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Sample records for exploits soil depth

  1. Efficient Depth Map Compression Exploiting Segmented Color Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milani, Simone; Zanuttigh, Pietro; Zamarin, Marco

    2011-01-01

    performances is still an open research issue. This paper presents a novel compression scheme that exploits a segmentation of the color data to predict the shape of the different surfaces in the depth map. Then each segment is approximated with a parameterized plane. In case the approximation is sufficiently...

  2. KBRA OPWP Soil Rooting Depth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  3. Soil carbon: Depth of understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Bernhard; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Earth system models disagree on the fate of soil organic carbon under climate change. Reproducing spatial patterns of the climatological temperature sensitivity of soil carbon is a necessary condition for trustworthy simulations of the carbon-cycle-climate feedback.

  4. Wyner-Ziv Coding of Depth Maps Exploiting Color Motion Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmistraro, Matteo; Zamarin, Marco; Forchhammer, Søren

    2013-01-01

    of depth maps exploiting corresponding color information is proposed. Due to the high correlation of the motion in color and corresponding depth videos, motion information from the decoded color signal can effectively be exploited to generate accurate side information for the depth signal, allowing...

  5. Sampling depth confounds soil acidification outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the northern Great Plains (NGP) of North America, surface sampling depths of 0-15 or 0-20 cm are suggested for testing soil characteristics such as pH. However, acidification is often most pronounced near the soil surface. Thus, sampling deeper can potentially dilute (increase) pH measurements an...

  6. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  7. KBRA OPWP Soil Depth to Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  8. Physicochemical properties of soil under two different depths in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variations in the physicochemical properties of soil at two different depths in a tropical secondary forest of International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria was investigated. Soil samples were collected at three random points each from twenty-four sampling plots at predetermined depths of 0-15cm and ...

  9. processes controlling the depth distribution of soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian; Wilson, Brian; Koen, Terry

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the processes controlling the depth distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) has two major purposes: A. Providing insights into the dynamics of SOC) that can be used for managing soil organic carbon and improving soil carbon sequestration B. The prediction of SOC stocks from surface measurements of soil carbon. We investigated the depth distributions of SOC in a range of soils under a number of land management practices tested how various mathematical models fitted these distributions. The mathematical models included exponential, power functions, inverse functions and multiphase exponential functions. While spline functions have been shown to fit depth distributions of SOC, the use of these functions is largely a data fitting exercise and does not necessarily provide insight into the processes of SOC dynamics. In general soils that were depleted of SOC (under traditional tillage and land management practices that deplete the soil of SOC) had depth distributions that were fitted closely by a number of mathematical functions, including the exponential function. As the amount of SOC in the soil increased, especially in the surface soils, it became clear that the only mathematical function that could reasonably fit the depth distribution of SOC was the multiphase exponential model. To test the mathematical models further, several of the depth distributions were tested with semi-log plots of depth v log (SOC). These plots clearly showed that there were definite phases in the distribution of SOC with depth. The implication is that different processes are occurring in the addition and losses of SOC within each of these phases, and the phases identified by the semi-log plots appear to be equivalent to the zones of SOC cycling postulated by Eyles et al. (2015). The identification of these zones has implications for the management and sequestration of carbon in soils. Eyles, A, Coghlan, G, Hardie, M, Hovenden, M and Bridle, K (2015). Soil carbon sequestration

  10. Dryland soil microbial communities display spatial biogeographic patterns associated with soil depth and soil parent material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are common to drylands worldwide. We employed replicated, spatially nested sampling and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the soil microbial communities in three soils derived from different parent material (sandstone, shale, and gypsum). For each soil type, two depths (biocrusts, 0–1 cm; below-crust soils, 2–5 cm) and two horizontal spatial scales (15 cm and 5 m) were sampled. In all three soils, Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria demonstrated significantly higher relative abundance in the biocrusts, while Chloroflexi and Archaea were significantly enriched in the below-crust soils. Biomass and diversity of the communities in biocrusts or below-crust soils did not differ with soil type. However, biocrusts on gypsum soil harbored significantly larger populations of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria and lower populations of Cyanobacteria. Numerically dominant operational taxonomic units (OTU; 97% sequence identity) in the biocrusts were conserved across the soil types, whereas two dominant OTUs in the below-crust sand and shale soils were not identified in the gypsum soil. The uniformity with which small-scale vertical community differences are maintained across larger horizontal spatial scales and soil types is a feature of dryland ecosystems that should be considered when designing management plans and determining the response of biocrusts to environmental disturbances.

  11. A Simple Model of the Variability of Soil Depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil depth tends to vary from a few centimeters to several meters, depending on many natural and environmental factors. We hypothesize that the cumulative effect of these factors on soil depth, which is chiefly dependent on the process of biogeochemical weathering, is particularly affected by soil porewater (i.e., solute transport and infiltration from the land surface. Taking into account evidence for a non-Gaussian distribution of rock weathering rates, we propose a simple mathematical model to describe the relationship between soil depth and infiltration flux. The model was tested using several areas in mostly semi-arid climate zones. The application of this model demonstrates the use of fundamental principles of physics to quantify the coupled effects of the five principal soil-forming factors of Dokuchaev.

  12. Active layer and permafrost properties, including snow depth, soil temperature, and soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains soil temperature, soil moisture, thaw depth, and snow depth data collected at test sites near Barrow, Alaska, during the following years. Soil...

  13. Biogeography of soil Thaumarchaeota in relation to soil depth and land usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinda; Seuradge, Brent J; Neufeld, Josh D

    2017-02-01

    Although Thaumarchaeota are important contributors to ammonia oxidation in terrestrial habitats, distributions of ammonia oxidizers along soil depth profiles are poorly understood, especially in relation to distinct land usages. Leveraging the close proximity of forest, field and agricultural plots at the RARE: Charitable Research Reserve, we examined soil thaumarchaeotal biogeography at three different depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-45 cm) from plots within areas of contrasting land usage. Data from high-throughput sequencing of thaumarchaeotal 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that OTU richness was affected significantly by depth and land-use type. Specifically, thaumarchaeotal diversity was higher in soils from forest sites than from field sites, and lower within 0-15 cm soils than either 15-30 cm or 30-45 cm soils. Soil land-use type influenced the relative abundance of the Soil Crenarchaeota Group (SCG), with a lower relative abundance of SCG in forest sites compared to field sites. At the OTU level, thaumarchaeotal communities changed with increasing soil depth for agricultural soils, in contrast to homogeneous depth profiles generated from forest site samples. Soil pH was the strongest factor impacting thaumarchaeotal community composition and, importantly, the evenness of archaeal taxa. Nitrogen, carbon and soil texture shaped thaumarchaeotal community composition among field site samples. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. physicochemical properties of soil under two different depths

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR SEGUN

    PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL UNDER TWO DIFFERENT DEPTHS. IN A TROPICAL FOREST OF INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TROPICAL. AGRICULTURE, ABEOKUTA, IBADAN , NIGERIA. Oladoye A.O.. Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Agriculture, P.M.B. 2240,. Abeokuta ...

  15. Depth Effects on Plant Residue Decay in Diverse Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Edward; Ellert, Benjamin; Janzen, Henry; Helgason, Bobbi; Beare, Michael; Curtin, Denis

    2017-04-01

    Decay of plant residues is tied to many ecosystem functions, affecting atmospheric CO2, plant-available nutrients, microbial diversity, soil organic matter quality, among others. The rate of decay, in turn, is governed by soil type and management, location in the soil profile, and environmental variables, some of which may be changing in coming decades. Our objective in this study was to elucidate the decomposition dynamics of plant-derived C and N at different soil depths. To describe mathematically the importance of these variables across a broad scale, we established a long-term study at two sites in Canada and one site in New Zealand. At each site, labelled barley straw (13C = 10.2 atom%, 15N = 8.3 atom %; C = 37.9%; N = 0.95%; C:N = 40) was installed at 3 depths (5-10, 20-25 and 40-45 cm). Soil temperature was logged at each depth. Samples were collected at different times over 5-6 year after application of the residues. Data on recovery and kinetics of residue C and N over the experimental period will be discussed as well as 13C- PLFA results.

  16. Evidence of hydrocarbon pollution in soil exploiting satellite optical and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Galvan-Pineda, J.; Espinosa-Hernandez, A.; Jimenez-Escalona, J. C.; Ramos-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    includes field measurements collecting soil samples at depths of 0-30 cm and 30-60 cm, the implementation of an algorithm to exploit Landsat 5 and 7 images to identify polluted zones, and the implementation of an algorithm using Envisat ASAR and an incoherent scattering model to delineate the polluted soil. The laboratory analysis of the soil samples showed that in all cases the most contaminated region of the soil is the deeper layer (30-60 cm). The processing of the optical images identifies contaminated regions mainly for bare soils and short vegetation. For highly vegetated regions, the optical images do not detect the polluted soils because the wavelength of observation cannot penetrate vegetation. The radar algorithm indicates that the most contaminated zones showed the lowest backscattering coefficient in comparison to clean zones. Unlike optical images, the Envisat images allowed the identification of polluted zones even under high vegetation conditions.

  17. Prediction of soil depth using a soil-landscape regression model: a case study on forest soils in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C C; Chen, Z S; Duh, C T; Horng, F W

    2001-01-01

    Techniques for conventional forest soil surveys in Taiwan need to be further developed in order to save time and money. Although some soil-landscape regression models have been developed to describe and predict soil properties and depths, they have seldom been studied in Taiwan. This study establishes linear soil-landscape regression models related to soil depths and landscape factors found in the forest soils of southern Taiwan. These models were evaluated by validating the models according to their mean errors and root mean square errors. The study was carried out at the 60,000 ha Chishan Forest Working Circle. About 310 soil pedons were collected. The landscape factors included elevation, slope, aspect, and surface stone contents. Sixty percent of the total field samples were used to establish the soil-landscape regression models, and forty % were used for validation. The sampling strategy indicated that each representative pedon covers an area of about 147 ha. The number of samples was appropriate considering the available time and budget. The single variate and/or multivariate linear regression soil-landscape models were successfully established. Those models revealed significant inter-relations among the soil depths of the B and B+BC horizons, solum thickness, and landscape factors, including slope and surface stone contents (p stone should be collected in a field soil survey to increase the precision of soil depth prediction of the B and B+BC horizons, and the solum thickness.

  18. Measuring Sandy Bottom Dynamics by Exploiting Depth from Stereo Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musumeci, Rosaria E.; Farinella, Giovanni M.; Foti, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an imaging system for measuring sandy bottom dynamics is proposed. The system exploits stereo sequences and projected laser beams to build the 3D shape of the sandy bottom during time. The reconstruction is used by experts of the field to perform accurate measurements and analysis...

  19. Response of seasonal soil freeze depth to climate change across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Tingjun; Frauenfeld, Oliver W.; Wang, Kang; Cao, Bin; Zhong, Xinyue; Su, Hang; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-05-01

    The response of seasonal soil freeze depth to climate change has repercussions for the surface energy and water balance, ecosystems, the carbon cycle, and soil nutrient exchange. Despite its importance, the response of soil freeze depth to climate change is largely unknown. This study employs the Stefan solution and observations from 845 meteorological stations to investigate the response of variations in soil freeze depth to climate change across China. Observations include daily air temperatures, daily soil temperatures at various depths, mean monthly gridded air temperatures, and the normalized difference vegetation index. Results show that soil freeze depth decreased significantly at a rate of -0.18 ± 0.03 cm yr-1, resulting in a net decrease of 8.05 ± 1.5 cm over 1967-2012 across China. On the regional scale, soil freeze depth decreases varied between 0.0 and 0.4 cm yr-1 in most parts of China during 1950-2009. By investigating potential climatic and environmental driving factors of soil freeze depth variability, we find that mean annual air temperature and ground surface temperature, air thawing index, ground surface thawing index, and vegetation growth are all negatively associated with soil freeze depth. Changes in snow depth are not correlated with soil freeze depth. Air and ground surface freezing indices are positively correlated with soil freeze depth. Comparing these potential driving factors of soil freeze depth, we find that freezing index and vegetation growth are more strongly correlated with soil freeze depth, while snow depth is not significant. We conclude that air temperature increases are responsible for the decrease in seasonal freeze depth. These results are important for understanding the soil freeze-thaw dynamics and the impacts of soil freeze depth on ecosystem and hydrological process.

  20. Effects of soil amendment on gas depth profiles in soil monoliths using direct mass spectrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S K; Lloyd, D

    2002-08-01

    Land use and agricultural practices are known to influence the source and sink concentrations of various gases, including greenhouse gases (NOx CH4 and CO2). in soils. With everincreasing production of domestic sewage sludge and the prohibition of disposal at sea, pressure on waste disposal increases. Anaerobically digested domestic sewage sludge and/or lime were applied to an upland. Scottish soil and their effects on gas depth profiles monitored as indicators of microbial processes of the soil ecosystem. The concentrations of various gases (Ar, O2. CO2, CH4, N2, NOx) were measured simultaneously at each depth using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). This technique enables the direct measurement of multiple gas species throughout soil cores with minimal disturbance. Intact soil monoliths were collected from the sample site, following amendment, and maintained in a constant temperature, environmental growth chambers. Statistical analyses (one-way ANOVA and LSD tests) were conducted to identify the depths at which gas concentrations in amended cores were significantly different from those in control (un-amended) cores. Significant effects were observed on the concentration of CO2, CH4, NOx and N2 at certain depths. Average CH4 concentration was consistently higher (>1 microM) in the upper horizon following application of sludge and sludge and lime together. N2 and NOx concentrations were elevated in cores treated with lime by approximately 100 and 32 microM. respectively, in much of the upper horizon. CO2 concentration increased above control mean values, at certain depths, following application of either sludge or lime. Some explanation for the changes in soil gas concentration was provided by reference to the microorganism assemblages and the gases associated with biochemistry of nitrification, denitrification, methane oxidation and methanogenesis.

  1. Identification of novel Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota clusters associated with different depth layers of a forest soil

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaro, Manuel; Widmer, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Archaea have been shown to be ubiquitous among soil microbial communities. However, our knowledge on their diversity and spatial distribution in soil ecosystems is still limited. This study was conducted to investigate archaeal community changes along a forest soil depth profile in Unterehrendingen, Switzerland. From four consecutive soil depth layers, bulk soil DNA was extracted. Archaea-specific PCR amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) was performed and combined with re...

  2. Large-extent digital soil mapping approaches for total soil depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Titia; Lacoste, Marine; Saby, Nicolas P. A.; Arrouays, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Total soil depth (SDt) plays a key role in supporting various ecosystem services and properties, including plant growth, water availability and carbon stocks. Therefore, predictive mapping of SDt has been included as one of the deliverables within the GlobalSoilMap project. In this work SDt was predicted for France following the directions of GlobalSoilMap, which requires modelling at 90m resolution. This first method, further referred to as DM, consisted of modelling the deterministic trend in SDt using data mining, followed by a bias correction and ordinary kriging of the residuals. Considering the total surface area of France, being about 540K km2, employed methods may need to be able dealing with large data sets. Therefore, a second method, multi-resolution kriging (MrK) for large datasets, was implemented. This method consisted of modelling the deterministic trend by a linear model, followed by interpolation of the residuals. For the two methods, the general trend was assumed to be explained by the biotic and abiotic environmental conditions, as described by the Soil-Landscape paradigm. The mapping accuracy was evaluated by an internal validation and its concordance with previous soil maps. In addition, the prediction interval for DM and the confidence interval for MrK were determined. Finally, the opportunities and limitations of both approaches were evaluated. The results showed consistency in mapped spatial patterns and a good prediction of the mean values. DM was better capable in predicting extreme values due to the bias correction. Also, DM was more powerful in capturing the deterministic trend than the linear model of the MrK approach. However, MrK was found to be more straightforward and flexible in delivering spatial explicit uncertainty measures. The validation indicated that DM was more accurate than MrK. Improvements for DM may be expected by predicting soil depth classes. MrK shows potential for modelling beyond the country level, at high

  3. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT SOIL TILLAGE VARIANTS ON QUALITY OF SEED DISTRIBUTION QUALITY PER SURFACE AND DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Šumanovac

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present influence of different soil tillage variants on quality of seed distribution per surface and depth. A sowing experiment was set up in three soil tillage variants: a repeated disking, b conventional tillage, c ploughing + harrowing. Soil levelling, effects of longitudinal and transverzal distribution as well as seed distribution per depth were analyzed by the investigation. The research results indicate the fact that no soil tillage variant is characterized by achieving satisfactory sowing quality . It means that reduced soil tillage application is justifiable in terms of energetic aspect, work productivity increase, sowing performance in optimal agricultural terms etc., compared to conventional soil tillage.

  4. Variations in bacterial and archaeal communities along depth profiles of Alaskan soil cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu Mani; Kim, Mincheol; Kim, Yongwon; Byun, Eunji; Yang, Ji-Woong; Ahn, Jinho; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2018-01-11

    Understating the microbial communities and ecological processes that influence their structure in permafrost soils is crucial for predicting the consequences of climate change. In this study we investigated the bacterial and archaeal communities along depth profiles of four soil cores collected across Alaska. The bacterial and archaeal diversity (amplicon sequencing) overall decreased along the soil depth but the depth-wise pattern of their abundances (qPCR) varied by sites. The community structure of bacteria and archaea displayed site-specific pattern, with a greater role of soil geochemical characteristics rather than soil depth. In particular, we found significant positive correlations between methane trapped in cores and relative abundance of methanogenic archaeal genera, indicating a strong association between microbial activity and methane production in subsurface soils. We observed that bacterial phylogenetic community assembly tended to be more clustered in surface soils than in deeper soils. Analyses of phylogenetic community turnover among depth profiles across cores indicated that the relative influence of deterministic and stochastic processes was mainly determined by soil properties rather than depth. Overall, our findings emphasize that the vertical distributions of bacterial and archaeal communities in permafrost soils are to a large extent determined by the variation in site-specific soil properties.

  5. The impact of assumed error variances on surface soil moisture and snow depth hydrologic data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate knowledge of antecedent soil moisture and snow depth conditions is often important for obtaining reliable hydrological simulations of stream flow. Data assimilation (DA) methods can be used to integrate remotely-sensed (RS) soil moisture and snow depth retrievals into a hydrology model and...

  6. Measuring soil frost depth in forest ecosystems with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; John L. Campbell; James B. Shanley; Stanley. Zarnoch

    2014-01-01

    Soil frost depth in forest ecosystems can be variable and depends largely on early winter air temperatures and the amount and timing of snowfall. A thorough evaluation of ecological responses to seasonally frozen ground is hampered by our inability to adequately characterize the frequency, depth, duration and intensity of soil frost events. We evaluated the use of...

  7. Classification of Effective Soil Depth by Using Multinomial Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Chan, H. C.; Chen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Classification of effective soil depth is a task of determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in Taiwan. The "Slopeland Conservation and Utilization Act" categorizes the slopeland into agriculture and husbandry land, land suitable for forestry and land for enhanced conservation according to the factors including average slope, effective soil depth, soil erosion and parental rock. However, sit investigation of the effective soil depth requires a cost-effective field work. This research aimed to classify the effective soil depth by using multinomial logistic regression with the environmental factors. The Wen-Shui Watershed located at the central Taiwan was selected as the study areas. The analysis of multinomial logistic regression is performed by the assistance of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The effective soil depth was categorized into four levels including deeper, deep, shallow and shallower. The environmental factors of slope, aspect, digital elevation model (DEM), curvature and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were selected for classifying the soil depth. An Error Matrix was then used to assess the model accuracy. The results showed an overall accuracy of 75%. At the end, a map of effective soil depth was produced to help planners and decision makers in determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in the study areas.

  8. Soil depth-age relationship of landslides on deforested hillslopes, taranaki, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trustrum, N. A.; De Rose, R. C.

    1988-03-01

    A soil chronosequence was examined on landslide scars of different ages in the Taranaki hill country. This area, underlain by Tertiary silty sandstone, was deforested 90 years ago. Sequential aerial photographs, historical terrestrial photographs and documented erosion events were used to date landslide scars formed since forest removal and establish age control for the chronosequence. Soil depth increased with landslide age and was used as an index of soil formation. Mean soil depth increased from 5 cm on 15 year old scars to 20 cm on 82 year old scars. Measures soil depths were attributed to rafted soil, colluvium and bedrock weathering. A chronofunction was derived by regressing mean soil depth against the logarithm of known scar age. Similarly, a second chronofunction was derived by excluding depths of rafted soil from the calculation of mean soil depth to describe soil accumulation on exposed bedrock within the landslide scar. This chronofunction showed a better correlation ( r2 = 0.92 compared with r2 = 0.79) and can give an estimate of the age of other landslide scars to within ±27% for ages up to 90 years. The rate of soil depth increase averaged 3.5 mm yr -1 over the first 40 years after slipping but dropped to 1.2 mm yr -1 over the following 50 years. The logarithmic chronofunction suggests that the rate of soil formation further decreases beyond 90 years. Soil formation is primarily a result of bedrock weathering and accumulation of colluvium derived from surface fragmentation of exposed bedrock and crumbling scar margins.

  9. Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  10. Trait-based characterisation of soil exploitation strategies of banana, weeds and cover plant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Tardy

    Full Text Available Cover plants can be introduced in cropping systems to provide agroecosystem services, including weed control via competition for resources. There is currently no consensus on how to identify the best cover plant species, while trait-based approaches are promising for screening plant species due to their agroecosystem service provision potential. This study was carried out to characterize soil exploitation strategies of cover plant species in banana agroecosystems using a trait-based approach, and in turn identify cover plant species with a high weed control potential via competition for soil resources in banana cropping systems. A field experiment was conducted on 17 cover plant species, two weed species and two banana cultivars grown individually. Four functional traits were measured. Two of them (i.e., the size of the zone explored by roots and the root impact density were used to characterize root system soil exploration patterns. Two other traits (i.e., specific root length and root diameter were used to characterize resource acquisition within the soil zone explored by the roots. All studied traits exhibited marked variations among species. The findings suggested a trade-off between the abilities of species to develop a limited number of large diameter roots exploring a large soil zone versus many thin roots exploring a smaller soil zone. Three soil-resource exploitation strategies were identified among species: (i with large diameter roots that explore a large soil zone; (ii with small diameter roots and a high specific length that explore a smaller soil zone; and (iii with a high total root-impact density and an intermediate specific root length that explore the uppermost soil layers. Interestingly, in our panel of species, no correlations with regard to belowground and aboveground strategies were noted: species with an acquisitive belowground strategy could display an acquisitive or a conservative aboveground strategy. The findings of

  11. Miscanthus-derived SOC: numerically declining over soil depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxian; Schäfer, Gerhard; Duplay, Joëlle; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Miscanthus is one of the most efficient perennial bioenergy crops for wide establishment and distribution. Most of the previous reports had shown the benefits of Miscanthus cultivation in soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) mitigation. However, some other papers pointed out that the Miscanthus-derived SOC is mainly of particulate organic matter and the labile quality of particulate organic matter may bear great uncertainties in GHGs emissions. This urges the necessity to investigate the quality and mineralization potential of Miscanthus-derived SOC. This study investigated soil profiles deep to 1 m from 20 yr Miscanthus fields in France and Switzerland. Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration and δ13C compositions of all the soil layers (0-10, 10-40, 40-70 and 70-100 cm) were determined. Our results show that: 1) Miscanthus cultivation can in general increase the SOC stocks compared to the Grassland, while the benefits of SOC sequestration may only constrain to the surface soil. Isotopically, the Miscanthus-derived SOC ranged from 69% the top 10 cm soil down to only 7% in the 70 to 100 cm layer, cautioning the use of SOC stocks on the surface soil to estimate the total net benefits of Miscanthus cultivation in terms of sequestrating atmospheric CO2. 2) Compared to the Grassland soils, the surface soils on the Miscanthus fields tended to have a risk of acidification (pH values down to 6) and exceeded contents of P and K, adding another precaution to the environmental impacts of Miscanthus cultivation in the entire Upper Rhine Region. Overall, changes of soil characteristics must be included into Life Cycle Assessment to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of long-term Miscanthus cultivation.

  12. Depth distribution of preferential flow patterns in a sandy loam soil as affected by tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Petersen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-tracer studies using the anionic dye Brilliant Blue FCF were conducted on a structured sandy loam soil (Typic Agrudalf. 25 mm of dye solution was applied to the surface of 11 1.6 x 1.6 m field plots, some of which had been subjected to conventional seed bed preparation (harrowing while others had been rotovated to either 5 or 15 cm depth before sowing. The soil was excavated to about 160 cm depth one or two days after dye application. Flow patterns and structural features appearing on vertical or horizontal cross sections were examined and photographed. The flow patterns were digitized, and depth functions for the number of activated flow pathways and the degree of dye coverage were calculated. Dye was found below 100 cm depth on 26 out of 33 vertical cross sections made in conventionally tilled plots showing that preferential flow was a prevailing phenomenon. The depth-averaged number of stained flow pathways in the 25-100 cm layer was significantly smaller in a plot rotovated to 5 cm depth than in a conventionally tilled plot, both under relatively dry initial soil conditions and when the entire soil profiles were initially at field capacity. There were no examples of dye penetration below 25 cm depth one month after deep rotovation. Distinct horizontal structures in flow patterns appearing at 20-40 cm depth coupled with changes in flow domains indicated soil layering with abrupt changes in soil structure and hydraulic properties.

  13. Depth-Dependent Mineral Soil CO2 Production Processes: Sensitivity to Harvesting-Induced Changes in Soil Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Lisa; Myette, Amy; Beltrami, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Forest harvesting induces a step change in the climatic variables (temperature and moisture), that control carbon dioxide (CO2) production arising from soil organic matter decomposition within soils. Efforts to examine these vertically complex relationships in situ within soil profiles are lacking. In this study we examined how the climatic controls on CO2 production change within vertically distinct layers of the soil profile in intact and clearcut forest soils of a humid temperate forest system of Atlantic Canada. We measured mineral soil temperature (0, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 cm depth) and moisture (0-15 cm and 30-60 cm depth), along with CO2 surface efflux and subsurface concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 35, 50, 75 and 100 cm depth) in 1 m deep soil pits at 4 sites represented by two forest-clearcut pairs over a complete annual cycle. We examined relationships between surface efflux at each site, and soil heat, moisture, and mineral soil CO2 production. Following clearcut harvesting we observed increases in temperature through depth (1-2°C annually; often in excess of 4°C in summer and spring), alongside increases in soil moisture (30%). We observed a systematic breakdown in the expected exponential relationship between CO2 production and heat with mineral soil depth, consistent with an increase in the role moisture plays in constraining CO2 production. These findings should be considered in efforts to model and characterize mineral soil organic matter decomposition in harvested forest soils.

  14. Depth of soil water uptake by tropical rainforest trees during dry periods: does tree dimension matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Clément; Hérault, Bruno; Rossi, Vivien; Burban, Benoit; Bréchet, Claude; Bonal, Damien

    2013-12-01

    Though the root biomass of tropical rainforest trees is concentrated in the upper soil layers, soil water uptake by deep roots has been shown to contribute to tree transpiration. A precise evaluation of the relationship between tree dimensions and depth of water uptake would be useful in tree-based modelling approaches designed to anticipate the response of tropical rainforest ecosystems to future changes in environmental conditions. We used an innovative dual-isotope labelling approach (deuterium in surface soil and oxygen at 120-cm depth) coupled with a modelling approach to investigate the role of tree dimensions in soil water uptake in a tropical rainforest exposed to seasonal drought. We studied 65 trees of varying diameter and height and with a wide range of predawn leaf water potential (Ψpd) values. We confirmed that about half of the studied trees relied on soil water below 100-cm depth during dry periods. Ψpd was negatively correlated with depth of water extraction and can be taken as a rough proxy of this depth. Some trees showed considerable plasticity in their depth of water uptake, exhibiting an efficient adaptive strategy for water and nutrient resource acquisition. We did not find a strong relationship between tree dimensions and depth of water uptake. While tall trees preferentially extract water from layers below 100-cm depth, shorter trees show broad variations in mean depth of water uptake. This precludes the use of tree dimensions to parameterize functional models.

  15. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  16. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-21

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  17. Variation in urease and β-glucosidase activities with soil depth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in urease and β-glucosidase activities with soil depth and root density in a 'Cripp's Pink'/M7 apple orchard under conventional and organic management. André H. Meyer, John Wooldridge, Joanna F. Dames ...

  18. Influence of soil parameters on depth of oil waste penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rychlicki Stanislaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A measurement post for testing propagation of hydrocarbon contamination in a model of a near-surface soil layer and its remediation, are characterized in the paper. Generalized results of laboratory observations require meeting similarity criteria of the laboratory and actual processes. These requirements were used when designing the measurement post. A successful attempt to match a theoretical model describing oil products filtration necessitates certain conditions, e.g. homogeneity of the physical model of soil and characteristic of the course of the analyzed processes.

  19. Microbial Community Dynamics in Soil Depth Profiles Over 120,000 Years of Ecosystem Development

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    Stephanie Turner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Along a long-term ecosystem development gradient, soil nutrient contents and mineralogical properties change, therefore probably altering soil microbial communities. However, knowledge about the dynamics of soil microbial communities during long-term ecosystem development including progressive and retrogressive stages is limited, especially in mineral soils. Therefore, microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community composition (pyrosequencing as well as their controlling soil properties were investigated in soil depth profiles along the 120,000 years old Franz Josef chronosequence (New Zealand. Additionally, in a microcosm incubation experiment the effects of particular soil properties, i.e., soil age, soil organic matter fraction (mineral-associated vs. particulate, O2 status, and carbon and phosphorus additions, on microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community patterns (T-RFLP were analyzed. The archaeal to bacterial abundance ratio not only increased with soil depth but also with soil age along the chronosequence, coinciding with mineralogical changes and increasing phosphorus limitation. Results of the incubation experiment indicated that archaeal abundances were less impacted by the tested soil parameters compared to Bacteria suggesting that Archaea may better cope with mineral-induced substrate restrictions in subsoils and older soils. Instead, archaeal communities showed a soil age-related compositional shift with the Bathyarchaeota, that were frequently detected in nutrient-poor, low-energy environments, being dominant at the oldest site. However, bacterial communities remained stable with ongoing soil development. In contrast to the abundances, the archaeal compositional shift was associated with the mineralogical gradient. Our study revealed, that archaeal and bacterial communities in whole soil profiles are differently affected by long-term soil development with archaeal communities probably being better adapted to

  20. Relationship between Depth of Soil Moisture Assessment and Turgidity of Coffee Plant in Selected Agroclimates

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    Rudy Erwiyono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Observation on the relationship between the depth of soil moisture assessment and turgidity of coffee plant has been carried out at 3 different agroclimates by survey method, i.e. Andungsari experimental station (Andosol soil type, >1.000 m asl. high, and rainfall type of C, Sumberasin experimental station (yellowish-red Mediterranean soil type, 450-500 m asl. high, and rainfall type of C, and Kaliwining experimental station (low humic glei soil type, 45 m asl. high, and rainfall type of D in order to assess the depth of soil moisture through soil profile influencing turgidity of coffee plants at three different agroclimates. The method of assessment is by fitting the relationship between the depth of soil moisture assessment and turgidity of coffee plant and their determination coefficients through the period of dry season up to early rainy season. Plant turgidity is evaluated from its relative water contents of the leaves sampled periodically at the same time as observation of soil moisture content. Plant turgidity is affected by soil moisture condition up to a certain depth which looks to be typical of the agroclimates. At Andungsari experimental station (high land it is necessary to assess soil moisture through the soil profile up to 100 cm deep in order to evaluate water stress of the plants; inversely, at Kaliwining experimental station in order to evaluate water stress of the plants it is just justified from the soil moisture condition of the soil surface layers (0-25 cm. Whereas at Sumberasin experimental station water stress of the plants could be predicted from soil moisture assessment of the surface layer depth or through the deeper layers of the soil profile either. Andungsari-1 and Lini S-795 clones are more resistant to drought than Kartika-2 clone at Andisol soil type with C rainfall type and elevation > 1000 m asl. BP-308 clone showed its response as relatively resistant to drought at yellowish red Mediterranean soil type with C

  1. Into the Deep: Variability in Soil Microbial Communities and Carbon Turnover Along a Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Wood, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored within deeper soil layers, but we know exceedingly little about the fate of this C or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. From the data that do exist, most organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization due to organo-metal co-precipitation and mineral-surface interactions. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, the turnover times of deep soil C, and sensitivity of this C to global environmental change. To address this critical research need, we quantified C pools, microbial communities and soil radiocarbon turnover times in bulk soils and soil fractions [free light (unprotected), dense (mineral-associated)] from 0-140 cm in replicate soil pits in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Unsurprisingly, we found soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C stocks dropped from 5.5 % at the surface to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C, and OM decomposition that highly favors free light C pools, even at depth. While previous work suggests these low C tropical subsoils contain small but metabolically active microbial communities at depths of ~100cm, these organisms appear highly OM limited, and preferentially degrade recent inputs. In the coming half century, tropical forests are predicted to see a 2 - 5 ° C temperature increase and substantial differences in rainfall amount and timing. The data described here represent baseline data for a site now undergoing a 4°C warming experiment; upcoming research will examine soil C storage and mean residence times during and post-warming to improve numerical models of ecosystem warming

  2. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-01-01

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha−1 yr−1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Given the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.

  3. [Relationships between typical vegetations, soil salinity, and groundwater depth in the Yellow River Delta of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Lei; Wang, De; Liu, Jun-Min; Wen, Xiao-Hu; Gao, Meng; Shao, Hong-Bo

    2013-09-01

    Soil salinity and groundwater depth are the two important factors affecting the vegetation growth and distribution in the Yellow River Delta. Through field investigation and statistical analysis, this paper studied the relationships between the typical vegetations (Suaeda heteroptera-Tamarix chinensis, Robinia pseudoacacia, Phragmites australis, and cotton) , soil salinity, and groundwater depth in the Delta. In the study area, groundwater depth had significant effects on soil salinity, with the average influence coefficient being 0.327. When the groundwater depth was 0.5-1.5 m, soil salinization was most severe. The vegetation growth in the Delta was poorer, with the NDVI in 78% of the total area being less than 0.4. Groundwater depth and soil salinity had significant effects on the vegetation distribution. Soil salinity had significant effects on the NDVI of R. pseudoacacia, S. heteroptera-T. chinensis, P. australis, and cotton, while groundwater depth had significant effects on the NDVI of S. heteroptera - T. chinensis, but lesser effects on the NDVI of P. australis, cotton and R. pseudoacacia.

  4. Enhanced degradation and soil depth effects on the fate of atrazine and major metabolites in Colorado and Mississippi soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutz, L Jason; Shaner, Dale L; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is to inform modelers of the differences in atrazine fate between s-triazine-adapted and nonadapted soils as a function of depth in the profile and to recommend atrazine and metabolite input values for pesticide process submodules. The objectives of this study were to estimate the atrazine-mineralizing bacterial population, cumulative atrazine mineralization, atrazine persistence, and metabolite (desethylatrazine [DEA], deisopropylatrazine [DIA], and hydroxyatrazine [HA]) formation and degradation in Colorado and Mississippi s-triazine-adapted and nonadapted soils at three depths (0-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm). Regardless of depth, the AMBP and cumulative atrazine mineralization was at least 3.8-fold higher in s-triazine-adapted than nonadapted soils. Atrazine half-life (T1/2) values pooled over nonadapted soils and depths approximated historic estimates (T1/2 = 60 d). Atrazine persistence in all depths of s-triazine-adapted soils was at least fourfold lower than that of the nonadapted soil. Atrazine metabolite concentrations were lower in s-triazine-adapted than in nonadapted soil by 35 d after incubation regardless of depth. Results indicate that (i) reasonable fate and transport modeling of atrazine will require identifying if soils are adapted to s-triazine herbicides. For example, our data confirm the 60-d T1/2 for atrazine in nonadapted soils, but a default input value of 6 d for atrazine is required for s-triazine adapted soils. (ii) Literature estimates for DEA, DIA, and HA T1/2 values in nonadapted soils are 52, 36, and 60 d, respectively, whereas our analysis indicates that reasonable T1/2 values for s-triazine-adapted soils are 10 d for DEA, 8 d for DIA, and 6 d for HA. (iii) An estimate for the relative distribution of DIA, DEA, and HA produced in nonadapted soils is 18, 72, and 10% of parent, respectively. In s-triazine-adapted soils, the values were 6, 23, and 71% for DIA, DEA, and HA, respectively. The effects of soil adaptation on

  5. Effect Of Depth Of Tillage On Soil Physical Conditions, Growth And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at Abakaliki, southeastern Nigerian during the raining seasons of 2000 – 2001. The experiment evaluated the changes in some soil physical properties owing to depth of tillage, and the effect on growth and yield of sweet potato. The tillage depth treatments included zero tillage, 10cm, 20cm, 30cm ...

  6. Simulation of emergence of winter wheat in response to soil temperature, water potential and planting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedling emergence is a critical stage in the establishment of dryland wheat. Soil temperature, soil water potential and planting depth are important factors influencing emergence. These factors have considerable spatio-temporal variation making it difficult to predict the timing and percentage of w...

  7. Bacterial and fungal communities respond differently to varying tillage depth in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Craig; Beare, Mike; Buckley, Hannah L; Lear, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    In arable cropping systems, reduced or conservation tillage practices are linked with improved soil quality, C retention and higher microbial biomass, but most long-term studies rarely focus on depths greater than 15 cm nor allow comparison of microbial community responses to agricultural practices. We investigated microbial community structure in a long-term field trial (12-years, Lincoln, New Zealand) established in a silt-loam soil over four depth ranges down to 30 cm. Our objectives were to investigate the degree of homogenisation of soil biological and chemical properties with depth, and to determine the main drivers of microbial community response to tillage. We hypothesised that soil microbiological responses would depend on tillage depth, observed by a homogenisation of microbial community composition within the tilled zone. Tillage treatments were mouldboard plough and disc harrow, impacting soil to ∼20 and ∼10 cm depth, respectively. These treatments were compared to a no-tillage treatment and two control treatments, both permanent pasture and permanent fallow. Bacterial and fungal communities collected from the site were not impacted by the spatial location of sampling across the study area but were affected by physicochemical changes associated with tillage induced soil homogenisation and plant presence. Tillage treatment effects on both species richness and composition were more evident for bacterial communities than fungal communities, and were greater at depths <15 cm. Homogenisation of soil and changing land management appears to redistribute both microbiota and nutrients deeper in the soil profile while consequences for soil biogeochemical functioning remain poorly understood.

