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Sample records for exploration nasa cp-2053

  1. 41 CFR 101-1.4902-2053 - GSA Form 2053, Agency Consolidated Requirements for GSA Regulations and Other External Issuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-2053 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.49-Illustrations of Forms § 101-1.4902-2053 GSA... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true GSA Form 2053, Agency...

  2. 40 CFR 205.3 - Number and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Number and gender. 205.3 Section 205.3... EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS General Provisions § 205.3 Number and gender. As used in this part, words in the -singular shall be deemed to import -the plural, and words in the masculine -gender shall be...

  3. Exploring CP Violation in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Arbey, A.; Godbole, R.M.; Mahmoudi, F.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the prospects for observing CP violation in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with six CP-violating parameters, three gaugino mass phases and three phases in trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters, using the CPsuperH code combined with a geometric approach to maximize CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We also implement CP-conserving constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics and the upper limits on the cosmological dark matter density and spin-independent scattering. We study possible values of observables within the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), the CPX scenario and a variant of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). We find values of the CP-violating asymmetry A_CP in b -> s gamma decay that may be as large as 3%, so future measurements of A_CP may provide independent information about CP violation in the MSSM. We find that CP-violating MSSM contributions to the...

  4. 37 CFR 205.3 - Waiver of rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the Copyright Office, the Library of Congress, or the... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waiver of rules. 205.3 Section 205.3 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE...

  5. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before...'s clients. (b) Duty to report evidence of a material violation. (1) If an attorney, appearing and...

  6. Exploring CP violation in the MSSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbey, Alexandre; Ellis, John; Godbole, Rohini M; Mahmoudi, Farvah

    We explore the prospects for observing CP violation in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with six CP-violating parameters, three gaugino mass phases and three phases in trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters, using the CPsuperH code combined with a geometric approach to maximise CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We also implement CP-conserving constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics and the upper limits on the cosmological dark matter density and spin-independent scattering. We study possible values of observables within the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), the CPX scenario and a variant of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). We find values of the CP-violating asymmetry [Formula: see text] in [Formula: see text] decay that may be as large as 3 %, so future measurements of [Formula: see text] may provide independent information about CP violation in the MSSM. We find that CP-violating MSSM contributions to the [Formula: see text] meson mass mixing term [Formula: see text] are in general below the present upper limit, which is dominated by theoretical uncertainties. If these could be reduced, [Formula: see text] could also provide an interesting and complementary constraint on the six CP-violating MSSM phases, enabling them all to be determined experimentally, in principle. We also find that CP violation in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] couplings can be quite large, and so may offer interesting prospects for future [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] colliders.

  7. New NASA Technologies for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing new technologies to enable planetary exploration. NASA's Space Launch System is an advance vehicle for exploration beyond LEO. Robotic explorers like the Mars Science Laboratory are exploring Mars, making discoveries that will make possible the future human exploration of the planet. In this presentation, we report on technologies being developed at NASA KSC for planetary exploration.

  8. 12 CFR 205.3 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authorizes a financial institution to debit or credit a consumer's account. Generally, this part applies to financial institutions. For purposes of §§ 205.3(b)(2) and (b)(3), 205.10(b), (d), and (e) and 205.13, this..., or magnetic tape for the purpose of ordering, instructing, or authorizing a financial institution to...

  9. Implementing NASA's Capability-Driven Approach: Insight into NASA's Processes for Maturing Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale; Rodgers, Erica; Antol, Jeff; Simon, Matthew; Hay, Jason; Larman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    NASA is engaged in transforming human spaceflight. The Agency is shifting from an exploration-based program with human activities focused on low Earth orbit (LEO) and targeted robotic missions in deep space to a more sustainable and integrated pioneering approach. Through pioneering, NASA seeks to address national goals to develop the capacity for people to work, learn, operate, live, and thrive safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time. However, pioneering space involves more than the daunting technical challenges of transportation, maintaining health, and enabling crew productivity for long durations in remote, hostile, and alien environments. This shift also requires a change in operating processes for NASA. The Agency can no longer afford to engineer systems for specific missions and destinations and instead must focus on common capabilities that enable a range of destinations and missions. NASA has codified a capability driven approach, which provides flexible guidance for the development and maturation of common capabilities necessary for human pioneers beyond LEO. This approach has been included in NASA policy and is captured in the Agency's strategic goals. It is currently being implemented across NASA's centers and programs. Throughout 2014, NASA engaged in an Agency-wide process to define and refine exploration-related capabilities and associated gaps, focusing only on those that are critical for human exploration beyond LEO. NASA identified 12 common capabilities ranging from Environmental Control and Life Support Systems to Robotics, and established Agency-wide teams or working groups comprised of subject matter experts that are responsible for the maturation of these exploration capabilities. These teams, called the System Maturation Teams (SMTs) help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the identified exploration capabilities. The SMTs are defining performance parameters and goals for each of the 12 capabilities

  10. 75 FR 15743 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-034)] NASA Advisory Council; Exploration... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory...-358-1715; [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda topics for the meeting will...

  11. 76 FR 18800 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-028)] NASA Advisory Council; Exploration... National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, April 26, 2011, 1 p.m.-6 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  12. NASA Virtual Institutes: International Bridges for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    NASA created the first virtual institute, the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI), in 2009 with an aim toward bringing together geographically disparate and multidisciplinary teams toward the goal of answering broad questions in the then-new discipline of astrobiology. With the success of the virtual institute model, NASA then created the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) in 2008 to address questions of science and human exploration of the Moon, and then the NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) in 2012 which addresses key questions in the development of aeronautics technologies. With the broadening of NASA's human exploration targets to include Near Earth Asteroids and the moons of Mars as well as the Moon, the NLSI morphed into the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) in 2012. SSERVI funds domestic research teams to address broad questions at the intersection of science and human exploration, with the underlying principle that science enables human exploration, and human exploration enables science. Nine domestic teams were funded in 2014 for a five-year period to address a variety of different topics, and nine international partners (with more to come) also work with the U.S. teams on a variety of topics of mutual interest. The result is a robust and productive research infrastructure that is not only scientifically productive but can respond to strategic topics of domestic and international interest, and which develops a new generation of researchers. This is all accomplished with the aid of virtual collaboration technologies which enable scientific research at a distance. The virtual institute model is widely applicable to a range of space science and exploration problems.

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2053 ref|YP_001474562.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] gb|ABV37434.1| DNA internalization-related competence protein ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] YP_001474562.1 0.18 25% ...

  14. 75 FR 52375 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-094)] NASA Advisory Council... National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, September 21, 2010, 1 p.m.-6:30 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  15. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Schmidt, G. K.; Bailey, B. E.; Minafra, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration, and was created to enable a deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies. SSERVI is supported jointly by NASA's Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The institute currently focuses on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, but the institute goals may expand, depending on NASA's needs, in the future. The 9 initial teams, selected in late 2013 and funded from 2014-2019, have expertise across the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences. Their research includes various aspects of the surface, interior, exosphere, near-space environments, and dynamics of these bodies. NASA anticipates a small number of additional teams to be selected within the next two years, with a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) likely to be released in 2016. Calls for proposals are issued every 2-3 years to allow overlap between generations of institute teams, but the intent for each team is to provide a stable base of funding for a five year period. SSERVI's mission includes acting as a bridge between several groups, joining together researchers from: 1) scientific and exploration communities, 2) multiple disciplines across a wide range of planetary sciences, and 3) domestic and international communities and partnerships. The SSERVI central office is located at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. The administrative staff at the central office forms the organizational hub for the domestic and international teams and enables the virtual collaborative environment. Interactions with geographically dispersed teams across the U.S., and global partners, occur easily and frequently in a collaborative virtual environment. This poster will provide an overview of the 9 current US teams and

  16. NASA Laboratory Analysis for Manned Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Shaw, Tianna E.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability Element under the NASA Human Research Program. ELA instrumentation is identified as an essential capability for future exploration missions to diagnose and treat evidence-based medical conditions. However, mission architecture limits the medical equipment, consumables, and procedures that will be available to treat medical conditions during human exploration missions. Allocated resources such as mass, power, volume, and crew time must be used efficiently to optimize the delivery of in-flight medical care. Although commercial instruments can provide the blood and urine based measurements required for exploration missions, these commercial-off-the-shelf devices are prohibitive for deployment in the space environment. The objective of the ELA project is to close the technology gap of current minimally invasive laboratory capabilities and analytical measurements in a manner that the mission architecture constraints impose on exploration missions. Besides micro gravity and radiation tolerances, other principal issues that generally fail to meet NASA requirements include excessive mass, volume, power and consumables, and nominal reagent shelf-life. Though manned exploration missions will not occur for nearly a decade, NASA has already taken strides towards meeting the development of ELA medical diagnostics by developing mission requirements and concepts of operations that are coupled with strategic investments and partnerships towards meeting these challenges. This paper focuses on the remote environment, its challenges, biomedical diagnostics requirements and candidate technologies that may lead to successful blood-urine chemistry and biomolecular measurements in future space exploration missions.

  17. Overview of NASA Finesse (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) Science and Exploration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D.S.S.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, B.; Sears, D.; Neish, C.; Osinski, G. R.; Hodges, K.; Downs, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) project was selected as a research team by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI is a joint Institute supported by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). As such, FINESSE is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program to generate strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of other planetary bodies including our Moon, Mars moons Phobos and Deimos, and near-Earth asteroids. FINESSE embodies the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science".

  18. 26 CFR 20.2053-9 - Deduction for certain State death taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for certain State death taxes. 20... § 20.2053-9 Deduction for certain State death taxes. (a) General rule. A deduction is allowed a... death taxes. However, see section 2058 to determine the deductibility of state death taxes by estates to...

  19. 26 CFR 20.2053-10 - Deduction for certain foreign death taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for certain foreign death taxes. 20... § 20.2053-10 Deduction for certain foreign death taxes. (a) General rule. A deduction is allowed the... for foreign death taxes. (b) Condition for allowance of deduction. (1) The deduction is not allowed...

  20. 26 CFR 20.2053-3 - Deduction for expenses of administering estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate... permitted by § 20.2053-1 even though the deduction, as such, was not claimed on the estate tax return or in... expenses include such expenses as court costs, surrogates' fees, accountants' fees, appraisers' fees, clerk...

  1. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2016-10-01

    Established in 2013, through joint funding from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on science at the intersection of these two enterprises. Addressing questions of value to the human exploration program that also represent important research relevant to planetary science, SSERVI creates a bridge between HEOMD and SMD. The virtual institute model reduces travel costs, but its primary virtue is the ability to join together colleagues who bring the right expertise, techniques and tools, regardless of their physical location, to address multi-faceted problems, at a deeper level than could be achieved through the typical period of smaller research grants. In addition, collaboration across team lines and international borders fosters the creation of new knowledge, especially at the intersections of disciplines that might not otherwise overlap.SSERVI teams investigate the Moon, Near-Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars, addressing questions fundamental to these target bodies and their near space environments. The institute is currently composed of nine U.S. teams of 30-50 members each, distributed geographically across the United States, ten international partners, and a Central Office located at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, CA. U.S. teams are competitively selected through peer-reviewed proposals submitted to NASA every 2-3 years, in response to a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN). The current teams were selected under CAN-1, with funding for five years (2014-2019). A smaller, overlapping set of teams are expected to be added in 2017 in response to CAN-2, thereby providing continuity and a firm foundation for any directional changes NASA requires as the CAN-1 teams end their term. This poster describes the research areas and composition of the institute to introduce SSERVI to the broader planetary

  2. NASA's New Mars Exploration Program: The Trajectory of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, James B.; Figueroa, Orlando; Naderi, Firouz M.

    2001-12-01

    NASA's newly restructured Mars Exploration Program (MEP) is finally on the way to Mars with the successful April 7 launch of the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. In addition, the announcement by the Bush Administration that the exploration of Mars will be a priority within NASA's Office of Space Science further cements the first decade of the new millennium as one of the major thrusts to understand the "new" Mars. Over the course of the past year and a half, an integrated team of managers, scientists, and engineers has crafted a revamped MEP to respond to the scientific as well as management and resource challenges associated with deep space exploration of the Red Planet. This article describes the new program from the perspective of its guiding philosophies, major events, and scientific strategy. It is intended to serve as a roadmap to the next 10-15 years of Mars exploration from the NASA viewpoint. [For further details, see the Mars Exploration Program web site (URL): http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov]. The new MEP will certainly evolve in response to discoveries, to successes, and potentially to setbacks as well. However, the design of the restructured strategy is attentive to risks, and a major attempt to instill resiliency in the program has been adopted. Mars beckons, and the next decade of exploration should provide the impetus for a follow-on decade in which multiple sample returns and other major program directions are executed. Ultimately the vision to consider the first human scientific expeditions to the Red Planet will be enabled. By the end of the first decade of this program, we may know where and how to look for the elusive clues associated with a possible martian biological record, if any was every preserved, even if only as "chemical fossils."

  3. Introducing NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and the moons of Mars. Comprised of competitively selected teams across the U.S., a growing number of international partnerships around the world, and a small central office located at NASA Ames Research Center, the institute advances collaborative research to bridge science and exploration goals. As a virtual institute, SSERVI brings unique skills and collaborative technologies for enhancing collaborative research between geographically disparate teams. SSERVI is jointly funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate and the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. Current U.S. teams include: Dr. Jennifer L. Heldmann, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA; Dr. William Farrell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; Prof. Carlé Pieters, Brown University, Providence, RI; Prof. Daniel Britt, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; Prof. Timothy Glotch, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY; Dr. Mihaly Horanyi, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Dr. Ben Bussey, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD; Dr. David A. Kring, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX; and Dr. William Bottke, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO. Interested in becoming part of SSERVI? SSERVI Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) awards are staggered every 2.5-3yrs, with award periods of five-years per team. SSERVI encourages those who wish to join the institute in the future to engage current teams and international partners regarding potential collaboration, and to participate in focus groups or current team activities now. Joining hand in hand with international partners is a winning strategy for raising the tide of Solar System science around the world. Non-U.S. science organizations can propose to become either Associate or Affiliate members on a no-exchange-of-funds basis. Current international partners

  4. NASA's Space Launch System: An Enabling Capability for International Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; May, Todd A.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2014-01-01

    As the program moves out of the formulation phase and into implementation, work is well underway on NASA's new Space Launch System, the world's most powerful launch vehicle, which will enable a new era of human exploration of deep space. As assembly and testing of the rocket is taking place at numerous sites around the United States, mission planners within NASA and at the agency's international partners continue to evaluate utilization opportunities for this ground-breaking capability. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, the SLS rocket will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), equipment, supplies, and major science missions for exploration and discovery. NASA is developing this new capability in an austere economic climate, a fact which has inspired the SLS team to find innovative solutions to the challenges of designing, developing, fielding, and operating the largest rocket in history, via a path that will deliver an initial 70 metric ton (t) capability in December 2017 and then continuing through an incremental evolutionary strategy to reach a full capability greater than 130 t. SLS will be enabling for the first missions of human exploration beyond low Earth in almost half a century, and from its first crewed flight will be able to carry humans farther into space than they have ever voyaged before. In planning for the future of exploration, the International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has created the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths toward a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for these destinations. SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they would need for such missions.

  5. Simulation Based Acquisition for NASA's Office of Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Joe

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, President George W. Bush unveiled his vision for NASA to advance U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program. This vision includes the goal to extend human presence across the solar system, starting with a human return to the Moon no later than 2020, in preparation for human exploration of Mars and other destinations. In response to this vision, NASA has created the Office of Exploration Systems (OExS) to develop the innovative technologies, knowledge, and infrastructures to explore and support decisions about human exploration destinations, including the development of a new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Within the OExS organization, NASA is implementing Simulation Based Acquisition (SBA), a robust Modeling & Simulation (M&S) environment integrated across all acquisition phases and programs/teams, to make the realization of the President s vision more certain. Executed properly, SBA will foster better informed, timelier, and more defensible decisions throughout the acquisition life cycle. By doing so, SBA will improve the quality of NASA systems and speed their development, at less cost and risk than would otherwise be the case. SBA is a comprehensive, Enterprise-wide endeavor that necessitates an evolved culture, a revised spiral acquisition process, and an infrastructure of advanced Information Technology (IT) capabilities. SBA encompasses all project phases (from requirements analysis and concept formulation through design, manufacture, training, and operations), professional disciplines, and activities that can benefit from employing SBA capabilities. SBA capabilities include: developing and assessing system concepts and designs; planning manufacturing, assembly, transport, and launch; training crews, maintainers, launch personnel, and controllers; planning and monitoring missions; responding to emergencies by evaluating effects and exploring solutions; and communicating across the OEx

  6. FINESSE Spaceward Bound - Teacher Engagement in NASA Science and Exploration Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. J. P.; Heldmann, J. L.; Sheely, T.; Karlin, J.; Johnson, S.; Rosemore, A.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Lim, D. S. S.; Garry, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars. The FINESSE science program is infused with leading edge exploration concepts since "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." The FINESSE education and public outreach program leverages the team's field investigations and educational partnerships to share the excitement of lunar, Near Earth Asteroid, and martian moon science and exploration locally, nationally, and internationally. The FINESSE education plan is in line with all of NASA's Science Mission Directorate science education objectives, particularly to enable STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and leverage efforts through partnerships.

  7. V2 and cP/CP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten; Christensen, Ken Ramshøj; Nyvad, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    As in Nyvad et al. (2017), we will explore a particular derivation of (embedded) V2, in terms of a cP/CP-distinction, which may be seen as a version of the CP-recursion analysis (de Haan & Weerman 1986; Vikner 1995 and many others). e idea is that because embedded V2 clauses do not allow extraction......, whereas other types of CP-recursion clauses do (Christensen et al. 2013a; 2013b; Christensen & Nyvad 2014), CP-recursion in embedded V2 is assumed to be fundamentally di erent from other kinds of CP-recursion, in that main clause V2 and embedded V2 involve a CP (“big CP”), whereas other clausal...... projections above IP are instances of cP (“little cP”)....

  8. Future NASA solar system exploration activities: A framework for international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Bevan M.; Ramlose, Terri; Briggs, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The goals and approaches for planetary exploration as defined for the NASA Solar System Exploration Program are discussed. The evolution of the program since the formation of the Solar System Exploration Committee (SSEC) in 1980 is reviewed and the primary missions comprising the program are described.

  9. NASA Technology Area 07: Human Exploration Destination Systems Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Alexander, Leslie; Landis, Rob; Linne, Diane; Mclemore, Carole; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Brown, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) led Space Technology Roadmap definition efforts. This paper will given an executive summary of the technology area 07 (TA07) Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS). These are draft roadmaps being reviewed and updated by the National Research Council. Deep-space human exploration missions will require many game changing technologies to enable safe missions, become more independent, and enable intelligent autonomous operations and take advantage of the local resources to become self-sufficient thereby meeting the goal of sustained human presence in space. Taking advantage of in-situ resources enhances and enables revolutionary robotic and human missions beyond the traditional mission architectures and launch vehicle capabilities. Mobility systems will include in-space flying, surface roving, and Extra-vehicular Activity/Extravehicular Robotics (EVA/EVR) mobility. These push missions will take advantage of sustainability and supportability technologies that will allow mission independence to conduct human mission operations either on or near the Earth, in deep space, in the vicinity of Mars, or on the Martian surface while opening up commercialization opportunities in low Earth orbit (LEO) for research, industrial development, academia, and entertainment space industries. The Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS) Technology Area (TA) 7 Team has been chartered by the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to strategically roadmap technology investments that will enable sustained human exploration and support NASA s missions and goals for at least the next 25 years. HEDS technologies will enable a sustained human presence for exploring destinations such as remote sites on Earth and beyond including, but not limited to, LaGrange points, low Earth orbit (LEO), high Earth orbit (HEO), geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the Moon, near

  10. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Science and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Greg; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and development and support of the international community. As part of its mission, SSERVI acts as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. The nine domestic SSERVI teams that comprise the U.S. complement of the Institute engage with the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships. SSERVI represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration enabling a deeper, integrated understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as human exploration moves beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI centers on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, with additional aspects of related technology development, including a major focus on human exploration-enabling efforts such as resolving Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs). The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science focused on airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. This research profile integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies. New opportunities for both domestic and international partnerships are continually generated through these research and

  11. Fission Power System Technology for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee; Houts, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program, and in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE), NASA is conducting a project to mature Fission Power System (FPS) technology. A primary project goal is to develop viable system options to support future NASA mission needs for nuclear power. The main FPS project objectives are as follows: 1) Develop FPS concepts that meet expected NASA mission power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options. 2) Establish a hardware-based technical foundation for FPS design concepts and reduce overall development risk. 3) Reduce the cost uncertainties for FPS and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates. 4) Generate the key products to allow NASA decisionmakers to consider FPS as a preferred option for flight development. In order to achieve these goals, the FPS project has two main thrusts: concept definition and risk reduction. Under concept definition, NASA and DOE are performing trade studies, defining requirements, developing analytical tools, and formulating system concepts. A typical FPS consists of the reactor, shield, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). Studies are performed to identify the desired design parameters for each subsystem that allow the system to meet the requirements with reasonable cost and development risk. Risk reduction provides the means to evaluate technologies in a laboratory test environment. Non-nuclear hardware prototypes are built and tested to verify performance expectations, gain operating experience, and resolve design uncertainties.

  12. NASA Advanced Exploration Systems: Advancements in Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Schneider, Walter F.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems (LSS) project strives to develop reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) critical to enabling long duration human missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Highly reliable, closed-loop life support systems are among the capabilities required for the longer duration human space exploration missions assessed by NASA’s Habitability Architecture Team.

  13. Engaging Students, Teachers, and the Public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Foxworth, S.; Kascak, A.; Luckey, M. K.; Mcinturff, B.; Runco, S.; Willis, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets, including Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts and NASA curation astromaterial samples, provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect citizens with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. Effective engagement can occur through both virtual connections such as webcasts and in-person connections at educator workshops and public outreach events. Access to NASA ARES assets combined with adaptable resources and techniques that engage and promote scientific thinking helps translate the science and research being facilitated through NASA exploration, elicits a curiosity that aims to carry over even after a given engagement, and prepares our next generation of scientific explorers.

  14. Transition in the Human Exploration of Space at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Carla A.; Cabana, Robert

    2011-01-01

    NASA is taking the next step in human exploration, beyond low Earth orbit. We have been going to low Earth orbit for the past 50 years and are using this experience to work with commercial companies to perform this function. This will free NASA resources to develop the systems necessary to travel to a Near Earth Asteroid, the Moon, Lagrange Points, and eventually Mars. At KSC, we are positioning ourselves to become a multi-user launch complex and everything we are working on is bringing us closer to achieving this goal. A vibrant multi-use spaceport is to the 21st Century what the airport was to the 20th Century - an invaluable transportation hub that supports government needs while promoting economic development and commercial markets beyond Earth's atmosphere. This past year saw the end of Shuttle, but the announcements of NASA's crew module, Orion, and heavy-lift rocket, the SLS, as well as the establishment of the Commercial Crew Program. We have a busy, but very bright future ahead of us and KSC is looking forward to playing an integral part in the next era of human space exploration. The future is SLS, 21st Century Ground Systems Program, and the Commercial Crew Program; and the future is here.

  15. Pseudoscalar top-Higgs coupling: exploration of CP-odd observables to resolve the sign ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileo, Nicolas [IFLP, CONICET - Dpto. de Física, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Kiers, Ken [Physics and Engineering Department, Taylor University,236 West Reade Ave., Upland, IN 46989 (United States); Szynkman, Alejandro [IFLP, CONICET - Dpto. de Física, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Crane, Daniel; Gegner, Ethan [Physics and Engineering Department, Taylor University,236 West Reade Ave., Upland, IN 46989 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    We present a collection of CP-odd observables for the process pp→t(→bℓ{sup +}ν{sub ℓ})t̄(→b̄ℓ{sup −}ν̄{sub ℓ})H that are linearly dependent on the scalar (κ{sub t}) and pseudoscalar (κ̃{sub t}) top-Higgs coupling and hence sensitive to the corresponding relative sign. The proposed observables are based on triple product (TP) correlations that we extract from the expression for the differential cross section in terms of the spin vectors of the top and antitop quarks. In order to explore other possibilities, we progressively modify these TPs, first by combining them, and then by replacing the spin vectors by the lepton momenta or the t and t̄ momenta by their visible parts. We generate Monte Carlo data sets for several benchmark scenarios, including the Standard Model (κ{sub t}=1, κ̃{sub t}=0) and two scenarios with mixed CP properties (κ{sub t}=1, κ̃{sub t}=±1). Assuming an integrated luminosity that is consistent with that envisioned for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, using Monte Carlo-truth and taking into account only statistical uncertainties, we find that the most promising observable can disentangle the “CP-mixed” scenarios with an effective separation of ∼19σ. In the case of observables that do not require the reconstruction of the t and t̄ momenta, the power of discrimination is up to ∼13σ for the same number of events. We also show that the most promising observables can still disentangle the CP-mixed scenarios when the number of events is reduced to values consistent with expectations for the Large Hadron Collider in the near term.

  16. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  17. Synthesis and oxidation of CpIrIII compounds: functionalization of a Cp methyl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Gehrke, Lisa S; Freudenthal, John; Kaminsky, Werner; Dipasquale, Antonio G; Mayer, James M

    2009-03-21

    [CpIrCl(2)](2) () and new CpIr(III)(L-L)X complexes (L-L = N-O or C-N chelating ligands; X = Cl, I, Me) have been prepared and their reactivity with two-electron chemical oxidants explored. Reaction of with PhI(OAc)(2) in wet solvents yields a new chloro-bridged dimer in which each of the Cp ligands has been singly acetoxylated to form [Cp(OAc)Ir(III)Cl(2)](2) () (Cp(OAc) = eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)CH(2)OAc). Complex and related carboxy- and alkoxy-functionalized Cp(OR) complexes can also be prepared from plus (PhIO)(n) and ROH. [Cp(OAc)Ir(III)Cl(2)](2) () and the methoxy analogue [Cp(OMe)Ir(III)Cl(2)](2) () have been structurally characterized. Treatment of [CpIrCl(2)](2) () with 2-phenylpyridine yields CpIr(III)(ppy)Cl () (ppy = cyclometallated 2-phenylpyridyl) which is readily converted to its iodide and methyl analogues CpIr(III)(ppy)I and CpIr(III)(ppy)Me (). CpIr(III) complexes were also prepared with N-O chelating ligands derived from anthranilic acid (2-aminobenzoic acid) and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (H(2)NCMe(2)COOH), ligands chosen to be relatively oxidation resistant. These complexes and were reacted with potential two-electron oxidants including PhI(OAc)(2), hexachlorocyclohexadienone (C(6)Cl(6)O), N-fluoro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium (Me(3)pyF(+)), [Me(3)O]BF(4) and MeOTf (OTf = triflate, CF(3)SO(3)). Iridium(V) complexes were not observed or implicated in these reactions, despite the similarity of the potential products to known CpIr(V) species. The carbon electrophiles [Me(3)O]BF(4) and MeOTf appear to react preferentially at the N-O ligands, to give methyl esters in some cases. Overall, the results indicate that Cp is not inert under oxidizing conditions and is therefore not a good supporting ligand for oxidizing organometallic complexes.

  18. Advanced Fuel Cell System Thermal Management for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. An analysis of a state-of-the-art fuel cell cooling systems was done to benchmark the portion of a fuel cell system s mass that is dedicated to thermal management. Additional analysis was done to determine the key performance targets of the advanced passive thermal management technology that would substantially reduce fuel cell system mass.

  19. Deviation from bimaximal mixing and leptonic CP phases in S4 family symmetry and generalized CP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The lepton flavor mixing matrix having one row or one column in common with the bimaximal mixing up to permutations is still compatible with the present neutrino oscillation data. We provide a thorough exploration of generating such a mixing matrix from S 4 family symmetry and generalized CP symmetry H CP . Supposing that S 4 ⋊H CP is broken down to Z 2 ST 2 SU ×H CP ν in the neutrino sector and Z 4 TST 2 U ⋊H CP l in the charged lepton sector, one column of the PMNS matrix would be of the form (1/2,1/√2,1/2) T up to permutations, both Dirac CP phase and Majorana CP phases are trivial to accommodate the observed lepton mixing angles. The phenomenological implications of the remnant symmetry K 4 (TST 2 ,T 2 U) ×H CP ν in the neutrino sector and Z 2 SU ×H CP l in the charged lepton sector are studied. One row of PMNS matrix is determined to be (1/2,1/2,−i/√2), and all the three leptonic CP phases can only be trivial to fit the measured values of the mixing angles. Two models based on S 4 family symmetry and generalized CP are constructed to implement these model independent predictions enforced by remnant symmetry. The correct mass hierarchy among the charged leptons is achieved. The vacuum alignment and higher order corrections are discussed.

  20. Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The starting point of these lectures is an introduction to the weak interactions of quarks and the Standard-Model description of CP violation, where the central role is played by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the corresponding unitarity triangles. Since the B-meson system will govern the stage of (quark) flavour physics and CP violation in this decade, it will be our main focus. We shall classify B-meson decays, introduce the theoretical tools to deal with them, investigate the requirements for non-vanishing CP-violating asymmetries, and discuss the main strategies to explore CP violation and the preferred avenues for physics beyond the Standard Model to enter. This formalism is then applied to discuss the status of important B-factory benchmark modes, where we focus on puzzling patterns in the data that may indicate new-physics effects, as well as the prospects for B-decay studies at the LHC.

  1. CP violation with an unbroken CP transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratz, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Trautner, Andreas [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics und Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn,Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-21

    A CP conserving SU(3) gauge theory is spontaneously broken to T{sub 7} by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a 15-plet. Even though the SU(3)-CP transformation is not broken by the VEV, the theory exhibits physical CP violation in the broken phase. This is because the SU(3)-CP transformation corresponds to the unique order-two outer automorphism of T{sub 7}, which is not a physical CP transformation for the T{sub 7} states, and there is no other possible CP transformation. We explicitly demonstrate that CP is violated by calculating a CP odd decay asymmetry in the broken phase. This scenario provides us with a natural protection for topological vacuum terms, ensuring that θ G{sub μν}G̃{sup μν} is absent even though CP is violated for the physical states of the model.

  2. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... topics: --Overview of Research in Space Life and Physical Sciences --Space Station and Future Exploration... Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the Research Subcommittee of the Human Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA...

  3. CP violation in the K and B systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1997-01-01

    Although CP violation was discovered more than thirty years ago, its origin is still unknown. In these lectures, we describe the CP-violation effects which have been seen in K decays, and explain how CP violation can be caused by the Standard Model weak interaction. The hypothesis that this interaction is indeed the origin of CP violation will be incisively tested by future experiments on B and K decays. We explain what quantities these experiments will try to determine, and how they will be able to determine them in a theoretically clean way. To clarify the physics of the K system, we give a phase-convention-free description of CP violation in this system. We conclude by briefly exploring whether electric dipole moments actually violate CP even if CPT invariance is not assumed. (author)

  4. CP violation in the K and B systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1996-11-01

    Although CP violation was discovered more than thirty years ago, its origin is still unknown. In these lectures, we describe the CP- violating effects which have been seen in K decays, and explain how CP violation can be caused by the Standard Model weak interaction. The hypothesis that this interaction is indeed the origin of CP violation will be incisively tested by future experiments on B and K decays. We explain what quantities these experiments will try to determine, and how they will be able to determine them in a theoretically clean way. To clarify the physics of the K system, we give a phase-convention-free description of CP violation in this system. We conclude by briefly exploring whether electric dipole moments actually violate CP even if CPT invariance is not assumed

  5. Exploring Cognition Using Software Defined Radios for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA missions typically operate using a communication infrastructure that requires significant schedule planning with limited flexibility when the needs of the mission change. Parameters such as modulation, coding scheme, frequency, and data rate are fixed for the life of the mission. This is due to antiquated hardware and software for both the space and ground assets and a very complex set of mission profiles. Automated techniques in place by commercial telecommunication companies are being explored by NASA to determine their usability by NASA to reduce cost and increase science return. Adding cognition the ability to learn from past decisions and adjust behavior is also being investigated. Software Defined Radios are an ideal way to implement cognitive concepts. Cognition can be considered in many different aspects of the communication system. Radio functions, such as frequency, modulation, data rate, coding and filters can be adjusted based on measurements of signal degradation. Data delivery mechanisms and route changes based on past successes and failures can be made to more efficiently deliver the data to the end user. Automated antenna pointing can be added to improve gain, coverage, or adjust the target. Scheduling improvements and automation to reduce the dependence on humans provide more flexible capabilities. The Cognitive Communications project, funded by the Space Communication and Navigation Program, is exploring these concepts and using the SCaN Testbed on board the International Space Station to implement them as they evolve. The SCaN Testbed contains three Software Defined Radios and a flight computer. These four computing platforms, along with a tracking antenna system and the supporting ground infrastructure, will be used to implement various concepts in a system similar to those used by missions. Multiple universities and SBIR companies are supporting this investigation. This paper will describe the cognitive system ideas under consideration and

  6. NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program Energy Storage Project Battery Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Mercer, Carolyn R.; Jankovsky, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Technical Interchange Meeting was held at Saft America s Research and Development facility in Cockeysville, Maryland on Sept 28th-29th, 2010. The meeting was attended by Saft, contractors who are developing battery component materials under contracts awarded through a NASA Research Announcement (NRA), and NASA. This briefing presents an overview of the components being developed by the contractor attendees for the NASA s High Energy (HE) and Ultra High Energy (UHE) cells. The transition of the advanced lithium-ion cell development project at NASA from the Exploration Technology Development Program Energy Storage Project to the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project, changes to deliverable hardware and schedule due to a reduced budget, and our roadmap to develop cells and provide periodic off-ramps for cell technology for demonstrations are discussed. This meeting gave the materials and cell developers the opportunity to discuss the intricacies of their materials and determine strategies to address any particulars of the technology.

  7. Nuclear power technology requirements for NASA exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how future exploration of the Moon and Mars will mandate developments in many areas of technology. In particular, major advances will be required in planet surface power systems and space transportation systems. Critical nuclear technology challenges that can enable strategic self-sufficiency, acceptable operational costs and cost-effective space transportation goals for NASA exploration missions have been identified. Critical technologies for surface power systems include stationary and mobile nuclear reactor and radio-isotope heat sources coupled to static and dynamic power conversion devices. These technologies can provide dramatic reductions in mass leading to operational and transportation cost savings. Critical technologies for space transportation systems include nuclear thermal rocket and nuclear electric propulsion options which present compelling concepts for significantly reducing mass, cost or travel time required for Earth-Mars transport

  8. CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    Contents: CP Phenomenology: Introduction to CP Violation (C Jarlskog); CP-Violation in the K 0 -K 0 -System (K Kleinknecht); The Quark Mixing Matrix, Charm Decays and B Decays (S Stone); The Question of CP Noninvariance - As Seen through the Eyes of Neutral Beauty (I I Bigi et al.); In Search of CP Noninvariance in Heavy Quark Systems (L-L Chau); CP Violation at High Energy e + e - Colliders (J Bernabéu & M B Gavela); CP Violation in the Standard Model with Four Families (A Datta & E A Paschos); CP Effects When Neutrinos are their Own Antiparticles (B Kayser); On Spontaneous CP Violation Trigg

  9. Bioinspired engineering of exploration systems for NASA and DoD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Chahl, Javaan; Srinivasan, M. V.; Young, L.; Werblin, Frank; Hine, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2002-01-01

    A new approach called bioinspired engineering of exploration systems (BEES) and its value for solving pressing NASA and DoD needs are described. Insects (for example honeybees and dragonflies) cope remarkably well with their world, despite possessing a brain containing less than 0.01% as many neurons as the human brain. Although most insects have immobile eyes with fixed focus optics and lack stereo vision, they use a number of ingenious, computationally simple strategies for perceiving their world in three dimensions and navigating successfully within it. We are distilling selected insect-inspired strategies to obtain novel solutions for navigation, hazard avoidance, altitude hold, stable flight, terrain following, and gentle deployment of payload. Such functionality provides potential solutions for future autonomous robotic space and planetary explorers. A BEES approach to developing lightweight low-power autonomous flight systems should be useful for flight control of such biomorphic flyers for both NASA and DoD needs. Recent biological studies of mammalian retinas confirm that representations of multiple features of the visual world are systematically parsed and processed in parallel. Features are mapped to a stack of cellular strata within the retina. Each of these representations can be efficiently modeled in semiconductor cellular nonlinear network (CNN) chips. We describe recent breakthroughs in exploring the feasibility of the unique blending of insect strategies of navigation with mammalian visual search, pattern recognition, and image understanding into hybrid biomorphic flyers for future planetary and terrestrial applications. We describe a few future mission scenarios for Mars exploration, uniquely enabled by these newly developed biomorphic flyers.

  10. Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The starting point of these lectures is an introduction to the weak interactions of quarks and the Standard-Model description of CP violation, where the key element is the Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa matrix and the corresponding unitarity triangles. Since the B-meson system will govern the stage of (quark) flavour physics and CP violation in this decade, it will be -- after a brief look at the kaon system -- our main focus. We shall classify B-meson decays, introduce the theoretical tools to deal with them, explore the requirements for non-vanishing CP-violating asymmetries, and discuss B^0_q--B^0_q_bar mixing (q={d,s}). We will then turn to B-factory benchmark modes, discuss the physics potential of B^0_s mesons, which is particularly promising for B-decay experiments at hadron colliders, and emphasize the importance of studies of rare decays, which are absent at the tree level in the Standard Model, complement nicely the studies of CP violation, and provide interesting probes for new physics.

  11. NASA's Space Launch System: A New Capability for Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd A.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and other high-priority payloads into deep space. Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with human missions beyond the Moon and then go on to transport astronauts or robots to distant places such as asteroids and Mars. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, SLS will start with 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket that launched astronauts to the Moon 40 years ago. From there it will evolve into the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, via an upgrade approach that will provide building blocks for future space exploration. This paper will explain how NASA will execute this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology, from the initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability through a block upgrade approach to an evolved 130-t capability, and will detail the progress that has already been made toward a first launch in 2017. This paper will also explore the requirements needed for human missions to deep-space destinations and for game-changing robotic science missions, and the capability of SLS to meet those requirements and enable those missions, along with the evolution strategy that will increase that capability. The International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has worked together to create the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths towards a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for all three destinations. The SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and

  12. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Building Collaboration Through International Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, K. E.; Schmidt, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on re-search at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the international partner re-search efforts and how we are engaging the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  13. NASA's strategy for Mars exploration in the 1990s and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntress, W. T.; Feeley, T. J.; Boyce, J. M.

    NASA's Office of Space Science is changing its approach to all its missions, both current and future. Budget realities are necessitating that we change the way we do business and the way we look at NASA's role in the U.S. Government. These challenges are being met by a new and innovative approach that focuses on achieving a balanced world-class space science program that requires less U.S. resources while providing an enhanced role for technology and education as integral components of our Research and Development (R&D) programs. Our Mars exploration plans, especially the Mars Surveyor program, are a key feature of this new NASA approach to space science. The Mars Surveyor program will be affordable, engaging to the public with global and close-up images of Mars, have high scientific value, employ a distributed risk strategy (two launches per opportunity), and will use significant advanced technologies.

  14. Learning More About Our Earth: An Exploration of NASA's Contributions to Earth Science Through Remote Sensing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Francis

    2017-01-01

    NASA is commonly known for its pioneering work in space exploration and the technological advancements that made access to space possible. NASA is now increasingly known for the agency's research and technologies that support the Earth sciences. This is a presentation focusing on NASA's Earth science efforts told mostly through the technological innovations NASA uses to achieve a greater understanding of the Earth, making it possible to explore the Earth as a system. Enabling this science is NASA's fleet of over two dozen Earth science spacecraft, supported by aircraft, ships and ground observations. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. With the launching of the three flagship satellite missions, Terra, Aqua and Aura, beginning in 1999, NASA's initial Mission to Planet Earth made it possible to measure aspects of the environment that touch the lives of every person around the world. NASA harnessing the unique space-based platform means, fortunately, no planet is better studied than the one we actually live on.

  15. NASA Instrument Cost Model for Explorer-Like Mission Instruments (NICM-E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Fox, George; Mrozinski, Joe; Ball, Gary

    2013-01-01

    NICM-E is a cost estimating relationship that supplements the traditional NICM System Level CERs for instruments flown on NASA Explorer-like missions that have the following three characteristics: 1) fly on Class C missions, 2) major development led and performed by universities or research foundations, and 3) have significant level of inheritance.

  16. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale,School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)

    2015-10-21

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  17. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R., E-mail: i.baldes@student.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: amillar@student.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: raymondv@unimelb.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Australia (Australia)

    2015-10-01

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  18. NASA's Planned Fuel Cell Development Activities for 2009 and Beyond in Support of the Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Energy Storage Project is one of many technology development efforts being implemented as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). The Energy Storage Project is a focused technology development effort to advance lithium-ion battery and proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technologies to meet the specific power and energy storage needs of NASA Exploration missions. The fuel cell portion of the project has as its focus the development of both primary fuel cell power systems and regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage systems, and is led by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), academia, and industrial partners. The development goals are to improve stack electrical performance, reduce system mass and parasitic power requirements, and increase system life and reliability.

  19. 26 CFR 20.2014-7 - Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Country X. The Country X tax imposed was at a 50-percent rate on all beneficiaries. A State inheritance... death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d). 20.2014-7 Section 20.2014-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF...

  20. Development of NASA's Small Fission Power System for Science and Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Mason, Lee S.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Poston, David I.; McClure, Patrick R.; Creasy, John; Robinson, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system has brought many exciting challenges to our nations scientific and engineering community over the past several decades. As we expand our visions to explore new, more challenging destinations, we must also expand our technology base to support these new missions. NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate is tasked with developing these technologies for future mission infusion and continues to seek answers to many existing technology gaps. One such technology gap is related to compact power systems (1 kWe) that provide abundant power for several years where solar energy is unavailable or inadequate. Below 1 kWe, Radioisotope Power Systems have been the workhorse for NASA and will continue to be used for lower power applications similar to the successful missions of Voyager, Ulysses, New Horizons, Cassini, and Curiosity. Above 1 kWe, fission power systems become an attractive technology offering a scalable modular design of the reactor, shield, power conversion, and heat transport subsystems. Near term emphasis has been placed in the 1-10kWe range that lies outside realistic radioisotope power levels and fills a promising technology gap capable of enabling both science and human exploration missions. History has shown that development of space reactors is technically, politically, and financially challenging and requires a new approach to their design and development. A small team of NASA and DOE experts are providing a solution to these enabling FPS technologies starting with the lowest power and most cost effective reactor series named Kilopower that is scalable from approximately 1-10 kWe.

  1. Exploring and Analyzing Climate Variations Online by Using NASA MERRA-2 Data at GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Ostrenga, Dana M.; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Kempler, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) (http:giovanni.sci.gsfc.nasa.govgiovanni) is a web-based data visualization and analysis system developed by the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Current data analysis functions include Lat-Lon map, time series, scatter plot, correlation map, difference, cross-section, vertical profile, and animation etc. The system enables basic statistical analysis and comparisons of multiple variables. This web-based tool facilitates data discovery, exploration and analysis of large amount of global and regional remote sensing and model data sets from a number of NASA data centers. Long term global assimilated atmospheric, land, and ocean data have been integrated into the system that enables quick exploration and analysis of climate data without downloading, preprocessing, and learning data. Example data include climate reanalysis data from NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) which provides data beginning in 1980 to present; land data from NASA Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), which assimilates data from 1948 to 2012; as well as ocean biological data from NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM), which provides data from 1998 to 2012. This presentation, using surface air temperature, precipitation, ozone, and aerosol, etc. from MERRA-2, demonstrates climate variation analysis with Giovanni at selected regions.

  2. Flavor and CP invariant composite Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, Michele; Weiler, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    The flavor protection in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness is known to be insufficient. We explore the possibility to alleviate the tension with CP odd observables by assuming that flavor or CP are symmetries of the composite sector, broken by the coupling to Standard Model fields. One realization is that the composite sector has a flavor symmetry SU(3) or SU(3) U x SU(3) D which allows us to realize Minimal Flavor Violation. We show how to avoid the previously problematic tension between a flavor symmetric composite sector and electro-weak precision tests. Some of the light quarks are substantially or even fully composite with striking signals at the LHC. We discuss the constraints from recent dijet mass measurements and give an outlook on the discovery potential. We also present a different protection mechanism where we separate the generation of flavor hierarchies and the origin of CP violation. This can eliminate or safely reduce unwanted CP violating effects, realizing effectively ''Minimal CP Violation'' and is compatible with a dynamical generation of flavor at low scales. (orig.)

  3. NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations: Science Operations Development for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission 16 in 2012 was to evaluate and compare the performance of a defined series of representative near-Earth asteroid (NEA) extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks under different conditions and combinations of work systems, constraints, and assumptions considered for future human NEA exploration missions. NEEMO 16 followed NASA's 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS), the primary focus of which was understanding the implications of communication latency, crew size, and work system combinations with respect to scientific data quality, data management, crew workload, and crew/mission control interactions. The 1-g environment precluded meaningful evaluation of NEA EVA translation, worksite stabilization, sampling, or instrument deployment techniques. Thus, NEEMO missions were designed to provide an opportunity to perform a preliminary evaluation of these important factors for each of the conditions being considered. NEEMO 15 also took place in 2011 and provided a first look at many of the factors, but the mission was cut short due to a hurricane threat before all objectives were completed. ARES Directorate (KX) personnel consulted with JSC engineers to ensure that high-fidelity planetary science protocols were incorporated into NEEMO mission architectures. ARES has been collaborating with NEEMO mission planners since NEEMO 9 in 2006, successively building upon previous developments to refine science operations concepts within engineering constraints; it is expected to continue the collaboration as NASA's human exploration mission plans evolve.

  4. CP violation in neutral B decays to non-CP-eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1992-01-01

    If CP violation comes from complex phases in the quark mixing matrix, then neutral B decays to CP eigenstates will exhibit large, cleanly-predicted CP-violating effects. The authors show that the same is true of neutral B decays to several types of ''near-CP-eigenstates.'' By experimentally studying the latter decays as well as those to the CP eigenstates, one will be able to obtain more definitive information on CP violation from a given number of B mesons

  5. Flavor and CP invariant composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, Michele [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Weiler, Andreas [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The flavor protection in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness is known to be insufficient. We explore the possibility to alleviate the tension with CP odd observables by assuming that flavor or CP are symmetries of the composite sector, broken by the coupling to Standard Model fields. One realization is that the composite sector has a flavor symmetry SU(3) or SU(3){sub U} x SU(3){sub D} which allows us to realize Minimal Flavor Violation. We show how to avoid the previously problematic tension between a flavor symmetric composite sector and electro-weak precision tests. Some of the light quarks are substantially or even fully composite with striking signals at the LHC. We discuss the constraints from recent dijet mass measurements and give an outlook on the discovery potential. We also present a different protection mechanism where we separate the generation of flavor hierarchies and the origin of CP violation. This can eliminate or safely reduce unwanted CP violating effects, realizing effectively ''Minimal CP Violation'' and is compatible with a dynamical generation of flavor at low scales. (orig.)

  6. Human Expeditions to Near-Earth Asteroids: An Update on NASA's Status and Proposed Activities for Small Body Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul; Mazanek, Dan; Barbee, Brent; Landis, Rob; Johnson, Lindley; Yeomans, Don; Reeves, David; Drake, Bret; Friedensen, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years, much attention has been focused on the human exploration of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Two independent NASA studies examined the feasibility of sending piloted missions to NEAs, and in 2009, the Augustine Commission identified NEAs as high profile destinations for human exploration missions beyond the Earth- Moon system as part of the Flexible Path. More recently the current U.S. presidential administration directed NASA to include NEAs as destinations for future human exploration with the goal of sending astronauts to a NEA in the mid to late 2020s. This directive became part of the official National Space Policy of the United States of America as of June 28, 2010. The scientific and hazard mitigation benefits, along with the programmatic and operational benefits of a human venture beyond the Earth-Moon system, make a mission to a NEA using NASA s proposed exploration systems a compelling endeavor.

  7. Enabling Laser and Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  8. Advances in Laser/Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  9. Proceedings of the Workshop on CP Violation at KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J.N.

    1989-07-01

    These proceedings contain the written version of eight talks delivered at the Workshop on CP Violation at KAON Factory. The articles contain reviews on the exploration of CP violation effects associated with the s-quark. Discussion on the use of intense kaon fluxes, which will be available at the proposed KAON Factory, are included

  10. NASA Exploration Launch Projects Overview: The Crew Launch Vehicle and the Cargo Launch Vehicle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoddy, Jimmy R.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Cook, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration (January 2004) serves as the foundation for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) strategic goals and objectives. As the NASA Administrator outlined during his confirmation hearing in April 2005, these include: 1) Flying the Space Shuttle as safely as possible until its retirement, not later than 2010. 2) Bringing a new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) into service as soon as possible after Shuttle retirement. 3) Developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics at NASA, consistent with the redirection of the human space flight program to focus on exploration. 4) Completing the International Space Station (ISS) in a manner consistent with international partner commitments and the needs of human exploration. 5) Encouraging the pursuit of appropriate partnerships with the emerging commercial space sector. 6) Establishing a lunar return program having the maximum possible utility for later missions to Mars and other destinations. In spring 2005, the Agency commissioned a team of aerospace subject matter experts to perform the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS). The ESAS team performed in-depth evaluations of a number of space transportation architectures and provided recommendations based on their findings? The ESAS analysis focused on a human-rated Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) for astronaut transport and a heavy lift Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) to carry equipment, materials, and supplies for lunar missions and, later, the first human journeys to Mars. After several months of intense study utilizing safety and reliability, technical performance, budget, and schedule figures of merit in relation to design reference missions, the ESAS design options were unveiled in summer 2005. As part of NASA's systems engineering approach, these point of departure architectures have been refined through trade studies during the ongoing design phase leading to the development phase that

  11. CP violation and ΔI=1/2 enhancement in K decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, S.R.; Scadron, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    We study CP-conserving and CP-violating K 0 →ππ and K 0 →ππγ decays, using the same techniques which explain the ΔI=1/2 enhancement of the former to also explore CP violation of the latter transitions. If CP violation is driven by the WWγ vertex, we show that direct CP violation in K L →ππγ is scaled to the s→dγ E1 quark transition and the latter is suppressed by the GIM mechanism (compatible with recent experiments). In the same spirit, the dominant ΔI=1/2 enhancement of CP-conserving kaon weak decays can be scaled to an s→d quark transition which is enhanced by the GIM mechanism. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. The NASA research and technology program on space power: A key element of the Space Exploration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Atkins, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    In July 1989, President Bush announced his space exploration initiative of going back to the Moon to stay and then going to Mars. Building upon its ongoing research and technology base, NASA has established an exploration technology program to develop the technologies needed for piloted missions to the Moon and Mars. A key element for the flights and for the planned bases is power. The NASA research and technology program on space power encompasses power sources, energy storage, and power management.

