreme tachycardia. Strontium can replace calcium in organisms, inhibit normal calcium absorption and induce strontium "rickets" in childhood. Thus, the development of sensitive and selective methods for the determination of trace amounts of Sr(2+) in aqueous media is of considerable importance for environmental and human health protection. A number of methodologies, such as X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and instrumental thermal neutron activation analysis, have been reported. However, these methods are somewhat complex, costly, time consuming and, especially, need special instruments. Thus, the design of convenient and inexpensive approaches for the sensitive and selective detection of Sr(2+) with rapid, easy manipulation is in ever-increasing demand. To the best of our knowledge, using DNA conformational change to detect Sr(2+) has not yet been reported. Herein we utilized thiazole orange (TO) as a signal reporter to devise a simple Sr(2+) detection assay based on Sr(2+) induced human telomeric DNA conformational change in the presence of SWNTs. The limit of detection is 10 nM Sr(2+) (0.87 μg L(-1)), far below 4 mg L(-1), the U.S. Federal threshold in drinking water defined by the U.S. EPA.

  6. Graphitic carbon nitride supported platinum nanocomposites for rapid and sensitive colorimetric detection of mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wei; Wang, Lixing; An, Fengping; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zejin; Tang, Shurong; Yang, Huang-Hao; Song, Hongbo

    2017-08-08

    In this study, graphitic carbon nitride supported platinum nanocomposites (g-C 3 N 4 /PtNPs) have been synthesized for the first time by an ultrasonic-assisted chemical reduction method. By using g-C 3 N 4 as the stabilizer, Pt ions could be reduced to PtNPs by NaBH 4 and uniformly deposited on the surface of g-C 3 N 4 . The resulting g-C 3 N 4 /PtNPs exhibited enhanced catalytic activity for the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) compared to that of g-C 3 N 4 or PtNPs alone. After interaction with Hg 2+ , the catalytic activity of g-C 3 N 4 /PtNPs was effectively inhibited due to the formation of HgPt amalgam. On the basis of this effect, a novel label free colorimetric sensor has been developed for sensitive detection of Hg 2+ through the g-C 3 N 4 /PtNPs mediated catalytic reaction. A detection limit as low as 1.23 nM was achieved. This assay also exhibited excellent selectivity toward Hg 2+ over other metal ions. In addition, it was successfully applied to the determination of Hg 2+ in real water samples. In view of the advantages, such as simple operation, cost-effective, rapid response and naked-eye observation, the developed colorimetric sensor hold great potential for the detection of toxic Hg 2+ in environmental and biological samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution based on PEG-coated ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Surinder K; Salaria, Khushboo; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-03-15

    Using polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs), a novel and highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution has been presented. ZnS NPs have been used to develop efficient luminescence sensor which exhibits high reproducibility and stability with the lowest limit of detection of 1.29×10(-6) mol L(-1). The observed limit of detection of the fabricated sensor is ~6 times lower than maximum value of cyanide permitted by United States Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water (7.69×10(-6) mol L(-1)). The interfering studies show that the developed sensor possesses good selectivity for cyanide ion even in presence of other coexisting ions. Importantly, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which demonstrates the utilization of PEG- coated ZnS NPs for efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution. This work demonstrates that rapidly synthesized ZnS NPs can be used to fabricate efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman detection of melamine on silver-nanoparticle-decorated silver/carbon nanospheres: effect of metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Miao; Liu, You-Nian

    2011-08-01

    Silver/carbon (Ag/C) core-shell nanospheres synthesized by a hydrothermal method were used as templates for fabricating silver nanoparticle-decorated Ag/C (Ag/C/AgNps) nanospheres. The particle size of Ag nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the concentration of Ag precursor. Detection of melamine molecules at concentrations as low as 5.0×10(-8) M shows that the Ag/C/AgNps nanosphere is a good SERS-active substrate. The effect of heavy metal ions on the detection of melamine is also investigated. It was found that the SERS spectrum profile of melamine is very sensitive to the presence of heavy metal ions: the peak positions of the SERS bands exhibit some apparent change with the kind of metal ion, showing a blue or red shift compared with those in the SERS spectrum of melamine; the SERS signal intensity decrease with increasing the concentration of metal ion.