  8. Evaluation Study of Boundary and Depth of the Soil Structure for Geotechnical Site Investigation using MASW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arisona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the correlation between the experimental Rayleigh dispersion curve and the Vp & Vs ground model versus depth. Six samples of stations A , B , C , D ,  E  and  F  were used in the experiment.The geophone spacing used was set 1 m and total length of each line was 23 m. The result shows positive significance (best fit of R2 that ranges from 0.80 to 0.90. The fk (frequency-wave number method dispersion curves analysis confirmed that the soil structure investigated is divided into three zones: (1 Unsaturated soil zone (clay soil, in which the layer is dominated by soil with typically alluvial clayey silt and sand. The Vp ranges from 240 m/s to 255 m/s at a depth of 2 to 8 m. (2 The intermediate zone (stiff soil, in which the layer is dominated by sand, silt, clayey sand, sandy clay and clay of low plasticity. This structure is interpreted as partially saturated soil zone, the soil is typically very dense. It contains soft rock typically fill with cobble, sand, slight gravel and highly weathered at depth of 18 to 30 m with Vp of  255 to 300 m/s. (3 Saturated soil zone at a depth of  8 to 18 m with Vp of 300 to 390 m/s. There is a very good agreement between wave-number (k and phase velocity (Vw  produced. Both the two parameters shows similar pattern in the topsoil and subsurface layer, which constitute boundary field of soil structure. Moreover, relationship between phase velocity versus wave-length shows best fit of model from inversion with measured value (observed in  implementation of the boundary and depth of each layer.

  9. The effects of forward speed and depth of conservation tillage on soil bulk density

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    A Mahmoudi

    2015-09-01

    , besides the importance of tillage depth and speed in different tiller performance. Materials and methods: This investigation was carried out based on random blocks in the form of split plot experimental design. The main factor, tillage depth, (was 10 and 20cm at both levels and the second factor, tillage speed, (was 6, 8, 10, 12 km h-1 in four levels for Bostan-Abad and 8,10,12,14 km h-1 for Hashtrood with four repetitions. It was carried out using complex tillage made in Sazeh Keshte Bukan Company, which is mostly used in Eastern Azerbaijanand using Massey Ferguson 285 and 399 tractors in Bostab-Abad and Hashtrood, respectively. In this investigation, the characteristics of soil bulk density were studied in two sampling depths of 7 and 17 centimeters. Bulk density is an indicator of soil compaction. It is calculated as the dry weight of soil divided by its volume. This volume includes the volume of soil particles and the volume of pores among soil particles. Bulk density is typically expressed in g cm-3. Results and Discussion: In this study, the effect of both factors on the feature of the soil bulk density at the sampling depth of 5-10 and 15-20 cm was examined. In Bostan-Abad, regarding tillage speed effect for studies characteristics at 1% probability level on soil bulk density was effective. The effect of tillage depth on the soil bulk density was significant at 5% probability level . The interaction effect of tillage speed and depth on soil bulk density was significant at probability level of 1%. Regarding sampling depth effect, the soil bulk density was significant at 5% probability level, respectively. In Hashtrood, the effect of tillage speed on soil bulk density at probability level of 1%, and also tillage depth effect on soil bulk density was significant at 5% level of probability. The interaction effect of tillage speed and depth on soil bulk density was significant at 5% level of probability. Regarding the depth of sampling it was significant on soil bulk

  10. Effect of soil depth and texture on fecal bacteria removal from septic effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, A D; Mueller, T G; Boone, B; Thompson, Y L

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of soils with different texture and depth to treat fecal bacteria eluted from a house-hold septic effluent. The assessments were accomplished by leaching undisturbed soil monoliths of 30, 45, and 60cm thickness and 25cm in diameter, representing the four different textural groups and hydraulic loadings recommended by the Kentucky Health Department, with domestic wastewater effluent collected regularly from a house-hold septic system. Eluent concentrations were monitored daily over a 15 day period for fecal coliform and fecal streptococci concentrations. The results of the study indicate an alarming frequency of failure to comply with United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for depth to groundwater, when using a 30 cm vertical separation distance between the bottom of the drain-field and a limiting soil interface. The treatment performance was especially poor in coarse-textured soils. Although biomat development over time is expected to improve treatment, the high influent levels of fecal bacteria pose great concerns for surface and groundwater contamination. Fine-textured soils generally provided better treatment efficiency and more consistent compliance with EPA standards. Treatment efficiency and compliance usually improved with increasing soil depth, with the 60cm thickness providing the most consistent performance and compliance with maximum discharge limit (MDL) requirements. The findings of this study document a general inadequacy of the 30cm vertical separation distance to provide effective treatment of septic effluents in Kentucky soils, particularly in coarse-textured soils. Considering that increasing the soil depth thickness may be impractical in many marginal soils, complementary or alternative treatment technologies should be adopted to improve treatment efficiency and prevent further deterioration of the quality of water resources.

  11. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  12. Depth function of manganese (Mn concentration in soil solutions: Hydropedological translocation of trace elements in stratified soils

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    Martin Reiss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Periglacial cover beds are an important trigger of slope-water paths in sloped terrain of the mid-latitudes. Most hydropedological studies focus on the quantitative analysis about the interrelation between subsurface layering and runoff processes at the slope scale. In this research we emphasis on a qualitative environmental geochemical analysis of trace elements and dissolved organic carbon in a small forest hydrological study area in the central parts of the subdued mountains of Germany (Location: KrofdorferForst, +50° 41' 3.69", +8° 38' 38.87". The main objective is to assess the effect of lithological discontinuities of stratified soils within the depth functions of trace elements concentration in soil solutions (soil water and its dissolved and mobile fraction in a vertical distribution. Lorz (2008 show that depth functions of manganese (Mn are characterized by strong pedogenic dynamics, analysing a shortened sequential extraction of solid soil material. We investigated the hypothesis that lithological discontinuities act like aquicludes. Therefore we expect abrupt changes within the depth function of manganese as a result of such water-blocking effect (= geochemical barriers as a consequence of mobilization under wet soil conditions. In a preliminary case study we sampled soil solutions from three different plots within a 400m-toposequence. We use in situ trench installed suction lysimeters with ceramic tips (Irrometer Soil Solution Access Tube to extract soil water samples each 20 cm from top- (10 cm to subsoil (110 cm. For geochemical element analysis we use an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The results: A clear character of abrupt changes within the depth function could be illustrated for most of the plots. For example, at the upper slope plot a contrast of the depth function is from 1013 ppb mean concentration at 50 cm profile depth to 290 ppb mean concentration at 70 cm profile depth (17 month sampling period

  13. Definition of initial conditions and soil profile depth for Hydrological Land Surface Models in Cold Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Gamazo, P. A.; Razavi, S.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Earth system models are essential for the evaluation of the impact of climate change. At global and regional scales, General Circulation Models (GCM) and Regional Climate Models (RCM) are used to simulate climate change evolution. Hydrological Land Surface Models (HLSM) are used along with GCMs and RCMs (coupled or offline) to have a better representation of the hydrological cycle. All these models typically have a common implementation of the energy and water balance in the soil, known as the Land Surface Model (LSM). In general, a standard soil configuration with a depth of no more than 4 meters is used in all LSMs that are commonly implemented in GCMs, RCMs and HLSMs. For moderate climate conditions, this depth is sufficient to capture the intra-annual variability in the energy and water balance. However, for cold regions and for long-term simulations, deeper subsurface layers are needed in order to allow the heat signal to propagate through the soil to deeper layers and hence to avoid erroneous near-surface states and fluxes. Deeper soil/rock configurations create longer system memories, and as such, particular care should be taken to define the initial conditions for the subsurface system. In this work we perform a sensitivity analysis of the main factors that affect the subsurface energy and water balance for LSMs in cold regions - depth of soil, soil parameters, initial conditions and climate conditions for a warm-up period. We implement a 1D model using the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) LSM for a study area in northern Canada where measurements of soil temperature profiles are available. Results suggest that an adequate representation of the heat propagation process in the soil requires the simulation of a soil depth of greater than 25 meters. As for initial conditions we recommend to spin-up over a cycle of an average climate year and then use reconstructed climate time series with a length of more than 300 years.

  14. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg−1·year−1 for SOM, 438.9 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:P, 5.3 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:K, and −3.23 mg·cm−3·year−1 for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0–80-cm soil profile (P: −4.10 mg·kg−1·year−1; pH: −0.0061 unit·year−1; C:N: 167.1 mg·g−1·year−1; K:P: 371.5 mg·g−1 year−1; N:K: −0.242 mg·g−1·year−1; EC: 0.169 μS·cm−1·year−1), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance. PMID:24772281

  15. A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH FOR DETERMINING HYDROLOGIC BEHAVIOR AND DEPTH OF SOILS AT BASIN SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Carriero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Land-surface models at basin scale usually employ various combinations of land-use and soil class data to parameterize the major hydrologic processes. Even though soil exerts a major influence on hydrologic processes, soil hydraulic behavior is still difficult to quantify at relatively large scales. Recently soil hydraulic parameterization for hydrologic modeling can be conveniently carried out using pedotransfer rules, which are based on the knowledge of basic soil physical and chemical variables, such as bulk density, textural composition, and organic matter content. However, the availability of this basic information can be rather limited over large land areas. Therefore, in this work we explore the feasibility of employing morphological features to retrieve basic soil data being then used in pedotransfer functions (PTFs, as well as soil depth being viewed here as an indicator of the lower boundary condition. The proposed approach is applied in the Agri River basin (approximately 1770 km2, in Southern Italy (Basilicata Region, where we assessed relationships among soil depth and texture with morphological attributes, such as elevation, slope gradient, slope orientation (aspect, and surface curvature. Climatic conditions were defined using mean annual rainfall and climatic indices. The results show an enhanced correlation between soil depth and slope when accounting for the local vegetation types. As expected, texture can be conveniently linked to parent material obtained from lithology. We show an application of the method to derive soil parameters from morphological and vegetation coverage data (DEM, Corine Land Cover, etc., which are actually available for almost all national basins.

  16. Elevation, rootstock, and soil depth affect the nutritional quality of mandarin oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Breksa, Andrew P; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2011-03-23

    The effects of elevation, rootstock, and soil depth on the nutritional quality of mandarin oranges from 11 groves in California were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by quantifying 29 compounds and applying multivariate statistical data analysis. A comparison of the juice from oranges in groves with deeper soil and trifoliate rootstock versus those with shallow soil and C-35 rootstock revealed differences in the concentrations of 4-aminobutyrate, ethanol, phenylalanine, succinate, and isoleucine. A comparison of fruit from trees grown at higher versus lower elevation revealed that those at higher elevation had higher concentrations of amino acids, succinate, and 4-aminobutyrate and lower concentrations of sugars and limonin glucoside. Such differences indicate that rootstock, soil depth, and differences in elevation influence the fruit nutrient composition. This study highlights how metabolomics coupled with multivariate statistical analysis can illuminate the metabolic characteristics of citrus, thereby aiding in the determination of the grove identity and fruit quality during orange production.

  17. THE IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE ABANDONED URANIUM MINING EXPLOITATIONS ON ROCKS AND SOILS - ZIMBRU PERIMETER, ARAD COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA M. BANU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mining exploration and exploitation, especially the activity of uranium mineralization exploration and exploitation has a negative impact on the environment by the alterations of the landscape and the degradation of the environmental factors' quality. The principal environmental factors that could be affected by mining operations resulting from uranium exploitation are: water, air, soil, population, fauna, and flora. The aim of this study is, first, to identify the sources of pollution (natural radionuclides - natural radioactive series of uranium, radium, thorium, potassium and heavy metals that are accompanying the mineralizations for two of the most important environmental factors: rocks and soils: and, second, to assess the pollution impact on those two environmental factors. In order to identify this pollutants and their impact assessment it was selected as a study case an abandoned uranium mining perimeter named the Zimbru perimeter located in Arad County, Romania.

  18. Variation in winter snowpack depth and duration influences summer soil respiration in a subalpine meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. L.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berhe, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Subalpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada rely on the depth and duration of the winter snowpack to supply ample water to restore the water table in the meadow during the spring snowmelt. This study examines the role that interannual variability in the winter snowpack plays in the overall rate of summer soil respiration along a hydrologic gradient in a subalpine meadow. Carbon dioxide efflux from the meadow was measured from June through September in 2011 and 2012 using soil collars and a LICOR 8100A infrared gas analyzer. Preliminary results show that soil respiration rates are influenced by the hydrologic gradient across the meadow, with drier regions peaking earlier in the summer as compared to wetter regions. We also show that high snowpack years can suppress soil respiration in the meadow until late in the summer season as compared to low snowpack years, where soil respiration peaks early in the summer.

  19. Functional diversity in arbuscular mycorrhizas: Exploitation of soil patches with different phosphate enrichment differs among fungal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavagnaro, T.R.; Smith, F.A.; Smith, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Most terrestrial plant species form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that transfer soil P to the plant via their external hyphae. The distribution of nutrients in soils is typically patchy (heterogeneous) but little is known about the ability of AMF to exploit P patches in soi...... by decreased P uptake by other parts of the mycelium. This is the first demonstration of variation in growth and nutrient uptake by an AMF as influenced by a localized P enrichment of the soil. The results are discussed in the context of functional diversity of AMF....

  20. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  1. Microbial Community and Functional Structure Significantly Varied among Distinct Types of Paddy Soils But Responded Differently along Gradients of Soil Depth Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ren; Wang, Jun-Tao; Deng, Ye; He, Ji-Zheng; Feng, Kai; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Paddy rice fields occupy broad agricultural area in China and cover diverse soil types. Microbial community in paddy soils is of great interest since many microorganisms are involved in soil functional processes. In the present study, Illumina Mi-Seq sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 4.2) techniques were combined to investigate soil microbial communities and functional gene patterns across the three soil types including an Inceptisol (Binhai), an Oxisol (Leizhou), and an Ultisol (Taoyuan) along four profile depths (up to 70 cm in depth) in mesocosm incubation columns. Detrended correspondence analysis revealed that distinctly differentiation in microbial community existed among soil types and profile depths, while the manifest variance in functional structure was only observed among soil types and two rice growth stages, but not across profile depths. Along the profile depth within each soil type, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes increased whereas Cyanobacteria, β-proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia declined, suggesting their specific ecophysiological properties. Compared to bacterial community, the archaeal community showed a more contrasting pattern with the predominant groups within phyla Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota largely varying among soil types and depths. Phylogenetic molecular ecological network (pMEN) analysis further indicated that the pattern of bacterial and archaeal communities interactions changed with soil depth and the highest modularity of microbial community occurred in top soils, implying a relatively higher system resistance to environmental change compared to communities in deeper soil layers. Meanwhile, microbial communities had higher connectivity in deeper soils in comparison with upper soils, suggesting less microbial interaction in surface soils. Structure equation models were developed and the models indicated that pH was the most representative characteristics of soil type and identified as

  2. Microbial Community and Functional Structure Significantly Varied among Distinct Types of Paddy Soils But Responded Differently along Gradients of Soil Depth Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Bai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Paddy rice fields occupy broad agricultural area in China and cover diverse soil types. Microbial community in paddy soils is of great interest since many microorganisms are involved in soil functional processes. In the present study, Illumina Mi-Seq sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 4.2 techniques were combined to investigate soil microbial communities and functional gene patterns across the three soil types including an Inceptisol (Binhai, an Oxisol (Leizhou, and an Ultisol (Taoyuan along four profile depths (up to 70 cm in depth in mesocosm incubation columns. Detrended correspondence analysis revealed that distinctly differentiation in microbial community existed among soil types and profile depths, while the manifest variance in functional structure was only observed among soil types and two rice growth stages, but not across profile depths. Along the profile depth within each soil type, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes increased whereas Cyanobacteria, β-proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia declined, suggesting their specific ecophysiological properties. Compared to bacterial community, the archaeal community showed a more contrasting pattern with the predominant groups within phyla Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota largely varying among soil types and depths. Phylogenetic molecular ecological network (pMEN analysis further indicated that the pattern of bacterial and archaeal communities interactions changed with soil depth and the highest modularity of microbial community occurred in top soils, implying a relatively higher system resistance to environmental change compared to communities in deeper soil layers. Meanwhile, microbial communities had higher connectivity in deeper soils in comparison with upper soils, suggesting less microbial interaction in surface soils. Structure equation models were developed and the models indicated that pH was the most representative characteristics of soil type and

  3. In depth variation of gypsifeorus forest soil properties after a controlled burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Aznar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes produced by fire on soils depends on several factors (vegetation, soil type, temperature, etc.. Here we study the influence of fire on a gypsiferous forest soil located northwest of the city of Zaragoza. Six blocks of undisturbed soil were collected and burned under laboratory conditions reaching 272.9 ± 21.7 oC at 1cm depth. The fire caused significant differences (p <0.05 in all studied parameters from the O horizon and in the first centimeter of the Ah horizon. No significant differences (p <0.05 for any parameters below this depth were observed. The O horizon, strongly hydrophobic, became hydrophilic after burning. Burning induced a loss of 3.14 Mg organic carbon/ha, less than half of the values ​​reported for other soils with mollic horizon (8.3 Mg/ha. In our soil, the loss is due to a 53.8% in the O horizon by 35.8% in the first centimeter of the Ah, and only 10.4% is lost deeper.

  4. Abundance of macrozoobenthos in relation to bottom soil textural types and water depth In aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nupur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural classes and different water depths on abundance of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds. Three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (TS2 and with clay loam (T3 were considered in this experiment. Samples were collected from three different depths (60.96 cm, 106.68 cm and 152.40 cm with three replications. The ranges of water quality parameters were suitable for the growth of macrozoobenthos during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed comparatively higher ranges in T2. Eight genera were recorded belonging to major groups of Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, Mollusca and Ceratoponogonidae. The highest population densities of Oligochaeta (1200±4.25 per m2, Chironomidae (1422±4.88 per m2, Ceratopogonidae (399±1.56 per m2 and Mollusca (977±2.24 per m2 were found in T2. The population densities of macrozoobenthos showed fortnightly variations in all the treatments. Among the three depths, significantly highest densities of macrozoobenthos were recorded in 106.68 cm in every treatment. The mean abundance of macrozoobenthos was significantly highest in T2. The present study indicates that loamy soil pond bottom along with water depth 106.68 cm is suitable for the growth and production of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds.

  5. Effects of depth, soil and vegetation types on indicators of soil organic carbon lability in forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Cécillon, Lauric; Guenet, Bertrand; Chenu, Claire; Baudin, François; Nicolas, Manuel; Barré, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Soil organic matter is a key property as it influences soil ecosystem services like productivity, water storage, etc. In particular, the labile soil organic carbon (SOC) fraction plays a central role in short- to medium-term nutrient availability and soil structural stability. There is little evidence to differentiate the relative importance of factors influencing the labile SOC fraction in contrasted pedological and vegetation conditions. Soil respiration tests and particulate or...

  6. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1) respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  8. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF, and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1 respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  9. Prediction of Soil Solum Depth Using Topographic Attributes in Some Hilly Land of Koohrang in Central Zagros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mehnatkesh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil depth is defined as the depth from the surface to more-or-less consolidated material and can be considered as the most crucial soil indicator, affecting desertification and degradation in disturbed ecosystems. Soil depth varies as a function of many different factors, including slope, land use, curvature, parent material, weathering rate, climate, vegetation cover, upslope contributing area, and lithology. Topography, one of the major soil forming factors, controls various soil properties. Thus, quantitative information on the topographic attributes has been applied in the form of digital terrain models (DTMs. The prediction of soil depth by topographic attributes depends mainly on: i the spatial scale of topographic variation in the area, ii the nature of the processes that are responsible for spatial variation in soil depth, and iii the degree to which terrain-soil relationships have been disturbed by human activities. This study was conducted to explore the relationships of soil depth with topographic attributes in a hilly region of western Iran. Materials and Methods: The study area is located at Koohrang district between 32°20′ to 32°30′ N latitudes and 50°14′ to 50°24′ E longitudes, in Charmahal and Bakhtiari province, western Iran. The field sites with an area of 30,000 ha are located on the hillslopes at about 20% transversal slope. The soils at the site are classified as Typic Calcixerepts, Typic Xerorthents and Calcic Haploxerepts for the representative excavated profiles in summit, shoulder and backslope, respectively. The soils located at footslope and toeslope were classified as Chromic Calcixererts. Measurements were made in twenty representative hillslopes of the studied area. At the selected site, one hundred points were selected using randomly stratified methodology, considering all geomorphic surfaces including summit, shoulder, backslope, footslope and toeslope during sampling. Overall, 100

  10. Tracking water pathways in steep hillslopes by δ18O depth profiles of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias H.; Alaoui, Abdallah; Kuells, Christoph; Leistert, Hannes; Meusburger, Katrin; Stumpp, Christine; Weiler, Markus; Alewell, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Assessing temporal variations in soil water flow is important, especially at the hillslope scale, to identify mechanisms of runoff and flood generation and pathways for nutrients and pollutants in soils. While surface processes are well considered and parameterized, the assessment of subsurface processes at the hillslope scale is still challenging since measurement of hydrological pathways is connected to high efforts in time, money and personnel work. The latter might not even be possible in alpine environments with harsh winter processes. Soil water stable isotope profiles may offer a time-integrating fingerprint of subsurface water pathways. In this study, we investigated the suitability of soil water stable isotope (δ18O) depth profiles to identify water flow paths along two transects of steep subalpine hillslopes in the Swiss Alps. We applied a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model using δ18O values of precipitation (ranging from -24.7 to -2.9‰) as input data to simulate the δ18O profiles of soil water. The variability of δ18O values with depth within each soil profile and a comparison of the simulated and measured δ18O profiles were used to infer information about subsurface hydrological pathways. The temporal pattern of δ18O in precipitation was found in several profiles, ranging from -14.5 to -4.0‰. This suggests that vertical percolation plays an important role even at slope angles of up to 46°. Lateral subsurface flow and/or mixing of soil water at lower slope angles might occur in deeper soil layers and at sites near a small stream. The difference between several observed and simulated δ18O profiles revealed spatially highly variable infiltration patterns during the snowmelt periods: The δ18O value of snow (-17.7 ± 1.9‰) was absent in several measured δ18O profiles but present in the respective simulated δ18O profiles. This indicated overland flow and/or preferential flow through the soil profile during the melt period. The applied

  11. Ruschita Romanian marble - 130 years of official exploitation and 130 m depth of architectural beauty around the word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetean, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Developed in a large metamorphic area, the marble deposit from Ruschita perimeter is the most important Romanian source for ornamental stone, the old quarry being operative since 1883. The closest locality offer the commercial name also, identical with the geological one as is defined in the technical referentials and in the denomination European standard. Ruschita is also an active quarry, developed by step-by-step expansion in depth (the initial extraction reached 130 m depth), but also in the adjacent areas. The important height of the open deposit offered the possibility to the owner, MARMOSIM SA, to apply an experimental extraction method, by underground mining. It is the only Romanian place, and few in the world, where this spectacular mining element can be found for dimension stone. The extraction gallery was built starting from the lower level of the old quarry and allowed obtaining nicer and bigger blocks. The Ruschita marble is a metamorphic stone with high crystallinity and medium size of crystals (until 0.2-0.5 mm). Has the basic colour from white and grey to pink, with many intermediary nuances generally given by grey veins and less by impurities from internal structure. The stone present irregular break, sometimes following the very narrow internal discontinuities, invisible at macroscopic analyse. The main physical - mechanical characteristics are presented below: Characteristic M.U. Value Apparent density Kg/m3 2680 - 2720 Water absorption % 0.12 - 0.21 Capillarity g/m2.s0,5 0.130-0.218 Porosity % 0.30 - 0.74 Compression strength N/mm2 85 - 120 Flexural strength MPa 15-18 Rupture energy J 5 Coefficient of frost cleftness % 10 -14 Abrasion resistance - Bohme cm3/50cm2 17-18 Salt crystallization % 0.1 Nowadays, the extraction in the Ruschita area is achieved by equipments from Dazzini, Fantini, Pellegrini, Korfamann, Caterpillar, Volvo and Komatsu. The average volume of blocks is bigger than 10-12 m2. The Ruschita marble can be easily cut at size and

  12. Mapping soil texture targeting predefined depth range or synthetizing from standard layers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Dezső Kaposi, András; Szatmári, Gábor; Takács, Katalin; Pásztor, László

    2017-04-01

    There are increasing demands nowadays on spatial soil information in order to support environmental related and land use management decisions. Physical soil properties, especially particle size distribution play important role in this context. A few of the requirements can be satisfied by the sand-, silt-, and clay content maps compiled according to global standards such as GlobalSoilMap (GSM) or Soil Grids. Soil texture classes (e. g. according to USDA classification) can be derived from these three fraction data, in this way texture map can be compiled based on the proper separate maps. Soil texture class as well as fraction information represent direct input of crop-, meteorological- and hydrological models. The model inputs frequently require maps representing soil features of 0-30 cm depth, which is covered by three consecutive depth intervals according to standard specifications: 0-5 cm, 5-15 cm, 15-30 cm. Becoming GSM and SoilGrids the most detailed freely available spatial soil data sources, the common model users (e. g. meteorologists, agronomists, or hydrologists) would produce input map from (the weighted mean of) these three layers. However, if the basic soil data and proper knowledge is obtainable, a soil texture map targeting directly the 0-30 cm layer could be independently compiled. In our work we compared Hungary's soil texture maps compiled using the same reference and auxiliary data and inference methods but for differing layer distribution. We produced the 0-30 cm clay, silt and sand map as well as the maps for the three standard layers (0-5 cm, 5-15 cm, 15-30 cm). Maps of sand, silt and clay percentage were computed through regression kriging (RK) applying Additive Log-Ratio (alr) transformation. In addition to the Hungarian Soil Information and Monitoring System as reference soil data, digital elevation model and its derived components, soil physical property maps, remotely sensed images, land use -, geological-, as well as meteorological data

  13. Carbon accumulation by biological soil crusts in relation to relief and sampling depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetter, Stefan; Drahorad, Sylvie; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems the soil surface is covered by biological soil crusts (BSC). These BSC are microbial communities of cyanobacteria, lichens and mosses. Due to the photosynthetic activity of these microorganisms, BSC are main carbon contributors to arid ecosystems. The cover is related to ecosystem functions like surface stabilization, water redistribution and nutrient fixation. These functions rely on the microbial community composition of the BSC. Cyanobacteria and cyanolichens excrete exopolysaccharides, which build microaggregates with soil particles. This stabilizes and seals the soil surface. Therefore cyanobacteria and cyanolichen dominated crusts introduce runoff, which affects the distribution of carbon. The total amount of soil organic carbon was determined in relation to the relief position and BSC thickness showing a strong correlation between relief, sampling depth and carbon amounts. At the Arid Ecosystem Research Center (AERC) station of the Nizzana sand dunes (NW Negev, Israel) the dunes and the interdune corridor are covered by BSC up to 80% of the total area. The BSC are composed of a thin topcrust section and a mineral subcrust section. The overall thickness changes in relation to the relief position. Along a dune transect topcrust and subcrust samples were taken and analyzed on their C_org, C_carb, and C_total concentration. The total amount of carbon (g m^-2) was calculated from the carbon concentrations, the BSC bulk density and the sampling depth. Comparing the topcrust and subcrust values of the sampling points the topcrust sections showed 3-4 times higher concentrations of organic carbon than the subcrust sections. The light intensity decreases with soil depth, resulting in a higher biological activity and carbon fixation in the topcrust sections. The subcrust showed relative higher amounts of C_carb contributing to the soil surface stability. Depending on the relief position the total amount of accumulated carbon was 4 times

  14. Effect of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa ecotype Warynski at different soil depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucwa-Przepiora, E.; Malkowski, E.; Sas-Nowosielska, A.; Kucharski, R.; Krzyzak, J.; Kita, A.; Romkens, P.F.A.M. [University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The effects of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) of Deschampsia cespitosa roots at different depths in soils highly contaminated with heavy metals were studied in field trials. Mycorrhizal parameters, including frequency of mycorrhization, intensity of root cortex colonization and arbuscule abundance were studied. Correlations between concentration of bioavailable Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu in soil and mycorrhizal parameters were estimated. An increase in AM colonization with increasing soil depth was observed in soils with spontaneously, growing D. cespitosa. A positive effect of chemophytostabilization amendments (calcium phosphate, lignite) on AM colonization was found in the soil layers to which the amendments were applied. Negative correlation coefficients between mycorrhizal parameters and concentration of bioavailable Cd and Zn in soil were obtained. Our results demonstrated that chemophytostabilization practices enhance AM colonization in D. cespitosa roots, even in soils fertilized with high rates of phosphorus.

  15. Effect of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa ecotype Warynski at different soil depths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucwa-Przepióra, E.; Malkowski, E.; Sas-Nowosielska, A.; Kucharski, R.; Krzyzak, J.; Kita, A.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) of Deschampsia cespitosa roots at different depths in soils highly contaminated with heavy metals were studied in field trials. Mycorrhizal parameters, including frequency of mycorrhization, intensity of root cortex

  16. Depth and Areal Distribution of Cs-137 in the Soil of a Small Water Catchment in the Sopron Mountains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ervin Kiss; Péter Volford

    2013-01-01

    The study presents the depth and areal distribution of Cs-137 activity concentration in the forest soils of Farkas Trench, a small water catchment in the Sopron Mountains, in 2001 and 2010, moreover...

  17. Method for the Preparation of Hazard Map in Urban Area Using Soil Depth and Groundwater Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Kyeong; Cho, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2017-04-01

    The hazard maps for predicting collapse on natural slopes consists of a combination of topographic, hydrological, and geological factors. Topographic factors are extracted from DEM, including aspect, slope, curvature, and topographic index. Hydrological factors, such as distance to drainage, drainage density, stream-power index, and wetness index are most important factors for slope instability. However, most of the urban areas are located on the plains and it is difficult to apply the hazard map using the topography and hydrological factors. In order to evaluate the risk of collapse of flat and low slope areas, soil depth and groundwater level data were collected and used as a factor for interpretation. In addition, the reliability of the hazard map was compared with the disaster history of the study area (Gangnam-gu and Yeouido district). In the disaster map of the disaster prevention agency, the urban area was mostly classified as the stable area and did not reflect the collapse history. Soil depth, drainage conditions and groundwater level obtained from boreholes were added as input data of hazard map, and disaster vulnerability increased at the location where the actual collapse points. In the study area where damage occurred, the moderate and low grades of the vulnerability of previous hazard map were 12% and 88%, respectively. While, the improved map showed 2% high grade, moderate grade 29%, low grade 66% and very low grade 2%. These results were similar to actual damage. Keywords: hazard map, urban area, soil depth, ground water level Acknowledgement This research was supported by a Grant from a Strategic Research Project (Horizontal Drilling and Stabilization Technologies for Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Operation) funded by the Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology.

  18. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  19. Effects of soil quality and depth on seed germination and seedling survival at the Nevada test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, K.W.; Lyon, G.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended in 1987, directs the US Department of Energy (DOE) to study Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a potential site for long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. DOE policy mandates the restoration of all lands disturbed by site characterization activities and DOE has developed an environmental program that is to be implemented during site characterization activities at Yucca.Mountain. DOE is currently conducting reclamation feasibility trials as part of this environmental program. No topsoil was saved on disturbances during early site investigation and minimal soil remains at existing disturbances on Yucca Mountain. A study was developed to test the effects of soil quality and depth on seedling emergence and survival. A series of plots was established and two treatments were tested. The first treatment compared native topsoil to subsoil imported from a borrow pit. The second treatment compared four different depth ranges of both soil types. All plots received identical seeding treatments. Seedling density was measured after emergence. Overall seedling densities were low, averaging 10.3 {plus_minus} 8.8 (SD) plants/m{sup 2}. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the two treatment factors. The subsoil had increasing densities from the deep soil depths to the shallow depths while the topsoil had increasing densities from the shallow soil depths to the deep depths. The cause of this interaction may have resulted from the bedrock being close to the soil surface of the shallow plots.

  20. Challenges in Ecohydrological Monitoring at Soil-Vegetation Interfaces: Exploiting the Potential for Fibre Optic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalari, A.; Ciocca, F.; Krause, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Blaen, P.; Coleman, T. I.; Mondanos, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forestry Research (BIFoR) is using Free-Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experiments to quantify the long-term impact and resilience of forests into rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The FACE campaign critically relies on a successful monitoring and understanding of the large variety of ecohydrological processes occurring across many interfaces, from deep soil to above the tree canopy. At the land-atmosphere interface, soil moisture and temperature are key variables to determine the heat and water exchanges, crucial to the vegetation dynamics as well as to groundwater recharge. Traditional solutions for monitoring soil moisture and temperature such as remote techniques and point sensors show limitations in fast acquisition rates and spatial coverage, respectively. Hence, spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of heat and water fluxes at this interface can only be monitored to a certain degree, limiting deeper knowledge in dynamically evolving systems (e.g. in impact of growing vegetation). Fibre optics Distributed Temperature Sensors (DTS) can measure soil temperatures at high spatiotemporal resolutions and accuracy, along kilometers of optical cable buried in the soil. Heat pulse methods applied to electrical elements embedded in the optical cable can be used to obtain the soil moisture. In July 2015 a monitoring system based on DTS has been installed in a recently forested hillslope at BIFoR in order to quantify high-resolution spatial patterns and high-frequency temporal dynamics of soil heat fluxes and soil moisture conditions. Therefore, 1500m of optical cables have been carefully deployed in three overlapped loops at 0.05m, 0.25m and 0.4m from the soil surface and an electrical system to send heat pulses along the optical cable has been developed. This paper discussed both, installation and design details along with first results of the soil moisture and temperature monitoring carried out since July 2015. Moreover, interpretations

  1. Impacts of Soil Warming and Plant Rhizosphere on Root Litter Decomposition at Different Soil Depths in a Mediterranuan Grassland Lysimeter Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Castanha, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Porras, R. C.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate understanding of soil carbon cycling is critical for predicting climate-ecosystem feedbacks. Decomposition of root litter and its transformation into soil organic matter (SOM) are critical processes of soil carbon cycling. We aim to study the impacts of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on the fate of 13C-labeled roots buried at two soil depths using a field lysimeter facility at Hopland, California. The lysimeters contain soil columns of 38-cm diameter and 48-cm depth (0-15 cm A-horizon, and 15-48 cm B-horizon, Laughlin soil series) sown with annual grasses dominated by Avena barbata. The experiment has three treatments (planted-ambient, planted-warming (+4°C), and unplanted-ambient). In February 2014, 13C-labeled A. fatua roots were added to two depths (8-12 and 38-42 cm). We measured root-derived 13C in respired CO2 collected at the soil surface and in leachate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected from the lysimeters during the growing season and in soil harvested in August 2014. We found (1) soil temperature at two depths (10- and 40-cm) have been elevated by 4±0.2°C in the warmed compared to the ambient lysimeters; (2) surface (10-cm) volumetric soil moisture followed this order (unplanted-ambient > planted-ambient > planted-warming), while subsurface (40-cm) soil moisture showed little variation among treatments; (3) ecosystem respiration was enhanced by soil warming during the early growing season (March 15th and April 5th) when soil moisture was not limiting (>20%), while it was suppressed by soil warming during the late growing season (May 7th) when soil moisture was limiting (plant biomass increased 25% with soil warming. More data including 13C values of ecosystem respiration, DOC loss, and harvested soil samples, as well as soil nutrient supply rates, microbial biomass and community structure will be presented during the meeting. Overall, these results suggest that the impact of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on ecosystem carbon

  2. Soil temperature modeling at different depths using neuro-fuzzy, neural network, and genetic programming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisi, Ozgur; Sanikhani, Hadi; Cobaner, Murat

    2017-08-01

    The applicability of artificial neural networks (ANN), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), and genetic programming (GP) techniques in estimating soil temperatures (ST) at different depths is investigated in this study. Weather data from two stations, Mersin and Adana, Turkey, were used as inputs to the applied models in order to model monthly STs. The first part of the study focused on comparison of ANN, ANFIS, and GP models in modeling ST of two stations at the depths of 10, 50, and 100 cm. GP was found to perform better than the ANN and ANFIS-SC in estimating monthly ST. The effect of periodicity (month of the year) on models' accuracy was also investigated. Including periodicity component in models' inputs considerably increased their accuracies. The root mean square error (RMSE) of ANN models was respectively decreased by 34 and 27 % for the depths of 10 and 100 cm adding the periodicity input. In the second part of the study, the accuracies of the ANN, ANFIS, and GP models were compared in estimating ST of Mersin Station using the climatic data of Adana Station. The ANN models generally performed better than the ANFIS-SC and GP in modeling ST of Mersin Station without local climatic inputs.

  3. Tree species partition N uptake by soil depth in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, D; Moore, J D; Ouimet, R; Marty, C

    2014-05-01

    It is recognized that the coexistence of herbaceous species in N-depleted habitats can be facilitated by N partitioning; however, the existence of such a phenomenon for trees has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we show from both foliage and soil 15N natural abundance values and from a 12-year in situ 15N addition experiment, that black spruce (Picea mariana) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), two widespread species of the Canadian boreal forest, take up N at different depths. While black spruce takes up N from the organic soil, jack pine acquires it deeper within the highly N-depleted mineral soil. Systematic difference in foliar 15N natural abundance between the two species across seven sites distributed throughout the eastern Canadian boreal forest shows that N spatial partitioning is a widespread phenomenon. Distinct relationships between delta15N and N concentration in leaves of both species further emphasize their difference in N acquisition strategies. This result suggests that such complementary mechanisms of N acquisition could facilitate tree species coexistence in such N-depleted habitats and could contribute to the positive biodiversity-productivity relationship recently revealed for the eastern Canadian boreal forest, where jack pine is present. It also has implications for forest management and provides new insights to interpret boreal forest regeneration following natural or anthropogenic perturbations.