  13. In-Space Propulsion Technology Products for NASA's Future Science and Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling, for future NASA flagship and sample return missions currently being considered, as well as having broad applicability to future competed mission solicitations. The high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost was completed in 2009. Two other ISPT technologies are nearing completion of their technology development phase: 1) NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 2) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; aerothermal effect models: and atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus. This paper provides status of the technology development, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies that have recently completed their technology development and will be ready for infusion into NASA s Discovery, New Frontiers, Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Flagship, and Exploration technology demonstration missions

  14. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Flavour Physics and CP Violation : Expecting the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The starting point of these lectures is an introduction to the weak interactions of quarks and the Standard-Model description of CP violation, where the central role is played by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the corresponding unitarity triangles. Since the B-meson system governs the stage of (quark) flavour physics and CP violation, it is our main focus: we shall classify B-meson decays, introduce the theoretical tools to deal with them, investigate the requirements for non-vanishing CP-violating asymmetries, and discuss the main strategies to explore CP violation and the preferred avenues for physics beyond the Standard Model to enter. This formalism allows us then to discuss important benchmark modes, where we will also address the question of how much space for new-physics effects in the B studies at the LHC is left by the recent experimental results from the B factories and the Tevatron.

  16. CpG + CpNpG Analysis of Protein-Coding Sequences from Tomato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wang, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We develop codon-based models for simultaneously inferring the mutational effects of CpG and CpNpG methylation in coding regions. In a data set of 369 tomato genes, we show that there is very little effect of CpNpG methylation but a strong effect of CpG methylation affecting almost all genes. We...... further show that the CpNpG and CpG effects are largely uncorrelated. Our results suggest different roles of CpG and CpNpG methylation, with CpNpG methylation possibly playing a specialized role in defense against transposons and RNA viruses....

  17. Cytosine methylation at CpCpG sites triggers accumulation of non-CpG methylation in gene bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Zabet, NR; Catoni, Marco; Prischi, F; Paszkowski, Jerzy Waclaw

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine is an epigenetic mark involved in the regulation of transcription, usually associated with transcriptional repression. In mammals, methylated cytosines are found predominantly in CpGs but in plants non-CpG methylation (in the CpHpG or CpHpH contexts, where H is A, C or T) is also present and is associated with the transcriptional silencing of transposable elements. In addition, CpG methylation is found in coding regions of active genes. In the absence of the demethylas...

  18. On the measurement of leptonic CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguet Castell, J.; Gavela, M.B.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernandez, P.; Mena, O.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the simultaneous determination of the leptonic CP-odd phase δ and the angle θ 13 from the subleading transitions ν e →ν μ and ν-bar e →ν-bar μ results generically, at fixed neutrino energy and baseline, in two degenerate solutions. In light of this, we refine a previous analysis of the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation at a neutrino factory, in the LMA-MSW scenario, by exploring the full range of δ and θ 13 . Furthermore, we take into account the expected uncertainties on the solar and atmospheric oscillation parameters and in the average Earth matter density along the neutrino path. An intermediate baseline of O(3000) km is still the best option to tackle CP violation, although a combination of two baselines turns out to be very important in resolving degeneracies

  19. Lessons Learned while Exploring Cloud-Native Architectures for NASA EOSDIS Applications and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilone, D.

    2016-12-01

    As new, high data rate missions begin collecting data, the NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) archive is projected to grow roughly 20x to over 300PBs by 2025. To prepare for the dramatic increase in data and enable broad scientific inquiry into larger time series and datasets, NASA has been exploring the impact of applying cloud technologies throughout EOSDIS. In this talk we will provide an overview of NASA's prototyping and lessons learned in applying cloud architectures to: Highly scalable and extensible ingest and archive of EOSDIS data Going "all-in" on cloud based application architectures including "serverless" data processing pipelines and evaluating approaches to vendor-lock in Rethinking data distribution and approaches to analysis in a cloud environment Incorporating and enforcing security controls while minimizing the barrier for research efforts to deploy to NASA compliant, operational environments. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of satellites for long term global observations. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a multi-petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research by providing end-to-end services from EOS instrument data collection to science data processing to full access to EOS and other earth science data. On a daily basis, the EOSDIS ingests, processes, archives and distributes over 3 terabytes of data from NASA's Earth Science missions representing over 6000 data products ranging from various types of science disciplines. EOSDIS has continually evolved to improve the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of high-impact NASA data spanning the multi-petabyte-scale archive of Earth science data products.

  20. CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.

    1995-01-01

    We review the present status of the Standard Model of CP violation, which is based on a complex phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. So far CP violation has been observed only in K 0 -K 0 mixing, consistent with a sizable phase. The implications of future CP nonconserving measusrements in K and B decays are discussed within the model. Direct CP violation in K→2π may be observed in the near future, however this would not be a powerful test of the model. B decays provide a wide variety of CP asymmetry measurements, which can serve as precise tests of the Standard Model in cases where the asymmetry is cleanly related to phases of CKM matrix elements. Some of the most promising cases are discussed. ((orig.))

  1. MeCP2 Rett mutations affect large scale chromatin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Noopur Agarwal; Becker, Annette; Jost, K Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological, X chromosomal-linked disorder associated with mutations in the MECP2 gene. MeCP2 protein has been proposed to play a role in transcriptional regulation as well as in chromatin architecture. Since MeCP2 mutant cells exhibit surprisingly mild changes in gene...... expression, we have now explored the possibility that Rett mutations may affect the ability of MeCP2 to bind and organize chromatin. We found that all but one of the 21 missense MeCP2 mutants analyzed accumulated at heterochromatin and about half of them were significantly affected. Furthermore, two......-thirds of all mutants showed a significantly decreased ability to cluster heterochromatin. Three mutants containing different proline substitutions (P101H, P101R and P152R) were severely affected only in heterochromatin clustering and located far away from the DNA interface in the MeCP2 methyl-binding domain...

  2. New, Efficient and Clean Strategies to Explore CP Violation Through Neutral B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2003-01-01

    We point out that decays of the kind $B_d\\to D_\\pm K_{S(L)}$ and $B_s\\to D_\\pm\\eta^{(')},D_\\pm\\phi, ...$, where $D_+$ and $D_-$ denote the CP-even and CP-odd eigenstates of the neutral D-meson system, respectively, provide very efficient, theoretically clean determinations of the angle $\\gamma$ of the unitarity triangle. In this new strategy, we use the $B^0_q$--$\\bar{B^0_q}$ ($q\\in\\{d,s\\}$) mixing phase $\\phi_q$ as an input, and employ only ``untagged'' and mixing-induced CP-violating observables, which satisfy a very simple relation, allowing us to determine $\\tan\\gamma$. Using a plausible dynamical assumption, $\\gamma$ can be fixed in an essentially unambiguous manner. The corresponding formalism can also be applied to $B_d\\to D_\\pm\\pi^0,D_\\pm\\rho^0, >...$ and $B_s\\to D_\\pm K_{S(L)}$ decays. Although these modes appear less attractive for the extraction of $\\gamma$, they provide interesting determinations of $\\sin\\phi_q$. In comparison with the conventional $B_d\\to J/\\psi K_{S(L)}$ and $B_s\\to J/\\psi\\phi$ ...

  3. Reference Mission Version 3.0 Addendum to the Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team. Addendum; 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bret G. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This Addendum to the Mars Reference Mission was developed as a companion document to the NASA Special Publication 6107, "Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team." It summarizes changes and updates to the Mars Reference Missions that were developed by the Exploration Office since the final draft of SP 6107 was printed in early 1999. The Reference Mission is a tool used by the exploration community to compare and evaluate approaches to mission and system concepts that could be used for human missions to Mars. It is intended to identify and clarify system drivers, significant sources of cost, performance, risk, and schedule variation. Several alternative scenarios, employing different technical approaches to solving mission and technology challenges, are discussed in this Addendum. Comparing alternative approaches provides the basis for continual improvement to technology investment plan and a general understanding of future human missions to Mars. The Addendum represents a snapshot of work in progress in support of planning for future human exploration missions through May 1998.

  4. CP Violation in Heavy MSSM Higgs Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Carena, M; Lee, J S; Pilaftsis, A; Wagner, C E M

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales M_S above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass M_H+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with a charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG...

  5. CP Violation course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The lecture introduces the concepts and phenomena of matter-antimatter symmetry violation, so-called "CP" violation. The lecture is organized in four courses, the first being devoted to a historical overview and an introduction into fundamental discrete symmetries. The second course introduces the most compelling CP-violating phenomena, and presents the first experimental discovery of CP violation in the neutral kaon system. The third course discusses how CP violation is beautifully incorporated into the Standard Model of particle interactions, and how modern B-meson "factories" provide precise tests of this picture. Finally, the fourth and last course introduces CP violation and the genesis of our matter world.

  6. Exploring the architectural trade space of NASAs Space Communication and Navigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M.; Selva, D.; Cameron, B.; Crawley, E.; Seas, A.; Seery, B.

    NASAs Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Program is responsible for providing communication and navigation services to space missions and other users in and beyond low Earth orbit. The current SCaN architecture consists of three independent networks: the Space Network (SN), which contains the TDRS relay satellites in GEO; the Near Earth Network (NEN), which consists of several NASA owned and commercially operated ground stations; and the Deep Space Network (DSN), with three ground stations in Goldstone, Madrid, and Canberra. The first task of this study is the stakeholder analysis. The goal of the stakeholder analysis is to identify the main stakeholders of the SCaN system and their needs. Twenty-one main groups of stakeholders have been identified and put on a stakeholder map. Their needs are currently being elicited by means of interviews and an extensive literature review. The data will then be analyzed by applying Cameron and Crawley's stakeholder analysis theory, with a view to highlighting dominant needs and conflicting needs. The second task of this study is the architectural tradespace exploration of the next generation TDRSS. The space of possible architectures for SCaN is represented by a set of architectural decisions, each of which has a discrete set of options. A computational tool is used to automatically synthesize a very large number of possible architectures by enumerating different combinations of decisions and options. The same tool contains models to evaluate the architectures in terms of performance and cost. The performance model uses the stakeholder needs and requirements identified in the previous steps as inputs, and it is based in the VASSAR methodology presented in a companion paper. This paper summarizes the current status of the MIT SCaN architecture study. It starts by motivating the need to perform tradespace exploration studies in the context of relay data systems through a description of the history NASA's space communicati

  7. Review of NASA approach to space radiation risk assessments for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-02-01

    Long duration space missions present unique radiation protection challenges due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which includes high charge and energy particles and other highly ionizing radiation such as neutrons. Based on a recommendation by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, a 3% lifetime risk of exposure-induced death for cancer has been used as a basis for risk limitation by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for low-Earth orbit missions. NASA has developed a risk-based approach to radiation exposure limits that accounts for individual factors (age, gender, and smoking history) and assesses the uncertainties in risk estimates. New radiation quality factors with associated probability distribution functions to represent the quality factor's uncertainty have been developed based on track structure models and recent radiobiology data for high charge and energy particles. The current radiation dose limits are reviewed for spaceflight and the various qualitative and quantitative uncertainties that impact the risk of exposure-induced death estimates using the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model. NSCR estimates of the number of "safe days" in deep space to be within exposure limits and risk estimates for a Mars exploration mission are described.

  8. Right-handed quark mixings in minimal left-right symmetric model with general CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Ji Xiangdong; An Haipeng; Mohapatra, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    We solve systematically for the right-handed quark mixings in the minimal left-right symmetric model which generally has both explicit and spontaneous CP violations. The leading-order result has the same hierarchical structure as the left-handed Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing, but with additional CP phases originating from a spontaneous CP-violating phase in the Higgs vacuum expectation values. We explore the phenomenology entailed by the new right-handed mixing matrix, particularly the bounds on the mass of W R and the CP phase of the Higgs vacuum expectation values

  9. LHCb : Measuring $CP$ violation with $\\Delta A_{CP}$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Pearce, A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements are presented of direct $CP$ violation in $D^{0}$ meson decays in LHCb, using the $\\Delta A_{CP}$ technique, and a proposal is outlined to make similar measurements in the decays of the charmed baryon $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$. The motivations for use of the $\\Delta A_{CP}$ method are discussed, along with the current results and future prospects.

  10. Methyl-CpG binding-protein 2 function in cholinergic neurons mediates cardiac arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2016-11-15

    Sudden unexpected death occurs in one quarter of deaths in Rett Syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). People with RTT show a variety of autonomic nervous system (ANS) abnormalities and mouse models show similar problems including QTc interval prolongation and hypothermia. To explore the role of cardiac problems in sudden death in RTT, we characterized cardiac rhythm in mice lacking Mecp2 function. Male and female mutant mice exhibited spontaneous cardiac rhythm abnormalities including bradycardic events, sinus pauses, atrioventricular block, premature ventricular contractions, non-sustained ventricular arrhythmias, and increased heart rate variability. Death was associated with spontaneous cardiac arrhythmias and complete conduction block. Atropine treatment reduced cardiac arrhythmias in mutant mice, implicating overactive parasympathetic tone. To explore the role of MeCP2 within the parasympathetic neurons, we selectively removed MeCP2 function from cholinergic neurons (MeCP2 ChAT KO), which recapitulated the cardiac rhythm abnormalities, hypothermia, and early death seen in RTT male mice. Conversely, restoring MeCP2 only in cholinergic neurons rescued these phenotypes. Thus, MeCP2 in cholinergic neurons is necessary and sufficient for autonomic cardiac control, thermoregulation, and survival, and targeting the overactive parasympathetic system may be a useful therapeutic strategy to prevent sudden unexpected death in RTT.

  11. Leptonic CP phases near the μ–τ symmetric limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Rivera-Agudelo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The neutrino masses and mixings indicated by current neutrino oscillation experiments suggest that the neutrino mass matrix possesses an approximate μ–τ exchange symmetry. In this study, we explore the neutrino parameter space and show that if a small μ–τ symmetry breaking is considered, the Majorana CP phases must be unequal and non-zero independently of the neutrino mass scale. Moreover, a small μ–τ symmetry breaking favors quasi-degenerate masses. We also show that Majorana phases are strongly correlated with the Dirac CP violating phase. Within this framework, we obtain robust predictions for the values of the Majorana phases when the experimental indications for the Dirac CP phase are used.

  12. Human Missions to Near-Earth Asteroids: An Update on NASA's Current Status and Proposed Activities for Small Body Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P. A.; Mazanek, D. D.; Barbee, B. W.; Mink, R. G.; Landis, R. R.; Adamo, D. R.; Johnson, L. N.; Yeomans, D. K.; Reeves, D. M.; Larman, K. T.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, much attention has been focused on the human exploration of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Two independent NASA studies examined the feasibility of sending piloted missions to NEAs, and in 2009, the Augustine Commission identified NEAs as high profile destinations for human exploration missions beyond the Earth-Moon system as part of the Flexible Path. More recently the current U.S. presidential administration directed NASA to include NEAs as destinations for future human exploration with the goal of sending astronauts to a NEA in the mid to late 2020s. This directive became part of the official National Space Policy of the United States of America as of June 28, 2010.

  13. CP violation in B decay

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We review the physics of CP violation in B decays. After introducing the CKM matrix and how it causes CP violation, we cover three types of CP violation that can occur in B decays: CP violation in mixing, CP violation by mixing-decay interference, and CP violation in decay.

  14. CP violation and modular symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    We reconsider the origin of CP violation in fundamental theory. Existing string models of spontaneous CP violation make ambiguous predictions, due to the arbitrariness of CP transformation and the apparent noninvariance of the results under duality. We find a modular CP invariance condition, applicable to any predictive model of spontaneous CP violation, which circumvents these problems; it strongly constrains CP violation by heterotic string moduli. The dilaton is also evaluated as a source of CP violation, but is likely experimentally excluded. We consider the prospects for explaining CP violation in strongly coupled strings and brane worlds

  15. "NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute" - Expanded Goals and More Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, D.; Schmidt, G.; Pendleton, Y.; Bailey, B.; Morrison, D.

    2015-10-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) has been pursuing international partnerships since its inceptionas the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), in order to both leverage the science being done by its domestic member institutions as well as to help lunar science and exploration become a greater global endeavor. The international partners of the I nstitute have pursued a broad program of lunar science stimulated by scientific partnerships enabled by the SSERVI community. Furthermore, regional partnerships have been formed such as the new pan- European lunar science consortium, which promises both new scientific approaches and mission concepts.International partner membership requires longterm commitment from both the partner and SSERVI, together with tangible and specific plans for scientific interaction that will produce results of mutual benefit to both the institute's U.S. Teams and the international partner.International partners are invited to participate in all aspects of the Institute's activities and programs, on a basis of no exchange of funds. Through these activities, SSERVI researchers and international partners participate in sharing ideas, information, and data arising from their respective research efforts, and contribute to the training of young scientists.This talk will present an overview of the Institute and the international nodes. We will also discuss the various processes to become a SSERVI partner as well as the opportunities available for collaborations with the SSERVI national teams.

  16. "NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute"; - Expanded Goals and New Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, D.; Schmidt, G. K.; Pendleton, Y.; Bailey, B. E.

    2014-04-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) has been pursuing international partnerships since its inception as the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), in order to both leverage the science being done by its domestic member institutions as well as to help lunar science and exploration become a greater global endeavor. The international partners of the Institute have pursued a broad program of lunar science stimulated by scientific partnerships enabled by the SSERVI community. Furthermore, regional partnerships have been formed such as the new pan-European lunar science consortium, which promises both new scientific approaches and mission concepts. International partner membership requires long-term commitment from both the partner and SSERVI, together with tangible and specific plans for scientific interaction that will produce results of mutual benefit to both the institute's U.S. Teams and the international partner. International partners are invited to participate in all aspects of the Institute's activities and programs, on a basis of no exchange of funds. Through these activities, SSERVI researchers and international partners participate in sharing ideas, information, and data arising from their respective research efforts, and contribute to the training of young scientists. This talk will present an overview of the Institute and the international nodes. We will also discuss the various processes to become a SSERVI partner as well as the opportunities available for collaborations with the SSERVI national teams.

  17. NASA-ESA Joint Mission to Explore Two Worlds of Great Astrobiological Interest - Titan and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, K.; Coustenis, A.; Lunine, J.; Matson, D.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Erd, C.; Beauchamp, P.

    2009-04-01

    Rugged shorelines, laced with canyons, leading to ethane/methane seas glimpsed through an organic haze, vast fields of dunes shaped by alien sciroccos… An icy moon festooned with plumes of water-ice and organics, whose warm watery source might be glimpsed through surface cracks that glow in the infrared… The revelations by Cassini-Huygens about Saturn's crown jewels, Titan and Enceladus, have rocked the public with glimpses of new worlds unimagined a decade before. The time is at hand to capitalize on those discoveries with a broad mission of exploration that combines the widest range of planetary science disciplines—Geology, Geophysics, Atmospheres, Astrobiology,Chemistry, Magnetospheres—in a single NASA/ESA collaboration. The Titan Saturn System Mission will explore these exciting new environments, flying through Enceladus' plumes and plunging deep into Titan's atmosphere with instruments tuned to find what Cassini could only hint at. Exploring Titan with an international fleet of vehicles; from orbit, from the surface of a great polar sea, and from the air with the first hot air balloon to ride an extraterrestrial breeze, TSSM will turn our snapshot gaze of these worlds into an epic film. This paper will describe a collaborative NASA-ESA Titan Saturn System Mission that will open a new phase of planetary exploration by projecting robotic presence on the land, on the sea, and in the air of an active, organic-rich world.

  18. The comparison of antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) and sulfated CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui; Chen, Jin; Li, Entao; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Deyun; Li, Peng; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Xingying; Qiu, Shulei; Gao, Zhenzhen; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2015-02-01

    Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) was extracted, purified and modified by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to obtain a sulfated CP (sCP). Their antioxidative activities in vitro were compared through the free radical-scavenging test. The results demonstrated that the scavenging capabilities of sCP were significantly stronger than those of CP. In vivo test, the mice hepatic injury model was prepared by BCG/LPS method, then administrated respectively with sCP and CP at three dosages, the biochemical indexes in serum, antioxidative indexes in liver homogenate and histopathological change in liver of the mice were compared. The results showed that in high (200mg/kg) and middle (150mg/kg) dosages of sCP groups, the contents of ALT, AST and TNF-α in serum and MDA in liver homogenate were significantly lower than those in the model group and numerically lower than those in the CP groups, the activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver homogenate were significantly higher than those in the model group and numerically higher than those in the CP groups. In the model group there were obvious pathological changes in the liver, while in the sCP groups were near normal. These results indicate that sCP and CP possess antioxidative activity in vitro and in vivo, the activity of sCP is stronger than that of CP and sulfation modification can enhance the antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Explore Earth Science Datasets for STEM with the NASA GES DISC Online Visualization and Analysis Tool, Giovanni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Acker, J.; Kempler, S.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center(DISC) is one of twelve NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Data Centers that provide Earth science data, information, and services to users around the world including research and application scientists, students, citizen scientists, etc. The GESDISC is the home (archive) of remote sensing datasets for NASA Precipitation and Hydrology, Atmospheric Composition and Dynamics, etc. To facilitate Earth science data access, the GES DISC has been developing user-friendly data services for users at different levels in different countries. Among them, the Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni, http:giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) allows users to explore satellite-based datasets using sophisticated analyses and visualization without downloading data and software, which is particularly suitable for novices (such as students) to use NASA datasets in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) activities. In this presentation, we will briefly introduce Giovanni along with examples for STEM activities.

  20. Stargate: An Open Stellar Catalog for NASA Exoplanet Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Angelle

    NASA is invested in a number of space- and ground-based efforts to find extrasolar planets around nearby stars with the ultimate goal of discovering an Earth 2.0 viable for searching for bio-signatures in its atmosphere. With both sky-time and funding resources extremely precious it is crucial that the exoplanet community has the most efficient and functional tools for choosing which stars to observe and then deriving the physical properties of newly discovered planets via the properties of their host stars. Historically, astronomers have utilized a piecemeal set of archives such as SIMBAD, the Washington Double Star Catalog, various exoplanet encyclopedias and electronic tables from the literature to cobble together stellar and planetary parameters in the absence of corresponding images and spectra. The mothballed NStED archive was in the process of collecting such data on nearby stars but its course may have changed if it comes back to NASA mission specific targets and NOT a volume limited sample of nearby stars. This means there is void. A void in the available set of tools many exoplanet astronomers would appreciate to create comprehensive lists of the stellar parameters of stars in our local neighborhood. Also, we need better resources for downloading adaptive optics images and published spectra to help confirm new discoveries and find ideal target stars. With so much data being produced by the stellar and exoplanet community we have decided to propose for the creation of an open access archive in the spirit of the open exoplanet catalog and the Kepler Community Follow-up Program. While we will highly regulate and constantly validate the data being placed into our archive the open nature of its design is intended to allow the database to be updated quickly and have a level of versatility which is necessary in today's fast moving, big data exoplanet community. Here, we propose to develop the Stargate Open stellar catalog for NASA exoplanet exploration.

  1. CP-Recursion in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvad, Anne Mette; Christensen, Ken Ramshøj; Vikner, Sten

    2017-01-01

    Based on data from extraction, embedded V2, and complementizer stacking, this paper proposes a cP/CP-analysis of CP-recursion in Danish. Because extraction can be shown to be possible from relative clauses, wh-islands, and adverbial clauses, and given that long extraction is successive......-cyclic, an extra specifier position has to be available as an escape hatch. Consequently, such extractions require a CP-recursion analysis, as has been argued for embedded V2 and for complementizer stacking. Given that CP-recursion in embedded V2 clauses does not allow extraction, whereas other types of CP......-recursion do, we suggest that embedded V2 is fundamentally different, in that main clause V2 and embedded V2 involve a CP (“big CP”), whereas all other clausal projections above IP are instances of cP (“little cP”). The topmost “little” c° has an occurrence feature that enables extraction but bars spell...

  2. CP violation and modular symmetries

    OpenAIRE

    Dent, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    We reconsider the origin of CP violation in fundamental theory. Existing string models of spontaneous CP violation make ambiguous predictions, due to the arbitrariness of CP transformation and the apparent non-invariance of the results under duality. We find an unambiguous modular CP invariance condition, applicable to predictive models of spontaneous CP violation, which circumvents these problems; it strongly constrains CP violation by heterotic string moduli. The dilaton is also evaluated a...

  3. 75 FR 80081 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-167)] NASA Advisory Council... the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 10:30 a.m.-5:45 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Glennan Conference Room-1Q39; 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20546 FOR...

  4. CP violation in B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1990-01-01

    The study of CP-violating effects in B decays will be a good test of whether CP violation is caused by the known weak interaction. If this is its origin, then large, cleanly-predicted CP-violating effects are expected in certain neutral B decays to hadronic CP eigenstates. The phenomenology of CP violation in the B system is reviewed, and the genesis of these large effects is explained. In this it is shown that large, cleanly-predicted effects are also expected in some decays to states which are not CP eigenstates. The combined study of the latter decays and those to CP eigenstates may make it possible to obtain a statistically-significant CP-violating signal with fewer B mesons that would otherwise be required

  5. CpG islands undermethylation in human genomic regions under selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cocozza

    Full Text Available DNA methylation at CpG islands (CGIs is one of the most intensively studied epigenetic mechanisms. It is fundamental for cellular differentiation and control of transcriptional potential. DNA methylation is involved also in several processes that are central to evolutionary biology, including phenotypic plasticity and evolvability. In this study, we explored the relationship between CpG islands methylation and signatures of selective pressure in Homo Sapiens, using a computational biology approach. By analyzing methylation data of 25 cell lines from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium, we compared the DNA methylation of CpG islands in genomic regions under selective pressure with the methylation of CpG islands in the remaining part of the genome. To define genomic regions under selective pressure, we used three different methods, each oriented to provide distinct information about selective events. Independently of the method and of the cell type used, we found evidences of undermethylation of CGIs in human genomic regions under selective pressure. Additionally, by analyzing SNP frequency in CpG islands, we demonstrated that CpG islands in regions under selective pressure show lower genetic variation. Our findings suggest that the CpG islands in regions under selective pressure seem to be somehow more "protected" from methylation when compared with other regions of the genome.

  6. The structure of completely positive matrices according to their CP-rank and CP-plus-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, Peter James Clair; Bomze, Immanuel M.; Still, Georg J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the topological properties of the cp-rank operator $\\mathrm{cp}(A)$ and the related cp-plus-rank operator $\\mathrm{cp}^+(A)$ (which is introduced in this paper) in the set $\\mathcal{S}^n$ of symmetric $n\\times n$-matrices. For the set of completely positive matrices, $\\mathcal{CP}^n$, we

  7. NASA reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, John E.; Fisk, Lennard A.; Aldrich, Arnold A.; Utsman, Thomas E.; Griffin, Michael D.; Cohen, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Activities and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs, both ongoing and planned, are described by NASA administrative personnel from the offices of Space Science and Applications, Space Systems Development, Space Flight, Exploration, and from the Johnson Space Center. NASA's multi-year strategic plan, called Vision 21, is also discussed. It proposes to use the unique perspective of space to better understand Earth. Among the NASA programs mentioned are the Magellan to Venus and Galileo to Jupiter spacecraft, the Cosmic Background Explorer, Pegsat (the first Pegasus payload), Hubble, the Joint U.S./German ROSAT X-ray Mission, Ulysses to Jupiter and over the sun, the Astro-Spacelab Mission, and the Gamma Ray Observatory. Copies of viewgraphs that illustrate some of these missions, and others, are provided. Also discussed were life science research plans, economic factors as they relate to space missions, and the outlook for international cooperation.

  8. CP and CP-PGN protect mice against MRSA infection by inducing M1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Li, Xiang-Xiang; Ma, Yuan; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Li-Na; Qian, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Xian-Feng; Shi, Jin-Fang; Han, Qing-Zhen

    2017-12-04

    Corynebacterium pyruviciproducens (C. pyruviciproducens, CP), as a newly discovered immunomodulator, has been confirmed to have a stronger immunoregulation than Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) of the traditional immune adjuvant, by previous experiments with model antigen ovalbumin and sheep red blood cells. Here, it was designed to assess its ability to resist methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), since MRSA as a vital gram positive pathogen is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. In this report, it was indicated that C. pyruviciproducens and its peptidoglycan (CP-PGN) could help to be against bloodstream infection of MRSA with raised survival rate, decreased bacteria load and alleviated systemic inflammation, and these effects of CP-PGN were more pronounced. However, the whole CP was inclined to prevent localized abdominal infection of MRSA from progressing to a systemic infection. And they showed the potential as a therapeutic drug alone or combined with vancomycin. The diversity of capacity of activating macrophages induced by CP and CP-PGN may result in distinct resistance to MRSA in different infection models. Furthermore, both CP and CP-PGN induced M1 macrophages. In conclusion, CP and its PGN could act as promising immune agents to treat and prevent MRSA infection.

  9. Factorized tree-level scattering in AdS4 x CP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalousios, Chrysostomos; Vergu, C.; Volovich, Anastasia

    2009-01-01

    AdS 4 /CFT 3 duality relating IIA string theory on AdS 4 x CP 3 to N = 6 superconformal Chern-Simons theory provides an arena for studying aspects of integrability in a new potentially exactly solvable system. In this paper we explore the tree-level worldsheet scattering for strings on AdS 4 x CP 3 . We compute all bosonic four-, five- and six-point amplitudes in the gauge-fixed action and demonstrate the absence of particle production.

  10. Functional assessment of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome and cancers of breast, colon, and prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Somnath; Pruitt, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Ever since the first report that mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurological disorder in females world-wide, there has been a keen interest to gain a comprehensive understanding of this protein. While the classical model associated with MeCP2 function suggests its role in gene suppression via recruitment of co-repressor complexes and histone deacetylases to methylated CpG-sites, recent discoveries have brought to light its role in transcription activation, modulation of RNA splicing, and chromatin compaction. Various post-translational modifications (PTMs) of MeCP2 further increase its functional versatility. Involvement of MeCP2 in pathologies other than RTT, such as tumorigenesis however, remains poorly explored and understood. This review provides a survey of the literature implicating MeCP2 in breast, colon and prostate cancer.

  11. [CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide stimulation improves the success for karyotypic analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiong; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Hai-rong; Wang, Rong; Yu, Hui; Fan, Lei; Miao, Kou-rong; Li, Jian-yong

    2009-09-01

    To explore the effect of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) in chromosome study of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Blood or bone marrow cells of 70 CLL patients were cultured for 72 h with PHA, CpG-ODN and CpG-ODN combined with IL-2, respectively. Routine karyotype analysis with R banding technique and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed. The metaphase number>or=20 was considered as successful stimulation, which in PHA, CpG-ODN and CpG-ODN combined IL-2 groups were 90.0%, 68.6% and 68.6%, respectively, and the detection rates of chromosome aberrations were 3.2%, 43.6% and 43.6%, respectively. The aberrations rates detected by interphase FISH with a panel of probes was 64.3%. CpG-ODN DSP30 can effectively raise the detection rate of chromosome aberrations in CLL patients.

  12. Trimethylsilylcyclopentadienyl (cp{sup '}) uranium chemistry. Synthetic and structural studies of Cp{sup '}{sub 4}U and Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UX (X = Cl, I, Me)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windorff, Cory J.; MacDonald, Matthew R.; Ziller, Joseph W.; Evans, William J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-12-13

    Cp{sup '}{sub 4}U (Cp{sup '} = C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3}) was synthesized from: (a) KCp{sup '} and [Cp{sup '}{sub 3}U(THF)][BPh{sub 4}]; (b) Cp{sup '}{sub 3}U and Cp{sup '}{sub 2}Pb; and (c) [K(2.2.2-cryptand)][Cp{sup '}{sub 4}U] and AgBPh{sub 4}. The compound was identified by X-ray crystallography as a rare example of a structurally-characterized tetrakis(cyclopentadienyl)U{sup IV} complex. For comparison, the corresponding Th complex, Cp{sup '}{sub 4}Th, was isolated from the direct combination of ThBr{sub 4}(THF){sub 4} with excess KCp{sup '}. During the preparation of Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UMe, the precursor of the [Cp{sup '}{sub 3}U(THF)][BPh{sub 4}] reagent used above, it was discovered that the reaction of Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UCl and MeLi gives a mixture of Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UMe and Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UCl that can co-crystallize better than Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UMe in pure form. The Cp'{sub 3}UMe/Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UCl mixture forms single crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography and provides a new way to characterize the oil, Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UMe. Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UCl and Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UI were also crystallographically characterized for comparison with the Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UMe/Cp{sup '}{sub 3}UCl crystals. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have just entered a period during which we expect considerable progress toward understanding CP violation. Here we review what we have learnt so far, and what is to be expected in the near future. To do this we cover the foundation of CP violation at a level which can be understood by physicists who are not working ...

  14. Servant Leadership: How does NASA Serve the Interests of Humankind in Aerospace Exploration and the Role STEM Plays in it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides a description of technology efforts illustrative of NASA Glenn Research Center Core competencies and which exemplifies how NASA serves the interest of humankind in aerospace exploration. Examples are provided as talking points to illustrate the role that career paths in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) plays in the aforementioned endeavor.

  15. NASA's Space Launch System: A Flagship for Exploration Beyond Earth's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit in an austere economic climate. This fact drives the SLS team to find innovative solutions to the challenges of designing, developing, fielding, and operating the largest rocket in history. To arrive at the current SLS plan, government and industry experts carefully analyzed hundreds of architecture options and arrived at the one clear solution to stringent requirements for safety, affordability, and sustainability over the decades that the rocket will be in operation. This paper will explore ways to fit this major development within the funding guidelines by using existing engine assets and hardware now in testing to meet a first launch by 2017. It will explain the SLS Program s long-range plan to keep the budget within bounds, yet evolve the 70 metric ton (t) initial lift capability to 130-t lift capability after the first two flights. To achieve the evolved configuration, advanced technologies must offer appropriate return on investment to be selected through a competitive process. For context, the SLS will be larger than the Saturn V that took 12 men on 6 trips for a total of 11 days on the lunar surface over 4 decades ago. Astronauts train for long-duration voyages on the International Space Station, but have not had transportation to go beyond Earth orbit in modern times, until now. NASA is refining its mission manifest, guided by U.S. Space Policy and the Global Exploration Roadmap. Launching the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle s (MPCV s) first autonomous certification flight in 2017, followed by a crewed flight in 2021, the SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they need for extended trips to asteroids, Lagrange Points, and Mars. In addition, the SLS will accommodate

  16. Phenomenology of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1987-01-01

    A short survey of the theoretical status of CP violation is presented. The Standart Model is confronted with the present experimental situation. Possible future tests of our notions of CP violation are discussed, concentrating on rare K decays. Other promising reactions such as B decays are briefly reviewed. Among alternative models of CP violation, multi-Higgs extensions of the Standart Model, left-right symmetric gauge theories and minimal SUSY models are discussed. Finally, the relevance of generalized CP invariance is emphasized. 64 refs., 7 figs. (Author)

  17. CP violation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    In the first two lectures, CP violation in the K system is pedagogically reviewed: its manifestations in the neutral K meson systems, in rare K meson decays and in decays of charged K mesons, and results from classical and current experiments, are discussed. In the third lecture, CP Violation in the B system and the forthcoming experimental tests will be discussed.

  18. CP violation in D0 →(K-K+,π-π+) from diquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Quiang

    2012-02-01

    The explanation of the large CP asymmetries in D 0 →(π + π - ,K + K - ) decays observed by the LHCb collaboration is likely to call for new physics beyond the CKM paradigm. We explore new contributions caused by the color-sextet scalar diquark, and demonstrate that the diquark with the mass of order 1 TeV and nominal couplings with quarks can generate the CP asymmetries at the percent level. Using the experimental data on branching ratios and CP asymmetries of D 0 →(π + π - ,K + K - ), we derive the constraints on the diquark mass and couplings, which can be further examined on hadron colliders in the dijet final states. (orig.)

  19. Is CP violation maximal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two ambiguities are noted in the definition of the concept of maximal CP violation. The phase convention ambiguity is overcome by introducing a CP violating phase in the quark mixing matrix U which is invariant under rephasing transformations. The second ambiguity, related to the parametrization of U, is resolved by finding a single empirically viable definition of maximal CP violation when assuming that U does not single out one generation. Considerable improvement in the calculation of nonleptonic weak amplitudes is required to test the conjecture of maximal CP violation. 21 references

  20. CP violation in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, C.O.

    Some aspects of CP violation in gauge theories are reviewed. The topics covered include a discussion of the Kobayashi-Maskawa six-quarks model, models of soft- CP violation (extended Higgs sector), the strong CP problem and finally some speculations relating CP violation and magnetic charges in non-abelian gauge theories. (Author) [pt

  1. CP-even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the electron in muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the weak interaction which contains intermediate vector bosons of the most general form and which admits CP violation in muon decay is used to calculate the CP-even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the μ-decay electrons with inclusion of radiative corrections. It is shown that these corrections are important only at the beginning of the spectrum, and their contribution reduces the observed effects of the transverse polarization. The transverse polarization grows appreciably at electron energies close to the maximum energy and at small emission angles. It is expedient to search for the CP-even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the electrons at energies E/sub e/ = 0.975E/sup max//sub e/ and emission angles theta = 25--35 0

  2. Measuring $CP$ violation with $\\Delta A_{CP}$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The control of systematic uncertainties is a key component of many analyses performed at the Large Hadron Collider, and will only become more important as more data are taken during Run II. Many of the CP measurements performed using the LHCb detector have statistical precisions below the per cent level, and so particular care must be taken in this area. One technique for dealing with the various production and detection asymmetries which can mask the physics asymmetry of interest, and increase the measurement’s systematic uncertainty, is $\\Delta A_{CP}$ . The application of $\\Delta A_{CP}$ in three separate LHCb analyses of $D^{0}$ and $\\Lambda_{b}^{0}$ decays will be discussed, along with prospects for applying the technique to $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$ decays.

  3. CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, H.

    1995-12-01

    In this talk the author briefly reviews the cosmological importance of CP violation and the status of calculations of baryogenisis in the context of the Standard Model. The author then turns to a discussion of Standard Model Predictions for CP violation in B decays, stressing the importance of multiple measurements to overconstrain the model parameters and thus search for indications of beyond-Standard-Model physics

  4. Surface Systems R&D in NASA's Planetary Exploration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbin, C.; Rodriguez, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on activities being supported by the Surface Systems Thrust of the NASA Cross Enterprise Technology Development Program, a research program whithin the NASA office of Space Science.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Capability Roadmap Development for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts. Although detailed requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, near-term technology investment decisions need to be guided by the anticipated capabilities needed to enable or enhance the mission concepts. This paper describes a roadmap that NASA has formulated to guide the development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing, flight-proven state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed. When SOA capabilities fell short of meeting the needs, those "gaps" were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The resulting list of enabling and enhancing capability gaps can be used to guide future ECLSS development. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies needed to enable and enhance exploration may be developed in a manner that synergistically benefits the ISS operational capability, supports Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) development, and sustains long-term technology investments for longer duration missions. This paper summarizes NASA s ECLSS capability roadmap

  6. The Challenges of Integrating NASA's Human, Budget, and Data Capital within the Constellation Program's Exploration Launch Projects Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Luanne; Morris, Kenneth B.; Self, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to retire the Space Shuttle in 2010 and replace it with safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Such emerging space transportation initiatives face massive organizational challenges, including building and nurturing an experienced, dedicated team with the right skills for the required tasks; allocating and tracking the fiscal capital invested in achieving technical progress against an integrated master schedule; and turning generated data into usehl knowledge that equips the team to design and develop superior products for customers and stakeholders. This paper discusses how NASA's Exploration Launch Projects Office, which is responsible for delivering these new launch vehicles, integrates these resources to create an engineering business environment that promotes mission success.

  7. On the determination of CP-even and CP-odd components of a mixed CP Higgs boson at e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dova, Maria Teresa; Ferrari, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to investigate the CP quantum numbers of the Higgs boson in the process e + e - ->Zφ at a future e + e - linear collider (LC), where φ, a generic Higgs boson, is a mixture of CP-even and CP-odd states. The procedure consists of a comparison of the data with predictions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to the productions of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs and the interference term which constitutes a distinctive signal of CP violation. We present estimates of the sensitivity of the method from Monte Carlo studies using hypothetical data samples with a full LC detector simulation taking into account the background signals

  8. CP Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksan, R.

    1993-06-01

    The violation of the CP symmetry is a phenomenon, the origin of which is not yet well established and deserves a particular attention since it may be a fundamental property of Nature with very important consequences for the evolution of the universe. We propose in these lectures to have an overview of this phenomenon as we understand it so far. To this end, and after introducing the discrete space-time symmetries, we discuss the observation of the violation of the CP symmetry in the neutral kaon decays. We then derive the general formalism for any neutral system made of a particle and its antiparticle and discuss how CP violation is introduced. We show how this phenomenon is generated in the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions and what are the predictions that can be made. In particular we shall concentrate on the expected effects in the decays of mesons involving the b quark. We review the various possibilities for observing these effects, calculate their magnitudes and show how the consistency of the theory can be tested. Finally, we outline the experimental prospects for studying CP non conservation at an asymmetric B Factory to either verify the Standard Model mechanism or provide evidence for new physics. (author)

  9. CP-even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the electron in the muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    In the most general weak interaction model with intermediate vector bosons, allowing CP breaking in the muon decay, CP- even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the μ-decay electrons is calculated taking into account the radiative corrections. It is shown that such corrections are essential only at the beginning of the spectrum reducing the observed transverse polarization effects. When the electron energy is close to its maximum and the emission angles are small, the transverse polarization considerably grows. Search for CP-even and CP-odd transverse polarization of the electrons should be carried out at energies Esub(e) approximately equal to O.975 Esub(e)sup(max) and emission angles THETA approximately equal to 25+35 deg [ru

  10. CP-violation and instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, C.G.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of Yang-Mills instantons on CP-violating strong interactions are studied. Using simplified models of CP-noninvariant weak interactions, we calculate the induced strong CP-violation. Even in the simple examples studied, the CP-violating phase of a vacuum-to-vacuum transition amplitude differs in general from the phase of the determinant of the quark mass matrix multiplied by the topological charge of the background Yang-Mills field. Then several CP-violating phenomena such as eta → 2π decay and neutron electric dipole moment induced by instantons are studied. The result of our explicit calculation of eta → 2π decay strength verifies the current algebraic method used by Crewther et al. We also present a calculation of the instanton contribution, in the dilute gas approximation for instanton gas, to the electric dipole moment of a free quark without using 't Hooft's effective Lagrangian

  11. Leptonic CP violation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, C.

    2017-01-01

    I summarize the status of theoretical predictions for the yet to be measured leptonic CP phases, the Dirac phase δ and the two Majorana phases α and β. I discuss different approaches based on: (a) a flavor symmetry without and with corrections, (b) different types of sum rules and (c) flavor and CP...... symmetries. I show their predictive power with examples. In addition, I present scenarios in which low and high energy CP phases are connected so that predictions for the CP phases α, β and δ become correlated to the sign of the baryon asymmetry YB of the Universe that is generated via leptogenesis....

  12. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 Decays to CP Eigenstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacFarlane, David B

    2001-02-26

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurement uses a data sample of 23 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we find events where one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a CP eigenstate containing charmonium and the flavor of the other neutral B meson is determined from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the Standard Model is proportional to sin2{beta}, is derived from the decay time distributions in such events. The result is sin2{beta} = 0.34 {+-} 0.20 (stat) {+-} 0.05 (syst).

  13. Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0 decays to CP eigenstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; De Bonis, I; Gaillard, J M; Jeremie, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Dardin, S; Day, C; Dow, S F; Elioff, T; Fan, Q; Gaponenko, I; Gill, M S; Goozen, F R; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Jared, R C; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Karcher, A; Kerth, L T; Kipnis, I; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; Lafever, R; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lewis, S A; Lionberger, C; Liu, T; Long, M; Lynch, G; Marino, M; Marks, K; Meyer, A B; Mokhtarani, A; Momayezi, M; Nyman, M; Oddone, P J; Ohnemus, J; Oshatz, D; Patton, S; Perazzo, A; Peters, C; Pope, W; Pripstein, M; Quarrie, D R; Rasson, J E; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Stone, R; Telnov, A V; von der Lippe, H; Weber, T; Wenzel, W A; Zisman, M S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kolachev, G M; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Burke, S; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hale, D; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Kyre, S; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spencer, E N; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hanson, J E; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; van Hoek, W C; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Warner, D W; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Eckstein, P; Futterschneider, H; Krause, R; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Fouque, G; Gastaldi, F; Matricon, P; Mora de Freitas, P; Renard, C; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Di Lodovico, F; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Pallavicini, M; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; McKay, R; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Albert, J N; Beigbeder, C; Benkebil, M; Breton, D; Cizeron, R; Du, S; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Truong, K; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Brooks, A; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; O'Connor, T G; Pedrotti, B; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Yamamoto, B; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Price, D R; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Newman-Coburn, D; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Ford, K; Li, Y; Pavlovich, J; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Thompson, R J; Weatherall, J H; Bard, R; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenberg, V; Kroeger, R; Reep, M; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Beaulieu, M; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cavallo, N; Cartaro, C; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Heck, J; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Borsato, E; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Marzolla, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Bailly, P; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Genat, J F; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Lebbolo, H; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Martin, L; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Zhang, B; Manfredi, P F; Ratti, L; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bosi, F; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Hairre, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Fernholz, R; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Sands, B; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Bronzini, F; Buccheri, A; Bulfon, C; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Waldi, R; Jacques, P F; Kalelkar, M; Plano, R J; Adye, T; Claxton, B; Franek, B; Galagedera, S; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Lidbury, J; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Besson, P; Bourgeois, P; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Gosset, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bartelt, J; Becla, J; Bell, R; Bloom, E; Boeheim, C T; Boyarski, A M; Boyce, R F; Bulos, F; Burgess, W; Byers, B; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coombes, R; Cottrell, L; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Craddock, W W; DeStaebler, H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Ecklund, S; Fieguth, T H; Field, R C; Freytag, D R; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Haller, G; Hanushevsky, A; Harris, J; Hasan, A; Hewett, J L; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kawahara, H; Keller, L; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Klaisner, L A; Kocian, M L; Krebs, H J; Kunz, P F; Langenegger, U; Langeveld, W; Leith, D W; Louie, S K; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacDonald, J; Manzin, G; Mariske, H; McCulloch, M; McShurley, D; Menke, S; Messner, R; Metcalfe, S; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, D; Nordby, M; O'Grady, C P; O'Neill, F G; Oxoby, G; Pavel, T; Perl, J; Petrak, S; Putallaz, G; Quinn, H; Raines, P E; Ratcliff, B N; Reif, R; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Russell, J J; Sapozhnikov, L; Saxton, O H; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J T; Serbo, V V; Skarpass, K; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; White, J L; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Zioulas, G; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Berridge, S; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Moore, T B; Neal, H

    2001-03-19

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurement uses a data sample of 23x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BbarB decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we find events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a CP eigenstate containing charmonium and the flavor of the other neutral B meson is determined from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the standard model is proportional to sin2beta, is derived from the decay time distributions in such events. The result is sin2beta = 0.34+/-0.20 (stat)+/-0.05 (syst).

  14. Religious development : C.P. Tiele's paradigm of science of religion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, Arie

    2004-01-01

    This essay explores C.P. Tiele's fundamental notion of religious development and, in a certain respect, it complements my earlier paper on his concept of religion, which he ultimately locates "in the innermost depths of our souls" (Numen 46 [1999]). The present article argues that the mere

  15. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  16. Probability of Loss of Crew Achievability Studies for NASA's Exploration Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Roger L.; Bigler, Mark; Rogers, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, NASA has been evaluating various vehicle designs for multiple proposed design reference missions (DRM) beyond low Earth orbit in support of its Exploration Systems Development (ESD) programs. This paper addresses several of the proposed missions and the analysis techniques used to assess the key risk metric, probability of loss of crew (LOC). Probability of LOC is a metric used to assess the safety risk as well as a design requirement. These risk assessments typically cover the concept phase of a DRM, i.e. when little more than a general idea of the mission is known and are used to help establish "best estimates" for proposed program and agency level risk requirements. These assessments or studies were categorized as LOC achievability studies to help inform NASA management as to what "ball park" estimates of probability of LOC could be achieved for each DRM and were eventually used to establish the corresponding LOC requirements. Given that details of the vehicles and mission are not well known at this time, the ground rules, assumptions, and consistency across the programs become the important basis of the assessments as well as for the decision makers to understand.

  17. CP violating scalar Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Cid, A.; Hernández-Sánchez, J.; Keus, V.; King, S. F.; Moretti, S.; Rojas, D.; Sokołowska, D.

    2016-12-01

    We study an extension of the Standard Model (SM) in which two copies of the SM scalar SU(2) doublet which do not acquire a Vacuum Expectation Value (VEV), and hence are inert, are added to the scalar sector. We allow for CP-violation in the inert sector, where the lightest inert state is protected from decaying to SM particles through the conservation of a Z 2 symmetry. The lightest neutral particle from the inert sector, which has a mixed CP-charge due to CP-violation, is hence a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. We discuss the new regions of DM relic density opened up by CP-violation, and compare our results to the CP-conserving limit and the Inert Doublet Model (IDM). We constrain the parameter space of the CP-violating model using recent results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and DM direct and indirect detection experiments.