  9. Enhanced detection of explosives by turn-on resonance Raman upon host-guest complexation in solution and the solid state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witlicki, Edward H.; Bähring, Steffen; Johnsen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of nitroaromatic explosives by a tetrakis-tetrathiafulvalene-calix[4]pyrrole receptor (TTF-C[4]P) yields a "turn on" and fingerprinting response in the resonance Raman scattering observed in solution and the solid state. Intensity changes in nitro vibrations with analyte...

  10. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, Ryan; Sohail, Manzar; Ogden, Mark I.; Mocerino, Mauro; Pretsch, Ernö; De Marco, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tuning of metal binding cavities in thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Novel calixarene-based ionophores with improved selectivity for thallium(I). • Sandwich membrane characterization of thallium(I) binding in novel calixarenes. • Improved selectivity and sensitivity with novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Solid contact ion-selective electrodes for novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. - Abstract: Three new calixarene Tl + ionophores have been utilized in Tl + ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10 −2 –10 −6 M TlNO 3 with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (log β IL ) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn 2+ , Ca 2+ , Ba 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ and Al 3+ with moderate selectivity against Pb 2+ , Li + , Na + , H + , K + , NH 4 + and Cs + , noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8 nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)–poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA–PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4 mV decade −1 and a lower detection limit of 30.2 nM. Due to the presence of an undesirable

  11. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, Ryan [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Sohail, Manzar [Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Queensland 4556 (Australia); Ogden, Mark I.; Mocerino, Mauro [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Pretsch, Ernö [ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), Universitätstrasse 16, CH-8092, Zürich (Switzerland); De Marco, Roland, E-mail: rdemarc1@usc.edu.au [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Queensland 4556 (Australia)

    2014-12-03

    Highlights: • Tuning of metal binding cavities in thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Novel calixarene-based ionophores with improved selectivity for thallium(I). • Sandwich membrane characterization of thallium(I) binding in novel calixarenes. • Improved selectivity and sensitivity with novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. • Solid contact ion-selective electrodes for novel thallium(I) calixarene ionophores. - Abstract: Three new calixarene Tl{sup +} ionophores have been utilized in Tl{sup +} ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10{sup −2}–10{sup −6} M TlNO{sub 3} with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (log β{sub IL}) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} with moderate selectivity against Pb{sup 2+}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, H{sup +}, K{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Cs{sup +}, noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8 nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)–poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA–PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4 mV decade

  12. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  13. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowell, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Slysz, Gordon W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Erin Shammel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monroe, Matthew E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Payne, Samuel H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Gordon A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  14. Fabrication of an Integrated Zeolite-fiber Optical Chemical Sensor for Detection of Mercury (II Ion in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a process for fabricating an integrated zeolite-captured silver fiber optical chemical sensor. b-oriented zeolite thin film was first coated onto the end surface of an optical fiber. Then Ag+ ions were loaded onto the zeolite crystal via ion exchange. The exchanged Ag+ ions were reduced in the zeolite channel by formaldehyde. The resulting Ag-embedded zeolite-fiber optical sensor was characterized with a number of techniques including scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By monitoring the reflection intensity change, this sensor can be used for in-situ Hg2+ detection.

  15. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  16. Application of an M13 bacteriophage displaying tyrosine on the surface for detection of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohua; Niu, Chuncheng; Wu, Yunhua; Liang, Xiaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Ferric and ferrous ion plays critical roles in bioprocesses, their influences in many fields have not been fully explored due to the lack of methods for quantification of ferric and ferrous ions in biological system or complex matrix. In this study, an M13 bacteriophage (phage) was engineered for use as a sensor for ferric and ferrous ions via the display of a tyrosine residue on the P8 coat protein. The interaction between the specific phenol group of tyrosine and Fe(3+) / Fe(2+) was used as the sensor. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregation of the tyrosine-displaying phages after incubation with Fe(3+) and Fe(2+). The aggregated phages infected the host bacterium inefficiently. This phenomenon could be utilized for detection of ferric and ferrous ions. For ferric ions, a calibration curve ranging from 200 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 58 nmol/L was acquired. For ferrous ions, a calibration curve ranging from 800 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 641.7 nmol/L was acquired. The assay was specific for Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) when tested against Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Ba(2+), and K(+). The tyrosine displaying phage to Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) interaction would have plenty of room in application to biomaterials and bionanotechnology.