  4. Soil Warming and Rhizosphere Effects on Root Litter Decomposition at Two Depths in a Mediterranean Grassland Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanha, C.; Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate understanding of soil processes is critical for predicting climate-ecosystem feedbacks. We investigated the effects of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on decomposition of 13C-labeled roots buried at two soil depths at the field lysimeter facilities at Hopland Research and Extension Center, CA. The lysimeters contain soil columns 38-cm in diameter and 48-cm deep (0-15 cm A-horizon and 15-48 cm B-horizon, Laughlin soil) sown with an annual grassland mix. The experimental design includes three treatments: heated, ambient, and unplanted. In February 2014 we added 13C-labeled Avena fatua roots to either 8-12 cm or 38-42 cm. We measured loss of 13C in CO2 from the soil surface and in leachate as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) over two growing seasons. At the end of each growing season we recovered the 13C remaining in the soil. In addition, we monitored plant productivity and soil temperature and moisture. The rates of both soil respiration and DOC losses were greatest in heated and least in unplanted plots, although respiration losses far outweighed leachate losses. Treatment affected timing of decomposition; added root litter was respired earlier in the ambient plots and later in the unplanted plots in both years. The litter addition stimulated native soil respiration in year 1 heated plots. The depth of the litter addition did not have an effect on soil respiration. However, after the first growing season, less added root litter remained in the A than in the B horizon (both in the visible root fraction and in the 2mm soil fraction), indicating lower overall decomposition rates at depth. These results, including 13C recovery following the 2nd growing season and soil microclimate variables, will be used to develop a mechanistic understanding of the impacts of soil warming, the rhizosphere, and soil depth on root decomposition and soil organic matter dynamics, and should improve our predictions of the feedbacks between climate change and carbon cycling

  5. Exploiting Soil-Management Strategies for Climate Mitigation in the European Union: Maximizing "Win-Win" Solutions across Policy Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bugge. Henriksen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC has identified a number of soil-management strategies that can be implemented to reduce GHG emissions. However, before deciding which of these strategies are most appropriate in any given situation, it is important to investigate how these strategies affect other aspects of sustainable development. For instance, some attempts to sequester carbon in the landscape could alter the soil's capacity to filter water. Alternatively, other strategies could unintentionally increase net energy consumption through greater fertilizer use. Focusing specifically on opportunities to implement soil-management strategies in the European Union (EU, we discuss the synergies and trade-offs of those strategies with respect to water resources management and energy security. The focus of the analysis is two-fold: first, we analyze the net benefit of strategies such as crop management, nutrient management, tillage and residue management, water management, and bioenergy vis-a-vis their implications for water resources and energy security; second, we undertake an assessment of the EU's relevant policy frameworks to assess whether the potential synergies from various soil-management strategies are being encouraged or, conversely, where perverse outcomes or trade-offs are likely. Our findings suggest there is much scope to encourage soil-management strategies in Europe that would mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, but these synergies are currently not fully exploited at the EU policy level. We identify a number of options for better policy integration among the Common Agricultural Policy, the Water Framework Directive, and the Climate Action and Renewable Energy Package.

  6. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production under elevated [CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Hooker, Toby [Utah State University (USU); Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] is projected to increase forest production, which could increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, sustained forest production will depend on the nutrient balance of the forested ecosystem. Our aim was to examine the causes and consequences of increased fine-root production and mortality throughout the soil profile under elevated CO2 with respect to potential gross nitrogen (N) cycling rates. Our study was conducted in a CO2-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We used isotope pool dilution methodology to measure potential gross N cycling rates in laboratory incubations of soil from four depth increments to 60 cm. Our objectives were two-fold: (1) determine whether N is available for root acquisition in deeper soil, and (2) determine whether increased inputs of labile C from greater fine-root mortality at depth under elevated [CO2] had altered N cycling rates. While gross N fluxes declined with soil depth, we found that N is potentially available for roots to access, especially below 15 cm depth where microbial consumption of mineral N was reduced. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization, and 100% of potential net N mineralization, occurred below 15-cm depth at this site. This finding was supported by in situ measurements from ion-exchange resins, where total inorganic N availability at 55 cm depth was equal to or greater than N availability at 15 cm depth. While it is likely that trees grown under elevated [CO2] are accessing a larger pool of inorganic N by mining deeper soil, we found no effect of elevated [CO2] on potential gross or net N cycling rates. Thus, increased root exploration of the soil volume under elevated [CO2] may be more important than changes in potential gross N cycling rates in sustaining forest responses to rising atmospheric CO2.

  7. Exploiting a constellation of satellite soil moisture sensors for accurate rainfall estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpanelli, A.; Massari, C.; Ciabatta, L.; Filippucci, P.; Amarnath, G.; Brocca, L.

    2017-10-01

    A merging procedure is applied to five daily rainfall estimates achieved via SM2RAIN applied to the soil moisture products obtained by the Advanced SCATterometer, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2, the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission and backscattering observations of RapidScat. The precipitation estimates are evaluated against dense ground networks in the period ranging from April to December, 2015, in India and in Italy, at 0.25°/daily spatial/temporal resolution. The merged product derived by combining the different SM2RAIN rainfall products shows better results in term of statistical and categorical metrics with respect to the use of the single products. A good agreement with reference to ground observations is obtained, with median correlations equal to 0.65 and 0.77 in India and in Italy, respectively. The merged dataset is found to slightly outperform those of the IMERG product of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission underlying the large potential of the proposed approach.

  8. SMOS-IC: An Alternative SMOS Soil Moisture and Vegetation Optical Depth Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fernandez-Moran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission over land surfaces is the production of global maps of soil moisture (SM and vegetation optical depth (τ based on multi-angular brightness temperature (TB measurements at L-band. The operational SMOS Level 2 and Level 3 soil moisture algorithms account for different surface effects, such as vegetation opacity and soil roughness at 4 km resolution, in order to produce global retrievals of SM and τ. In this study, we present an alternative SMOS product that was developed by INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique and CESBIO (Centre d’Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère. One of the main goals of this SMOS-INRA-CESBIO (SMOS-IC product is to be as independent as possible from auxiliary data. The SMOS-IC product provides daily SM and τ at the global scale and differs from the operational SMOS Level 3 (SMOSL3 product in the treatment of retrievals over heterogeneous pixels. Specifically, SMOS-IC is much simpler and does not account for corrections associated with the antenna pattern and the complex SMOS viewing angle geometry. It considers pixels as homogeneous to avoid uncertainties and errors linked to inconsistent auxiliary datasets which are used to characterize the pixel heterogeneity in the SMOS L3 algorithm. SMOS-IC also differs from the current SMOSL3 product (Version 300, V300 in the values of the effective vegetation scattering albedo (ω and soil roughness parameters. An inter-comparison is presented in this study based on the use of ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting SM outputs and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index from MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. A six-year (2010–2015 inter-comparison of the SMOS products SMOS-IC and SMOSL3 SM (V300 with ECMWF SM yielded higher correlations and lower ubRMSD (unbiased root mean square difference for SMOS-IC over most of the pixels. In terms of τ, SMOS-IC τ was

  9. Structure and Composition of Leachfield Bacterial Communities: Role of Soil Texture, Depth and Septic Tank Effluent Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet A. Atoyan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although groundwater quality depends on microbial processes in the soil treatment area (STA of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS, our understanding of the development of these microbial communities is limited. We examined the bacterial communities of sand, sandy loam, and clay STAs at different depths in response to septic tank effluent (STE addition using mesocosms. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP analysis was used to compare the bacterial community structure and composition of STE, native soil prior to STE addition (UNX and soil exposed to STE (EXP. Principal component analysis separated communities with depth in sand but not in sandy loam or clay. Indices of richness, diversity, and evenness followed the order: sandy loam > sand > clay. Analysis of TRF peaks indicated that STE contributed least to the composition of STA bacterial communities (5%–16%, followed by UNX soil (18%–48%, with the highest proportion of the community made up of TRFs not detected previously in either UNX or STE (50%–82% for all three soils. Soil type and depth can have a marked effect on the structure and composition of STA bacterial communities, and on the relative contribution of native soil and STE to these communities.

  10. Determination of anthropogenic boundary depth in industrially polluted soil and semi-quantification of heavy metal loads using magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, U; Appel, E; Stanjek, H

    2008-11-01

    This study focuses on magnetic susceptibility processing and analysis towards fast and cost-efficient discrimination and semi-quantification of anthropogenic heavy metal loads in soil. Spatial variability of magnetic susceptibility was investigated on sets of soil cores from both "polluted" and "less polluted" forest soil close to a steel mill near Leoben, Austria. Test sites of approximately 10 m(2) represent "site scale" dimensions. Statistical analysis of magnetic data provides a boundary depth indicating the transition from the "polluted" to the deeper, "unpolluted" zone in contaminated natural soil. Introduction of a block master curve simplifies the complex variations of individual curves, and represents magnetic susceptibility at "site scale". For linking the block master curve to heavy metals we only require magnetic susceptibility data from one soil core and heavy metal data from two sub-samples from the same core. Our optimized magnetic susceptibility data processing scheme provides an applicable tool to semi-quantify anthropogenic heavy metal loads in soil.

  11. Relative Roles of Soil Moisture, Nutrient Supply, Depth, and Mechanical Impedance in Determining Composition and Structure of Wisconsin Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerehl, Robert W; Givnish, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have long classified Midwestern prairies based on compositional variation assumed to reflect local gradients in moisture availability. The best known classification is based on Curtis' continuum index (CI), calculated using the presence of indicator species thought centered on different portions of an underlying moisture gradient. Direct evidence of the extent to which CI reflects differences in moisture availability has been lacking, however. Many factors that increase moisture availability (e.g., soil depth, silt content) also increase nutrient supply and decrease soil mechanical impedance; the ecological effects of the last have rarely been considered in any ecosystem. Decreased soil mechanical impedance should increase the availability of soil moisture and nutrients by reducing the root costs of retrieving both. Here we assess the relative importance of soil moisture, nutrient supply, and mechanical impedance in determining prairie composition and structure. We used leaf δ13C of C3 plants as a measure of growing-season moisture availability, cation exchange capacity (CEC) x soil depth as a measure of mineral nutrient availability, and penetrometer data as a measure of soil mechanical impedance. Community composition and structure were assessed in 17 remnant prairies in Wisconsin which vary little in annual precipitation. Ordination and regression analyses showed that δ13C increased with CI toward "drier" sites, and decreased with soil depth and % silt content. Variation in δ13C among remnants was 2.0‰, comparable to that along continental gradients from ca. 500-1500 mm annual rainfall. As predicted, LAI and average leaf height increased significantly toward "wetter" sites. CI accounted for 54% of compositional variance but δ13C accounted for only 6.2%, despite the strong relationships of δ13C to CI and CI to composition. Compositional variation reflects soil fertility and mechanical impedance more than moisture availability. This study is the

  12. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  13. Effects of tree diversity and environmental factors on the soil microbial community in three soil depth in a Central European beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornacon, C.; Jacob, M.; Guckland, A.; Meinen, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the link between aboveground and belowground diversity in forest ecosystems. Therefore, we determined the effect of tree composition on amount and composition of the soil microbial community using phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the Hainich National Park in Thuringia, a deciduous mixed forest on loess over limestone in Central Germany. On the one hand we investigated the composition of the microbial community in dependence of leave litter composition, hypothesizing that distinct leave litter compositions activated signature PLFA's. On the other hand we determined if environmental factor like clay content or nutrient status influence the microbial community in deeper soil horizons. Consequently soil was sampled from depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Plots with highest diversity of leave litter had highest total amounts of fatty acids in the upper 5 cm. Mainly PLFA 16:1?5 was activated in autumn, being a common marker for mycorrhizal fungi. In soil depth below 5 cm the environmental factors like clay and soil nutrients like phosphorus and carbon, explained most of the soil microbial variability. On pure beech sites the total phosphorus content of soil influenced soil microbial diversity, but on sites with higher tree diversity no single factor varying the microbial community could be identified. Tree diversity and environmental factors together effect soil microbial community and are closely related to the link between aboveground and belowground diversity.

  14. Mapping Depth to Argillic Horizon Using Electromagnetic Induction on Historically Farmed Soils within the Piedmont Region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, R.; Markewitz, D.; Thompson, A.

    2016-12-01

    Historic agricultural practices throughout the Piedmont region of the southeastern United States from 1820 to 1940 led to accelerated erosion. Practices, such as tilling, degraded soil quality altering hydrologic processes on the landscape by limiting infiltration and leading to overland flow and erosion. Erosion due to these practices has substantially redistributed sediment from upper to lower landscape positions, causing a change in the depth-to-argillic horizon along hillslopes. By mapping the depth to argillic horizon within watersheds that have a history of farming and watersheds with little evidence of agricultural disturbance, a better understanding of the effects of farming practices on erosion and sediment redistribution can be made. This study uses extensive soil sampling within historically farmed and unfarmed watersheds to map spatial variations in the depth to argillic horizon. In addition to sampling, Electro-magnetic Induction (EMI) is being tested and calibrated to clay content and other topographic characteristic (i.e. landscape position, aspect, percent slope) from which the depth to argillic horizon can be predicted. Current hillslope and watershed hydrologic models use characteristics from soil classification maps for parameterization, however, these soil maps may lack sufficient spatial detail and may not accurately represent landscapes that have been eroded from historical farming. The results from this study will improve understanding of previous erosion on sediment redistribution and will characterize the potential use of electromagnetic induction as an accurate and efficient means to predict the depth to the argillic horizon. This information will improve parameterization of hillslope and watershed hydrologic models.

  15. Substrate Composition and Depth Affect Soil Moisture Behavior and Plant-Soil Relationship on Mediterranean Extensive Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chenot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin is extremely vulnerable to climate change, and one of the areas most impacted by human water demand. Yet the green roofs increasingly created both for aesthetic reasons and to limit pollution and urban runoff are themselves very water-demanding. Successful green roof installation depends on the establishment of the vegetation, and the substrate is the key element: it conserves water, and provides the nutrients and physical support indispensable for plant growth. Since typical Mediterranean plant communities require no maintenance, this study seeks to develop techniques for creating maintenance- and watering-free horizontal green roofs for public or private buildings in a Mediterranean context. The innovative aspect of this study lies in creating two soil mixes, fine elements (clay and silt and coarse elements (pebbles of all sizes, in two different thicknesses, to assess vegetation development. Monitoring of substrate moisture was carried out and coupled with local rainfall measurements during summer and autumn. As expected, substrate moisture is mainly influenced by substrate depth (the deeper, the moister and composition (the finer the particles (clays and silts, the higher the moisture content. Vegetation cover impacts moisture to a lesser extent but is itself affected by the composition and depth of the substrates. These results are subsequently discussed with relation to the issue of sustainable green roofs in Mediterranean climates. Considering applications of our results, for an optimal colonization of a Mediterranean vegetation, a substrate thickness of 15 cm composed mainly of fine elements (75% clay-silt and 25% pebble-sand would be recommended in green roofs.

  16. Depth-dependent erodibility: representing burnt soils as a two-layered cohesive/non-cohesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, P.; Sheridan, G. J.; Moody, J. A.; Smith, H. G.; Lane, P. N.

    2011-12-01

    Immediately after wildfire there is an abundant supply of non-cohesive ash, soil and gravel which is easily entrained by overland flow. Under these conditions the sediment flux on hillslopes can be assumed to be equal to the transport capacity of the flow. However, the supply of material is finite and at some point the hillslope could shift towards a system where entrainment is restricted by armouring and soil cohesion. In this study we test the notion that burnt hillslopes can be represented as a two-layered system of non-cohesive and cohesive soils. Using a combination of i) shear vane measurements, ii) confined hillslope flow experiments and iii) a laboratory flume, we demonstrate how erosion on burnt hillslopes primarily takes place in a distinct layer of non-cohesive soil with erosion properties that are very different to the underlying soil matrix. Shear vane measurements were taken at 5 soil depths at more than 50 points along transects in order to quantify the depth and spatial distribution of non-cohesive soil in two small (0.5 ha) and steep (30 deg) convergent basins (SE Australia) that were burnt at high severity. The measurements showed that the recently burnt hillslopes were mantled with non-cohesive soil to an average depth of 18mm and 20mm at the two sites which were situated in different geologic terrain but in similar eucalyptus dominated forests. In the hillslope flow experiments, the rapid entrainment of non-cohesive material resulted in very high sediment concentration (50-60% by volume) in the initial surge from the test area. During the flow experiments the sediment concentration decreased exponentially with time until the erosion rate reached a steady state reflecting the erodibility of the underlying cohesive soil. The formation of shallow rills and the presence of large clasts (>16cm) within the test area resulted in incomplete removal of the non-cohesive material at shear stress 50 Ncm-2 all material was removed, and the erosion depth at

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of Deschampsia cespitosa (Poaceae at different soil depths in highly metal-contaminated site in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gucwa-Przepióra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents root colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa growing in the immediate vicinity of a former Pb/Zn smelter by arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF and dark septated endophytes (DSE at different soil depths. AMF spores and species distribution in soil profile were also assessed. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and DSE were found in D. cespitosa roots at all investigated soil levels. However, mycorrhizal colonization in topsoil was extremely low with sporadically occurring arbuscules. AM parameters: frequency of mycorrhization of root fragments (F%, intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, intensity of colonization within individual mycorrhizal roots (m%, and arbuscule abundance in the root system (A% were markedly higher at 20–40, 40–60 cm soil levels and differed in a statistically significant manner from AM parameters from 0–10 and 10–20 cm layers. Mycorrhizal colonization was negatively correlated with bioavailable Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The number of AMF spores in topsoil was very low and increased with soil depth (20–40 and 40–60 cm. At the study area spores of three morphologically distinctive AMF species were found: Archaeospora trappei, Funneliformis mosseae and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. The fourth species Glomus tenue colonized roots of D. cespitosa and was observed in the root cortex at 20–40 and 40–60 soil depth, however, its spores were not found at the site.

  18. In-depth variations of the quality of organic matter in a gypsiferous forest soil under controlled burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. González-Pérez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires exert changes in soil organic matter quality and quantity mainly in the organic top soil and first centimetres in the mineral horizon. These effects are highly variable and among other factors depend on fire and soil characteristics. In this work the changes caused by fire to the soil organic matter in a gypseous soil (Hypergypsic Gypsisol. Undisturbed soil blocks were sampled in the field and burned in the laboratory. The burning treatment finished when the temperature reached 250 °C at 1cm depth in the Ah-horizon. In the burned blocks a decrease in soil organic carbon (CO was observed in the soil O horizon (75% and down till the 1st cm in the mineral Ah horizon. Under the conditions of our burning experiment no appreciable neat differences were observed in the inorganic C content (CI. Soil organic matter alteration caused by fire was assessed at a molecular level using direct analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS. Fire severely modified soil organic matter molecular structure. In the organic soil layer (O horizon an almost complete disappearance of chromatographic peaks is apparent. In the mineral Ah horizon the effect of fire is still apparent (0-1 cm depth affecting the chromatograms both qualitative and quantitative with a complete disappearance of some biogenic compounds, a reduction in the relative abundance of typical vegetation markers and neat deviations of the natural distribution of the alkylic series i.e. shifts in parity and increase in the relative abundance of low molecular weight homologues.

  19. Depth distribution of exchangeable aluminum in acid soils - A study from subtropical Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    High exchangeable aluminum (Al3+) requires greater attention when preparing agricultural soils. However, research examining the relationship between natural levels of soil Al3+ and pedogenetic processes receives little priority, particularly regarding the number of soil profiles investigated. To rep...

  20. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Density fractionation is a useful tool to study the relevance of OC stabilization in aggregates and in association with minerals, but it has rarely been applied to full soil profiles. We aim to determine factors shaping the depth profiles of physically unprotected and mineral associated OC and test their relevance for OC stability across a range of European soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ14C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine CO2 evolution per g OC in the samples (specific mineralization rates as an indicator for OC stability. Depth profiles of OC in the light fraction (LF-OC matched those of roots for undisturbed grassland and forest sites, suggesting that roots are shaping the depth distribution of LF-OC. Organic C in the HF declined less with soil depth than LF-OC and roots, especially at grassland sites. The decrease in Δ14C (increase in age of HF-OC with soil depth was related to soil pH as well as to dissolved OC fluxes. This indicates that dissolved OC translocation contributes to the formation of subsoil HF-OC and shapes the Δ14C profiles. The LF at three sites were rather depleted in 14C, indicating the presence of fossil material such as coal and lignite, probably inherited from the parent material. At the other sites, modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlations between specific mineralization rates and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is a potentially available energy and

  1. Restoration of soils affected by oil exploitation activities based in functional diversity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacis, Jaime; Casanoves, Fernando; Hang, Susana; Armas, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    The functional characteristics of 25 forest species used in the restoration of areas affected by oil extraction activities were determined and species functional groups were constructed. Subsequently, the functional characteristics of the groups were related with performance variables of the species obtained in complementary studies, to make use recommendations. Three functional groups of species with similar responses and / or performance were characterized that showed significant differences between them for quantitative and qualitative traits. The first group formed by all shrubs and the rest of trees, most do not fix nitrogen, have single leaves and all species are evergreen and characterized by having lower values of specific foliar area, foliar nitrogen, dry matter leaf content and wood density, was denominated as intermediate acquisitions. The second group composed only for trees that do not fix nitrogen and with deciduous leaves and characterized by having the highest values of dry matter leaf content and foliar tensile force and intermediate values of specific foliar area and foliar nitrogen, was denominated as low conservative. Finally the third group formed only by trees that fix nitrogen, composed of leaves and mostly evergreen and characterized by having higher values of specific foliar area, foliar nitrogen, foliar phosphorus and lower foliar tensile force, was denominated as acquisitive. The intermediary acquisitions species Apeiba membranacea, Myrcia aff. fallax and Zygia longifolia, and the acquisitive species Cedrelinga cateniformis, Inga densiflora, Myroxylon balsamum, Piptadenia pteroclada and Platymiscium pinnatum, which showed excellent performance in nursery and / or field, represent the most suitable species to be used in reforestation programs of the sites affected by oil extraction activities in the Amazon region of Ecuador, because they have greater potential to protect soil and recycle nutrients in the initial stages of planting.

  2. Does strip-tillage could limit the drop of yields on soils of reduced depth of profiles in loess areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejman, Jerzy; Rafalska-Przysucha, Anna; Jadzczyszyn, Jan; Rodzik, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Strip tillage restrict a tillage operation to seed rows and enables a combination of tillage, sowing and application of fertilizers during one pass of agricultural machines. The practice decreases the costs of fuel and limits the risk of water erosion by the increase of infiltration of soil water. In the studies, we put a hypothesis that strip tillage is a tool to increase the yields on soils of reduced profiles. Studies were carried out in the loess area of the Lublin Upland (Poland). The site is cultivated from the beginning of the 18th century, and strip tillage is performed from 2008. All plant residues is left after harvest in the field and mixed with the soil by disc harrow. Measurements of solum depth (Ap-BC), soil properties and parameters of plant growth were carried out in 108 points in the field of the area of 4 ha. Crops included winter wheat (2014) and maize (2015). Studies showed that the profiles of Haplic Luvisol were largely truncated or overbuilt due to erosion and moldboard plow in the past. Solum depth ranged from 0.2 to 3.6 m (mean=1.29 m, CV=64%), and soils with the non-eroded, slightly, moderately, severely, very severely eroded and depositional profiles represented 13, 32, 10, 5, 8 and 32% of total number of cores, respectively. In a result of modification of profiles, clay content ranged from 84 to 222 (145; 16%) in the layer of 0-15 cm, whereas SOC concentration remained on relatively low level and ranged from 4.3 to 16.8 g/kg (9.1; 21.4%). Soil water content (SWC) within depth of 1-m profile was differentiated at the start of measurements in the middle of June 2015. The SWC was the highest in non-eroded and depositional soils and the smallest in severely and very severely eroded soils. The difference of 5% has maintained during the whole growing season and did not affect the growth of plants till the phase of flowering. Then, the plants on shallower soils passed quicker to the next phenological phases in comparison to the plants on deeper

  3. Bacteria utilizing plant-derived carbon in the rhizosphere of Triticum aestivum change in different depths of an arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uksa, Marie; Buegger, Franz; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Lueders, Tillmann; Kublik, Susanne; Kautz, Timo; Athmann, Miriam; Köpke, Ulrich; Munch, Jean Charles; Schloter, Michael; Fischer, Doreen

    2017-12-01

    Root exudates shape microbial communities at the plant-soil interface. Here we compared bacterial communities that utilize plant-derived carbon in the rhizosphere of wheat in different soil depths, including topsoil, as well as two subsoil layers up to 1 m depth. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse using soil monoliths with intact soil structure taken from an agricultural field. To identify bacteria utilizing plant-derived carbon, 13 C-CO2 labelling of plants was performed for two weeks at the EC50 stage, followed by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation of extracted DNA from the rhizosphere combined with 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing. Our findings suggest substantially different bacterial key players and interaction mechanisms between plants and bacteria utilizing plant-derived carbon in the rhizosphere of subsoils and topsoil. Among the three soil depths, clear differences were found in 13 C enrichment pattern across abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Whereas, OTUs linked to Proteobacteria were enriched in 13 C mainly in the topsoil, in both subsoil layers OTUs related to Cohnella, Paenibacillus, Flavobacterium showed a clear 13 C signal, indicating an important, so far overseen role of Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes in the subsoil rhizosphere. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Improving Streamflow Prediction Using Remotely-Sensed Soil Moisture and Snow Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishen Lü

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of both cold and warm season hydrologic processes in headwater watersheds is critical for accurate water resource monitoring in many alpine regions. This work presents a new method that explores the simultaneous use of remotely sensed surface soil moisture (SM and snow depth (SD retrievals to improve hydrological modeling in such areas. In particular, remotely sensed SM and SD retrievals are applied to filter errors present in both solid and liquid phase precipitation accumulation products acquired from satellite remote sensing. Simultaneously, SM and SD retrievals are also used to correct antecedent SM and SD states within a hydrological model. In synthetic data assimilation experiments, results suggest that the simultaneous correction of both precipitation forcing and SM/SD antecedent conditions is more efficient at improving streamflow simulation than data assimilation techniques which focus solely on the constraint of antecedent SM or SD conditions. In a real assimilation case, results demonstrate the potential benefits of remotely sensed SM and SD retrievals for improving the representation of hydrological processes in a headwater basin. In particular, it is demonstrated that dual precipitation/state correction represents an efficient strategy for improving the simulation of cold-region hydrological processes.

  5. Distinct fungal and bacterial δ13C signatures can drive the increase in soil δ13C with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Lukas; Laganièrea, Jérôme; Edwards, Kate A.; Billings, Sharon A.; Morrill, Penny L.; Van Biesen, Geert; Ziegler, Susan E.

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a key precursor of soil organic carbon (SOC), and the enrichment in 13C during SOC diagenesis has been purported to be driven by increasing proportions of microbially derived SOC. Yet, little is known about how the δ13C of soil microbial biomass - and by extension the δ13C of microbial inputs to SOC - vary in space, time, or with the composition of the microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) can be analyzed to measure the variation of the natural abundance δ13C values of both individual groups of microorganisms and the microbial community as a whole. Here, we show how variations of δ13CPLFA within the soil profile provides insight into C fluxes in undisturbed soils and demonstrate that distinct δ13C of fungal and bacterial biomass and their relative abundance can drive the increase of bulk δ13CSOC with depth. We studied the variation in natural abundance δ13C signatures of PLFA in podzolic soil profiles from mesic boreal forests in Atlantic Canada. Samples from the organic horizons (L,F,H) and the mineral (B; top 10 cm) horizons were analyzed for δ13C values of PLFA specific to fungi, G+ bacteria, or G- bacteria as proxies for the δ13C of the biomass of these groups, and for δ13C values of PLFA produced by a wide range of microorganisms (e.g. 16:0) as a proxy for the δ13C value of microbial biomass as a whole. Results were compared to fungi:bacteria ratios (F:B) and bulk δ13CSOC values. The δ13C values of group-specific PLFA were driven by differences among source organisms, with fungal PLFA consistently depleted (2.1 to 6.4‰) relative to and G+ and G- bacterial PLFA in the same sample. All group-specific PLFA, however, exhibited nearly constant δ13C values throughout the soil profile, apparently unaffected by the over 2.8‰ increase in δ13CSOC with depth from the L to B horizons. This indicates that bulk SOC poorly represents the substrates actually consumed by soil microorganisms in situ. Instead, our

  6. Centimeter-scale spatial variability in 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralization increases with depth in agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawi, Nora; Johnsen, Anders R.; Sørensen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Mineralization of organic chemicals in soil is typically studied using large homogenized samples, but little is known about the small-scale spatial distribution of mineralization potential. We studied centimeter-scale spatial distribution of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) mineralization...... activity at different depths (8-115 cm) in a Danish agricultural soil profi le using a 96-well microplate C-radiorespirometric method for small-volume samples. The heterotrophic microbial population and specifi c MCPA degraders decreased 10- to 100-fold from the plow layer to a depth of 115 cm. MCPA...... was mineralized in all samples in the plow layer, but only about 60% in the transition zone immediately below the plow layer showed mineralization; at greater depth even fewer samples showed mineralization. A patchy spatial distribution of mineralization activity was observed from right below the plow layer...

  7. The Spatial and Temporal Variability of Water Content in an Organic Soil in Dartmoor National Park, UK and its Relation to Microtopography and Organic Soil Horizon Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J.; Miles, H.; Berg, A.

    2009-05-01

    The water content of organic and mineral soils is an important parameter which links energy and mass balances at the earth's surface and as such is essential to understanding the spatial and temporal organization of many biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. The characterization of surface water content in space and time is also important for the continued development of regional-scale and global circulation climate models and has large implications for agriculture and land-use planning. A field study was performed in Dartmoor National Park, Devon, UK in August 2008 for the purpose of exploring the predictive power of terrain indices on wetness patterns in an organic soil. Point samples were taken over the course of three days on two hill slopes of varying aspect in order to assess the influence of incident solar radiation on water storage. Additionally, the depth of the organic layer was estimated for each sample location and topographic information collected for the creation of a digital elevation model. A weak correlation between peat water content and organic soil layer depth was demonstrated and found to be strongest in shallow soils. Microtopography was found to influence the variability of soil moisture over the sampled area with surface roughness (measured by using residual elevation from the mean transect slope). Based on repeated observations over the sampling grids temporal persistence of water content patterns is evident and can be linked to terrain indices and depth of the organic layer.

  8. Impact of interspecific interactions on the soil water uptake depth in a young temperate mixed species plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossiord, Charlotte; Gessler, Arthur; Granier, André; Berger, Sigrid; Bréchet, Claude; Hentschel, Rainer; Hommel, Robert; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bonal, Damien

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between tree species in forests can be beneficial to ecosystem functions and services related to the carbon and water cycles by improving for example transpiration and productivity. However, little is known on below- and above-ground processes leading to these positive effects. We tested whether stratification in soil water uptake depth occurred between four tree species in a 10-year-old temperate mixed species plantation during a dry summer. We selected dominant and co-dominant trees of European beech, Sessile oak, Douglas fir and Norway spruce in areas with varying species diversity, competition intensity, and where different plant functional types (broadleaf vs. conifer) were present. We applied a deuterium labelling approach that consisted of spraying labelled water to the soil surface to create a strong vertical gradient of the deuterium isotope composition in the soil water. The deuterium isotope composition of both the xylem sap and the soil water was measured before labelling, and then again three days after labelling, to estimate the soil water uptake depth using a simple modelling approach. We also sampled leaves and needles from selected trees to measure their carbon isotope composition (a proxy for water use efficiency) and total nitrogen content. At the end of the summer, we found differences in the soil water uptake depth between plant functional types but not within types: on average, coniferous species extracted water from deeper layers than did broadleaved species. Neither species diversity nor competition intensity had a detectable influence on soil water uptake depth, foliar water use efficiency or foliar nitrogen concentration in the species studied. However, when coexisting with an increasing proportion of conifers, beech extracted water from progressively deeper soil layers. We conclude that complementarity for water uptake could occur in this 10-year-old plantation because of inherent differences among functional groups (conifers

  9. Ice Table Depth Variability Near Small Rocks at the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, H. G.; Golombek, M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2008-03-01

    We make statistical predictions of the ice table depth variability in the area accessible to the Robotic Arm and highlight spatial configurations of surface rocks that Phoenix might exploit to optimize soil investigation.

  10. SMOS-IC: An Alternative SMOS Soil Moisture and Vegetation Optical Depth Product

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberto Fernandez-Moran; Amen Al-Yaari; Arnaud Mialon; Ali Mahmoodi; Ahmad Al Bitar; Gabrielle De Lannoy; Nemesio Rodriguez-Fernandez; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; Yann Kerr; Jean-Pierre Wigneron

    2017-01-01

    .... The operational SMOS Level 2 and Level 3 soil moisture algorithms account for different surface effects, such as vegetation opacity and soil roughness at 4 km resolution, in order to produce global...

  11. Estimating drain flow from measured water table depth in layered soils under free and controlled drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Samaneh; Bowling, Laura; Frankenberger, Jane; Kladivko, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Long records of continuous drain flow are important for quantifying annual and seasonal changes in the subsurface drainage flow from drained agricultural land. Missing data due to equipment malfunction and other challenges have limited conclusions that can be made about annual flow and thus nutrient loads from field studies, including assessments of the effect of controlled drainage. Water table depth data may be available during gaps in flow data, providing a basis for filling missing drain flow data; therefore, the overall goal of this study was to examine the potential to estimate drain flow using water table observations. The objectives were to evaluate how the shape of the relationship between drain flow and water table height above drain varies depending on the soil hydraulic conductivity profile, to quantify how well the Hooghoudt equation represented the water table-drain flow relationship in five years of measured data at the Davis Purdue Agricultural Center (DPAC), and to determine the impact of controlled drainage on drain flow using the filled dataset. The shape of the drain flow-water table height relationship was found to depend on the selected hydraulic conductivity profile. Estimated drain flow using the Hooghoudt equation with measured water table height for both free draining and controlled periods compared well to observed flow with Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values above 0.7 and 0.8 for calibration and validation periods, respectively. Using this method, together with linear regression for the remaining gaps, a long-term drain flow record for a controlled drainage experiment at the DPAC was used to evaluate the impacts of controlled drainage on drain flow. In the controlled drainage sites, annual flow was 14-49% lower than free drainage.

  12. Long-term Fertilization Structures Bacterial and Archaeal Communities along Soil Depth Gradient in a Paddy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunfu; Wang, Yingyan; Lu, Sheng'e; Xiang, Quanju; Yu, Xiumei; Zhao, Ke; Zou, Likou; Chen, Qiang; Tu, Shihua; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbes provide important ecosystem services. Though the effects of changes in nutrient availability due to fertilization on the soil microbial communities in the topsoil (tilled layer, 0-20 cm) have been extensively explored, the effects on communities and their associations with soil nutrients in the subsoil (below 20 cm) which is rarely impacted by tillage are still unclear. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was used to investigate bacterial and archaeal communities in a Pup-Calric-Entisol soil treated for 32 years with chemical fertilizer (CF) and CF combined with farmyard manure (CFM), and to reveal links between soil properties and specific bacterial and archaeal taxa in both the top- and subsoil. The results showed that both CF and CFM treatments increased soil organic carbon (SOC), soil moisture (MO) and total nitrogen (TN) while decreased the nitrate(_)N content through the profile. Fertilizer applications also increased Olsen phosphorus (OP) content in most soil layers. Microbial communities in the topsoil were significantly different from those in subsoil. Compared to the CF treatment, taxa such as Nitrososphaera, Nitrospira, and several members of Acidobacteria in topsoil and Subdivision 3 genera incertae sedis, Leptolinea, and Bellilinea in subsoil were substantially more abundant in CFM. A co-occurrence based network analysis demonstrated that SOC and OP were the most important soil parameters that positively correlated with specific bacterial and archaeal taxa in topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Hydrogenophaga was identified as the keystone genus in the topsoil, while genera Phenylobacterium and Steroidobacter were identified as the keystone taxa in subsoil. The taxa identified above are involved in the decomposition of complex organic compounds and soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transformations. This study revealed that the spatial variability of soil properties due to long-term fertilization strongly shapes the bacterial and archaeal

  13. Long-term Fertilization Structures Bacterial and Archaeal Communities along Soil Depth Gradient in a Paddy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfu Gu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbes provide important ecosystem services. Though the effects of changes in nutrient availability due to fertilization on the soil microbial communities in the topsoil (tilled layer, 0–20 cm have been extensively explored, the effects on communities and their associations with soil nutrients in the subsoil (below 20 cm which is rarely impacted by tillage are still unclear. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was used to investigate bacterial and archaeal communities in a Pup-Calric-Entisol soil treated for 32 years with chemical fertilizer (CF and CF combined with farmyard manure (CFM, and to reveal links between soil properties and specific bacterial and archaeal taxa in both the top- and subsoil. The results showed that both CF and CFM treatments increased soil organic carbon (SOC, soil moisture (MO and total nitrogen (TN while decreased the nitrate_N content through the profile. Fertilizer applications also increased Olsen phosphorus (OP content in most soil layers. Microbial communities in the topsoil were significantly different from those in subsoil. Compared to the CF treatment, taxa such as Nitrososphaera, Nitrospira, and several members of Acidobacteria in topsoil and Subdivision 3 genera incertae sedis, Leptolinea, and Bellilinea in subsoil were substantially more abundant in CFM. A co-occurrence based network analysis demonstrated that SOC and OP were the most important soil parameters that positively correlated with specific bacterial and archaeal taxa in topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Hydrogenophaga was identified as the keystone genus in the topsoil, while genera Phenylobacterium and Steroidobacter were identified as the keystone taxa in subsoil. The taxa identified above are involved in the decomposition of complex organic compounds and soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transformations. This study revealed that the spatial variability of soil properties due to long-term fertilization strongly shapes the bacterial

  14. Rock-Eval analysis of French forest soils: the influence of depth, soil and vegetation types on SOC thermal stability and bulk chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Cecchini, Sébastien; Chenu, Claire; Mériguet, Jacques; Nicolas, Manuel; Savignac, Florence; Barré, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool and SOM degradation has multiple consequences on key ecosystem properties like nutrients cycling, soil emissions of greenhouse gases or carbon sequestration potential. With the strong feedbacks between SOM and climate change, it becomes particularly urgent to develop reliable routine methodologies capable of indicating the turnover time of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. Thermal analyses have been used to characterize SOM and among them, Rock-Eval 6 (RE6) analysis of soil has shown promising results in the determination of in-situ SOC biogeochemical stability. This technique combines a phase of pyrolysis followed by a phase of oxidation to provide information on both the SOC bulk chemistry and thermal stability. We analyzed with RE6 a set of 495 soils samples from 102 permanent forest sites of the French national network for the long-term monitoring of forest ecosystems (''RENECOFOR'' network). Along with covering pedoclimatic variability at a national level, these samples include a range of 5 depths up to 1 meter (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, 40-80 cm and 80-100 cm). Using RE6 parameters that were previously shown to be correlated to short-term (hydrogen index, HI; T50 CH pyrolysis) or long-term (T50 CO2 oxidation and HI) SOC persistence, and that characterize SOM bulk chemical composition (oxygen index, OI and HI), we tested the influence of depth (n = 5), soil class (n = 6) and vegetation type (n = 3; deciduous, coniferous-fir, coniferous-pine) on SOM thermal stability and bulk chemistry. Results showed that depth was the dominant discriminating factor, affecting significantly all RE6 parameters. With depth, we observed a decrease of the thermally labile SOC pool and an increase of the thermally stable SOC pool, along with an oxidation and a depletion of hydrogen-rich moieties of the SOC. Soil class and vegetation type had contrasted effects on the RE6 parameters but both affected significantly T

  15. Seed Burial Depth and Soil Water Content Affect Seedling Emergence and Growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of seed burial depth and soil water content on seedling emergence and growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm, an important native tree species distributed over the European-Asian steppe. Experimental sand burial depths in the soil were 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 cm, and soil water contents were 4%, 8%, 12% and 16% of field capacity. All two-way ANOVA (five sand burial depths and four soil water contents results showed that seed burial depths, soil water content and their interactions significantly affected all the studied plant variables. Most of the times, seedling emergence conditions were greater at the lower sand burial depths (less than 1.0 cm than at the higher (more than 1.0 cm seed burial depths, and at the lower water content (less than 12% than at the higher soil water content. However, high seed burial depths (more than 1.5 cm or low soil water content (less than 12% reduced seedling growth or change in the root/shoot biomass ratios. In conclusion, the most suitable range of sand burial was from 0.5 to 1.0 cm soil depth and soil water content was about 12%, respectively, for the processes of seedling emergence and growth. These findings indicate that seeds of the sandy elm should be kept at rather shallow soil depths, and water should be added up to 12% of soil capacity when conducting elm planting and management. Our findings could help to create a more appropriate sandy elm cultivation and understand sparse elm woodland recruitment failures in arid and semi-arid regions.