  18. CP invariance: a point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Gyan

    1983-01-01

    That the longlived component L of K 0 has both CP = +1 and CP = -1 modes of decay is often cited as evidence of violation of CP invariance. The careful ones find the compelling evidence to be the non-dilution of the regeneration interference pattern when the incident K 0 beam is mixed even substantially with anti-K 0 . However the two phenomena comprehensively imply that L has a CP = +1 component Lsub(+) and CP = -1 component Lsub(-) and that the longlived component of both K 0 and anti-K 0 are one and the same L. This does not demand abandoning CP invariance. It does imply that anti-K 0 is not the CP conjugate of K 0 . (author)

  19. Is CP a gauge symmetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.; Kaplan, D.B.; Nelson, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional solutions to the strong CP problem all require the existence of global symmetries. However, quantum gravity may destroy global symmetries, making it hard to understand why the electric dipole moment of the neutron (EDMN) is so small. We suggest here that CP is actually a discrete gauge symmetry, and is therefore not violated by quantum gravity. We show that four-dimensional CP can arise as a discrete gauge symmetry in theories with dimensional compactification, if the original number of Minkowski dimensions equals 8k+1, 8k+2 or 8k+3, and if there are certain restrictions on the gauge group; these conditions are met by superstrings. CP may then be broken spontaneously below 10 9 GeV, explaining the observed CP violation in the kaon system without inducing a large EDMN. We discuss the phenomenology of such models, as well as the peculiar properties of cosmic 'SP strings' which could be produced at the compactification scale. Such strings have the curious property that a particle carried around the string is turned into its CP conjugate. A single CP string renders four-dimensional space-time nonorientable. (orig.)

  20. CP-violations in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity ...

  1. Beautiful CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunietz, I.

    1997-01-01

    CP violation is observed to date only in K 0 decays and is parameterizable by a single quantity ε. Because it is one of the least understood phenomena in the Standard Model and holds a clue to baryogenesis, it must be investigated further. Highly specialized searches in K 0 decays are possible. Effects in B decays are much larger. In addition to the traditional B d → J/ψK S , π + π - asymmetries, CP violation could be searched for in already existing inclusive B data samples. The rapid B s --anti B s oscillations cancel in untagged B s data samples, which therefore allow feasibility studies for the observation of CP violation and the extraction of CKM elements with present vertex detectors. The favored method for the extraction of the CKM angle γ is shown to be unfeasible and a solution is presented involving striking direct CP violation in charged B decays. Novel methods for determining the B s mixing parameter Δm are described without the traditional requirement of flavor-specific final states

  2. Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Human Exploration Program: Benchmarking with "The Hydrogen Economy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The theoretically high efficiency and low temperature operation of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has motivated them to be the subject of much study since their invention in the 19th Century, but their relatively high life cycle costs kept them as a "solution in search of a problem" for many years. The first problem for which fuel cells presented a truly cost effective solution was that of providing a power source for NASA's human spaceflight vehicles in the 1960 s. NASA thus invested, and continues to invest, in the development of fuel cell power plants for this application. This development program continues to place its highest priorities on requirements for minimum system mass and maximum durability and reliability. These priorities drive fuel cell power plant design decisions at all levels, even that of catalyst support. However, since the mid-1990's, prospective environmental regulations have driven increased governmental and industrial interest in "green power" and the "Hydrogen Economy." This has in turn stimulated greatly increased investment in fuel cell development for a variety of commercial applications. This investment is bringing about notable advances in fuel cell technology, but, as these development efforts place their highest priority on requirements for minimum life cycle cost and field safety, these advances are yielding design solutions quite different at almost every level from those needed for spacecraft applications. This environment thus presents both opportunities and challenges for NASA's Human Exploration Program

  3. Some ideas for learning CP-theories

    OpenAIRE

    Fierens, Daan

    2008-01-01

    Causal Probabilistic logic (CP-logic) is a language for describing complex probabilistic processes. In this talk we consider the problem of learning CP-theories from data. We briefly discuss three possible approaches. First, we review the existing algorithm by Meert et al. Second, we show how simple CP-theories can be learned by using the learning algorithm for Logical Bayesian Networks and converting the result into a CP-theory. Third, we argue that for learning more complex CP-theories, an ...

  4. A search for CP violation in hyperon decays by the hyper-CP experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Hyper-CP collaboration is performing a precision search for CP violation in hyperon decays, these decays are sensitive to sources of CP violation to which neutral kaon decays are not. The measured CP observable is proportional to the difference between the product of the Ξ and Λ decay α parameters and that of the CP-conjugate decays. About 2.5 billion fully-reconstructed Ξ - → Λπ - → pπ - π - and Ξ-bar + → Λ-barπ + → p-barπ + π + decays were taken in 2 fixed-target runs at Fermilab, allowing a statistical sensitivity of about 2.10 -4 in the CP asymmetry. These 2 runs gave us the largest sample of Ξ and Ω ever collected. An initial study has been done on a fraction of the data and we have obtained: A ΞΛ equals (-7±12(statistical)±6.2(systematic))*10 -4 . Other preliminary results are also presented in this series of slides

  5. CP-recursion and the derivation of verb second in Germanic main and embedded clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2017-01-01

    , this is normally not the case for all types of embedded clauses, as e. g. embedded questions (almost) never allow V2 (Julien 2007, Vikner 2001, though see McCloskey 2006 and Biberauer 2015). As in Nyvad et al. (2016), I will explore a particular derivation of (embedded) V2, in terms of a cP/CP-distinction, which...... may be seen as a version of the CP-recursion analysis (deHaan & Weerman 1986, Vikner 1995 and many others). The idea is that because embedded V2 clauses do not allow extraction, whereas other types of CP-recursion clauses do (Christensen et al. 2013a; Christensen et al. 2013b; Christensen & Nyvad 2014...

  6. Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing in NASA: An Overview of Current Projects and Future Initiatives for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA, including each Mission Directorate, is investing in, experimenting with, and/or utilizing AM across a broad spectrum of applications and projects; Centers have created and are continuing to create partnerships with industry, other Government Agencies, other Centers, and Universities; In-house additive manufacturing capability enables rapid iteration of the entire design, development and testing process, increasing innovation and reducing risk and cost to projects; For deep space exploration, AM offers significant reduction to logistics costs and risk by providing ability to create on demand; There are challenges: Overwhelming message from recent JANNAF AM for Propulsion Applications TIM was "certification."; NASA will continue to work with our partners to address this and other challenges to advance the state of the art in AM and incorporate these capabilities into an array of applications from aerospace to science missions to deep space exploration.

  7. Analysis list: Cp190 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cp190 Cell line,Embryo,Larvae + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/...target/Cp190.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Cp190.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Cp190.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cp190.Cell_l...ine.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cp190.Embryo.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cp190.Larvae.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/

  8. Testing New Indirect CP Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Perez, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    If new CP violating physics contributes to neutral meson mixing, but its contribution to CP violation in decay amplitudes is negligible, then there is a model independent relation between four (generally independent) observables related to the mixing: the mass splitting (x), the width splitting (y), the CP violation in mixing (1-|q/p|), and the CP violation in the interference of decays with and without mixing (φ). For the four neutral meson systems, this relation can be written in a simple approximate form: ytanφ≅x(1-|q/p|). In the K system, all four observables have been measured and obey the relation to excellent accuracy. For the B s and D systems, new predictions are provided. The success or failure of these relations will probe the physics that is responsible for the CP violation.

  9. NASA strategic plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Strategic Plan is a living document. It provides far-reaching goals and objectives to create stability for NASA's efforts. The Plan presents NASA's top-level strategy: it articulates what NASA does and for whom; it differentiates between ends and means; it states where NASA is going and what NASA intends to do to get there. This Plan is not a budget document, nor does it present priorities for current or future programs. Rather, it establishes a framework for shaping NASA's activities and developing a balanced set of priorities across the Agency. Such priorities will then be reflected in the NASA budget. The document includes vision, mission, and goals; external environment; conceptual framework; strategic enterprises (Mission to Planet Earth, aeronautics, human exploration and development of space, scientific research, space technology, and synergy); strategic functions (transportation to space, space communications, human resources, and physical resources); values and operating principles; implementing strategy; and senior management team concurrence.

  10. Sharing NASA's Scientific Explorations with Communities Across the Country: A Study of Public Libraries Collaborating with NASA STEM Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P.; LaConte, K.; Holland, A.; Harold, J. B.; Johnson, A.; Randall, C.; Fitzhugh, G.

    2017-12-01

    NASA research programs are helping humanity understand the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planets, how our Sun varies and impacts the heliosphere, and defining the conditions necessary to support life beyond Earth. As places that offer their services for free, public libraries have become the "public square" by providing a place where members of a community can gather for information, educational programming, and policy discussions. Libraries are also developing new ways to engage their patrons in STEM learning. The Space Science Institute's (SSI) National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) was funded by NASA`s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to develop and implement a project called NASA@ My Library: A National Earth and Space Science Initiative That Connects NASA, Public Libraries and Their Communities. NCIL's STAR Library Network (STAR_Net) is providing important leverage to expand its community of practice that serves both librarians and STEM professionals. Seventy-five libraries were selected through a competitive application process to receive NASA STEM Facilitation Kits, NASA STEM Backpacks for circulation, financial resources, training, and partnership opportunities. Initial survey data from the 75 NASA@ My Library partners showed that, while they are actively providing programming, few STEM programs connected with NASA science and engineering. With the launch of the initiative - including training, resources, and STEM-related event opportunities - all 75 libraries are engaged in offering NASA-focused programs, including with NASA subject matter experts. This talk will highlight the impacts the initiative is having on both public library partners and many others across the country.

  11. CP-violating top quark couplings at future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bernreuther, Werner; Garcia Garcia, Ignacio; Perello Rosello, Martin; Poeschl, Roman; Richard, Francois; Ros, Eduardo; Vos, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    We study the potential of future lepton colliders to probe violation of the CP symmetry in the top quark sector. In certain extensions of the Standard Model, such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), sizeable anomalous top quark dipole moments can arise, that may be revealed by a precise measurement of top quark pair production. We present results from detailed Monte Carlo studies for the ILC at 500 GeV and CLIC at 380 GeV and use parton level simulations to explore the potential of high-energy operation. We find that precise measurements in $e^+e^- \\rightarrow t \\bar{t}$ production with subsequent decay to lepton plus jets final states can provide sufficient sensitivity to detect Higgs-boson-induced CP violation in a viable two-Higgs-doublet model. The potential of a linear $e^+e^-$ collider to detect CP-violating electric and weak dipole form factors of the top quark exceeds the prospects of the HL-LHC by over an order of magnitude.

  12. CP-violating top quark couplings at future linear e^+e^- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernreuther, W.; Chen, L.; García, I.; Perelló, M.; Poeschl, R.; Richard, F.; Ros, E.; Vos, M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the potential of future lepton colliders to probe violation of the CP symmetry in the top quark sector. In certain extensions of the Standard Model, such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), sizeable anomalous top quark dipole moments can arise, which may be revealed by a precise measurement of top quark pair production. We present results from detailed Monte Carlo studies for the ILC at 500 GeV and CLIC at 380 GeV and use parton-level simulations to explore the potential of high-energy operation. We find that precise measurements in e^+e^- → t\\bar{t} production with subsequent decay to lepton plus jets final states can provide sufficient sensitivity to detect Higgs-boson-induced CP violation in a viable two-Higgs-doublet model. The potential of a linear e^+e^- collider to detect CP-violating electric and weak dipole form factors of the top quark exceeds the prospects of the HL-LHC by over an order of magnitude.

  13. GaussianCpG: a Gaussian model for detection of CpG island in human genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ning; Guo, Xuan; Zelikovsky, Alexander; Pan, Yi

    2017-05-24

    As crucial markers in identifying biological elements and processes in mammalian genomes, CpG islands (CGI) play important roles in DNA methylation, gene regulation, epigenetic inheritance, gene mutation, chromosome inactivation and nuclesome retention. The generally accepted criteria of CGI rely on: (a) %G+C content is ≥ 50%, (b) the ratio of the observed CpG content and the expected CpG content is ≥ 0.6, and (c) the general length of CGI is greater than 200 nucleotides. Most existing computational methods for the prediction of CpG island are programmed on these rules. However, many experimentally verified CpG islands deviate from these artificial criteria. Experiments indicate that in many cases %G+C is human genome. We analyze the energy distribution over genomic primary structure for each CpG site and adopt the parameters from statistics of Human genome. The evaluation results show that the new model can predict CpG islands efficiently by balancing both sensitivity and specificity over known human CGI data sets. Compared with other models, GaussianCpG can achieve better performance in CGI detection. Our Gaussian model aims to simplify the complex interaction between nucleotides. The model is computed not by the linear statistical method but by the Gaussian energy distribution and accumulation. The parameters of Gaussian function are not arbitrarily designated but deliberately chosen by optimizing the biological statistics. By using the pseudopotential analysis on CpG islands, the novel model is validated on both the real and artificial data sets.

  14. CP violation effects on the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle γ from B→DK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-02-08

    Inspired by the unexpectedly large difference between the CP violation of D decays into K(+)K(-) and π(+)π(-), we explore the impact on the extraction of γ via the B→DK process with the D meson reconstructed in the K(+)K(-), π(+)π(-) final state. We show that the extracted results for γ can be shifted by O(A(CP)/r(B)(K)), where A(CP) is the direct CP asymmetry in D decays and r(B)(K) is the ratio of the decay amplitudes of B(-)→D[over ¯](0)K(-) and B(-)→D(0)K(-). Using the recent data on CP asymmetry, we demonstrate that the correction to physical observables in B→DK can reach 6%, which corresponds to the shift of γ by roughly 5°. The remanent corrections depend on the strong phase of the D decays but are less than 0.5°. With the increasing precision in the γ determination on the LHCb experiment and the Super B factories, the inclusion of the CP violation of D decays will therefore soon become important.

  15. CP -symmetry of order 4 and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.

    2017-01-01

    Extended Higgs sectors offer rich opportunities for various forms of CP -violation. Here, we describe a new form of CP-conservation and discuss its consequences. We give a concrete example of a three-Higgs-doublet model dubbed CP4-3HDM with a CP -symmetry of order 4 and no other other accidental symmetries. If the vacuum conserves this symmetry, the model is CP -conserving with pairwise mass-degenerate extra neutral Higgs bosons. These fields cannot be classified as CP -even or CP -odd but they can be combined into complex physical fields which are CP -half-odd, that is, they pick up the i factor upon CP transformation. These CP -half-odd scalars can be Yukawa-coupled to the fermion bilinears in a CP -conserving way. We discuss fundamental and phenomenological features of the model, and stress a peculiar clash between the CP -symmetry and any convention for the particle-antiparticle assignment. (paper)

  16. CP violation in b-hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341004

    2016-01-01

    Latest LHCb measurements of $CP$ violation in b-hadrons are presented based on $pp$ collision data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $\\rm TeV$ and $8\\ \\rm TeV$ respectively. The total integrated luminosity collected is 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. Results include recent measurements of $CP$ violation in $B_d$ and $B_s$ mixing, along with those of quantifying the effects of $b\\to c\\bar{c} s$ loop pollution. Standard Model $CP$ violation tests in loop transitions are discussed with results consistent with expectations. New decays of b-baryons are presented and preliminary studies of $CP$ violation are performed.

  17. The Challenges of Integrating NASA's Human, Budget, and Data Capital within the Constellation Program's Exploration Launch Projects Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Luanne; Morris, Kenneth B.; Self, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to retire the Space Shuttle in 2010 and replace it with safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Such emerging space transportation initiatives face massive organizational challenges, including building and nurturing an experienced, dedicated team with the right skills for the required tasks; allocating and tracking the fiscal capital invested in achieving technical progress against an integrated master schedule; and turning generated data into useful knowledge that equips the team to design and develop superior products for customers and stakeholders. It has been more than 30 years since the Space Shuttle was designed; therefore, the current aerospace workforce has limited experience with developing new designs for human-rated spaceflight hardware. To accomplish these activities, NASA is using a wide range of state-of-the-art information technology tools that connect its diverse, decentralized teams and provide timely, accurate information for decision makers. In addition, business professionals are assisting technical managers with planning, tracking, and forecasting resource use against an integrated master schedule that horizontally and vertically interlinks hardware elements and milestone events. Furthermore, NASA is employing a wide variety of strategies to ensure that it has the motivated and qualified staff it needs for the tasks ahead. This paper discusses how NASA's Exploration Launch Projects Office, which is responsible for delivering these new launch vehicles, integrates its resources to create an engineering business environment that promotes mission success, which is defined by replacing the Space Shuttle by 2014 and returning to the Moon by 2020.

  18. NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education: Bringing NASA Science into the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, B. K.; Thomas, C.; Eyermann, S.; Mitchell, S.; LaConte, K.; Hauck, K.

    2015-11-01

    Libraries are community-centered, free-access venues serving learners of all ages and backgrounds. Libraries also recognize the importance of science literacy and strive to include science in their programming portfolio. Scientists and educators can partner with local libraries to advance mutual goals of connecting the public to Earth and Space Science. In this interactive Special Interest Group (SIG) discussion, representatives from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community's library collaborations discussed the opportunities for partnership with public and school libraries; explored the resources, events, and programs available through libraries; explored NASA science programming and professional development opportunities available for librarians; and strategized about the types of support that librarians require to plan and implement programs that use NASA data and resources. We also shared successes, lessons learned, and future opportunities for incorporating NASA science programming into library settings.

  19. Higgs pair production at NLO QCD for CP-violating Higgs sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, R.; Mühlleitner, M.; Spira, M.

    2017-12-01

    Higgs pair production through gluon fusion is an important process at the LHC to test the dynamics underlying electroweak symmetry breaking. Higgs sectors beyond the Standard Model (SM) can substantially modify this cross section through novel couplings not present in the SM or the on-shell production of new heavy Higgs bosons that subsequently decay into Higgs pairs. CP violation in the Higgs sector is important for the explanation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry through electroweak baryogenesis. In this work we compute the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in the heavy top quark limit, including the effects of CP violation in the Higgs sector. We choose the effective theory (EFT) approach, which provides a rather model-independent way to explore New Physics (NP) effects by adding dimension-6 operators, both CP-conserving and CP-violating ones, to the SM Lagrangian. Furthermore, we perform the computation within a specific UV-complete model and choose as benchmark model the general 2-Higgs-Doublet Model with CP violation, the C2HDM. Depending on the dimension-6 coefficients, the relative NLO QCD corrections are affected by several per cent through the new CP-violating operators. This is also the case for SM-like Higgs pair production in the C2HDM, while the relative QCD corrections in the production of heavier C2HDM Higgs boson pairs deviate more strongly from the SM case. The absolute cross sections both in the EFT and the C2HDM can be modified by more than an order of magnitude. In particular, in the C2HDM the resonant production of Higgs pairs can by far exceed the SM cross section.

  20. CP violation in η, KL → μantiμ- decays and electric dipole moments of electron and muon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, C.Q.; Ng, J.N.

    1990-03-01

    The CP-violating longitudinal polarization asymmetry P L of the outgoing muon in η → μ μ - decays and the electric dipole moments of electron and muon (d l , l = e,μ) are studied in various extensions of the standard CP violation model. The possibility of having large P L in both decays and d l is explored

  1. Structural and Electrochemical Consequences of [Cp*] Ligand Protonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Ramos-Garcés, Mario V; Lionetti, Davide; Blakemore, James D

    2017-09-05

    There are few examples of the isolation of analogous metal complexes bearing [η 5 -Cp*] and [η 4 -Cp*H] (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) complexes within the same metal/ligand framework, despite the relevance of such structures to catalytic applications. Recently, protonation of Cp*Rh(bpy) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl) has been shown to yield a complex bearing the uncommon [η 4 -Cp*H] ligand, rather than generating a [Rh III -H] complex. We now report the purification and isolation of this protonated species, as well as characterization of analogous complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). Specifically, reaction of Cp*Rh(bpy) or Cp*Rh(phen) with 1 equiv of Et 3 NH + Br - affords rhodium compounds bearing endo-η 4 -pentamethylcyclopentadiene (η 4 -Cp*H) as a ligand. NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies confirm protonation of the Cp* ligand, rather than formation of metal hydride complexes. Analysis of new structural data and electronic spectra suggests that phen is significantly reduced in Cp*Rh(phen), similar to the case of Cp*Rh(bpy). Backbonding interactions with olefinic motifs are activated by formation of [η 4 -Cp*H]; protonation of [Cp*] stabilizes the low-valent metal center and results in loss of reduced character on the diimine ligands. In accord with these changes in electronic structure, electrochemical studies reveal a distinct manifold of redox processes that are accessible in the [Cp*H] complexes in comparison with their [Cp*] analogues; these processes suggest new applications in catalysis for the complexes bearing endo-η 4 -Cp*H.

  2. NASA Advanced Explorations Systems: Advancements in Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Schneider, Walter F.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems (LSS) project strives to develop reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) critical to enabling long duration human missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Highly reliable, closed-loop life support systems are among the capabilities required for the longer duration human space exploration missions assessed by NASA's Habitability Architecture Team (HAT). The LSS project is focused on four areas: architecture and systems engineering for life support systems, environmental monitoring, air revitalization, and wastewater processing and water management. Starting with the international space station (ISS) LSS systems as a point of departure (where applicable), the mission of the LSS project is three-fold: 1. Address discrete LSS technology gaps 2. Improve the reliability of LSS systems 3. Advance LSS systems towards integrated testing on the ISS. This paper summarized the work being done in the four areas listed above to meet these objectives. Details will be given on the following focus areas: Systems Engineering and Architecture- With so many complex systems comprising life support in space, it is important to understand the overall system requirements to define life support system architectures for different space mission classes, ensure that all the components integrate well together and verify that testing is as representative of destination environments as possible. Environmental Monitoring- In an enclosed spacecraft that is constantly operating complex machinery for its own basic functionality as well as science experiments and technology demonstrations, it's possible for the environment to become compromised. While current environmental monitors aboard the ISS will alert crew members and mission control if there is an emergency, long-duration environmental monitoring cannot be done in-orbit as current methodologies

  3. Leptonic CP Violation measurement at the neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguet Castell, J.; Mena, O.

    2003-01-01

    In this talk, based on the work [J. Burguet Castell, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 608 (2001) 301], we refine our previous analysis [A. Cervera, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 579 (2000) 17] of the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and θ 13 at a neutrino factory in the LMA-MSW scenario, by exploring the full range of these two parameters. We have discovered that there exist, at fixed neutrino energy, E ν , and baseline, L, degenerate solutions. Although the spectral analysis helps in disentangling fake from true solutions, a leftover product of this degeneracy remains for a realistic detector, which we analyse. Furthermore, we take into account the expected uncertainties on the solar and atmospheric oscillation parameters and in the average Earth matter density along the neutrino path. An intermediate baseline of O(3000) km is still the best option to tackle CP violation, although a combination of two baselines turns out to be very important in resolving degeneracies

  4. CP violation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric dipole moments of large atoms are an excellent tool to search for CP violation beyond the Standard Model. These tell us about the electron EDM but also about CP-violating electron-nucleon dimension-6 operators that arise from Higgs-exchange. Rapid strides are being made in searches for atomic EDMs. Limits on the electron EDM approaching the values which would be expected from Higgs-exchange mediated CP violation have been achieved. It is pointed out that in this same kind of model if tan β is large the effects in atoms of the dimension-6 e - n operators may outweigh the effect of the electron EDM. (author) 21 refs

  5. CpG island mapping by epigenome prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bock

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available CpG islands were originally identified by epigenetic and functional properties, namely, absence of DNA methylation and frequent promoter association. However, this concept was quickly replaced by simple DNA sequence criteria, which allowed for genome-wide annotation of CpG islands in the absence of large-scale epigenetic datasets. Although widely used, the current CpG island criteria incur significant disadvantages: (1 reliance on arbitrary threshold parameters that bear little biological justification, (2 failure to account for widespread heterogeneity among CpG islands, and (3 apparent lack of specificity when applied to the human genome. This study is driven by the idea that a quantitative score of "CpG island strength" that incorporates epigenetic and functional aspects can help resolve these issues. We construct an epigenome prediction pipeline that links the DNA sequence of CpG islands to their epigenetic states, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin accessibility. By training support vector machines on epigenetic data for CpG islands on human Chromosomes 21 and 22, we identify informative DNA attributes that correlate with open versus compact chromatin structures. These DNA attributes are used to predict the epigenetic states of all CpG islands genome-wide. Combining predictions for multiple epigenetic features, we estimate the inherent CpG island strength for each CpG island in the human genome, i.e., its inherent tendency to exhibit an open and transcriptionally competent chromatin structure. We extensively validate our results on independent datasets, showing that the CpG island strength predictions are applicable and informative across different tissues and cell types, and we derive improved maps of predicted "bona fide" CpG islands. The mapping of CpG islands by epigenome prediction is conceptually superior to identifying CpG islands by widely used sequence criteria since it links CpG island detection to

  6. CpG island mapping by epigenome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Christoph; Walter, Jörn; Paulsen, Martina; Lengauer, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    CpG islands were originally identified by epigenetic and functional properties, namely, absence of DNA methylation and frequent promoter association. However, this concept was quickly replaced by simple DNA sequence criteria, which allowed for genome-wide annotation of CpG islands in the absence of large-scale epigenetic datasets. Although widely used, the current CpG island criteria incur significant disadvantages: (1) reliance on arbitrary threshold parameters that bear little biological justification, (2) failure to account for widespread heterogeneity among CpG islands, and (3) apparent lack of specificity when applied to the human genome. This study is driven by the idea that a quantitative score of "CpG island strength" that incorporates epigenetic and functional aspects can help resolve these issues. We construct an epigenome prediction pipeline that links the DNA sequence of CpG islands to their epigenetic states, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin accessibility. By training support vector machines on epigenetic data for CpG islands on human Chromosomes 21 and 22, we identify informative DNA attributes that correlate with open versus compact chromatin structures. These DNA attributes are used to predict the epigenetic states of all CpG islands genome-wide. Combining predictions for multiple epigenetic features, we estimate the inherent CpG island strength for each CpG island in the human genome, i.e., its inherent tendency to exhibit an open and transcriptionally competent chromatin structure. We extensively validate our results on independent datasets, showing that the CpG island strength predictions are applicable and informative across different tissues and cell types, and we derive improved maps of predicted "bona fide" CpG islands. The mapping of CpG islands by epigenome prediction is conceptually superior to identifying CpG islands by widely used sequence criteria since it links CpG island detection to their characteristic

  7. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are potent enhancers of radio- and chemoresponses of murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathryn A.; Neal, Robert; Hunter, Nancy; Ariga, Hisanori; Ang, Kian; Milas, Luka

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs bind to Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and stimulate both innate and adaptive immune reactions and possess anti-tumor activity. We recently reported that CpG ODN 1826 strongly enhances radioresponse of both immunogenic [Milas L, Mason K, Ariga H, et al. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide enhances tumor response to radiation. Cancer Res 2004;64:5074-7] and non-immunogenic [Mason KA, Ariga H, Neal R, et al. Targeting toll-like receptor-9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides enhances tumor response to fractionated radiotherapy. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:361-9] murine tumors. Using two immunogenic murine tumors, a fibrosarcoma (FSa) and a mammary carcinoma (MCa-K), the present study explored whether CpG ODN 1826 also improves the response of murine tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel (DOC). Materials and methods: CpG ODN 1826 (100 μg) was given sc three times: when leg tumors were 6 mm, when they grew to 8 mm and again 1 week later. DOC (33 mg/kg iv) and local tumor radiation (10 Gy) were given when tumors were 8 mm. Effects of the treatments were assayed by tumor growth delay, defined as days for tumors to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter. Results: Treatment with CpG ODN 1826 resulted in strongly enhanced response of FSa tumors to radiation and MCa-K tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent DOC. Enhancement of tumor treatment response was demonstrated by a strong prolongation in the primary tumor treatment endpoint, tumor growth delay. Coincidentally, this treatment also resulted in a higher rate of tumor cure than that observed after tumor radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone. When all three agents were combined the effect was comparable to that of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with radiation in the case of FSa or of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with DOC in the case of MCa-K. Conclusion: Overall results show that CpG ODN 1826 can markedly improve tumor response

  8. Did the CP audits promote the enterprises' CP? A case study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Huang, Jun; Chen, Qing

    2002-03-09

    Seven enterprises that have had recent Cleaner Production (CP) audits in Beijing were interviewed to identify whether these enterprises implemented the audit recommendations. If enterprises did implement the recommendations, their reasons and the results were analyzed. Finally, some suggestions on how to promote enterprise-wide CP were given.

  9. Prospects for CP violation measurements with ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Konecki, M

    2001-01-01

    Very high LHC luminosity will result in ~10^13 b-particles produced per year allowing general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS to contribute to the exploration of phenomena in B physics. A review of simulation studies made by ATLAS and CMS B-physics groups is given. The expected numbers of reconstructed events, sensitivities to CP violating parameters, the x_s measurements, and possibilities to observe very rare B-decays are discussed.

  10. CP violation and the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, D.

    1994-02-01

    We consider signals of CP violation in semi-leptonic decay of the top quark. We show that the transverse polarization asymmetries of the τ-lepton in the decay t → brv is extremely sensitive CP violation. As an illustration we consider CP phases arising from the charged Higgs exchange in the Weinberg three Higgs doublet model. Qualitatively, the polarization asymmetries are enhanced over rate or energy asymmetries by a factor of O(m t /m r ) ∼ 100 with a corresponding increase in sensitivity to CP violating parameters. We also examine τ polarization in b decays via b → cvr and find that may also be very effective in constraining CP violating effects such as those that arise from an extended Higgs sector

  11. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  12. CP violation without elementary scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.; Lane, K.; Preskill, J.

    1980-04-01

    Dynamically broken gauge theories of electroweak interactions provide a natural mechanism for generating CP violation. Even if all vacuum angles are unobservable, strong CP violation is not automatically avoided. In the absence of strong CP violation, the neutron electric dipole moment is expected to be of order 10 -24 e cm

  13. B decays and models for CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao Gang

    1995-12-01

    The decay modes B to π π,υK S , K - D, πK and ηK are promising channels to study the unitarity triangle of the CP violating Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. The consequences of these measurements in the Weinberg model are discussed. It is shown that measurements of CP violation in B decay can be used to distinguish Standard Model from Weinberg model and that the following different mechanisms for CP violation can be distinguished: 1) CP is violated in the CKM sector only; 2) CP is violated spontaneously in the Higgs sector only; and 3) CP is violated in both the CKM and Higgs sectors. 27 refs., 4 figs

  14. Higgs pair production at NLO QCD for CP-violating Higgs sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gröber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Higgs pair production through gluon fusion is an important process at the LHC to test the dynamics underlying electroweak symmetry breaking. Higgs sectors beyond the Standard Model (SM can substantially modify this cross section through novel couplings not present in the SM or the on-shell production of new heavy Higgs bosons that subsequently decay into Higgs pairs. CP violation in the Higgs sector is important for the explanation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry through electroweak baryogenesis. In this work we compute the next-to-leading order (NLO QCD corrections in the heavy top quark limit, including the effects of CP violation in the Higgs sector. We choose the effective theory (EFT approach, which provides a rather model-independent way to explore New Physics (NP effects by adding dimension-6 operators, both CP-conserving and CP-violating ones, to the SM Lagrangian. Furthermore, we perform the computation within a specific UV-complete model and choose as benchmark model the general 2-Higgs-Doublet Model with CP violation, the C2HDM. Depending on the dimension-6 coefficients, the relative NLO QCD corrections are affected by several per cent through the new CP-violating operators. This is also the case for SM-like Higgs pair production in the C2HDM, while the relative QCD corrections in the production of heavier C2HDM Higgs boson pairs deviate more strongly from the SM case. The absolute cross sections both in the EFT and the C2HDM can be modified by more than an order of magnitude. In particular, in the C2HDM the resonant production of Higgs pairs can by far exceed the SM cross section.

  15. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions: Overview of the Technology Maturation Efforts Funded by NASA's Game Changing Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Robin A.; Arnold, James O.; Gasch, Matthew J.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Fan, Wendy; Szalai, Christine E.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Chief Technologist (OCT), NASA has identified the need for research and technology development in part from NASA's Strategic Goal 3.3 of the NASA Strategic Plan to develop and demonstrate the critical technologies that will make NASA's exploration, science, and discovery missions more affordable and more capable. Furthermore, the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) is a primary avenue to achieve the Agency's 2011 strategic goal to "Create the innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future." In addition, recently released "NASA space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities," by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences stresses the need for NASA to invest in the very near term in specific EDL technologies. The report points out the following challenges (Page 2-38 of the pre-publication copy released on February 1, 2012): Mass to Surface: Develop the ability to deliver more payload to the destination. NASA's future missions will require ever-greater mass delivery capability in order to place scientifically significant instrument packages on distant bodies of interest, to facilitate sample returns from bodies of interest, and to enable human exploration of planets such as Mars. As the maximum mass that can be delivered to an entry interface is fixed for a given launch system and trajectory design, the mass delivered to the surface will require reduction in spacecraft structural mass; more efficient, lighter thermal protection systems; more efficient lighter propulsion systems; and lighter, more efficient deceleration systems. Surface Access: Increase the ability to land at a variety of planetary locales and at a variety of times. Access to specific sites can be achieved via landing at a specific location (s) or transit from a single designated landing location, but it is currently infeasible to transit long distances and through extremely rugged terrain, requiring landing close to the

  16. Superweak-like models of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoura, L.

    1992-01-01

    I put forward a two-Higgs-doublet model in which CP violation is mediated only by the neutral Higgs bosons, via the mechanism of scalar-pseudoscalar mixing. In this model there is no CP violation in the exchange of either W bosons or of charged Higgs bosons. The model is therefore an approximate realization of the superweak theory of CP violation. It has only two basic CP-violating quantities. I point out that other models of this kind, but with more than two Higgs doublets, may also be built

  17. Present status of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    A review of the status of CP violation in kaons is given. Status of our knowledge of quark mixing angles in the standard six quark model is presented. The role Β d o - Βd o transition plays in this study is examined. A comparison of the estimates of CP violation effects from models beyond the standard one is given. Other experiments that have the capability of testing different CP violation models are also discussed. (Author) 35 refs., 6 figs., tab

  18. Constraints on the CP-Violating MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Arbey, A; Godbole, R M; Mahmoudi, F

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for observing CP violation in the MSSM with six CP-violating phases, using a geometric approach to maximise CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We consider constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics, the dark matter relic density and spin-independent scattering cross section with matter.

  19. An Analysis of $B_{s}$ Decays in the Left-Right-Symmetric Model with Spontaneous CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Patricia; Ball, Patricia; Fleischer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Non-leptonic B_s decays into CP eigenstates that are caused by \\bar b -> \\bar cc\\bar s quark-level transitions, such as B_s -> D_s^+D^-_s, J/psi eta^(') or J/psi phi, provide a powerful tool to search for ``new physics'', as the CP-violating effects in these modes are tiny in the Standard Model. We explore these effects for a particular scenario of new physics, the left-right-symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In our analysis, we take into account all presently available experimental constraints on the parameters of this model, i.e. those implied by K- and B-decay observables; we find that CP asymmetries as large as O(40%) may arise in the B_s channels, whereas the left-right-symmetric model favours a small CP asymmetry in the ``gold-plated'' mode B_d -> J/psi K_S. Such a pattern would be in favour of B-physics experiments at hadron machines, where the B_s modes are very accessible.

  20. NASA's explorer school and spaceward bound programs: Insights into two education programs designed to heighten public support for space science initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, Matthew; McKay, Christopher P; Coe, Liza; Rask, Jon; Paradise, Jim; Wynne, J. Judson

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionNASA has played an influential role in bringing the enthusiasm of space science to schools across the United States since the 1980s. The evolution of this public outreach has led to a variety of NASA funded education programs designed to promote student interest in science, technology, engineering, math, and geography (STEM-G) careers.PurposeThis paper investigates the educational outreach initiatives, structure, and impact of two of NASA's largest educational programs: the NASA Explorer School (NES) and NASA Spaceward Bound programs.ResultsSince its induction in 2003 the NES program has networked and provided resources to over 300 schools across the United States. Future directions include further development of mentor schools for each new NES school selected, while also developing a longitudinal student tracking system for NES students to monitor their future involvement in STEM-G careers. The Spaceward Bound program, now in its third year of teacher outreach, is looking to further expand its teacher network and scientific collaboration efforts, while building on its teacher mentorship framework.

  1. A Comparison of Flow-Through Versus Non-Flow-Through Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for NASA's Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), NASA is developing both primary fuel cell power systems and regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage systems within the fuel cell portion of the Energy Storage Project. This effort is being led by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and industrial partners. The development goals are to improve fuel cell and electrolysis stack electrical performance, reduce system mass, volume, and parasitic power requirements, and increase system life and reliability. A major focus of this effort has been the parallel development of both flow-through and non-flow-through proton exchange membrane (PEM) primary fuel cell power systems. The plan has been, at the appropriate time, to select a single primary fuel cell technology for eventual flight hardware development. Ideally, that appropriate time would occur after both technologies have achieved a technology readiness level (TRL) of six, which represents an engineering model fidelity PEM fuel cell system being successfully tested in a relevant environment. Budget constraints in fiscal year 2009 and beyond have prevented NASA from continuing to pursue the parallel development of both primary fuel cell options. Because very limited data exists for either system, a toplevel, qualitative assessment based on engineering judgement was performed expeditiously to provide guidance for a selection. At that time, the non-flow-through technology was selected for continued development because of potentially major advantages in terms of weight, volume, parasitic power, reliability, and life. This author believes that the advantages are significant enough, and the potential benefits great enough, to offset the higher state of technology readiness of flow-through technology. This paper

  2. Highlights of CP 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Various developing topics in CP violation are reviewed. There are many theoretical reasons to hope that the CKM paradigm may be incomplete. It is surely too soon to be claiming new physics in \\epsilon^\\prime/\\epsilon or in D^0-\\bar D^0 mixing, but rare K decays offer interesting places to search for new physics. It is probably also premature to see a clash between global CKM fits and current estimates of sin \\beta and \\gamma, where much more precise data will soon be available. There are interesting possibilities to look for CP violation in neutrino oscillations and in Higgs physics. Rapid progress can be expected now that CP violation is moving to the top of the particle physics agenda.

  3. The CpG island searcher: a new WWW resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Daiya; Jones, Peter A

    2003-01-01

    Clusters of CpG dinucleotides in GC rich regions of the genome called "CpG islands" frequently occur in the 5' ends of genes. Methylation of CpG islands plays a role in transcriptional silencing in higher organisms in certain situations. We have established a CpG-island-extraction algorithm, which we previously developed [Takai and Jones, 2002], on a web site which has a simple user interface to identify CpG islands from submitted sequences of up to 50kb. The web site determines the locations of CpG islands using parameters (lower limit of %GC, ObsCpG/ExpCpG, length) set by the user, to display the value of parameters on each CpG island, and provides a graphical map of CpG dinucleotide distribution and borders of CpG islands. A command-line version of the CpG islands searcher has also been developed for larger sequences. The CpG Island Searcher was applied to the latest sequence and mapping information of human chromosomes 20, 21 and 22, and a total of 2345 CpG islands were extracted and 534 (23%) of them contained first coding exons and 650 (28%) contained other exons. The CpG Island Searcher is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.cpgislands.com or http://www.uscnorris.com/cpgislands/cpg.cgi.

  4. CP violation in K decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs

  5. CP violation conditions in N-Higgs-doublet potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Conditions for CP violation in the scalar potential sector of general N-Higgs-doublet models are analyzed from a group theoretical perspective. For the simplest two-Higgs-doublet model potential, a minimum set of conditions for explicit and spontaneous CP violation is presented. The conditions can be given a clear geometrical interpretation in terms of quantities in the adjoint representation of the basis transformation group for the two doublets. Such conditions depend on CP-odd pseudoscalar invariants. When the potential is CP invariant, the explicit procedure to reach the real CP-basis and the explicit CP transformation can also be obtained. The procedure to find the real basis and the conditions for CP violation are then extended to general N-Higgs-doublet model potentials. The analysis becomes more involved and only a formal procedure to reach the real basis is found. Necessary conditions for CP invariance can still be formulated in terms of group invariants: the CP-odd generalized pseudoscalars. The problem can be completely solved for three Higgs-doublets

  6. Higgs boson searches in CP-conserving and CP-violating MSSM scenarios with the DELPHI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J.; Antilogus, P.; Augustin, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the final interpretation of the results from DELPHI on the searches for Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). A few representative scenarios are considered, that include CP conservation and explicit CP violation in the Higgs sector. The experimental results encompass the searches for neutral Higgs bosons at LEP1 and LEP2 in final states as expected in the MSSM, as well as LEP2 searches for charged Higgs bosons and for neutral Higgs bosons decaying into hadrons independent of the quark flavour. The data reveal no significant excess with respect to background expectations. The results are translated into excluded regions of the parameter space in the various scenarios. In the CP-conserving case, these lead to limits on the masses of the lightest scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons, h and A, and on tan β. The dependence of these limits on the top quark mass is discussed. Allowing for CP violation reduces the experimental sensitivity to Higgs bosons. It is shown that this effect depends strongly on the values of the parameters responsible for CP violation in the Higgs sector. (orig.)

  7. Strong CP, flavor, and twisted split fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class. (author)

  8. 78 FR 70963 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ....m. to 2:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Kennedy Space Center, Headquarters Building, Room 2229... Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-2245, or [email protected] meeting at the NASA Kennedy Space Center must provide their full name, company affiliation (if applicable...

  9. B decays and models for CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.

    1996-01-01

    The decay modes B to ππ, ψK S , K - D, πK, and ηK are promising channels to study the unitarity triangle of the CP-violating Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. In this paper I study the consequences of these measurements in the Weinberg model. I show that using the same set of measurements, the following different mechanisms for CP violation can be distinguished: (1) CP is violated in the CKM sector only; (2) CP is violated spontaneously in the Higgs sector only; and (3) CP is violated in both the CKM and Higgs sectors. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. CP violation in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: In the standard model CP violation is generated by a non trivial complex phase in the CKM matrix. The Standard Model does not predict the elements of the CKM matrix, they need to be experimentally measured. This will show if all the CP violation phenomena can be accounted by the complex phase or there are other contributing mechanisms which lie beyond the scope of Standard Model. It is of interest to overconstraint the so called unitary triangle by measuring each angle (α, β and γ) from the CP asymmetry that occurs in different decay modes. During the initial low luminosity period of the LHC a large effort will be concentrated in studying B physics, especially CP violation in the B 0 - B-bar 0 system, with the ATLAS detector. The features of the detector which are important for CP studies are: sharp trigger from the muon spectrometer (muons will be identify down to p T ≅ 5GeV, be able to distinguish electrons from hadrons (down to p T ≅ 1 GeV) with the Straw Tracker and Transition detector and high resolution of tracks, secondary vertices with the Semiconductor Tracker (resolution of 10-90 μm. For some decays modes ATLAS is expected to obtain larger sample of events than the B-factories that are being proposed. It has been calculated that the systematic error σ sin (2 α) = 0.06 and σ sin ( 2 β) = 0.027 which is comparable with other future experiments

  11. CP trajectory diagram--a tool for a pictorial representation of CP and matter effects in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Nunokawa, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a 'CP trajectory diagram in bi-probability space' as a powerful tool for a pictorial representation of the genuine CP and the matter effects in neutrino oscillations. The existence of correlated ambiguity in the determination of CP-violating phase δ and the sign of Δm 13 2 is uncovered. The principles of tuning the beam energy for a given baseline distance are proposed to resolve the ambiguity and to maximize the CP-odd effect. We finally point out, quite contrary to what is usually believed, that the ambiguity may be resolved with ∼50% chance in the super-JHF experiment despite its relatively short baseline of 300 km

  12. Theory prospective on leptonic CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcov, S.T.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenology of 3-neutrino mixing, the current status of our knowledge about the 3-neutrino mixing parameters, including the absolute neutrino mass scale, and of the Dirac and Majorana CP violation in the lepton sector are reviewed. The problems of CP violation in neutrino oscillations and of determining the nature – Dirac or Majorana – of massive neutrinos are discussed. The seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation and the related leptogenesis scenario of generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe are considered. The results showing that the CP violation necessary for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in leptogenesis can be due exclusively to the Dirac and/or Majorana CP-violating phase(s) in the neutrino mixing matrix U are briefly reviewed. The discrete symmetry approach to understanding the observed pattern of neutrino mixing and the related predictions for the leptonic Dirac CP violation are also reviewed.

  13. The NASA GOLD Mission: Exploring the Interface between Earth and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T.; Costanza, B.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, mission will explore a little understood area close to home, but historically hard to observe: the interface between Earth and space, a dynamic area of near-Earth space that responds both to space weather above, and the lower atmosphere below. GOLD, scheduled to launch into geostationary orbit in early 2018, will collect observations with a 30-minute cadence, much higher than any mission that has come before it. This will enable GOLD to be the first mission to study the day-to-day weather of a region of space—the thermosphere and ionosphere—rather than its long-term climate. GOLD will explore the near-Earth space environment, which is home to astronauts, radio signals used to guide airplanes and ships, and satellites that provide our communications and GPS systems. GOLD's unprecedented images and data will enable research that can improve situational awareness to help protect astronauts, spacecraft, and humans on the ground. As part of the GOLD communications and outreach program, the Office of Communications & Outreach at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) is developing a suite of products and programs to introduce the science of the GOLD mission to a broad range of public audiences, including students, teachers, journalists, social media practitioners, and the wider planetary and Earth science communities. We plan to showcase with this poster some of the tools we are developing to achieve this goal.

  14. Optimised sensitivity to leptonic CP violation from spectral information: the LBNO case at 2300 km baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, S K; Aittola, M; Alekou, A; Andrieu, B; Antoniou, F; Asfandiyarov, R; Autiero, D; Bésida, O; Balik, A; Ballett, P; Bandac, I; Banerjee, D; Bartmann, W; Bay, F; Biskup, B; Blebea-Apostu, A M; Blondel, A; Bogomilov, M; Bolognesi, S; Borriello, E; Brancus, I; Bravar, A; Buizza-Avanzini, M; Caiulo, D; Calin, M; Calviani, M; Campanelli, M; Cantini, C; Cata-Danil, G; Chakraborty, S; Charitonidis, N; Chaussard, L; Chesneanu, D; Chipesiu, F; Crivelli, P; Dawson, J; De Bonis, I; Declais, Y; Sanchez, P Del Amo; Delbart, A; Di Luise, S; Duchesneau, D; Dumarchez, J; Efthymiopoulos, I; Eliseev, A; Emery, S; Enqvist, T; Enqvist, K; Epprecht, L; Erykalov, A N; Esanu, T; Franco, D; Friend, M; Galymov, V; Gavrilov, G; Gendotti, A; Giganti, C; Gilardoni, S; Goddard, B; Gomoiu, C M; Gornushkin, Y A; Gorodetzky, P; Haesler, A; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, S; Huitu, K; Izmaylov, A; Jipa, A; Kainulainen, K; Karadzhov, Y; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kopylov, A N; Korzenev, A; Kosyanenko, S; Kryn, D; Kudenko, Y; Kuusiniemi, P; Lazanu, I; Lazaridis, C; Levy, J -M; Loo, K; Maalampi, J; Margineanu, R M; Marteau, J; Martin-Mari, C; Matveev, V; Mazzucato, E; Mefodiev, A; Mineev, O; Mirizzi, A; Mitrica, B; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Narita, S; Nesterenko, D A; Nguyen, K; Nikolics, K; Noah, E; Novikov, Yu; Oprima, A; Osborne, J; Ovsyannikova, T; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascoli, S; Patzak, T; Pectu, M; Pennacchio, E; Periale, L; Pessard, H; Popov, B; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M; Resnati, F; Ristea, O; Robert, A; Rubbia, A; Rummukainen, K; Saftoiu, A; Sakashita, K; Sanchez-Galan, F; Sarkamo, J; Saviano, N; Scantamburlo, E; Sergiampietri, F; Sgalaberna, D; Shaposhnikova, E; Slupecki, M; Smargianaki, D; Stanca, D; Steerenberg, R; Sterian, A R; Sterian, P; Stoica, S; Strabel, C; Suhonen, J; Suvorov, V; Toma, G; Tonazzo, A; Trzaska, W H; Tsenov, R; Tuominen, K; Valram, M; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Vannucci, F; Vasseur, G; Velotti, F; Velten, P; Venturi, V; Viant, T; Vihonen, S; Vincke, H; Vorobyev, A; Weber, A; Wu, S; Yershov, N; Zambelli, L; Zito, M

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Long Baseline Neutrino Observatory (LBNO) is to study the $L/E$ behaviour (spectral information) of the electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance probabilities, in order to determine the unknown CP-violation phase $\\delta_{CP}$ and discover CP-violation in the leptonic sector. The result is based on the measurement of the appearance probabilities in a broad range of energies, covering t he 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima, at a very long baseline of 2300 km. The sensitivity of the experiment can be maximised by optimising the energy spectra of the neutrino and anti-neutrino fluxes. Such an optimisation requires exploring an extended range of parameters describing in details the geometries and properties of the primary protons, hadron target and focusing elements in the neutrino beam line. In this paper we present a numerical solution that leads to an optimised energy spectra and study its impact on the sensitivity of LBNO to discover leptonic CP violation. In the optimised flux ...