  17. Evaluation of the Oak Ridge MS/MS explosives detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, F.J.; Hannum, D.W.; Grant, B.C.; McLuckey, S.A.; McKown, H.S.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for the evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) MS/MS as an explosives detector. This instrument is a beam instrument containing a quadrupole and a time-of-flight detector section (QTOF). The tests include a Limit of Detection for the instrument, an interferent study, a test of personnel sampling for explosives, a test involving mail sampling, and detection tests with bomb quantity explosives. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Detection of isolated protein-bound metal ions by single-particle cryo-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Nadav; Bellapadrona, Giuliano; Houben, Lothar; Sagi, Irit; Elbaum, Michael

    2017-10-17

    Metal ions play essential roles in many aspects of biological chemistry. Detecting their presence and location in proteins and cells is important for understanding biological function. Conventional structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-transmission electron microscopy can identify metal atoms on protein only if the protein structure is solved to atomic resolution. We demonstrate here the detection of isolated atoms of Zn and Fe on ferritin, using cryogenic annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (cryo-STEM) coupled with single-particle 3D reconstructions. Zn atoms are found in a pattern that matches precisely their location at the ferroxidase sites determined earlier by X-ray crystallography. By contrast, the Fe distribution is smeared along an arc corresponding to the proposed path from the ferroxidase sites to the mineral nucleation sites along the twofold axes. In this case the single-particle reconstruction is interpreted as a probability distribution function based on the average of individual locations. These results establish conditions for detection of isolated metal atoms in the broader context of electron cryo-microscopy and tomography.

  19. Precision mass measurements using the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Karthein, Jonas

    This thesis presents the implementation and improvement of the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (PI-ICR) detection technique at the ISOLTRAP experiment, located at the ISOLDE / CERN, with the purpose of on-line high-precision and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Extensive simulation studies were performed with the aim of improving the phase-imaging resolution and finding the optimal position for detector placement. Following the outcome of these simulations, the detector was moved out of a region of electric-field distortion and closer to the center of the Penning trap, showing a dramatic improvement in the quality and reproducibility of the phase-imaging measurements. A new image reconstitution and analysis software for the MCP-PS detector was written in Python and ROOT and introduced in the framework of PI-ICR mass measurements. The state of the art in the field of time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance measurements is illustrated through an analysis of on-line measurements of the mirror nuclei $...

  20. New EDTA determination method based on ion chromatography with suppressed conductimetric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergy Patzay; Yahya Ramadan; Csilla Tonko

    2014-01-01

    A novel direct method for the determination of EDTA in alkaline radioactive evaporator residue solution was developed and validated based on ion chromatography with suppressed conductimetric detection and anion exchange columns (A Supp 4, 4 mm × 250 mm and A Supp 5, 4 mm × 150 mm). The yttrium-EDTA complex resulted one single chromatographic peak in the eluent and allowed the correct determination of EDTA in an alkaline, high concentration radioactive waste water. Depending on coexisting substances, suitable eluent is 10.0 mM carbonate buffer/pH 10.6 or 10.75 (t R ,Y-EDTA = 7.01 and 6.4 min, respectively). For 10.0 mM carbonate buffer/pH 10.6 and isocratic flow rate of 1.0 cm 3 /min, a linear calibration curve was obtained from 5 to 40 mg/dm 3 (r > 0.999) EDTA. Good resolution was achieved from commonly coexisting anions (chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulphate, phosphate, bromide and citrate). The developed simple ion chromatographic method was applied for the assay of EDTA in various radioactive alkaline solutions. (author)

  1. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry of Potential By-Products from Homemade Nitrate Ester Explosive Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were ...