  16. Soil thermal dynamics, snow cover, and frozen depth under five temperature treatments in an ombrotrophic bog: Constrained forecast with data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Jiang; Ma, Shuang; Ricciuto, Daniel; Hanson, Paul J.; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-08-01

    Accurate simulation of soil thermal dynamics is essential for realistic prediction of soil biogeochemical responses to climate change. To facilitate ecological forecasting at the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental change site, we incorporated a soil temperature module into a Terrestrial ECOsystem (TECO) model by accounting for surface energy budget, snow dynamics, and heat transfer among soil layers and during freeze-thaw events. We conditioned TECO with detailed soil temperature and snow depth observations through data assimilation before the model was used for forecasting. The constrained model reproduced variations in observed temperature from different soil layers, the magnitude of snow depth, the timing of snowfall and snowmelt, and the range of frozen depth. The conditioned TECO forecasted probabilistic distributions of soil temperature dynamics in six soil layers, snow, and frozen depths under temperature treatments of +0.0, +2.25, +4.5, +6.75, and +9.0°C. Air warming caused stronger elevation in soil temperature during summer than winter due to winter snow and ice. And soil temperature increased more in shallow soil layers in summer in response to air warming. Whole ecosystem warming (peat + air warmings) generally reduced snow and frozen depths. The accuracy of forecasted snow and frozen depths relied on the precision of weather forcing. Uncertainty is smaller for forecasting soil temperature but large for snow and frozen depths. Timely and effective soil thermal forecast, constrained through data assimilation that combines process-based understanding and detailed observations, provides boundary conditions for better predictions of future biogeochemical cycles.

  17. Soil thermal dynamics, snow cover, and frozen depth under five temperature treatments in an ombrotrophic bog: Constrained forecast with data assimilation: Forecast With Data Assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuanyuan [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; Jiang, Jiang [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; Key Laboratory of Soil and Water Conservation and Ecological Restoration in Jiangsu Province, Collaborative Innovation Center of Sustainable Forestry in Southern China of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing China; Ma, Shuang [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; Ricciuto, Daniel [Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Hanson, Paul J. [Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Luo, Yiqi [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing China

    2017-08-01

    Accurate simulation of soil thermal dynamics is essential for realistic prediction of soil biogeochemical responses to climate change. To facilitate ecological forecasting at the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental change site, we incorporated a soil temperature module into a Terrestrial ECOsystem (TECO) model by accounting for surface energy budget, snow dynamics, and heat transfer among soil layers and during freeze-thaw events. We conditioned TECO with detailed soil temperature and snow depth observations through data assimilation before the model was used for forecasting. The constrained model reproduced variations in observed temperature from different soil layers, the magnitude of snow depth, the timing of snowfall and snowmelt, and the range of frozen depth. The conditioned TECO forecasted probabilistic distributions of soil temperature dynamics in six soil layers, snow, and frozen depths under temperature treatments of +0.0, +2.25, +4.5, +6.75, and +9.0°C. Air warming caused stronger elevation in soil temperature during summer than winter due to winter snow and ice. And soil temperature increased more in shallow soil layers in summer in response to air warming. Whole ecosystem warming (peat + air warmings) generally reduced snow and frozen depths. The accuracy of forecasted snow and frozen depths relied on the precision of weather forcing. Uncertainty is smaller for forecasting soil temperature but large for snow and frozen depths. Timely and effective soil thermal forecast, constrained through data assimilation that combines process-based understanding and detailed observations, provides boundary conditions for better predictions of future biogeochemical cycles.

  18. Quantitative molecular biology and gas flux measurements demonstrate soil treatment and depth affects on the distribution and activity of denitrifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M. M.; Jahangir, M.; Cardenas, L.; Khalil, M.; Richards, K. R.; O'Flaherty, V.

    2010-12-01

    The growing industrialisation of agriculture has led to a dramatic increase in organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) fertiliser inputs to agro-ecosystems. This increase has had negative effects on the quality of water ecosystems and greenhouse gas emissions.The study objective was to quantify denitrification and denitrifying microorganisms, using real-time PCR assays of the nitrite reductase(nir) and nitrous oxide reductase(nos) functional gene copy concentrations (GCC g[soil]-1) in Irish agricultural surface and subsoils. Soil cores from 3 soil horizons (A:0-10 cm; B:45-55 cm; C:120-130cm) were amended with 3 alternate N- and C-source amendments (NO3-; NO3-+glucose-C; NO3-+Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). Real-time production of N2O and N2 was recorded by gas chromatography in a specialized He/O2 environment. N2O and Total Denitrification (TDN) (N2O+N2) production was generally greater in surface soil (2.052 mg/kg/d TDN) than in subsoils (0.120 mg/kg/d TDN). The abundance of denitrifying nirS, nirK (nir) and nos genes was higher in the surface soil, decreasing with soil depth, except in incubations amended with NO3- and DOC, where the carbon source directly positively affected gene copy numbers and fluxes of N2O and N2 production. C addition increased soil denitrification rates, and resulted in higher N2O/(N2O+N2) ratios in surface soil (0.39) than subsoils (0.005), indicating that the subsoil had higher potential for complete reduction of N2O to N2. In the subsoils, complete reduction of NO3- due to glucose-C and DOC addition was observed. Interestingly, at all 3 soil depths, lower nirK abundance (2.78 105 GCC) was recorded, compared to nirS (1.45 107 GCC), but the overall abundance of nir (S+K) i.e. (1.54 107GCC), corresponded with N2O emission fluxes (3.34 mg/kg/d) Statistical analysis indicates negative correlation between nirK GCC and N2O production, but a strong positive correlation was observed between nirS GCC and N2O. We therefore hypothesize that the

  19. Estimating post-fire organic soil depth in the Alaskan boreal forest using the Normalized Burn Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Verbyla; R. Lord

    2008-01-01

    As part of a long-term moose browse/fire severity study, we used the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) with historic Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery to estimate fire severity from a 1983 wildfire in interior Alaska. Fire severity was estimated in the field by measuring the depth of the organic soil at 57 sites during the summer of 2006. Sites were selected for field...

  20. Impact of Soil Depth and Topography on the Effectiveness of Conservation Practices on Discharge and Soil Loss in the Ethiopian Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adugnaw T. Akale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of degraded landscapes through the implementation of soil and water conservation practices is considered a viable option to increase agricultural production by enhancing ecosystems. However, in the humid Ethiopian highlands, little information is available on the impact of conservation practices despite wide scale implementation. The objective of this research was to document the effect of conservation practices on discharge and sediment concentration and load in watersheds that have different soil depths and topography. Precipitation, discharge, and sediment concentration were measured from 2010 to 2012 in two watersheds in close proximity and located in the Lake Tana basin, Ethiopia: Tikur-Wuha and Guale watersheds. The Tikur-Wuha watershed has deep soils and a gentle slope stream channel. The Guale watershed has shallow soils and a steep slope stream channel. In early 2011, the local community installed upland conservation measures consisting of stone and soil bunds, waterways, cutoff drains, infiltration furrows, gully rehabilitation, and enclosures. The results show that conservation practices marginally decreased direct runoff in both watersheds and increased base flow in the Tikur-Wuha watershed. Average sediment concentration decreased by 81% in Tikur-Wuha and 45% in Guale. The practices intended to increase infiltration were most effective in the Tikur-Wuha watershed because the deep soil could store the infiltrated water and release it over a longer period of time after the rainy season than the steeper Guale watershed with shallow soils.

  1. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on glomalin-related soil protein distribution, aggregate stability and their relationships with soil properties at different soil depths in lead-zinc contaminated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yurong; He, Chuangjun; Huang, Li; Ban, Yihui; Tang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), a widespread glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), is crucial for ecosystem functioning and ecological restoration. In the present study, an investigation was conducted to comprehensively analyze the effects of heavy metal (HM) contamination on AMF status, soil properties, aggregate distribution and stability, and their correlations at different soil depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40 cm). Our results showed that the mycorrhizal colonization (MC), hyphal length density (HLD), GRSP, soil organic matter (SOM) and soil organic carbon (SOC) were significantly inhibited by Pb compared to Zn at 0-20 cm soil depth, indicating that HM had significant inhibitory effects on AMF growth and soil properties, and that Pb exhibited greater toxicity than Zn at shallow layer of soil. Both the proportion of soil large macroaggregates (>2000 μm) and mean weight diameter (MWD) were positively correlated with GRSP, SOM and SOC at 0-20 cm soil depth (P soil particles together into large macroaggregates and improving aggregate stability. Furthermore, MC and HLD had significantly positive correlation with GRSP, SOM and SOC, suggesting that AMF played an essential role in GRSP, SOM and SOC accumulation and subsequently influencing aggregate formation and particle-size distribution in HM polluted soils. Our study highlighted that the introduction of indigenous plant associated with AMF might be a successful biotechnological tool to assist the recovery of HM polluted soils, and that proper management practices should be developed to guarantee maximum benefits from plant-AMF symbiosis during ecological restoration.

  2. ZVI-CLAY SOIL MIXING TREATS DNAPL SOURCE AREA AT 35-FOOT DEPTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DuPont Company and Colorado State University (CSU) are collaborating in development and refinement of a technology that involves in-situ admixing of contaminated soil, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and clay using conventional soil mixing equipment. A full-scale application...

  3. Mercury transformation and release differs with depth and time in a contaminated riparian soil during simulated flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Brett; Aiken, George R.; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2016-01-01

    Riparian soils are an important environment in the transport of mercury in rivers and wetlands, but the biogeochemical factors controlling mercury dynamics under transient redox conditions in these soils are not well understood. Mercury release and transformations in the Oa and underlying A horizons of a contaminated riparian soil were characterized in microcosms and an intact soil core under saturation conditions. Pore water dynamics of total mercury (HgT), methylmercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (Hg0(aq)) along with selected anions, major elements, and trace metals were characterized across redox transitions during 36 d of flooding in microcosms. Next, HgT dynamics were characterized over successive flooding (17 d), drying (28 d), and flooding (36 d) periods in the intact core. The observed mercury dynamics exhibit depth and temporal variability. At the onset of flooding in microcosms (1–3 d), mercury in the Oa horizon soil, present as a combination of ionic mercury (Hg(II)) bound to thiol groups in the soil organic matter (SOM) and nanoparticulate metacinnabar (b-HgS), was mobilized with organic matter of high molecular weight. Subsequently, under anoxic conditions, pore water HgT declined coincident with sulfate (3–11 d) and the proportion of nanoparticulate b-HgS in the Oa horizon soil increased slightly. Redox oscillations in the intact Oa horizon soil exhausted the mobile mercury pool associated with organic matter. In contrast, mercury in the A horizon soil, present predominantly as nanoparticulate b-HgS, was mobilized primarily as Hg0(aq) under strongly reducing conditions (5–18 d). The concentration of Hg0(aq) under dark reducing conditions correlated positively with byproducts of dissimilatory metal reduction (P(Fe,Mn)). Mercury dynamics in intact A horizon soil were consistent over two periods of flooding, indicating that nanoparticulate b-HgS was an accessible pool of mobile mercury over recurrent reducing conditions. The

  4. Mercury transformation and release differs with depth and time in a contaminated riparian soil during simulated flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Brett A.; Aiken, George R.; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2016-03-01

    Riparian soils are an important environment in the transport of mercury in rivers and wetlands, but the biogeochemical factors controlling mercury dynamics under transient redox conditions in these soils are not well understood. Mercury release and transformations in the Oa and underlying A horizons of a contaminated riparian soil were characterized in microcosms and an intact soil core under saturation conditions. Pore water dynamics of total mercury (HgT), methylmercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (Hg0(aq)) along with selected anions, major elements, and trace metals were characterized across redox transitions during 36 d of flooding in microcosms. Next, HgT dynamics were characterized over successive flooding (17 d), drying (28 d), and flooding (36 d) periods in the intact core. The observed mercury dynamics exhibit depth and temporal variability. At the onset of flooding in microcosms (1-3 d), mercury in the Oa horizon soil, present as a combination of ionic mercury (Hg(II)) bound to thiol groups in the soil organic matter (SOM) and nanoparticulate metacinnabar (β-HgS), was mobilized with organic matter of high molecular weight. Subsequently, under anoxic conditions, pore water HgT declined coincident with sulfate (3-11 d) and the proportion of nanoparticulate β-HgS in the Oa horizon soil increased slightly. Redox oscillations in the intact Oa horizon soil exhausted the mobile mercury pool associated with organic matter. In contrast, mercury in the A horizon soil, present predominantly as nanoparticulate β-HgS, was mobilized primarily as Hg0(aq) under strongly reducing conditions (5-18 d). The concentration of Hg0(aq) under dark reducing conditions correlated positively with byproducts of dissimilatory metal reduction (∑(Fe,Mn)). Mercury dynamics in intact A horizon soil were consistent over two periods of flooding, indicating that nanoparticulate β-HgS was an accessible pool of mobile mercury over recurrent reducing conditions. The

  5. Calculating thermal insulation thickness and embedment depth of underground heat supply pipeline for permafrost soils

    OpenAIRE

    M.P. Akimov; S.D. Mordovskoy; N.P. Starostin

    2014-01-01

    In this work the authors considered a freezing-and-melting process of soils under the polyurethane-insulated polyethylene heating pipeline, which is used in the regions with permafrost soils. Temperature field dynamics of the “pipeline – soil” system is determined by heat conductivity equation in polar coordinate system. The corresponding two-dimensional Stefan problem is solved by the finite differences method. The authors propose to determine the thickness of pipeline thermal insulation...

  6. Effects of Enhanced Thaw Depth on the Composition of Arctic Soil Organic Matter Leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J.; Zhang, X.; Bianchi, T. S.; Schuur, E.; Arellano, A. R.; Liu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Pan-Arctic permafrost is increasingly susceptible to thaw due to the disproportionally high rate of temperature change in high latitudes. These soils contain a globally significant quantity of organic carbon that, when thawed, interacts with the modern carbon cycle. Current research has focused on atmospheric carbon fluxes and transport by rivers and streams to continental shelves, but has overlooked the lateral flux of carbon within watershed soils, which is the primary link between terrestrial and riverine ecosystems. Understanding the effects of water movement through permafrost soils on dissolved organic carbon is critical to better modelling of lateral carbon fluxes and interpreting the resulting observed riverine carbon fluxes with applications to investigations of the past, present, and future of the pan-Arctic. We conducted a laboratory leaching experiment using active layer soils from the Eight Mile Lake region of interior Alaska. Cores were sampled into surface and deep sections. Surface sections were subjected to a three-stage leaching process using artificial rain, with cores stored frozen overnight between stages (which crudely simulated freeze-thaw mechanisms). Surface leachates were sampled for analysis and the remainder percolated through deep soils using the same three-staged approach. Measurements of surface and deep leachates were selected to characterize transport-related changes to dissolved organic matter and included dissolved organic carbon, fluorescent dissolved organic matter via excitation emission matrices, and molecular composition via Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Primary findings from the experiment include a net retention of 2.4 to 27% of dissolved organic carbon from surface leachates in deep soils, a net release of fluorescent dissolved organic matter from deep soils that was 43 to 106% greater than surface leachates, increased hydrophobicity during stage three of leaching, and the preferential

  7. Range-Depth Tracking of Sounds from a Single-Point Deployment by Exploiting the Deep-Water Sound Speed Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    hardware. The four-day data set, sponsored under a separate MURI research thrust, inadvertently collected numerous sperm, humpback, and dolphin calls...remains the same. 9 Figure 9: Evolution of ray arrival angles (top) and relative multipath arrival times (bottom) as a controlled source is winched...from 300 m to 100 m depth at 49.5 km range. Figure 10: Evolution of ray arrival angles (top) and relative arrival times for a sperm whale click train over 20 minutes.

  8. Effects of Different Sowing Depths and Soil Compactions on Emergence and Initial Growth of Pepper Varieties (Capsicum annum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shahriari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in the mass production of pepper transplant is the stickiness of seed coat to the cotyledony leaves that can lead to no emergence or having poor emergence of pepper seedlings. Therefore, in order to evaluate the effects of different sowing depths and soil compactions on emergence and early seedlings growth of pepper, a greenhouse experiment was conducted in the Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, in 2010, using a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and four replications. The experimental factors included different levels of soil compactions (0 (no compaction, 150.5, 681.340 and 1201.7 Pa, different sowing depths (0 (surface, 1 and 2 cm and different pepper varieties (Olter, California Wonder, EM Bell, Anahiem and Iranian Falei. The results indicated that except the seed coat adherence to cotyledon leaves and the emergence percentage traits, the compaction treatments had a significant effect on (dry matter of seedlings, height, leaf area, number of abnormal seedling and mean emergence time were significant. In addition, sowing depth treatments had positive and significant effects on increasing the number of seedling with releasing seed coats from the cotyledony leaves.

  9. Thiol-ene thermosets exploiting surface reactivity for layer-by-layer structures and control of penetration depth for selective surface reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Westh, Andreas; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines

    Thiol-ene thermosets have been shown to be an efficient platform for preparation of functional polymer surfaces. Especially the effectiveness and versatility of the system has enabled a large variety of network properties to be obtained in a simple and straight-forward way. Due to its selectivity......, various thiols and allyl or other vinyl reactants can be used to obtain either soft and flexible1 or more rigid functional thermosets 2. The methodology permits use of etiher thermal or photochemical conditions both for matrix preparation as well as for surface functionalization. Due to excess reactive...... groups in thµe surface of thiol-ene thermosets, it is possible to prepare surface functional thermosets or to exploit the reactive groups for modular construction and subsequent chemical bonding. Here a different approach preparing monolithic layer-by-layer structures with controlled mechanical...

  10. Modelling shallow landslide susceptibility by means of a subsurface flow path connectivity index and estimates of soil depth spatial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lanni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Topographic index-based hydrological models have gained wide use to describe the hydrological control on the triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides at the catchment scale. A common assumption in these models is that a spatially continuous water table occurs simultaneously across the catchment. However, during a rainfall event isolated patches of subsurface saturation form above an impeding layer and their hydrological connectivity is a necessary condition for lateral flow initiation at a point on the hillslope.

    Here, a new hydrological model is presented, which allows us to account for the concept of hydrological connectivity while keeping the simplicity of the topographic index approach. A dynamic topographic index is used to describe the transient lateral flow that is established at a hillslope element when the rainfall amount exceeds a threshold value allowing for (a development of a perched water table above an impeding layer, and (b hydrological connectivity between the hillslope element and its own upslope contributing area. A spatially variable soil depth is the main control of hydrological connectivity in the model. The hydrological model is coupled with the infinite slope stability model and with a scaling model for the rainfall frequency–duration relationship to determine the return period of the critical rainfall needed to cause instability on three catchments located in the Italian Alps, where a survey of soil depth spatial distribution is available. The model is compared with a quasi-dynamic model in which the dynamic nature of the hydrological connectivity is neglected. The results show a better performance of the new model in predicting observed shallow landslides, implying that soil depth spatial variability and connectivity bear a significant control on shallow landsliding.

  11. Effect of sowing depth and soil conditions on the germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The viability of D. eriantha subsp. eriantha (=D. smutsii) seed is generally experienced to be very low, which often results in poor establishment in this grass. The effect of different external factors on the germination of this species was investigated. Results indicated that sowing depth had no significant effect on germination, ...

  12. Herbivore impact on moss depth, soil temperature and arctic plant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, R; Loonen, MJJE

    We provide evidence for a mechanism by which herbivores may influence plant abundance in arctic ecosystems, These systems are commonly dominated by mosses, the thickness of which influences the amount of heat reaching the soil surface. Herbivores can reduce the thickness of the moss layer by means

  13. Dependence of the Q10 values on the depth of the soil temperature measuring point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Acosta, Manuel; Marek, Michal V.; Kutsch, W.; Janouš, Dalibor

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 292, - (2007), s. 171-179 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD526/03/H036; GA MŽP SM/640/18/03 Grant - others:EU(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-505572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : respiration * soil * temperature * Q10 * Norway spruce * grassland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2007

  14. Depth profile of 236U/238U in soil samples in La Palma, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srncik, M.; Steier, P.; Wallner, G.

    2011-01-01

    The vertical distribution of the 236U/238U isotopic ratio was investigated in soil samples from three different locations on La Palma (one of the seven Canary Islands, Spain). Additionally the 240Pu/239Pu atomic ratio, as it is a well establish tool for the source identification, was determined. The radiochemical procedure consisted of a U separation step by extraction chromatography using UTEVA® Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Inc.). Afterwards Pu was separated from Th and Np by anion exchange using Dowex 1x2 (Dow Chemical Co.). Furthermore a new chemical procedure with tandem columns to separate Pu and U from the matrix was tested. For the determination of the uranium and plutonium isotopes by alpha spectrometry thin sources were prepared by microprecipitation techniques. Additionally these fractions separated from the soil samples were measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to get information on the isotopic ratios 236U/238U, 240Pu/239Pu and 236U/239Pu, respectively. The 236U concentrations [atoms/g] in each surface layer (∼2 cm) were surprisingly high compared to deeper layers where values around two orders of magnitude smaller were found. Since the isotopic ratio 240Pu/239Pu indicated a global fallout signature we assume the same origin as the probable source for 236U. Our measured 236U/239Pu value of around 0.2 is within the expected range for this contamination source. PMID:21481502

  15. Desert shrub responses to experimental modification of precipitation seasonality and soil depth: relationship to the two-layer model and ecohydrological niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Matthew J.; Reinhardt, Keith

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecohydrological niches are important for understanding plant community responses to climate shifts, particularly in dry lands. According to the two-layer hypothesis, selective use of deep-soil water increases growth or persistence of woody species during warm and dry summer periods and thereby contributes to their coexistence with shallow-rooted herbs in dry ecosystems. The resource-pool hypothesis further suggests that shallow-soil water benefits growth of all plants while deep-soil water primarily enhances physiological maintenance and survival of woody species. Few studies have directly tested these by manipulating deep-soil water availability and observing the long-term outcomes. 2. We predicted that factors promoting infiltration and storage of water in deep soils, specifically greater winter precipitation and soil depth, would enhance Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush) in cold, winter-wet/summer-dry desert. Sagebrush responses to 20 years of winter irrigation were compared to summer- or no irrigation, on plots having relatively deep or shallow soils (2 m vs. 1 m depths). 3. Winter irrigation increased sagebrush cover, and crown and canopy volumes, but not density (individuals/plot) compared to summer or no irrigation, on deep-soil plots. On shallow-soil plots, winter irrigation surprisingly decreased shrub cover and size, and summer irrigation had no effect. Furthermore, multiple regression suggested that the variations in growth were related (i) firstly to water in shallow soils (0-0.2 m) and secondly to deeper soils (> 1 m deep) and (ii) more by springtime than by midsummer soil water. Water-use efficiency increased considerably on shallow soils without irrigation and was lowest with winter irrigation. 4. Synthesis. Sagebrush was more responsive to the seasonal timing of precipitation than to total annual precipitation. Factors that enhanced deep-water storage (deeper soils plus more winter precipitation) led to increases in Artemisia tridentata that

  16. Effects of soil temperature and depth to ground water on first-year growth of a dryland riparian phreatophyte, Glycyrrhiza lepidota (American licorice)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas C.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of soil temperature and depth to ground water on first-year growth of a facultative floodplain phreatophyte, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, in a 2-×-2 factorial greenhouse experiment. We grew plants in mesocosms subirrigated with water low in dissolved oxygen, mimicking natural systems, and set depth of ground water at 63 or 100 cm and soil temperature at cold (ambient) or warm (≤2.7°C above ambient). We hypothesized the moister (63 cm) and warmer soil would be most favorable and predicted faster growth of shoots and roots and greater nitrogen-fixation (thus, less uptake of mineral nitrogen) under those conditions. Growth in height was significantly faster in the moister treatment but was not affected by soil temperature. Final biomass of shoots and of roots, total biomass of plants, and root:shoot ratio indicated a significant effect only from depth of ground water. Final levels of soil mineral-nitrogen were as predicted, with level of nitrate in the moister treatment more than twice that in the drier treatment. No effect from soil temperature on level of soil-mineral nitrogen was detected. Our results suggest that establishment of G. lepidotarequires strict conditions of soil moisture, which may explain the patchy distribution of the species along southwestern dryland rivers.

  17. Dissolved Organic Matter as a Mechanism for Carbon Stabilization at Depth in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Kramer, M. G.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    cover on the island of Hawai'i. Previous research has measured soil organic C with very long mean residence times in the deeper mineral horizons at similar sites. Our study is focused on identifying the source of this highly stabilized C and the role of preferential water flow-paths in the vertical transport of C and nutrients. The soil's strongly blocky structure facilitates the downward movement of DOM to lower horizons where it comes in contact with allophane and is potentially sorbed. Through field sampling and laboratory manipulations, we will identify the zones of greatest DOC production and removal. Using separation by column chromatography (XAD resins), specific UV-absorbance, 13C-NMR, and microbial bioavailability assays, we will describe differences in the chemical composition of the organic material in solution amd solid-phase with depth.

  18. Long-term controls of soil organic carbon with depth and time: a case study from the Cowlitz River Chronosequence, WA USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Xu, Xiaomei; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Trumbore, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Over timescales of soil development (millennia), the capacity of soils to stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) is linked to soil development through changes in soil mineralogy and other soil properties. In this study, an extensive dataset of soil profile chemistry and mineralogy is compiled from the Cowlitz River Chronosequence (CRC), WA USA. The CRC soils range in age from 0.25 to 1200 kyr, spanning a developmental gradient encompassing clear changes in soil mineralogy, chemistry, and surface area. Comparison of these and other metrics of soil development with SOC properties reveal several relationships that may be diagnostic of the long-term coupling of soil development and C cycling. Specifically, SOC content was significantly correlated with sodium pyrophosphate extractable metals emphasizing the relevance of organo-metal complexes in volcanic soils. The depth distributions of organo-metals and other secondary weathering products, including the kaolin and short-range order (SRO) minerals, support the so-called “binary composition” of volcanic soils. The formation of organo-metal complexes limits the accumulation of secondary minerals in shallow soils, whereas in deep soils with lower SOC content, secondary minerals accumulate. In the CRC soils, secondary minerals formed in deep soils (below 50 cm) including smectite, allophane, Fe-oxides and dominated by the kaolin mineral halloysite. The abundance of halloysite was significantly correlated with bulk soil surface area and 14C content (a proxy for the mean age of SOC), implying enhanced stability of C in deep soils. Allophane, an SRO mineral commonly associated with SOC storage, was not correlated with SOC content or 14C values in CRC soils. We propose conceptual framework to describe these observations based on a general understanding of pedogenesis in volcanic soils, where SOC cycling is coupled with soil development through the formation of and fate of organo-metal or other mobile weathering products

  19. Constructing a Depth-Stratified Model for Soil Organic Carbon: Dynamics of Past, Current, and Future Accumulation and Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ise, T.

    2010-12-01

    Accumulation and decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) have significant impacts on global carbon cycling. Especially, high-latitudinal regions, where a particularly strong warming is expected, currently store large amounts of SOC, and vulnerability against environmental changes are hotly discussed. Due to the expected warming, the SOC in high-latitudinal regions can start to decompose quickly and the resultant carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere would further intensify the ongoing climate change. To quantitatively study this land-atmosphere feedback, I developed a depth-stratified SOC model and applied it to a boreal forest site in Alaska. Based on model structure of ED2.0-peat and VISIT, the newly constructed model was designed to reproduce short- (months to several years) and long-term (centuries to millennia) SOC dynamics (Figure a). Since decomposition rates of SOC are highly sensitive to soil environmental conditions (i.e., temperature and moisture), a physics-based approach to simulate belowground thermal and hydrological conditions is used. Moreover, the model simulates radiocarbon dynamics simultaneously with SOC. Current anthropogenic impacts in radiocarbon concentrations such as the Suess effect (since the industrial revolution) and explosions of thermonuclear weapons (mid-20th century) are tracked (Figure b). Since Δ14C was highly sensitive to the recent anthropogenic impacts, a direct comparison against field sampling data will enhance the predictive ability of the model by estimating the recent SOC dynamics. (a) accumulation of soil organic carbon in 2 layers: litter and humus. (b) changes in Δ14C in 2 layers: litter and humus.

  20. High resolution depth distribution of Bacteria, Archaea, methanotrophs, and methanogens in the bulk and rhizosphere soils of a flooded rice paddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jung eLee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The communities and abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, along with the oxygen, methane, and total organic carbon (TOC concentrations, were investigated along a depth gradient in a flooded rice paddy. Broad patterns in vertical profiles of oxygen, methane, TOC, and microbial abundances were similar in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, though methane and TOC concentrations and 16S rRNA gene copies were clearly higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil. Oxygen concentrations decreased sharply to below detection limits at the 8 mm depth. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial and archaeal communities varied according to the oxic, oxic-anoxic, and anoxic zones, indicating that oxygen is a determining factor for the distribution of bacterial and archaeal communities. Aerobic methanotrophs were maximally observed near the oxic-anoxic interface, while methane, TOC, and methanogens were highest in the rhizosphere soil at 30–200 mm depth, suggesting that methane is produced mainly from organic carbon derived from rice plants and is metabolized aerobically. The relative abundances of type I methanotrophs such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylocaldum decreased more drastically than those of type II methanotrophs (such as Methylocystis and Methylosinus with increasing depth. Methanosaeta and Methanoregula were predominant methanogens at all depths, and the relative abundances of Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanosphaerula, and GOM_Arc_I increased with increasing depth. Based on contrasts between absolute abundances of methanogens and methanotrophs at depths sampled across rhizosphere and bulk soils (especially millimeter-scale slices at the surface, we have identified populations of methanogens (Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, Methanocella, Methanobacterium, and Methanosphaerula and methanotrophs (Methylosarcina, Methylococcus, Methylosinus, and unclassified Methylocystaceae that are likely physiologically

  1. Exploiting Co-Benefits of Increased Rice Production and Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emission through Optimized Crop and Soil Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ning; Fan, Mingsheng; Zhang, Fusuo; Christie, Peter; Yang, Jianchang; Huang, Jianliang; Guo, Shiwei; Shi, Xiaojun; Tang, Qiyuan; Peng, Jianwei; Zhong, Xuhua; Sun, Yixiang; Lv, Shihua; Jiang, Rongfeng; Dobermann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the future food security challenge without further sacrificing environmental integrity requires transformative changes in managing the key biophysical determinants of increasing agronomic productivity and reducing the environmental footprint. Here, we focus on Chinese rice production and quantitatively address this concern by conducting 403 on-farm trials across diverse rice farming systems. Inherent soil productivity, management practices and rice farming type resulted in confounded and interactive effects on yield, yield gaps and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2-equivalent) with both trade-offs and compensating effects. Advances in nitrogen, water and crop management (Best Management Practices-BMPs) helped closing existing yield gaps and resulted in a substantial reduction in CO2-equivalent emission of rice farming despite a tradeoff of increase N2O emission. However, inherent soil properties limited rice yields to a larger extent than previously known. Cultivating inherently better soil also led to lower GHG intensity (GHG emissions per unit yield). Neither adopting BMPs only nor improving soils with low or moderate productivity alone can adequately address the challenge of substantially increasing rice production while reducing the environmental footprint. A combination of both represents the most efficient strategy to harness the combined-benefits of enhanced production and mitigating climate change. Extrapolating from our farm data, this strategy could increase rice production in China by 18%, which would meet the demand for direct human consumption of rice by 2030. It would also reduce fertilizer nitrogen consumption by 22% and decrease CO2-equivalent emissions during the rice growing period by 7% compared with current farming practice continues. Benefits vary by rice-based cropping systems. Single rice systems have the largest food provision benefits due to its wider yield gap and total cultivated area, whereas double-rice system

  2. Exploiting Co-Benefits of Increased Rice Production and Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emission through Optimized Crop and Soil Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning An

    Full Text Available Meeting the future food security challenge without further sacrificing environmental integrity requires transformative changes in managing the key biophysical determinants of increasing agronomic productivity and reducing the environmental footprint. Here, we focus on Chinese rice production and quantitatively address this concern by conducting 403 on-farm trials across diverse rice farming systems. Inherent soil productivity, management practices and rice farming type resulted in confounded and interactive effects on yield, yield gaps and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2-equivalent with both trade-offs and compensating effects. Advances in nitrogen, water and crop management (Best Management Practices-BMPs helped closing existing yield gaps and resulted in a substantial reduction in CO2-equivalent emission of rice farming despite a tradeoff of increase N2O emission. However, inherent soil properties limited rice yields to a larger extent than previously known. Cultivating inherently better soil also led to lower GHG intensity (GHG emissions per unit yield. Neither adopting BMPs only nor improving soils with low or moderate productivity alone can adequately address the challenge of substantially increasing rice production while reducing the environmental footprint. A combination of both represents the most efficient strategy to harness the combined-benefits of enhanced production and mitigating climate change. Extrapolating from our farm data, this strategy could increase rice production in China by 18%, which would meet the demand for direct human consumption of rice by 2030. It would also reduce fertilizer nitrogen consumption by 22% and decrease CO2-equivalent emissions during the rice growing period by 7% compared with current farming practice continues. Benefits vary by rice-based cropping systems. Single rice systems have the largest food provision benefits due to its wider yield gap and total cultivated area, whereas double

  3. Integrating depth functions and hyper-scale terrain analysis for 3D soil organic carbon modeling in agricultural fields at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Lopez, L.; van Wesemael, B.; Stevens, A.; Doetterl, S.; Van Oost, K.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) represents a key component in the global C cycle and has an important influence on the global CO2 fluxes between terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. In the context of agricultural landscapes, SOC inventories are important since soil management practices have a strong influence on CO2 fluxes and SOC stocks. However, there is lack of accurate and cost-effective methods for producing high spatial resolution of SOC information. In this respect, our work is focused on the development of a three dimensional modeling approach for SOC monitoring in agricultural fields. The study area comprises ~420 km2 and includes 4 of the 5 agro-geological regions of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The soil dataset consist of 172 profiles (1033 samples) which were not sampled specifically for this study. This dataset is a combination of profile samples collected in previous soil surveys and soil profiles sampled for other research purposes. The proposed strategy comprises two main steps. In the first step the SOC distribution within each profile (vertical distribution) is modeled. Depth functions for are fitted in order to summarize the information content in the profile. By using these functions the SOC can be interpolated at any depth within the profiles. The second step involves the use of contextual terrain (ConMap) features (Behrens et al., 2010). These features are based on the differences in elevation between a given point location in the landscape and its circular neighbourhoods at a given set of different radius. One of the main advantages of this approach is that it allows the integration of several spatial scales (eg. local and regional) for soil spatial analysis. In this work the ConMap features are derived from a digital elevation model of the area and are used as predictors for spatial modeling of the parameters of the depth functions fitted in the previous step. In this poster we present some preliminary results in which we analyze: i. The use of

  4. An algorithm for generating soil moisture and snow depth maps from microwave spaceborne radiometers: HydroAlgo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Santi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A systematic and timely monitoring of land surface parameters that affect the hydrological cycle at local and global scales is of primary importance in obtaining a better understanding of geophysical processes and in managing environmental resources as well as natural disasters. Soil moisture and snow water equivalent are two quantities that play a major role in these applications. In this paper an algorithm for hydrological purposes (called hereinafter HydroAlgo, which is able to generate maps of snow depth (SD and soil moisture content (SMC from AMSR-E data, has been developed and implemented within the framework of the JAXA ADEOS-II/AMSR-E and GCOM/AMSR-2 programs, as well as of a project of the Italian Space Agency that is devoted to civil protection from floods and landslides. As auxiliary output, the algorithm also generates maps of vegetation biomass (VB. An initial phase of pre-processing includes the improvement of spatial resolution, as well as masking for urban areas, water bodies, and dense vegetation. The algorithm was then split into two branches, the first of which focused on the retrieval of SMC and the second, on SD. Both parameters were retrieved using Artificial Neural Network (ANN methods. The algorithm was calibrated using a wide set of experimental data collected on three sites: Mongolia and Australia (for SMC, and Siberia (for SD, integrated with model simulations. These results were then validated by comparing the algorithm outputs with experimental data collected on two additional sites: a part of a watershed in Northern Italy, and a large portion of Scandinavia. An additional test of the algorithm was also performed on a large scale, and included sites characterized by differing climatic and meteorological conditions.