  15. In vivo control of CpG and non-CpG DNA methylation by DNA methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Arand

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic control of the setting and maintenance of symmetric and non-symmetric DNA methylation patterns in a particular genome context is not well understood. Here, we describe a comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation patterns generated by high resolution sequencing of hairpin-bisulfite amplicons of selected single copy genes and repetitive elements (LINE1, B1, IAP-LTR-retrotransposons, and major satellites. The analysis unambiguously identifies a substantial amount of regional incomplete methylation maintenance, i.e. hemimethylated CpG positions, with variant degrees among cell types. Moreover, non-CpG cytosine methylation is confined to ESCs and exclusively catalysed by Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. This sequence position-, cell type-, and region-dependent non-CpG methylation is strongly linked to neighboring CpG methylation and requires the presence of Dnmt3L. The generation of a comprehensive data set of 146,000 CpG dyads was used to apply and develop parameter estimated hidden Markov models (HMM to calculate the relative contribution of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts for de novo and maintenance DNA methylation. The comparative modelling included wild-type ESCs and mutant ESCs deficient for Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, or Dnmt3a/3b, respectively. The HMM analysis identifies a considerable de novo methylation activity for Dnmt1 at certain repetitive elements and single copy sequences. Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b contribute de novo function. However, both enzymes are also essential to maintain symmetrical CpG methylation at distinct repetitive and single copy sequences in ESCs.

  16. Soft CP violation in K-meson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, J.C.; Nishi, C.C.; Pleitez, V.; Ravinez, O.; Rodriguez, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    We consider a model with soft CP violation which accommodates the CP violation in the neutral kaons even if we assume that the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix is real and the sources of CP violation are three complex vacuum expectation values and a trilinear coupling in the scalar potential. We show that for some reasonable values of the masses and other parameters the model allows us to explain all the observed CP violation processes in the K 0 -K 0 system

  17. Risk Factors for Carbapenemase-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CP-CRE) Acquisition Among Contacts of Newly Diagnosed CP-CRE Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Neiderman, Anat; Braun, Tali; Fallach, Noga; Schwartz, David; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schechner, Vered

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CP-CRE) are extremely drug-resistant pathogens. Screening of contacts of newly identified CP-CRE patients is an important step to limit further transmission. We aimed to determine the risk factors for CP-CRE acquisition among patients exposed to a CP-CRE index patient. METHODS A matched case-control study was performed in a tertiary care hospital in Israel. The study population was comprised of patients who underwent rectal screening for CP-CRE following close contact with a newly identified CP-CRE index patient. Cases were defined as positive tests for CP-CRE. For each case patient, 2 matched controls were randomly selected from the pool of contacts who tested negative for CP-CRE following exposure to the same index case. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS In total, 53 positive contacts were identified in 40 unique investigations (896 tests performed on 735 contacts) between October 6, 2008, and June 7, 2012. bla KPC was the only carbapenemase identified. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for CP-CRE acquisition among contacts were (1) contact with an index patient for ≥3 days (odds ratio [OR], 9.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-48.9), (2) mechanical ventilation (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.4-11.9), and (3) carriage or infection with another multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.0-7.1). Among patients who received antibiotics, cephalosporins were associated with a lower risk of acquisition. CONCLUSIONS Patient characteristics (ventilation and carriage of another MDRO) as well as duration of contact are risk factors for CP-CRE acquisition among contacts. The role of cephalosporins requires further study. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-7.

  18. Human Exploration System Test-Bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Support of Future NASA Deep-Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo, Jose; Ewert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate at the NASA - Johnson Space Center is outfitting a 20-Foot diameter hypobaric chamber in Building 7 to support future deep-space Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) research as part of the Human Exploration System Test-bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Project. This human-rated chamber is the only NASA facility that has the unique experience, chamber geometry, infrastructure, and support systems capable of conducting this research. The chamber was used to support Gemini, Apollo, and SkyLab Missions. More recently, it was used to conduct 30-, 60-, and 90-day human ECLSS closed-loop testing in the 1990s to support the International Space Station and life support technology development. NASA studies show that both planetary surface and deep-space transit crew habitats will be 3-4 story cylindrical structures driven by human occupancy volumetric needs and launch vehicle constraints. The HESTIA facility offers a 3-story, 20-foot diameter habitat consistent with the studies' recommendations. HESTIA operations follow stringent processes by a certified test team that including human testing. Project management, analysis, design, acquisition, fabrication, assembly and certification of facility build-ups are available to support this research. HESTIA offers close proximity to key stakeholders including astronauts, Human Research Program (who direct space human research for the agency), Mission Operations, Safety & Mission Assurance, and Engineering Directorate. The HESTIA chamber can operate at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen environments including those proposed for deep-space exploration. Data acquisition, power, fluids and other facility resources are available to support a wide range of research. Recently completed HESTIA research consisted of unmanned testing of ECLSS technologies. Eventually, the HESTIA research will include humans for extended durations at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen to demonstrate

  19. MeCP2 regulates ethanol sensitivity and intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Chen, Jihuan; Lefebvre, Celine; Kawamura, Tomoya; Kreifeldt, Max; Basson, Oan; Roberts, Amanda J; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the expression of chromatin-regulating genes in the prefrontal cortex and in the shell subdivision of the nucleus accumbens during protracted withdrawal in mice with increased ethanol drinking after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure and in mice with a history of non-dependent drinking. We observed that the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) was one of the few chromatin-regulating genes to be differentially regulated by a history of dependence. As MeCP2 has the potential of acting as a broad gene regulator, we investigated sensitivity to ethanol and ethanol drinking in MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice, which harbor a truncated MeCP2 allele but have a milder phenotype than MeCP2 null mice. We observed that MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice were more sensitive to ethanol's stimulatory and sedative effects than wild-type (WT) mice, drank less ethanol in a limited access 2 bottle choice paradigm and did not show increased drinking after induction of dependence with exposure to CIE vapors. Alcohol metabolism did not differ in MeCP2(308/) (Y) and WT mice. Additionally, MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice did not differ from WT mice in ethanol preference in a 24-hour paradigm nor in their intake of graded solutions of saccharin or quinine, suggesting that the MeCP2(308/) (Y) mutation did not alter taste function. Lastly, using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis algorithm, we found a significant overlap in the genes regulated by alcohol and by MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 contributes to the regulation of ethanol sensitivity and drinking. © 2013 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. CP and other gauge symmetries in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dine, M.; Leigh, R.G.; MacIntire, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    We argue that CP is a gauge symmetry in string theory. As a consequence, CP cannot be explicitly broken either perturbatively or nonperturbatively; there can be no nonperturbative CP-violating parameters. String theory is thus an example of a theory where all θ angles arise due to spontaneous CP violation, and are in principle calculable

  1. Planetary Protection Issues in the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, Marvin E.; Race, M. S.; Rummel, J. D.; Baker, A.

    2005-01-01

    This workshop report, long delayed, is the first 21st century contribution to what will likely be a series of reports examining the effects of human exploration on the overall scientific study of Mars. The considerations of human-associated microbial contamination were last studied in a 1990 workshop ("Planetary Protection Issues and Future Mars Missions," NASA CP-10086, 1991), but the timing of that workshop allowed neither a careful examination of the full range of issues, nor an appreciation for the Mars that has been revealed by the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Pathfinder missions. Future workshops will also have the advantage of Mars Odyssey, the Mars Exploration Rover missions, and ESA's Mars Express, but the Pingree Park workshop reported here had both the NCR's (1992) concern that "Missions carrying humans to Mars will contaminate the planet" and over a decade of careful study of human exploration objectives to guide them and to reconcile. A daunting challenge, and one that is not going to be simple (as the working title of this meeting, "When Ecologies Collide?" might suggest), it is clear that the planetary protection issues will have to be addressed to enable human explorers to safely and competently extend out knowledge about Mars, and its potential as a home for life whether martian or human.

  2. Invariant approach to CP in unbroken Δ(27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Branco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The invariant approach is a powerful method for studying CP violation for specific Lagrangians. The method is particularly useful for dealing with discrete family symmetries. We focus on the CP properties of unbroken Δ(27 invariant Lagrangians with Yukawa-like terms, which proves to be a rich framework, with distinct aspects of CP, making it an ideal group to investigate with the invariant approach. We classify Lagrangians depending on the number of fields transforming as irreducible triplet representations of Δ(27. For each case, we construct CP-odd weak basis invariants and use them to discuss the respective CP properties. We find that CP violation is sensitive to the number and type of Δ(27 representations.

  3. CP determination and tests for CP or P violation by the V1V2 decay mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A decay mode such as phiphi, UPSILONUPSILON, K/sup asterisk+/K/sup asterisk-/, or D/sup asterisk+/D/sup asterisk-/ can be used to distinguish between a neutral spin-0 technipion and a neutral spin-0 Higgs particle. By this generalization of phiphi parity test, the CP eigenvalue γ/sub C/P can be determined for an X particle of any spin J which decays CP invariantly into VV, or VV-bar, where each vector meson either decays into two spin-0 bosons, or is ω. The absence in a VV, or VV-bar, decay channel of sin2phi and sinphi terms in the azimuthal distribution is due to CP invariance and/or P invariance. For a V 1 V 2 decay channel without a V 1 bold-arrow-left-rightV 2 exchange property, and in a mode like K/sup asterisk+/K /sup asterisk0/, such terms would imply that P is violated. For a V 1 V 2 mode such as phiω where each vector meson is its own antiparticle, such terms would imply that both P and CP are violated; when CP invariance holds, the γ/sub C/P(-)/sup J/ eigenvalue of X can be determined provided certain amplitudes do not accidentally vanish

  4. CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-12-01

    Predictions for CP violation in the three generation Standard Model are reviewed based on what is known about the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Application to the K and B meson systems are emphasized. 43 refs., 13 figs

  5. The Role of Synthetic Biology in NASA's Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The time has come to for NASA to exploit synthetic biology in pursuit of its missions, including aeronautics, earth science, astrobiology and most notably, human exploration. Conversely, NASA advances the fundamental technology of synthetic biology as no one else can because of its unique expertise in the origin of life and life in extreme environments, including the potential for alternate life forms. This enables unique, creative "game changing" advances. NASA's requirement for minimizing upmass in flight will also drive the field toward miniaturization and automation. These drivers will greatly increase the utility of synthetic biology solutions for military, health in remote areas and commercial purposes. To this end, we have begun a program at NASA to explore the use of synthetic biology in NASA's missions, particular space exploration. As part of this program, we began hosting an iGEM team of undergraduates drawn from Brown and Stanford Universities to conduct synthetic biology research at NASA Ames Research Center. The 2011 team (http://2011.igem.org/Team:Brown-Stanford) produced an award-winning project on using synthetic biology as a basis for a human Mars settlement.

  6. Arsenic-Rich Polyarsenides Stabilized by Cp*Fe Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Monika; Konieczny, David; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Virovets, Alexander V; Balázs, Gabor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Riedlberger, Felix; Krauss, Hannes; Scheer, Manfred

    2017-06-12

    The redox chemistry of [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] (1, Cp*=η 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry, revealing a redox behavior similar to that of its lighter congener [Cp*Fe(η 5 -P 5 )]. However, the subsequent chemical reduction of 1 by KH led to the formation of a mixture of novel As n scaffolds with n up to 18 that are stabilized only by [Cp*Fe] fragments. These include the arsenic-poor triple-decker complex [K(dme) 2 ][{Cp*Fe(μ,η 2:2 -As 2 )} 2 ] (2) and the arsenic-rich complexes [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] (3), [K(dme) 2 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 2:2:2:2 -As 14 )] (4), and [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 4 (μ 4 ,η 4:3:3:2:2:1:1 -As 18 )] (5). Compound 4 and the polyarsenide complex 5 are the largest anionic As n ligand complexes reported thus far. Complexes 2-5 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, 1 H NMR spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy (2), and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, DFT calculations showed that the intermediate [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] - , which is presumably formed first, undergoes fast dimerization to the dianion [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] 2- . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Novel MeCP2 isoform-specific antibody reveals the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression in murine brain, primary neurons and astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby M Zachariah

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a severe neurological disorder in young females, and is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene. MECP2/Mecp2 gene encodes for two protein isoforms; MeCP2E1 and MeCP2E2 that are identical except for the N-terminus region of the protein. In brain, MECP2E1 transcripts are 10X higher, and MeCP2E1 is suggested to be the relevant isoform for RTT. However, due to the unavailability of MeCP2 isoform-specific antibodies, the endogenous expression pattern of MeCP2E1 is unknown. To gain insight into the expression of MeCP2E1 in brain, we have developed an anti-MeCP2E1 antibody and validated its specificity in cells exogenously expressing individual MeCP2 isoforms. This antibody does not show any cross-reactivity with MeCP2E2 and detects endogenous MeCP2E1 in mice brain, with no signal in Mecp2(tm1.1Bird y/- null mice. Additionally, we show the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression throughout different brain regions in adult mice, and demonstrate its highest expression in the brain cortex. Our results also indicate that MeCP2E1 is highly expressed in primary neurons, as compared to primary astrocytes. This is the first report of the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression at the protein levels, providing novel avenues for understanding different aspects of MeCP2 function.

  8. NASA program planning on nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Miller, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    As part of the focused technology planning for future NASA space science and exploration missions, NASA has initiated a focused technology program to develop the technologies for nuclear electric propulsion and nuclear thermal propulsion. Beginning in 1990, NASA began a series of interagency planning workshops and meetings to identify key technologies and program priorities for nuclear propulsion. The high-priority, near-term technologies that must be developed to make NEP operational for space exploration include scaling thrusters to higher power, developing high-temperature power processing units, and developing high power, low-mass, long-lived nuclear reactors. 28 refs

  9. NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET): NASA's key to environmental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Beth

    1993-01-01

    NASA has stepped forward to face the environmental challenge to eliminate the use of Ozone-Layer Depleting Substances (OLDS) and to reduce our Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) by 50 percent in 1995. These requirements have been issued by the Clean Air Act, the Montreal Protocol, and various other legislative acts. A proactive group, the NASA Operational Environment Team or NOET, received its charter in April 1992 and was tasked with providing a network through which replacement activities and development experiences can be shared. This is a NASA-wide team which supports the research and development community by sharing information both in person and via a computerized network, assisting in specification and standard revisions, developing cleaner propulsion systems, and exploring environmentally-compliant alternatives to current processes.

  10. Report of the CP-violation working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The CP-Violation Working Group met twice during the workshop. A nice summary of our present knowledge of CP-violation was presented in the talk by Prof. James W. Cronin. In the final paragraph of his talk, Prof. Cronin argues that higher precision experiments studying CP-violation at LAMPF II will be extremely important no matter what additional knowledge we acquire in the time before LAMPF II is constructed. The crucial issue at present is to uncover the underlying mechanism responsible for CP-violation. The Working Group heard several talks aimed at reviewing the theoretical status of CP-violation and the directions that future experimental efforts might take. These talks included: Kaon Experiments at KEK, T. Yamazaki, University of Tokyo; Mechanisms for CP Violation, P. Herczeg, Los Alamos; and The Experimental Status of eta 00 Experiments, J.W. Cronin, Univ. of Chicago. There were also extended discussions on which experiments appear to be the most important and how to best perform these measurements. A summary of these discussions is given

  11. NASA's Big Data Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. P.; Kinter, J. L.; Beebe, R. F.; Feigelson, E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Mentzel, C.; Smith, G.; Tino, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Two years ago NASA established the Ad Hoc Big Data Task Force (BDTF - https://science.nasa.gov/science-committee/subcommittees/big-data-task-force), an advisory working group with the NASA Advisory Council system. The scope of the Task Force included all NASA Big Data programs, projects, missions, and activities. The Task Force focused on such topics as exploring the existing and planned evolution of NASA's science data cyber-infrastructure that supports broad access to data repositories for NASA Science Mission Directorate missions; best practices within NASA, other Federal agencies, private industry and research institutions; and Federal initiatives related to big data and data access. The BDTF has completed its two-year term and produced several recommendations plus four white papers for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. This presentation will discuss the activities and results of the TF including summaries of key points from its focused study topics. The paper serves as an introduction to the papers following in this ESSI session.

  12. NASA Facts, The Viking Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of publications of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. The Viking mission to Mars, consisting of two unmanned NASA spacecraft launched in August and September, 1975, is described. A description of the spacecraft and their paths is given. A diagram identifying the…

  13. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  14. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-12

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  15. CP violation in D{sup 0} {yields}(K{sup -}K{sup +},{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) from diquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (China). Dept. of Physics; National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Geng, Chao-Quiang [National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu (China); National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (China). Dept. of Physics; Wang, Wei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The explanation of the large CP asymmetries in D{sup 0}{yields}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -},K{sup +}K{sup -}) decays observed by the LHCb collaboration is likely to call for new physics beyond the CKM paradigm. We explore new contributions caused by the color-sextet scalar diquark, and demonstrate that the diquark with the mass of order 1 TeV and nominal couplings with quarks can generate the CP asymmetries at the percent level. Using the experimental data on branching ratios and CP asymmetries of D{sup 0}{yields}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -},K{sup +}K{sup -}), we derive the constraints on the diquark mass and couplings, which can be further examined on hadron colliders in the dijet final states. (orig.)

  16. Mars Sample Return: Do Australians trust NASA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, S.; Tomkins, C. S.; Weinstein, P.

    2008-09-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) represents an important scientific goal in space exploration. Any sample return mission will be extremely challenging from a scientific, economic and technical standpoint. But equally testing, will be communicating with a public that may have a very different perception of the mission. A MSR mission will generate international publicity and it is vital that NASA acknowledge the nature and extent of public concern about the mission risks and, perhaps equally importantly, the public’s confidence in NASA’s ability to prepare for and manage these risks. This study investigated the level of trust in NASA in an Australian population sample, and whether this trust was dependent on demographic variables. Participants completed an online survey that explored their attitudes towards NASA and a MSR mission. The results suggested that people believe NASA will complete the mission successfully but have doubts as to whether NASA will be honest when communicating with the public. The most significant finding to emerge from this study was that confidence in NASA was significantly (p communication.

  17. CP nonconservation in dynamically broken gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, K.

    1981-01-01

    The recent proposal of Eichten, Lane, and Preskill for CP nonconservation in electroweak gauge theories with dynamical symmetry breaking is reviewed. Through the alignment of the vacuum with the explicit chiral symmetry breaking Hamiltonian, these theories provide a natural way to understand the dynamical origin of CP nonconservation. Special attention is paid to the problem of strong CP violation. Even through all vacuum angles are zero, this problem is not automatically avoided. In the absence of strong CP violation, the neutron electric dipole moment is expected to be 10 -24 -10 -26 e-cm. A new class of models is proposed in which both strong CP violation and large /ΔS/ = 2 effects may be avoided. In these models, /ΔC/ = 2 processes such as D/sup o/ D/sup -o/ mixing may be large enough to observe

  18. Entamoeba histolytica EhCP112 Dislocates and Degrades Claudin-1 and Claudin-2 at Tight Junctions of the Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cuellar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During intestinal invasion, Entamoeba histolytica opens tight junctions (TJs reflected by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER dropping. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying this, we studied in vitro and in vivo the damage produced by the recombinant E. histolytica cysteine protease (rEhCP112 on TJ functions and proteins. rEhCP112 reduced TEER in Caco-2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner; and EhCP112-overexpressing trophozoites provoked major epithelial injury compared to control trophozoites. rEhCP112 penetrated through the intercellular space, and consequently the ion flux increased and the TJs fence function was disturbed. However, macromolecular flux was not altered. Functional in vitro assays revealed specific association of rEhCP112 with claudin-1 and claudin-2, that are both involved in regulating ion flux and fence function. Of note, rEhCP112 did not interact with occludin that is responsible for regulating macromolecular flux. Moreover, rEhCP112 degraded and delocalized claudin-1, thus affecting interepithelial adhesion. Concomitantly, expression of the leaky claudin-2 at TJ, first increased and then it was degraded. In vivo, rEhCP112 increased intestinal epithelial permeability in the mouse colon, likely due to apical erosion and claudin-1 and claudin-2 degradation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that EhCP112 causes epithelial dysfunction by specifically altering claudins at TJ. Thus, EhCP112 could be a potential target for therapeutic approaches against amoebiasis.

  19. Leadership in Space: Selected Speeches of NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, May 2005 - October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Speech topics include: Leadership in Space; Space Exploration: Real and Acceptable Reasons; Why Explore Space?; Space Exploration: Filling up the Canvas; Continuing the Voyage: The Spirit of Endeavour; Incorporating Space into Our Economic Sphere of Influence; The Role of Space Exploration in the Global Economy; Partnership in Space Activities; International Space Cooperation; National Strategy and the Civil Space Program; What the Hubble Space Telescope Teaches Us about Ourselves; The Rocket Team; NASA's Direction; Science and NASA; Science Priorities and Program Management; NASA and the Commercial Space Industry; NASA and the Business of Space; American Competitiveness: NASA's Role & Everyone's Responsibility; Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration; The Next Generation of Engineers; System Engineering and the "Two Cultures" of Engineering; Generalship of Engineering; NASA and Engineering Integrity; The Constellation Architecture; Then and Now: Fifty Years in Space; The Reality of Tomorrow; and Human Space Exploration: The Next 50 Years.

  20. Higgs boson searches in CP-conserving and CP-violating MSSM scenarios with the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, Sofia; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, Marc; Besson, N.; Bloch, Daniel; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, PSL; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, Javier; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Muller, Ulrich; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, Paolo; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, Andrei Valerevich; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, Filipe; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the final interpretation of the results from DELPHI on the searches for Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). A few representative scenarios are considered, that include CP conservation and explicit CP violation in the Higgs sector. The experimental results encompass the searches for neutral Higgs bosons at LEP1 and LEP2 in final states as expected in the MSSM, as well as LEP2 searches for charged Higgs bosons and for neutral Higgs bosons decaying into hadrons independent of the quark flavour. The data reveal no significant excess with respect to background expectations. The results are translated into excluded regions of the parameter space in the various scenarios. In the CP-conserving case, these lead to limits on the masses of the lightest scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons, h and A, and on tan(beta). The dependence of these limits on the top quark mass is discussed. Allowing for CP violation reduces the experimental sensitivity to Higgs b...

  1. Transitioning a Fundamental Research Program to Align with the NASA Exploration Initiative-Perspectives from Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    A new Vision for Space Exploration was announced earlier this year by U.S. President George W. Bush. NASA has evaluated on-going programs for strategic alignment with this vision. The evaluation proceeded at a rapid pace and is resulting in changes to the scope and focus of experimental research that will be conducted in support of the new vision. The existing network of researchers in the physical sciences - a highly capable, independent, and loosely knitted community - typically have shared conclusions derived from their work within appropriate discipline-specific peer reviewed journals and publications. The initial result of introducing this Vision for Space Exploration has been to shift research focus from a broad coverage of numerous, widely varying topics into a research program focused on a nearly-singular set of supporting research objectives to enable advances in space exploration. Two of these traditional physical science research disciplines, Combustion Science and Fluid Physics, are implementing a course adjustment from a portfolio dominated by "Fundamental Science Research" to one focused nearly exclusively on supporting the Exploration Vision. Underlying scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure of the Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics disciplines do provide essential research capabilities to support the contemporary thrusts of human life support, radiation countermeasures, human health, low gravity research for propulsion and materials and, ultimately, research conducted on the Moon and Mars. A perspective on how these two research disciplines responded to the course change will be presented. The relevance to the new NASA direction is provided, while demonstrating through two examples how the prior investment in fundamental research is being brought to bear on solving the issues confronting the successful implementation of the exploration goals.

  2. NASA Accountability Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  3. CP violation in the baryon sector

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Eluned Anne

    2017-01-01

    The study of CP violation in the baryon sector is still a relatively new field and offers the possibility to make many CP measurements which could complement those performed in the meson sector. This is especially true of late given the large number of baryons currently being produced at the LHC. Such measurements could help further over-constrain the CKM unitary triangle, as well as furthering our understand of baryongenesis. These proceedings will give an overview of the current state of the search for CP violation in the baryon sector.

  4. CP violation in CMS expected performance

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, J

    1999-01-01

    The CMS experiment can contribute significantly to the measurement of the CP violation asymmetries. A recent evaluation of the expected precision on the CP violation parameter sin 2 beta in the channel B /sub d//sup 0/ to J/ psi $9 K/sub s//sup 0/ has been performed using a simulation of the CMS tracker including full pattern recognition. CMS has also studied the possibility to observe CP violation in the decay channel B/sub s//sup 0/ to J/ psi phi . The $9 results of these studies are reviewed. (7 refs).

  5. Testing CP in K/sub μ/3 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurer, M.

    1989-01-01

    K factories will open the way for high-precision CP tests in K/sub μ/ 3 decays. The standard model does not predict CP breaking in this process. We consider here the effects of nonstandard interactions mediated by vector and scalar particles and by leptoquarks. We show that, for the only experimentally measurable quantity, vector particles alone never induce CP violation, and give a general expression for the CP breaking induced by scalars and leptoquarks

  6. Search for CP-violation in the charm sector at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombes, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of searches for CP-violation in charm hadrons and measurements of CP-violating and D 0 mixing parameters are presented for LHCb data accumulated during 2010 and 2011. A time-integrated CP-violating asymmetry in two-body D 0 decays constitutes the first evidence of CP violation in the decay of charm hadrons. No CP violation has been found in D + → K - K + π + decays. Concerning mixing and time-dependent CP asymmetries in D 0 decays, results are compatible with the absence of CP-violation

  7. Topics in CP violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, H. R.

    1993-02-01

    Given the varied backgrounds of the members of this audience this talk will be a grab bag of topics related to the general theme of CP Violation. I do not have time to dwell in detail on any of them. First, for the astronomers and astrophysicists among you, I want to begin by reviewing the experimental status of evidence for CP violation in particle processes. There is only one system where this has been observed, and that is in the decays of neutral K mesons.

  8. Topics in CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, H.R.

    1993-02-01

    Given the varied backgrounds of the members of this audience this talk will be a grab bag of topics related to the general theme of CP Violation. I do not have time to dwell in detail on any of them. First, for the astronomers and astrophysicists among you, I want to begin by reviewing the experimental status of evidence for CP violation in particle processes. There is only one system where this has been observed, and that is in the decays of neutral K mesons

  9. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well known that the study of flavour physics and CP violation is very important to critically test the Standard Model and to look for possible signature of new physics beyond it. The observation of CP violation in kaon system in 1964 has ignited a lot of experimental and theoretical efforts to understand its origin and to look ...

  10. CP-violating top quark couplings at future linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernreuther, W. [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, Aachen (Germany); Chen, L. [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, Aachen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Garcia, I. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC, UVEG/CSIC), Valencia (Spain); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Perello, M.; Ros, E.; Vos, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC, UVEG/CSIC), Valencia (Spain); Poeschl, R.; Richard, F. [Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Orsay (France)

    2018-02-15

    We study the potential of future lepton colliders to probe violation of the CP symmetry in the top quark sector. In certain extensions of the Standard Model, such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), sizeable anomalous top quark dipole moments can arise, which may be revealed by a precise measurement of top quark pair production. We present results from detailed Monte Carlo studies for the ILC at 500 GeV and CLIC at 380 GeV and use parton-level simulations to explore the potential of high-energy operation. We find that precise measurements in e{sup +}e{sup -} → t anti t production with subsequent decay to lepton plus jets final states can provide sufficient sensitivity to detect Higgs-boson-induced CP violation in a viable two-Higgs-doublet model. The potential of a linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider to detect CP-violating electric and weak dipole form factors of the top quark exceeds the prospects of the HL-LHC by over an order of magnitude. (orig.)

  11. The Physiological Functions and Structural Determinants of Catalytic Bias in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases CpI and CpII of Clostridium pasteurianum Strain W5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse B. Therien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The first generation of biochemical studies of complex, iron-sulfur-cluster-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenases and Mo-nitrogenase were carried out on enzymes purified from Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5. Previous studies suggested that two distinct [FeFe]-hydrogenases are expressed differentially under nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. As a result, the first characterized [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CpI is presumed to have a primary role in central metabolism, recycling reduced electron carriers that accumulate during fermentation via proton reduction. A role for capturing reducing equivalents released as hydrogen during nitrogen fixation has been proposed for the second hydrogenase, CpII. Biochemical characterization of CpI and CpII indicated CpI has extremely high hydrogen production activity in comparison to CpII, while CpII has elevated hydrogen oxidation activity in comparison to CpI when assayed under the same conditions. This suggests that these enzymes have evolved a catalytic bias to support their respective physiological functions. Using the published genome of C. pasteurianum (strain W5 hydrogenase sequences were identified, including the already known [NiFe]-hydrogenase, CpI, and CpII sequences, and a third hydrogenase, CpIII was identified in the genome as well. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed in order to analyze transcript abundance of the hydrogenases under diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic growth conditions. There is a markedly reduced level of CpI gene expression together with concomitant increases in CpII gene expression under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Structure-based analyses of the CpI and CpII sequences reveal variations in their catalytic sites that may contribute to their alternative physiological roles. This work demonstrates that the physiological roles of CpI and CpII are to evolve and to consume hydrogen, respectively, in concurrence with their catalytic activities in vitro, with Cp

  12. The Physiological Functions and Structural Determinants of Catalytic Bias in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases CpI and CpII of Clostridium pasteurianum Strain W5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Jesse B.; Artz, Jacob H.; Poudel, Saroj; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Noone, Seth M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; King, Paul W.; Bryant, Donald A.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of biochemical studies of complex, iron-sulfur-cluster-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenases and Mo-nitrogenase were carried out on enzymes purified from Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5). Previous studies suggested that two distinct [FeFe]-hydrogenases are expressed differentially under nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. As a result, the first characterized [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CpI) is presumed to have a primary role in central metabolism, recycling reduced electron carriers that accumulate during fermentation via proton reduction. A role for capturing reducing equivalents released as hydrogen during nitrogen fixation has been proposed for the second hydrogenase, CpII. Biochemical characterization of CpI and CpII indicated CpI has extremely high hydrogen production activity in comparison to CpII, while CpII has elevated hydrogen oxidation activity in comparison to CpI when assayed under the same conditions. This suggests that these enzymes have evolved a catalytic bias to support their respective physiological functions. Using the published genome of C. pasteurianum (strain W5) hydrogenase sequences were identified, including the already known [NiFe]-hydrogenase, CpI, and CpII sequences, and a third hydrogenase, CpIII was identified in the genome as well. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed in order to analyze transcript abundance of the hydrogenases under diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic growth conditions. There is a markedly reduced level of CpI gene expression together with concomitant increases in CpII gene expression under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Structure-based analyses of the CpI and CpII sequences reveal variations in their catalytic sites that may contribute to their alternative physiological roles. This work demonstrates that the physiological roles of CpI and CpII are to evolve and to consume hydrogen, respectively, in concurrence with their catalytic activities in vitro, with CpII capturing excess

  13. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  14. NASA's Planetary Science Missions and Participations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Doris; Green, James L.

    2017-04-01

    NASA's Planetary Science Division (PSD) and space agencies around the world are collaborating on an extensive array of missions exploring our solar system. Planetary science missions are conducted by some of the most sophisticated robots ever built. International collaboration is an essential part of what we do. NASA has always encouraged international participation on our missions both strategic (ie: Mars 2020) and competitive (ie: Discovery and New Frontiers) and other Space Agencies have reciprocated and invited NASA investigators to participate in their missions. NASA PSD has partnerships with virtually every major space agency. For example, NASA has had a long and very fruitful collaboration with ESA. ESA has been involved in the Cassini mission and, currently, NASA funded scientists are involved in the Rosetta mission (3 full instruments, part of another), BepiColombo mission (1 instrument in the Italian Space Agency's instrument suite), and the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer mission (1 instrument and parts of two others). In concert with ESA's Mars missions NASA has an instrument on the Mars Express mission, the orbit-ground communications package on the Trace Gas Orbiter (launched in March 2016) and part of the DLR/Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer instruments going onboard the ExoMars Rover (to be launched in 2018). NASA's Planetary Science Division has continuously provided its U.S. planetary science community with opportunities to include international participation on NASA missions too. For example, NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs provide U.S. scientists the opportunity to assemble international teams and design exciting, focused planetary science investigations that would deepen the knowledge of our Solar System. The PSD put out an international call for instruments on the Mars 2020 mission. This procurement led to the selection of Spain and Norway scientist leading two instruments and French scientists providing a significant portion of another

  15. Measurement of the direct $CP$-violating parameter $A_{CP}$ in the decay $D^+ \\to K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2014-12-11

    We measure the direct CP-violating parameter A_CP for the decay of the charged charm meson, D+ -> K-pi+pi+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 fb-1 sample of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from B -> D processes) using input from Monte Carlo simulation. We measure A_CP = [-0.16 +- 0.15 (stat.) +- 0.09 (syst.)]%, which is consistent with zero, as expected from the standard model prediction of CP conservation, and is the most precise measurement of this quantity to date

  16. Evidence for non-CpG methylation in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jie; Zierath, Juleen R; Barres, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the existence of cytosine methylation on non-CpG sequences is controversial. Here, we adapted a LuminoMetric-based Assay (LUMA) to determine global non-CpG methylation levels in rodent and human tissues. We observed that......In mammals, the existence of cytosine methylation on non-CpG sequences is controversial. Here, we adapted a LuminoMetric-based Assay (LUMA) to determine global non-CpG methylation levels in rodent and human tissues. We observed that...

  17. CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in cancer: causes and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoridis, Jens M; Hardie, Catriona; Brown, Robert

    2008-09-18

    Strong evidence exists for a subgroup of tumours, from a variety of tissue types, exhibiting concordant tumour specific DNA methylation: the "CpG island methylator phenotype" (CIMP). Occurrence of CIMP is associated with a range of genetic and environmental factors, although the molecular causes are not well-understood. Both increased expression and aberrant targeting of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) could contribute to the occurrence of CIMP. One under-explored area is the possibility that DNA damage may induce or select for CIMP during carcinogenesis or treatment of tumours with chemotherapy. DNA damaging agents can induce DNA damage at guanine rich regions throughout the genome, including CpG islands. This DNA damage can result in stalled DNA synthesis, which will lead to localised increased DNMT1 concentration and therefore potentially increased DNA methylation at these sites. Chemotherapy can select for cells which have increased tolerance to DNA damage due to increased lesion bypass, in some cases by mechanisms which involve inactivation of genes by CpG island methylation. CIMP has been associated with worse patient prognosis, probably due to increased epigenetic plasticity. Therefore, further clinical testing of the diagnostic and prognostic value of the current CIMP markers, as well as increasing our understanding of the molecular causes underlying CIMP are required.

  18. Strong-Weak CP Hierarchy from Non-Renormalization Theorems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, Gudrun

    2002-01-28

    We point out that the hierarchy between the measured values of the CKM phase and the strong CP phase has a natural origin in supersymmetry with spontaneous CP violation and low energy supersymmetry breaking. The underlying reason is simple and elegant: in supersymmetry the strong CP phase is protected by an exact non-renormalization theorem while the CKM phase is not. We present explicit examples of models which exploit this fact and discuss corrections to the non-renormalization theorem in the presence of supersymmetry breaking. This framework for solving the strong CP problem has generic predictions for the superpartner spectrum, for CP and flavor violation, and predicts a preferred range of values for electric dipole moments.

  19. Testing non-standard CP violation in neutrino propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Non-standard physics which can be described by effective four fermion interactions may be an additional source of CP violation in the neutrino propagation. We discuss the detectability of such a CP violation at a neutrino factory. We assume the current baseline setup of the international design study of a neutrino factory (IDS-NF) for the simulation. We find that the CP violation from certain non-standard interactions is, in principle, detectable significantly below their current bounds - even if there is no CP violation in the standard oscillation framework. Therefore, a new physics effect might be mis-interpreted as the canonical Dirac CP violation, and a possibly even more exciting effect might be missed

  20. Finding CP-violating Higgses

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinowski, Jan

    1999-01-01

    In a general two-Higgs-doublet model with CP violation in the Higgs sector, the three neutral physical Higgs bosons have no definite CP properties. A new sum rule relating Yukawa and Higgs-Z couplings implies that a neutral Higgs boson cannot escape detection at an e^+e^- collider if it is kinematically accessible in Z+Higgs, $b\\bar b+$Higgs and $t\\bar t+$Higgs production, irrespective of the mixing angles and the masses of the other neutral Higgs bosons. The implications of the sum rules for...

  1. Flexible Electronics Development Supported by NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The commercial electronics industry is leading development in most areas of electronics for NASA applications; however, working in partnership with industry and the academic community, results from NASA research could lead to better understanding and utilization of electronic materials by the flexible electronics industry. Innovative ideas explored by our partners in industry and the broader U.S. research community help NASA execute our missions and bring new American products and services to the global technology marketplace. [Mike Gazarik, associate administrator for Space Technology, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC] This presentation provides information on NASA needs in electronics looking towards the future, some of the work being supported by NASA in flexible electronics, and the capabilities of the Glenn Research Center supporting the development of flexible electronics.

  2. "Spacecraft Reveals Recent Geological Activity on the Moon": Exploring the Features of NASA Twitter Posts and Their Potential to Engage Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesley, Mellinee

    2014-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 200 "tweets," this study was an exploration into the distinct features of text posted to NASA's "Twitter" site and the potential for these posts to serve as more engaging scientific text than traditional textbooks for adolescents. Results of the content analysis indicated the tweets and linked…

  3. [Relationship and interaction between folate and expression of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 in cervical cancerization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q L; Ding, L; Nan, J; Liu, C L; Yang, Z K; Chen, F; Liang, Y L; Wang, J T

    2016-07-01

    To explore the interaction between folate and the expression of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2(MeCP2)in cervical cancerization. Forty one patients diagnosed with cervical squamous cell carcinoma(SCC), 71 patients diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasm(CIN1, n=34; CIN2 +, n=37)and 61 women with normal cervix(NC)were recruited in this study. Microbiological assay was conducted to detect the levels of serum folate and RBC folate, Western blot assay and real-time PCR were performed to detect the expression levels of MeCP2 protein and mRNA, respectively. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis H test, χ(2) test, trend χ(2) test and Spearman correlation with SPSS statistical software(version 20.0), and the interaction were evaluated by using generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction(GMDR)model. The levels of serum folate(H=44.71, Pfolate(H=5.28, Pfolate level and RBC folate level(r=0.270, Pfolate level and the expression level of MeCP2 protein(serum folate: r=-0.226, P=0.003; RBC folate: r=-0.164, P=0.004). Moreover, the results by GMDR model revealed there were interaction among serum folate deficiency, RBC folate deficiency, MeCP2 protein high expression and MeCP2 mRNA high expression in SCC and CIN2 + patients. Folate deficiency and high expression of MeCP2 gene might increase the risk of cervical cancer and its precancerous lesions through interaction among serum folate deficiency, RBC folate deficiency, MeCP2 protein high expression and mRNA high expression in the progression of cervical cancerization.

  4. 78 FR 64253 - NASA Asteroid Initiative Idea Synthesis Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-124] NASA Asteroid Initiative Idea.... SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces that the agency will resume the NASA... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michele Gates, Senior Technical Advisor, NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission...

  5. NASA Education Recommendation Report. Education Design Team 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The people at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are passionate about their work. NASA's missions are exciting to learners of all ages. Since its creation in 1958, NASA's people have been passionate about sharing their inspiring discoveries, research and exploration with students and educators. When retired Marine Corps General…

  6. Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register (BCPR): a pilot study to develop a national cerebral palsy (CP) register with surveillance of children for CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Gulam; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Islam, Johurul; Alam, Monzurul; Jung, Jenny; Novak, Iona; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl; Badawi, Nadia; Muhit, Mohammad

    2015-09-25

    The causes and pathogenesis of cerebral palsy (CP) are all poorly understood, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). There are gaps in knowledge about CP in Bangladesh, especially in the spheres of epidemiological research, intervention and service utilization. In high-income countries CP registers have made substantial contributions to our understanding of CP. In this paper, we describe a pilot study protocol to develop, implement, and evaluate a CP population register in Bangladesh (i.e., Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register - BCPR) to facilitate studies on prevalence, severity, aetiology, associated impairments and risk factors for CP. The BCPR will utilise a modified version of the Australian Cerebral Palsy Register (ACPR) on a secured web-based platform hosted by the Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Institute, Australia. A standard BCPR record form (i.e., data collection form) has been developed in consultation with local and international experts. Using this form, the BPCR will capture information about maternal health, birth history and the nature of disability in all children with CP aged CP will be identified by using the community based Key Informants Method (KIM). Data from the completed BPCR record together with details of assessment by a research physician will be entered into an online data repository. Once implemented, BCPR will be, to the best of our knowledge, the first formalised CP register from a LMIC. Establishment of the BCPR will enable estimates of prevalence; facilitate clinical surveillance and promote research to improve the care of individuals with CP in Bangladesh.

  7. CP violation searches in the charm sector at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons, thus enabling measurements of direct and indirect CP violation parameters of D^0 mesons to be made with unprecedented precision. The difference in CP asymmetries between the singly Cabibbo-suppressed (SCS) D^0 -> K+K- and D^0 -> pi+pi- decays (Delta A_CP) has emerged as a powerful observable to search for direct CPV in the charm sector. By taking the difference between the two modes, most of the asymmetries induced by the detector or coming from the production mechanism are cancelled. The measurement of Delta A_CP done at LHCb is the most precise measurement of a time-integrated CP asymmetry in the charm sector from a single experiment, with a precision reaching the sub-permille level. Two independent measurements of Delta A_CP based on complementary data sets will be presented. Related 2-body searches and searches for direct CP violation in multi-body decays of the D^0 mesons will be discussed. Indirect CP violation in charm is measured throug...

  8. High-Power Hall Propulsion Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Manzella, David H.; Smith, Timothy D.; Schmidt, George R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Office of the Chief Technologist Game Changing Division is sponsoring the development and testing of enabling technologies to achieve efficient and reliable human space exploration. High-power solar electric propulsion has been proposed by NASA's Human Exploration Framework Team as an option to achieve these ambitious missions to near Earth objects. NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA Glenn) is leading the development of mission concepts for a solar electric propulsion Technical Demonstration Mission. The mission concepts are highlighted in this paper but are detailed in a companion paper. There are also multiple projects that are developing technologies to support a demonstration mission and are also extensible to NASA's goals of human space exploration. Specifically, the In-Space Propulsion technology development project at NASA Glenn has a number of tasks related to high-power Hall thrusters including performance evaluation of existing Hall thrusters; performing detailed internal discharge chamber, near-field, and far-field plasma measurements; performing detailed physics-based modeling with the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Hall2De code; performing thermal and structural modeling; and developing high-power efficient discharge modules for power processing. This paper summarizes the various technology development tasks and progress made to date

  9. $CP$ violation in the B system at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067431

    2014-01-01

    A selection of recent LHCb results on $CP$ violation in the $B$ system is presented. These include direct $CP$ violation measurements in $B^0 \\to \\phi K^*(892)^0$, $B_{(s)}^0 \\to K^\\pm\\pi^\\pm$, $B^\\pm \\to K^\\pm \\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^\\pm \\to K^\\pm K^+K^-$ and $B^\\pm \\to \\phi K^\\pm$ decays; time-dependent $CP$ violation measurements in $B_s^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays; determination of the flavour-specific $CP$-violating asymmetry $a_{sl}^s$ in $B_s^0$ decays; and study of the mixing-induced $CP$ violation in $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ and $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays.

  10. Four-dimensional CP2 model on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitar, K.M.; Raja, R.

    1983-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of dynamical generation of gauge interactions from CP/sup N/-1 models in four dimensions. We do this for the CP 2 model on a lattice. The phase diagram of a model that interpolates between CP 2 and U(1) gauge theory on a lattice is first mapped out. The potential between static charges in various regions of this diagram is also measured. Contrary to hopes based on the large-N behavior of similar models in two dimensions and on our phase diagram, we find that the potentials generated by CP 2 do not bear any resemblance to those of U(1). They are rather similar to the Higgs phase of an Abelian gauge theory in both phases displayed by CP 2

  11. Completing the Heterocubane Family [Cp*AlE]4 (E = O, S, Se, and Te) by Selective Oxygenation and Sulfuration of [Cp*Al]4: Density Functional Theory Calculations of [Cp*AlE]4 and Reactivity of [Cp*AlO]4 toward Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Adrian C; Hrobárik, Peter; Braun, Thomas; Kaupp, Martin; Braun-Cula, Beatrice

    2016-05-16

    The subvalent aluminum compound [Cp*Al]4 (1) reacts with dioxygen, N2O, or sulfur to yield the heterocubane complexes [Cp*AlX]4 [X = O (2) and S (3)]. Treatment of [Cp*AlO]4 (2) with (tBuO)3SiOH gave [(tBuO)3SiOAlO]4 (6) and Cp*H. The structures and spectroscopic data of the Al clusters are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which also demonstrate the importance of noncovalent interactions (NCI) in oligomeric Al(I) complexes as well as in [Cp*AlS]4 and the heavier homologues of Se and Te. The computed (27)Al NMR shifts indicate a deshielding at the Al centers with increasing electronegativity of the chalcogen atom as well as significant spin-orbit shielding effects within the heavier heterocubane [Al4E4] cores. Further hydrolysis of 6 with an additional amount of silanol in the presence of water resulted in the formation of [Al4(OH)6(OH2)2(OSiOtBu3)6] (7), which shows a structural motif found in boehmite and diaspore.

  12. Toimintaterapeuttinen nukkekoti CP-vammaisille lapsille

    OpenAIRE

    Ruotsalainen, Ulla; Tokola, Eveliina

    2009-01-01

    Toiminnallisen opinnäytetyön tarkoitus oli suunnitella ja rakentaa toimintaterapeuttinen nukkekoti CP-vammaisille lapsille. Työn toimeksiantajana oli toimintaterapeutti Päivi Raitanen Terapiapajalta. Työn tavoitteena oli toteuttaa mukana kuljetettava ja lapsen pyörätuolin pöytälevylle sopiva nukkekoti, jolla leikkiminen tukee CP-vammaisen lapsen toimintaterapiaa. Yleisimpiä tavoitteita ovat muun muuassa hienomotoristen taitojen, leikkitaitojen, syy-seuraussuhteiden ja visuaalisen hahmott...

  13. Measurements of direct CP violation in charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00257861

    2013-01-01

    Two searches for direct CP violation in D 0 ! h h + (where h = K or ) are presented using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb 1 collected in 2011 by LHCb in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. One analysis uses D 0 mesons produced via a D resonance and the other analysis uses D 0 mesons originating from semileptonic b - decays. In the rst case the avour is tagged by the charge of the accompanying pion and in the latter by the muon charge. The dierence of the CP -violating asymmetries ( A CP = A CP ( K K + ) A CP ( + )) in the two decay channels is measured to be A CP (muon tagged) = (0 : 49 0 : 30 (stat) 0 : 14 (syst))% ; A CP (pion tagged) = ( 0 : 35 0 : 15 (stat) 0 : 10 (syst))% ; A CP (LHCb) = ( 0 : 15 0 : 16)% : These results do not conrm evidence for CP violation in the charm sector

  14. Val L. Fitch, the CP Violation, and Antimatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Val L. Fitch, the CP Violation, and Antimatter Resources ) 'to verify a fundamental tenet of physics, known as CP [charge-parity] symmetry, by showing that two into two pi mesons. Cronin and Fitch had found an example of CP violation. The discovery's

  15. CP violation through particle mixing and the H-A lineshape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabeu, Jose; Binosi, Daniele; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility of looking for CP-mixing effects in two-Higgs doublet models (and particularly in the MSSM) by studying the lineshape of the CP-even (H) and CP-odd (A) neutral scalars. In most cases H and A come quite degenerate in mass, and their s-channel production would lead to nearly overlapping resonances. CP-violating effects may connect these two Higgs bosons, giving origin to one-loop particle mixing, which, due to their mass proximity, can be resonantly enhanced. The corresponding transition amplitude contains then CP-even and CP-odd components; besides the signal of intereference between both amplitudes, leading to a CP-odd asymmetry, we propose to look for the mixing probability itself, a quantity which, although CP-even, can originate only from a CP-odd amplitude. We show that, in general, the effect of such a mixing probability cannot be mimicked by (or be re-absorbed into) a simple redefinition of the H and A masses in the context of a CP-conserving model. Specifically, the effects of the CP-mixing are such that, either the mass-splitting of the H and A bosons cannot be accounted for in the absence of CP-mixing, and/or the detailed energy dependence of the produced lineshape is clearly different from the one obtained by redefining the masses, but not allowing any mixing. This analysis suggests that the detailed study of the lineshape of this Higgs system may provide valuable information on the CP nature of the underlying theory

  16. Mission control team structure and operational lessons learned from the 2009 and 2010 NASA desert RATS simulated lunar exploration field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ernest R.; Badillo, Victor; Coan, David; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; Rosenbaum, Megan; Smart, Tifanie; Stone, Jeffry; Stueber, Ronald; Welsh, Daren; Guirgis, Peggy; Looper, Chris; McDaniel, Randall

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is an annual field test of advanced concepts, prototype hardware, and potential modes of operation to be used on human planetary surface space exploration missions. For the 2009 and 2010 NASA Desert RATS field tests, various engineering concepts and operational exercises were incorporated into mission timelines with the focus of the majority of daily operations being on simulated lunar geological field operations and executed in a manner similar to current Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The field test for 2009 involved a two week lunar exploration simulation utilizing a two-man rover. The 2010 Desert RATS field test took this two week simulation further by incorporating a second two-man rover working in tandem with the 2009 rover, as well as including docked operations with a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). Personnel for the field test included the crew, a mission management team, engineering teams, a science team, and the mission operations team. The mission operations team served as the core of the Desert RATS mission control team and included certified NASA Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) flight controllers, former flight controllers, and astronaut personnel. The backgrounds of the flight controllers were in the areas of Extravehicular Activity (EVA), onboard mechanical systems and maintenance, robotics, timeline planning (OpsPlan), and spacecraft communicator (Capcom). With the simulated EVA operations, mechanized operations (the rover), and expectations of replanning, these flight control disciplines were especially well suited for the execution of the 2009 and 2010 Desert RATS field tests. The inclusion of an operations team has provided the added benefit of giving NASA mission operations flight control personnel the opportunity to begin examining operational mission control techniques, team compositions, and mission scenarios. This also gave the mission operations

  17. MeCP2-Related Diseases and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinelo D. Ezeonwuka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetics in human disease has become an area of increased research interest. Collaborative efforts from scientists and clinicians have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation is involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Several neurological and non-neurological disorders are associated with mutations in genes that encode for epigenetic factors. One of the most studied proteins that impacts human disease and is associated with deregulation of epigenetic processes is Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2. MeCP2 is an epigenetic regulator that modulates gene expression by translating epigenetic DNA methylation marks into appropriate cellular responses. In order to highlight the importance of epigenetics to development and disease, we will discuss how MeCP2 emerges as a key epigenetic player in human neurodevelopmental, neurological, and non-neurological disorders. We will review our current knowledge on MeCP2-related diseases, including Rett Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, Hirschsprung disease, and Cancer. Additionally, we will briefly discuss about the existing MeCP2 animal models that have been generated for a better understanding of how MeCP2 impacts certain human diseases.