  2. Hardware/Software Codesign in a Compact Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Subsurface Contaminant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribb MollyM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A field-programmable-gate-array-(FPGA- based data acquisition and control system was designed in a hardware/software codesign environment using an embedded Xilinx Microblaze soft-core processor for use with a subsurface ion mobility spectrometer (IMS system, designed for detection of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs. An FPGA is used to accelerate the digital signal processing algorithms and provide accurate timing and control. An embedded soft-core processor is used to ease development by implementing nontime critical portions of the design in software. The design was successfully implemented using a low-cost, off-the-shelf Xilinx Spartan-III FPGA and supporting digital and analog electronics.

  3. The Trace Detection of Nitrite Ions Using Neutral Red Functionalized SH-β-Cyclodextrin @Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Du

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescence sensor of NR-β-CD@AuNPs was prepared for the trace detection of nitrite in quantities as low as 4.25 × 10−3 μg∙mL−1 in an aqueous medium. The fluorescence was due to the host-guest inclusion complexes between neutral red (NR molecules and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, which were modified by per-6-mercapto-beta-cyclodextrins (SH-β-CDs as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer under microwave radiation. The color of the NR-β-CD@AuNPs changed in the presence of nitrite ions. A sensor was applied to the determination of trace nitrites in environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets[I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas[2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study[3] has been

  5. Ruthenium Nanoparticles Mediated Electrocatalytic Reduction of UO22+Ions for Its Rapid and Sensitive Detection in Natural Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruma; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Gamare, Jayashree S

    2017-08-01

    Reduction of UO 2 2+ ions to U 4+ ions is difficult due to involvement of two axially bonded oxygen atoms, and often requires a catalyst to lower the activation barrier. The noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit high electrocatalytic activity, and could be employed for the sensitive and rapid quantifications of U0 2 2+ ions in the aqueous matrix. Therefore, the Pd, Ru, and Rh NPs decorated glassy carbon electrode were examined for their efficacy toward electrocatalytic reduction of UO 2 2+ ions and observed that Ru NPs mediate efficiently the electro-reduction of UO 2 2+ ions. The mechanism of the electroreduction of UO 2 2+ by the RuNPs/GC was studied using density functional theory calculations which pointed different approach of 5f metal ions electroreduction unlike 4p metal ions such as As(III). RuNP decorated on the glassy carbon would be hydrated, which in turn assist to adsorb the uranyl sulfates through hydrogen bonding thus facilitated electro-reduction. Differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) technique, was used for rapid and sensitive quantification of UO 2 2+ ions. The RuNPs/GC based DPV technique could be used to determine the concentration of uranyl in a few minutes with a detection limit of 1.95 ppb. The RuNPs/GC based DPV was evaluated for its analytical performance using seawater as well lake water and groundwater spiked with known amounts of UO 2 2+ .

  6. Knowledge Representation of Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor Voltage Response for Potassium Ion Concentration Detection in Mixed Potassium/Ammonium Ion Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Wan F.H. Abdullah; Masuri Othman; Mohd A.M. Ali; Md S. Islam

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) is a metal-oxide field-effect transistor-based sensor that reacts to ionic activity at the electrolye/membrane/gate interface. The ionic sensor faces issue of selectivity from interfering ions that contribute to the sensor electrical response in mixed solutions. Approach: We present the training data collection of ISFET voltage response for the purpose of post-processing stage neural network supervised learning. The role of ...

  7. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Lut Tamam; Meliha Zengin Eroglu; Ozlem Paltaci

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etio...

  8. Chernobyl explosion bombshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.; Arnott, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is suggested that the explosion at the Chernobyl-4 reactor in April 1986 was a nuclear explosion. The evidence for this is examined. The sequence of events at Chernobyl is looked at to see if the effects were like those from a nuclear explosion. The question of whether a United Kingdom reactor could go prompt critical is discussed. It is concluded that prompt criticality excursions are possible, but the specific Chernobyl sequence is impossible. (UK)