  5. Phytoremediation of Metal Contaminated Soil Using Willow: Exploiting Plant-Associated Bacteria to Improve Biomass Production and Metal Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jolien; Weyens, Nele; Croes, Sarah; Beckers, Bram; Meiresonne, Linda; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar is proposed for economic valorization and concurrently as remediation strategy for metal contaminated land in northeast-Belgium. However, metal phytoextraction appears insufficient to effectuate rapid reduction of soil metal contents. To increase both biomass production and metal accumulation of SRC, two strategies are proposed: (i) in situ selection of the best performing clones and (ii) bioaugmentation of these clones with beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Based on field data, two experimental willow clones, a Salix viminalis and a Salix alba x alba clone, were selected. Compared to the best performing commercial clones, considerable increases in stem metal extraction were achieved (up to 74% for Cd and 91% for Zn). From the selected clones, plant-associated bacteria were isolated and identified. All strains were subsequently screened for their plant growth-promoting and metal uptake enhancing traits. Five strains were selected for a greenhouse inoculation experiment with the selected clones planted in Cd-Zn-Pb contaminated soil. Extraction potential tended to increase after inoculation of S. viminalis plants with a Rahnella sp. strain due to a significantly increased twig biomass. However, although bacterial strains showing beneficial traits in vitro were used for inoculation, increments in extraction potential were not always observed.

  6. Redefining Exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwala, Rina

    2016-01-01

    -employed workers are organizing as workers. They are fighting labor exploitation by redefining the concept to include additional exploitation axes (from the state and middle class) and forms (including sexual). In doing so, they are redefining potential solutions, including identities and material benefits, to fit...... their unique needs. By expanding the category of “workers” beyond those defined by a narrow focus on a standard employer-employee relationship, these movements are also fighting exclusion from earlier labor protections by increasing the number of entitled beneficiaries. These struggles provide an important...

  7. Seasonal Patterns of Fine Root Production and Turnover in a Mature Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.) Stand- Differentiation with Soil Depth and Implications for Soil Carbon Stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeght, Jean-Luc; Gonkhamdee, Santimaitree; Clément, Corentin; Isarangkool Na Ayutthaya, Supat; Stokes, Alexia; Pierret, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fine root dynamics is a main driver of soil carbon stocks, particularly in tropical forests, yet major uncertainties still surround estimates of fine root production and turnover. This lack of knowledge is largely due to the fact that studying root dynamics in situ, particularly deep in the soil, remains highly challenging. We explored the interactions between fine root dynamics, soil depth, and rainfall in mature rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.) exposed to sub-optimal edaphic and climatic conditions. A root observation access well was installed in northern Thailand to monitor root dynamics along a 4.5 m deep soil profile. Image-based measurements of root elongation and lifespan of individual roots were carried out at monthly intervals over 3 years. Soil depth was found to have a significant effect on root turnover. Surprisingly, root turnover increased with soil depth and root half-life was 16, 6-8, and only 4 months at 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 3.0 m deep, respectively (with the exception of roots at 4.5 m which had a half-life similar to that found between depths of 1.0 and 2.5 m). Within the first two meters of the soil profile, the highest rates of root emergence occurred about 3 months after the onset of the rainy season, while deeper in the soil, root emergence was not linked to the rainfall pattern. Root emergence was limited during leaf flushing (between March and May), particularly within the first two meters of the profile. Between soil depths of 0.5 and 2.0 m, root mortality appeared independent of variations in root emergence, but below 2.0 m, peaks in root emergence and death were synchronized. Shallow parts of the root system were more responsive to rainfall than their deeper counterparts. Increased root emergence in deep soil toward the onset of the dry season could correspond to a drought acclimation mechanism, with the relative importance of deep water capture increasing once rainfall ceased. The considerable soil depth regularly explored by

  8. Seasonal patterns of fine root production and turnover in a mature rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. stand - differentiation with soil depth and implications for soil carbon stocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eMaeght

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fine root dynamics is a main driver of soil carbon stocks, particularly in tropical forests, yet major uncertainties still surround estimates of fine root production and turnover. This lack of knowledge is largely due to the fact that studying root dynamics in situ, particularly deep in the soil, remains highly challenging.We explored the interactions between fine root dynamics, soil depth and rainfall in mature rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. exposed to sub-optimal edaphic and climatic conditions. A root observation access well was installed in northern Thailand to monitor root dynamics along a 4.5 m deep soil profile. Image-based measurements of root elongation and lifespan of individual roots were carried out at monthly intervals over 3 years. Soil depth was found to have a significant effect on root turnover. Surprisingly, root turnover increased with soil depth and root half-life was 16, 6 - 8 and only 4 months at 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 3.0 m deep, respectively (with the exception of roots at 4.5 m which had a half-life similar to that found between depths of 1.0 and 2.5 m. Within the first two meters of the soil profile, the highest rates of root emergence occurred about three months after the onset of the rainy season, while deeper in the soil, root emergence was not linked to the rainfall pattern. Root emergence was limited during leaf flushing (between March and May, particularly within the first two meters of the profile. Between soil depths of 0.5 and 2.0 m, root mortality appeared independent of variations in root emergence, but below 2.0 m, peaks in root emergence and death were synchronized.Shallow parts of the root were more responsive to rainfall than their deeper counterparts. Increased root emergence in deep soil towards the onset of the dry season could correspond to a drought acclimation mechanism, with the relative importance of deep water capture increasing once rainfall ceased. The considerable soil depth regularly

  9. Evaluation of Radar Backscattering Models IEM, OH, and Dubois using L and C-Bands SAR Data over different vegetation canopy covers and soil depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khabazan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several algorithms have been proposed in the literature to invert radar measurements to estimate surface soil moisture. The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of the most common surface back scattering models including the theoretical integral equation model (IEM of Fung et al. (1992, and the semi-empirical models of Oh et al. (1992, 1994, 2002 and2004 and Dubois et al. (1995. This analysis uses four AIRSAR data in L and C band together with in situ measurements (soil moisture and surface roughness over bare soil and vegetation covers area and three different soil depths. The results show that Dubois model tend to over-estimate the radar response in both bands while IEM model and Oh model frequently over-estimate the radar response in L band but under-estimate them in C band. By evaluating of all models in different soil depths, the best results were obtained in 0–3 cm depths. For vegetation area poor correlation between models backscatter simulation and radar response was observed.

  10. Solar-induced Chloropyll Fluorescence Reveals Depth-specific Relationships to Soil Moisture: An Assesment Based on a Novel Automated Field Spectroscopy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Wu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture play an important role in regulating both the water and energy balance of land surface. Water stress is frequently happened when soil moisture cannot meet the needs of normal growth and developments of plants. It will thus influence the efficiency of photosynthesis and spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of chlorophyll fluorescence. As a consequence, chlorophyll fluorescence can not only be the proxy of photosynthesis but may also provide some information on soil moisture. To prove the viewpoint, a novel automatic system was designed to measure long time series of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) at 760 nm (F760) and 687 nm (F687) of wheat in two plots with different hydraulic gradients. F760 and F687 showed a negative correlation with averaged soil moisture at seasonal scales (R2=0.14, p<0.05 and R2=0.25, p<0.01). However, the significance of correlation varied with depths of soil. Surface soil moisture in 10 cm or 20 cm has a better correlation with SIF than that in 50 cm (for F760, R2 =0.30 (p<0.01), 0.40 (p<0.01) and 0.17 (p<0.05); for F687, R2 =0.20 (p<0.01), 0.31 (p<0.01) and 0.07 (not significance)). Moreover, SIF at different bands also showed different relationships with soil moisture in surface soil. For example, soil moisture in the same depth showed better correlation with F760 than F687. Based on above results, F760 and F687 were used to distinguish two plots with different soil moisture. Each of them showed significant difference of two plots when soil moisture difference is greater than 0.11m3/m3.Yet fluorescence ratio F687/F760 was a better index to distinguish difference of soil moisture than F760 and F687, it showed significant difference in all selected days at 0.05 significant level. Our results provide ground-based evidence that SIF is directly related to soil moisture, and confirm that F687/F760 is better to recognize the difference of soil moisture than F760 and F687, hence SIF has a potential as a new

  11. Carbon storage potential in size–density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breulmann, Marc [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Environmental and Biotechnology Centre (UBZ), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Boettger, Tatjana [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Isotope Hydrology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Buscot, François [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gruendling, Ralf [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department, Department of Soil Physics, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Schulz, Elke [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0–10, 10–20, 20–30 30–50 50–80 and 80 + cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm{sup −3} (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, < 1 μm; and CF2, 1–2 μm) and two light fractions (LF1, < 1.8 g cm{sup −3}; and LF2, 1.8–2.0 g cm{sup −3}) were separated. The stability of these fractions was characterised by their carbon hot water extractability (C{sub HWE}) and stable carbon isotope composition. In the semi-natural grasslands studied, most OC was stored in the top 30 cm, where turnover is rapid. Effects of low productivity grasslands became only significantly apparent when fractional OC contributions of total SOM was considered (CF1 and LF1). In deeper soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ{sup 13}C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ{sup 13}C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown. - Highlights: • OC stocks over varying

  12. Depth profiles of radioactive cesium in soil using a scraper plate over a wide area surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Norihiro; Mikami, Satoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Takahashi, Junko; Nakano, Masakazu; Shimada, Kiyotaka; Uno, Kiichiro; Hagiwara, Shigetomo; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    During the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, radioactive cesium was released in the environment and deposited on the soils. Depth profiles of radioactive cesium in contaminated soils provide useful information not only for radiation protection and decontamination operations but also for geoscience and radioecology studies. Soil samples were collected using a scraper plate three times between December 2011 and December 2012 at 84 or 85 locations within a 100-km radius of the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP. In most of the obtained radioactive cesium depth profiles, it was possible to fit the concentration to a function of mass depth as either an exponential or hyperbolic secant function. By using those functions, following three parameters were estimated: (i) relaxation mass depth β (g cm(-2)), (ii) effective relaxation mass depth βeff (g cm(-2)), which is defined for a hyperbolic secant function as the relaxation mass depth of an equivalent exponential function giving the same air kerma rate at 1 m above the ground as the inventory, and (iii) 1/10 depth L1/10 (cm), at which the soil contains 90% of the inventory. The average β value (wet weight) including ones by hyperbolic secant function in December 2012, was 1.29 times higher than that in December 2011. In fact, it was observed that depth profiles at some study sites deviated from the typical exponential distributions over time. These results indicate the gradual downward migration of radioactive cesium in the soils. The L1/10 values in December 2012 were summarized and presented on a map surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, and the average value of L1/10 was 3.01 cm (n = 82) at this time. It was found that radioactive cesium remained within 5 cm of the ground surface at most study sites (71 sites). The sech function can also be used to estimate the downward migration rate V (kg m(-2) y(-1)). The V values in December 2012 (n = 25) were in good agreement with those found by a

  13. A new data set for estimating organic carbon storage to 3 m depth in soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, G.; Bockheim, James G.; Camill, P.; Elberling, B.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J.W.; Johnson, K.; Jorgenson, T.; Koven, C.D.; Kuhry, P.; Michaelson, G.; Mishra, U.; Palmtag, J.; Ping, C.-L.; O'Donnell, J.; Schirrmeister, L.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Sheng, Y.; Smith, L.C.; Strauss, J.; Yu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon cycle. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the northern circumpolar permafrost region (a total area of 18.7 × 106 km2). The NCSCD is a geographical information system (GIS) data set that has been constructed using harmonized regional soil classification maps together with pedon data from the northern permafrost region. Previously, the NCSCD has been used to calculate SOC storage to the reference depths 0–30 cm and 0–100 cm (based on 1778 pedons). It has been shown that soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region also contain significant quantities of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, but there has been no circumpolar compilation of pedon data to quantify this deeper SOC pool and there are no spatially distributed estimates of SOC storage below 100 cm depth in this region. Here we describe the synthesis of an updated pedon data set for SOC storage (kg C m-2) in deep soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost regions, with separate data sets for the 100–200 cm (524 pedons) and 200–300 cm (356 pedons) depth ranges. These pedons have been grouped into the North American and Eurasian sectors and the mean SOC storage for different soil taxa (subdivided into Gelisols including the sub-orders Histels, Turbels, Orthels, permafrost-free Histosols, and permafrost-free mineral soil orders) has been added to the updated NCSCDv2. The updated version of the data set is freely available online in different file formats and spatial resolutions that enable spatially explicit applications in GIS mapping and terrestrial ecosystem models. While this newly compiled data set adds to our knowledge of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, it also reveals that large uncertainties remain. Identified data gaps include spatial coverage of deep (> 100 cm) pedons in many regions as well as the spatial extent of areas

  14. Radon, helium and CO{sub 2} measurements in soils overlying a former exploited oilfield, Pechelbronn district, Bas-Rhin, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel-le pierres, Karine, E-mail: k.lepierres@brgm.f [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, 3 Avenue Claude-Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Gal, Frederick, E-mail: f.gal@brgm.f [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, 3 Avenue Claude-Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Brach, Michel, E-mail: m.brach@brgm.f [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, 3 Avenue Claude-Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Guignat, Stephanie, E-mail: s.guignat@brgm.f [BRGM, Regional Geological Survey, Parc Club des Tanneries, 15 Rue du Tanin, B.P. 177, 67834 Tanneries cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    The Pechelbronn oilfield (Rhine Graben, France), where mining activity ended in the 1960s, has been used for waste disposal for twenty years. Since the wastes are varied, work is underway to identify the discharged materials and their derivatives, as well as to locate and quantify potential discharge sites. Two major goals were assigned to the present work. The first was to identify or refine the location of hidden structures that could facilitate gas emanation up to the surface, by studying soil gas concentrations (mainly {sup 222}Rn, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and helium) and carbon isotope ratios in the CO{sub 2} phase. The second was devoted to examining, from a health and safety viewpoint, if the use of the oilfield as a waste disposal site might have led to enhanced or modified gas emanation throughout the area. It appeared that CO{sub 2} and {sup 222}Rn evolution in the whole area were similar, except near some of the faults and fractures that are known through surface mapping and underground observations. These {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} anomalies made it possible to highlight more emissive zones that are either related to main faults or to secondary fractures acting as migration pathways. In that sense, the CO{sub 2} phase can be used to evaluate {sup 222}Rn activities distant from tectonic structures but can lead to erroneous evaluations near to gas migration pathways. Dumping of wastes, as well as oil residues, did not appear to have a strong influence on soil gaseous species and emanation. Similarly, enhanced gas migration due to underground galleries and exploitation wells has not been established. Carbon isotope ratios suggested a balance of biological phenomena, despite the high CO{sub 2} contents reached. Other monitored gaseous species (N{sub 2}, Ar, H{sub 2} and alkanes), when detected, always showed amounts close to those found subsurface and/or in atmospheric gases.

  15. Influence of Root Diameter and Soil Depth on the Xylem Anatomy of Fine- to Medium-Sized Roots of Mature Beech Trees in the Top- and Subsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirfel, Kristina; Leuschner, Christoph; Hertel, Dietrich; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Despite their importance for water uptake and transport, the xylem anatomical and hydraulic properties of tree roots have only rarely been studied in the field. We measured mean vessel diameter (D), vessel density (VD), relative vessel lumen area (lumen area per xylem area) and derived potential hydraulic conductivity (Kp) in the xylem of 197 fine- to medium-diameter roots (1-10 mm) in the topsoil and subsoil (0-200 cm) of a mature European beech forest on sandy soil for examining the influence of root diameter and soil depth on xylem anatomical and derived hydraulic traits. All anatomical and functional traits showed strong dependence on root diameter and thus root age but no significant relation to soil depth. Averaged over topsoil and deep soil and variable flow path lengths in the roots, D increased linearly with root diameter from ∼50 μm in the smallest diameter class (1-2 mm) to ∼70 μm in 6-7 mm roots (corresponding to a mean root age of ∼12 years), but remained invariant in roots >7 mm. D never exceeded ∼82 μm in the 1-10 mm roots, probably in order to control the risk of frost- or drought-induced cavitation. This pattern was overlain by a high variability in xylem anatomy among similar-sized roots with Kp showing a higher variance component within than between root diameter classes. With 8% of the roots exceeding average Kp in their diameter class by 50-700%, we obtained evidence of the existence of 'high-conductivity roots' indicating functional differentiation among similar-sized roots. We conclude that the hydraulic properties of small to medium diameter roots of beech are mainly determined by root age, rendering root diameter a suitable predictor of hydraulic functioning, while soil depth - without referring to path length - had a negligible effect.

  16. Influence of Root Diameter and Soil Depth on the Xylem Anatomy of Fine- to Medium-Sized Roots of Mature Beech Trees in the Top- and Subsoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kirfel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their importance for water uptake and transport, the xylem anatomical and hydraulic properties of tree roots have only rarely been studied in the field. We measured mean vessel diameter (D, vessel density (VD, relative vessel lumen area (lumen area per xylem area and derived potential hydraulic conductivity (Kp in the xylem of 197 fine- to medium-diameter roots (1–10 mm in the topsoil and subsoil (0–200 cm of a mature European beech forest on sandy soil for examining the influence of root diameter and soil depth on xylem anatomical and derived hydraulic traits. All anatomical and functional traits showed strong dependence on root diameter and thus root age but no significant relation to soil depth. Averaged over topsoil and deep soil and variable flow path lengths in the roots, D increased linearly with root diameter from ∼50 μm in the smallest diameter class (1–2 mm to ∼70 μm in 6–7 mm roots (corresponding to a mean root age of ∼12 years, but remained invariant in roots >7 mm. D never exceeded ∼82 μm in the 1–10 mm roots, probably in order to control the risk of frost- or drought-induced cavitation. This pattern was overlain by a high variability in xylem anatomy among similar-sized roots with Kp showing a higher variance component within than between root diameter classes. With 8% of the roots exceeding average Kp in their diameter class by 50–700%, we obtained evidence of the existence of ‘high-conductivity roots’ indicating functional differentiation among similar-sized roots. We conclude that the hydraulic properties of small to medium diameter roots of beech are mainly determined by root age, rendering root diameter a suitable predictor of hydraulic functioning, while soil depth – without referring to path length – had a negligible effect.

  17. Emergence of native plant seeds in response to seed pelleting, planting depth, scarification, and soil anti-crusting treatment, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clint Shock; Erik Feibert; Lamont Saunders; Nancy Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Seed of native plants is needed to restore rangelands of the Intermountain West. Reliable commercial seed production is desirable to provide the quantity of seed needed for restoration efforts. Establishment of native seed crops has been difficult, because fall-planted seed is susceptible to bird damage, soil crusting, and soil erosion. Fall planting is important for...

  18. Plant species distribution in relation to water-table depth and soil redox potential in montane riparian meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; J. Boone Kauffman; John E. Baham

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of riparian plant species is largely driven by hydrologic and soil variables, and riparian plant communities frequently occur in relatively distinct zones along streamside elevational and soil textural gradients. In two montane meadows in northeast Oregon, USA, we examined plant species distribution in three riparian plant communities¡ªdefined as wet,...

  19. Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric S. Kasischke; Laura L. Bourgeau-Chavez; Allison R. Rober; Kevin H. Wyatt; James M. Waddington; Merritt R. Turetsky

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary investigation of the response of ERS C-band SAR backscatter to variations in soil moisture and surface inundation in wetlands of interior Alaska. Data were collected from 5 wetlands over a three-week period in 2007. Results showed a positive correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in sites dominated by herbaceous vegetation cover (r...

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Different Infiltration Equations and Their Coefficients under Various Initial Soil Moisture and Ponding Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali javadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration is a complex process that changed by initial moisture and water head on the soil surface. The main objective of this study was to estimate the coefficients of infiltration equations, Kostiakov-Lewis, Philip and Horton, and evaluate the sensitivity of these equations and their coefficients under various initial conditions (initial moisture soil and boundary (water head on soil surface. Therefore, one-and two-dimensional infiltration for basin (or border irrigation were simulated by changing the initial soil moisture and water head on soil surface from irrigation to other irrigation using the solution of the Richards’ equation (HYDRUS model. To determine the coefficients of infiltration equations, outputs of the HYDRUS model (cumulative infiltration over time were fitted using the Excel Solver. Comparison of infiltration sensitivity equations and their coefficients in one-and two-dimensional infiltration showed infiltration equations and their sensitivity coefficients were similar function but quantitatively in most cases sensitive two-dimensional equations and their coefficients were greater than one dimension. In both dimensions the soil adsorption coefficient Philip equation as the sensitive coefficient and Horton equation as the sensitive equation under various initial moisture soil and water head on soil surface were identified.

  1. Depth-dependent inactivation of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis in soil after manure application and simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.coli and Enterococcus serve as important water quality indicator organisms. Rainfall action on manured fields and pastures releases these organisms into soil with infiltrating water. They can then be released back to runoff during subsequent rainfall or irrigation events as soil solution interacts...

  2. Importance of lateral flux and its percolation depth on organic carbon export in Arctic tundra soil: Implications from a soil leaching experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Hutchings, Jack A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Liu, Yina; Arellano, Ana R.; Schuur, Edward A. G.

    2017-04-01

    Temperature rise in the Arctic is causing deepening of active layers and resulting in the mobilization of deep permafrost dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the mechanisms of DOM mobilization from Arctic soils, especially upper soil horizons which are drained most frequently through a year, are poorly understood. Here we conducted a short-term leaching experiment on surface and deep organic active layer soils, from the Yukon River basin, to examine the effects of DOM transport on bulk and molecular characteristics. Our data showed a net release of DOM from surface soils equal to an average of 5% of soil carbon. Conversely, deep soils percolated with surface leachates retained up to 27% of bulk DOM while releasing fluorescent components (up to 107%), indicating selective release of aromatic components (e.g., lignin and tannin), while retaining nonchromophoric components, as supported by spectrofluorometric and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectroscopic techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of the lateral flux of DOM on ecosystem carbon balance as well as processing of DOM transport through organic active layer soils en route to rivers and streams. This work also suggests the potential role of leachate export as an important mechanism of C losses from Arctic soils, in comparison with the more traditional pathway from soil to atmosphere in a warming Arctic.

  3. Gross mineralization of nitrogen in fertile soils. Effects of the tillage system and soil depths; Mineralizacao bruta do nitrogenio em solos de alta fertilidade. Efeito do manejo e a profundidade de amostragem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, C.; Echeverria, H.; Studdert, G. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP), Balcarce (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Agrarias; Trivelin, P.C.; Bendassolli, J.A. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out with the aim of determining the effect of different tillage systems and soil depths on gross mineralization rates (TMB). The studied soil was a Typic Argiudoll Petrocalcic Paleudoll complex, under: conventional tillage for 23 yr. (PC treatment); no tillage for 6 yr. (PD treatment), and pasture for 4 yr. (P treatment) and 0-10 and 10-20 sampling depths. TMB were estimated through {sup 15} N dilution technique, by addition of labelled (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10% {sup 15} N at. exc.) at days 0, 7, 21 and 35. Twenty-four and 72 h after each addition, N inorganic content and {sup 15} N enrichment of inorganic were determined on 2M KCl extracts in order to estimate the TMB. At 0-10 cm depth, TMB increase until day 21 and decreased afterwards. There were no significant differences between tillage treatments. At 10-20 cm soil depth PC and PD TMB were constant during the whole analysed period. P treatment had a quadratic adjust, with negative linear component. P TMB was lower than PC and PD until day 21 but afterwards it was significantly higher. These results suggest the presence in the pasture of an organic matter fraction, which mineralizes lately but with a high rate. (author)

  4. Depth-related changes in community structure of culturable mineral weathering bacteria and in weathering patterns caused by them along two contrasting soil profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Sheng, Xia-Fang; Xi, Jun; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhen-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play important roles in mineral weathering and soil formation. However, few reports of mineral weathering bacteria inhabiting subsurfaces of soil profiles have been published, raising the question of whether the subsurface weathering bacteria are fundamentally distinct from those in surface communities. To address this question, we isolated and characterized mineral weathering bacteria from two contrasting soil profiles with respect to their role in the weathering pattern evolution, their place in the community structure, and their depth-related changes in these two soil profiles. The effectiveness and pattern of bacterial mineral weathering were different in the two profiles and among the horizons within the respective profiles. The abundance of highly effective mineral weathering bacteria in the Changshu profile was significantly greater in the deepest horizon than in the upper horizons, whereas in the Yanting profile it was significantly greater in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Most of the mineral weathering bacteria from the upper horizons of the Changshu profile and from the deeper horizons of the Yanting profile significantly acidified the culture media in the mineral weathering process. The proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Changshu profile was similar in all horizons except in the Bg2 horizon, whereas the proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Yanting profile was higher in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Both profiles existed in different highly depth-specific culturable mineral weathering community structures. The depth-related changes in culturable weathering communities were primarily attributable to minor bacterial groups rather than to a change in the major population structure.

  5. Sensitivity of a model projection of near-surface permafrost degradation to soil column depth and representation of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Lawrence; Andrew G. Slater; Vladimir E. Romanovsky; Dmitry J. Nicolsky

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of a global land-surface model projection of near-surface permafrost degradation is assessed with respect to explicit accounting of the thermal and hydrologic properties of soil organic matter and to a deepening of the soil column from 3.5 to 50 or more m. Together these modifications result in substantial improvements in the simulation of near-surface...

  6. Depths to Ice-cemented Soils in High-elevation Quartermain Mountains, Dry Valleys, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is comprised of four surveyed valleys focusing on the depth to ground ice in the high-elevation Quartermain Mountains in the Beacon Valley area:...

  7. Spatio-temporal patterns of groundwater depths and soil nutrients in a small watershed in the Ethiopian highlands: Topographic and land-use controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christian D.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Dagnew, Dessalegn C.; Zimale, Fasikaw A.; Zegeye, Assefa D.; Boll, Jan; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil and water conservation structures, promoted by local and international development organizations throughout rural landscapes, aim to increase recharge and prevent degradation of soil surface characteristics. This study investigates this unexamined relationship between recharge, water table depths, and soil surface characteristics (nutrients) in a small sub-watershed in the northwestern Ethiopian highlands. These highland watersheds have high infiltration rates (mean 70 mm hr-1, median 33 mm hr-1), recharging the shallow unconfined hillslope aquifer with water transport occurring via subsurface pathways down the slope. The perched water tables reflect the subsurface flux and are deep where this flux is rapid in the upland areas (138 cm below surface). Soil saturation and overland flow occur when the subsurface flux exceeds the transport capacity of the soil in the lower downslope areas near the ephemeral stream (19 cm below surface). Land use is directly related to the water table depth, corresponding to grazing and fallowed (saturated) land in the downslope areas and cultivated (unsaturated) land in the middle and upper parts where the water table is deeper. Kjeldahl Total Nitrogen (TN), Bray II available phosphorus (AP), and exchangeable potassium (K+) averages exhibit different behaviors across slope, land use transects, or saturation conditions. TN was moderate to low (0.07% ± 0.04) in various land uses and slope regions. Bray II AP had very low concentrations (0.25 mg kg-1 ± 0.26) among the different slope regions with no significant differences throughout (p > .05). The exchangeable cation (K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) concentrations and pH, however, were greater in non-cultivated (seasonally saturated) lands and in a downslope direction (p concentration of the two primarily applied nutrients in fertilizers (N, P).

  8. Impact of fire, landscape position, aspect, and soil depth on microbial extracellular enzyme activities in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D.; Murphy, M. A.; Frost, G.; Chorover, J.; Gallery, R. E.; Rich, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    Fire frequency and severity are increasing across the western US, and post-fire recovery and effects on critical zone structure are not fully understood. Resident microbiota (bacteria and fungi) transform the majority of carbon in ecosystems, and the structure of these communities influence seedling establishment and the trajectory of vegetative recovery as well as biogeochemical cycling. We surveyed changes in microbial composition and activity after wildfire to better understand soil microbial resilience and fire ecology. Specifically, we assessed potential extracellular enzyme activities in response to fire severity across landscape position and aspect. We sampled 18 days after containment of the June 2013 Thompson Ridge Fire in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory, across a gradient of burn severities in a mixed-conifer zero order basin. We subsampled six depths through the surface soil profile and measured potential activities of seven hydrolytic enzymes using established fluorometric techniques. Four of these enzymes hydrolyze C-rich substrates (β-glucosidase [BG], β-D-cellubiosidase [CB], xylosidase [XYL], and α-glucosidase [AG], two hydrolyze N-rich substrates N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase [NAG] and leucine aminopeptidase [LAP]), and one hydrolyzes a P-rich substrate (acid phosphatase [PHOS]). Results showed decreased activities with depth for BG, CB, and LAP. Significantly higher potential enzyme activity was observed for convergent sites relative to planar or divergent sites across all depths sampled. Additionally, we looked at shifts in enzyme nutrient acquisition ratios that correspond with resource limitations relative to microbial stoichiometric demands. Higher acquisition potential is interpreted as greater resource allocation towards nutrient acquisition. Results showed a variance in resource acquisition potential with depth for C relative to N, with greater resources being allocated towards acquiring C at shallower depth. Conversely

  9. Effects of soil heterogeneity on martian ground-ice stability and orbital estimates of ice table depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    2006-12-01

    Data from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument suite and results from numerical simulations of subsurface ground-ice stability have been used to estimate the depth of martian ground-ice. Geographic correlation between these estimates is remarkable; the relative ice table depth distributions also agree well. However, GRS-based estimates of ice table depth are generally deeper than predictions based on ground-ice stability simulations. This discrepancy may be related to heterogeneities in the martian surface such as rocks, dust, and albedo variations. We develop a multi-dimensional numerical model of ground-ice stability in a heterogeneous martian subsurface and use it to place the first quantitative constraints on the response of the ice table to meter-scale heterogeneities. We find that heterogeneities produce significant undulations/topography in the ice table at horizontal length scales of a few meters. Decimeter scale rocks create localized areas of deep ice, producing a vertical depression of 10-60 cm in the ice table over a horizontal range of 1-2 rock radii. Decimeter scale dust lenses produce locally shallow ice; however the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the ice table is small (1-4 cm). The effects of decimeter scale albedo variations on the ice table are nearly negligible, although albedo very weakly enhances the effects of dark rocks and bright dust on the ice table. Additionally, we investigate the role played by rocks in estimates of ice table depth based on orbital data. Surface rocks can account for more than half of the discrepancy between ice table depths inferred from GRS data and those predicted by theoretical ice-stability simulations that utilize thermophysical observations. Our results have considerable relevance to the up-coming Mars Scout Mission, Phoenix, because they indicate that the uncertainty in the ice table depth of a given region is greater than differences between current depth estimates. Likewise, small

  10. Transformation and speciation of typical heavy metals in soil aquifer treatment system during long time recharging with secondary effluent: Depth distribution and combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liangliang; Wang, Kun; Noguera, Daniel R; Jiang, Junqiu; Oyserman, Ben; Zhao, Ningbo; Zhao, Qingliang; Cui, Fuyi

    2016-12-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) systems rely on extensive physical and biogeochemical processes in the vadose zone and aquifer for water quality improvement. In this study, the distribution, quantitative changes, as well as the speciation characteristics of heavy metals in different depth of soils of a two-year operated lab-scale SAT was explored. A majority of the heavy metals in the recharged secondary effluent were efficiently trapped by the steady-state operated SAT (removal efficiency ranged from 74.7% to 98.2%). Thus, significant accumulations of 31.7% for Cd, 15.9% for Cu, 15.3% for Zn and 8.6% for Cr were observed for the top soil after 730 d operation, leading to the concentration (in μg g(-1)) of those four heavy metals of the packed soil increased from 0.51, 46.7, 61.0 and 35.7 to 0.66, 54.2, 70.4 and 38.8, respectively. By contrast, the accumulation of Mn and Pb were quite low. The residual species were the predominant fraction of the six heavy metals (ranged for 59.8-82.4%), followed by oxidisable species. Although the Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu and Mn were efficiently bounded onto the oxide components within the soil, the percentage of the labile metal fractions (water-, acid-exchangeable and reducible metal fractions) exhibited a slight increasing after 2 Y operation. Significantly heavy metals accumulation and slightly decreasing of the proportion of the stable fractions indicated a potentially higher environmental hazard for those six heavy metals after long-term SAT operation (especially for Cu, Zn and Cd). Finally, a linear relationship between the accumulation rate of metal species and the variation of soil organic carbon concentration and water extractable organic carbon was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis and exploitation of bacterial population from natural uranium-rich soils: selection of a model specie; Analyse et exploitation des populations bacteriennes de sols riches en uranium: selection d'une espece modele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondani, L.

    2010-11-23

    It is well known that soils play a key role in controlling the mobility of toxic metals and this property is greatly influenced by indigenous bacterial communities. This study has been conducted on radioactive and controls soils, collected in natural uraniferous areas (Limousin). A physico-chemical and mineralogical analysis of soils samples was carried out.The structure of bacterial communities was estimated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The community structure is remarkably more stable in the uranium-rich soils than in the control ones, indicating that uranium exerts a high selection from the soils was constructed and screened for uranium resistance in order to study bacteria-uranium interactions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a phylo-genetically diverse set of uranium-resistant species ware able to chelate uranium at the cell surface. (author) [French] On sait que les sols et les populations bacteriennes indigenes ont une influence sur la mobilite des metaux, donc sur leur toxicite. Cette etude a ete menee sur des sols uraniferes et controles collectes dans le Limousin (regions naturellement riches en uranium ). Une analyse physico-chimique et mineralogique des echantillons de sol a ete realisee. La structure des communautes bacteriennes a ete etudiee par electrophorese en gradient de denaturant (DGGE). La structure des communautes est remarquablement stable dans les sols uraniferes, ce qui indique que l'uranium exerce une forte pression de selection. D'autre part, une collection de bacteries cultivables a ete realisee a partir des sols, puis criblee pour la resistance a l'uranium, dans le but d'etudier les interactions entre bacteries et uranium. Des observations en Microscopie electronique a Balayage ont mis en evidence differents mecanismes de chelation de l'uranium a la surface cellulaire

  12. Estimating the relative nutrient uptake from different soil depths in Quercus robur, Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göransson, Hans; Wallander, Håkan; Ingerslev, Morten

    2006-01-01

    uptake capacity of Rb+ and NH4+ by these fine roots under standardized conditions in the laboratory. The study was performed in monocultures of oak (Quercus robur L.), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] on sandy soil in a tree species trial in Denmark...

  13. Use of Contour Maps of Water Depths to Predict Flora and Fauna Abundance in Moist Soil Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project was to develop a technique to quantitatively predict the area of moist soil that would be exposed as a result of a water drawdown of any...

  14. Black earth bonanza? : Soil, soul and depth in large-scale farmland investments in Russia and Ukraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Visser (Oane)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper deals with the centrality of what is called here the ‘celebration’ of black earth soil (fertility) in driving foreign investors’ land rush in the fertile black earth region of Russia and Ukraine. Since the mid-2000s, this region experienced a quick rise of farmland investment

  15. Volumetric humidity timely variation, at different depths, in soils of a toposequence of the Reconcavo Baiano - Brazil; Variacao da umidade volumetrica ao longo do tempo, em diferentes profundidades, em solos de uma topossequencia do Reconcavo Baiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos; Costa, Liovando Marciano da [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Paiva, Arlicelio de Queiroz [UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Agrarias e Ambientais. E-mail: aqpaiva@jacaranda.uescba.com.br; Souza, Luciano da Silva [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura. E-mail: lsouza@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Santana, Marlete Bastos [Bahia Univ., Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia

    1997-07-01

    Aiming the time basis volumetric humidity evaluation, at different depths, the present work has been developed in a Reconcavo Baiano toposequence consisting of three different soils, in accordance with the distances from the toposequence begin. A neutron probe has been used for determination of the soil water contents. The relative counting of the neutron probe has been converted to gravimetric humidity by using regression equation for each type of soil.

  16. Calibration of a gamma-ray depth probe with standard blocks. Examples of application to soil bulk density measurements and relations with rooting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossignol, J.P.; Morlat, R.

    1984-11-01

    A ..gamma..-ray depth probe was tested by standard blocks of different volume weight and composition. A regression straight line was calculated; the straight line validity, as well as the precision of the bulk-density determination from the line were tested. This calibration was used in two different applications. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray measurement tubes were set up on a same type of soil in an experimental pear orchard. Bulk-density measurements were carried out at two different periods (may-june and september). The obtained results were compared to each other in space as well as in time. Within the framework of the studies on apple-tree rooting, a relation between bulk-density and root number was calculated.