  18. CP violation outside the standard model phenomenology for pedestrians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    So far the only experimental evidence for CP violation is the 1964 discovery of K L →2π where the two mass eigenstates produced by neutral meson mixing both decay into the same CP eigenstate. This result is described by two parameters ε and ε'. Today ε ∼ its 1964 value, ε' data are still inconclusive and there is no new evidence for CP violation. One might expect to observe similar phenomena in other systems and also direct CP violation as charge asymmetries between decays of charge conjugate hadrons H ± → f ± . Why is it so hard to find CP violation? How can B Physics help? Does CP lead beyond the standard model? The author presents a pedestrian symmetry approach which exhibits the difficulties and future possibilities of these two types of CP-violation experiments, neutral meson mixing and direct charge asymmetry: what may work, what doesn't work and why

  19. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in CP-conserving and CP-violating MSSM scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the final results from the OPAL collaboration on searches for neutral Higgs bosons predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). CP-conserving and for the first time at LEP CP-violating scenarios are studied. New scenarios are also included, which aim to set the stage for Higgs searches at future colliders. The results are based on the data collected with the OPAL detector at e+e- centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The data are consistent with the prediction of the Standard Model with no Higgs boson produced. Model-independent limits are derived for the cross-section of a number of events topologies motivated by prediction of the MSSM. Limits on Higgs boson masses and other MSSM parameters are obtained for a number of representative MSSM benchmark scenarios. For example, in the CP-conserving scenario mh-max where the MSSM parameters are adjusted to predict the largest range of values for mh at each tan beta, and for a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV, the domain 0.784.5 ...

  20. Synthesis and Electronic Structure of Dissymmetrical, Naphthalene-Bridged Sandwich Complexes [Cp ' Fe(mu-C10H8)MCp*](x) (x=0,+1; M = Fe, Ru; Cp ' = eta(5)-C5H2-1,2,4-tBu(3); Cp* = eta(5)-C5Me5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malberg, J.; Lupton, E.; Schnöckelborg, E.M.; de Bruin, B.; de Sutter, J.; Meyer, K.; Hartl, F.; Wolf, R.

    2013-01-01

    The dissymmetrical naphthalene-bridged complexes [Cp'Fe(mu-C10H8)FeCp*] (3; Cp* = eta(5)-C5Me5, Cp' = eta(5)-C5H2-1,2,4-tBu(3)) and [Cp'Fe(mu-C10H8)RuCp*] (4) were synthesized via a one-pot procedure from FeCl2(thf)(1.5), Cp'K, KC10H8, and [Cp*FeCl(tmeda)] (tmeda =

  1. Baryogenesis and standard model CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, P.

    1994-08-01

    The standard model possesses a natural source of CP violation contained in the phase of the CKM matrix. Whether the latter participated to the making of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the observable universe is a fundamental question which has been addressed only recently. The generation of a CP observable occurs through interference of quantum paths along which a sequence of flavor mixings and chirality flips take place. The coherence of this phenomenon in the primeval plasma is limited by the fast quark-gluon interactions. At the electroweak era, this phenomenon of decoherence forbids a successful baryogenesis based on the sole CP violation of the CKM matrix

  2. CP asymmetries in the supersymmetric trilepton signal at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornhauser, S.; Drees, M.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Kim, J.S.; Kittel, O.

    2012-01-01

    In the CP-violating Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, we study the production of a neutralino-chargino pair at the LHC. For their decays into three leptons, we analyze CP asymmetries which are sensitive to the CP phases of the neutralino and chargino sector. We present analytical formulas for the entire production and decay process, and identify the CP-violating contributions in the spin correlation terms. This allows us to define the optimal CP asymmetries. We present a detailed numerical analysis of the cross sections, branching ratios, and the CP observables. For light neutralinos, charginos, and squarks, the asymmetries can reach several 10%. We estimate the discovery potential for the LHC to observe CP violation in the trilepton channel. (orig.)

  3. Limits from LEP Data on CP-Violating Nonminimal Higgs Sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunion, J.F.; Grzadkowski, B.; Kalinowski, J.; Haber, H.E.; Kalinowski, J.

    1997-01-01

    We derive a sum rule which shows how to extend limits from LEP data on the masses of the lightest CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons of a CP-conserving two-Higgs doublet model to any two Higgs bosons of a general CP-violating two-Higgs-doublet model. We generalize the analysis to a Higgs sector consisting of an arbitrary number of Higgs doublets and singlets, giving explicit limits for the CP-conserving and CP-violating two-doublet plus one-singlet Higgs sectors. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Two C3H Type Zinc Finger Protein Genes, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2, from Chimonanthus praecox Affect Stamen Development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamin Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox is a popular garden plant because of its flowering time, sweet fragrance, and ornamental value. However, research into the molecular mechanism that regulates flower development in wintersweet is still limited. In this study, we sought to investigate the molecular characteristics, expression patterns, and potential functions of two C3H-type zinc finger (CZF protein genes, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2, which were isolated from the wintersweet flowers based on the flower developmental transcriptome database. CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 were more highly expressed in flower organs than in vegetative tissues, and during the flower development, their expression profiles were associated with flower primordial differentiation, especially that of petal and stamen primordial differentiation. Overexpression of either CpCZF1 or CpCZF2 caused alterations on stamens in transgenic Arabidopsis. The expression levels of the stamen identity-related genes, such as AGAMOUS (AG, PISTILLATA (PI, SEPALLATA1 (SEP1, SEPALLATA2 (SEP2, SEPALLATA3 (SEP3, APETALA1 (AP1, APETALA2 (AP2, and boundary gene RABBIT EAR (RBE were significantly up-regulated in CpCZF1 overexpression lines. Additionally, the transcripts of AG, PI, APETALA3 SEP1-3, AP1, and RBE were markedly increased in CpCZF2 overexpressed plant inflorescences. Moreover, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 could interact with each other by using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Our results suggest that CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 may be involved in the regulation of stamen development and cause the formation of abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  5. Astrocyte-specific regulation of hMeCP2 expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Hess-Homeier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the expression of Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 either by mutations or gene duplication leads to a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders including Rett Syndrome and MeCP2 duplication disorder. Common features of Rett Syndrome (RTT, MeCP2 duplication disorder, and neuropsychiatric disorders indicate that even moderate changes in MeCP2 protein levels result in functional and structural cell abnormalities. In this study, we investigated two areas of MeCP2 pathophysiology using Drosophila as a model system: the effects of MeCP2 glial gain-of-function activity on circuits controlling sleep behavior, and the cell-type specific regulation of MeCP2 expression. In this study, we first examined the effects of elevated MeCP2 levels on microcircuits by expressing human MeCP2 (hMeCP2 in astrocytes and distinct subsets of amine neurons including dopamine and octopamine (OA neurons. Depending on the cell-type, hMeCP2 expression reduced sleep levels, altered daytime/nighttime sleep patterns, and generated sleep maintenance deficits. Second, we identified a 498 base pair region of the MeCP2e2 isoform that is targeted for regulation in distinct subsets of astrocytes. Levels of the full-length hMeCP2e2 and mutant RTT R106W protein decreased in astrocytes in a temporally and spatially regulated manner. In contrast, expression of the deletion Δ166 hMeCP2 protein was not altered in the entire astrocyte population. qPCR experiments revealed a reduction in full-length hMeCP2e2 transcript levels suggesting transgenic hMeCP2 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level. Given the phenotypic complexities that are caused by alterations in MeCP2 levels, our results provide insight into distinct cellular mechanisms that control MeCP2 expression and link microcircuit abnormalities with defined behavioral deficits.

  6. A model for the origin and mechanisms of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In this talk I will show that the two-Higgs doublet model with vacuum CP violation and approximate global U(1) family symmetries may provide one of the simplest and attractive models for understanding the origin and mechanisms of CP violation. It is shown that the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking provides not only a mechanism for generating masses of the bosons and fermions, but also a mechanism for creating CP-phases of the bosons and fermions, so that CP violation occurs, after spontaneous symmetry breaking, in all possible ways from a single CP phase of the vacuum and is generally classified into four types of CP-violating mechanism. A new type of CP-violating mechanism in the charged Higgs boson interactions of the fermions is emphasized and can provide a consistent description for both established and reported CP-, P-, and T-violating phenomena. Of particular importance is the new source of CP violation for charged Higgs boson interactions that lead to the value of ε'/ε as large as 10 -3 independent of the CKM phase. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Integration of CpG-free DNA induces de novo methylation of CpG islands in pluripotent stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Yuta; Wu, Jun; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Li, Mo; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Wu, Min-Zu; Herná ndez-Bení tez, Reyna; Hishida, Tomoaki; Shokhirev, Maxim Nikolaievich; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2017-01-01

    that insertion of CpG-free DNA into targeted CGIs induces de novo methylation of the entire CGI in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The methylation status is stably maintained even after CpG-free DNA removal, extensive passaging, and differentiation

  8. Origin of CP-violation through quark mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the CP violation models, we trace the origin of CP-phases from the phases of a class of quark mass matrices compatible with the calculability condition. The case of three generations corresponding to the standard milliweak CP model is discussed explicitly for the generic case of Fritzsch-type mass matrices. (orig.)

  9. Constructing co-Higgs bundles on CP^2

    OpenAIRE

    Rayan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    On a complex manifold, a co-Higgs bundle is a holomorphic vector bundle with an endomorphism twisted by the tangent bundle. The notion of generalized holomorphic bundle in Hitchin's generalized geometry coincides with that of co-Higgs bundle when the generalized complex manifold is ordinary complex. Schwarzenberger's rank-2 vector bundle on the projective plane, constructed from a line bundle on the double cover CP^1 \\times CP^1 \\to CP^2, is naturally a co-Higgs bundle, with the twisted endom...

  10. Registration of 'CP 09-2392' Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    CP 09-2392’ (Reg. No.____; PI _____) sugarcane, a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp, was developed through cooperative research conducted by the USDA-ARS, the University of Florida, and the Florida Sugar Cane League, Inc., and was released to growers in June 2016. ‘CP 09-2392’ was selected from a cro...

  11. Benefits of NASA to the USA and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    During his 28+ as a NASA employee, Mr. Duarte has had the privilege to work in several programs and projects (Space Shuttle Main Engine; Advanced Solid Rocket Booster; X-33; X-34; X-36; External Tank for the Space Shuttle; Space Shuttle missions and others) related to the NASA aerospace exploration program. At the VIII version of F-AIR COLOMBIA, the organizers want to have Colombian born aerospace professionals with experience in aerospace matters to contribute as panelists for this years theme, Benefits of Space Development for A Country. For more than 50 years NASA has lead the world in exploration through continuous advancement in science and innovative technologies. The results have been not only of a service to the nation but to humankind, as well. Those remarkable developments have resulted in positive impact in social and economic growth, enhancements in academics and educational horizons, creation of numerous investment opportunities for large corporations and small business, and a more comprehensive understanding of the universe. NASA has layout path for space exploration and has been of inspiration for scientist, academics and students. Benefits of NASA to the USA and Humanity, will provide a relevant contribution to the theme and objectives of this national event in Colombia.

  12. CP properties of symmetry-constrained two-Higgs-doublet models

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P M; Nachtmann, O; Silva, Joao P

    2010-01-01

    The two-Higgs-doublet model can be constrained by imposing Higgs-family symmetries and/or generalized CP symmetries. It is known that there are only six independent classes of such symmetry-constrained models. We study the CP properties of all cases in the bilinear formalism. An exact symmetry implies CP conservation. We show that soft breaking of the symmetry can lead to spontaneous CP violation (CPV) in three of the classes.

  13. Frequency Constrained ShiftCP Modeling of Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer H.

    2011-01-01

    The shift invariant multi-linear model based on the CandeComp/PARAFAC (CP) model denoted ShiftCP has proven useful for the modeling of latency changes in trial based neuroimaging data[17]. In order to facilitate component interpretation we presently extend the shiftCP model such that the extracted...... components can be constrained to pertain to predefined frequency ranges such as alpha, beta and gamma activity. To infer the number of components in the model we propose to apply automatic relevance determination by imposing priors that define the range of variation of each component of the shiftCP model...

  14. Aspects of soft and spontaneous CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, P.H.; Harada, M.

    1999-01-01

    We study four different models for CP violation: the standard Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) model, the aspon model of spontaneous breaking, and two models of soft breaking. In all except the standard model, the strong CP problem is addressed and solved. Testable predictions for the area of the unitarity triangle and for (ε ' /ε) K are emphasized. The issue of CP violation may well become the first place where the standard model of particle theory is shown definitively to be deficient. There are two reasons for expecting this to happen: (1) the strong CP problem is still not understood in the unadorned standard model and (2) the KM mechanism, although unquestionably present, may not provide the full explanation of ε K and (ε ' /ε) K . copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Masses, flavor mix and CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussard, L.

    2004-06-01

    The author describes the relationships between masses, mixing of flavors and CP violation. This document is divided into 4 chapters: 1) fermions' masses, 2) mixing of flavors and CP violation, 3) beauty physics and 4) neutrino physics. In chapter 1 an attempt is made to explain what is behind the concepts of lepton mass and quark mass. As for neutrinos, the only neutral fermion, Dirac's and Majorana's views are exposed as well as their consequences. Fermion flavors are mixed in the process of mass generation and this mix is responsible for the breaking of CP and T symmetries. In chapter 2 the author shows how the analysis of particle oscillations from neutral mesons (K 0 , D 0 , B d 0 and B s 0 ) and from neutrinos can shed light on CP violation. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the contribution of beauty physics to the determination of the unitary triangle, through the oscillations of beauty mesons. In chapter 4 the author reviews the experimental results obtained recently concerning neutrino mass and neutrino oscillations and draws some perspectives on future neutrino experiments. (A.C.)

  16. Integration of CpG-free DNA induces de novo methylation of CpG islands in pluripotent stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Yuta

    2017-05-05

    CpG islands (CGIs) are primarily promoter-associated genomic regions and are mostly unmethylated within highly methylated mammalian genomes. The mechanisms by which CGIs are protected from de novo methylation remain elusive. Here we show that insertion of CpG-free DNA into targeted CGIs induces de novo methylation of the entire CGI in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The methylation status is stably maintained even after CpG-free DNA removal, extensive passaging, and differentiation. By targeting the DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1 CGI, we could generate a PSC model of a cancer-related epimutation. Furthermore, we successfully corrected aberrant imprinting in induced PSCs derived from an Angelman syndrome patient. Our results provide insights into how CpG-free DNA induces de novo CGI methylation and broaden the application of targeted epigenome editing for a better understanding of human development and disease.

  17. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  18. CECE: Expanding the Envelope of Deep Throttling Technology in Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engines for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Lyda, Randy T.; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA s Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RL10, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in high-energy, cryogenic, in-space propulsion. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Four series of demonstrator engine tests have been successfully completed between April 2006 and April 2010, accumulating 7,436 seconds of hot fire time over 47 separate tests. While the first two test series explored low power combustion (chug) and system instabilities, the third test series investigated and was ultimately successful in demonstrating several mitigating technologies for these instabilities and achieved a stable throttling ratio of 13:1. The fourth test series significantly expanded the engine s operability envelope by successfully demonstrating a closed-loop control system and extensive transient modeling to enable lower power engine starting, faster throttle ramp rates, and mission-specific ignition testing. The final hot fire test demonstrated a chug-free, minimum power level of 5.9%, corresponding to an overall 17.6:1 throttling ratio achieved. In total, these tests have provided an early technology demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data

  19. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Weigang [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  20. Benchmark test of CP-PACS for lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshie, Tomoteru

    1996-01-01

    The CP-PACS is a massively parallel computer dedicated for calculations in computational physics and will be in operation in the spring of 1996 at Center for Computational Physics, University of Tsukuba. In this paper, we describe the architecture of the CP-PACS and report the results of the estimate of the performance of the CP-PACS for typical lattice QCD calculations. (author)

  1. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. (author)

  2. Worm Algorithm for CP(N-1) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The CP(N-1) model in 2D is an interesting toy model for 4D QCD as it possesses confinement, asymptotic freedom and a non-trivial vacuum structure. Due to the lower dimensionality and the absence of fermions, the computational cost for simulating 2D CP(N-1) on the lattice is much lower than that for simulating 4D QCD. However, to our knowledge, no efficient algorithm for simulating the lattice CP(N-1) model has been tested so far, which also works at finite density. To this end we propose a new type of worm algorithm which is appropriate to simulate the lattice CP(N-1) model in a dual, flux-variables based representation, in which the introduction of a chemical potential does not give rise to any complications. In addition to the usual worm moves where a defect is just moved from one lattice site to the next, our algorithm additionally allows for worm-type moves in the internal variable space of single links, which accelerates the Monte Carlo evolution. We use our algorithm to compare the two popular CP(N-1) l...

  3. CP-violation and Todd effects at lep-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, A.; Masso, E.; Rujula, A. de

    1991-01-01

    LEP-II will be a tool study CP-violation in processes involving vector bosons, and will test in particular the CP properties of the coupling of photons and Z's to W-pairs. While it is difficult to observe truly CP-odd effects, it is easy to measure T-odd ones. The latter can originate from CP-violation, or from radiative corrections involving the absorptive part of the scattering amplitude. T-odd effects are interesting in themselves, in that they accurately test the standard model and are sensitive to its unmeasured ingredients, such as the WW→WW scattering amplitude of the masses of the top quark and the elementary scalar. The prediction of the standard T-odd effects is a necessary stepping stone in the search for an honest-to-goodness violation of CP in the pure gauge sector. We thoroughly analyse the T-odd observables in the e + e - →W + W - process within the standard model, as well as the extra effects to be expected if the γW + W - and/or ZW + W - vertices were to violate CP in a non-standard fashion. (orig.)

  4. A CP violating mixing matrix compatible with neutral flavour conservation and spontaneous CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.; Grimus, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1987-01-01

    A specific ansatz for the Yukawa couplings of a four-generation SU(2) L x U(I) model with two Higgs doublets is discussed which leads to neutral flavour conservation, spontaneous CP violation and to a genuinely complex mixing matrix. W exchange conserves CP in the limit m t' = m t only. The decay rate for t → b is reduced by a factor two compared to the Standard Model with three generations. The phenomenological implications for K 0 -K-bar 0 and B 0 -B-bar 0 are investigated. (Author)

  5. Diphosphine- and CO-Induced Fragmentation of Chloride-bridged Dinuclear Complex and Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) and Attempted Synthesis of Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3): Spectroscopic Data and X-ray Diffraction Structures of the Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Compounds [Cp*IrCl{(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl]center dot 2CHCl(3) and Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, Casey [University of North Texas; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Nesterov, Vladimir [University of North Texas; Richmond, Michael G. [University of North Texas

    2010-01-01

    The confacial bioctahedral compound Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) (1) undergoes rapid fragmentation in the presence of the unsaturated diphosphine ligand (Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2 to give the mononuclear compounds [Cp*IrCl {(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl] (2) and fac-ClRe(CO)(3)[(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2] (3). 2 has been characterized by H-1 and P-31 NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. 2 center dot 2CHCl(3) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 35.023 (8) angstrom, b = 10.189 (2) angstrom, c = 24.003 (6) angstrom, b = 103.340 (3), V = 8,335 (3) angstrom 3, Z = 8, and d(calc) = 1.647 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0383, R-w = 0.1135 for 8,178 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The Ir(III) center in 2 exhibits a six-coordinate geometry and displays a chelating diphosphine group. Compound 1 reacts with added CO with fragmentation to yield the known compounds Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2 (4) and ClRe(CO)(5) (5) in near quantitative yield by IR spectroscopy. Using the protocol established by our groups for the synthesis of 1, we have explored the reaction of [Cp*IrCl2](2) with ClMn(CO)(5) as a potential route to Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3); unfortunately, 4 was the only product isolated from this reaction. The solid-state structure of 4 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. 4 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1, a = 7.4059 (4) angstrom, b = 7.8940 (4) angstrom, c = 11.8488 (7) angstrom, alpha = 80.020 (1), beta = 79.758 (1), gamma = 68.631 (1), V = 630.34 (6) angstrom(3), Z = 2, and d(calc) = 2.246 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0126, R-w = 0.0329 for 2,754 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The expected three-legged piano-stool geometry in 4 has been crystallographically confirmed.

  6. NASA Education: Yesterday's Dream...Today's Vision...Tomorrow's Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Joyce L.

    2010-01-01

    For 50 years, NASA's journeys into air and space have developed humankind's understanding of the universe, advanced technology breakthroughs, enhanced air travel safety and security, and expanded the frontiers of scientific research. These accomplishments share a common genesis: education. Education is a fundamental element of NASA's activities, reflecting a balanced and diverse portfolio of: Elementary and Secondary Education, Higher Education, e-Education, Informal Education, and Minority University Research and Education Programs (MUREP). Previous experience has shown that implementing exciting and compelling NASA missions are critical to inspiring the next generation of explorers, innovators, and leaders. Through partnerships with the Agency's Mission Directorates, other federal agencies, private industries, scientific research, and education/academic organizations, NASA's unique mission and education initiatives (content, people, and facilities) are helping to spark student interest and to guide them toward careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). NASA continues to inspire the next generation of explorers, innovators, and future leaders through its educational investments, which are designed to: (1) Strengthen NASA and the Nation's future workforce -- NASA will identify and develop the critical skills and capabilities needed to ensure achievement of exploration, science, and aeronautics. (2) Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines through a progression of educational opportunities for students, teachers, and faculty -- To compete effectively for the minds, imaginations, and career ambitions of America's young people, NASA will focus on engaging and retaining students in STEM education programs to encourage their pursuit of educational disciplines critical to NASA's future engineering, scientific, and technical missions. 3. Engage Americans in NASA's mission -- NASA will build strategic partnerships and links between formal

  7. The seesaw path to leptonic CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, A.; Kekic, M.; López-Pavón, J.; Salvado, J.

    2017-04-24

    Future experiments such as SHiP and high-intensity $e^+ e^-$ colliders will have a superb sensitivity to heavy Majorana neutrinos with masses below $M_Z$. We show that the measurement of the mixing to electrons and muons of one such state could imply the discovery of leptonic CP violation in the context of seesaw models. We quantify in the minimal model the CP discovery potential of these future experiments, and demonstrate that a 5$\\sigma$ CL discovery of leptonic CP violation would be possible in a very significant fraction of parameter space.

  8. Leptogenesis and low energy CP-violation in neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoli, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Riotto, A.

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the recent progress in the understanding of the lepton flavor effects in leptogenesis, we investigate in detail the possibility that the CP-violation necessary for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is due exclusively to the Dirac and/or Majorana CP-violating phases in the PMNS neutrino mixing matrix U, and thus is directly related to the low energy CP-violation in the lepton sector (e.g., in neutrino oscillations, etc.). We first derive the conditions of CP-invariance of the neutrino Yukawa couplings λ in the see-saw Lagrangian, and of the complex orthogonal matrix R in the 'orthogonal' parametrization of λ. We show, e.g. that under certain conditions (i) real R and specific CP-conserving values of the Majorana and Dirac phases can imply CP-violation, and (ii) purely imaginary R does not necessarily imply breaking of CP-symmetry. We study in detail the case of hierarchical heavy Majorana neutrino mass spectrum, presenting results for three possible types of light neutrino mass spectrum: (i) normal hierarchical, (ii) inverted hierarchical, and (iii) quasi-degenerate. Results in the alternative case of quasi-degenerate in mass heavy Majorana neutrinos, are also derived. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard theory with right-handed Majorana neutrinos and see-saw mechanism of neutrino mass generation is discussed as well. We illustrate the possible correlations between the baryon asymmetry of the Universe and (i) the rephasing invariant J CP controlling the magnitude of CP-violation in neutrino oscillations, or (ii) the effective Majorana mass in neutrinoless double beta decay, in the cases when the only source of CP-violation is respectively the Dirac or the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix

  9. CP violation in the lepton sector with Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguila, F. del

    1995-01-01

    We study CP violation in the lepton sector in extended models with right-handed neutrinos, without and with left-right symmetry, and with arbitrary mass terms. We find the conditions which must be satisfied by the neutrino and charged lepton mass matrices for CP conservation. These constraints, which are independent of the choice of weak basis, are proven to be also sufficient in simple cases. This invariant formulation makes apparent the necessary requirements for CP violation, as well as the size of CP violating effects. As an example, we show that CP violation can be much larger in left-right symmetric models than in models with only additional right-handed neutrinos, i.e., without right-handed currents. (orig.)

  10. Pharmacy in Space: A Session on NASA Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, Vice-president Gore was charged with creation of a correctional plan for the poor findings from an efficiency study of governmental agencies. That correctional analysis was then used to support efforts to balance the budget in ways anticipated to improve the value returned per tax payer dollar spent. The final result was a broad initiative collectively termed "reinventing the government", which included major restructuring within NASA as well, termed "reinventing NASA This included substantial elimination of middle management and downsizing such that about 2 million government workers employed in 1992 has shrunk now to about 1.2 million government workers who are employed in ways that at least somewhat decrease bureaucratic and programmatic inefficiencies. Today, "reinvented NASA" has an awareness of contractual commitment to the public. NASA now operates within a so-called "strategic plan" that requires awareness and response to domestic needs. This is important to this audience because it means that NASA is committed to exploring interactions that you may wish to initiate. That is, you are urged to explore with NASA on topics of educational support, collaborative research, or commercial partnerships in drug development and application, as the pertinent examples here, in ways that can include involvement of central NASA resources and missions.

  11. James Cronin, CP Violation, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis James Cronin, CP Violation and the Pierre Auger Observatory matter over antimatter."1 "The experiment uncovered the CP [charge-parity] violation, or a with Additional Information Additional information about James Cronin and the charge-parity (CP

  12. CPLEAR et BABAR, all aspects of CP violation; CPLEAR et BABAR la violation de CP dans tous ses etats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeche, Ch

    2003-06-01

    This report of French 'Habilitation a diriger les recherches' summarizes my scientific activity from 1993 to 2003. During this decade, my research work was related to two particle physics experiments: CPLEAR and BABAR. The first one, CPLEAR, has recorded data from 1988 to 1995 on the low energy anti-proton ring (LEAR) at CERN. This experiment was devoted to the study of T, CPT et CP discrete symmetries. The second experiment, BABAR, has been running since 1999, on the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. This experiment searches for CP violation and tests the Standard Model through the measurements of the angles and the sides of the Unitarity Triangle. My research work is divided in five main topics: Study of CP and CPT violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} decays; Performance optimization of the particle identification detector (DIRC) of the BABAR experiment; B meson tagging in BABAR experiment; {delta}m{sub d} measurement and Search for CP and T violation in mixing with dilepton events; Search for CP violation in B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}} {pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}} K{sup {+-}} decays. (author)

  13. CP110 exhibits novel regulatory activities during centriole assembly in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Anna; Roque, Hélio; Saurya, Saroj; Dobbelaere, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    CP110 is a conserved centriole protein implicated in the regulation of cell division, centriole duplication, and centriole length and in the suppression of ciliogenesis. Surprisingly, we report that mutant flies lacking CP110 (CP110Δ) were viable and fertile and had no obvious defects in cell division, centriole duplication, or cilia formation. We show that CP110 has at least three functions in flies. First, it subtly influences centriole length by counteracting the centriole-elongating activity of several centriole duplication proteins. Specifically, we report that centrioles are ∼10% longer than normal in CP110Δ mutants and ∼20% shorter when CP110 is overexpressed. Second, CP110 ensures that the centriolar microtubules do not extend beyond the distal end of the centriole, as some centriolar microtubules can be more than 50 times longer than the centriole in the absence of CP110. Finally, and unexpectedly, CP110 suppresses centriole overduplication induced by the overexpression of centriole duplication proteins. These studies identify novel and surprising functions for CP110 in vivo in flies. PMID:24297749

  14. Spontaneous CP violation on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko

    2000-01-01

    At finite temperatures around the electroweak phase transition, the thermodynamics of the MSSM can be described by a three-dimensional two Higgs doublet effective theory. This effective theory has a phase where CP is spontaneously violated. We study spontaneous CP violation with non-perturbative lattice simulations, and analyse whether one could end up in this phase for any physical MSSM parameter values.

  15. NASA 3D Models: TRMM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) designed to monitor and study...

  16. Investigation of Inclusive CP Asymmetries in B$^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Boix, G; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Spagnolo, P; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tournefier, E; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Petersen, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; Thomson, E; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Giehl, I; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Leroy, O; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Heister, A; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Yuan, C; Zerwas, D; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Misiejuk, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Cranmer, K; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2001-01-01

    A search for CP violating effects in the mixing of neutral B mesons is performed using a sample of 4.1 million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector from 1991 to 1995. By studying time-dependent asymmetries in flavour-tagged samples of semileptonic and fully inclusive b-hadron decays, two measurements of the semileptonic asymmetry a_cp are extracted. No evidence for CP violation is observed, and the combined value a_cp = -0.013 +- 0.026 is obtained.

  17. CP-odd Phase Correlations and Electric Dipole Moments

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, Keith A; Ritz, A; Santoso, Y; Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam; Santoso, Yudi

    2005-01-01

    We revisit the constraints imposed by electric dipole moments (EDMs) of nucleons and heavy atoms on new CP-violating sources within supersymmetric theories. We point out that certain two-loop renormalization group corrections induce significant mixing between the basis-invariant CP-odd phases. In the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), the CP-odd invariant related to the soft trilinear A-phase at the GUT scale, theta_A, induces non-trivial and distinct CP-odd phases for the three gaugino masses at the weak scale. The latter give one-loop contributions to EDMs enhanced by tan beta, and can provide the dominant contribution to the electron EDM induced by theta_A. We perform a detailed analysis of the EDM constraints within the CMSSM, exhibiting the reach, in terms of sparticle spectra, which may be obtained assuming generic phases, as well as the limits on the CP-odd phases for some specific parameter points where detailed phenomenological studies are available. We also i...

  18. Light Higgs boson in THDM with explicit CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetzyanova, Eh.N.; Dolgopolov, M.V.; Smirnov, I.A.; Dubinin, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian of the two-doublet Higgs sector with complex parameters is considered in the case of Minimal Supersymmetric Model with explicit CP violation. Light Higgs boson decay widths are calculated for the scenario with maximal mixing of CP even and CP odd states [ru

  19. A brief introduction to the strong CP problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dan-di; Melbourne Univ., Parkville

    1991-09-01

    The present status of the strong CP problem is briefly reviewed in a heuristic way. A crisis in EDMN calculation is explained. The equation of vacuum alignment obtained by the author and collaborators last year put a constraint on strong CP parameters. Thus the strong CP will be forced to vanish in one of the three scenarios characterized by axion, zero quark mass, and vanishing quark condensate. 12 refs

  20. A Cp-theory problem book compactness in function spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachuk, Vladimir V

    2015-01-01

    This third volume in Vladimir Tkachuk's series on Cp-theory problems applies all modern methods of Cp-theory to study compactness-like properties in function spaces and introduces the reader to the theory of compact spaces widely used in Functional Analysis. The text is designed to bring a dedicated reader from basic topological principles to the frontiers of modern research covering a wide variety of topics in Cp-theory and general topology at the professional level.  The first volume, Topological and Function Spaces © 2011, provided an introduction from scratch to Cp-theory and general topology, preparing the reader for a professional understanding of Cp-theory in the last section of its main text. The second volume, Special Features of Function Spaces © 2014, continued from the first, giving reasonably complete coverage of Cp-theory, systematically introducing each of the major topics and providing 500 carefully selected problems and exercises with complete solutions. This third volume is self-contained...

  1. Investment in Open Innovation Service Providers: NASA's Innovative Strategy for Solving Space Exploration Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Rando, Cynthia; Baumann, David; Richard, Elizabeth; Davis, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to expand routes for open communication and create additional opportunities for public involvement with NASA, Open Innovation Service Provider (OISP) methodologies have been incorporated as a tool in NASA's problem solving strategy. NASA engaged the services of two OISP providers, InnoCentive and Yet2.com, to test this novel approach and its feasibility in solving NASA s space flight challenges. The OISPs were chosen based on multiple factors including: network size and knowledge area span, established process, methodology, experience base, and cost. InnoCentive and Yet2.com each met the desired criteria; however each company s approach to Open Innovation is distinctly different. InnoCentive focuses on posting individual challenges to an established web-based network of approximately 200,000 solvers; viable solutions are sought and granted a financial award if found. Based on a specific technological need, Yet2.com acts as a talent scout providing a broad external network of experts as potential collaborators to NASA. A relationship can be established with these contacts to develop technologies and/or maintained as an established network of future collaborators. The results from the first phase of the pilot study have shown great promise for long term efficacy of utilizing the OISP methodologies. Solution proposals have been received for the challenges posted on InnoCentive and are currently under review for final disposition. In addition, Yet2.com has identified new external partners for NASA and we are in the process of understanding and acting upon these new opportunities. Compared to NASA's traditional routes for external problem solving, the OISP methodologies offered NASA a substantial savings in terms of time and resources invested. In addition, these strategies will help NASA extend beyond its current borders to build an ever expanding network of experts and global solvers.

  2. Space astronomy and astrophysics program by NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Paul L.

    2014-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration recently released the NASA Strategic Plan 20141, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate released the NASA 2014 Science Plan3. These strategic documents establish NASA's astrophysics strategic objectives to be (i) to discover how the universe works, (ii) to explore how it began and evolved, and (iii) to search for life on planets around other stars. The multidisciplinary nature of astrophysics makes it imperative to strive for a balanced science and technology portfolio, both in terms of science goals addressed and in missions to address these goals. NASA uses the prioritized recommendations and decision rules of the National Research Council's 2010 decadal survey in astronomy and astrophysics2 to set the priorities for its investments. The NASA Astrophysics Division has laid out its strategy for advancing the priorities of the decadal survey in its Astrophysics 2012 Implementation Plan4. With substantial input from the astrophysics community, the NASA Advisory Council's Astrophysics Subcommittee has developed an astrophysics visionary roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions5, to examine possible longer-term futures. The successful development of the James Webb Space Telescope leading to a 2018 launch is an Agency priority. One important goal of the Astrophysics Division is to begin a strategic mission, subject to the availability of funds, which follows from the 2010 decadal survey and is launched after the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA is studying a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its next large astrophysics mission. NASA is also planning to partner with other space agencies on their missions as well as increase the cadence of smaller Principal Investigator led, competitively selected Astrophysics Explorers missions.

  3. Systematic CpT (ApG) Depletion and CpG Excess Are Unique Genomic Signatures of Large DNA Viruses Infecting Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Neha; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the relative abundance of dinucleotides, if any may provide important clues on host-driven evolution of viruses. We studied dinucleotide frequencies of large DNA viruses infecting vertebrates (n = 105; viruses infecting mammals = 99; viruses infecting aves = 6; viruses infecting reptiles = 1) and invertebrates (n = 88; viruses infecting insects = 84; viruses infecting crustaceans = 4). We have identified systematic depletion of CpT(ApG) dinucleotides and over-representation of CpG dinucleotides as the unique genomic signature of large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates. Detailed investigation of this unique genomic signature suggests the existence of invertebrate host-induced pressures specifically targeting CpT(ApG) and CpG dinucleotides. The depletion of CpT dinucleotides among large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates is at least in part, explained by non-canonical DNA methylation by the infected host. Our findings highlight the role of invertebrate host-related factors in shaping virus evolution and they also provide the necessary framework for future studies on evolution, epigenetics and molecular biology of viruses infecting this group of hosts. PMID:25369195

  4. CP violation in B and D decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-06-01

    Non-leptonic B decays offer the best opportunity to discover the violation of CP invariance outside the neutral K system. Employing the Standard Model one predicts - with reasonable confidence - CP asymmetries of up to 205 (or even more in some cases). The branching ratios for the individual exclusive modes of interest are not expected to exceed the 10 -3 level in most cases; the identification of such decays poses non-trivial problems. It is shown that by summing intelligently over appropriate classes of decays one can greatly enhance statistics without jeopardizing the signal. Data that contain 10 6 produced B mesons would allow meaningful searches for CP violation. It is noted that ''New Physics'' could lead to CP asymmetries in D 0 decays of order 1%. Due to higher branching ratios one can search for such effects in samples of 10 6 produced D mesons. 7 refs

  5. CP-violating profile of the electroweak bubble wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funakubo, Koichi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kakuto, Akira; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Takenaga, Kazunori; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    1995-11-01

    In any scenario of the electroweak baryogenesis, the profile of the CP violating bubble wall, created at the first-order phase transition, plays an essential role. We attempt to determine it by solving the equations of motion for the scalars in the two-Higgs-doublet model at the transition temperature. According to the parameters in the potential, we found three solutions. Two of them smoothly connect the CP-violating broken phase and the symmetric phase, while the other connects CP-conserving vacua but violates CP in the intermediate region. We also estimate the chiral charge flux, which will be turned into the baryon density in the symmetric phase by the sphaleron process. (author).

  6. LHC experimental sensitivity to CP violating gtt couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Sjölin, J

    2003-01-01

    The level of CP violation in pp to tt+X induced by the standard model is known to be below the experimental sensitivity by many orders of magnitude. However, in some effective theories, it is plausible that new CP violating physics could reveal itself as additional non- renormalizable terms in the Lagrangian. Since these should respect the symmetries of the low-energy gauge interaction, violate CP and generate the correct event topology, the set of allowed terms is highly restricted. This analysis gives an estimate of the expected experimental sensitivity to the lowest order effective CP violating gtt interaction term beyond the standard model using simulated data from the ATLAS detector at the LHC. (36 refs).

  7. CP violating observables in e$^{-}$e$^{+}$ --> W$^{-}$W$^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D; Phillips, I

    1993-01-01

    We consider various integrated lepton charge-energy asymmetries and azimuthal asymmetries as tests of CP violation in the process $e^-e^+ \\to W^-W^+$. These asymmetries are sensitive to different linear combinations of the CP violating form factors in the three gauge boson $W^-W^+$ production vertex, and can distinguish dispersive and absorptive parts of the form factors. It makes use of purely hadronic and purely leptonic modes of $W$'s decays as well as the mixed modes. The techniques of using the kinematics of jets or missing momentum to construct CP--odd observables are also employed. These CP violating observables are illustrated in the generalized Left-Right Model and the Charged Higgs Model.

  8. NASA: Investing in Our Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    A short explanation of NASA's accomplishments and goals are discussed in this video. Space Station Freedom, lunar bases, manned Mars mission, and robotic spacecrafts to explore other worlds are briefly described.

  9. Sigma decomposition: the CP-odd Lagrangian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierro, I.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Università di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padua (Italy); Merlo, L. [Instituto de Física Teórica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Rigolin, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Università di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padua (Italy)

    2016-04-04

    In Alonso et al., http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP12(2014)034, the CP-even sector of the effective chiral Lagrangian for a generic composite Higgs model with a symmetric coset has been constructed, up to four momenta. In this paper, the CP-odd couplings are studied within the same context. If only the Standard Model bosonic sources of custodial symmetry breaking are considered, then at most six independent operators form a basis. One of them is the weak-θ term linked to non-perturbative sources of CP violation, while the others describe CP-odd perturbative couplings between the Standard Model gauge bosons and an Higgs-like scalar belonging to the Goldstone boson sector. The procedure is then applied to three distinct exemplifying frameworks: the original SU(5)/SO(5) Georgi-Kaplan model, the minimal custodial-preserving SO(5)/SO(4) model and the minimal SU(3)/(SU(2)×U(1)) model, which intrinsically breaks custodial symmetry. Moreover, the projection of the high-energy electroweak effective theory to the low-energy chiral effective Lagrangian for a dynamical Higgs is performed, uncovering strong relations between the operator coefficients and pinpointing the differences with the elementary Higgs scenario.

  10. CpGislandEVO: A Database and Genome Browser for Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of CpG Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Barturen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypomethylated, CpG-rich DNA segments (CpG islands, CGIs are epigenome markers involved in key biological processes. Aberrant methylation is implicated in the appearance of several disorders as cancer, immunodeficiency, or centromere instability. Furthermore, methylation differences at promoter regions between human and chimpanzee strongly associate with genes involved in neurological/psychological disorders and cancers. Therefore, the evolutionary comparative analyses of CGIs can provide insights on the functional role of these epigenome markers in both health and disease. Given the lack of specific tools, we developed CpGislandEVO. Briefly, we first compile a database of statistically significant CGIs for the best assembled mammalian genome sequences available to date. Second, by means of a coupled browser front-end, we focus on the CGIs overlapping orthologous genes extracted from OrthoDB, thus ensuring the comparison between CGIs located on truly homologous genome segments. This allows comparing the main compositional features between homologous CGIs. Finally, to facilitate nucleotide comparisons, we lifted genome coordinates between assemblies from different species, which enables the analysis of sequence divergence by direct count of nucleotide substitutions and indels occurring between homologous CGIs. The resulting CpGislandEVO database, linking together CGIs and single-cytosine DNA methylation data from several mammalian species, is freely available at our website.

  11. Addressing the strong CP problem with quark mass ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Cruz, J.L.; Saldana-Salazar, U.J. [Benemerita Univ. Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico). Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas; Hollik, W.G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The strong CP problem is one of many puzzles in the theoretical description of elementary particles physics that still lacks an explanation. Solutions to that problem usually comprise new symmetries or fields or both. The main problem seems to be how to achieve small CP in the strong interactions despite large CP violation in weak interactions. Observation of CP violation is exclusively through the Higgs-Yukawa interactions. In this letter, we show that with minimal assumptions on the structure of mass (Yukawa) matrices the strong CP problem does not exist in the Standard Model and no extension to solve this is needed. However, to solve the flavor puzzle, models based on minimal SU(3) flavor groups leading to the proposed flavor matrices are favored.

  12. Addressing the strong CP problem with quark mass ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Cruz, J.L.; Saldana-Salazar, U.J.

    2016-05-01

    The strong CP problem is one of many puzzles in the theoretical description of elementary particles physics that still lacks an explanation. Solutions to that problem usually comprise new symmetries or fields or both. The main problem seems to be how to achieve small CP in the strong interactions despite large CP violation in weak interactions. Observation of CP violation is exclusively through the Higgs-Yukawa interactions. In this letter, we show that with minimal assumptions on the structure of mass (Yukawa) matrices the strong CP problem does not exist in the Standard Model and no extension to solve this is needed. However, to solve the flavor puzzle, models based on minimal SU(3) flavor groups leading to the proposed flavor matrices are favored.

  13. Neutrino mixing and lepton CP-phase in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhikh, D.A.; Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    One studied oscillations of the Dirac neutrinos belonging to three generations in vacuum with regard to the effect of the lepton CP-breaking phase on them in the matrix of lepton mixing (analogue of the quark CP-phase). In the general form one obtained formulae for probabilities of transition of neutrino of one kind to another at oscillations depending on three angles of mixing and on CP-phase. It was pointed that when measuring oscillation average probabilities of transition of neutrino of one kind to another one might in principle, restore the value of lepton CP-phase. Manifestation of CP-phase in the form of deviation of the values of probabilities of direct neutrino transition from reverse one is the effect practically escaping observation [ru

  14. An Investigation of the Sources of Earth-directed Solar Wind during Carrington Rotation 2053

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakerley, A. N.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we analyze multiple sources of solar wind through a full Carrington Rotation (CR 2053) by analyzing the solar data through spectroscopic observations of the plasma upflow regions and the in situ data of the wind itself. Following earlier authors, we link solar and in situ observations by a combination of ballistic backmapping and potential-field source-surface modeling. We find three sources of fast solar wind that are low-latitude coronal holes. The coronal holes do not produce a steady fast wind, but rather a wind with rapid fluctuations. The coronal spectroscopic data from Hinode’s Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer show a mixture of upflow and downflow regions highlighting the complexity of the coronal hole, with the upflows being dominant. There is a mix of open and multi-scale closed magnetic fields in this region whose (interchange) reconnections are consistent with the up- and downflows they generate being viewed through an optically thin corona, and with the strahl directions and freeze-in temperatures found in in situ data. At the boundary of slow and fast wind streams there are three short periods of enhanced-velocity solar wind, which we term intermediate based on their in situ characteristics. These are related to active regions that are located beside coronal holes. The active regions have different magnetic configurations, from bipolar through tripolar to quadrupolar, and we discuss the mechanisms to produce this intermediate wind, and the important role that the open field of coronal holes adjacent to closed-field active regions plays in the process.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE SOURCES OF EARTH-DIRECTED SOLAR WIND DURING CARRINGTON ROTATION 2053

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazakerley, A. N.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L., E-mail: a.fazakerley@ucl.ac.uk [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    In this work we analyze multiple sources of solar wind through a full Carrington Rotation (CR 2053) by analyzing the solar data through spectroscopic observations of the plasma upflow regions and the in situ data of the wind itself. Following earlier authors, we link solar and in situ observations by a combination of ballistic backmapping and potential-field source-surface modeling. We find three sources of fast solar wind that are low-latitude coronal holes. The coronal holes do not produce a steady fast wind, but rather a wind with rapid fluctuations. The coronal spectroscopic data from Hinode ’s Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer show a mixture of upflow and downflow regions highlighting the complexity of the coronal hole, with the upflows being dominant. There is a mix of open and multi-scale closed magnetic fields in this region whose (interchange) reconnections are consistent with the up- and downflows they generate being viewed through an optically thin corona, and with the strahl directions and freeze-in temperatures found in in situ data. At the boundary of slow and fast wind streams there are three short periods of enhanced-velocity solar wind, which we term intermediate based on their in situ characteristics. These are related to active regions that are located beside coronal holes. The active regions have different magnetic configurations, from bipolar through tripolar to quadrupolar, and we discuss the mechanisms to produce this intermediate wind, and the important role that the open field of coronal holes adjacent to closed-field active regions plays in the process.

  16. CP violation and supersymmetry-breaking in superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, T.E.

    2000-09-01

    In this thesis I discuss aspects of the phenomenology of heterotic string, theory, using low-energy effective supergravity models. I investigate the origin of CP violation, the implications for low-energy physics of the modular invariance of the theory, supersymmetry-breaking via gaugino condensation in a hidden sector, and the interplay between these topics. I review the theory of CP violation and the problem of CP violation in supersymmetry phenomenology. In a scenario where the origin of CP violation lies in the compactification of the extra dimensions of string theory, I present simple models which include a duality symmetry acting on the compactification modulus and on observable fields. I show how the structure of the theory affects CP-violating observables, and discuss the effect of such a symmetry on low-energy physics in general. I present a detailed investigation of supersymmetry-breaking by gaugino condensation in supergravity, in particular as applied to the stabilisation of string moduli. For hidden sectors with or without matter I calculate corrections to the usual formulae for the scalar potential and soft supersymmetry-breaking terms. I discuss the phenomenological implications of these corrections and show that they may affect the value of the compactification modulus. and consequently the prospects for predictions of CP violation in string models. (author)

  17. The Crucial Role of Additive Manufacturing at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2016-01-01

    At NASA, the first steps of the Journey to Mars are well underway with the development of NASA's next generation launch system and investments in research and technologies that should increase the affordability, capability, and safety of exploration activities. Additive Manufacturing presents a disruptive opportunity for NASA to design and manufacture hardware with new materials at dramatically reduced cost and schedule. Opportunities to incorporate additive manufacturing align very well with NASA missions and with most NASA programs related to space, science, and aeronautics. The Agency also relies on many partnerships with other government agencies, industry and academia.

  18. NASA Advanced Explorations Systems: Concepts for Logistics to Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Howe, A. Scott; Flynn, Michael T.; Howard, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project strives to enable a largely mission-independent cradle-to-grave-to-cradle approach to minimize logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass. The goals are to engineer logistics materials, common crew consumables, and container configurations to meet the following five basic goals: 1. Minimize intrinsic logistics mass and improve ground logistics flexibility. 2. Allow logistics components to be directly repurposed for on-orbit non-logistics functions (e.g., crew cabin outfitting) thereby indirectly reducing mass/volume. 3. Compact and process logistics that have not been directly repurposed to generate useful on-orbit components and/or compounds (e.g., radiation shielding, propellant, other usable chemical constituents). 4. Enable long-term stable storage and disposal of logistics end products that cannot be reused or repurposed (e.g., compaction for volume reduction, odor control, and maintenance of crew cabin hygienic conditions). 5. Allow vehicles in different mission phases to share logistics resources. This paper addresses the work being done to meet the second goal, the direct repurposing of logistics components to meet other on-orbit needs, through a strategy termed Logistics to Living (L2L). L2L has several areas but can be defined as repurposing or converting logistical items (bags, containers, foam, components, etc.) into useful crew items or life support augmentation on-orbit after they have provided their primary logistics function. The intent is that by repurposing items, dedicated crew items do not have to be launched and overall launch mass is decreased. For non-LEO missions, the vehicle interior volume will be relatively fixed so L2L will enable this volume to be used more effectively through reuse and rearrangement of logistical components. Past work in the area of L2L has already conceptually developed several potential technologies [Howe

  19. arXiv Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenik, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    These notes represent a summary of three lectures on flavour and CP violation, given at the CERNs European School of High Energy Physics in 2014. They cover flavour physics within the standard model, phenomenology of CP violation in meson mixing and decays, as well as constraints of flavour observableson physics beyond the standard model. In preparing the lectures (and consequently this summary) I drew heavily from several existing excellent and exhaustive sets of lecture notes and reviews on flavour physics and CP violation [1]. The reader is encouraged to consult those as well as the original literature for a more detailed study.