  9. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  10. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phosphorescent Chemosensor Based on Iridium(III) Complex for the Selective Detection of Cu(II) Ion in Aqueous Acetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyebin; Li, Yinan; Hyun, Myungho [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Iridium(III) complex 1 containing two cyclo-metalating 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) ligands and one 2,2'-bipyridine ligand tethered with two DPA moieties by a methylene linker was prepared. Iridium(III) complex 1 was found to form 1:2 complex selectively with Cu(II) ion with the Stern-Volmer constant of 5.8 Χ 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. Cu(II) ion has two sides. In one side, Cu(II) ion is an important cofactor in nearly 20 metalloenzymes and an essential micronutrient for all living systems. But, in other side, Cu(II) ion is one of significant metal pollutants and toxic to living cells if present in slightly high concentrations, causing neurodegenerative diseases such as Menkes and Wilson's disease. In this instance, the selective detection of Cu(II) ion in environment and in living systems is very important. Consequently, various fluorescent chemosensors for the highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu (II) ion have been developed.

  12. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II) and Lead(II) Ions in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab), a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens) and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM) for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM) and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM). Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract) with artificially added cadmium(II) and lead(II). Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic. PMID:22219663

  13. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II and Lead(II Ions in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Krystofova

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab, a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II and lead(II ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM. Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract with artificially added cadmium(II and lead(II. Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic.

  14. Simultaneous Determination of Different Anions in Milk Samples Using Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülçin Gümüş Yılmaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The description of a simple method for simultaneous determination of chloride, nitrate, sulfate, iodide, phosphate, thiocyanate, perchlorate, and orotic acid in milk samples was outlined. The method involves the use of dialysis cassettes for matrix elimination, followed by ion chromatography on a high capacity anion exchange column with suppressed conductivity detection. The novelty of dialysis process was that it did not need any chemical and organic solvent for elimination of macromolecules such as fat, carbohydrates and proteins from milk samples. External standard calibration curves for these analytes were linear with great correlation coefficients. The relative standard deviations of analyte concentrations were acceptable both inter-day and intra-day evaluations. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (Signal-to-Noise ratio = 3 for chloride, phosphate, thiocyanate, perchlorate, iodide, nitrate, sulfate, and orotate was found to be 0.012, 0.112, 0.140, 0.280, 0.312, 0.516, 0.520, and 0.840 mg L−1, respectively. Significant results were obtained for various spiked milk samples with % recovery in the range of 93.88 - 109.75 %. The proposed method was successfully applied to milk samples collected from Istanbul markets. The advantages of the method described herein are reagent-free, simple, and reliable.

  15. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  16. Compositional analysis of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, F.L. [Departamento de Electronica y Tecnologia de Computadoras, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus Universitario Muralla del Mar, E-30202 Cartagena (Spain)]. E-mail: Felix.Martinez@upct.es; Toledano, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); San Andres, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Martil, I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Bohne, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Roehrich, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Strub, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-25

    The composition of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films has been measured by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). The films were deposited by high-pressure reactive sputtering (HPRS) on silicon wafers using an oxygen plasma at pressures between 0.8 and 1.6 mbar and during deposition times between 0.5 and 3.0 h. Hydrogen was found to be the main impurity and its concentration increased with deposition pressure. The composition was always slightly oxygen-rich, which is attributed to the oxygen plasma. Additionally, an interfacial silicon oxide thin layer was detected and taken into account. The thickness of the hafnium oxide film was found to increase linearly with deposition time and to decrease exponentially with deposition pressure, whereas the thickness of the silicon oxide interfacial layer has a minimum as a function of pressure at around 1.2 mbar and increases slightly as a function of time. The measurements confirmed that this interfacial layer is formed mainly during the early stages of the deposition process.

  17. Direct detection and quantification of transition metal ions in human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, Nadina; Lindner, Robyn A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The involvement of transition metals in atherosclerosis is controversial. Some epidemiological studies have reported a relationship between iron (Fe) and cardiovascular disease, whereas others have not. Experimental studies have reported elevated levels of iron and copper (Cu) in disea......OBJECTIVE: The involvement of transition metals in atherosclerosis is controversial. Some epidemiological studies have reported a relationship between iron (Fe) and cardiovascular disease, whereas others have not. Experimental studies have reported elevated levels of iron and copper (Cu......) in diseased human arteries but have often used methods that release metal ions from proteins. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we have used the minimally invasive technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICPMS) to quantify iron...... and copper in ex vivo healthy human arteries and carotid lesions. The EPR spectra detected are characteristic of nonheme Fe(III) complexes. Statistically elevated levels of iron were detected in the intima of lesions compared with healthy controls (0.370 versus 0.022 nmol/mg tissue for EPR, 0.525 versus 0...