  17. Rainfall-runoff relation: A physically based model to investigate interactions between rainfall duration, slope angle, soil depth and bedrock topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Benjamin; Bronstert, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Hillslopes are one of the fundamental geomorphic unit of catchments and act as the primary interface and filter between rainfall and runoff transmission to streams. Nevertheless, hillslope response to storm rainfall remains poorly understood. Typically, a certain rainfall volume is needed to exceed an intrinsic threshold before subsurface stormflow is released. Thresholds, however, vary locally. In particular, studies showed that the subsurface topography of an impeding layer may act as first order control on runoff mechanisms and herewith subsurface runoff generation. Thus, one of the key questions in hillslope hydrology is how slope angle, depth to bedrock or impeding layer and their topography impact the spatial and temporal evolution of subsurface storm flow. To this end, we conducted small scaled irrigation experiments (1 m2) covering intensities of 40, 50 and 60 mm/h over one hour duration in the Schäfertal catchment (51° 39´N, 11° 03´E) in the Lower Harz Mountains, Germany. During the experiments, we measured volumetric water contents at five depths (0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0,60, 0,75 m) at intervals of 60 s. These measurements were used to develop a physically-based model to investigate subsurface flow. Here, this model was applied on an artificial hillslope segment (10 x 5 m) with varying slopes and depth to the local impermeable layers. In addition, rainfall duration changed with each simulation. Finally, the impact of the spatial position of a topographical depression in the impermeable layer was analyzed. Assuming vertical water flow to the impeding layer followed by subsequent lateral flow along this boundary, the recorded water content increase owing to irrigation was modelled based on a coupled approach combining both Stokes flow with elements of kinematic wave theory. Bases on this model, gravity drives flow while viscosity counteracts. Since capillarity is neglected, this approach is applicable to a certain soil moisture range between Darc

  18. Highly integrated flow assembly for automated dynamic extraction and determination of readily bioaccessible chromium(VI) in soils exploiting carbon nanoparticle-based solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosende, Maria; Miro, Manuel; Cerda, Victor [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Segundo, Marcela A.; Lima, Jose L.F.C. [University of Porto, REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto (Portugal)

    2011-06-15

    An automated dynamic leaching test integrated in a portable flow-based setup is herein proposed for reliable determination of readily bioaccessible Cr(VI) under worst-case scenarios in soils containing varying levels of contamination. The manifold is devised to accommodate bi-directional flow extraction followed by processing of extracts via either in-line clean-up/preconcentration using multi-walled carbon nanotubes or automatic dilution at will, along with Cr(VI) derivatization and flow-through spectrophotometric detection. The magnitude of readily mobilizable Cr(VI) pools was ascertained by resorting to water extraction as promulgated by current standard leaching tests. The role of carbon nanomaterials for the uptake of Cr(VI) in soil leachates and the configuration of the packed column integrated in the flow manifold were investigated in detail. The analytical performance of the proposed system for in vitro bioaccessibility tests was evaluated in chromium-enriched soils at environmentally relevant levels and in a standard reference soil material (SRM 2701) with a certified value of total hexavalent chromium. The automated method was proven to afford unbiased assessment of water-soluble Cr(VI) in soils as a result of the minimization of the chromium species transformation. By combination of the kinetic leaching profile and a first-order leaching model, the water-soluble Cr(VI) fraction in soils was determined in merely 6 h against >24 h taken in batchwise steady-state standard methods. (orig.)

  19. Microorganisms of radionuclides-contaminated soils of Chernobyl: in depth analysis of diversity and study of uranium-bacteria interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapon, V.; Berthomieu, C. [LIPM-CEA-CNRS-Universite d' Aix Marseille (France); Theodorakopoulos, N. [CEA-CNRS-Universite d' Aix Marseille-IRSN (France); Christen, R. [CNRS-Universite de Nice (France); Vercouter, T. [CEA-DEN-LANIE (France); Coppin, F.; Fevrier, L. [IRSN-L2BT (France); Sergeant, C. [CENBG-CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux (France)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we explored the microbial diversity of Bacteria and Archaea evolving since 25 years in a radioactive-waste repository trench located in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. To assess the effect of long-term RNs exposure on diversity, microbial assemblages of soil samples highly contaminated with radionuclides (RNs) such as {sup 137}Cs and uranium were compared with nearby controls using high throughput pyro-sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The analysis of 690,023 sequences evidenced high diversity in all samples with 34 bacterial and 2 archaeal phylum represented. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the most consistently detected phyla, representing 90% of all sequences.This result demonstrates that a long term exposure did not lead to the decrease of microbial diversity. Furthermore, principal component analysis of pyro-sequencing data showed that microbial communities of RNs contaminated samples differed significantly from that of controls, suggesting the presence of RNs adapted species in the contaminated samples. Several heterotrophic aerobic bacteria have been cultured from the contaminated samples. Among them, the strain Microbacterium sp. A9 exhibited high uranium tolerance. The interaction between this strain and uranium was investigated by a combination of spectroscopic (FTIR and TRLFS) and microscopic (TEM/EDX) approaches. Comparison of data obtained at 4 and 25 deg. C evidenced active and passive mechanisms of uranium uptake and release. We demonstrated that after a first step of uranium and phosphate release via an active efflux mechanism, Microbacterium sp. A9 accumulates U(VI) as intracellular needle-like structures composed of autunite. The functional groups involved in the interactions with uranium were identified. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  20. Spatial variability in depth and landscape of heavy metal contents of volcanic soils of the National Cajas Park in the Azuay Andes (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria; Boluda, Rafael; Gil, Carlos; Ramos-Miras, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    potential outliers from the data set and the calculation of the mean and the standard deviation for the remaining sub-collective. Andisols are dominated by amorphous aluminium silicates and Al-organic complexes. The soils of a volcanic area usually have an Ah-Bh-Bhs/ Bw-C horizon sequence. The Ah horizon is dark-coloured and very high in organic carbon. The pH NaF usually rises to 10.5 below 20 cm. Correlation metal concentration with pH NaF may reflect the impact of volcanic pedogenetic pathways of soils on the original trace elements distribution (Cr and Pb). Close relationships between organic matter have a marked affinity to trace elements (Cd and Cu) forming organomineral complexes. Ni and Zn present a close relationship with soil grain distribution. This may reflect the impact of wind or water on the original parent material distribution. The great dispersion of heavy metals between horizons could be horizon discontinuities. The elements Zr, Ti and Y, have been widely used as indices of immobile minerals. These studies must be performed to definitively confirm the complex profiles. Cadmium, Cu, Ni and Zn showed highly significant differences between Andisols. The complex association of the soils in the landscape was attributed to the difference in their parent material compositions. Occasional or continuous addition of volcanic deposits to soil becomes the soil forming process, and is decisive in the distribution of heavy metals. Although, the Azuay soils have shown a spatial variability of heavy metal concentrations in depth and landscape, the data sets were predominantly influenced by natural element distribution. In general, the upper limits of heavy metal background are (in mg•kg-1): Cd (1), Cr (44), Cu (54), Ni (10), Pb (69) and Zn (149). Only one point with slight enrichment Cd anomalies were observed: A4 (35-69 cm): 1.72 mg•kg-1. The concentrations of heavy metals found in the Cajas National Park are normal and do not show any sign of contamination

  1. A novel dynamic approach for automatic microsampling and continuous monitoring of metal ion release from soils exploiting a dedicated flow-through microdialyser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro, Manuel [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Illes Balears (Spain); Jimoh, Modupe; Frenzel, Wolfgang [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Technischen Umweltschutz, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a novel concept is presented for automatic microsampling and continuous monitoring of metal ions in soils with minimum disturbance of the sampling site. It involves a hollow-fiber microdialyser that is implanted in the soil body as a miniaturized sensing device. The idea behind microdialysis in this application is to mimic the function of a passive sampler to predict the actual, rather than potential, mobility and bioavailability of metal traces. Although almost quantitative dialysis recoveries were obtained for lead ({>=} 98%) from aqueous model solutions with sufficiently long capillaries (l{>=}30 mm, 200 {mu}m i.d.) at perfusion rates of 2.0 {mu}L min{sup -1}, the resistance of an inert soil matrix was found to reduce metal uptake by 30%. Preliminary investigation of the potential of the microdialysis analyser for risk assessment of soil pollution, and for metal partitioning studies, were performed by implanting the dedicated probe in a laboratory-made soil column and hyphenating it with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), so that minute, well-defined volumes of clean microdialysates were injected on-line into the graphite furnace. A noteworthy feature of the implanted microdialysis-based device is the capability to follow the kinetics of metal release under simulated natural scenarios or anthropogenic actions. An ancillary flow set-up was arranged in such a way that a continuous flow of leaching solution - mild extractant (10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1} CaCl{sub 2}), acidic solution (10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3}), or chelating agent (10{sup -4} or 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1} EDTA) - was maintained through the soil body, while the concentration trends of inorganic (un-bound) metal species at the soil-liquid interface could be monitored at near real-time. Hence, relevant qualitative and quantitative information about the various mobile fractions is obtained, and metal-soil phase associations can also be elucidated. Finally

  2. Importance of lateral flux and its percolation depth on organic carbon export in Arctic tundra soil: Implications from a soil leaching experiment: Changes of OC in Arctic Soil Leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaowen [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Hutchings, Jack A. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Bianchi, Thomas S. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Liu, Yina [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Arellano, Ana R. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Schuur, Edward A. G. [Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff Arizona USA; Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA

    2017-04-01

    Temperature rise in the Arctic is causing deepening of active layers and resulting in the mobilization of deep permafrost dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the mechanisms of DOM mobilization from Arctic soils, especially upper soil horizons which are drained most frequently through a year, are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a short-term leaching experiment on surface and deep organic active layer soils, from the Yukon River basin, to examine the effects of DOM transport on bulk and molecular characteristics. Our data showed a net release of DOM from surface soils equal to an average of 5% of soil carbon. Conversely, deep soils percolated with surface leachates retained up to 27% of bulk DOM-while releasing fluorescent components (up to 107%), indicating selective release of aromatic components (e.g. lignin, tannin), while retaining non-chromophoric components, as supported by spectrofluorometric and ultra high resolution mass spectroscopic techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of the lateral flux of DOM on ecosystem carbon balance as well as processing of DOM transport through organic active layer soils en route to rivers and streams. This work also suggests the potential role of leachate export as an important mechanism of C losses from Arctic soils, in comparison with the more traditional pathway from soil to atmosphere in a warming Arctic.

  3. Adaptation to exploit nitrate in surface soils predisposes yellow-cedar to climate-induced decline while enhancing the survival of western redcedar: a new hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    David V. D' Amore; Paul E. Hennon; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley

    2009-01-01

    Yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach) and western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn), two valuable tree species of Pacific Northwest forests, are competitive in low productivity forests on wet, nearly saturated soils with low nitrogen (N) availability and turnover. We propose a mechanism where cedar trees survive in...

  4. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  5. Spatial distribution of trace elements and risk assessment in agricultural soils affected by sulphide exploitation in Riotinto (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Antonio; González, Isabel; López, María.; Galán, Emilio; González, Félix

    2010-05-01

    The decadence of mining activity in the Riotinto Mining District (SW Spain) during the end of the last century has led to citrus agriculture as the new social development. This new activity has been carried out around abandoned mines without the assessment of soil pollution. The aim of this work is to study the distribution of potentially toxic elements in soils of the Riotinto mining area and compare them with the element concentration absorbed by plants, in order to assess the potential risk involved in the use of the studied soils, defining also the most dangerous areas for agricultural activities. Twenty-seven agricultural soil samples were collected from the Riotinto area. Major and trace elements were analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after 4 acid (HF-HClO4-HNO3-HCl) digestion, except As, Co and Cr that were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). In general, the total concentrations of the trace elements analysed exceeded the background concentration values for Andalusian soils and, on occasions, they surpassed the threshold values defined by percentile 95 for the geological domain of the South Portuguese Zone (Galán et al., 2008). Copper and Zn displayed median values of 99 and 150 mg/kg, respectively, and 44% of the samples surpassed the threshold of 147 and 173 mg/kg for Cu and Zn, respectively. Arsenic reached up to 204 mg/kg and Pb up to 598 mg/kg. The association As-Cu-Pb-Zn and their distribution close the Riotinto waste dumps (NE of the studied area) suggests an anthropogenic origin for these elements. On the contrary, Ni, Cr and Co showed also high values with median concentrations of 41, 113 and 23 mg/kg, respectively, but about 30-48% of the samples were below the baseline values proposed for these elements. The distribution of Fe-Co-Cr-Ni shows they are enriched in the SW part associated to volcanic rocks, which suggests a geogenic origin for them. In order to evaluate the

  6. The Ethics of Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul McLaughlin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Philosophical inquiry into exploitation has two major deficiencies to date: it assumes that exploitation is wrong by definition; and it pays too much attention to the Marxian account of exploitation. Two senses of exploitation should be distinguished: the ‘moral’ or pejorative sense and the ‘non-moral’ or ‘non-prejudicial’ sense. By demonstrating the conceptual inadequacy of exploitation as defined in the first sense, and by defining exploitation adequately in the latter sense, we seek to demonstrate the moral complexity of exploitation. We contend, moreover, that moral evaluation of exploitation is only possible once we abandon a strictly Marxian framework and attempt, in the long run, to develop an integral ethic along Godwinian lines.

  7. Exploiting biogeochemical and spectroscopic techniques to assess the geochemical distribution and release dynamics of chromium and lead in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Schröter, Felix; Rennert, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) combined with a seven steps sequential extraction technique were used to assess the geochemical distribution of chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a contaminated floodplain soil. Total contents of Cr and Pb were 490.3 and 402.1 mg kg(-1), respectively. The residual fraction was 59.5 and 56.3% of total Cr and Pb. The crystalline iron (Fe) oxide was the dominant non-residual fraction of Cr (35.9% of total Cr). Considerable amounts of Pb were found in the organic fraction (35.4%). Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the soil organic matter was identified as 48.9% aromatic carbon, which indicated that a certain portion of Pb and Cr might be associated with aromatic compounds. The SEM-EDX images demonstrate a concomitant occurrence of Pb, manganese (Mn), Fe, and aluminum (Al) as well as a coexistence of Cr and Fe. The release dynamics of dissolved Cr and Pb as affected by redox potential (EH), pH, Fe, Mn, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate was quantified using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. Soil pH decreased under oxic conditions. The release of Cr, Pb, Fe, and Mn increased under acidic oxic (pH = 3.7, EH = 521 mV) conditions due to the associated decrease of pH (7.1-3.7). The mobilization of Cr and Pb was affected by the Fe and Mn. In conclusion, our multi-technique approach identified the geochemical distribution of Cr and Pb and verified major factors that explain mobilization of Cr and Pb in floodplain soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-08-21

    In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr -1 with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha -1 and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha -1 yr -1 Fine root biomass (0-30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha -1 (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha -1 yr -1 (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr -1 and lifespan was 0·8 years. Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the topsoil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  9. Diversity of Phototrophic Genes Suggests Multiple Bacteria May Be Able to Exploit Sunlight in Exposed Soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Tahon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial life in exposed terrestrial surface layers in continental Antarctica is faced with extreme environmental conditions, including scarcity of organic matter. Bacteria in these exposed settings can therefore be expected to use alternative energy sources such as solar energy, abundant during the austral summer. Using Illumina MiSeq sequencing, we assessed the diversity and abundance of four conserved protein encoding genes involved in different key steps of light-harvesting pathways dependent on (bacteriochlorophyll (pufM, bchL/chlL and bchX genes and rhodopsins (actinorhodopsin genes, in exposed soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica. Analysis of pufM genes, encoding a subunit of the type 2 photochemical reaction center found in anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, revealed a very broad diversity, dominated by Roseobacter- and Loktanella-like sequences. The bchL and chlL, involved in (bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, on the other hand, showed a high abundance of either cyanobacterial or green algal trebouxiophyceael chlL reads, depending on the sample, while most bchX sequences belonged mostly to previously unidentified phylotypes. Rhodopsin-containing phototrophic bacteria could not be detected in the samples. Our results, while suggesting that Cyanobacteria and green algae are the main phototrophic groups, show that light-harvesting bacteria are nevertheless very diverse in microbial communities in Antarctic soils.

  10. Soil quality indices for evaluating smallholder agricultural land uses in northern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gelaw, Aweke Mulualem; Singh, Bal Ram; lal, rattan

    2015-01-01

    Population growth and increasing resource demands in Ethiopia are stressing and degrading agricultural landscapes. Most Ethiopian soils are already exhausted by several decades of over exploitation and mismanagement. Since many agricultural sustainability issues are related to soil quality, its assessment is very important. We determined integrated soil quality indices (SQI) within the surface 0–15 cm depth increment for three agricultural land uses: rain fed cultivation (RF); agroforestry (...

  11. Exploitability Assessment with TEASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    exploits. We saw this as an advantage of our dataset because we had to confirm that either a bug was exploitable or not exploitable. For the 28 CHAPTER 5...corruption which demonstrates that there is very little activity within c-ares to take advantage of after the heap corruption. This idea is in line with the...remote code execution POCs. 42 Bibliography [1] Analyze crashes to find security vulnerabilities in your apps . https: //blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

  12. Anthropology of sexual exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Velibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors observe sexual exploitation from an anthropological perspective. They analyze the rational, ethical, emotional and mythological dimensions of human sexuality. Consequently, after setting the phenomenon in a social and historical context, sexual exploitation is closely observed in the contemporary age. Based on thoughts of relevant thinkers, they make the conclusion that the elimination of sexual exploitation is not an utterly legal issue, but political and economical issues as well. Namely, legal norms are not sufficient to overcome sexual exploitation, but, political and economical relationships in contemporary societies, which will be based on sincere equal opportunities must be established.

  13. EXPLOITATION OF GRANITE BOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cotman

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of forming, petrography, features, properties and exploitation of granite boulders are described. The directional drilling and black powder blasting is the succesful method in exploitation of granite boulders (boulder technology (the paper is published in Croatian.

  14. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons exploiting spent substrate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-08-13

    Aug 13, 2014 ... Biodegradation of hydrocarbons exploiting spent substrate from Pleurotus ostreatus in agricultural soils. A. Mauricio-Gutiérrez1, T. Jiménez-Salgado2, A. Tapia-Hernández2, J. Cavazos-Arroyo1 and. B. Pérez-Armendáriz1*. 1Interdisciplinary Research and Consulting, Autonomus Popular University of State ...

  15. Global Climate Responses to Anthropogenic Groundwater Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.; Xie, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a groundwater exploitation scheme is incorporated into the earth system model, Community Earth System Model 1.2.0 (CESM1.2.0), which is called CESM1.2_GW, and the climatic responses to anthropogenic groundwater withdrawal are then investigated on global scale. The scheme models anthropogenic groundwater exploitation and consumption, which are then divided into agricultural irrigation, industrial use and domestic use. A group of 41-year ensemble groundwater exploitation simulations with six different initial conditions, and a group of ensemble control simulations without exploitation are conducted using the developed model CESM1.2_GW with water supplies and demands estimated. The results reveal that the groundwater exploitation and water consumption cause drying effects on soil moisture in deep layers and wetting effects in upper layers, along with a rapidly declining groundwater table in Central US, Haihe River Basin in China and Northern India and Pakistan where groundwater extraction are most severe in the world. The atmosphere also responds to anthropogenic groundwater exploitation. Cooling effects on lower troposphere appear in large areas of North China Plain and of Northern India and Pakistan. Increased precipitation occurs in Haihe River Basin due to increased evapotranspiration from irrigation. Decreased precipitation occurs in Northern India because water vapor here is taken away by monsoon anomalies induced by anthropogenic alteration of groundwater. The local reducing effects of anthropogenic groundwater exploitation on total terrestrial water storage evinces that water resource is unsustainable with the current high exploitation rate. Therefore, a balance between slow groundwater withdrawal and rapid human economic development must be achieved to maintain a sustainable water resource, especially in over-exploitation regions such as Central US, Northern China, India and Pakistan.

  16. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in a Dune Sand Aquifer in Western Saudi Arabia: Assessment of Evaporation Loss for Design of an MAR System

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2015-12-10

    A component of designing a managed aquifer recharge system in a dune aquifer is the control of diffusive evaporative loss of water which is governed by the physical properties of the sediments and the position of the water table. A critical water table position is the “extinction depth”, below which no further loss of water occurs via diffusion. Field experiments were conducted to measure the extinction depth of sediments taken from a typical dune field in the region. The soil grain size characteristics, laboratory porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured. The sand is classified as well-sorted, very fine sand with a mean grain diameter of 0.15 mm. Soil moisture gradients and diffusion loss rates were measured using sensors in a non-weighing lysimeter that was placed below land surface. The sand was saturated carefully with water from the bottom to the top and was exposed to the natural climate for a period of about two months. The moisture gradient showed a gradual decline during measurement until extinction depth was reached at about 100 cm below surface after 56 days. Diurnal temperature changes were observed in the upper 75 cm of the column and were negligible at greater depth.

  17. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in a Dune Sand Aquifer in Western Saudi Arabia: Assessment of Evaporation Loss for Design of an MAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqra Mughal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A component of designing a managed aquifer recharge system in a dune aquifer is the control of diffusive evaporative loss of water which is governed by the physical properties of the sediments and the position of the water table. A critical water table position is the “extinction depth”, below which no further loss of water occurs via diffusion. Field experiments were conducted to measure the extinction depth of sediments taken from a typical dune field in the region. The soil grain size characteristics, laboratory porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured. The sand is classified as well-sorted, very fine sand with a mean grain diameter of 0.15 mm. Soil moisture gradients and diffusion loss rates were measured using sensors in a non-weighing lysimeter that was placed below land surface. The sand was saturated carefully with water from the bottom to the top and was exposed to the natural climate for a period of about two months. The moisture gradient showed a gradual decline during measurement until extinction depth was reached at about 100 cm below surface after 56 days. Diurnal temperature changes were observed in the upper 75 cm of the column and were negligible at greater depth.

  18. Colonization and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in maize roots at different depths in the soil profile respond differently to phosphorus inputs on a long-term experimental site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; White, Philip J; Li, Chunjian

    2017-05-01

    Effects of soil depth and plant growth stages on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization and community structure in maize roots and their potential contribution to host plant phosphorus (P) nutrition under different P-fertilizer inputs were studied. Research was conducted on a long-term field experiment over 3 years. AMF colonization was assessed by AM colonization rate and arbuscule abundances and their potential contribution to host P nutrition by intensity of fungal alkaline phosphatase (ALP)/acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and expressions of ZmPht1;6 and ZmCCD8a in roots from the topsoil and subsoil layer at different growth stages. AMF community structure was determined by specific amplification of 18S rDNA. Increasing P inputs up to 75-100 kg ha -1  yr -1 increased shoot biomass and P content but decreased AMF colonization and interactions between AMF and roots. AM colonization rate, intensity of fungal ACP/ALP activities, and expression of ZmPht1;6 in roots from the subsoil were greater than those from topsoil at elongation and silking but not at the dough stage when plants received adequate or excessive P inputs. Neither P input nor soil depth influenced the number of AMF operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present in roots, but P-fertilizer input, in particular, influenced community composition and relative AMF abundance. In conclusion, although increasing P inputs reduce AMF colonization and influence AMF community structure, AMF can potentially contribute to plant P nutrition even in well-fertilized soils, depending on the soil layer in which roots are located and the growth stage of host plants.

  19. Soil spatial variability and the estimation of the irrigation water depth Variabilidade espacial do solo e a estimativa da lâmina de irrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reichardt

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of soil water spatial variability previous to irrigation and of the field capacity on the estimation of irrigation water depth are evaluated. The experiment consisted of a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop established on a Kandiudalfic Eutrudox of Piracicaba, SP, Brazil, irrigated by central pivot, in which soil water contents were evaluated with a depth neutron gauge, in a grid of 20x4 points with lag of 0.5 m. In a given situation, the 80 calculated irrigation water depths presented a coefficient of variation of 29.3%, with an average water value of 18 mm, maximum of 41mm and minimum of 9 mm. It is concluded that the only practical way of irrigation is the use of an average water depth, due to the inherent variability of the soil, and that the search for better field capacity values does not imply in better water depth estimates.A influência da variabilidade espacial da umidade do solo em uma situação pré-irrigação e da capacidade de campo é avaliada no cálculo da lâmina de irrigação. O experimento constou de cultura de feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L. estabelecida em um ARGISSOLO da região de Piracicaba, SP, irrigada por pivô central, tendo as medidas de umidade sido feitas com sonda de nêutrons, em uma malha de 20x4 pontos, espaçados de 0.5 m. Em determinada situação, os 80 valores de lâmina de irrigação calculados apresentaram um coeficiente de variação de 29.3%, para uma média de 18 mm, com valor mínimo de 9 mm e máximo de 41mm. É concluído que a única forma prática de irrigação é o uso de uma lâmina média devido à variabilidade inerente ao solo, e que a procura de melhores valores para a capacidade de campo não implica em melhores estimativas da lâmina de irrigação.

  20. Flare Systems Exploitation and Impact on Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, M. Yu; Vaganova, N. A.

    2017-09-01

    Mathematical models and numerical algorithms of horizontal and vertical flare systems exploitation in northern oil and gas fields located in permafrost zone are developed. Computations of long-term forecasts of permafrost degradation around such constructions have been carried out for various types of operation, including emergency situations, which cause a short-term increase in the heat flow near the ground surface, which leads to an additional soil temperature increasing.

  1. Viruses exploiting peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarow, Paul B

    2011-08-01

    Viruses that are of great importance for global public health, including HIV, influenza and rotavirus, appear to exploit a remarkable organelle, the peroxisome, during intracellular replication in human cells. Peroxisomes are sites of lipid biosynthesis and catabolism, reactive oxygen metabolism, and other metabolic pathways. Viral proteins are targeted to peroxisomes (the spike protein of rotavirus) or interact with peroxisomal proteins (HIV's Nef and influenza's NS1) or use the peroxisomal membrane for RNA replication. The Nef interaction correlates strongly with the crucial Nef function of CD4 downregulation. Viral exploitation of peroxisomal lipid metabolism appears likely. Mostly, functional significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recently, peroxisomes were discovered to play a crucial role in the innate immune response by signaling the presence of intracellular virus, leading to the first rapid antiviral response. This review unearths, interprets and connects old data, in the hopes of stimulating new and promising research. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dissemination and Exploitation Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio; Fransson, Torsten

    The research infrastructure project Virtual Campus Hub (VCH) runs from October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2013. Four technical universities in Europe, who are all active in the field of sustainable energy, form the project consortium: the Technical University of Denmark, The Royal Institute...... of Technology in Sweden, Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. The project is partially funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme (project no. RI-283746). This report describes the final dissemination and exploitation strategy...... for project Virtual Campus Hub. A preliminary dissemination and exploitation plan was setup early in the project as described in the deliverable D6.1 Dissemination strategy paper - preliminary version. The plan has been revised on a monthly basis during the project’s lifecycle in connection with the virtual...

  3. Profundidade do solo e micro-relevo em bananais irrigados: impactos na nutrição mineral e potencial produtivo Soil depth and microrelief in irrigated banana plantation: impacts on mineral nutrition and yield potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Cristina Gomes Costa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o papel da profundidade do solo e da microtopografia em aspectos nutricionais e produtivos de bananais irrigados. O estudo foi conduzido na Chapada do Apodi (CE, em área com variações na profundidade do solo. Os tratamentos foram sítios (locais em diferentes classes de micro-relevo (côncavo, convexo e retilíneo que abrangeram quatro profundidades de solo: A 0,92 m; B 0,77 m; C 0,65 m; D 0,52 m. Foram avaliados: altura da planta mãe (APM, altura da planta filha (APF, diâmetro do pseudocaule da planta mãe (DPPM, massa de folhas frescas (MFF e secas (MFS, teores de fósforo (P, potássio (K, cálcio (Ca, enxofre (S e sódio (Na no tecido vegetal e massa dos cachos. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado com sete repetições para avaliações de crescimento e cinco repetições para avaliações referentes à massa de folhas, estado nutricional e produção. A análise estatística foi feita pela ANOVA e DMS a 5% de significância. APM e DPPM foram maiores em A e C, enquanto que menores médias ocorreram no solo mais raso (D. MFF e MFS foram superiores em A e D que também apresentaram maior acúmulo de nutrientes nas folhas. Entretanto, maiores teores foliares e níveis adequados de P ocorreram em A, que também apresentou maior massa de cachos em relação aos solos mais rasos. Isto mostra que a profundidade efetiva do solo e o micro-relevo influenciam a absorção de nutrientes, o crescimento e o potencial produtivo de bananeiras irrigadas na Chapada do Apodi.The aim of this research was to verify whether soil depth affects aspects of mineral nutrition and yield potential of irrigated banana plantations. The study was carried out at Apodi Plateau (CE, Brazil, in an area characterized by soil depth variations. The treatments were sites in different microrelief classes (concave, convex and retilinea with four different soil depths: A 0.92 m; B 0.77 m; C 0.6 5m; D 0.52 m. The

  4. Hacking the art of exploitation

    CERN Document Server

    Erickson, Jon

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the techniques of exploitation and creative problem-solving methods commonly referred to as "hacking," Hacking: The Art of Exploitation is for both technical and non-technical people who are interested in computer security. It shows how hackers exploit programs and write exploits, instead of just how to run other people's exploits. Unlike many so-called hacking books, this book explains the technical aspects of hacking, including stack based overflows, heap based overflows, string exploits, return-into-libc, shellcode, and cryptographic attacks on 802.11b.

  5. CLPX-Ground: ISA Snow Depth Transects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is part of the NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX). Parameters include snow depth, surface wetness, surface roughness, canopy, and soil...

  6. Chemical weathering of a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California I: Interpreting rates and controls based on soil concentration-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Anderson, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in element and mineral concentrations in regolith profiles in a chronosequence developed on marine terraces along coastal California are interpreted in terms of chemical weathering rates and processes. In regoliths up to 15 m deep and 226 kyrs old, quartz-normalized mass transfer coefficients indicate non-stoichiometric preferential release of Sr > Ca > Na from plagioclase along with lesser amounts of K, Rb and Ba derived from K-feldspar. Smectite weathering results in the loss of Mg and concurrent incorporation of Al and Fe into secondary kaolinite and Fe-oxides in shallow argillic horizons. Elemental losses from weathering of the Santa Cruz terraces fall within the range of those for other marine terraces along the Pacific Coast of North America. Residual amounts of plagioclase and K-feldspar decrease with terrace depth and increasing age. The gradient of the weathering profile bs is defined by the ratio of the weathering rate, R to the velocity at which the profile penetrates into the protolith. A spreadsheet calculator further refines profile geometries, demonstrating that the non-linear regions at low residual feldspar concentrations at shallow depth are dominated by exponential changes in mineral surface-to-volume ratios and at high residual feldspar concentrations, at greater depth, by the approach to thermodynamic saturation. These parameters are of secondary importance to the fluid flux qh, which in thermodynamically saturated pore water, controls the weathering velocity and mineral losses from the profiles. Long-term fluid fluxes required to reproduce the feldspar weathering profiles are in agreement with contemporary values based on solute Cl balances (qh = 0.025-0.17 m yr-1). During saturation-controlled and solute-limited weathering, the greater loss of plagioclase relative to K-feldspar is dependent on the large difference in their respective solubilities instead of the small difference between their respective

  7. Depth-based Multi-View 3D Video Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamarin, Marco

    on edge-preserving solutions. In a proposed scheme, texture-depth correlation is exploited to predict surface shapes in the depth signal. In this way depth coding performance can be improved in terms of both compression gain and edge-preservation. Another solution proposes a new intra coding mode targeted...... to depth blocks featuring arbitrarily-shaped edges. Edge information is encoded exploiting previously coded edge blocks. Integrated in H.264/AVC, the proposed mode allows significant bit rate savings compared with a number of state-of-the-art depth codecs. View synthesis performances are also improved......, both in terms of objective and visual evaluations. Depth coding based on standard H.264/AVC is explored for multi-view plus depth image coding. A single depth map is used to disparity-compensate multiple views and allow more efficient coding than H.264 MVC at low bit rates. Lossless coding of depth...

  8. The Geohazards Exploitation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, Henri; Casu, Francesco; Bally, Philippe; Caumont, Hervé; Pinto, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform, or Geohazards TEP (GEP), is an ESA originated R&D activity of the EO ground segment to demonstrate the benefit of new technologies for large scale processing of EO data. This encompasses on-demand processing for specific user needs, systematic processing to address common information needs of the geohazards community, and integration of newly developed processors for scientists and other expert users. The platform supports the geohazards community's objectives as defined in the context of the International Forum on Satellite EO and Geohazards organised by ESA and GEO in Santorini in 2012. The GEP is a follow on to the Supersites Exploitation Platform (SSEP) an ESA initiative to support the Geohazards Supersites & Natural Laboratories initiative (GSNL). Today the GEP allows to exploit 70+ Terabyte of ERS and ENVISAT archive and the Copernicus Sentinel-1 data available on line. The platform has already engaged 22 European early adopters in a validation activity initiated in March 2015. Since September, this validation has reached 29 single user projects. Each project is concerned with either integrating an application, running on demand processing or systematically generating a product collection using an application available in the platform. The users primarily include 15 geoscience centres and universities based in Europe: British Geological Survey (UK), University of Leeds (UK), University College London (UK), ETH University of Zurich (CH), INGV (IT), CNR-IREA and CNR-IRPI (IT), University of L'Aquila (IT), NOA (GR), Univ. Blaise Pascal & CNRS (FR), Ecole Normale Supérieure (FR), ISTERRE / University of Grenoble-Alpes (FR). In addition, there are users from Africa and North America with the University of Rabat (MA) and the University of Miami (US). Furthermore two space agencies and four private companies are involved: the German Space Research Centre DLR (DE), the European Space Agency (ESA), Altamira Information (ES

  9. Exploitative Learning by Exporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Elena; Lopes Bento, Cindy; Sofka, Wolfgang

    Decisions on entering foreign markets are among the most challenging but also potentially rewarding strategy choices managers can make. In this study, we examine the effect of export entry on the firm investment decisions in two activities associated with learning about new technologies...... and learning about new markets ? R&D investments and marketing investments, in search of novel insights into the content and process underlying learning by exporting. We draw from organizational learning theory for predicting changes in both R&D and marketing investment patterns that accompany firm entry......, it is predominantly the marketing-related investment decisions associated with starting to export that lead to increases in firm productivity. We conclude that learning-by-exporting might be more properly characterized as ?learning about and exploiting new markets? rather than ?learning about new technologies...

  10. Ice table depth variability near small rocks at the Phoenix landing site, Mars: A pre-landing assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Mellon, Michael T.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2009-02-01

    We combine thermal simulations of ground ice stability near small rocks with extrapolations of the abundance of rocks at the Phoenix landing site based on HiRISE rock counts to estimate the degree of ice table depth variability within the 3.8 m 2 workspace that can be excavated during the mission. Detailed predictions of this kind are important both to test current ground-ice theory and to optimize soil investigations after landing. We find that Phoenix will very likely have access to at least one rock in the diameter range 5 cm to 1 m. Our simulations, which assume the ice to be in diffusive equilibrium with atmospheric water vapor, indicate that all rocks in this size range are associated with an annulus of deep ice-free soil. Ice table depth variability of 1-5 cm is very likely at the landing site due to the presence of small rocks. Further, there are scenarios in which Phoenix might exploit the presence of individual large rocks and/or the arrangement of small rocks to sample soils at depths >10 cm below the average depth predicted from orbit (˜4 cm). Scale analysis to constrain uncertainties in simulation results indicates that estimates of maximum depths may be somewhat conservative and that ice table depressions associated with individual rocks could be deeper and laterally more extended than indicated by formal predictions by mm to cm.

  11. Image exploitation for MISAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, N.; Edrich, M.; Saur, G.; Krüger, W.

    2007-04-01

    The miniature SAR-system MiSAR has been developed by EADS Germany for lightweight UAVs like the LUNASystem. MiSAR adds to these tactical UAV-systems the all-weather reconnaissance capability, which is missing until now. Unlike other SAR sensors, that produce large strip maps at update rates of several seconds, MiSAR generates sequences of SAR images with approximately 1 Hz frame rate. photo interpreters (PI) of tactical drones, now mainly experienced with visual interpretation, are not used to SARimages, especially not with SAR-image sequence characteristics. So they should be supported to improve their ability to carry out their task with a new, demanding sensor system. We have therefore analyzed and discussed with military PIs in which task MiSAR can be used and how the PIs can be supported by special algorithms. We developed image processing- and exploitation-algorithms for such SAR-image sequences. A main component is the generation of image sequence mosaics to get more oversight. This mosaicing has the advantage that also non straight /linear flight-paths and varying squint angles can be processed. Another component is a screening-component for manmade objects to mark regions of interest in the image sequences. We use a classification based approach, which can be easily adapted to new sensors and scenes. These algorithms are integrated into an image exploitation system to improve the image interpreters ability to get a better oversight, better orientation and helping them to detect relevant objects, especially considering long endurance reconnaissance missions.

  12. Learning Metasploit exploitation and development

    CERN Document Server

    Balapure, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    A practical, hands-on tutorial with step-by-step instructions. The book will follow a smooth and easy-to-follow tutorial approach, covering the essentials and then showing the readers how to write more sophisticated exploits.This book targets exploit developers, vulnerability analysts and researchers, network administrators, and ethical hackers looking to gain advanced knowledge in exploitation development and identifying vulnerabilities. The primary goal is to take readers wishing to get into more advanced exploitation discovery and reaching the next level.Prior experience exploiting basic st

  13. Limit of crustal drilling depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep drilling is becoming the direct and the most efficient means in exploiting deep mineral resources, facilitating to understanding the earthquake mechanism and performing other scientific researches on the Earth's crust. In order to understand the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust, we first conducted tests on granite samples with respect to the borehole deformation and stability under high temperature and high pressure using the triaxial servo-controlled rock testing system. Then the critical temperature-pressure coupling conditions that result in borehole instability are derived. Finally, based on the testing results obtained and the requirements for the threshold values of borehole deformations during deep drilling, the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust is formulated with ground temperature.

  14. Semantic-Aware Depth Super-Resolution in Outdoor Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Miaomiao; Salzmann, Mathieu; He, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    While depth sensors are becoming increasingly popular, their spatial resolution often remains limited. Depth super-resolution therefore emerged as a solution to this problem. Despite much progress, state-of-the-art techniques suffer from two drawbacks: (i) they rely on the assumption that intensity edges coincide with depth discontinuities, which, unfortunately, is only true in controlled environments; and (ii) they typically exploit the availability of high-resolution training depth maps, wh...