  20. CP Violation and B Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Helen R

    2001-01-01

    These lectures provide a basic overview of topics related to the study of CP Violation in B decays. In the first lecture, I review the basics of discrete symmetries in field theories, the quantum mechanics of neutral but flavor-non-trivial mesons, and the classification of three types of CP violation [1]. The actual second lecture which I gave will be separately published as it is my Dirac award lecture and is focused on the separate topic of strong CP Violation. In Lecture 2 here, I cover the Standard Model predictions for neutral B decays, and in particular discuss some channels of interest for CP Violation studies. Lecture 3 reviews the various tools and techniques used to deal with the hadronic physics effects. In Lecture 4, I briefly review the present and planned experiments that can study B decays. I cannot teach all the details of this subject in this short course, so my approach is instead to try to give students a grasp of the relevant concepts and an overview of the available tools. The level of these lectures is introductory. I will provide some references to more detailed treatments and current literature, but this is not a review article so I do not attempt to give complete references to all related literature. By now there are some excellent textbooks that cover this subject in great detail [1]. I refer students to these for more details and for more complete references to the original literature

  1. B physics and CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, H.

    2002-01-01

    These lectures provide a basic overview of topics related to the study of CP Violation in B decays. In the first lecture, I review the basics of discrete symmetries in field theories, the quantum mechanics of neutral but flavor-non-trivial mesons, and the classification of three types of CP violation. The actual second lecture which I gave will be separately published as it is my Dirac award lecture and is focussed on the separate topic of strong CP Violation. In Lecture 2 here, I cover the Standard Model predictions for neutral B decays, and in particular discuss some channels of interest for CP Violation studies. Lecture 3 reviews the various tools and techniques used to deal with the hadronic physics effects. In Lecture 4, I briefly review the present and planned experiments that can study B decays. I cannot teach all the details of this subject in this short course, so my approach is instead to try to give students a grasp of the relevant concepts and an overview of the available tools. The level of these lectures is introductory. I will provide some references to more detailed treatments and current literature, but this is not a review article so I do not attempt to give complete references to all related literature. By now there are some excellent textbooks that cover this subject in great detail. I refer students to these for more details and for more complete references to the original literature. (author)

  2. Risk and Exploration: Earth, Sea and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J. (Editor); Cowing, Keith L. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The NASA History Division is pleased to present the record of a unique meeting on risk and exploration held under the auspices of the NASA Administrator, Sean O Keefe, at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, from September 26-29, 2004. The meeting was the brainchild of Keith Cowing and astronaut John Grunsfeld, NASA's chief scientist at the time. Its goals, stated in the letter of invitation published herein, were precipitated by the ongoing dialogue on risk and exploration in the wake of the Columbia Shuttle accident, the Hubble Space Telescope servicing question, and, in a broader sense, by the many NASA programs that inevitably involve a balance between risk and forward-looking exploration. The meeting, extraordinarily broad in scope and participant experience, offers insights on why we explore, how to balance risk and exploration, how different groups defi ne and perceive risk differently, and the importance of exploration to a creative society. At NASA Headquarters, Bob Jacobs, Trish Pengra, and Joanna Adamus of NASA Public Affairs led the meeting's implementation. The Naval Postgraduate School, commanded by Rear Admiral Patrick W. Dunne, provided a congenial venue. The meeting was broadcast on NASA TV, and thanks are due in this regard to Al Feinberg, Tony Stewart, Jim Taylor, and the planners collaborative: Mark Shaddock and Spotlight Productions, Donovan Gates of Donovan Gates Production, and Michael Ditertay and his staff on this 30-person television crew. Thanks to their efforts, a DVD record of the meeting has also been produced. Thanks are also due to the moderators: Miles O Brien of CNN, Chris McKay of NASA Ames, David Halpern of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and John Grunsfeld, NASA Headquarters. In order to maintain the informal flavor of the meetings, these proceedings are based on transcripts that have been lightly edited for grammar and punctuation. Most references to slides shown during the

  3. Measurement of the Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries of B{sup -} --> D{sup 0}{sub (CP)}K{sup -} Decays with the BABAR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-17

    The authors have reconstructed B{sup -} --> D{sup 0}K{sup -} decays with D{sup 0} mesons decaying to non-CP (K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), CD-even (K{sup -}K{sup +}, {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) and CP-odd (K{sup 0}{sub s}{pi}{sup 0}) eigenstates. They have measured the CP asymmetries A{sub CP{sup +}} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst), A{sup CP{sup -}} = 0.21 {+-} 0.17(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst), and the double ratio of branching fractions R{sub +} = 0.87 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst), R{sub -} = 0.80 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst). These results improve the previous existing measurements from BABAR. All results presented in this document are preliminary.

  4. CP violation in KL → π0e+e-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    It's been appreciated for many years that the decays K L → π 0 ell bar ell are CP violating to lowest order in the Standard Model, and that the component of direct CP violation in these decays is likely to be comparable to that of the CP violation due to state mixing (ε). This is to be contrasted with the case of K 0 → ππ wherein the latter contribution is predicted to be hundreds of times larger than the former. This paper investigates this CP violation further. 19 refs., 2 figs

  5. CP violation in τ → ντ + 3π

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    In the Standard Model no CP violation can occur in decay processes involving leptons either as a parent or a daughter because these processes involve one W exchange and thus, even if the CP violating complex coupling exists in these decays, its effect will not show up when the amplitude is squared. The author needs two diagrams to interfere with each other to see the CP violating effects. Here, he discusses ways to find CP violation in the decay of τ ± → ν τ + 3π from unpolarized as well as polarized τ ±

  6. On the determination of the CP of the Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjold, A.

    1995-12-31

    While the Higgs particle of the Standard Models is a Cp-even scalar particle, extended models may contain Higgs particles that are odd under CP, and also models invoking Higgs-like particles which are not eigenstates of CP may be considered. In the context of Higgs production via the Bjorken process and Higgs decay to tour fermions distributions that are sensitive to the CP parity are discussed. The author also discuss observables which may demonstrate presence of CP violation and identify a phase shift {delta} which is a measure of the strength of CP violation in the Higgs-vector-vector coupling, and which can be measured directly in the relevant distribution. In the case of Higgs production via the Bjorken process at a future e{sup +}e{sup -}collider, Monte Carlo data on the expected efficiency is presented, and it is concluded that it is relatively easy to determine whether the produced particle is even or odd under CP. However, observation of any CP violation would require a very large amount of data. It is argued that the analogous prospects at LEP2 or at a future hadron collider like the LHC seem to be less promising. 63 refs.

  7. On the determination of the CP of the Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjold, A

    1996-12-31

    While the Higgs particle of the Standard Models is a Cp-even scalar particle, extended models may contain Higgs particles that are odd under CP, and also models invoking Higgs-like particles which are not eigenstates of CP may be considered. In the context of Higgs production via the Bjorken process and Higgs decay to tour fermions distributions that are sensitive to the CP parity are discussed. The author also discuss observables which may demonstrate presence of CP violation and identify a phase shift {delta} which is a measure of the strength of CP violation in the Higgs-vector-vector coupling, and which can be measured directly in the relevant distribution. In the case of Higgs production via the Bjorken process at a future e{sup +}e{sup -}collider, Monte Carlo data on the expected efficiency is presented, and it is concluded that it is relatively easy to determine whether the produced particle is even or odd under CP. However, observation of any CP violation would require a very large amount of data. It is argued that the analogous prospects at LEP2 or at a future hadron collider like the LHC seem to be less promising. 63 refs.

  8. On the determination of the CP of the Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjold, A.

    1995-01-01

    While the Higgs particle of the Standard Models is a Cp-even scalar particle, extended models may contain Higgs particles that are odd under CP, and also models invoking Higgs-like particles which are not eigenstates of CP may be considered. In the context of Higgs production via the Bjorken process and Higgs decay to tour fermions distributions that are sensitive to the CP parity are discussed. The author also discuss observables which may demonstrate presence of CP violation and identify a phase shift δ which is a measure of the strength of CP violation in the Higgs-vector-vector coupling, and which can be measured directly in the relevant distribution. In the case of Higgs production via the Bjorken process at a future e + e - collider, Monte Carlo data on the expected efficiency is presented, and it is concluded that it is relatively easy to determine whether the produced particle is even or odd under CP. However, observation of any CP violation would require a very large amount of data. It is argued that the analogous prospects at LEP2 or at a future hadron collider like the LHC seem to be less promising. 63 refs

  9. NASA Education Recommendation Report - Education Design Team 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengra, Trish; Stofan, James

    2011-01-01

    NASA people are passionate about their work. NASA's missions are exciting to learners of all ages. And since its creation in 1958, NASA's people have been passionate about sharing their inspiring discoveries, research and exploration with students and educators. In May 2010, NASA administration chartered an Education Design Team composed of 12 members chosen from the Office of Education, NASA's Mission Directorates and Centers for their depth of knowledge and education expertise, and directed them to evaluate the Agency's program in the context of current trends in education. By improving NASA's educational offerings, he was confident that the Agency can play a leading role in inspiring student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as few other organizations can. Through its unique workforce, facilities, research and innovations, NASA can expand its efforts to engage underserved and underrepresented communities in science and mathematics. Through the Agency's STEM education efforts and science and exploration missions, NASA can help the United States successfully compete, prosper and be secure in the 21st century global community. After several months of intense effort, including meeting with education experts; reviewing Administration policies, congressional direction and education research; and seeking input from those passionate about education at NASA, the Education Design Team made six recommendations to improve the impact of NASA's Education Program: (1) Focus the NASA Education Program to improve its impact on areas of greatest national need (2) Identify and strategically manage NASA Education partnerships (3) Participate in National and State STEM Education policy discussions (4) Establish a structure to allow the Office of Education, Centers and Mission Directorates to implement a strategically integrated portfolio (5) Expand the charter of the Education Coordinating Committee to enable deliberate Education Program design (6

  10. CpG traffic lights are markers of regulatory regions in humans

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.; Lioznova, Anna V.; Artemov, Artem V.; Ramensky, Vasily; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Medvedeva, Yulia A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in regulation of gene expression. Although modern methods profile DNA methylation at single CpG sites, methylation levels are usually averaged over genomic regions in the downstream analyses. In this study we demonstrate that single CpG methylation can serve as a more accurate predictor of gene expression compared to average promoter / gene body methylation. CpG positions with significant correlation between methylation and expression of a gene nearby (named CpG traffic lights) are evolutionary conserved and enriched for exact TSS positions and active enhancers. Among all promoter types, CpG traffic lights are especially enriched in poised promoters. Genes that harbor CpG traffic lights are associated with development and signal transduction. Methylation levels of individual CpG traffic lights vary between cell types dramatically with the increased frequency of intermediate methylation levels, indicating cell population heterogeneity in CpG methylation levels. Being in line with the concept of the inherited stochastic epigenetic variation, methylation of such CpG positions might contribute to transcriptional regulation. Alternatively, one can hypothesize that traffic lights are markers of absent gene expression resulting from inactivation of their regulatory elements. The CpG traffic lights provide a promising insight into mechanisms of enhancer activity and gene regulation linking methylation of single CpG to expression.

  11. CpG traffic lights are markers of regulatory regions in humans

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2016-12-29

    DNA methylation is involved in regulation of gene expression. Although modern methods profile DNA methylation at single CpG sites, methylation levels are usually averaged over genomic regions in the downstream analyses. In this study we demonstrate that single CpG methylation can serve as a more accurate predictor of gene expression compared to average promoter / gene body methylation. CpG positions with significant correlation between methylation and expression of a gene nearby (named CpG traffic lights) are evolutionary conserved and enriched for exact TSS positions and active enhancers. Among all promoter types, CpG traffic lights are especially enriched in poised promoters. Genes that harbor CpG traffic lights are associated with development and signal transduction. Methylation levels of individual CpG traffic lights vary between cell types dramatically with the increased frequency of intermediate methylation levels, indicating cell population heterogeneity in CpG methylation levels. Being in line with the concept of the inherited stochastic epigenetic variation, methylation of such CpG positions might contribute to transcriptional regulation. Alternatively, one can hypothesize that traffic lights are markers of absent gene expression resulting from inactivation of their regulatory elements. The CpG traffic lights provide a promising insight into mechanisms of enhancer activity and gene regulation linking methylation of single CpG to expression.

  12. HSI in NASA: From Research to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Plaga, John A.

    2016-01-01

    As NASA plans to send human explorers beyond low Earth orbit, onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system, there will be new challenges to address in terms of HSI. These exploration missions will be quite different from the current and past missions such as Apollo, Shuttle, and International Space Station. The exploration crew will be more autonomous from ground mission control with delayed, and at times, no communication. They will have limited to no resupply for much longer mission durations. Systems to deliver and support extended human habitation at these destinations are extremely complex and unique, presenting new opportunities to employ HSI practices. In order to have an effective and affordable HSI implementation, both research and programmatic efforts are required. Currently, the HSI-related research at NASA is primarily in the area of space human factors and habitability. The purpose is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit, and update standards, requirements, and processes to verify and validate these requirements. In addition, HSI teams are actively engaged in technology development and demonstration efforts to influence the mission architecture and next-generation vehicle design. Finally, appropriate HSI references have been added to NASA' s systems engineering documentation, and an HSI Practitioner's Guide has been published to help design engineers consider HSI early and continuously in the acquisition process. These current and planned HSI-related activities at NASA will be discussed in this panel.

  13. NASA Administrative Data Base Management Systems, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosevich, J. D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Strategies for converting to a data base management system (DBMS) and the implementation of the software packages necessary are discussed. Experiences with DBMS at various NASA centers are related including Langley's ADABAS/NATURAL and the NEMS subsystem of the NASA metrology informaton system. The value of the integrated workstation with a personal computer is explored.

  14. On the energy crisis in noncommutative CP(1) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sourrouille, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    We study the CP(1) system in (2+1)-dimensional noncommutative space with and without Chern-Simons term. Using the Seiberg-Witten map we convert the noncommutative CP(1) system to an action written in terms of the commutative fields. We find that this system presents the same infinite size instanton solution as the commutative Chern-Simons-CP(1) model without a potential term. Based on this result we argue that the BPS equations are compatible with the full variational equations of motion, rejecting the hypothesis of an 'energy crisis'. In addition we examine the noncommutative CP(1) system with a Chern-Simons interaction. In this case we find that when the theory is transformed by the Seiberg-Witten map it also presents the same instanton solution as the commutative Chern-Simons-CP(1) model.

  15. The possibility of leptonic CP-violation measurement with JUNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, M. V.; Hu, Zh. J.; Li, S. J.; Ling, J. J.

    2018-06-01

    The existence of CP-violation in the leptonic sector is one of the most important issues for modern science. Neutrino physics is a key to the solution of this problem. JUNO (under construction) is the near future of neutrino physics. However CP-violation is not a priority for the current scientific program. We estimate the capability of δCP measurement, assuming a combination of the JUNO detector and a superconductive cyclotron as the antineutrino source. This method of measuring CP-violation is an alternative to conventional beam experiments. A significance level of 3σ can be reached for 22% of the δCP range. The accuracy of measurement lies between 8o and 22o. It is shown that the dominant influence on the result is the uncertainty in the mixing angle Θ23.

  16. Implications of maximal Jarlskog invariant and maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Jauregui, E.; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

    2001-04-01

    We argue here why CP violating phase Φ in the quark mixing matrix is maximal, that is, Φ=90 . In the Standard Model CP violation is related to the Jarlskog invariant J, which can be obtained from non commuting Hermitian mass matrices. In this article we derive the conditions to have Hermitian mass matrices which give maximal Jarlskog invariant J and maximal CP violating phase Φ. We find that all squared moduli of the quark mixing elements have a singular point when the CP violation phase Φ takes the value Φ=90 . This special feature of the Jarlskog invariant J and the quark mixing matrix is a clear and precise indication that CP violating Phase Φ is maximal in order to let nature treat democratically all of the quark mixing matrix moduli. (orig.)

  17. Introduction to heavy meson decays and CP asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    2003-01-01

    These lectures are intended to provide an introduction to heavy meson decays and CP violation. The first lecture contains a brief review of the standard model and how the CKM matrix and CP violation arise, mixing and CP violation in neutral meson systems, and explanation of the cleanliness of the sin 2β measurement. The second lecture deals with the heavy quark limit, some applications of heavy quark symmetry and the operator product expansion for exclusive and inclusive semileptonic B decays. The third lecture concerns with theoretically clean CP violation measurements that may become possible in the future, and some developments toward a better understanding of nonleptonic B decays. The conclusions include a subjective best buy list for the near future

  18. Technological Innovations from NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge of human space exploration places demands on technology that push concepts and development to the leading edge. In biotechnology and biomedical equipment development, NASA science has been the seed for numerous innovations, many of which are in the commercial arena. The biotechnology effort has led to rational drug design, analytical equipment, and cell culture and tissue engineering strategies. Biomedical research and development has resulted in medical devices that enable diagnosis and treatment advances. NASA Biomedical developments are exemplified in the new laser light scattering analysis for cataracts, the axial flow left ventricular-assist device, non contact electrocardiography, and the guidance system for LASIK surgery. Many more developments are in progress. NASA will continue to advance technologies, incorporating new approaches from basic and applied research, nanotechnology, computational modeling, and database analyses.

  19. Rephasing-invariant CP violating parameters with Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, Jose F.; Pal, Palash B.

    2001-06-01

    We analyze the dependence of the squared amplitudes on the rephasing-invariant CP-violating parameters of the lepton sector, involving Majorana neutrinos, for various lepton- conserving and lepton-violating processes. We analyze the conditions under which the CP-violating effects in such processes vanish, in terms of the minimal set of rephasing invariants, giving special attention to the dependence on the extra CP-violating parameters that are due to the Majorana nature of the neutrinos. (author)

  20. Neutrinos as a probe of CP-violation and leptogenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Establishing CP-violation in the lepton sector is one of the most challenging future tasks in neutrino physics. The lepton mixing matrix contains one Dirac phase and, if neutrinos are Majorana particles, two additional CP-violating phases. I will review the main theoretical aspects of CP-violation in the lepton sector. Then, I will ...

  1. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-09-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  3. A bottom-up approach to the strong CP problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Hollik, W. G.; Saldana-Salazar, U. J.

    2018-05-01

    The strong CP problem is one of many puzzles in the theoretical description of elementary particle physics that still lacks an explanation. While top-down solutions to that problem usually comprise new symmetries or fields or both, we want to present a rather bottom-up perspective. The main problem seems to be how to achieve small CP violation in the strong interactions despite the large CP violation in weak interactions. In this paper, we show that with minimal assumptions on the structure of mass (Yukawa) matrices, they do not contribute to the strong CP problem and thus we can provide a pathway to a solution of the strong CP problem within the structures of the Standard Model and no extension at the electroweak scale is needed. However, to address the flavor puzzle, models based on minimal SU(3) flavor groups leading to the proposed flavor matrices are favored. Though we refrain from an explicit UV completion of the Standard Model, we provide a simple requirement for such models not to show a strong CP problem by construction.

  4. Status of the CP-PACS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukawa, A.

    1995-01-01

    The CP-PACS Project, which started in April 1992, is a five-year plan to develop a massively parallel computer for carrying out research in computational physics with primary emphasis on lattice QCD. This article describes the architectural design of the CP-PACS computer, the entire computing system including the front end and mass storage, and results of benchmarks for the expected performance for lattice QCD applications. ((orig.))

  5. First evidence for direct CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, A.C.

    1988-06-01

    The double ratio R of the relative decay rates of the short-and long-lived neutral kaons into two charged and two neutral pions was measured to be 0.980 ± 0.004 ± 0.005. The deviation of R from unity implies CP violation in the transition of the CP-odd K 2 into two pions with ε , / ε = (3.3 ± 1.1) X 10 -3

  6. CP symmetry violation. The search for its origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present experimental situation on detection of CP symmetry violation is presented. Interference between decays of long-lived (Ksub(L)sup(0)) and short-lived (Ksub(S)sup(0)) mesons into two charged pions serves a direct demonstration of the fact that the effect is caused by CP symmetry breaking. The time distribution of decays into π + π - when the 4-10 GeV Ksub(L) meson beam passes through a carbon regenerator is given as an example of the measurement accuracy. The measurements of the charge asymmetry in half-lepton channels of Ksub(L)→π +- l +- ν decay where l is an electron or a muon are discussed. It is noted that the presence of the charge asymmetry serves an indication of CP invariance violation and permits to carry out experimental differentiation between the matter and antimatter. Different theoretical assumptions on the nature of CP invariance violation are discussed. A list of experiments on search for CP, T and C invariance violation carried out in different laboratories of the world is given [ru

  7. NASA Space Biology Plant Research for 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Tomko, D. L.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) recently published "Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era" (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record id=13048), and NASA completed a Space Biology Science Plan to develop a strategy for implementing its recommendations ( http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/library/esmd documents.html). The most important recommendations of the NRC report on plant biology in space were that NASA should: (1) investigate the roles of microbial-plant systems in long-term bioregenerative life support systems, and (2) establish a robust spaceflight program of research analyzing plant growth and physiological responses to the multiple stimuli encountered in spaceflight environments. These efforts should take advantage of recently emerged analytical technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and apply modern cellular and molecular approaches in the development of a vigorous flight-based and ground-based research program. This talk will describe NASA's strategy and plans for implementing these NRC Plant Space Biology recommendations. New research capabilities for Plant Biology, optimized by providing state-of-the-art automated technology and analytical techniques to maximize scientific return, will be described. Flight experiments will use the most appropriate platform to achieve science results (e.g., ISS, free flyers, sub-orbital flights) and NASA will work closely with its international partners and other U.S. agencies to achieve its objectives. One of NASA's highest priorities in Space Biology is the development research capabilities for use on the International Space Station and other flight platforms for studying multiple generations of large plants. NASA will issue recurring NASA Research Announcements (NRAs) that include a rapid turn-around model to more fully engage the biology community in designing experiments to respond to the NRC recommendations. In doing so, NASA

  8. Powering the Space Exploration Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) establishes the long-term goal of returning to the Moon and then exploring Mars. One of the prerequisites of SEI is the Exploration Technology Program which includes program elements on space nuclear power and surface solar power. These program elements in turn build upon the ongoing NASA research and technology base program in space energy conversion. There is a wide range of missions in NASA's strategic planning and most would benefit from power sources with improved efficiency, lighter weight and reduced cost

  9. A violation of CP symmetry in B meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyotakis, Y.; Monchenault, G.H. de

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the issue of CP-violation and reports the most recent results about the observation of large CP asymmetries in the decay of neutral B-mesons. Some of the CP asymmetries in the neutral B-meson decay are expected to be large. CP-violation always involves quantum mechanical interference. This occurs for instance when there are 2 paths for a particle to decay into a given final state. The interference between the mixing-induced amplitude (B 0 → B-bar 0 → f) and the decay amplitude (B 0 → f) to a CP eigenstate f leads to a time dependent CP asymmetry that can be interpreted in terms of the angles of the unitary triangle (sin(2β)). The experimental challenge comes from the fact that B decays to some CP eigenstates have very small branching ratios and low efficiencies for complete reconstruction of the final state. It is therefore necessary to produce a very large number of B-mesons to perform a CP-measurement. To make the measurement possible, a new type of e + e - collider, called asymmetric B-factory has been designed. 2 asymmetric B-factories are operating in the world: PEP2 (Stanford, Usa) fitted with the Babar detector and KEK-B (Japan) which hosts Belle detector. The measurements given by Babar and Belle are in good agreement and can be combined. The average value is sin(2β) = 0.78 ± 0.08 and this value is in excellent agreement with the standard model predictions based on available experimental data. (A.C.)

  10. Reaction of (CP(2)asterisk-lnH)(2) (ln=Y, La) and CP(2)asterisk-Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) with esters and amides and molecular-structure of [CP(2)asterisk-Y(mu- ocme=chc(oet)o)](2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, B.J; Wierda, F.; Meetsma, A.; Teuben, J.H

    1995-01-01

    The activation of esters and amides by (Cp(2)*LnH)(2) [Ln = Y (1a), Ln = La (1b), Cp*=C(5)Me] and Cp(2)*Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) (2) is described. Compounds 1a and 1b react with ethyl acetate to form Cp(2)*YOEt (3a) and Cp(2)*LaOEt (30). With 1a and ethyl benzoate a 1:1 mixture of 3a and

  11. The seesaw path to leptonic CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caputo, A.; Hernandez, P. [Universidad de Valencia and CSIC, Edificio Institutos Investigacion, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Kekic, M.; Salvado, J. [Universidad de Valencia and CSIC, Edificio Institutos Investigacion, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain); Lopez-Pavon, J. [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Future experiments such as SHiP and high-intensity e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders will have a superb sensitivity to heavy Majorana neutrinos with masses below M{sub Z}. We show that the measurement of the mixing to electrons and muons of one such state could establish the existence of CP violating phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, in the context of low-scale seesaw models. We quantify in the minimal model the CP reach of these future experiments, and demonstrate that CP violating phases in the mixing matrix could be established at 5σ CL in a very significant fraction of parameter space. (orig.)

  12. Quark mixing and CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    These lectures present a pedagogical introduction to the topics quark mixing and CP violation. They explain how the mixing matrix comes about and reviews the values of constraints for its elements. The second chapter reviews the CP transformation properties of amplitudes and defines the quantities which are measured in the experiments. Then it reviews the theory of CP violation in the standard model. In addition to the phase and the angles introduced through the flavor matrix, numerical predictions also depend (a) on hadronic matrix elements of weak current operators and (b) the short distance expansion of effective Hamiltonians computed by methods of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). I also review these topics and present predictions for (ε'/ε) which are shown to be consistent with the experiments. Last but not least, the article is divided into sections which are as self-contained as possible. The article assumes a general knowledge of the electroweak theory. For guidance, the interested reader will find a table of contents at the end of the text. (author). 29 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  13. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for ''direct'' CP violation in K 0 → ππ, which is parametrized by var-epsilon '/var-epsilon. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K L,S → π + π - (π 0 π 0 ) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re(var-epsilon '/var-epsilon) = -0.0004 ± 0.0014 (stat) ± 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for ''direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference Δφ = φ 00 - φ ± between the two CP violating parameters η 00 and η ± . We fine Δφ = -0.3 degrees ± 2.4 degree(stat) ± 1.2 degree(syst). Using this together with the world average φ ± , we fine that the phase of the K 0 -bar K 0 mixing parameter var-epsilon is 44.5 degree ± 1.5 degree. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs

  14. In Brief: NASA Advisory Council structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has added four new committees to the NASA Advisory Council in the areas of commercial space, education and public outreach, information technology infrastructure, and technology and innovation, the agency announced on 2 November. Other committees are in the areas of aeronautics; audit, finance, and analysis; exploration; science; and space operations. The council, which provides advice and makes recommendations to the administrator about agency programs, policies, plans, financial controls, and other matters, holds its next meeting on 18-19 February 2010. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/nac/home/index.html.

  15. 77 FR 37098 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8038-CP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... 8038-CP AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... Form 8038-CP, Return for Credit Payments to Issuers of Qualified Bonds. DATES: Written comments should... Issuers of Qualified Bonds. OMB Number: 1545-2142. Form Number: Form 8038-CP. Abstract: Form 8038-CP...

  16. Search for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation has been observed in the K- and B-meson systems, but not yet with any baryonic particle. We report on searches for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb using Run I data. We find evidence for CP violation in Lambda0b -> p pi- pi+ pi- decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations, including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence of CP violation in the baryon sector. An overview of other recent results of baryon decays will be presented, along with some highlights of the charmless B-decay programme.

  17. NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) - NASA's key to environmental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Beth

    1993-01-01

    NOET is a NASA-wide team which supports the research and development community by sharing information both in person and via a computerized network, assisting in specification and standard revisions, developing cleaner propulsion systems, and exploring environmentally compliant alternatives to current processes. NOET's structure, dissemination of materials, electronic information, EPA compliance, specifications and standards, and environmental research and development are discussed.

  18. The impact of intragenic CpG content on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Asli Petra; Leikam, Doris; Krinner, Simone; Notka, Frank; Ludwig, Christine; Längst, Gernot; Wagner, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    The development of vaccine components or recombinant therapeutics critically depends on sustained expression of the corresponding transgene. This study aimed to determine the contribution of intragenic CpG content to expression efficiency in transiently and stably transfected mammalian cells. Based upon a humanized version of green fluorescent protein (GFP) containing 60 CpGs within its coding sequence, a CpG-depleted variant of the GFP reporter was established by carefully modulating the codon usage. Interestingly, GFP reporter activity and detectable protein amounts in stably transfected CHO and 293 cells were significantly decreased upon CpG depletion and independent from promoter usage (CMV, EF1 alpha). The reduction in protein expression associated with CpG depletion was likewise observed for other unrelated reporter genes and was clearly reflected by a decline in mRNA copy numbers rather than translational efficiency. Moreover, decreased mRNA levels were neither due to nuclear export restrictions nor alternative splicing or mRNA instability. Rather, the intragenic CpG content influenced de novo transcriptional activity thus implying a common transcription-based mechanism of gene regulation via CpGs. Increased high CpG transcription correlated with changed nucleosomal positions in vitro albeit histone density at the two genes did not change in vivo as monitored by ChIP.

  19. Enabling Future Science and Human Exploration with NASA's Next Generation Near Earth and Deep Space Communications and Navigation Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard; Schier, James; Israel, David; Tai, Wallace; Liebrecht, Philip; Townes, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying alternatives for the United States space communications architecture through the 2040 timeframe. This architecture provides communication and navigation services to both human exploration and science missions throughout the solar system. Several of NASA's key space assets are approaching their end of design life and major systems are in need of replacement. The changes envisioned in the relay satellite architecture and capabilities around both Earth and Mars are significant undertakings and occur only once or twice each generation, and therefore is referred to as NASA's next generation space communications architecture. NASA's next generation architecture will benefit from technology and services developed over recent years. These innovations will provide missions with new operations concepts, increased performance, and new business and operating models. Advancements in optical communications will enable high-speed data channels and the use of new and more complex science instruments. Modern multiple beam/multiple access technologies such as those employed on commercial high throughput satellites will enable enhanced capabilities for on-demand service, and with new protocols will help provide Internet-like connectivity for cooperative spacecraft to improve data return and coordinate joint mission objectives. On-board processing with autonomous and cognitive networking will play larger roles to help manage system complexity. Spacecraft and ground systems will coordinate among themselves to establish communications, negotiate link connectivity, and learn to share spectrum to optimize resource allocation. Spacecraft will autonomously navigate, plan trajectories, and handle off-nominal events. NASA intends to leverage the ever-expanding capabilities of the satellite communications industry and foster its continued growth. NASA's technology development will complement and extend commercial capabilities

  20. Enabling Future Science and Human Exploration with NASA's Next Generation near Earth and Deep Space Communications and Navigation Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Schier, James S.; Israel, David J.; Tai, Wallace; Liebrecht, Philip E.; Townes, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying alternatives for the United States space communications architecture through the 2040 timeframe. This architecture provides communication and navigation services to both human exploration and science missions throughout the solar system. Several of NASA's key space assets are approaching their end of design life and major systems are in need of replacement. The changes envisioned in the relay satellite architecture and capabilities around both Earth and Mars are significant undertakings and occur only once or twice each generation, and therefore is referred to as NASA's next generation space communications architecture. NASA's next generation architecture will benefit from technology and services developed over recent years. These innovations will provide missions with new operations concepts, increased performance, and new business and operating models. Advancements in optical communications will enable high-speed data channels and the use of new and more complex science instruments. Modern multiple beam/multiple access technologies such as those employed on commercial high throughput satellites will enable enhanced capabilities for on-demand service, and with new protocols will help provide Internet-like connectivity for cooperative spacecraft to improve data return and coordinate joint mission objectives. On-board processing with autonomous and cognitive networking will play larger roles to help manage system complexity. Spacecraft and ground systems will coordinate among themselves to establish communications, negotiate link connectivity, and learn to share spectrum to optimize resource allocation. Spacecraft will autonomously navigate, plan trajectories, and handle off-nominal events. NASA intends to leverage the ever-expanding capabilities of the satellite communications industry and foster its continued growth. NASA's technology development will complement and extend commercial capabilities

  1. A Cp-theory problem book special features of function spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachuk, Vladimir V

    2014-01-01

    The books in Vladimir Tkachuk’s A Cp-Theory Problem Book series will be the ‘go to’ texts for basic reference to Cp-theory. This second volume, Special Features of Function Spaces, gives a reasonably complete coverage of Cp-theory, systematically introducing each of the major topics and providing  500 carefully selected problems and exercises with complete solutions. Bonus results and open problems are also given. The text is designed to bring a dedicated reader from basic topological principles to the frontiers of modern research covering a wide variety of topics in Cp-theory and general topology at the professional level. The first volume, Topological and Function Spaces © 2011, provided an introduction from scratch to Cp-theory and general topology, preparing the reader for a professional understanding of Cp-theory in the last section of its main text. This second volume continues from the first, and can be used as a textbook for courses in both Cp-theory and general topology as well as a referenc...

  2. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides as a Future Vaccine for Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Sano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An astounding feature of the DNA sequences termed CpG motifs is the induction of immune and inflammatory responses in a senseless manner. CpG motifs exist abundantly in microbes and evoke innate immunity that constitutes the first line of defense against microbial infections in vertebrates. CpG motifs that essentially work in an antigen-nonspecific fashion, however, turn into novel immunomodulators that can manipulate acquired immunity in an antigen-specific manner if oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODNs are directly conjugated to the antigen. CpG ODNs with potent polyclonal Th1-inducing ability show promise for application in immunotherapy whereby neutralization of dominant allergy-prone Th2 cells is achieved by inducing allergen-specific Th1 cells. The underlying mechanisms include an unexpected enhancement of dendritic cell function as a linker between innate and acquired immunity. In the foreseeable future the mainstream therapeutic role of corticosteroids in anti-inflammatory therapy for allergic diseases could possibly be replaced by immunotherapy using CpG ODN-conjugated antigens.

  3. Is CP violation observable in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied CP violation originating from the phase of the neutrino-mixing matrix in the long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The direct measurement of CP violation is the difference of the transition probabilities between CP-conjugate channels. In those experiments, the CP-violating effect is not suppressed if the highest neutrino mass scale is taken to be 1 endash 5 eV, which is appropriate for the cosmological hot dark matter. Assuming the hierarchy for the neutrino masses, the upper bounds of CP violation have been calculated for three cases, in which mixings are constrained by the recent short baseline ones. The calculated upper bounds are larger than 10 -2 , which will be observable in the long baseline accelerator experiments. The matter effect, which is not CP invariant, has been also estimated in those experiments. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Higgs pair production in the MSSM with explicit CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, D.A.

    1999-07-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric standard model with explicit CP violation, associated production of the lightest Higgs boson with heavier ones is analyzed. Due to explicit CP violation, the Higgs bosons are no longer CP eigenstates so that both of the heavy Higgs bosons contribute to the process. While the radiative corrections in the Higgs sector turn out to be quite important, the vertex radiative corrections remain small as in the CP conserving theory. (author)

  5. Probing non-unitary CP violation effects in neutrino oscillation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surender; Bhardwaj, Shankita

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, we have considered minimal unitarity violation scheme to obtain the general expression for ν _{μ }→ ν _{τ } oscillation probability in vacuum and matter. For this channel, we have investigated the sensitivities of short baseline experiments to non-unitary parameters |ρ _{μ τ }| and ω _{μ τ } for normal as well as inverted hierarchical neutrino masses and θ _{23} being above or below maximality. We find that for normal hierarchy, the 3σ sensitivity of |ρ _{μ τ }| is maximum for non-unitary phase ω _{μ τ }=0 whereas it is minimum for ω _{μ τ }=± π . For inverted hierarchy, the sensitivity is minimum at ω _{μ τ }=0 and maximum for ω _{μ τ }=± π . We observe that the sensitivity to measure non-unitarity remains unaffected for unitary CP phase δ =0 or δ =π /2 . We have, also, explored wide spectrum of L/E ratio to investigate the possibilities to observe CP-violation due to unitary (δ ) and non-unitary (ω _{μ τ } ) phases. We find that the both phases can be disentangled, in principle, from each other for L/E<200 km/GeV.

  6. On the strong CP problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowrick, N.J. (Dept. of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom)); McDougall, N.A. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-07-09

    We show that two well-known solutions to the strong CP problem, the axion and a massless quark, may be understood in terms of the mechanism recently proposed by Samuel where long-range interactions between topological charges may be responsible for the removal of CP violation. We explain how the axion and a QCD meson (identified as the {eta}' if all quarks are massless) suppress fluctuations in global topological charge by almost identical dynamical although the masses, couplings and relevant length scales are very different. Furthermore, we elucidate the precise origin of the {eta}' mass. (orig.).

  7. NASA and the National Climate Assessment: Promoting awareness of NASA Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Earth science observations, models, analyses, and applications made significant contributions to numerous aspects of the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report and are contributing to sustained climate assessment activities. The agency's goal in participating in the NCA was to ensure that NASA scientific resources were made available to understand the current state of climate change science and climate change impacts. By working with federal agency partners and stakeholder communities to develop and write the report, the agency was able to raise awareness of NASA climate science with audiences beyond the traditional NASA community. To support assessment activities within the NASA community, the agency sponsored two competitive programs that not only funded research and tools for current and future assessments, but also increased capacity within our community to conduct assessment-relevant science and to participate in writing assessments. Such activities fostered the ability of graduate students, post-docs, and senior researchers to learn about the science needs of climate assessors and end-users, which can guide future research activities. NASA also contributed to developing the Global Change Information System, which deploys information from the NCA to scientists, decision makers, and the public, and thus contributes to climate literacy. Finally, NASA satellite imagery and animations used in the Third NCA helped the pubic and decision makers visualize climate changes and were frequently used in social media to communicate report key findings. These resources are also key for developing educational materials that help teachers and students explore regional climate change impacts and opportunities for responses.

  8. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Michael W.

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  9. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  10. Higgs-production at LHC. Observables for the measurements of CP properties; Produktion von Higgsbosonen am LHC. Observablen zur Bestimmung ihrer CP-Quantenzahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziethe, J.

    2007-05-22

    In this work we calculated observables which can be used to determine the CP parity of the Higgs boson. We considered the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM as well as CP-indefinite Higgs bosons. The calculation have been made for an application at LHC. For Higgs production we considered gluon fusion (in NLO) and b-quark annihilation (in LO) and for the Higgs decay studied the decay in tau lepton or top quark. We find that the angle between the charged particles of the tau (or top) decay are a good observable to determine CP properties of the intermediate Higgs bosons. For CP indefinite Higgs bosons we considered triplet-correlation-observables. (orig.)

  11. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  12. Measurements of the B0 bar B0 CP asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1993-01-01

    A figure of merit for a measurement of CP violation is the error on the intrinsic asymmetry A CP . The observed asymmetry A obs will always be smaller than A CP due to a number of effects that dilute the measurement. If one defines A obs =DA CP , where D represents the product of all dilution factors, then the error on A CP , δA CP is related to the number of produced B 0 or bar B 0 , N prod , needed to obtain a given error on δA CP by N prod =1/((δA CP ) 2 D 2 εBr). To determine the figure of merit for a particular decay mode one must determine the number of reconstructed events N obs and calculate the corresponding dilution factor D. N obs depends on the luminosity and production cross section, on the branching ratio of the B 0 or bar B 0 into the specific final state under study, Br, and on ε, the reconstruction efficiency for both the combination of the signal CP state and any tagging signal. The production rate N prod , the dilution factor D, and the efficiency ε, differ substantially in magnitude as a function of energy and detector layout. The detection efficiency and dilution factor can both be written as a product of several factors that can be estimated for a particular experiment. These factors depend critically on the decay mode under study, the tagging method, the detector configuration, and more generally on the production process, backgrounds, and detector performance. Furthermore, the present knowledge of these quantities varies largely, as well as ones ability to ultimately measure the dilution factor which relates the experimentally observed asymmetry to the true CP asymmetry

  13. Standard Model CP-violation and baryon asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gavela, M.B.; Orloff, J.; Pene, O.

    1994-01-01

    Simply based on CP arguments, we argue against a Standard Model explanation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe in the presence of a first order phase transition. A CP-asymmetry is found in the reflection coefficients of quarks hitting the phase boundary created during the electroweak transition. The problem is analyzed both in an academic zero temperature case and in the realistic finite temperature one. The building blocks are similar in both cases: Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violation, CP-even phases in the reflection coefficients of quarks, and physical transitions due to fermion self-energies. In both cases an effect is present at order $\\alpha_W^2$ in rate. A standard GIM behaviour is found as intuitively expected. In the finite temperature case, a crucial role is played by the damping rate of quasi-particles in a hot plasma, which is a relevant scale together with $M_W$ and the temperature. The effect is many orders of magnitude below what observation requires, and indicates that non standard physics is ...

  14. CPLEAR et BABAR, all aspects of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeche, Ch.

    2003-06-01

    This report of French 'Habilitation a diriger les recherches' summarizes my scientific activity from 1993 to 2003. During this decade, my research work was related to two particle physics experiments: CPLEAR and BABAR. The first one, CPLEAR, has recorded data from 1988 to 1995 on the low energy anti-proton ring (LEAR) at CERN. This experiment was devoted to the study of T, CPT et CP discrete symmetries. The second experiment, BABAR, has been running since 1999, on the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. This experiment searches for CP violation and tests the Standard Model through the measurements of the angles and the sides of the Unitarity Triangle. My research work is divided in five main topics: Study of CP and CPT violation in K 0 → π + π - decays; Performance optimization of the particle identification detector (DIRC) of the BABAR experiment; B meson tagging in BABAR experiment; Δm d measurement and Search for CP and T violation in mixing with dilepton events; Search for CP violation in B 0 → ρ ± π ± and B 0 → π ± K ± decays. (author)

  15. CP-odd phase correlations and electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam; Santoso, Yudi

    2005-01-01

    We revisit the constraints imposed by electric dipole moments (EDMs) of nucleons and heavy atoms on new CP-violating sources within supersymmetric theories. We point out that certain two-loop renormalization group corrections induce significant mixing between the basis-invariant CP-odd phases. In the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, the CP-odd invariant related to the soft trilinear A-phase at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, θ A , induces nontrivial and distinct CP-odd phases for the three gaugino masses at the weak scale. The latter give one-loop contributions to EDMs enhanced by tanβ, and can provide the dominant contribution to the electron EDM induced by θ A . We perform a detailed analysis of the EDM constraints within the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, exhibiting the reach, in terms of sparticle spectra, which may be obtained assuming generic phases, as well as the limits on the CP-odd phases for some specific parameter points where detailed phenomenological studies are available. We also illustrate how this reach will expand with results from the next generation of experiments which are currently in development

  16. New Age for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.; Martel, L. M. V.

    2018-04-01

    Lunar-focused research and plans to return to the lunar surface for science and exploration have reemerged since the Space Policy Directive-1 of December 11, 2017 amended the National Space Policy to include the following, "Lead an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system and to bring back to Earth new knowledge and opportunities. Beginning with missions beyond low-Earth orbit, the United States will lead the return of humans to the Moon for long-term exploration and utilization, followed by human missions to Mars and other destinations." In response to this revision, NASA proposes a Lunar Exploration and Discovery Program in the U.S. fiscal year 2019 Budget Request. It supports NASA's interests in commercial and international partnerships in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO), long-term exploration in Cislunar space beyond LEO, and research and exploration conducted on the Moon to inform future crewed missions, even to destinations beyond the Moon. (Cislunar refers to the volume of space between LEO and the Moon's orbital distance.) The lunar campaign strengthens the integration of human and robotic activities on the lunar surface with NASA's science, technology, and exploration goals.

  17. CP violation in multibody decays of beauty baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durieux, Gauthier

    2016-08-15

    Beauty baryons are being observed in large numbers in the LHCb detector. The rich kinematic distributions of their multibody decays are therefore becoming accessible and provide us with new opportunities to search for CP violation. We analyse the angular distributions of some three- and four-body decays of spin-1/2 baryons using the Jacob-Wick helicity formalism. The asymmetries that provide access to small differences of CP-odd phases between decay amplitudes of identical CP-even phases are notably discussed. The understanding gained on processes featuring specific resonant intermediate states allows us to establish which asymmetries are relevant for what purpose. It is for instance shown that some CP-odd angular asymmetries measured by the LHCb collaboration in the Λ{sub b}→Λφ→pπ K{sup +}K{sup -} decay are expected to vanish identically.

  18. NASA, Building Tomorrow's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward

    2011-01-01

    We, as NASA, continue to Dare Mighty Things. Here we are in October. In my country, the United States of America, we celebrate the anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the Americas, which occurred on October 12, 1492. His story, although happening over 500 years ago, is still very valid today. It is a part of the American spirit; part of the international human spirit. Columbus is famous for discovering the new world we now call America, but he probably never envisioned what great discoveries would be revealed many generations later. But in order for Columbus to begin his great adventure, he needed a business plan. Ho would he go about obtaining the funds and support necessary to build, supply, and man the ships required for his travels? He had a lot of obstacles and distractions. He needed a strong, internal drive to achieve his plans and recruit a willing crew of explorers also ready to risk their all for the unknown journey ahead. As Columbus set sail, he said "By prevailing over all obstacles and distractions, one may unfailingly arrive at his chosen goal or destination." Columbus may not have known he was on a journey for all human exploration. Recently, Charlie Bolden, the NASA Administrator, said, "Human exploration is and has always been about making life better for humans on Earth." Today, NASA and the U.S. human spaceflight program hold many of the same attributes as did Columbus and his contemporaries - a willing, can-do spirit. We are on the threshold of exciting new times in space exploration. Like Columbus, we need a business plan to take us into the future. We need to design the best ships and utilize the best designers, with their past knowledge and experience, to build those ships. We need funding and support from governments to achieve these goals of space exploration into the unknown. NASA does have that business plan, and it is an ambitious plan for human spaceflight and exploration. Today, we have a magnificent spaceflight

  19. Heavy quarks and CP: Moriond 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The presentations at the Fifth Moriond Workshop on Heavy Quarks, Flavor Mixing, and CP Violation (La Plagne, France, January 13-19, 1985) are summarized. The following topics are reviewed. What's New (beyond the top, top quarks, bottom quarks, charm quarks, strange quarks, and others); why is all this being done (strong interactions and hadron structure, and electroweak properties); and what next (facilities and can one see CP violation in the B-anti B system). 64 refs., 10 figs

  20. Status in CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayard, L.

    1989-11-01

    Twenty-five years after the discovery of CP violation in the neutral Kaon system, we still dont know exactly the origin and the components of that weak non invariance. The two more precise experiments give slightly different answers concerning the direct way of CP violation NA 31 gives ε prime/ε incompatible with the Superweak Model (for which ε prime=0) and in agreement with Standard Model predictions compatible with both. Again, one needs new and precise results in order to conclude about ε prime. E731 and NA31 are actually working on their new data samples. Longer term ideas are also being discussed, looking for new experiments able to give ε prime/ε with a precision. Concerning CPT invariance the situation seems to be more clear

  1. CP violation in K- and B-meson decays

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    These lectures will describe CP violation in K- and B-meson decays and will include the following topics:i) Grand view of the field including CKM matrix and the unitarily triangle ii) General aspects of the theoretical framework iii) Fundamentals of particle-antiparticle mixing iv) Fundamentals of CP violation v) Standard analysis of the unitarily triangle vi) The ratio e'/e including most recent developments vii) CP Violation in rare K- decays viii) Violation in B-Decays (asymmetries and other strategies) ix) A brief look beyond the Standard Model

  2. SU(4) x U(1) gauge theory. II. CP nonconservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.; Hwa, R.C.; Mannheim, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    We exploit the higher symmetry inherent in an SU(4) x U(1) gauge theory to construct a spontaneously broken theory of CP nonconservation. Higgs multiplets in the adjoint representation of SU(4) contain both even and odd CP fields; thus, requiring the simultaneous nonvanishing of the vacuum expectation values of these fields leads to CP noninvariance of the vacuum. We find that all the CP-nonconserving effects are mediated in our theory by the superheavy gauge bosons of the broken SU(4) x U(1) symmetry. In fact, the very existence of CP violation sets an upper limit on the masses of these bosons. In our model the dominant CP effect lies in the neutral kaon system and is found to arise through a direct (ΔS = 2) K 1 -K 2 transition. The model has all the features of a superweak theory, with a neutron electric dipole moment substantially smaller than 10 -24 e cm

  3. Phenomenology of CP violation from the Kobayashi-Maskawa model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The CP violation consequences of the K-M model, which Kobayashi, Maskawa introduced in 1977 for the purpose of incorporating CP violation via the complexity in the mixing matrix of the quarks are discussed. Much of the talk is a review of current work on the subject. Some new results on the CP violation effects in exclusive and inclusive decays of bottom, charm and strange particles are also given

  4. Circadian cycle-dependent MeCP2 and brain chromatin changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Martínez de Paz

    Full Text Available Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 is a chromosomal protein of the brain, very abundant especially in neurons, where it plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Hence it has the potential to be affected by the mammalian circadian cycle. We performed expression analyses of mice brain frontal cortices obtained at different time points and we found that the levels of MeCP2 are altered circadianly, affecting overall organization of brain chromatin and resulting in a circadian-dependent regulation of well-stablished MeCP2 target genes. Furthermore, this data suggests that alterations of MeCP2 can be responsible for the sleeping disorders arising from pathological stages, such as in autism and Rett syndrome.

  5. Neutral D→KK^{*} Decays as Discovery Channels for Charm CP Violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierste, Ulrich; Schacht, Stefan

    2017-12-22

    We point out that the CP asymmetries in the decays D^{0}→K_{S}K^{*0} and D^{0}→K_{S}K[over ¯]^{*0} are potential discovery channels for charm CP violation in the standard model. We stress that no flavor tagging is necessary, the untagged CP asymmetry a_{CP}^{dir}(D[over (-)]→K_{S}K^{*0}) is essentially equal to the tagged one, so that the untagged measurement comes with a significant statistical gain. Depending on the relevant strong phase, |a_{CP}^{dir,untag}| can be as large as 0.003. The CP asymmetry is dominantly generated by exchange diagrams and does not require nonvanishing penguin amplitudes. While the CP asymmetry is smaller than in the case of D^{0}→K_{S}K_{S}, the experimental analysis is more efficient due to the prompt decay K^{*0}→K^{+}π^{-}. One may further search for favorable strong phases in the Dalitz plot in the vicinity of the K^{*0} peak.