  18. Microfluidic Paper-Based Sample Concentration Using Ion Concentration Polarization with Smartphone Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for microfluidic paper-based sample concentration using ion concentration polarization (ICP with smartphone detection is developed. The concise and low-cost microfluidic paper-based ICP analytical device, which consists of a black backing layer, a nitrocellulose membrane, and two absorbent pads, is fabricated with the simple lamination method which is widely used for lateral flow strips. Sample concentration on the nitrocellulose membrane is monitored in real time by a smartphone whose camera is used to collect the fluorescence images from the ICP device. A custom image processing algorithm running on the smartphone is used to track the concentrated sample and obtain its fluorescence signal intensity for quantitative analysis. Two different methods for Nafion coating are evaluated and their performances are compared. The characteristics of the ICP analytical device especially with intentionally adjusted physical properties are fully evaluated to optimize its performance as well as to extend its potential applications. Experimental results show that significant concentration enhancement with fluorescence dye sample is obtained with the developed ICP device when a fast depletion of fluorescent dye is observed. The platform based on the simply laminated ICP device with smartphone detection is desired for point-of-care testing in settings with poor resources.

  19. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Ryan; Sohail, Manzar; Ogden, Mark I; Mocerino, Mauro; Pretsch, Ernö; De Marco, Roland

    2014-12-03

    Three new calixarene Tl(+) ionophores have been utilized in Tl(+) ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10(-2)-10(-6)M TlNO3 with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (logβIL) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) with moderate selectivity against Pb(2+), Li(+), Na(+), H(+), K(+), NH4(+) and Cs(+), noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA-PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4mVdecade(-1) and a lower detection limit of 30.2nM. Due to the presence of an undesirable water layer and/or leaching of redox mediator from the graphite redox buffered SC, a coated wire electrode on gold and graphite redox buffered SC yielded grossly inferior detection limits against the polypyrrole/PVC SC and POT/PMMA-PDMA SC ISEs that did not display signs of a water layer or leaching of SC ingredients into the membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of precursor and product ions in single-stage high resolution mass spectrometry. A tool for detecting diagnostic ions and improving the precursor elemental composition elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borràs, S. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, A., E-mail: anton.kaufmann@klzh.ch [Official Food Control Authority, Fehrenstrasse 15, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland); Companyó, R. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We are describing a technique to spot ions which are derived from each other. ► Single stage high resolution data is used. ► This “in silicon” technique is compared to conventional precursor scan. ► Some applications for this technique are presented. -- Abstract: Monitoring of common diagnostic fragments is essential for recognizing molecules which are members of a particular compound class. Up to now, unit resolving tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, operating in the precursor ion scan mode, have been typically used to perform such analysis. By means of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) a much more sensitive and selective detection can be achieved. However, using a single-stage HRMS instrument, there is no unequivocal link to the corresponding precursor ion, since such instrumentation does not permit a previous precursor selection. Thus, to address this limitation, an in silico approach to locate precursor ions, based on diagnostic fragments, was developed. Implemented as an Excel macro, the algorithm rapidly assembles and surveys exact mass data to provide a list of feasible precursor candidates according to the correlation of the chromatographic peak shape profile and other additional filtering criteria (e.g. neutral losses and isotopes). The macro was tested with two families of veterinary drugs, sulfonamides and penicillins, which are known to yield diagnostic product ions when fragmented. Data sets obtained from different food matrices (fish and liver), both at high and low concentration of the target compounds, were investigated in order to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the reported approach. Finally, other possible applications of this technique, such as the elucidation of elemental compositions based on product ions and corresponding neutral losses, were also presented and discussed.