  15. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (˜1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  16. Exploitation of nutrient- and C-rich paleosols by deep rooting plants in Dutch drift- and coversands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocke, Martina; Kessler, Fabian; van Mourik, Jan; Jansen, Boris; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2015-04-01

    Plant roots are commonly assumed to be most abundant in topsoil, with strongly decreasing frequencies in underlying soil horizons with incrasing depth and almost absence of roots below the uppermost few dm due to unfavorable environmental conditions in terms of e.g. aeration, nutrient availability or water, that hamper root growth. It still remains unknown, to which extent roots might be able to exploit deeper parts of soils and underlying soil parent material as well as burried paleosols. The study site is located in SE Netherlands. Undisturbed oak forests developed about 200 years ago on stabilized driftsand, deposited on a plaggic Anthrosol after approximately 700 years of agricultural use. The soil profile, consisting of the recent initial Podzol in driftsand, overlying 1.1 m thick plaggic deposits that were established in a 0.5 m thick residual Podzol in coversand, was excavated in a pit of 2.3 m depth. Living and dead roots were counted throughout the profile on both, the vertical wall and horizontal levels. Additionally, soil or sediment samples free of visible root remains were collected in depth intervals between 0.05 m and 0.15 m from topsoil down to the coversand. A multi-proxy approach, including assessment of bulk elemental composition of soil, sediments and paleosol and molecular structure of organic matter therein, organic carbon contents, bulk density and pH was applied in order to comprehensively describe the varying environmental conditions within the soil profile and in transects from roots to root-free material. The burried agricultural soil revealed low density and high organic carbon contents compared to the coversand parent material, and especially in its lower part, high phosphorous contents. In contrast, the burried Podzol was characterized by completely different geochemical and physical properties, like increasing pH with depth and high iron and aluminium contents. In the recent initial Podzol, fine roots (≤ 2 mm), deriving from both

  17. Bayesian depth estimation from monocular natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Che-Chun; Cormack, Lawrence K; Bovik, Alan C

    2017-05-01

    Estimating an accurate and naturalistic dense depth map from a single monocular photographic image is a difficult problem. Nevertheless, human observers have little difficulty understanding the depth structure implied by photographs. Two-dimensional (2D) images of the real-world environment contain significant statistical information regarding the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the world that the vision system likely exploits to compute perceived depth, monocularly as well as binocularly. Toward understanding how this might be accomplished, we propose a Bayesian model of monocular depth computation that recovers detailed 3D scene structures by extracting reliable, robust, depth-sensitive statistical features from single natural images. These features are derived using well-accepted univariate natural scene statistics (NSS) models and recent bivariate/correlation NSS models that describe the relationships between 2D photographic images and their associated depth maps. This is accomplished by building a dictionary of canonical local depth patterns from which NSS features are extracted as prior information. The dictionary is used to create a multivariate Gaussian mixture (MGM) likelihood model that associates local image features with depth patterns. A simple Bayesian predictor is then used to form spatial depth estimates. The depth results produced by the model, despite its simplicity, correlate well with ground-truth depths measured by a current-generation terrestrial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) scanner. Such a strong form of statistical depth information could be used by the visual system when creating overall estimated depth maps incorporating stereopsis, accommodation, and other conditions. Indeed, even in isolation, the Bayesian predictor delivers depth estimates that are competitive with state-of-the-art "computer vision" methods that utilize highly engineered image features and sophisticated machine learning algorithms.

  18. Sensor and control for consistent seed drill coulter depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren; Nørremark, Michael; Green, Ole

    The even placement of seeds at the correct depth is crucial for achieving the optimum yield. The depth of drill coulters on state-of-the-art seeding machines is normally set manually by downforce springs or weights will therefore react to different soil resistances. A prototype seeder with one...... drill coulter was constructed and tested in a rotational soil bin. The research concluded a potential of minimizing the low frequent drill coulter depth variations and a solution for providing an even coulter depth in soil....

  19. Effective depth of soil compaction : [brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) spends approximately 10 percent of : its improvement project budget on embankment construction each year. A critical aspect of : embankment construction is stability. It is needed to provide an acce...

  20. Commercial sexual exploitation of children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mauricio Rojas Betancur; Raquel Mendez Villamizar; Diana Lucía Moreno

    2012-01-01

      We study the sexual exploitation of children contributing to the understanding of risk and situations favouring the entry and permanence of children and adolescents from the reconstruction of the...

  1. Deep-C Drilling: Carbon Sequestration at Depth under Vine Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Allister; Mueller, Karin; Clothier, Brent; Deurer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Management practices designed to increase carbon sequestration via perennial tree crops, are potential tools to mitigate the consequences of climate change. Changes in orchard management could enable growers to meet eco-verification market demands for products with a low carbon footprint, and potentially exploit the emerging business opportunity in carbon storage, whilst enhancing the delivery of ecosystem services that depend on soil carbon stocks. However, there is no standard methodology to verify any potential claims of carbon storage by perennial vine crops. We developed a robust methodology to quantify carbon storage in kiwifruit orchards. Soil carbon stocks (SCS) were determined in six depth increments to 1 m depth in two adjacent kiwifruit blocks, which had been established 10 ('young') and 25 ('old') years earlier. We used a 'space-for-time' analysis. Our key results were: • The 'young' and 'old' kiwifruit block stored about 139 and 145 t C/ha to 1 m depth. Between 80-90% of the SCS were stored in the top 0.5 m, and 89-95% in the top 0.7 m. • There was no significant difference between the SCS in row and alley to a depth of 0.5 m. • A CV of 5-15% indicates that 4-10 cores are needed for 80% confidence in the estimated SCS. • We recommend separating each core into the depths 0-0.1, 0.1-0.3, 0.3-0.5 and 0.5-1 m to allow the assessment of SCS dynamics. • We detected a weak spatial pattern of the SCS only for the 'old' kiwifruit block with a range of about 3 m. A sampling bay along a vine-row should have a maximum length of 3 m. We then assessed SCS in over 60 kiwifruit orchards throughout New Zealand. They stored on average 174.9 ± 3 t C ha-1 to 1 m depth. On average, 51% of the SCS down to 1 m depth were stored in the top 0.3 m, which is the standard depth according to the Kyoto protocol. About 72% of the SCS to 1 m depth were captured when increasing the sampling depth to 0.5 m. These results underscore the necessity to analyze SCS in an orchard

  2. The interplay between rainfall infiltration depth, rooting depth and water table depth in regulating Amazon evapotranspiration (ET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Fan, Ying; Dominguez, Francina

    2017-04-01

    Plants link the subsurface to the atmosphere via water and carbon fluxes and are therefore a key player in climate. The Amazon, one of Earth's largest ecosystems, is an important climate regulator. As a large source of evapotranspiration, it has significant influence on regional and remote precipitation dynamics. For its equatorial position, it impacts significantly the global climate engine. The Amazon receives abundant annual rainfall but parts of it experience a multi-month dry season. Here we elucidate the interplay among three hydrological depths: precipitation infiltration depth, root water uptake-depth, and the water table depth in regulating dry-season ET, using inverse modeling based on observed productivity, ERA Interim reanalysis atmosphere, and a novel integrated soil-surface-groundwater model with dynamic root uptake to meet the transpiration demand. We perform high-resolution ( 1km) multi-year simulations over the region, with shallow soil, deep soil, with and without groundwater, with and without dynamic rooting depth; attempting to tease out these components. The results demonstrate the strong interactions among the three depths and what each factor does in regulating dry season ET, shedding light on how future global change may preferentially impact Amazon ecosystem functioning.

  3. Determinación de nitrógeno inorgánico y fosfatos a distintas profundidades de suelo bajo pilas de abonos Determination of inorganic nitrogen and phosphates at different soil depths beneath manure piles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Luis Ferrari

    2012-12-01

    meses de invierno.In the Andean - Patagonian region, nutrient supply for different crops is frequently made using wood chips mixed with manure. These materials are accumulated in piles of 1.5 - 2 m height. As the piles remain for a period of time outdoors, a partial composting may occur, which would be beneficial. Composting is a biooxidative process, involving an organic substrate, a thermophilic phase that must be reached (55°C and a maturity stage. If the manure piles remain outdoors, nutrients can also be transported by water and lost from the soil through percolation (particulary during winter months of higher precipitations. With the objective of studying if extractable phosphorus in NaHCO3 0.5M (P-Ol of phosphorus Olsen and inorganic nitrogen (Nin;ammonium plus nitrates move beneath the piles of manure, composites soil samples were taken from three blocks at different depths in a farm near the town of El Bolsón. The relationship between P-Ol (agronomic threshold and extractable P in 0.01 M CaCl2 (environmental threshold was also studied. Manure temperatures were taken in different seasons. Nin showed a high data dispersion and excessively high mean values up to the 200 cm depth. Average values (of three blocks found for P exceeded the threshold limit of 60 mg kg-1 P-Ol only on the first sampling date in the 0-20cm depth, although individual data for each block reached 52 mg kg-1 in the 40-60 cm depth. A statistically significant linear regression between P-Ol and P-CaCl2 in soils was obtained, and a threshold near 50/60 mg kg-1, similar to the values reported in the literature. High values for both parameters were found in manures. It is advisable to protect piles of manure from rainfall in winter months.

  4. Geotechnology to determine the depth of active zone in expansive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The active zone is the region of soil near the surface in which the water content varies due to precipitation and evapo-transpiration. Even though the soil may have the potential to shrink and swell below the depth of active zone, volume changes will not take place because the water content of the soil is constant. Because ...

  5. Changes of soil organic matter and microbial activity in irrigated and non irrigated olive groves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavvadias, Victor; Papadopoulou, Maria; Theocharopoulos, Sideris; Vavoulidou, Evagelia; Doula, Maria; Reppas, Spiros

    2014-05-01

    rhizosphere and the favorable soil moisture conditions under tree canopy on soil microbial activities. TOC, BR and MB-C values were considerably lower in soil depth of 10-40cm compared with 0-10 cm in both irrigated and rainfed soil parcels. Moreover BR and MB-C was higher in irrigated soil parcels compared with rainfed ones suggesting that the periodic irrigation significantly enhances the soil microbial activity. There were no considerable differences in TOC. For this the TOC and potential activity of microbial community can contribute in the soil nutrient and irrigation management guidelines in order to exploit the utilization of productive soils in the region under studied.

  6. Exploitation et obligation de travailler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Étienne Vandamme

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cet article défend une définition de l’exploitation, restreinte aux relations de travail, en tentant d’une part d’expliciter une certaine compréhension de sens commun du concept (rémunération inéquitable en fonction du travail presté, et d’autre part d’échapper aux difficultés qui ont affecté la définition marxiste traditionnelle de l’exploitation comme extorsion de la plus-value (dans ses diverses variantes. Il explore ainsi le lien entre l’exploitation et l’obligation matérielle de travailler pour subvenir à ses besoins fondamentaux. Après avoir mis en garde contre les politiques d’activation des chômeurs, il conclut que l’exploitation est un phénomène contre lequel on peut lutter à l’aide de mécanismes relativement simples, même dans les sociétés capitalistes. Il rappelle toutefois que cela ne suffit pas à réaliser la justice sociale, resituant l’exploitation parmi d’autres enjeux fondamentaux pour une philosophie politique égalitariste

  7. Sequential Ambidexterity in Practice : A Longitudinal study on shifts from exploration to exploitation and vice versa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Matthias; Faems, Dries; Visscher, Klaasjan; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.

    2017-01-01

    The poster shows highlights of a study aimed at providing in-depth insights into the dynamics of a growing organization’s exploration and exploitation levels, demonstrating how structural and individual factors change an organization’s exploration and exploitation over time. A fast-growing research

  8. Exploitation of bioremediation in the environment protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptáková

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Soils and waters contaminated with toxic metals pose a major environmental problem that needs an effective and affordable technological solution. Many areas remain contaminated with no remediation in sight because it is too expensive to clean them up with available technologies. Bioremediation may provide an economically viable solution for remediation of some of these sites. The bioremediation is an application of the biological treatment to the cleanup of hazardous chemicals and is an example of the environmental biotechnology. The aim of this paper is to give a theoretical and practical view concerning the possibility of the bioremediation exploitation in the environment protection. This paper includes some results of the bioremediation of the acid mine drainage by sulphate-reducing bacteria.

  9. “METAMORPHOSIS OF INHABITED SPACE” ACCORDING TO A NEW ECONOMIC ACTIVITY: THE EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION OF ROCKS ORMANENTAIS SOIL IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF BARRA DE SÃO FRANCISCO - NORTH OF ESPÍRITO SANTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Castro Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The northwestern state of Espírito Santo has experienced a ‘boom’ economic driven by mining activities related to the exploitation of ornamental rocks, granite being primarily responsible for this whole dynamic. The lands of the region, in particular the urban areas of the municipality of Barra de São Francisco, has been the subject of strong speculation due to increasing investments in the sector of ornamental rocks. This sector has changed the dynamics of the city francisquense, formerly based on agricultural activities, they had coffee in conilon the mainstay of its economy, as well as the (re configuration space of the city as a whole. The purpose of the study is presented in evidence and clues pointing to think about the growth of cities rationally use and occupation of urban areas and neighborhoods, and with the planned management of policies that promote the participation of stakeholders in identifying conflicts. These policies must be compatible with the perspectives involved, seeking to stimulate activities economically viable and to keep an ordering in the appropriation of the landscape.

  10. Depth Edge Filtering Using Parameterized Structured Light Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ziqi; Bae, Seho; Yi, Juneho

    2017-04-03

    This research features parameterized depth edge detection using structured light imaging that exploits a single color stripes pattern and an associated binary stripes pattern. By parameterized depth edge detection, we refer to the detection of all depth edges in a given range of distances with depth difference greater or equal to a specific value. While previous research has not properly dealt with shadow regions, which result in double edges, we effectively remove shadow regions using statistical learning through effective identification of color stripes in the structured light images. We also provide a much simpler control of involved parameters. We have compared the depth edge filtering performance of our method with that of the state-of-the-art method and depth edge detection from the Kinect depth map. Experimental results clearly show that our method finds the desired depth edges most correctly while the other methods cannot.

  11. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed

  12. Teotihuacan, tepeapulco, and obsidian exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, T H

    1978-06-16

    Current cultural ecological models of the development of civilization in central Mexico emphasize the role of subsistence production techniques and organization. The recent use of established and productive archeological surface survey techniques along natural corridors of communication between favorable niches for cultural development within the Central Mexican symbiotic region resulted in the location of sites that indicate an early development of a decentralized resource exploitation, manufacturing, and exchange network. The association of the development of this system with Teotihuacán indicates the importance such nonsubsistence production and exchange had in the evolution of this first central Mexican civilization. The later expansion of Teotihuacán into more distant areas of Mesoamerica was based on this resource exploitation model. Later civilizations centered at Tula and Tenochtitlán also used such a model in their expansion.

  13. Dark matters: exploitation as cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Partha

    2012-04-21

    The empirical literature on human cooperation contains studies of communitarian institutions that govern the provision of public goods and management of common property resources in poor countries. Scholars studying those institutions have frequently used the Prisoners' Dilemma game as their theoretical tool-kit. But neither the provision of local public goods nor the management of local common property resources involves the Prisoners' Dilemma. That has implications for our reading of communitarian institutions. By applying a fundamental result in the theory of repeated games to a model of local common property resources, it is shown that communitarian institutions can harbour exploitation of fellow members, something that would not be possible in societies where cooperation amounts to overcoming the Prisoners' Dilemma. The conclusion we should draw is that exploitation can masquerade as cooperation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Network exploitation using WAMI tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimey, Ray; Record, Jim; Keefe, Dan; Kennedy, Levi; Cramer, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Creating and exploiting network models from wide area motion imagery (WAMI) is an important task for intelligence analysis. Tracks of entities observed moving in the WAMI sensor data are extracted, then large numbers of tracks are studied over long time intervals to determine specific locations that are visited (e.g., buildings in an urban environment), what locations are related to other locations, and the function of each location. This paper describes several parts of the network detection/exploitation problem, and summarizes a solution technique for each: (a) Detecting nodes; (b) Detecting links between known nodes; (c) Node attributes to characterize a node; (d) Link attributes to characterize each link; (e) Link structure inferred from node attributes and vice versa; and (f) Decomposing a detected network into smaller networks. Experimental results are presented for each solution technique, and those are used to discuss issues for each problem part and its solution technique.

  15. Emergência de plantas da família Convolvulaceae influenciada pela profundidade da semente no solo e cobertura com palha de cana-de-açúcar Emergence of Convolvulaceae family species influenced by sowing depth in the soil and sugarcane straw cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D.S Labonia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Em casa de vegetação, cinco experimentos foram desenvolvidos com o objetivo de avaliar a influência da profundidade de semeadura e da condição de cobertura do solo na emergência de plântulas de cinco espécies da família Convolvulaceae (Ipomoea hederifolia, I. nil, I. quamoclit, I. triloba e Merremia cissoides. Foi utilizada combinação fatorial entre quatro profundidades de semeadura (0, 20, 40 e 80 mm e duas condições de solo (exposto ou coberto com palha de cana-de-açúcar em quantidade proporcional a 10 t ha-1, com delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso e quatro repetições. Foi realizada contagem diária do número de plântulas emersas e, ao final dos experimentos, calculou-se o índice de velocidade de emergência. Quanto à profundidade de semeadura no solo, maior emergência foi observada para as sementes que foram dispostas na superfície, tanto na presença quanto na ausência de palha. Considerando-se I. hederifolia e I. nil, não foi observado efeito da cobertura do solo, nem mesmo interação de profundidade e cobertura, sobre a emergência das espécies. Para I. quamoclit, observaram-se efeitos isolados da cobertura do solo e da profundidade de alocação das sementes, que indicaram maior adaptação da espécie para emergir em solo sem palhada superficial. Também para as espécies I. triloba e M. cissoides, a emergência foi inferior nas parcelas com palha distribuída na superfície do solo, quando comparadas àquelas sem palha, e, ainda, a presença de palha reduziu a velocidade de emergência e estabelecimento das plântulas.Five trials were developed under greenhouse conditions aiming to evaluate the influence of sowing depth and soil cover condition on seedling emergence of five Convolvulaceae family species (Ipomoea hederifolia, I. nil, I. quamoclit, I. triloba and Merremia cissoides. A factorial scheme was used for four sowing depths (0, 20, 40 and 80 mm and two soil conditions (exposed or covered with

  16. Estimation of soil moisture and its effect on soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The soil temperatures at 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.50 m depths and soil moisture at 0.05 and 0.10 m are measured using the hydrometeorological data acquisition system installed at the observational site. For soil water contents ranging between 11 and 42% in the soil layer of depth 0.05–0.10 m, the mean values of the ...

  17. Robust Depth-Based Person Re-Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ancong; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2017-06-01

    Person re-identification (re-id) aims to match people across non-overlapping camera views. So far the RGB-based appearance is widely used in most existing works. However, when people appeared in extreme illumination or changed clothes, the RGB appearance-based re-id methods tended to fail. To overcome this problem, we propose to exploit depth information to provide more invariant body shape and skeleton information regardless of illumination and color change. More specifically, we exploit depth voxel covariance descriptor and further propose a locally rotation invariant depth shape descriptor called Eigen-depth feature to describe pedestrian body shape. We prove that the distance between any two covariance matrices on the Riemannian manifold is equivalent to the Euclidean distance between the corresponding Eigen-depth features. Furthermore, we propose a kernelized implicit feature transfer scheme to estimate Eigen-depth feature implicitly from RGB image when depth information is not available. We find that combining the estimated depth features with RGB-based appearance features can sometimes help to better reduce visual ambiguities of appearance features caused by illumination and similar clothes. The effectiveness of our models was validated on publicly available depth pedestrian datasets as compared to related methods for re-id.

  18. Seed drill depth control system for precision seeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    An adequate and uniform seeding depth is crucial for the homogeneous development of a crop, as it affects time of emergence and germination rate. The considerable depth variations observed during seeding operations - even for modern seed drills - are mainly caused by variability in soil resistance...... acting on the drill coulters, which generates unwanted vibrations and, consequently, a non-uniform seed placement. Therefore, a proof-of-concept dynamic coulter depth control system for a low-cost seed drill was developed and studied in a field experiment. The performance of the active control system...... was evaluated for the working speeds of 4, 8 and 12 km h−1, by testing uniformity and accuracy of the coulter depth in relation to the target depth of −30 mm. The evaluation was based on coulter depth measurements, obtained by coulter position sensors combined with ultrasonic soil surface sensors. Mean coulter...

  19. Força de tração e volume de solo mobilizado por haste sulcadora em semeadura direta sobre campo nativo, em função do teor de água no solo, profundidade e velocidade de operação Draft and soil loosening by knife type coulter related to soil moisture and planter's working speed and depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla T. C. Cepik

    2005-08-01

    's coulters. The specific aims of the present work are to determine the knowledge of coulter draft requirements and the amount of displaced soil and tractor slippage on a Paleudult soil at different soil moisture condition, in direct planting on natural pastures chemically killed. Draft requirements increased with an increase in working depth. The increase of the ground speed had no effect on draft when soil was dry or moist; it increased however, on friable soil. Soil displacement was always higher with dry soil and at 12 cm working depth. When soil was friable or dry, the front wheels traction was needed to keep tractor slippage within acceptable levels.

  20. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE BY UN PEACEKEEPERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allaiac

    The sexual exploitation of children by peacekeepers is particularly insidious. Educational interventions and training initiatives to bring about behaviour change to address sexual exploitation and abuse .... its own peacekeeping personnel are engaging in acts of sexual exploitation and abuse, including such crimes as rape.

  1. The exploitation argument against commercial surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2003-04-01

    This paper discusses the exploitation argument against commercial surrogacy: the claim that commercial surrogacy is morally objectionable because it is exploitative. The following questions are addressed. First, what exactly does the exploitation argument amount to? Second, is commercial surrogacy in fact exploitative? Third, if it were exploitative, would this provide a sufficient reason to prohibit (or otherwise legislatively discourage) it? The focus throughout is on the exploitation of paid surrogates, although it is noted that other parties (e.g. 'commissioning parents') may also be the victims of exploitation. It is argued that there are good reasons for believing that commercial surrogacy is often exploitative. However, even if we accept this, the exploitation argument for prohibiting (or otherwise legislatively discouraging) commercial surrogacy remains quite weak. One reason for this is that prohibition may well 'backfire' and lead to potential surrogates having to do other things that are more exploitative and/or more harmful than paid surrogacy. It is concluded therefore that those who oppose exploitation should (rather than attempting to stop particular practices like commercial surrogacy) concentrate on: (a) improving the conditions under which paid surrogates 'work'; and (b) changing the background conditions (in particular, the unequal distribution of power and wealth) which generate exploitative relationships.

  2. Profundidade de localização do herbicida imazetapir + imazapique no solo sobre a fitotoxicidade em de plantas de arroz não resistente Depth of placement of the herbicide imazethapyr + imazapic in soil profile on non-tolerant rice injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Da Cas Bundt

    2010-09-01

    depths along the profile. This positioning can be a in-depth selectivity factor and partially explain the different results found in literature about carryover of imidazolines. To understand this effect, this study had the objective of to evaluate the effect of the positioning of the mixture of imazethapyr and imazapic (75g ai L-1 and 25g ai L-1 on the injury to non-resistant rice crop. Two experiments were carried out in soil with 15% clay and 1.2% organic matter in a greenhouse at the Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil. Experiment I consisted of a preliminary study to verify the location depth of the herbicide in the soil profile that causes injury to rice non-tolerant rice, and the herbicides has been allocated at depths of 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 e 70cm. Experiment II also consisted in the allocation of herbicide at depths in the soil profile of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18cm. The variables were visual plant injury, plant shoot dry weight and plant height. The formulated mixture of imazethapyr + imazapic located near the soil surface cause injury to non resistant rice plants but when allocated at depths greater than 20cm of the soil surface does not affect the development of non-resistant rice.

  3. Modeled Daily Thaw Depth and Frozen Ground Depth, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains modeled daily thaw depth and freezing depth for the Arctic terrestrial drainage basin. Thaw and freezing depths were calculated over the study...

  4. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle–ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10−16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability–depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350–500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic–plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no ‘jump’ in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2–6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  5. Why bother about depth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Obrador, Biel; Christensen, Jesper Philip

    We present results from a newly developed method to determine depth specific rates of GPP, NEP and R using frequent automated profiles of DO and temperature. Metabolic rate calculations were made for three lakes of different trophic status using a diel DO methodology that integrates rates across...

  6. The Exploitation of Evolving Resources

    CERN Document Server

    McGlade, Jacqueline; Law, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The impact of man on the biosphere is profound. Quite apart from our capacity to destroy natural ecosystems and to drive species to extinction, we mould the evolution of the survivors by the selection pressures we apply to them. This has implications for the continued health of our natural biological resources and for the way in which we seek to optimise yield from those resources. Of these biological resources, fish stocks are particularly important to mankind as a source of protein. On a global basis, fish stocks provide the major source of protein for human consumption from natural ecosystems, amounting to some seventy million tonnes in 1970. Although fisheries management has been extensively developed over the last century, it has not hitherto considered the evolutionary consequences of fishing activity. While this omission may not have been serious in the past, the ever increasing intensity of exploitation and the deteriorating health of fish stocks has generated an urgent need for a better understanding...

  7. NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. A.; Waltman, S. W.; Geng, X.; James, D.; Hernandez, L.

    2009-05-01

    NOAM-SOIL is being created by combining the CONUS-SOIL database with pedon data and soil geographic data coverages from Canada and Mexico. Completion of the in-progress NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) database will provide complete North America coverage comparable to CONUS. Canadian pedons, which number more than 500, have been painstakingly transcribed to a common format, from hardcopy, and key- entered. These data, along with map unit polygons from the 1:1,000,000 Soil Landscapes of Canada, will be used to create the required spatial data coverages. The Mexico data utilizes the INEGI 1:1,000,000 scale soil map that was digitized by U. S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center in the mid 1990's plus about 20,000 pedons. The pedon data were published on the reverse side of the paper 1:250,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico and key entered by USDA and georeferenced by Penn State to develop an attribute database that can be linked to the 1:1,000,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico based on taxonomic information and geographic proximity. The essential properties that will be included in the NOAM-SOIL data base are: layer thickness (depth to bedrock or reported soil depth); available water capacity; sand, silt, clay; rock fragment volume; and bulk density. For quality assurance purposes, Canadian and Mexican soil scientists will provide peer review of the work. The NOAM-SOIL project will provide a standard reference dataset of soil properties for use at 1km resolution by NACP modelers for all of North America. All data resources, including metadata and selected raw data, will be provided through the Penn State web site: Soil Information for Environmental Modeling and Ecosystem Management (www.soilinfo.psu.edu). Progress on database completion is reported.

  8. Using "residual depths" to monitor pool depths independently of discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Lisle

    1987-01-01

    As vital components of habitat for stream fishes, pools are often monitored to follow the effects of enhancement projects and natural stream processes. Variations of water depth with discharge, however, can complicate monitoring changes in the depth and volume of pools. To subtract the effect of discharge on depth in pools, residual depths can be measured. Residual...

  9. The Gaia scientific exploitation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.

    2015-05-01

    On July 2014 the Gaia satellite, placed at L2 since January 2014, finished their commissioning phase and started collecting high accurate scientific data. New and more realistic estimations of the astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic accuracy expected after five years mission operation (2014-2019) have been recently published in the Gaia Science Performance Web page. Here we present the coordination efforts and the activities being conducted through the two GREAT (Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training) European Networks, the GREAT-ESF, a programme supported by the European Science Foundation (2010-2015), and the GREAT-ITN network, from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (2011-2015). The main research theme of these networks is to unravel the origin and history of our home galaxy. Emphasis is placed on the research projects being conducted by the Spanish Researchers through these networks, well coordinated by the Red Española de Explotación Científica de Gaia (REG network, with more than 140 participants). Members of the REG play an important role on the collection of complementary spectroscopic data from ground based telescopes, on the development of new tools for an optimal scientific exploitation of Gaia data and on the preparation task to create the Gaia archive.

  10. Topsoil Depth Effects on Crop Yields as Affected by Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott; Cruse, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Topsoil (A-horizon) depth is positively correlated with crop productivity; crop roots and available nutrients are concentrated in this layer; topsoil is critical for nutrient retention and water holding capacity. Its loss or reduction can be considered an irreversible impact of soil erosion. Climatic factors such as precipitation and temperature extremes that impose production stress further complicate the relationship between soil erosion and crop productivity. The primary research objective was to determine the effects of soil erosion on corn and soybean yields of loess and till-derived soils in the rain-fed farming region of Iowa. Data collection took place from 2007 to 2012 at seven farm sites located in different major soil regions. Collection consisted of 40 to 50 randomly selected georeferenced soil probe locations across varying erosion classes in well drained landscape positions. Soil probes were done to a minimum depth of 100 cm and soil organic carbon samples were obtained in the top 10 cm. Crop yields were determined utilizing georeferenced harvest maps from yield monitoring devices and cross referenced with georeferenced field data points. Data analysis targeted relationships between crop yields versus soil organic carbon contents (SOC) and crop yields versus topsoil depths (TSD). The variation of yield and growing season rainfall across multiple years were also evaluated to provide an indication of soil resiliency associated with topsoil depth and soil organic carbon levels across varying climatic conditions. Results varied between sites but generally indicated a greater yield potential at thicker TSD's and higher SOC concentrations; an annual variation in yield response as a function of precipitation amount during the growing season; largest yield responses to both TSD and SOC occurred in the driest study year (2012); and little to no significant yield responses to TSD occurred during the wettest study year (2010). These results were not

  11. Soil Quality Indices for Evaluating Smallholder Agricultural Land Uses in Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aweke M. Gelaw

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and increasing resource demands in Ethiopia are stressing and degrading agricultural landscapes. Most Ethiopian soils are already exhausted by several decades of over exploitation and mismanagement. Since many agricultural sustainability issues are related to soil quality, its assessment is very important. We determined integrated soil quality indices (SQI within the surface 0–15 cm depth increment for three agricultural land uses: rain fed cultivation (RF; agroforestry (AF and irrigated crop production (IR. Each land use was replicated five times within a semi-arid watershed in eastern Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Using the framework suggested by Karlen and Stott (1994; four soil functions regarding soil’s ability to: (1 accommodate water entry (WE; (2 facilitate water movement and availability (WMA; (3 resist degradation (RD; and (4 supply nutrients for plant growth (PNS were estimated for each land use. The result revealed that AF affected all soil quality functions positively more than the other land uses. Furthermore, the four soil quality functions were integrated into an overall SQI; and the values for the three land uses were in the order: 0.58 (AF > 0.51 (IR > 0.47 (RF. The dominant soil properties influencing the integrated SQI values were soil organic carbon (26.4%; water stable aggregation (20.0%; total porosity (16.0%; total nitrogen (11.2%; microbial biomass carbon (6.4%; and cation exchange capacity (6.4%. Collectively, those six indicators accounted for more than 80% of the overall SQI values.

  12. Estimation of soil moisture and its effect on soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the earth's climate system. Regression model for estimation of soil moisture at various depths has been developed using the amount of moisture near the surface layer. The estimated values of soil moisture are tested with the measured moisture values and it is found that the ...

  13. Relations between soil factors and herbage yields of natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Cation exchange capacity; Correlation matrix; Nitrogen supplies; Root mass; Root measurements; Soil acidity; Soil variables; Soil water content; Soil water measurements; Yield measurements; nitrogen supply; ph; herbage yield; grassland; soils; productivity; soil depth; dry matter yield; grasses; water content; n; ...

  14. Effect of Irrigation Levels on Dissolved Organic Carbon Soil Distribution and the Depth Mobility of Chlorpyrifos Efecto de Niveles de Riego sobre la Distribución de Carbono Orgánico Disuelto en el Suelo y La Mobility en Profundidad de Clorpirifos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Junod

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Water flows provided by irrigation systems may be associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC content in the soil solution and may modify the mobility of pesticides, such as chlorpyrifos (CHP. These compounds were analyzed under field conditions, evaluating their distribution in the soil profile under excessive irrigation in a Humic Haploxerand soil. The trial was carried out in soil columns located under the canopy of apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. in an orchard located in the Bío-Bío Region, Chile. The insecticide CHP was applied 120 g hL-1, and later the natural run off was collected from the foliage to the columns. Surface irrigation was used as a control, the equivalent to 4 L h-1 weekly, plus two treatments over the columns of 6 and 8 L h-1 per pulse, respectively. Samples were obtained at three column depths: 0-5, 5-20 and 20-30 cm. The results showed that in spite of the fact there was no interaction between depth and irrigation, a greater concentration of CHP was observed in the samples with greater water flow, with significant differences between the treatments at a depth of 20-30 cm, which suggests some level of influence on vertical mobility. DOC shows stratification with greater concentrations at the surface and lower concentrations at depth, with significant differences between the superficial stratum (0-5 cm and the lower strata (5-20, 20-30 cm. These results are discussed in relation to explaining the movement of CHP in the soil profile.Los flujos de agua aportados por los sistemas de riego pueden estar asociados al contenido de carbono orgánico disuelto (DOC en la solución del suelo y modificar la movilidad de pesticidas como el clorpirifos (CHP. Se analizan estos compuestos bajo condiciones de campo, evaluando su distribución en el perfil de suelo ante un exceso de riego en un suelo Humic Haploxerands. El ensayo se desarrolló en columnas de suelo ubicadas bajo la canopia de un huerto de manzanos (Malus domestica

  15. Produção e qualidade de melão amarelo influenciado por coberturas do solo e lâminas de irrigação no período chuvoso Yield and quality of yellow melon influenced by soil coverages and irrigation depth during rainfall period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Tôrres Câmara

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available O plantio de melão no período chuvoso tem sido um dos grandes desafios para os produtores da região do Nordeste brasileiro devido a problemas fitossanitários. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar os efeitos de cobertura do solo e de lâminas de irrigação na produção e na qualidade do melão amarelo híbrido "Goldex", no período chuvoso. O experimento foi desenvolvido na Fazenda Santa Júlia Agrocomercial Exportadora de Frutos Tropicais Ltda, no município de Mossoró-RN, no período de abril a julho de 2003. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos completos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos resultaram da combinação de cinco tipos de coberturas do solo (solo descoberto e coberturas do solo com plástico preto, prateado, amarelo e marrom com três lâminas de irrigação (100%, 86% e 72% da lâmina padrão, esta equivalente a 238,4mm por ciclo. As características avaliadas foram número, massa média e produtividade de frutos comercializáveis (mercados interno e externo, refugos e totais, firmeza e espessura de polpa, relação de formato e teor de sólidos solúveis totais. Houve interação significativa entre os tipos de coberturas do solo e as lâminas de irrigação para a produtividade total. A maior produtividade de frutos comercializáveis e de conteúdo de sólidos solúveis totais foi registrada nas coberturas do solo com plástico. Os números de frutos comercializáveis, refugos e totais, bem como a produtividade de frutos comercializáveis e refugos, não foram afetados significativamente pelas lâminas de irrigação.Growing a melon crop during the rainfall period has been a great challenge for producers from the north eastern Brazil due to crop sanitary problems. This work was aimed at evaluating the effects of soil coverages and irrigation depth on yield and quality of yellow melon (hybrid Goldex during the rainfall period. The experiment was carried out at Fazenda Santa Júlia Agro

  16. Packaging of Sin Goods - Commitment or Exploitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafziger, Julia

    to such self-control problems, and possibly exploit them, by offering different package sizes. In a competitive market, either one or three (small, medium and large) packages are offered. In contrast to common intuition, the large, and not the small package is a commitment device. The latter serves to exploit...

  17. The exploitation of Gestalt principles by magicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Anthony S

    2010-01-01

    Magicians exploit a host of psychological principles in deceiving their audiences. Psychologists have recently attempted to pinpoint the most common psychological tendencies exploited by magicians. This paper highlights two co-occurring principles that appear to be the basis for many popular magic tricks: accidental alignment and good continuation.

  18. Exploration, Exploitation, and Organizational Coordination Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Popadiuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical relationship among exploration, exploitation, and organizational coordination mechanisms, classified as the centralization of decision-making, formalization, and connectedness. In order to analyze the findings of this survey, we used two techniques: Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Partial Least Squares Path Modeling (PLS-PM. Our analysis was supported by 249 answers from managers of companies located in Brazil (convenience sampling. Contrary to expectations, centralization and exploitation were negatively associated. Our data supports the research hypothesis that formalization is positively associated with exploitation. Although the relationship between formalization and exploration were significant, the result is contrary to the research hypothesis that we made. The relationships among connectedness and exploitation, and connectedness and exploration were both positive and significant. This relationship means that the more connectedness increases, the higher the likelihood of exploitation and exploration.

  19. Profundidade de semeadura e crescimento inicial de espécies forrageiras utilizadas para cobertura do solo Depth of sowing and initial growth of forage species used for soil coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pereira Pacheco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O uso do consórcio entre plantas de cobertura e culturas anuais, no Cerrado, tem sido prática cada vez mais difundida, pela possibilidade de implantação das forrageiras durante o desenvolvimento das culturas anuais, através da diferença de profundidade e sistema de semeadura. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho avaliar a emergência e algumas características agronômicas de quatro espécies de plantas de cobertura, em diferentes profundidades, visando ao seu emprego na consorciação e sobressemeadura em culturas anuais. O experimento foi conduzido em casa-de-vegetação, no delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, em arranjo fatorial 4 x 7, composto pelas plantas de cobertura Brachiaria brizantha, B. decumbens, B. ruziziensis e Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia, e por seis profundidades de semeadura e um sistema de cobertura de sementes (0 sem cobertura, 0 com cobertura, 1, 4, 8, 10 e 15 cm. As sementes foram semeadas em vasos e as plantas cultivadas por 40 dias. Avaliou-se o índice e o tempo de emergência, a altura de plantas, a fitomassa verde e seca da parte aérea, a área foliar, a fitomassa seca radicular e a densidade de comprimento radicular. O maior desenvolvimento das plantas estudadas foi detectado nas semeaduras até 1 cm de profundidade. O P. maximum não apresentou aptidão para uso em consórcio com culturas anuais.Não se recomenda a semeadura das plantas de cobertura a partir de 10 cm.The use of the consortium between cover crops and annual crops in the Cerrado, is an increasingly widespread practice, because of the possibility of deployment of cover crops during the development of annual crops by the difference in depth and seeding system. The objective was to evaluate the emergency and some agronomic characteristics of four species of cover crops at different seeding depths, to use them in consortium and oversown in annual crops. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, and the experimental design of randomized blocks

  20. Depth-dependent influence of different land-use systems on bacterial biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuradge, Brent J; Oelbermann, Maren; Neufeld, Josh D

    2017-02-01

    Despite progress in understanding microbial biogeography of surface soils, few studies have investigated depth-dependent distributions of terrestrial microorganisms in subsoils. We leveraged high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes obtained from soils collected from the RARE: Charitable Research Reserve (Cambridge, ON, Canada) to assess the influence of depth on bacterial communities across various land-use types. Although bacterial communities were strongly influenced by depth across all sites, the magnitude of this influence was variable and demonstrated that land-use attributes also played a significant role in shaping soil bacterial communities. Soil pH exhibited a large gradient across samples and strongly influenced shifts in bacterial communities with depth and across different land-use systems, especially considering that physicochemical conditions showed generally consistent trends with depth. We observed significant (p ≤ 0.001) and strongly correlated taxa with depth and pH, with a strong predominance of positively depth-correlated OTUs without cultured representatives. These findings highlight the importance of depth in soil biogeographical surveys and that subsurface soils harbour understudied bacterial members with potentially unique and important functions in deeper soil horizons that remain to be characterized. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  2. Depth inpainting by tensor voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Mandar; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram N

    2013-06-01

    Depth maps captured by range scanning devices or by using optical cameras often suffer from missing regions due to occlusions, reflectivity, limited scanning area, sensor imperfections, etc. In this paper, we propose a fast and reliable algorithm for depth map inpainting using the tensor voting (TV) framework. For less complex missing regions, local edge and depth information is utilized for synthesizing missing values. The depth variations are modeled by local planes using 3D TV, and missing values are estimated using plane equations. For large and complex missing regions, we collect and evaluate depth estimates from self-similar (training) datasets. We align the depth maps of the training set with the target (defective) depth map and evaluate the goodness of depth estimates among candidate values using 3D TV. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches on real as well as synthetic data.