  6. Measurement of the CP Content and CP Violating Asymmetries in Neutral B Decays to Two D Mesons with the BaBar Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillard, V.

    2005-04-25

    This dissertation presents a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries and a measurement of the CP-odd parity fraction in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} D*{sup -}. The measurements are derived from a data sample of 88 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A one-dimensional angular analysis of the decay products measures the CP-odd fraction to be 0.063 {+-} 0.055(stat) {+-} 0.009(syst), indicating that the D*{sup +}D*{sup -} final state is mostly CP-even. The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters Im({lambda}{sub +}) and |{lambda}{sub +}| are determined from an analysis of the time-dependence of flavor-tagged B decays. One neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a D*{sup +} D*{sup -} final state, while the other B is inclusively reconstructed in order to determine its flavor. The Standard Model predicts the CP asymmetry parameters Im({lambda}{sub +}) and |{lambda}{sub +}| to be sin2{beta} and 1, respectively, in the absence of penguin diagram contributions. They are determined to be 0.05 {+-} 0.29(stat) {+-} 0.10(syst) and 0.75 {+-} 0.19(stat) {+-} 0.02(syst), respectively, which corresponds to a 2.5 sigma deviation from Standard Model predictions with penguin contributions ignored.

  7. CP asymmetries in semiinclusive B0 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunietz, Isard

    1999-02-01

    It was recently pointed out that inclusive B^0(t) decays could show CP violation. The totally inclusive asymmetry is expected to be tiny [O(10^{-3})] because of large cancellations among the asymmetries in the charmless, single charm and double charm final states. Enriching particular final state configurations could significantly increase the CP-asymmetry and observability. Such studies can extract fundamental CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) parameters, and (perhaps) even Delta m(B_s). A superb vertex detector could see CP violation with 10^5 (10^6) flavor-tagged B_s (B_d) mesons within the CKM model. Because the effects could be significantly larger due to new physics, they should be searched for in existing or soon available data samples.

  8. A time-dependent measurement of charm CP violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, M

    2014-01-01

    A time dependent analysis of CP violation in charm mesons is presented through the measurement of the observable $A_{\\Gamma}$. This observable involves precise measurements of the D0 lifetime as it decays to a CP eigenstate. The results presented are the most precise to date. No CP violation is observed.

  9. New physics effects on CP violation in B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The author reviews new physics effects on CP violation in B decays. In chapter 2 he introduces the formalism, and discusses the Standard Model picture of CP violation in B decays, with special emphasis on the cleanliness of the predictions. Chapter 3 gives a general discussion of new physics effects: he points out the ingredients in the analysis that are sensitive to new physics and deduces the type of new physics that is most likely to modify the Standard Model predictions. Explicit examples are given in chapter 4: a model with Z-mediated flavor changing neutral currents demonstrates in which ways the new physics will manifest itself in CP asymmetries in B decays; a supersymmetric model with open-quotes quark-squark alignmentclose quotes mechanism shows that supersymmetry may affect CP asymmetries in B decays, even though the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model does not; multi-scalar models may affect the asymmetries even in the absence of new CP violating phases; schemes for quark mass matrices will be crucially tested by the CP asymmetries. In chapter 5 he explains how, if deviations from the Standard Model predictions are measured, one will be able to learn detailed features of the New Physics that is responsible for that

  10. On the Nature of CP Pup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E.; Orio, M.; Mukai, K.; Bianchini, A.; deMartino, D.; diMille, F.; Williams, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    We present new X-ray and optical spectra of the old nova CP Pup (nova Pup 1942) obtained with Chandra and the CTIO 4m telescope. The X-ray spectrum reveals a multi-temperature optically thin plasma reaching a maximum temperature of 36+19 keV 16 absorbed by local complex neutral material. The time resolved optical spectroscopy confirms the presence of the 1.47 hr period, with cycle-to-cycle amplitude changes, as well as of an additional long term modulation which is suggestive either of a longer pe- riod or of non-Keplerian velocities in the emission line regions. These new observational facts add further support to CP Pup as a magnetic cataclysmic variable (mCV). We compare the mCV and the non-mCV scenarios and while we cannot conclude whether CP Pup is a long period system, all observational evidences point at an intermediate polar (IP) type CV.

  11. Signatures of CP-Violating Electroweak Penguins in K and B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, Felix

    2007-01-01

    The B->πK decays with significant electroweak penguin contributions show a puzzling pattern. We explore this ''B->πK puzzle'' through a systematic strategy. The starting point, which is essentially unaffected by electroweak penguins, is the determination of the angle γ of the unitarity triangle through the CP-violating B d 0 ->π + π - , B d 0 ->π - K + asymmetries, yielding γ=(73.9 -6.5 +5.8 ) o , and the extraction of hadronic parameters through the measured B->ππ branching ratios. Using arguments related to the SU(3) flavor symmetry, we convert the hadronic B->ππ parameters into their B->πK counterparts, allowing us to predict the B->πK observables in the Standard Model. We find agreement with the data for those quantities that are only marginally affected by electroweak penguins, while this is not the case for the observables with sizeable electroweak penguin contributions. Since we may also perform a couple of internal consistency checks of our working assumptions, which are nicely satisfied for the current data, and find a small sensitivity of our results to large non-factorizable SU(3)-breaking corrections, the ''B->πK'' puzzle may be due to new physics in the electroweak penguin sector. We show that it can indeed be resolved through such a kind of new physics with a large CP-violating phase. Further insights into the electroweak penguins are provided by the B + ->π 0 K + and B d 0 ->π 0 K S CP asymmetries, and in particular through correlations with various rare K and B decays

  12. NASA's engineering research centers and interdisciplinary education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.

    1990-01-01

    A new program of interactive education between NASA and the academic community aims to improve research and education, provide long-term, stable funding, and support cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research. The mission of NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is discussed and it is pointed out that the OAET conducts about 10 percent of its total R&D program at U.S. universities. Other NASA university-based programs are listed including the Office of Commercial Programs Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) and the National Space Grant program. The importance of university space engineering centers and the selection of the nine current centers are discussed. A detailed composite description is provided of the University Space Engineering Research Centers. Other specialized centers are described such as the Center for Space Construction, the Mars Mission Research Center, and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration. Approaches to educational outreach are discussed.

  13. Study of inclusive CP-asymmetries in B0 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    The object of the present thesis is the search for CP-violating effects in the mixing of neutral B mesons. For this the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the decay of completely inclusively reconstructed B 0 mesons was studied. The basis of the analysis were about 4.1 millions hadronic Z decays, which were token up in the years 1991-1995 with the ALEPH detector at the e + e - storage ring LEP at CERN. From the data b hadron decays were inclusively reconstructed by means of a search for secondary decay vertices. By a fit to the decay-time spectra od identified B 0 and anti B 0 decays the following value of the semileptonic asymmetry in the B d 0 - anti B d 0 system could be determined: a CP =0.016±0.034(stat.)±0.009(syst.). This value can be alternatively interpreted as a measurement of the CP-violating parameter Re ε B : Re εB/(1+ vertical stroke ε B vertical stroke 2 )=0.004±0.009(stat.)±0.002(syst.). Furthermore a combination of the results of this analysis with a further ALEPH measurement was performed. The value of a CP determined from this, which was obtained under regardment of the statistical correlation of both measurements as well as correlated systematic uncertainties, is: a CP =-0.013±0.026. The present result is compatible with the standard model prediction and yields no significant hint to CP violation in the B d 0 - anti B 0 d mixing. (orig.) [de

  14. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  15. The Craterostigma plantagineum glycine-rich protein CpGRP1 interacts with a cell wall-associated protein kinase 1 (CpWAK1) and accumulates in leaf cell walls during dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Valentino; Krey, Stephanie; von den Driesch, Barbara; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-04-01

    Craterostigma plantagineum tolerates extreme desiccation. Leaves of this plant shrink and extensively fold during dehydration and expand again during rehydration, preserving their structural integrity. Genes were analysed that may participate in the reversible folding mechanism. Analysis of transcripts abundantly expressed in desiccated leaves identified a gene putatively coding for an apoplastic glycine-rich protein (CpGRP1). We studied the expression, regulation and subcellular localization of CpGRP1 and its ability to interact with a cell wall-associated protein kinase (CpWAK1) to understand the role of CpGRP1 in the cell wall during dehydration. The CpGRP1 protein accumulates in the apoplast of desiccated leaves. Analysis of the promoter revealed that the gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level, is independent of abscisic acid (ABA) and involves a drought-responsive cis-element (DRE). CpGRP1 interacts with CpWAK1 which is down-regulated in response to dehydration. Our data suggest a role of the CpGRP1-CpWAK1 complex in dehydration-induced morphological changes in the cell wall during dehydration in C. plantagineum. Cell wall pectins and dehydration-induced pectin modifications are predicted to be involved in the activity of the CpGRP1-CpWAK1 complex. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Investments by NASA to build planetary protection capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxbaum, Karen; Conley, Catharine; Lin, Ying; Hayati, Samad

    NASA continues to invest in capabilities that will enable or enhance planetary protection planning and implementation for future missions. These investments are critical to the Mars Exploration Program and will be increasingly important as missions are planned for exploration of the outer planets and their icy moons. Since the last COSPAR Congress, there has been an opportunity to respond to the advice of NRC-PREVCOM and the analysis of the MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group. This stimulated research into such things as expanded bioburden reduction options, modern molecular assays and genetic inventory capability, and approaches to understand or avoid recontamination of spacecraft parts and samples. Within NASA, a portfolio of PP research efforts has been supported through the NASA Office of Planetary Protection, the Mars Technology Program, and the Mars Program Office. The investment strategy focuses on technology investments designed to enable future missions and reduce their costs. In this presentation we will provide an update on research and development supported by NASA to enhance planetary protection capability. Copyright 2008 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. Theoretical Prediction on [5]Radialene Sandwich Complexes (CpM)2(C10H10) (Cp = η5-C5H5; M = Fe, Co, Ni): Geometry, Spin States, and Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Nan; Xue, Ying-Ying; Ding, Yi-Hong

    2017-02-09

    [5]Radialene, the missing link for synthesis of radialene family, has been finally obtained via the preparation and decomplexation of the [5]radialene-bis-Fe(CO) 3 complex. The stability of [5]radialene complex benefits from the coordination with Fe(CO) 3 by losing free 1,3-butadiene structures to avoid polymerization. In light of the similar coordination ability of half-sandwiches CpM(Cp = η 5 -C 5 H 5 ; M = Fe, Co, Ni), there is a great possibility that the sandwiched complexes of [5]radialene with CpM are available. Herein, we present the first theoretical prediction on the geometry, spin states and bonding of (CpM)(C 10 H 10 ) and (CpM) 2 (C 10 H 10 ). For M = Fe, Co, Ni, the ground states of (CpM)(C 10 H 10 ) and (CpM) 2 (C 10 H 10 ) are doublet and triplet, singlet and singlet, and doublet and triplet states, where each Fe, Co, and Ni adopts 17, 18, and 19 electron-configuration, respectively. In particular, (CpFe) 2 (C 10 H 10 ) and (CpNi) 2 (C 10 H 10 ) have considerable open-shell singlet features. Generally the trans isomers of (CpM) 2 (C 10 H 10 ) with two CpM fragments on the opposite sides of the [5]radialene plane are apparently more stable than the cis ones with CpM fragments on the same side. However, for the singlet and triplet isomers of (CpNi) 2 (C 10 H 10 ) (both cis and trans isomers), the energy differences are relatively small, indicating that these isomers all have the opportunity to exist. Besides, the easy Diels-Alder (DA) dimerization between the [3]dendralene-like fragments of (CpM)(C 10 H 10 ) suggests the great difficulty in isolating the (CpM)(C 10 H 10 ) monomer.

  18. Bringing NASA Technology Down to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockney, Daniel P.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2018-01-01

    Whether putting rovers on Mars or sustaining life in extreme conditions, NASA develops technologies to solve some of the most difficult challenges ever faced. Through its Technology Transfer Program, the agency makes the innovations behind space exploration available to industry, academia, and the general public. This paper describes the primary mechanisms through which NASA disseminates technology to solve real-life problems; illustrates recent program accomplishments; and provides examples of spinoff success stories currently impacting everyday life.

  19. CP violation with self-tagging Bd modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunietz, I.

    1991-01-01

    Gronau and Wyler (GW) extract the weak phase γ and remove the dependence on final state phases by measuring six charged B mesons rates, which are grouped into two trinangles. This note applies the GW method to self-tagging B d modes. Self-tagging eliminates the need for time-dependent measurements. Of interest are the six rates, Γ(B d →D 0 K *0 )=Γ(anti B d →anti D 0 anti K *0 ), Γ(B d →anti D 0 K *0 )=Γ(anti B d →D 0 anti K *0 ), Γ(B d →D 0 CP K *0 ) and Γ(anti B d →D 0 CP anti K *0 ), where D 0 CP denotes a CP eigenmode of a D 0 or anti D 0 . Here the K *0 must be seen in its K + π - mode, which tags the beauty flavour. An additional handle exists to resolve an ambiguity in vertical strokesin γvertical stroke, which accomplished by isospin symmetry from B u and B d data. Preliminary results of a feasibility study are given. (orig.)

  20. Syntheses, structures and redox properties of some complexes containing the Os(dppe)Cp* fragment, including [{Os(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C triple bondCC triple bond C)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Michael I; Costuas, Karine; Davin, Thomas; Halet, Jean-François; Kramarczuk, Kathy A; Low, Paul J; Nicholson, Brian K; Perkins, Gary J; Roberts, Rachel L; Skelton, Brian W; Smith, Mark E; White, Allan H

    2007-12-14

    The sequential conversion of [OsBr(cod)Cp*] (9) to [OsBr(dppe)Cp*] (10), [Os([=C=CH2)(dppe)Cp*]PF6 ([11]PF6), [Os(C triple bond CH)(dppe)Cp*] (12), [{Os(dppe)Cp*}2{mu-(=C=CH-CH=C=)}][PF6]2 ([13](PF6)2) and finally [{Os(dppe)Cp*}(2)(mu-C triple bond CC triple bond C)] (14) has been used to make the third member of the triad [{M(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C triple bond CC triple bond C)] (M = Fe, Ru, Os). The molecular structures of []PF6, 12 and 14, together with those of the related osmium complexes [Os(NCMe)(dppe)Cp*]PF6 ([15]PF6) and [Os(C triple bond CPh)(dppe)Cp*] (16), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Comparison of the redox properties of 14 with those of its iron and ruthenium congeners shows that the first oxidation potential E1 varies as: Fe approximately Os < Ru. Whereas the Fe complex has been shown to undergo three sequential 1-electron oxidation processes within conventional electrochemical solvent windows, the Ru and Os compounds undergo no fewer than four sequential oxidation events giving rise to a five-membered series of redox related complexes [{M(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C4)]n+ (n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4), the osmium derivatives being obtained at considerably lower potentials than the ruthenium analogues. These results are complimented by DFT and DT DFT calculations.

  1. NASA's Space Launch System Takes Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askins, Bruce; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2017-01-01

    Major hardware and software for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) began rolling off assembly lines in 2016, setting the stage for critical testing in 2017 and the launch of a major new capability for deep space human exploration. SLS continues to pursue a 2018 first launch of Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). At NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, LA, Boeing completed welding of structural test and flight liquid hydrogen tanks, and engine sections. Test stands for core stage structural tests at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. neared completion. The B2 test stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center, MS, completed major structural renovation to support core stage green run testing in 2018. Orbital ATK successfully test fired its second qualification solid rocket motor in the Utah desert and began casting the motor segments for EM-1. Aerojet Rocketdyne completed its series of test firings to adapt the heritage RS-25 engine to SLS performance requirements. Production is under way on the first five new engine controllers. NASA also signed a contract with Aerojet Rocketdyne for propulsion of the RL10 engines for the Exploration Upper Stage. United Launch Alliance delivered the structural test article for the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage to MSFC for tests and construction was under way on the flight stage. Flight software testing at MSFC, including power quality and command and data handling, was completed. Substantial progress is planned for 2017. Liquid oxygen tank production will be completed at Michoud. Structural testing at Marshall will get under way. RS-25 hotfire testing will verify the new engine controllers. Core stage horizontal integration will begin. The core stage pathfinder mockup will arrive at the B2 test stand for fit checks and tests. EUS will complete preliminary design review. This paper will discuss the technical and programmatic successes and challenges of 2016 and look ahead to plans for 2017.

  2. Photodissociation dynamics of gaseous CpCo(CO)2 and ligand exchange reactions of CpCoH2 with C3H4, C3H6, and NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Melania; Nakatsuka, Yumiko; Albert, Daniel R; Davis, H Floyd

    2012-05-31

    The photodissociation dynamics of CpCo(CO)(2) was studied in a molecular beam using photofragment translational energy spectroscopy with 157 nm photoionization detection of the metallic products. At 532 and 355 nm excitation, the dominant one-photon channel involved loss of a single CO ligand producing CpCoCO. The product angular distributions were isotropic, and a large fraction of excess energy appeared as product vibrational excitation. Production of CpCO + 2CO resulted from two-photon absorption processes. The two-photon dissociation of mixtures containing CpCo(CO)(2) and H(2) at the orifice of a pulsed nozzle was used to produce a novel 16-electron unsaturated species, CpCoH(2). Transition metal ligand exchange reactions, CpCoH(2) + L → CpCoL + H(2) (L = propyne, propene, or ammonia), were studied under single-collision conditions for the first time. In all cases, ligand exchange occurred via 18-electron association complexes with lifetimes comparable to their rotational periods. Although ligand exchange reactions were not detected from CpCoH(2) collisions with methane or propane (L = CH(4) or C(3)H(8)), a molecular beam containing CpCoCH(4) was produced by photolysis of mixtures containing CpCo(CO)(2) and CH(4).

  3. Discrete ambiguities in CP-violating asymmetries in B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, David

    1998-01-01

    The CP-angles α, β and γ can be extracted from CP-violating asymmetries in the B system, but only up to discrete ambiguities. These discrete ambiguities make it difficult to determine with certainty whether or not new physics is present. I show that, if the condition α+β+γ=π is imposed, there remains a twofold ambiguity in the CP-angle set (α,β,γ), and I discuss ways to cleanly resolve this final discrete ambiguity

  4. NASA's Universe of Learning: Engaging Learners in Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, L.; Smith, D. A.; Lestition, K.; Greene, M.; Squires, G.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning is one of 27 competitively awarded education programs selected by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to enable scientists and engineers to more effectively engage with learners of all ages. The NASA's Universe of Learning program is created through a partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Chandra X-ray Center, IPAC at Caltech, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Exoplanet Exploration Program, and Sonoma State University. The program will connect the scientists, engineers, science, technology and adventure of NASA Astrophysics with audience needs, proven infrastructure, and a network of over 500 partners to advance the objectives of SMD's newly restructured education program. The multi-institutional team will develop and deliver a unified, consolidated suite of education products, programs, and professional development offerings that spans the full spectrum of NASA Astrophysics, including the Exoplanet Exploration theme. Program elements include enabling educational use of Astrophysics mission data and offering participatory experiences; creating multimedia and immersive experiences; designing exhibits and community programs; providing professional development for pre-service educators, undergraduate instructors, and informal educators; and, producing resources for special needs and underserved/underrepresented audiences. This presentation will provide an overview of the program and process for mapping discoveries to products and programs for informal, lifelong, and self-directed learning environments.

  5. Measurement of Indirect CP Violation in Charm at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00342046

    This thesis describes two pieces of work. The first is a study of the resolution of the LHCb vertex locator throughout Run 1. The second comprises analyses to measure the charm mixing and $CP$ violation observables $A_{\\Gamma}$ and $y_{CP}$. An estimate of the resolution of the LHCb vertex locator is required for use in the track fits. A method to measure the resolution with collision data has been developed and tested. The performance of the sub-detector throughout Run 1 of the LHC has been assessed. A significant degrading of the resolution has been seen. The effects of this on the track reconstruction has been examined with little change in the measured quantities being observed. The measurement of indirect $CP$ violation in neutral $D$ meson transitions has been measured through the observables $A_{\\Gamma}$ and $y_{CP}$, using $fb^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions with a centre of mass energy $7 TeV$, collected by the LHCb detector in 2011. $A_{\\Gamma}$ describes the $CP$ asymmetry of the lifetime of the $D^0$ dec...

  6. NASA technology investments: building America's future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Mason

    2013-03-01

    Investments in technology and innovation enable new space missions, stimulate the economy, contribute to the nation's global competitiveness, and inspire America's next generation of scientists, engineers and astronauts. Chief Technologist Mason Peck will provide an overview of NASA's ambitious program of space exploration that builds on new technologies, as well as proven capabilities, as it expands humanity's reach into the solar system while providing broadly-applicable benefits here on Earth. Peck also will discuss efforts of the Office of the Chief Technologist to coordinate the agency's overall technology portfolio, identifying development needs, ensuring synergy and reducing duplication, while furthering the national initiatives as outlined by President Obama's Office of Science and Technology Policy. By coordinating technology programs within NASA, Peck's office facilitates integration of available and new technology into operational systems that support specific human-exploration missions, science missions, and aeronautics. The office also engages other government agencies and the larger aerospace community to develop partnerships in areas of mutual interest that could lead to new breakthrough capabilities. NASA technology transfer translates our air and space missions into societal benefits for people everywhere. Peck will highlight NASA's use of technology transfer and commercialization to help American entrepreneurs and innovators develop technological solutions that stimulate the growth of the innovation economy by creating new products and services, new business and industries and high quality, sustainable jobs.

  7. FRET analysis of CP12 structural interplay by GAPDH and PRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Satish Babu; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; de Torres, Juan; Ghenuche, Petru; Gontero, Brigitte; Wenger, Jérôme

    2015-03-13

    CP12 is an intrinsically disordered protein playing a key role in the regulation of the Benson-Calvin cycle. Due to the high intrinsic flexibility of CP12, it is essential to consider its structural modulation induced upon binding to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) enzymes. Here, we report for the first time detailed structural modulation about the wild-type CP12 and its site-specific N-terminal and C-terminal disulfide bridge mutants upon interaction with GAPDH and PRK by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Our results indicate an increase in CP12 compactness when the complex is formed with GAPDH or PRK. In addition, the distributions in FRET histograms show the elasticity and conformational flexibility of CP12 in all supra molecular complexes. Contrarily to previous beliefs, our FRET results importantly reveal that both N-terminal and C-terminal site-specific CP12 mutants are able to form the monomeric (GAPDH-CP12-PRK) complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolving role of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSalle, Janine M; Yasui, Dag H

    2009-10-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked autism-spectrum disorder caused by mutations in MECP2, encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2. Since the discovery of MECP2 mutations as the genetic cause of Rett syndrome, the understanding of MeCP2 function has evolved. Although MeCP2 was predicted to be a global transcriptional repressor of methylated promoters, large-scale combined epigenomic approaches of MeCP2 binding, methylation and gene expression have demonstrated that MeCP2 binds preferentially to intergenic and intronic regions, and sparsely methylated promoters of active genes. This review compares the evolution of thought within two ‘classic’ epigenetic mechanisms of parental imprinting and X chromosome inactivation to that of the MeCP2 field, and considers the future relevance of integrated epigenomic databases to understanding autism and Rett syndrome.

  9. Synthesis and structural studies of Cp{sup *} rhodium and Cp{sup *} iridium complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palepu, Narasinga Rao; Kollipara, Mohan Rao [Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong (India); Kaminsky Werner [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    2017-01-15

    A series of Cp{sup *}Rh and Cp{sup *}Ir complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand are synthesized and characterized. Picolinic hydrazine has yielded only dinuclear complexes in the case of rhodium metal whereas both mono and dinuclear complexes with iridium metal. Iridium complexes are formed as quaternary salts by the migration of the N–H proton onto the adjacent amine group of the hydrazine after binding to the metal. Picolinic hydrazine acts as nitrogen and oxygen donor ligand in the form of bi and tetradentate bonding modes.

  10. Synthesis of Carboxylate Cp*Zr(IV) Species: Toward the Formation of Novel Metallocavitands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Maxime; Bi, Wenhua; Légaré, Marc-André; Morin, Jean-François; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2015-06-01

    With the intent of generating metallocavitands isostructural to species [(CpZr)3(μ(3)-O)(μ(2)-OH)3(κO,O,μ(2)-O2C(R))3](+), the reaction of Cp*2ZrCl2 and Cp*ZrCl3 with phenylcarboxylic acids was carried out. Depending on the reaction conditions, five new complexes were obtained, which consisted of Cp*2ZrCl(κ(2)-OOCPh) (1), (Cp*ZrCl(κ(2)-OOCPh))2(μ-κ(2)-OOCPh)2 (2), [(Cp*Zr(κ(2)-OOCPh))2(μ-κ(2)-OOCPh)2(μ(2)-OH)2]·Et2O (3·Et2O), [[Cp*ZrCl2](μ-Cl)(μ-OH)(μ-O2CC6H5)[Cp*Zr

  11. Direct CP Violation and Rare $K$ Decays Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccucci, A

    2016-01-01

    Quark mixing and CP violation has been a very active area of investigation over the past decades. Owing to the last round of experiments in $K$ and $B$ mesons, our understanding is now completely compatible with the existence of {\\it just} one phase in the Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa mixing matrix. The precision of the tests in the quark sector can further improve thanks to the interplay of theory and experiments. Flavour transitions are so sensitive to short distance mechanisms that we are compelled to press for more quantitative tests of the Standard Model (SM) studying rare processes involving quarks and leptons. This is especially important because the direct exploration of the energy frontier is currently limited at the LHC energies and may remain so for many years to come.

  12. A Chiang-type lagrangian in CP^2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas da Silva, Ana

    2018-03-01

    We analyse a monotone lagrangian in CP^2 that is hamiltonian isotopic to the standard lagrangian RP^2, yet exhibits a distinguishing behaviour under reduction by one of the toric circle actions, namely it intersects transversally the reduction level set and it projects one-to-one onto a great circle in CP^1. This lagrangian thus provides an example of embedded composition fitting work of Wehrheim-Woodward and Weinstein.

  13. Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will

  14. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration activities associated with NASA?s goals to return to the Moon, travel to Mars, or explore Near Earth Objects (NEOs) will involve the need for human-supported space and surface extravehicular activities (EVAs). The technology development and human element associated with these exploration missions provide fantastic content to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). As NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden remarked on December 9, 2009, "We....need to provide the educational and experiential stepping-stones to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and leaders in STEM fields." The EVA Systems Project actively supports this initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for these missions. This paper summarizes these education and public efforts.

  15. Constraints on Mixing and CP-Violation in the Neutral Charmed Meson System at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Michael Thomas; Soler, P

    This thesis presents measurements of the charm sector mixing and CP-violation parameters yCP and AGamma, made using data collected in 2010 by the LHCb experiment at the LHC at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV. yCP is defined as the difference from unity of the ratio of the effective lifetime of the D0 meson decaying to a CP-undefined final state to its lifetime when decaying to a CP-eigenstate. AGamma is the CP-asymmetry of the effective lifetimes of the D0 and D0bar when decaying to a CP-eigenstate. In the absence of CPV yCP will be consistent with the mixing parameter y, and AGamma will be consistent with zero. CP-violation in the charm sector is predicted to be very small in the SM, though first evidence for direct CP-violation in D0 decays has recently been observed by LHCb. Observation of significantly more CP-violation than is allowed in the SM would be a strong indication of new physics. The current world best measurements of yCP and AGamma show no evidence of CP-violation. The methods used to measure ...

  16. NASA's interstellar probe mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Ayon, J.A.; Wallace, R.A.; Mewaldt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Interstellar Probe will be the first spacecraft designed to explore the nearby interstellar medium and its interaction with our solar system. As envisioned by NASA's Interstellar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team, the spacecraft will be propelled by a solar sail to reach >200 AU in 15 years. Interstellar Probe will investigate how the Sun interacts with its environment and will directly measure the properties and composition of the dust, neutrals and plasma of the local interstellar material which surrounds the solar system. In the mission concept developed in the spring of 1999, a 400-m diameter solar sail accelerates the spacecraft to ∼15 AU/year, roughly 5 times the speed of Voyager 1 and 2. The sail is used to first bring the spacecraft to ∼0.25 AU to increase the radiation pressure before heading out in the interstellar upwind direction. After jettisoning the sail at ∼5 AU, the spacecraft coasts to 200-400 AU, exploring the Kuiper Belt, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and the nearby interstellar medium

  17. Coordination Chemistry of [E(Idipp)]2+ Ligands (E = Ge, Sn): Metal Germylidyne [Cp*(CO)2W≡Ge(Idipp)]+ and Metallotetrylene [Cp*(CO)3W–E(Idipp)]+ Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Lebedev, Yury; Das, Ujjal; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Filippou, Alexander C.

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis and full characterization of the NHC-stabilized tungstenochlorostannylene [Cp*(CO)3W–SnCl(Idipp)] (1Sn), the NHC-stabilized chlorogermylidyne complex [Cp*(CO)2W═GeCl(Idipp)] (2), the tungsten germylidyne complex salt [Cp*(CO)2W

  18. SM with two Higgs doublets: an example of CP-violation without Fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, G.

    1993-01-01

    Some CP-violation effects without fermions in the Standard Model are investigated with two Higgs doublets. First, the mass eigenstates of the physical neutral Higgses are calculated for small but nonzero CP-violation parameter ξ * , and then a ''forward-backward'' asymmetry A fb for the decay H → W + W - Z that would be a signal of CP-violation. The effects are in general small. However, A fb turns out to be a rather clean signal of CP-violation: neither the CP-conserving final state interactions nor the direct production background events contribute to Γ fb . The KM-type CP-violation effects that could in principle also contribute to A fb are negligible. 6 refs

  19. CP-violating MSSM Higgs bosons in the light of LEP 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the MSSM, the CP parities of the neutral Higgs bosons may be mixed by radiative effects induced by explicit CP violation in the third generation of squarks. To allow for this possibility, we argue that the charged Higgs-boson mass and tanβ should be used to parametrize the MSSM Higgs sector. We introduce a new benchmark scenario of maximal CP violation appropriate for direct searches of CP-violating MSSM Higgs bosons. We show that the bounds established by LEP 2 on the MSSM Higgs sector may be substantially relaxed at low and intermediate values of tanβ in the presence of CP violation, and comment on possible Higgs boson signatures at LEP 2 within this framework.

  20. Why does CP violation matter to the universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    1999-01-01

    The seemingly obscure phenomenon of CP violation is increasingly being viewed as the key to a deeper understanding of both the behaviour of elementary particles and the big bang origin of the universe. Here, John Ellis of CERN explains how far and how deep the implications of CP violation extend. (0 refs).

  1. NASA Resources for Educators and Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lester

    2012-01-01

    A variety of NASA Classroom Activities, Educator Guides, Lithographs, Posters and more are available to Pre ]service and In ]service Educators through Professional Development Workshops. We are here for you to engage, demonstrate, and facilitate the use of educational technologies, the NASA Website, NASA Education Homepage and more! We are here for you to inspire you by providing in-service and pre- service training utilizing NASA curriculum support products. We are here for you to partner with your local, state, and regional educational organizations to better educate ALL! NASA AESP specialists are experienced professional educators, current on education issues and familiar with the curriculum frameworks, educational standards, and systemic architecture of the states they service. These specialists provide engaging and inspiring student presentations and teacher training right at YOUR school at no cost to you! Experience free out-of-this-world interactive learning with NASA's Digital Learning Network. Students of all ages can participate in LIVE events with NASA Experts and Education Specialists. The Exploration Station provides NASA educational programs that introduce the application of Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics, to students. Students participate in a variety of hands-on activities that compliment related topics taught by the classroom teacher. NASA KSC ERC can create Professional Development Workshops for teachers in groups of fifteen or more. Education/Information Specialists also assist educators in developing lessons to meet Sunshine State and national curriculum standards.

  2. Astrobiology and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Garvin, James B.; Drake, B. G.; Beaty, David

    2010-01-01

    In March 2007, the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) chartered the Human Exploration of Mars Science Analysis Group (HEM-SAG), co-chaired by J. B. Garvin and J. S. Levine and consisting of about 30 Mars scientists from the U.S. and Europe. HEM-SAG was one of a half dozen teams charted by NASA to consider the human exploration of Mars. Other teams included: Mars Entry, Descent and Landing, Human Health and Performance, Flight and Surface Systems, and Heliospheric/Astrophysics. The results of these Mars teams and the development of an architecture for the human exploration of Mars were summarized in two recent publications: Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, NASA Special Publication-2009-566 (B. G. Drake, Editor), 100 pages, July 2009 and Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, NASA Special Publication-2009-566 Addendum (B. G. Drake, Editor), 406 pages, July 2009. This presentation summarizes the HEM-SAG conclusions on astrobiology and the search for life on Mars by humans.

  3. Lectures on Flavor Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamín

    2016-12-20

    These lectures on flavor physics are an introduction to the subject. First lec- ture: We discuss the meaning of flavor and the importance of flavor physics in restricting extensions of the Standard Model (SM) of Electroweak interactions. We explain the origin of the KM matrix and how its elements are determined. We discuss FCNC and the GIM mechanism, followed by how a principle of Minimal Flavor Violation leads to SM extensions that are safe as far as FCNC are concerned even if the new physics comes in at low, TeVish scales. This is illustrated by the example of B radiative decays ( b → sγ ). Second lecture: We then turn our attention to CP-violation. We start by presenting neutral meson mixing. Then we consider various CP-asymmetries, culminating in the theoretically clean interference between mixing and decay into CP eigenstates.

  4. Stacking reactions of the borole complex Cp*Rh(η5-C4H4BPh) with the dicationic fragments [Cp*M]2+ (M = Rh or Ir)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, D.A.; Muratov, D.V.; Starikova, Z.A.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Kudinov, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of the (borole)rhodium iodide complex [(η-C 4 H 4 BPh)RhI] 4 with Cp*Li afforded the sandwich compound Cp*Rh(η-C 4 H 4 BPh) (1). The reactions of compound 1 with the solvated complexes [Cp*M(MeNO 2 ) 3 ] 2+ (BF 4 - ) 2 gave triple-decker cationic complexes with the central borole ligand [Cp*Rh(μ-η 5 :η 5 -C 4 H 4 BPh)MCp*] 2+ (BF 4 - ) 2 (M = Rh or Ir). The structure of complex 1 was established by X-ray diffraction [ru

  5. Measurement of $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-04-10

    A measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^-1$, collected with the LHCb detector at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavour of the charm meson at production is determined from the charge of the pion in $D^{*+}\\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+$ and $D^{*-}\\rightarrow \\bar{D^0} \\pi^-$ decays. The time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry $A_{CP}(K^-K^+)$ is obtained assuming negligible $CP$ violation in charm mixing and in Cabibbo-favoured $D^0\\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+$, $D^+\\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ and $D^+\\rightarrow \\bar{K^0}\\pi^+$ decays used as calibration channels. It is found to be $A_{CP}(K^-K^+)=(0.14\\pm0.15(stat)\\pm0.10(syst))\\%$. A combination of this result with previous LHCb measurements yields $A_{CP}(K^-K^+)=(0.04\\pm0.12(stat)\\pm0.10(syst))\\%$, $A_{CP}(\\pi^-\\pi^+)=(0.07\\pm0.14(stat)\\pm0.11(syst))\\%$. These are the most precise measurements from a single experi...

  6. Synthesis, properties, and crystal structure of complex Cp2Yb(DAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifonov, A.A.; Kirillov, E.N.; Bochkarev, M.N.; Shumani, G.; Myule, S.

    1999-01-01

    Diazadiene complex of trivalent ytterbium Cp 2 Yb(DAD) (1) (DAD = Bu 1 -N CH-CH = N-Bu 1 ) was obtained by three routes: the oxidation of Cp 2 Yb(THF) 2 by diazadiene in tetrahydrofuran (THF), the reaction of Cp 2 YbCl with DAD 2- Na 2 + (2:1), and the reaction of Cp 2 YbCl(THF) with DAD - K + in the 1:1 ratio. Complex 1 was characterized by microanalysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, and X-ray structural analysis [ru

  7. Neutrino mass textures with maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Ichiro; Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasue, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    We show three types of neutrino mass textures, which give maximal CP violation as well as maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing. These textures are described by six real mass parameters: one specified by two complex flavor neutrino masses and two constrained ones and the others specified by three complex flavor neutrino masses. In each texture, we calculate mixing angles and masses, which are consistent with observed data, as well as Majorana CP phases

  8. Penguins and cp violation in β decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.C.

    1996-11-01

    The measurement of the ε-parameter in the K 0 - K-bar 0 meson system is the only direct evidence for CP violation in the laboratory. The Standard Model (SM) of three generations with the source for CP violation arising from the phases in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix is consistent with the experiment. An unique feature of this model is that the CKM matrix is a 3 x 3 unitary matrix. (author)

  9. Middleware and Web Services for the Collaborative Information Portal of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinderson, Elias; Magapu, Vish; Mak, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and deployment of the middleware for the Collaborative Information Portal (CIP), a mission critical J2EE application developed for NASA's 2003 Mars Exploration Rover mission. CIP enabled mission personnel to access data and images sent back from Mars, staff and event schedules, broadcast messages and clocks displaying various Earth and Mars time zones. We developed the CIP middleware in less than two years time usins cutting-edge technologies, including EJBs, servlets, JDBC, JNDI and JMS. The middleware was designed as a collection of independent, hot-deployable web services, providing secure access to back end file systems and databases. Throughout the middleware we enabled crosscutting capabilities such as runtime service configuration, security, logging and remote monitoring. This paper presents our approach to mitigating the challenges we faced, concluding with a review of the lessons we learned from this project and noting what we'd do differently and why.

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of dimolybdathiaborane cluster [(Cp Mo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cluster 2 has a bicapped octahedral geometry with the {Fe(CO)3} fragment occupying one of the ... thesis and characterization of [(Cp. ∗ ... Infrared spectra were obtained on a Nicolet 6700 FT-. IR spectrometer. Microanalyses for C, H, and N were performed on .... tains signals attributable to the one type of Cp. ∗ ligand.

  11. Searches for CP violation in two-body charm decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00160626

    2015-10-16

    The LHCb experiment recorded data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 $fb^{-1}$ during its first run of data taking. These data yield the largest samples of charmed hadrons in the world and are used to search for CP violation in the $D^0$ system. Among the many measurements performed at LHCb, a measurement of the direct CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\rightarrow K_S^0 K_S^0$ decays is presented and is found to be $A_{CP}(D^0 \\rightarrow K_S^0 K_S^0) = (-2.9 \\pm 5.2 \\pm 2.2)\\, \\%, $ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This represents a significant improvement in precision over the previous measurement of this parameter. Measurements of the parameter $A^\\Gamma$, defined as the CP asymmetry of the $D^0$ effective lifetime when decaying to a CP eigenstate, are also presented. Using semi-leptonic b-hadron decays to tag the flavour of the $D^0$ meson at production with the $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states yields $A^\\Gamma(K^+K^-) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\, \\%...

  12. submitter Time-dependent CP violation in charm mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Inguglia, Gianluca

    CP violation is a well established phenomenon for B and K mesons, but for D0 mesons, bound states made up of a quark-antiquark pair containing a charm quark, a conclusive answer to the question whether there is CP vio- lation or not, has yet to be determined. I show here the phenomenology of time-dependent CP asymmetries in charm decays, and discuss the implica- tions of experimental tests aimed at the measurement of CP violation in the interference between mixing and decays of charm mesons, in particular when studying the decay channels D0 ! h+h (h = K; ). The decay channels considered can also be used to constrain quantities that are poorly measured or still to be investigated, such as MIX and c;eff , provided that the e ects of penguin pollution are ignored. I considered correlated production of D0 mesons at the SuperB experiment and its planned asymmetric run at the charm threshold and performed a study of simulated events, nding that a boost factor = 0:28 would not be su cient to produce competitive re- ...

  13. The NASA Human Research Wiki - An Online Collaboration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael; Rasbury, Jack; Johnson, Jordan; Barstend, Kristina; Saile, Lynn; Watkins, Sharmi

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element is one of six elements of the Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC is charged with decreasing the risk of: "Inability to adequately recognize or treat an ill or injured crew member" for exploration-class missions In preparation for exploration-class missions, ExMC has compiled a large evidence base, previously available only to persons within the NASA community. ExMC has developed the "NASA Human Research Wiki" in an effort to make the ExMC information available to the general public and increase collaboration within and outside of NASA. The ExMC evidence base is comprised of several types of data, including: (1)Information on more than 80 medical conditions which could occur during space flight (a)Derived from several sources (b)Including data on incidence and potential outcomes, as captured in the Integrated Medical Model s (IMM) Clinical Finding Forms (CliFFs). (2)Approximately 25 gap reports (a)Identify any "gaps" in knowledge and/or technology that would need to be addressed in order to provide adequate medical support for these novel missions.

  14. A Geometric Approach to CP Violation: Applications to the MCPMFV SUSY Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the constraints imposed by experimental upper limits on electric dipole moments (EDMs) within the Maximally CP- and Minimally Flavour-Violating (MCPMFV) version of the MSSM. Since the MCPMFV scenario has 6 non-standard CP-violating phases, in addition to the CP-odd QCD vacuum phase \\theta_QCD, cancellations may occur among the CP-violating contributions to the three measured EDMs, those of the Thallium, neutron and Mercury, leaving open the possibility of relatively large values of the other CP-violating observables. We develop a novel geometric method that uses the small-phase approximation as a starting point, takes the existing EDM constraints into account, and enables us to find maximal values of other CP-violating observables, such as the EDMs of the Deuteron and muon, the CP-violating asymmetry in b --> s \\gamma decay, and the B_s mixing phase. We apply this geometric method to provide upper limits on these observables within specific benchmark supersymmetric scenarios, including extensions t...

  15. CP violation in the two-doublet Higgs sector of the MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetzyanova, Eh.N.; Dolgopolov, M.V.; Dubinin, M.N.

    2006-01-01

    Models with extended two-doublet Higgs sector are discussed in view of using their particular features to find out which sources of CP violation could take place in nature. It is considered the effective two-Higgs-doublet potential with complex parameters, when the CP invariance is broken both explicitly and spontaneously. For case of the two-doublet Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric model, when CP invariance is violated by the interactions of Higgs fields with the third generation of scalar quarks, the Higgs bosons mass spectrum in the case of maximal CP mixing is calculated which is significantly different from CP-conserving case. The phenomenological consequences for the Higgs mass spectrum in the decoupling regime and for the strong mixing case are considered [ru

  16. Battery and Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Reid, Concha M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's return to the moon will require advanced battery, fuel cell and regenerative fuel cell energy storage systems. This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  17. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Isospin analysis of CP asymmetries in B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.; London, D.

    1990-09-01

    There is some theoretical uncertainty in the predictions for CP violating hadronic asymmetries in neutral B decays to CP eigenstates due to the existence of penguin diagrams. Using isospin relatins, we show that it is possible to remove this uncertainty for the decays B d 0 → ππ, up to a 4-fold ambiguity. (orig.)

  19. Exploring Climatology and Long-Term Variations of Aerosols from NASA Reanalysis MERRA-2 with Giovanni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Ostrenga, Dana; Vollmer, Bruce; Li, Zhanqing

    2016-01-01

    Dust plays important roles in energy cycle and climate variations. The dust deposition is the major source of iron in the open ocean, which is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth and therefore may influence the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2. Mineral dust can also act as fertilizer for forests over long time periods. Over 35 years of simulated global aerosol products from NASA atmospheric reanalysis, second Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) are available from NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The MERRA-2 covers the period 1980-present, continuing as an ongoing climate analysis. Aerosol assimilation is included throughout the period, using MODIS, MISR, AERONET, and AVHRR (in the pre-EOS period). The aerosols are assimilated by using MERRA-2 aerosol model, which interact directly with the radiation parameterization, and radiatively coupled with atmospheric model dynamics in the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5). Dust deposition data along with other major aerosol compositions (e.g. black carbon, sea salt, and sulfate, etc.) are simulated as dry and wet deposition, respectively. The hourly and monthly data are available at spatial resolution of 0.5ox0.625o (latitude x longitude). Quick data exploration of climatology and interannual variations of MERRA-2 aerosol can be done through the online visualization and analysis tool, Giovanni. This presentation, using dust deposition as an example, demonstrates a number of MERRA-2 data services at GES DISC. Global distributions of dust depositions, and their seasonal and inter-annual variations are investigated from MERRA-2 monthly aerosol products.

  20. Kobayashi-Maskawa type of hard-CP-violation model with three-generation Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.

    1986-01-01

    Within the framework of the Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) type of hard CP-violation model with three-generation Majorana neutrinos, we point out that on-shell CP-violation phenomena (i.e., CP-violating effects taking place in on-shell processes), which are characteristic of Majorana neutrinos, can only occur in total-lepton-number-conserving reactions, and are unobservably small. Off-shell CP-nonconserving effects which arise from gauge bosons are undetectable, but those which are mediated by Higgs bosons could be seen in certain rare decays. It is emphasized that CP-odd effects intrinsic to Majorana behavior depend not only on the two CP-violating Majorana phases but also on the KM phase. We then demonstrate why the KM model, which has rich implications in the hadronic sector, leads to no observable CP-violating effects in leptonic processes (except in neutrino oscillations) directly related to the CP-odd KM phase

  1. Vision 21: The NASA strategic plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Strategic Plan, Vision 21, is a living roadmap to the future to guide the men and women of the NASA team as they ensure U.S. leadership in space exploration and aeronautics research. This multiyear plan consists of a set of programs and activities that will retain our leadership in space science and the exploration of the solar system; help rebuild our nation's technology base and strengthen our leadership in aviation and other key industries; encourage commercial applications of space technology; use the unique perspective of space to better understand our home planet; provide the U.S. and its partners with a permanent space based research facility; expand on the legacy of Apollo and initiate precursor activities to establish a lunar base; and allow us a journey into tomorrow, journey to another planet (Mars), and beyond.

  2. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been used for station-keeping of geostationary communications satellites since the 1980s. Solar electric propulsion has also benefitted from success on NASA Science Missions such as Deep Space One and Dawn. The xenon propellant loads for these applications have been in the 100s of kilograms range. Recent studies performed for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have demonstrated that SEP is critically enabling for both near-term and future exploration architectures. The high payoff for both human and science exploration missions and technology investment from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) are providing the necessary convergence and impetus for a 30-kilowatt-class SEP mission. Multiple 30-50- kilowatt Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM) concepts have been developed based on the maturing electric propulsion and solar array technologies by STMD with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). Xenon is the optimal propellant for the existing state-of-the-art electric propulsion systems considering efficiency, storability, and contamination potential. NASA mission concepts developed and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30-kilowatt-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100s of kilograms up to 10,000 kilograms. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper will provide updated information on the xenon market relative to previous papers that discussed xenon production relative to NASA mission needs. The paper will discuss the various approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 metric tons of xenon propellant to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for larger NASA missions requiring 100s of metric tons of xenon will be discussed.

  3. Cationic Protic Imidazolylidene NHC Complexes of Cp*IrCl+ and Cp*RhCl+ with a Pyridyl Tether Formed at Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Grotjahn

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Protic NHC (PNHC complexes with N1H, N2-alkyl/aryl imidazolylidene ligands are relatively rare, and routes for their synthesis differ from what is used to make non-protic analogs. Prior work from our group and others showed that in the presence of a tethering ligand (phosphine or in one case, pyridine, CpM and Cp*M (M = Ir, Ru PNHC complexes could be made by heating. Here, we find that the use of ionizing agents to activate [Cp*MIIICl(μ-Cl]2 (M = Ir, Rh allows for what we believe is unprecedented ambient temperature formation of PNHC complexes from neutral imidazoles; the product complexes are able to perform transfer hydrogenation.

  4. Association of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis recombinant proteins rCP09720 or rCP01850 with rPLD as immunogens in caseous lymphadenitis immunoprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mara Thais de Oliveira; Bezerra, Francisco Silvestre Brilhante; de Pinho, Rodrigo Barros; Begnini, Karine Rech; Seixas, Fabiana Kommling; Collares, Tiago; Portela, Ricardo Dias; Azevedo, Vasco; Dellagostin, Odir; Borsuk, Sibele

    2018-01-02

    Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a chronic disease responsible for significant economic losses in sheep and goat breeding worldwide. The treatment for this disease is not effective, and an intense vaccination schedule would be the best control strategy. In this study, we evaluated the associations of rCP09720 or rCP01850 proteins from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis with recombinant exotoxin phospholipase D (rPLD) as subunit vaccines in mice. Four experimental groups (10 animals each) were immunized with a sterile 0.9% saline solution (G1), rPLD (G2), rPLD + rCP09720 (G3), and rPLD + rCP01850 (G4). The mice received two doses of each vaccine at a 21-day interval and were challenged 21 days after the last immunization. The animals were evaluated daily for 40 days after the challenge, and mortality rate was recorded. The total IgG production level increased significantly in the experimental groups on day 42 after the first vaccination. Similarly, higher levels of specific IgG2a were observed in experimental groups G2, G3, and G4 compared to the IgG1 levels on day 42. G4 showed a significant (p < .05) humoral response against both antigens of the antigenic formulations. The cellular immune response induced by immunization was characterized by a significant (p < .05) production of interferon-γ compared to that in the control, while the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-12 were not significant in any group. A significant increase of tumor necrosis factor was observed only in G4. The survival rates after the challenge were 30% (rPLD), 40% (rPLD + rCP09720), and 50% (rPLD + rCP01850). Thus, the association of rCP01850 with rPLD resulted in the best protection against the challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis and induced a more intense type 1 T-helper cell immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correction: Graillot, B.; et al. Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M. Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Graillot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In our article “Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M.” (Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144; doi:10.3390/v6125135 [1] we obtained resistance values of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, RGV laboratory colony [2], when challenged with Cydia pomonella Granulovirus, Mexican Isolate (CpGV-M, that were lower than those previously published [2]. Careful analysis of both the RGV colony and the CpGV-M virus stock used led to the realization that a low level contamination of this virus stock with CpGV-R5 occurred. We have made new tests with a verified stock, and the results are now in agreement with those previously published.

  6. Quaternionic potentials and CP-violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Celso Chikahiro

    2000-01-01

    Full text follows: In the formulation of Quantum Mechanics by using a non-commutative ring of quaternions, we attempt to solve the Schroedinger equation with quaternionic potentials. Decay processes can easily be modeled by including complex imaginary potentials. Although, it could be explained as a transition between states under action of a perturbation. Purely imaginary quaternionic potentials can be used to describe CP-violation effects. The neutral kaon system, K 0 - K-bar 0 or K L - K S , represents an example of CP-violation phenomenon. The inclusion of quaternionic potentials imply a reformulation of the whole quantum theory. The use of a quaternionic algebra in discussing the Schroedinger equation leads to the lost of time reversal invariance (T), closely connected to CP violation by the well-known CPT theorem. In particular, we study the Schroedinger equation in presence of a quaternionic potential barrier given in terms of V, real potential acting in the region of width a, and jW, purely quaternionic potential acting in the region of width b. Different cases, |W|/V and b/a, are discussed in view of possible deviations of standard Quantum Mechanics. The complex linear Schroedinger equation is solved for stationary states. The explicit solution contains complex and quaternionic transmission/reflection coefficients. A wave packet treatment needs to make a more realistic and physical description. We briefly discuss possible interpretations and remaining questions. (author)

  7. Search for Direct CP Violation in Quasi-2-Body Charmless B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2004-02-12

    We have searched for direct CP violation in quasi-two-body charmless B decays observed in a sample of about 45 million B mesons collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. We measure the following charge asymmetries in decay: {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup {+-}}) = -0.11 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup {+-}}) = 0.01{sub -0.31}{sup +0.29} {+-} 0.03, {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = -0.05 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.03, {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K*{sup {+-}}) = -0.43{sub -0.30}{sup +0.36} {+-} 0.06, and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K*{sup 0}/{bar K}*{sup 0}) = 0.00 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.03.

  8. NASA Self-Assessment of Space Radiation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space exploration involves unavoidable exposures to high-energy galactic cosmic rays whose penetration power and associated secondary radiation makes radiation shielding ineffective and cost prohibitive. NASA recognizing the possible health dangers from cosmic rays notified the U.S. Congress as early as 1959 of the need for a dedicated heavy ion accelerator to study the largely unknown biological effects of galactic cosmic rays on astronauts. Information and scientific tools to study radiation health effects expanded over the new decades as NASA exploration programs to the moon and preparations for Mars exploration were carried out. In the 1970 s through the early 1990 s a more than 3-fold increase over earlier estimates of fatal cancer risks from gamma-rays, and new knowledge of the biological dangers of high LET radiation were obtained. Other research has increased concern for degenerative risks to the central nervous system and other tissues at lower doses compared to earlier estimates. In 1996 a review by the National Academy of Sciences Space Science Board re-iterated the need for a dedicated ground-based accelerator facility capable of providing up to 2000 research hours per year to reduce uncertainties in risks projections and develop effective mitigation measures. In 1998 NASA appropriated funds for construction of a dedicated research facility and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) opened for research in October of 2003. This year marks the 8th year of NSRL research were about 1000 research hours per year have been utilized. In anticipation of the approaching ten year milestone, funded investigators and selected others are invited to participate in a critical self-assessment of NSRL research progress towards NASA s goals in space radiation research. A Blue and Red Team Assessment format has been integrated into meeting posters and special plenary sessions to allow for a critical debate on the progress of the research and major gaps areas. Blue

  9. Methyl CpG–binding proteins induce large-scale chromatin reorganization during terminal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brero, Alessandro; Easwaran, Hariharan P.; Nowak, Danny; Grunewald, Ingrid; Cremer, Thomas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Pericentric heterochromatin plays an important role in epigenetic gene regulation. We show that pericentric heterochromatin aggregates during myogenic differentiation. This clustering leads to the formation of large chromocenters and correlates with increased levels of the methyl CpG–binding protein MeCP2 and pericentric DNA methylation. Ectopic expression of fluorescently tagged MeCP2 mimicked this effect, causing a dose-dependent clustering of chromocenters in the absence of differentiation. MeCP2-induced rearrangement of heterochromatin occurred throughout interphase, did not depend on the H3K9 histone methylation pathway, and required the methyl CpG–binding domain (MBD) only. Similar to MeCP2, another methyl CpG–binding protein, MBD2, also increased during myogenic differentiation and could induce clustering of pericentric regions, arguing for functional redundancy. This MeCP2- and MBD2-mediated chromatin reorganization may thus represent a molecular link between nuclear genome topology and the epigenetic maintenance of cellular differentiation. PMID:15939760

  10. CP violation in the lepton sector and implications for leptogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, C.; Mohapatra, R. N.; Molinaro, E.

    2018-01-01

    We review the current status of the data on neutrino masses and lepton mixing and the prospects for measuring the CP-violating phases in the lepton sector. The possible connection between low energy CP violation encoded in the Dirac and Majorana phases of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing...... matrix and successful leptogenesis is emphasized in the context of seesaw extensions of the Standard Model with a flavor symmetry Gf (and CP symmetry)....

  11. LHCb CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Vesterinen, Mika

    2016-01-01

    The study of $CP$ violation in the beauty hadron sector is a promising approach to search for the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model. Several recent measurements in this area from the LHCb experiment are reported in these proceedings. These are based on the Run-I dataset of 3~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected at proton-proton centre of mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) by Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2): a Novel Mechanism for Re-Myelination and/or Myelin Repair Involved in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhorshidAhmad, Tina; Acosta, Crystal; Cortes, Claudia; Lakowski, Ted M; Gangadaran, Surendiran; Namaka, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive, neurological disease characterized by the targeted immune system-mediated destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Autoreactive CD4+ T helper cells have a key role in orchestrating MS-induced myelin damage. Once activated, circulating Th1-cells secrete a variety of inflammatory cytokines that foster the breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) eventually infiltrating into the CNS. Inside the CNS, they become reactivated upon exposure to the myelin structural proteins and continue to produce inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) that leads to direct activation of antibodies and macrophages that are involved in the phagocytosis of myelin. Proliferating oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) migrating to the lesion sites are capable of acute remyelination but unable to completely repair or restore the immune system-mediated myelin damage. This results in various permanent clinical neurological disabilities such as cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, bowel/bladder abnormalities, and neuropathic pain. At present, there is no cure for MS. Recent remyelination and/or myelin repair strategies have focused on the role of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream transcriptional repressor methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2). Research in the field of epigenetic therapeutics involving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) inhibitors is being explored to repress the detrimental effects of MeCP2. This review will address the role of MeCP2 and BDNF in remyelination and/or myelin repair and the potential of HDAC and KAT inhibitors as novel therapeutic interventions for MS.

  13. Instantons, CP-violation and axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, S. R.

    1980-07-01

    Some specific aspects of the developments in pseudoparticle solutions of Gauge theories are discussed. The general features of the Lagrangian are described. The concepts of instantons, confinement, O-vacua and CP nonconservation are explained.

  14. CP violation in the standard model and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present status of CP violation in the standard six quark model is reviewed and a combined analysis with B-meson decays is presented. The theoretical uncertainties in the analysis are discussed and the resulting KM weak mixing angles, the phase delta and the ratio epsilon'/epsilon are given as functions of Tsub(B), GAMMA(b -> u)/GAMMA(b -> c), msub(t) and the B parameter. For certain ranges of the values of these parameters the standard model is not capable in reproducing the experimental values for epsilon' and epsilon parameters. Anticipating possible difficulties we discuss various alternatives to the standard explanation of CP violation such as horizontal interactions, left-right symmetric models and supersymmetry. CP violation outside the kaon system is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  15. Enhancing NASA's Procedure Representation Language to Support Planning Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Automation and autonomy are key elements in realizing the vision for space exploration. The NASA Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) has been...

  16. First Observation of CP Violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Ahmed, H; Aihara, H; Akar, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Al Said, S; Andreassen, R; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arinstein, K; Arnaud, N; Asner, D M; Aston, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barberio, E; Bard, D J; Barlow, R J; Batignani, G; Beaulieu, A; Bellis, M; Ben-Haim, E; Bernard, D; Bernlochner, F U; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biswal, J; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Bobrov, A; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bračko, M; Briand, H; Browder, T E; Brown, D N; Brown, D N; Bünger, C; Burchat, P R; Buzykaev, A R; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Casarosa, G; Cenci, R; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chao, D S; Chauveau, J; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, C; Cheng, C H; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, H H F; Choi, S-K; Chrzaszcz, M; Cibinetto, G; Cinabro, D; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Cremaldi, L; Dalseno, J; Dasu, S; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Mori, F; De Nardo, G; Denig, A G; Derkach, D; de Sangro, R; Dey, B; Di Lodovico, F; Dingfelder, J; Dittrich, S; Doležal, Z; Dorfan, J; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Dutta, D; Ebert, M; Echenard, B; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Faccini, R; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Filippi, A; Finocchiaro, G; Fioravanti, E; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forti, F; Franco Sevilla, M; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gabyshev, N; Gamba, D; Garmash, A; Gary, J W; Garzia, I; Gaspero, M; Gaur, V; Gaz, A; Gershon, T J; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Li Gioi, L; Giorgi, M A; Glattauer, R; Godang, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Golubev, V B; Gorodeisky, R; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grauges, E; Griessinger, K; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Grünberg, O; Guttman, N; Haba, J; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hast, C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hearty, C; He, X H; Hess, M; Hitlin, D G; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Huard, Z; Hutchcroft, D E; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Innes, W R; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jaegle, I; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kass, R; Kawasaki, T; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, P; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; King, G J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koch, H; Kodyš, P; Kolomensky, Yu G; Korpar, S; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R; Kravchenko, E A; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lacker, H M; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Leddig, T; Le Diberder, F; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, M J; Lees, J P; Leith, D W G S; Leruste, Ph; Lewczuk, M J; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lockman, W S; Long, O; Lopes Pegna, D; LoSecco, J M; Lou, X C; Lueck, T; Luitz, S; Lukin, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Luth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; MacFarlane, D B; Malaescu, B; Mallik, U; Manoni, E; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Martellotti, S; Martinez-Vidal, F; Masuda, M; Mattison, T S; Matvienko, D; McKenna, J A; Meadows, B T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyashita, T S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Monge, M R; Moon, H K; Morandin, M; Muller, D R; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakazawa, H; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Neal, H; Neri, N; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nugent, I M; Oberhof, B; Ocariz, J; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olaiya, E O; Olsen, J; Ongmongkolkul, P; Onorato, G; Onuchin, A P; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oyanguren, A; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Palano, A; Pal, B; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panduro Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Park, C W; Park, H; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pedlar, T K; Peimer, D R; Peruzzi, I M; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Prasad, V; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Puccio, E M T; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Pushpawela, B G; Rama, M; Randle-Conde, A; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Ribežl, E; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Röhrken, M; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Rossi, A; Rostomyan, A; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Sacco, R; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schindler, R H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serednyakov, S I; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sohn, Y-S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solodov, E P; Solovieva, E; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Starič, M; Stocchi, A; Stroili, R; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Summers, D J; Sun, L; Tamponi, U; Taras, P; Tasneem, N; Teramoto, Y; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Touramanis, C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Uwer, U; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vasseur, G; Va'vra, J; Verderi, M; Vinokurova, A; Vitale, L; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Waldi, R; Walsh, J J; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; West, C A; Williams, K M; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zallo, A; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-09-18

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays, where the light neutral hadron h^{0} is a π^{0}, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K^{+}K^{-}, K_{S}^{0}π^{0}, or K_{S}^{0}ω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters -η_{f}S=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=-0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  17. Near Earth Asteroid Scout: NASA's Solar Sail Mission to a NEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Lockett, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing a solar sail propulsion system for use on the Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout reconnaissance mission and laying the groundwork for their use in future deep space science and exploration missions. Solar sails use sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like sail made of a lightweight, highly reflective material. This continuous photon pressure provides propellantless thrust, allowing for very high Delta V maneuvers on long-duration, deep space exploration. Since reflected light produces thrust, solar sails require no onboard propellant. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout mission, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program and managed by NASA MSFC, will use the sail as primary propulsion allowing it to survey and image Asteroid 1991VG and, potentially, other NEA's of interest for possible future human exploration. NEA Scout uses a 6U cubesat (to be provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory), an 86 m(exp. 2) solar sail and will weigh less than 12 kilograms. NEA Scout will be launched on the first flight of the Space Launch System in 2018. The solar sail for NEA Scout will be based on the technology developed and flown by the NASA NanoSail-D and The Planetary Society's Lightsail-A. Four approximately 7 m stainless steel booms wrapped on two spools (two overlapping booms per spool) will be motor deployed and pull the sail from its stowed volume. The sail material is an aluminized polyimide approximately 2.5 microns thick. As the technology matures, solar sails will increasingly be used to enable science and exploration missions that are currently impossible or prohibitively expensive using traditional chemical and electric propulsion systems. This paper will summarize the status of the NEA Scout mission and solar sail technology in general.

  18. Flavour physics and CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Nir, Y.

    2015-05-22

    We explain the many reasons for the interest in flavor physics. We describe flavor physics and the related CP violation within the Standard Model, and explain how the B-factories proved that the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism dominates the CP violation that is observed in meson decays. We explain the implications of flavor physics for new physics, with emphasis on the “new physics flavor puzzle”, and present the idea of minimal flavor violation as a possible solution. We explain why the values flavor parameters of the Standard Model are puzzling, present the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism as a possible solution, and describe how measurements of neutrino parameters are interpreted in the context of this puzzle. We show that the recently discovered Higgs-like boson may provide new opportunities for making progress on the various flavor puzzles.

  19. CP nonconservation in decays of W and Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, W.; Deshpande, N.G.; Eilam, G.; Soni, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of CP asymmetries in decays of W and Z bosons is examined. The asymmetries studied are the differences in the branching ratios of charge-conjugate modes such as W + →tb-bar vs W - →t-barb or Z→b-bars vs Z→bs-bar. In the standard model, with three generations, such effects are found to be vanishingly small. With four generations, flavor-changing transitions such as Z→bs-bar or b'b-bar may be observable, but the prospects for observing CP asymmetries appear discouraging. We also discuss the situation in some other models of CP nonconservation

  20. Ultrasonic green synthesis of an Ag/CP nanocomposite for enhanced photodegradation effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hai Ning; Hou, Suo Xia; Hao, Zeng Chuan; Cui, Guang Hua

    2018-01-01

    A nanoparticle of cobalt(II) coordination polymer (CP), [Co(L)(npht)] n (1) (H 2 npht=4-nitrophthalic acid, L=1,3-bis(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene) and its nanocomposite (Ag/CP 1) were obtained by the sonochemical approach and characterized by IR, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). CP 1 shows a 1D double chain containing two different helical chains, which is further extended into a two-dimensional supramolecular framework by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions. The photoluminescence properties and photocatalytic properties of the nanoparticles of CP 1 and Ag/CP 1 on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) were investigated, Ag/CP 1 exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity under UV and visible light, which can be attributed to the strong interactions between Ag nanorods and CP 1, which lead to electron-hole pair separation between Ag nanorods and CP 1. In addition, the photocatalytic mechanism is also carried out by introducing t-butyl alcohol (TBA) as a widely used ·OH scavenger. The influence of ultrasound irradiation time and power on the morphology and size of the nanostructure CP 1 were studied. The results indicated that a decrease in time and an increase in power led to a decrease of particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CT-1-CP-induced ventricular electrical remodeling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-fen; Wei, Tao-zhi; Rao, Li-ya; Xu, Ming-guang; Dong, Zhan-ling

    2015-02-01

    The chronic effects of carboxyl-terminal polypeptide of Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1-CP) on ventricular electrical remodeling were investigated. CT-1-CP, which contains 16 amino acids in sequence of the C-terminal of Cardiotrophin-1, was selected and synthesized, and then administered to Kunming mice (aged 5 weeks) by intraperitoneal injection (500 ng·g⁻¹·day⁻¹) (4 groups, n=10 and female: male=1:1 in each group) for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, respectively. The control group (n=10, female: male=1:1) was injected by physiological saline for 4 weeks. The epicardial monophasic action potential (MAP) was recorded by using a contact-type MAP electrode placed vertically on the left ventricular (LV) epicardium surface, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal in lead II was monitored synchronously. ECG intervals (RR, PR, QRS and QT) and the amplitude of MAP (Am), the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax), as well as action potential durations (APDs) at different repolarization levels (APD30, APD50, APD70, and APD90) of MAP were determined and analyzed in detail. There were no significant differences in RR and P intervals between CT-1-CP-treated groups and control group, but the PR segment and the QRS complex were greater in the former than in the latter (F=2.681 and 5.462 respectively, PCP-treated groups than in control group, the QT dispersion (QTd) of them was greater in the latter than in the former (F=3.090, PCP-treated groups and the prolongation of QT intervals increased gradually along with the time of exposure to CT-1-CP. The QRS complex had no significant change in control group, one-week and three-week CT-1-CP-treated groups, but prolonged significantly in two-week and four-week CT-1-CP-treated groups. Interestingly, the QTd after chest-opening was significantly greater than that before chest-opening in control group (t=5.242, PCP-treated groups. The mean MAP amplitude, Vmax and APD were greater in CT-1-CP-treated groups than those in control group, and became more obvious

  2. Soft CP violation and the global matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senjanovic, G.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Scenarios for baryon production are considered within the context of SU(5) and SO(10) grand unified theories where CP violation arises spontaneously. The spontaneous CP symmetry breaking then results in a matter-antimatter domain structure in the universe. Two possible, distinct types of theories of soft CP violation are defined. In the first type the CP nonconservation originates only from the breaking of SU(2) sub L X U(1) symmetry, and in the second type, even at the unification temperature scale, CP violation can emerge as a result of symmetry breaking by the vacuum expectation values of the superheavy Higgs sector scalars.

  3. NASA Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Portals provide web-based suites of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, and Vesta. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap significant enhancements to these toolsets during the past year and look forward to the results of the exciting work currently being undertaken. Additional data products and tools continue to be added to the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP). These include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for the Resource Prospector mission. Current development work on LMMP also includes facilitating mission planning and data management for lunar CubeSat missions, and working with the NASA Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office's Lunar Apollo Sample database in order to help better visualize the geographic contexts from which samples were retrieved. A new user interface provides, among other improvements, significantly enhanced 3D visualizations and navigation. Mars Trek, the project's Mars portal, has now been assigned by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for the Mars 2020 Rover mission as well as for the Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites. This effort is concentrating on enhancing Mars Trek with data products and analysis tools specifically requested by the proposing teams for the various sites. Also being given very high priority by NASA Headquarters is Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in these upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars. The portals also serve as

  4. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide nanomedicines for the prophylaxis or treatment of cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotide-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), which are synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), activate humoral and cellular immunity and are being developed as vaccine adjuvants to prevent or treat cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies. Free CpG ODNs have been used in many clinical trials implemented to verify their effects. However, recent research has reported that self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes demonstrate higher adjuvant effects than free CpG ODNs, owing to their improved uptake efficiency into cells expressing TLR9. Moreover, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes are able to deliver CpG ODNs and antigens (or allergens) to the same types of cells, which enables a higher degree of prophylaxis or therapeutic effect. In this review, the author describes recent trends in the research and development of CpG ODN nanomedicines containing self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes, focusing mainly on the results of preclinical and clinical studies.

  5. Future prospects for studying CP violation in B-meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, T.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental prospects for observing CP violation in B-meson decays are reviewed. Comparisons are made for various options: experiments a e + e - B-Meson Factories, HERA and the TEVATRON will produce results n near future. They will have a good chance to discover CP violation in B-meson decays. On a longer time scale, experiments at the LHC will aim at accurate measurements to make a precision test of the standard model in CP violation. (author)

  6. NASA Pathways Internship: Spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Oscar, III

    2016-01-01

    I was selected to contribute to the Data Systems and Handling Branch under the Avionics Flight Systems Division at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. There I used my knowledge from school, as well as my job experience from the military, to help me comprehend my assigned project and contribute to it. With help from my mentors, supervisors, colleagues, and an excellent NASA work environment, I was able to learn, as well as accomplish, a lot towards my project. Not only did I understand more about embedded systems, microcontrollers, and low-level programming, I also was given the opportunity to explore the NASA community.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Battery Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn s history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and their development for future Exploration missions. Current component development efforts for high energy and ultra high energy Li-ion batteries are addressed. Electrochemical systems are critical to the success of Exploration, Science and Space Operations missions. NASA Glenn has a long, successful heritage with batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications. GRC Battery capabilities and expertise span basic research through flight hardware development and implementation. There is a great deal of synergy between energy storage system needs for aerospace and terrestrial applications.

  8. CP violation in rare K decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of rare K decays calls for a unified treatment of short- and long-distance aspects as provided by chiral perturbation theory. For the standard model with three generations, the theoretical predictions for signals of CP violation in those decays are reviewed. With direct CP violation as the main target, special emphasis is given to the charge asymmetries in charged K decays and to the especially rare decays K L → π 0 ll-bar. Time dependent rate asymmetries in K 0 decays and the longitudinal muon polarization in K L → μ + μ - are also discussed. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  9. Physical properties of superbulky lanthanide metallocenes: synthesis and extraordinary luminescence of [Eu(II)(Cp(BIG))2] (Cp(BIG) = (4-nBu-C6H4)5-cyclopentadienyl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Sjoerd; Naglav, Dominik; Ruspic, Christian; Wickleder, Claudia; Adlung, Matthias; Hermes, Wilfried; Eul, Matthias; Pöttgen, Rainer; Rego, Daniel B; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Herber, Rolfe H; Nowik, Israel

    2013-09-09

    The superbulky deca-aryleuropocene [Eu(Cp(BIG))2], Cp(BIG) = (4-nBu-C6H4)5-cyclopentadienyl, was prepared by reaction of [Eu(dmat)2(thf)2], DMAT = 2-Me2N-α-Me3Si-benzyl, with two equivalents of Cp(BIG)H. Recrystallizyation from cold hexane gave the product with a surprisingly bright and efficient orange emission (45% quantum yield). The crystal structure is isomorphic to those of [M(Cp(BIG))2] (M = Sm, Yb, Ca, Ba) and shows the typical distortions that arise from Cp(BIG)⋅⋅⋅Cp(BIG) attraction as well as excessively large displacement parameter for the heavy Eu atom (U(eq) = 0.075). In order to gain information on the true oxidation state of the central metal in superbulky metallocenes [M(Cp(BIG))2] (M = Sm, Eu, Yb), several physical analyses have been applied. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility data of [Yb(Cp(BIG))2] show diamagnetism, indicating stable divalent ytterbium. Temperature-dependent (151)Eu Mössbauer effect spectroscopic examination of [Eu(Cp(BIG))2] was examined over the temperature range 93-215 K and the hyperfine and dynamical properties of the Eu(II) species are discussed in detail. The mean square amplitude of vibration of the Eu atom as a function of temperature was determined and compared to the value extracted from the single-crystal X-ray data at 203 K. The large difference in these two values was ascribed to the presence of static disorder and/or the presence of low-frequency torsional and librational modes in [Eu(Cp(BIG))2]. X-ray absorbance near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that all three [Ln(Cp(BIG))2] (Ln = Sm, Eu, Yb) compounds are divalent. The XANES white-line spectra are at 8.3, 7.3, and 7.8 eV, for Sm, Eu, and Yb, respectively, lower than the Ln2O3 standards. No XANES temperature dependence was found from room temperature to 100 K. XANES also showed that the [Ln(Cp(BIG))2] complexes had less trivalent impurity than a [EuI2(thf)x] standard. The complex [Eu(Cp(BIG))2] shows already at room temperature

  10. Digital Learning Network Education Events of NASA's Extreme Environments Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather; Guillory, Erika

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLN) reaches out to thousands of students each year through video conferencing and web casting. The DLN has created a series of live education videoconferences connecting NASA s Extreme Environment Missions Operations (NEEMO) team to students across the United States. The programs are also extended to students around the world live web casting. The primary focus of the events is the vision for space exploration. During the programs, NEEMO Crewmembers including NASA astronauts, engineers and scientists inform and inspire students about the importance of exploration and share the impact of the project as it correlates with plans to return to the moon and explore the planet Mars. These events highlight interactivity. Students talk live with the aquanauts in Aquarius, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration s underwater laboratory. With this program, NASA continues the Agency s tradition of investing in the nation's education programs. It is directly tied to the Agency's major education goal of attracting and retaining students in science, technology, and engineering disciplines. Before connecting with the aquanauts, the students conduct experiments of their own designed to coincide with mission objectives. This paper describes the events that took place in September 2006.

  11. CPLEAR and BaBar: CP violation in all its states

    CERN Document Server

    Yeche, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    This report of French 'Habilitation a diriger les recherches' summarizes my scientific activity from 1993 to 2003. During this decade, my research work was related to two particle physics experiments: CPLEAR and BABAR. The first one, CPLEAR, has recorded data from 1988 to 1995 on the low energy anti-proton ring (LEAR) at CERN. This experiment was devoted to the study of T, CPT et CP discrete symmetries. The second experiment, BABAR, has been running since 1999, on the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. This experiment searches for CP violation and tests the Standard Model through the measurements of the angles and the sides of the Unitarity Triangle. My research work is divided in five main topics: Study of CP and CPT violation in K0 → π+ π- decays; Performance optimization of the particle identification detector (DIRC) of the BABAR experiment; B meson tagging in BABAR experiment; Δmd measurement and Search for CP and T violation in mixing with dilepton events; Search for CP violation in B0 → ρ± π± and B0 �...

  12. Aerospace Communications Technologies in Support of NASA Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is endeavoring in expanding communications capabilities to enable and enhance robotic and human exploration of space and to advance aero communications here on Earth. This presentation will discuss some of the research and technology development work being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in aerospace communications in support of NASAs mission. An overview of the work conducted in-house and in collaboration with academia, industry, and other government agencies (OGA) to advance radio frequency (RF) and optical communications technologies in the areas of antennas, ultra-sensitive receivers, power amplifiers, among others, will be presented. In addition, the role of these and other related RF and optical communications technologies in enabling the NASA next generation aerospace communications architecture will be also discussed.

  13. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    status and prospectives of the flavour physics associated with the strange, charm and .... might reveal something completely unexpected. Standard Model weak ..... Thus, in order to have an observable CP violation effect in the SM, the mixing.

  14. Physical Properties of Superbulky Lanthanide Metallocenes : Synthesis and Extraordinary Luminescence of [Eu-II(Cp-BIG)(2)] (Cp-BIG=(4-nBu-C6H4)(5)-Cyclopentadienyl)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, Sjoerd; Naglav, Dominik; Ruspic, Christian; Wickleder, Claudia; Adlung, Matthias; Hermes, Wilfried; Eul, Matthias; Poettgen, Rainer; Rego, Daniel B.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Herber, Rolfe H.; Nowik, Israel

    2013-01-01

    The superbulky deca-aryleuropocene [Eu(Cp-BIG)(2)], Cp-BIG=(4-nBu-C6H4)(5)-cyclopentadienyl, was prepared by reaction of [Eu(dmat)(2)(thf)(2)], DMAT=2-Me2N--Me3Si-benzyl, with two equivalents of (CpH)-H-BIG. Recrystallizyation from cold hexane gave the product with a surprisingly bright and

  15. Intratracheal synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide causes acute lung injury with systemic inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial genome is characterized by frequent unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG motifs. Deleterious effects can occur when synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN with unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG-ODN are administered in a systemic fashion. We aimed to evaluate the effect of intratracheal CpG-ODN on lung inflammation and systemic inflammatory response. C57BL/6J mice received intratracheal administration of CpG-ODN (0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 100 μM or control ODN without CpG motif. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained 3 or 6 h or 1, 2, 7, or 14 days after the instillation and subjected to a differential cell count and cytokine measurement. Lung permeability was evaluated as the BAL fluid-to-plasma ratio of the concentration of human serum albumin that was injected 1 h before euthanasia. Nuclear factor (NF-κB DNA binding activity was also evaluated in lung homogenates. Intratracheal administration of 10 μM or higher concentration of CpG-ODN induced significant inflammatory cell accumulation into the airspace. The peak accumulation of neutrophils and lymphocytes occurred 1 and 2 days after the CpG-ODN administration, respectively. Lung permeability was increased 1 day after the 10 μM CpG-ODN challenge. CpG-ODN also induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and upregulation of various inflammatory cytokines in BAL fluid and plasma. Histopathology of the lungs and liver revealed acute lung injury and liver damage with necrosis, respectively. Control ODN without CpG motif did not induce any inflammatory change. Since intratracheal CpG-ODN induced acute lung injury as well as systemic inflammatory response, therapeutic strategies to neutralize bacterial DNA that is released after administration of bactericidal agents should be considered.

  16. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion.

  17. Quark flavor mixing, CP violation, and all that

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    We review the present state of knowledge of the mixing of quark flavors under weak interactions and the associated explanation of CP violation inherent in the single nontrivial phase present in the three-generation mixing matrix. In this context we present the phenomenological basis for the increasing possibility that large CP violation asymmetries can be experimentally observed in the B meson system. 39 refs., 11 figs.,

  18. Measurement of CP observables for the decays B±→DCP0K*±

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.

    2005-01-01

    Using a sample of 232x10 6 Υ(4S)→BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory in 1999-2004, we study B - →D 0 K*(892) - decays where K* - →K S 0 π - and D 0 →K - π + , K - π + π 0 , K - π + π + π - (non-CP final states); K + K - , π + π - (CP+ eigenstates); K S 0 π 0 , K S 0 φ, and K S 0 ω (CP- eigenstates). We measure four observables that are sensitive to the angle γ of the CKM unitarity triangle; the partial-rate charge asymmetries A CP± and the ratios of the B-decay branching fraction in CP± and non-CP decays R CP± : A CP+ =-0.08±0.19(stat)±0.08(syst), A CP- =-0.26±0.40(stat)±0.12(syst), R CP+ =1.96±0.40(stat)±0.11(syst), and R CP- =0.65±0.26(stat)±0.08(syst)

  19. Insertion Chemistry of Cp*2Y(2-pyridyl) and Molecular Structure of the Unexpected CO Insertion Product (Cp*2Y)2(μ-η2 : η2-OC(NC5H4)2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, Berth-Jan; Stevels, Willem M.; Teuben, Jan H.; Lakin, Miles T.; Spek, Anthony L.

    1994-01-01

    Pyridine is metalated selectively at the 2-position by (Cp*2YH)2 to yield Cp*2Y(2-pyridyl) (1). Compound 1 reacts with H2 to give the hydride addition product Cp*2Y(NC5H6) (2). With THF and pyridine the adducts Cp*2Y(η2-2-pyridyl)(THF) (3) and Cp*2Y(η1-2-pyridyl)(py) (4) are formed. The pyridine

  20. Status of NASA's commercial cargo and crew transportation initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmoyer, Alan; Stone, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    To stimulate the commercial space transportation industry, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is facilitating the demonstration of Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by private-sector companies. In 2006, NASA entered into funded agreements with two such companies to share NASA's 500 million investment, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) and Rocketplane Kistler (RpK), each of which proposed to obtain the additional private financing needed to complete its flight demonstrations. In 2007, NASA terminated the agreement with RpK because it failed to meet a series of technical and financial milestones which were necessary to receive the incremental NASA payments. In 2008, NASA conducted another competition for the remaining 170 million of NASA funding and entered into a funded agreement with Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). This paper provides an overview of the COTS approach of SpaceX and OSC and the status of their efforts to develop reliable and cost-effective commercial transportation to serve the LEO marketplace.

  1. A possible explanation of the CP puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takhtamyshev, Georgij

    1996-03-01

    The problem of mirror-reflection symmetry (MRS) and time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in our world is discussed. The opinion is expressed, that well-known experiments on parity violation and CP-violation can be treated as signals of some new, yet unknown, level of matter. An hypothesis, which can be used as a base for some future model or theory is formulated. In the framework of this hypothesis, experiments will demonstrate parity violation or CP-violation do not contradict MRS or TRS conservation. (author). 14 refs

  2. Maximal CP violation via Higgs-boson exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The unitarity of the mixing matrix of the charged Higgs bosons, and the orthogonality of the mixing matrix of the neutral Higgs bosons, are used to derive upper bounds on the values of general CP-violating expressions. The bounds are independent of the total number of Higgs fields in any specific model. They allow is to relax the usual assumption of only one Higgs boson being light. It is natural that the CP violation in the exchange of neutral Higgs bosons between bottom quarks be particularly large

  3. The CP-odd nucleon interaction and the value of T-violation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, V.P.

    1997-01-01

    The relations between the value of T- and P-violating correlations in neutron scattering and different models of CP violation are discussed. It is shown that a specific structure of CP-odd nucleon interactions gives the possibility to obtain the essential information about CP-odd interaction at the quark-gluon level from nuclear experimental data. The up-to-date estimations for CP-violating nucleon coupling constants show that each class of CP-violating models can give a measurable effect for the neutron scattering experiments. 57 refs

  4. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, David J.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Benner, Steven A.; Boss, Alan P.; Deamer, David; Falkowski, Paul G.; Farmer, Jack D.; Hedges, S. Blair; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Knoll, Andrew H.; hide

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: How does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own solar system, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high-priority efforts for the next 3-5 years. These 18 objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  5. D-amino acid substitution enhances the stability of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fengjing; Wang, Jiayi; Peng, Jinxiu; Zhao, Ping; Kong, Ziqing; Wang, Kairong; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2017-10-01

    With the increasing emergence of resistant microbes toward conventional antimicrobial agents, there is an urgent need for the development of antimicrobial agents with novel action mode. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are believed to be one kind of ideal alternatives. However, AMPs can be easily degraded by protease, which limited their therapeutic use. In the present study, D-amino acid substitution strategy was employed to enhance the stability of polybia-CP. We investigated the stability of peptides against the degradation of trypsin and chymotrypsin by determining the antimicrobial activity or determining the HPLC profile of peptides after incubation with proteases. Our results showed that both the all D-amino acid derivative (D-CP) and partial D-lysine substitution derivative (D-lys-CP) have an improved stability against trypsin and chymotrypsin. Although D-CP takes left-hand α-helical conformation and D-lys-CP loses some α-helical content, both of the D-amino acid-substituted derivatives maintain their parental peptides' membrane active action mode. In addition, D-lys-CP showed a slight weaker antimicrobial activity than polybia-CP, but the hemolytic activity decreased greatly. These results suggest that D-CP and D-lys-CP can offer strategy to improve the property of AMPs and may be leading compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Association of six CpG-SNPs in the inflammation-related genes with coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaomin; Chen, Xiaoying; Xu, Yan; Yang, William; Wu, Nan; Ye, Huadan; Yang, Jack Y.; Hong, Qingxiao; Xin, Yanfei; Yang, Mary Qu; Deng, Youping; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation has been widely considered to be the major risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD). The goal of our study was to explore the possible association with CHD for inflammation-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides. A total of 784 CHD patients and 739 non-CHD controls were recruited from Zhejiang Province, China. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform, we measured the genotypes of six inflammatio...

  7. The mass-hierarchy and CP-violation discovery reach of the LBNO long-baseline neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, S.K.; Aittola, M.; Alekou, A.; Andrieu, B.; Angus, D.; Antoniou, F.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Autiero, D.; Ballett, P.; Bandac, I.; Banerjee, D.; Barker, G.J.; Barr, G.; Bartmann, W.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Bertram, I.; Bésida, O.; Blebea-Apostu, A.M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Borriello, E.; Boyd, S.; Brancus, I.; Bravar, A.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Cafagna, F.; Calin, M.; Calviani, M.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Caretta, O.; Cata-Danil, G.; Catanesi, M.G.; Cervera, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Chaussard, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Chipesiu, F.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Crivelli, P.; Davenne, T.; Dawson, J.; De Bonis, I.; De Jong, J.; Déclais, Y.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Duchesneau, D.; Dumarchez, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Eliseev, A.; Emery, S.; Enqvist, K.; Enqvist, T.; Epprecht, L.; Ereditato, A.; Erykalov, A.N.; Esanu, T.; Finch, A.J.; Fitton, M.D.; Franco, D.; Galymov, V.; Gavrilov, G.; Gendotti, A.; Giganti, C.; Goddard, B.; Gomez, J.J.; Gomoiu, C.M.; Gornushkin, Y.A.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grant, N.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M.D.; Hasegawa, T.; Haug, S.; Hierholzer, M.; Hissa, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huitu, K.; Ilic, J.; Ioannisian, A.N.; Izmaylov, A.; Jipa, A.; Kainulainen, K.; Kalliokoski, T.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kawada, J.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kokko, E.; Kopylov, A.N.; Kormos, L.L.; Korzenev, A.; Kosyanenko, S.; Kreslo, I.; Kryn, D.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumpulainen, J.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lagoda, J.; Lazanu, I.; Levy, J. -M.; Litchfield, R.P.; Loo, K.; Loveridge, P.; Maalampi, J.; Magaletti, L.; Margineanu, R.M.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Mari, C.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; Mercadante, A.; Mineev, O.; Mirizzi, A.; Mitrica, B.; Morgan, B.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Narita, S.; Nesterenko, D.A.; Nguyen, K.; Nikolics, K.; Noah, E.; Novikov, Yu.; O'Keeffe, H.; Odell, J.; Oprima, A.; Palladino, V.; Pascoli, S.; Patzak, T.; Payne, D.; Pectu, M.; Pennacchio, E.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Periale, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Przewlocki, P.; Quinto, M.; Radicioni, E.; Ramachers, Y.; Ratoff, P.N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M.; Resnati, F.; Ristea, O.; Robert, A.; Rondio, E.; Rubbia, A.; Rummukainen, K.; Sacco, R.; Saftoiu, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sarkamo, J.; Sato, F.; Saviano, N.; Scantamburlo, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Slupecki, M.; Sorel, M.; Spooner, N.J.C.; Stahl, A.; Stanca, D.; Steerenberg, R.; Sterian, A.R.; Sterian, P.; Still, B.; Stoica, S.; Strauss, T.; Suhonen, J.; Suvorov, V.; Szeptycka, M.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L.F.; Toma, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Touramanis, C.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tsenov, R.; Tuominen, K.; Vacheret, A.; Valram, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vanucci, F.; Vasseur, G.; Velotti, F.; Velten, P.; Viant, T.; Vincke, H.; Virtanen, A.; Vorobyev, A.; Wark, D.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wiebusch, C.; Wilson, J.R.; Wu, S.; Yershov, N.; Zalipska, J.; Zito, M.

    2014-01-01

    The next generation neutrino observatory proposed by the LBNO collaboration will address fundamental questions in particle and astroparticle physics. The experiment consists of a far detector, in its first stage a 20 kt LAr double phase TPC and a magnetised iron calorimeter, situated at 2300 km from CERN and a near detector based on a high-pressure argon gas TPC. The long baseline provides a unique opportunity to study neutrino flavour oscillations over their 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima exploring the $L/E$ behaviour, and distinguishing effects arising from $\\delta_{CP}$ and matter. In this paper we have reevaluated the physics potential of this setup for determining the mass hierarchy (MH) and discovering CP-violation (CPV), using a conventional neutrino beam from the CERN SPS with a power of 750 kW. We use conservative assumptions on the knowledge of oscillation parameter priors and systematic uncertainties. The impact of each systematic error and the precision of oscillation prior is shown. We demonstrat...

  8. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Long; Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Theobald, Michael; Asghar, Esfandiari; Campino, Jane; Vollmer, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Cloud Computing has been implemented in several commercial arenas. The NASA Nebula Cloud Computing platform is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) built in 2008 at NASA Ames Research Center and 2010 at GSFC. Nebula is an open source Cloud platform intended to: a) Make NASA realize significant cost savings through efficient resource utilization, reduced energy consumption, and reduced labor costs. b) Provide an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to efficiently explore and share large and complex data sets. c) Allow customers to provision, manage, and decommission computing capabilities on an as-needed bases

  9. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing.

  10. Solution of the strong CP problem by color exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.M.; Zee, A.

    1985-08-01

    We present a new way to solve the strong CP problem in models with a spontaneously broken CP invariance. It is simpler than existing non-Peccei-Quinn approaches. It predicts the existence of light (i.e. weak scale) colored Higgs bosons which could be seen in colliders. 25 refs., 3 figs

  11. CP Methods for Scheduling and Routing with Time-Dependent Task Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Kelareva, Elena; Kilby, Philip

    2013-01-01

    a cost function, and Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) are often used for solving such problems. However, Constraint Programming (CP), particularly with Lazy Clause Genera- tion (LCG), has been found to be faster than MIP for some scheduling problems with time-varying action costs. In this paper, we...... compare CP and LCG against a solve-and-improve approach for two recently introduced problems in maritime logistics with time-varying action costs: the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) and the Bulk Port Cargo Throughput Optimisation Problem (BPCTOP). We present a novel CP model...... for the LSFRP, which is faster than all previous methods and outperforms a simplified automated planning model without time-varying costs. We show that a LCG solver is faster for solving the BPCTOP than a standard finite domain CP solver with a simplified model. We find that CP and LCG are effective methods...

  12. Methylation-mediated deamination of 5-methylcytosine appears to give rise to mutations causing human inherited disease in CpNpG trinucleotides, as well as in CpG dinucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cytosine-guanine (CpG dinucleotide has long been known to be a hotspot for pathological mutation in the human genome. This hypermutability is related to its role as the major site of cytosine methylation with the attendant risk of spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine (5mC to yield thymine. Cytosine methylation, however, also occurs in the context of CpNpG sites in the human genome, an unsurprising finding since the intrinsic symmetry of CpNpG renders it capable of supporting a semi-conservative model of replication of the methylation pattern. Recently, it has become clear that significant DNA methylation occurs in a CpHpG context (where H = A, C or T in a variety of human somatic tissues. If we assume that CpHpG methylation also occurs in the germline, and that 5mC deamination can occur within a CpHpG context, then we might surmise that methylated CpHpG sites could also constitute mutation hotspots causing human genetic disease. To test this postulate, 54,625 missense and nonsense mutations from 2,113 genes causing inherited disease were retrieved from the Human Gene Mutation Database http://www.hgmd.org. Some 18.2 per cent of these pathological lesions were found to be C → T and G → A transitions located in CpG dinucleotides (compatible with a model of methylation-mediated deamination of 5mC, an approximately ten-fold higher proportion than would have been expected by chance alone. The corresponding proportion for the CpHpG trinucleotide was 9.9 per cent, an approximately two-fold higher proportion than would have been expected by chance. We therefore estimate that ~5 per cent of missense/nonsense mutations causing human inherited disease may be attributable to methylation-mediated deamination of 5mC within a CpHpG context.

  13. CP violating mixings of toponium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, U.

    1988-01-01

    In the present thesis the possibility of an admixture χ of the 2 1 P 1 toponium state which has the CP quantum number -1 to the 2 3 S 1 toponium state with CP quantum number +1 is discussed. The value of χ was estimated in 3 different models of the electroweak interaction. In the standard model the lowest contribution to χ is of 6th order in the weak coupling g or of 4th order in g and of 2nd order in the strong coupling g S . The Feynman diagrams which contribute to χ contain 2 loops. According to a crude estimate of these diagrams it is expected that they yield a contribution smaller than 10 -10 . In the model with extended Higgs sector - for a top-quark mass of 45 GeV - a value of 7x10 -4 resulted for χ. For a top-quark mass of 100 GeV it is expected that χ is even of the order of magnitude of 10 -2 . The large contributions originate from CP violating coupling neutral Higgs particles. In the right-left symmetric model two contributions to χ were calculated. The first one results from the exchange of the right- and left-handed W bosons. For a mass m R =500 GeV this contribution lies at χ ≅ 10 -14 . The second contribution is again based on the exchange of two neutral CP violating coupling Higgs particles. It lies in the order of magnitude at 10 -8 . Possibilities were indicated to find the estimated admixture χ in an experiment. A correlation in the 3-gluon decay of toponium and the decay of toponium into exclusive decays was discussed. (orig./HSI) [de

  14. Conventional methods fail to measure cp(omega) of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    thermal-wave method does not measure the isobaric frequency-dependent specific heat cp(omega). This method rather measures a "longitudinal" frequency-dependent specific heat, a quantity defined and detailed here that is in between cp(omega) and cV(omega). This result means that no reliable wide......-frequency measurements of cp(omega) on liquids approaching the calorimetric glass transition exist. We briefly discuss consequences for experiment....

  15. Constraints on CP violating four-fermion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.G.; McKellar, B.

    1996-04-01

    It has been shown that CP violating electron-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon interactions can induce atomic electric dipole moments and are therefore constrained from experimental data. We show that using the experimental upper bounds on neutron and electron electric dipole moments, one can also obtain constraints, in some cases better ones, on these interactions. In addition stringent constraints can also be obtained for muon-quark and tauon-quark four-fermion CP violating interactions, which cannot be constrained from atomic electric dipole moment experiments. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  16. Two Discrete RuCp* (Cp*=Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) Binding Modes of N-Confused Porphyrins: Peripheral π Complex and Sitting Atop Ruthenocenophane Complex by Skeletal Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaaki; Mitsuno, Koki; Mori, Shigeki; Itoyama, Shuhei; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Ishida, Masatoshi; Furuta, Hiroyuki

    2018-05-07

    Complexation of a RuCp* cation with N-confused tetraarylporphyrins (NCPs) forms directly bound ruthenium(II) pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*) π-complex on a specific meso-aryl group (e.g., phenyl) neighboring peripheral imino nitrogen of NCPs in high yields. In contrast, in the case of NCPs bearing bulky meso-substituents (e.g., 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl), new ruthenocenophane-like complex embedded on an N-confused calix[4]phyrin was formed through multiple C-H bond activation of methyl groups of Cp* ligand. The mechanistic insight into the formation of the ruthenocenophane was derived from DFT calculations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Using Authentic Science in the Classroom: NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B.; Schwerin, T.; Low, R.

    2015-11-01

    A key NASA education goal is to attract and retain students in science, technology engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. When teachers engage students in the examination of authentic data derived from NASA satellite missions, they simultaneously build 21st century technology skills as well as core content knowledge about the Earth and space. In this session, we highlight coordinated efforts by NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) programs to enhance educator accessibility to data resources, distribute state-of -the-art data tools and expand pathways for educators to find and use data resources. The group discussion explores how NASA SMD EPO efforts can further improve teacher access to authentic NASA data, identifies the types of tools and lessons most requested by the community, and explores how communication and collaboration between product developers and classroom educators using data tools and products can be enhanced.

  18. CP violation in a multi-Higgs-doublet model with flavor-changing neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.; He, X.

    1994-01-01

    We study CP violation in multi-Higgs-doublet model based on a S 3 xZ 3 horizontal symmetry where the CKM phase is not the principal source of CP violation. We consider two mechanisms for CP violation in this model: (a) CP violation due to complex Yukawa couplings, and (b) CP violation due to scalar-pseudoscalar Higgs boson mixings. Both mechanisms can explain the observed CP violation in the neutral kaon system. ε'/ε due to neutral Higgs boson exchange is small in both mechanisms, but charged Higgs boson contributions can be as large as 10 -4 for (a) and 10 -3 for (b). CP violation in the neutral B system is, however, quite different from the minimal standard model. The neutron electric dipole moment can be as large as the present experimental bound, and can be used to constrain charged Higgs boson masses. The electron EDM is one order of magnitude below the experimental bound in case (b) and smaller in case (a)

  19. Super-PINGU for measurement of the leptonic CP-phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razzaque, Soebur [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg,PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Smirnov, A.Yu. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics,Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34100 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-05-27

    We explore a possibility to measure the CP-violating phase δ using multi-megaton scale ice or water Cherenkov detectors with low, (0.2–1) GeV, energy threshold assuming that the neutrino mass hierarchy is identified. We elaborate the relevant theoretical and phenomenological aspects of this possibility. The distributions of the ν{sub μ} (track) and ν{sub e} (cascade) events in the neutrino energy and zenith angle (E{sub ν}−θ{sub z}) plane have been computed for different values of δ. We study properties and distinguishability of the distributions before and after smearing over the neutrino energy and zenith angle. The CP-violation effects are not washed out by smearing, and furthermore, the sensitivity to δ increases with decrease of the energy threshold. The ν{sub e} events contribute to the CP-sensitivity as much as the ν{sub μ} events. While sensitivity of PINGU to δ is low, we find that future possible upgrade, Super-PINGU, with few megaton effective volume at (0.5–1) GeV and e.g. after 4 years of exposure will be able to disentangle values of δ=π/2, π, 3π/2 from δ=0 with “distinguishability” (∼ significance in σ’s) S{sub σ}{sup tot}=(3–8), (6–14), (3–8) correspondingly. Here the intervals of S{sub σ}{sup tot} are due to various uncertainties of detection of the low energy events, especially the flavor identification, systematics, etc. Super-PINGU can be used simultaneously for the proton decay searches.

  20. NASA Lunar Mining and Construction Activities and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    The Space Exploration Policy enacted by the US Congress in 2005 calls for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to implement a sustained and affordable human and robotic program to explore the solar system and beyond; Extend human presence across the solar system, starting with a human return to the Moon by the year 2020, in preparation for human exploration of Mars and other destinations; Develop the innovative technologies, knowledge, and infrastructures both to explore and to support decisions about the destinations for human exploration; and Promote international and commercial participation in exploration to further U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests. In 2006, NASA released the Lunar Architecture Study, which proposed establishing a lunar Outpost on the Moon with international participation to extend human presence beyond Earth's orbit, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere. The establishment of sustained human presence on the Moon for science and exploration combines the design, integration, and operation challenges experienced from both the short Apollo lunar missions and the build-up and sustained crew operations of the International Space Station (ISS). Apollo experience reminds developers and mission planners that hardware must operate under extremely harsh environmental and abrasive conditions and every kilogram of mass and payload must be critical to achieve the mission s objectives due to the difficulty and cost of reaching the lunar surface. Experience from the ISS reminds developers and mission planners that integration of all hardware must be designed and planned from the start of the program, operations and evolution of capabilities on a continuous basis are important, and long-term life-cycle costs and logistical needs are equally or more important than minimizing early development and test costs. Overarching all of this is