  3. Effect of growing media, sowing depth, and hot water treatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To optimize seedling production for reforestation of degraded dryland with A. senegal seeds, a study was conducted on the effect of boiled water treatment, growing media, sowing depth on seed germination and seedling growth of A. senegal. Three different growing media (farm soil, forest soil and sand soil), boiled water ...

  4. CRECIMIENTO Y DESARROLLO DE LA LIMA ÁCIDA (Citrus latifolia Tanaka, cv. Tahití, EN SUELOS CON LIMITACIONES POR PROFUNDIDAD EFECTIVA, EN UN BOSQUE SECO TROPICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF LIME (Citrus latifolia Tanaka, cv. Tahiti, IN SOILS WITH LIMITATIONS BY EFFECTIVE DEPTH IN A TROPICAL DRY FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fernando Ochoa Agudelo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. Se evaluó la evolución de la biomasa, la distribución diferencial de ésta entre los órganos y algunos parámetros del crecimiento y desarrollo, de la lima ácida (Citrus latifolia Tanaka, cv. Tahití, injertada sobre Carrizo y Kryder. El cultivo se estableció en suelos con limitaciones por profundidad efectiva (PE entre 10 y 20 cm; las evaluaciones se realizaron a los 24, 32 y 39 meses después del trasplante. Se debe tener presente que el crecimiento de las raíces está condicionado a los atributos edáficos en donde se establecen los cultivos, en especial los perennes, en cuyo caso existen requerimientos mínimos de PE para el adecuado desarrollo de los árboles; se establecieron diferencias entre la biomasa acumulada, como consecuencia de ésta limitación. Al comparar el crecimiento de las plantas con la PE se evidenció que los individuos que crecieron en suelos con PE de 20 cm, presentaron un desarrollo relativamente semejante a plantaciones sin limitaciones de este tipo; mientras que, en suelos con PE inferior a 10 cm, la respuesta fue 3 a 5 veces menor.Abstract. It was evaluated the evolution of biomass, its differential distribution among the organs and some parameters of growth and development of acid lime (Citrus latifolia Tanaka, cv. Tahiti, grafted on Carrizo and Kryder patterns. The plants were established in soils with limitations by its effective depth (ED, which ranged between 10 and 20 cm. Assessments were effectuated at 24, 32 and 39 months after transplantation. It is must to keep in mind that root growth is conditioned to the soil attributes of the site where the crops are established, especially in the case of perennials, which have requirements of minimum PE in order to achieve an adequate development. Differences were established between biomass accumulated as a result of the limitation in effective depth. When comparing the growth of plants with ED, we found that the individuals that grew up in soils with

  5. Soil Compaction by Valmet Forwarder Operation at Soil Surface with and without Slash

    OpenAIRE

    Juang Rata Matangaran

    2012-01-01

    Soil compaction by machine used in forest harvesting operation caused negative impacts for regeneration and tree growth.  This research was intended to analyze the effectiveness of using slash to decrease soil compaction, to analyze soil compaction at various soil depths, and to measure rut depth at  soil surface.  Valmet 860.1 forwarder was used in this research. Soil compaction was measured through its bulk density, cone index, and rut depth, under the condition with and without slash.  The...

  6. Influência das variacões estacionais e profundidade de sementes no solo na dormência e germinação em Rumex crispus L. The effects of seasonality and burial depth of seeds in the soil on the dormancy and germination of Rumex crispus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Carmona

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Sementes de Rumex cripus L. foram enterradas às profundidades de 1 e 10 cm no solo e coletadas a intervalos regulares durante dois anos. As sementes coletadas foram testadas a 10 e 20oC no escuro; a 5/25oC (16/8 horas com 10mM de nitrato de potássio e luz; e num regime de temperatura alternadas correspondendo às mínimas e máximas médias do solo (MMTS, a profundidade de 1 cm durante 6 dias anteriores a cada coleta. Os tratamentos MMTS foram executados no escuro com 1 mM de nitrato de potássio ou uma mistura de estimulantes de germinação consistindo de nitrato de potássio, tiuréia, etefon, azida de sódio e peróxido de hidrogênio. A perda de viabilidade das sementes no solo durante o período estudado foi praticamente desprezível. As sementes mostraram ciclos de dormência ao longo do ano, quando as baixas temperaturas do solo superaram a dormência primária e paralelamente induziram dormência secundária, a qual por sua vez era superada pela elevação da temperatura. A dormência decresceu no segundo ano. O ambiente a 10 cm favoreceu a perda de dormência, entretanto o decréscimo de sementes devido à germinação in situ foi mais acentuado a 1cm de profundidade. A mistura química foi mais eficiente quando a dormência era mínima e as temperaturas do solo eram mais promotivas, o que correspondeu ao período quente do ano (da primavera ao outono. Discutem-se as implicações destes resultados na interpretação do comportamento ecológico da espécie e na adoção de práticas de manejo de bancos de sementes da invasora no solo.Rumex crispus L. seeds were buried at 1 and 10 cm depth in the soil and retrieved at regular intervals during two years. Retrieved seeds were tested at 10o and 20o in darkness; at 5/25oC (16/8 hours with 10 mM potassium nitrate and light; and at an alternating temperature regime corresponding to the minimum and maximum soil temperatures (MMTS at a depth of 1 cm during the six days prior to each retrieval

  7. Adaptive Depth Imaging with Single-Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    He, Weiji; Lin, Jie; Shen, Shanshan; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Zhou, Beibei; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    For active optical imaging, the use of single-photon detectors could greatly improve the detection sensitivity of the system. However in low light-level, traditional maximum-likelihood based imaging method needs long acquisition time to capture clear three-dimensional (3D) image. To tackle this problem, we present a novel imaging method for depth estimate, which can obtain the accurate depth image in a short acquisition time. We exploit the temporal correlations of signal and avoid building the photon-count histogram of the maximum likelihood depth estimate. Our method can efficiently distinguish signal from noise and adaptively change the dwell time of each pixel. The experiment results demonstrate that we can fast obtain the accurate depth image despite the existence of strong background noise.

  8. Reasoning About Programs by Exploiting the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-02

    1i TITLE ( lude Security Ca .fcation) Reasoning about Programs by Exploiting the Environment rt 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) w]ba1oa Ui.tm A Limor Fix axd...editions are obsolete. Reasoning About Programs by Exploiting the Environment * Limor Fix Fred B. Schneider TR 94-1409 February 1994 Department of Computer...agencies. Limor Fix is also supported, in part, by a Fullbright post-doctoral award. Reasoning about Programs by Exploiting the Environment ---- NITIS GRA&I

  9. Exploitative and Deceptive Resource Acquisition Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Reynolds

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Life history strategy (LHS and life history contingencies (LHCs should theoretically influence the use of exploitative and deceptive resource acquisition strategies. However, little research has been done in this area. The purpose of the present work was to create measures of exploitative strategies and test the predictions of life history theory. Pilot studies developed and validated a behavioral measure of cheating called the Dot Game. The role of individual LHS and LHCs (manipulated via validated story primes on cheating was investigated in Study 1. Studies 2a through 2c were conducted to develop and validate a self-report measure called the Exploitative and Deceptive Resource Acquisition Strategy Scale (EDRASS. Finally, Study 3 investigated life history and EDRASS. Results indicated that while LHS influences exploitative strategies, life history contingences had little effect. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Life History Theory and Exploitative Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Reynolds

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploitative strategies involve depriving others of resources while enhancing one’s own. Life history theory suggests that there are individual differences (life history strategy and environmental characteristics (life history contingencies [LHCs] that influence the use of exploitative strategies. However, past work manipulating LHCs has found mixed evidence for the influence of this information on exploitative behavior. We present three studies that help clarify the effects of this type of information. Results indicated that younger individuals are most sensitive to LHC information. We also found, contrary to predictions, that communicating slow LHC information (i.e., high population density, intraspecific competition, and resource scarcity increased rather than decreased the temptation to engage in exploitative behavior. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  11. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  12. Liposomal cancer therapy: exploiting tumor characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2010-01-01

    the reader will gain: The review focuses on strategies that exploit characteristic features of solid tumors, such as abnormal vasculature, overexpression of receptors and enzymes, as well as acidic and thiolytic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. Take home message: It is concluded that the design...... of new liposomal drug delivery systems that better exploit tumor characteristic features is likely to result in more efficacious cancer treatments....

  13. geotechnology to determine the depth of active zone in expansive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    though the soil may have the potential to shrink and swell below the depth of active zone, volume changes will not take place because the water content of .... The groundwater table is well below the active zone. The supposition is supported by a number of ..... Adeleide, South Australia. GEOTECHNOLOGY TO DETERMINE ...

  14. SOIL Geo-Wiki: A tool for improving soil information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalský, Rastislav; Balkovic, Juraj; Fritz, Steffen; See, Linda; van der Velde, Marijn; Obersteiner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Crowdsourcing is increasingly being used as a way of collecting data for scientific research, e.g. species identification, classification of galaxies and unravelling of protein structures. The WorldSoilProfiles.org database at ISRIC is a global collection of soil profiles, which have been 'crowdsourced' from experts. This system, however, requires contributors to have a priori knowledge about soils. Yet many soil parameters can be observed in the field without specific knowledge or equipment such as stone content, soil depth or color. By crowdsourcing this information over thousands of locations, the uncertainty in current soil datasets could be radically reduced, particularly in areas currently without information or where multiple interpretations are possible from different existing soil maps. Improved information on soils could benefit many research fields and applications. Better soil data could enhance assessments of soil ecosystem services (e.g. soil carbon storage) and facilitate improved process-based ecosystem modeling from local to global scales. Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool that was developed at IIASA for land cover validation using satellite imagery. Several branches are now available focused on specific aspects of land cover validation, e.g. validating cropland extent or urbanized areas. Geo-Wiki Pictures is a smart phone application for collecting land cover related information on the ground. The extension of Geo-Wiki to a mobile environment provides a tool for experts in land cover validation but is also a way of reaching the general public in the validation of land cover. Here we propose a Soil Geo-Wiki tool that builds on the existing functionality of the Geo-Wiki application, which will be largely designed for the collection and sharing of soil information. Two distinct applications are envisaged: an expert-oriented application mainly for scientific purposes, which will use soil science related language (e.g. WRB or any other global reference

  15. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  16. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Stress transmission in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    We urgently need increased quantitative knowledge on stress transmission in real soils loaded with agricultural machinery. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under tracked wheels were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol (clay content 20 %) continuously cropped with small grain cereals......). Seven load cells were inserted horizontally from a pit with minimal disturbance of soil in each of three depths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m), covering the width of the wheeled area. The position of the wheel relative to the transducers was recorded using a laser sensor. Finally, the vertical stresses near...... the soil-tyre interface were measured in separate tests by 17 stress transducers across the width of the tyres. The results showed that the inflation pressure controlled the level of maximum stresses at 0.3 m depth, while the wheel load was correlated to the measured stresses at 0.9 m depth. This supports...

  18. Physical soil quality indicators for monitoring British soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Corstanje

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil condition or quality determines its ability to deliver a range of functions that support ecosystem services, human health and wellbeing. The increasing policy imperative to implement successful soil monitoring programmes has resulted in the demand for reliable soil quality indicators (SQIs for physical, biological and chemical soil properties. The selection of these indicators needs to ensure that they are sensitive and responsive to pressure and change, e.g. they change across space and time in relation to natural perturbations and land management practices. Using a logical sieve approach based on key policy-related soil functions, this research assessed whether physical soil properties can be used to indicate the quality of British soils in terms of their capacity to deliver ecosystem goods and services. The resultant prioritised list of physical SQIs was tested for robustness, spatial and temporal variability, and expected rate of change using statistical analysis and modelling. Seven SQIs were prioritised: soil packing density, soil water retention characteristics, aggregate stability, rate of soil erosion, depth of soil, soil structure (assessed by visual soil evaluation and soil sealing. These all have direct relevance to current and likely future soil and environmental policy and are appropriate for implementation in soil monitoring programmes.

  19. Physical soil quality indicators for monitoring British soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corstanje, Ron; Mercer, Theresa G.; Rickson, Jane R.; Deeks, Lynda K.; Newell-Price, Paul; Holman, Ian; Kechavarsi, Cedric; Waine, Toby W.

    2017-09-01

    Soil condition or quality determines its ability to deliver a range of functions that support ecosystem services, human health and wellbeing. The increasing policy imperative to implement successful soil monitoring programmes has resulted in the demand for reliable soil quality indicators (SQIs) for physical, biological and chemical soil properties. The selection of these indicators needs to ensure that they are sensitive and responsive to pressure and change, e.g. they change across space and time in relation to natural perturbations and land management practices. Using a logical sieve approach based on key policy-related soil functions, this research assessed whether physical soil properties can be used to indicate the quality of British soils in terms of their capacity to deliver ecosystem goods and services. The resultant prioritised list of physical SQIs was tested for robustness, spatial and temporal variability, and expected rate of change using statistical analysis and modelling. Seven SQIs were prioritised: soil packing density, soil water retention characteristics, aggregate stability, rate of soil erosion, depth of soil, soil structure (assessed by visual soil evaluation) and soil sealing. These all have direct relevance to current and likely future soil and environmental policy and are appropriate for implementation in soil monitoring programmes.

  20. Soil physical criteria for evaluating irrigation suitability of Okija ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suitability of upland soils of Anigbo Okija for irrigation was assessed using soil physical criteria of texture, depth, pore type, slope percent colour and soil structure for the purpose of estimating season farming and rainy season drought. Soils were classified using Soil Taxonomy and FAO/UNESCO legend. Mapping was ...

  1. Analysis of soil temperature harmonics and filtering characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incident solar energy determines the periodic variation of the soil temperatures and the attenuation with depth. Harmonic analysis of soil ... The results show that the soil behaves like an energy filter and an electrical analogue was modeled to simulate the filtering characteristics of the soil. It was found that the soil acts as ...

  2. Exploitation in International Paid Surrogacy Arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Many critics have suggested that international paid surrogacy is exploitative. Taking such concerns as its starting point, this article asks: (1) how defensible is the claim that international paid surrogacy is exploitative and what could be done to make it less exploitative? (2) In the light of the answer to (1), how strong is the case for prohibiting it? Exploitation could in principle be dealt with by improving surrogates' pay and conditions. However, doing so may exacerbate problems with consent. Foremost amongst these is the argument that surrogates from economically disadvantaged countries cannot validly consent because their background circumstances are coercive. Several versions of this argument are examined and I conclude that at least one has some merit. The article's overall conclusion is that while ethically there is something to be concerned about, paid surrogacy is in no worse a position than many other exploitative commercial transactions which take place against a backdrop of global inequality and constrained options, such as poorly-paid and dangerous construction work. Hence, there is little reason to single surrogacy out for special condemnation. On a policy level, the case for prohibiting international commercial surrogacy is weak, despite legitimate concerns about consent and background poverty.

  3. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. Prediction maps of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinh Hong Phi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents study results of the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study includes collection and analysis of data on geology, hydrology, soil properties and settlements observed at 10 monitoring stations as well as models of the time-dependent settlement. The calculated settlements are relatively close to actual monitoring data. The models were done for prediction of the land subsidence at 92 selected points by the finite element method. Prediction maps are made for prediction of the land subsidence in 2020 and 2030. Recommendations are proposed for potential zones of groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  5. Microbial activity and soil organic matter decay in roadside soils polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Fischer, Thomas; Iurchenko, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that hydrocarbon addition to soil provokes soil organic matter priming (Zyakun et al., 2011). It has further been shown that petroleum hydrocarbons deposit to roadside soils bound to fine mineral particles and together with vehicle spray (Mykhailova et al., 2014), and that hydrocarbon concentrations decrease to safe levels within the first 15 m from the road, reaching background concentrations at 60-100 m distance (Mykhailova et al., 2013). It was the aim of this study to (I) identify the bioavailability of different petroleum hydrocarbon fractions to degradation and to (II) identify the native (i.e. pedogenic) C fraction affected by hydrocarbon-mediated soil organic matter priming during decay. To address this aim, we collected soil samples at distances from 1 to 100 m (sampling depth 15 cm) near the Traktorostroiteley avenue and the Pushkinskaya street in Kharkov, as well as near the country road M18 near Kharkov, Ukraine. The roads have been under exploitation for several decades, so microbial adaptation to enhanced hydrocarbon levels and full expression of effects could be assumed. The following C fractions were quantified using 13C-CP/MAS-NMR: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lignin, Aliphates, Carbonyl/Carboxyl as well as black carbon according to Nelson and Baldock (2005). Petroleum hydrocarbons were determind after hexane extraction using GC-MS and divided into a light fraction (chain-length C27, Mykhailova et al., 2013). Potential soil respiration was determined every 48 h by trapping of CO2 evolving from 20 g soil in NaOH at 20 ° C and at 60% of the maximum water holding capacity and titration after a total incubation period of 4 weeks in the lab. It was found that soil respiration positively correlated with the ratio of the light fraction to the sum of medium and heavy fractions of petroleum hydrocarbons, which indicates higher biodegradation primarily of the light petroleum hydrocarbon fraction. Further, soil respiration was

  6. Rethinking exploitation: a process-centered account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Lynn A; Wall, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Exploitation has become an important topic in recent discussions of biomedical and research ethics. This is due in no small measure to the influence of Alan Wertheimer's path-breaking work on the subject. This paper presents some objections to Wertheimer's account of the concept. The objections attempt to show that his account places too much emphasis on outcome-based considerations and too little on process-based considerations. Building on these objections, the paper develops an alternative process-centered account of the concept. This alternative account of exploitation takes as its point of departure the broadly Kantian notion that it is wrong to use another as an instrument for the advancement of one's own ends. It sharpens this slippery notion and adds a number of refinements to it. The paper concludes by arguing that process-centered accounts of exploitation better illuminate the ethical challenges posed by research on human subjects than outcome-centered accounts.

  7. Generalized Soil Map of Europe ; aggregation of the FAO-Unesco soil units based on the characteristics determining the vulnerability to degradation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters B; LBG

    1996-01-01

    The FAO-Unesco soil units of Europe have been aggregated into categories of soils with similar soil characteristics (soil depth, stoniness, texture, acidity, etc.) which are of importance to the vulnerability of the soil to major degradation processes. The major soil degradation processes in Europe

  8. Growth, Mortality and Exploitation Rates of Sarotherodon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evans

    ABSTRACT. Sarotherodon melanotheron population of Dominli Lagoon in the Western Region of Ghana was studied for its growth and mortality parameters as well as exploitation rate. The study generally aimed at providing basic information necessary for the assessment and management of the fish stock in the lagoon.

  9. Exploiting a natural auxotrophy for genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Larry; Manoil, Colin

    2012-08-01

    We exploited the natural histidine auxotrophy of Francisella species to develop hisD (encodes histidinol dehydrogenase) as a positive selection marker. A shuttle plasmid (pBR103) carrying Escherichia coli hisD and designed for cloning of PCR fragments replicated in both attenuated and highly virulent Francisella strains. During this work, we formulated a simplified defined growth medium for Francisella novicida.

  10. Courseware Design: Exploiting the Colour Micro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Marilyn E.; Holmes, Glyn

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact of the presentation of data on the educational effectiveness of computer assisted learning systems, describes some of the existing systems for controlling the display of instructional data on CRTs, and outlines a project undertaken at the University of Western Ontario to exploit the capabilities of microcomputer color…

  11. Child Exploitation: Some Pieces of the Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlader, Dorothy

    The report addresses the status in North Carolina and in the nation of child exploitation. Legislative and judicial backgrounds of child pornography and child prostitution are reviewed, and difficulties in obtaining statistical data are noted. Law enforcement issues in pornography are cited, and suggestions for further legislation regarding child…

  12. On the dynamics of exploited fish populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beverton, R. J. H; Holt, Sidney J

    1993-01-01

    ...-brooding cichlids, and viviparity in many sharks and toothcarps. Moreover, fish are of considerable importance to the survival of the human species in the form of nutritious, delicious and diverse food. Rational exploitation and management of our global stocks of fishes must rely upon a detailed and precise insight of their biology. The...

  13. Exploiting indigenous knowledge in the environmental conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of agriculture and reared livestock (especially goats). Over several years, they developed sustainable and effective exploitation mechanisms of the existing biodiversity resources to satisfy their individual needs and those of their societies in general. Journal of Language, Technology and Entrepreneurship in Africa Vol.

  14. Groundwater exploitation in the Abakaliki metropolis (southeastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    Full Length Research Paper. Groundwater exploitation in the Abakaliki metropolis. (southeastern Nigeria): Issues and challenges. O. P. Aghamelu*, H. N. Ezeh and A. I. Obasi. Department of Geology and Exploration Geophysics, Ebonyi State University, P.M.B., 053,. Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Accepted 24 September ...

  15. The Illegal Exploitation of Natural Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhout van Solinge, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156696207

    2014-01-01

    This essay discusses the involvement of organized crime in natural resource exploitation and trade. This is accomplished by examining case studies from different tropical regions in the world: Africa (Liberia, Sierra Leone, and DR Congo), Southeast Asia (Indonesia), and Latin America (Brazilian

  16. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you experienced the tragedy of a missing child? We're here to help. Learn More >> × KidSmartz New Parent Tips to Help Kids Set Physical Boundaries! Download Resources >> × Subscribe EN SP Blog Media About Us Contact Us Legal T&C Careers Copyright © National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. All ...

  17. Finding All Elementary Circuits Exploiting Transconductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.; Nauta, Bram

    Commonly used elementary circuits like single transistor amplifier stages, the differential pair and current mirror basically exploit the transconductance of transistors. This paper aims at finding ALL elementary transconductance based circuits. For this purpose, all graphs of two-port circuits with

  18. Finding all elementary circuits exploiting transconductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.; Nauta, Bram

    2001-01-01

    Commonly used elementary circuits like single-transistor amplifier stages, the differential pair, and current mirrors basically exploit the transconductance property of transistors. This paper aims at finding all elementary transconductance-based circuits. For this purpose, all graphs of two-port

  19. Transmission of vertical soil stress under agricultural tyres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Berli, M.; Ruiz, S.

    2014-01-01

    and simulate soil stress under defined loads. Stress in the soil profile at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m depth was measured during wheeling at a water content close to field capacity on five soils (13–66% clay). Stress transmission was then simulated with a semi-analytical model, using vertical stress at 0.1 m depth...

  20. Intelligent estimation of spatially distributed soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, F.; Friedel, M.J.; Ribeiro, G.F.; Fraser, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial analysis of soil samples is often times not possible when measurements are limited in number or clustered. To obviate potential problems, we propose a new approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM) technique. This approach exploits underlying nonlinear relation of the steady-state geomorphic concave-convex nature of hillslopes (from hilltop to bottom of the valley) to spatially limited soil textural data. The topographic features are extracted from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission elevation data; whereas soil textural (clay, silt, and sand) and hydraulic data were collected in 29 spatially random locations (50 to 75. cm depth). In contrast to traditional principal component analysis, the SOM identifies relations among relief features, such as, slope, horizontal curvature and vertical curvature. Stochastic cross-validation indicates that the SOM is unbiased and provides a way to measure the magnitude of prediction uncertainty for all variables. The SOM cross-component plots of the soil texture reveals higher clay proportions at concave areas with convergent hydrological flux and lower proportions for convex areas with divergent flux. The sand ratio has an opposite pattern with higher values near the ridge and lower values near the valley. Silt has a trend similar to sand, although less pronounced. The relation between soil texture and concave-convex hillslope features reveals that subsurface weathering and transport is an important process that changed from loss-to-gain at the rectilinear hillslope point. These results illustrate that the SOM can be used to capture and predict nonlinear hillslope relations among relief, soil texture, and hydraulic conductivity data. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Dissemination and Exploitation: Project Goals beyond Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Reitz, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Dissemination and Exploitation are essential parts of public funded projects. In Horizon 2020 a plan for the exploitation and dissemination of results (PEDR) is a requirement. The plan should contain a clear vision on the objectives of the project in relation to actions for dissemination and potential exploitation of the project results. The actions follow the basic idea to spread the knowledge and results gathered within the project and face the challenge of how to bring the results into potentially relevant policy circle and how they impact the market. The plan follows the purpose to assess the impact of the project and to address various target groups who are interested in the project results. Simply put, dissemination concentrates on the transfer of knowledge and exploitation on the commercialization of the project. Beyond the question of the measurability of project`s impact, strategies within science marketing can serve purposes beyond internal and external communication. Accordingly, project managers are facing the challenge to implement a dissemination and exploitation strategy that ideally supports the identification of all partners with the project and matches the current discourse of the project`s content within the society, politics and economy. A consolidated plan might unite all projects partners under a central idea and supports the identification with the project beyond the individual research questions. Which applications, strategies and methods can be used to bring forward a PEDR that accompanies a project successfully and allows a comprehensive assessment of the project afterwards? Which hurdles might project managers experience in the dissemination process and which tasks should be fulfilled by the project manager?

  2. Trolling may intensify exploitation in crappie fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, K. O.; Dunn, A. W.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2012-01-01

    In some parts of the USA, anglers targeting crappies Pomoxis spp. are transitioning from mostly stationary angling with a single pole around submerged structures to using multiple poles while drifting with the wind or under power. This shift in fishing methods could result in a change in catch efficiency, possibly increasing exploitation rates to levels that would be of concern to managers. We studied the catch statistics of anglers fishing while trolling with multiple poles (trollers) and those fishing with single poles (polers) in Mississippi reservoirs. Specifically, we tested whether (1) various catch statistics differed between trollers and polers, (2) catch rates of trollers were related to the number of poles fished, and (3) trollers could raise exploitation rates to potentially unsustainable levels. Results showed that participation in the crappie fisheries was about equally split between polers and trollers. In spring, 90% of crappie anglers were polers; in summer, 85% of crappie anglers were trollers. The size of harvested crappies was similar for the two angler groups, but the catch per hour was almost three times higher for trollers than for polers. Catch rates by trollers were directly correlated to the number of poles fished, although the relationship flattened as the number of poles increased. The average harvest rate for one troller fishing with three poles was similar to the harvest rate obtained by one poler. Simulations predicted that at the existing mix of about 50% polers and 50% trollers and with no restrictions on the number of poles used by trollers, exploitation of crappies is about 1.3 times higher than that in a polers-only fishery; under a scenario in which 100% of crappie anglers were trollers, exploitation was forecasted to increase to about 1.7 times the polers-only rate. The efficiency of trolling for crappies should be of concern to fishery managers because crappie fisheries are mostly consumptive and may increase exploitation

  3. Full depth reclamation : workshop materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Rehabilitating an old pavement by pulverizing and stabilizing the existing pavement is a process referred to as Full Depth Reclamation (FDR). This process shows great potential as an economical rehabilitation alternative that provides deep structural...

  4. Archetypal Depth Criticism and Melville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    Applies psychologist James Hillman's idea of soul-making to literary studies. Uses the works of Melville to discuss the terms (1) depth, (2) image, and (3) archetype as they relate to the concept of soul-making. (MM)

  5. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and...

  6. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and climate....

  7. Determinação do fator de cobertura do melão cultivado sob diferentes lâminas e salinidades da água de irrigação Determination of the soil cover factor for melon grown under different depths and irrigation water salinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indalécio Dutra

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Dois experimentos foram conduzidos com objetivo de se comparar metodologias de determinação do coeficiente de cobertura do solo pelo melão, quando submetido a condições diferenciadas de lâminas e nível de salinidade da água, em Mossoró, RN. O delineamento experimental adotado foi o de blocos ao acaso, no arranjo fatorial 2 x 2 x 6. Foram testados dois métodos (Stocking e régua, dois níveis de salinidade da água de irrigação (0,55 e 2,65 dS m-1 e seis lâminas (0,55, 0,70, 0,85, 1,00, 1,15 e 1,30 da ETm. Os métodos de medida do fator de cobertura do solo mostraram-se eficientes, detectando-se, em ambos, diferenças significativas entre os efeitos da qualidade da água e da lâmina de irrigação no desenvolvimento do melão. Os resultados obtidos pelo método da régua diferiram do método de Stocking apenas nas fases inicial e de crescimento do melão.Two experiments were carried out with the objective of comparing methodologies for determination of the soil cover factor of melon when submitted to different conditions of water depths and salinity, in Mossoro, RN. The experimental design was of completely randomized blocks in a 2 x 2 x 6 factorial scheme. Two methods were tested (Stocking's and ruler, two salinity levels (0.55 and 2.65 dS m-1 and six water depths (0.55, 0.70, 0.85, 1.00, 1.15 and 1.30 of the ETc. Both methods of measurement were efficient, with significant effects for both irrigation water depths and salinity in the melon crop being observed. The results obtained by the ruler method differed from Stocking's method in the melon only during the initial and rapid growth stages.

  8. Strategies for determining soil-loss tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Earl B.

    1988-11-01

    Excessive soil losses due to erosion or lateral displacement by machinery impair productivity. Some soil loss is tolerable, but not so much that plant productivity diminishes. Thus productivity is the dominant concern in determining soil-loss tolerance. The effects of soil loss on productivity, however, are difficult to determine. Therefore, two alternatives are discussed for determining the limits of soil loss, or soil-loss tolerance. These alternatives are the maintenance of soil organic matter and, for shallow and moderately deep soils, the maintenance of soil depth. They are not new strategies, but our rapidly increasing knowledge of the dynamics of soil organic matter and the rates of soil formation from bedrock or consolidated sediments warrants the reconsideration of these alternatives. Reductions in either soil organic matter or the depth of shallow or moderately deep soils will lead to declining productivity. Soil organic matter, considered to be a surrogate for productivity, is much easier to monitor than is productivity. Also, there are many computer models for predicting the effects of management on soil organic matter. Recently compiled data on rates of soil formation suggest that soil losses of 1 t/a (2.24 Mg/ha yr) are greater than the rate of replenishment by the weathering of lithic or paralithic material in all but very wet climates.

  9. OCNELE MARI-OCNIŢA, VÂLCEA COUNTY RESOURCES, EXPLOITATION, RISKS, UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. GÂŞTESCU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocnele Mari-Ocniţa. Resources, exploitation, risks, valorization. In Ocnele Mari Town and its constituent locality - Ocniţa, Vâlcea County, following the extraction of a large volume of salt through its underground dissolution, the soil and the breccias covering the salt have become unstable, producing landfalls and landslides that affected the exploitation installations, the transport infrastructure and several homes, during the last decennia, especially in the area of Ocniţa locality. In order to avoid major imbalances in this geographic area, following the mining activities, and also in order to reduce the consequences of the pollution triggered by saltwater, the main affected areas-locations have been identified and analyzed. This paper presents the resources existing in the exploitation area, the modifications occurred following the salt mining activities and their effects on: economic efficiency, local population, environmental balance, tourist potential and utilisation.

  10. Managing compost stability and amendment to soil to enhance soil heating during soil solarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Christopher W; Guo, Hongyun; Claypool, Joshua T; Marshall, Megan N; Perano, Kristen M; Stapleton, James J; Vandergheynst, Jean S

    2013-05-01

    Soil solarization is a method of soil heating used to eradicate plant pathogens and weeds that involves passive solar heating of moist soil mulched (covered) with clear plastic tarp. Various types of organic matter may be incorporated into soil prior to solarization to increase biocidal activity of the treatment process. Microbial activity associated with the decomposition of soil organic matter may increase temperatures during solarization, potentially enhancing solarization efficacy. However, the level of organic matter decomposition (stability) necessary for increasing soil temperature is not well characterized, nor is it known if various amendments render the soil phytotoxic to crops following solarization. Laboratory studies and a field trial were performed to determine heat generation in soil amended with compost during solarization. Respiration was measured in amended soil samples prior to and following solarization as a function of soil depth. Additionally, phytotoxicity was estimated through measurement of germination and early growth of lettuce seedlings in greenhouse assays. Amendment of soil with 10%(g/g) compost containing 16.9 mg CO2/gdry weight organic carbon resulted in soil temperatures that were 2-4 °C higher than soil alone. Approximately 85% of total organic carbon within the amended soil was exhausted during 22 days of solarization. There was no significant difference in residual respiration with soil depth down to 17.4 cm. Although freshly amended soil proved highly inhibitory to lettuce seed germination and seedling growth, phytotoxicity was not detected in solarized amended soil after 22 days of field solarization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term Impact of Rotary Method of Soil Mechanical Treatment on Soil Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy P. Kalinichenko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The imitating approach to the technique and technology of soil cultivation excels the influence of natural factors of soil formation and leads to the anthropogenic biosphere degradation. The article fundamentally justifies the rotary soil cultivation in terms of genesis of soil. This method provides the formation of a new layer in the soil depth, which intensifies the geological and biological processes, influences the overlying soil layers, increases the biological productivity of the soil and stability of its mechanical system for a long term. Technical solutions of rotary devices for soil cultivation are considered and long-term results of their practical application are presented.

  12. THE SPATIAL VARIATION OF MORPHOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF VIRGIN AND TILED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ursu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Is established that the morphological parameters of soils change on small distance. Especially appreciably vary the depth of transitive horizons (B in brown and gray soils, as under a forest, and ploughed up. All on distance of two meters the general depth of soil (A + B and the depth of penetration of carbonates varies also.

  13. Sensor and control for consistent seed drill coulter depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren; Nørremark, Michael; Green, Ole

    2016-01-01

    by a sub-millimetre accurate positioning system (iGPS, Nikon Metrology NV, Belgium) mounted on the drill coulter. At a drill coulter depth of 55 mm and controlled by an ordinary fixed spring loaded down force only, the change in soil resistance decreased the mean depth by 23 mm. By dynamically controlling...... of a drill coulter, providing sensor feedback to a control system via an electro hydraulic actuator that delivers an even coulter depth. The results showed a strong correlation between the angle of the coulter and the coulter depth under static (R^2=0.9996) and dynamic (R^2=0.987) operations, verified...... the spring loaded down force based on the angle sensor, the mean depth was independent of the seedbed change, from sand to gravel. The PID controller was superior because it providing a mean depth deviation from the target depth of -0.17 mm and +0.08 mm for sand and gravel, respectively. The most cost...

  14. Parâmetros solo-máquina em função de doses de resíduos vegetais e profundidades de deposição de adubo em semeadura direta Parameters of soil-machine in function of the amount of cover residues and different fertilizer deposition depths in direct drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina M. Kamimura

    2009-09-01

    , sub-plots were two working depth of the driller chisel-type furrow opener, and two traffic conditions (combine and tractor wheel traffic.The physical characteristics of the soil were influenced by the traffic tracks. The whole tractor-drill was influenced by the depths of fertilizer shanks and traffic of traffic tracks and combine.

  15. Effects of exchangeable Ca:Mg ratio on the dispersion of soils some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil surface sealing and erosion which are the result of soil dispersion can be harmful or detrimental to soil, soil resources and also agricultural production thereby leading to great economic loss. Soil samples were collected at 0-30cm depth in eight locations in southern Nigeria. Dispersion behaviours of soil contents were ...

  16. Nitrogen Uptake in Soils under Different Water Table Depths ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical model was used to examine the interactions of NH4 + transport to rice roots, as well as to calculate root length densities required to relate N uptake to concentrations of NH4 + in solution around the rooting medium for three water treatments: water table 30 cm below the surface, 15 cm below the surface and ...

  17. Exploiting host immunity: the Salmonella paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnsen, Judith; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved clever strategies to evade and in some cases exploit the attacks of an activated immune system. Salmonella enterica is one such pathogen, exploiting multiple aspects of host defense to promote its replication in the host. Here we review recent findings on the mechanisms by which Salmonella establishes systemic and chronic infection, including strategies involving manipulation of innate immune signaling and inflammatory forms of cell death, as well as immune evasion by establishing residency in M2 macrophages. We also examine recent evidence showing that the oxidative environment and the high levels of antimicrobial proteins produced in response to localized Salmonella gastrointestinal infection enable the pathogen to successfully outcompete the resident gut microbiota. PMID:25582038

  18. Organizational Factors for Exploration and Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharadindu Pandey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Purpose of the paper is to develop a conceptual framework which suggests a relationship between organisational factors and exploratory and exploitative innovation types. We searched major databases like ABI/INFORM global, EBSCO, Elsevier’s science direct, Springer link and Emerald full text. Most of studies were included from published sources. We explored the literature of organisational culture, motivational bases of the rewards system and leadership values which are responsible for increasing creative and productive output. Our study has attempted to identify common patterns and themes in the literature regarding the drivers that increase both sides of the organisational creativity. The paper discusses the role of culture, system and styles in the initiation and implementation phases of the innovation called herein exploitative and exploratory innovation.

  19. Tribal children are most exploited - UNICEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workshop sponsored by the UN Children's Fund in the Philippines examined the status of the children of indigenous people and found that exploitation of the assets of indigenous people in the name of development has resulted in social inequalities that have damaged the indigenous children. As examples of the disregard for the human rights of the children, participants cited projects in Davao, Boracay, and Benguet that have displaced native children. These include mining schemes that have "raped" ancestral lands, large-scale agricultural enterprises, promotion of tourism, and creation of hydroelectric dams. The children rarely benefit at all from any of these projects as their families are moved from a position of isolated independence to one of exploited dependence. Social changes accompanying development ruin traditional culture without providing a better or even similar basis of existence.

  20. Sustainable exploitation and management of aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Köster, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    DTU Aqua conducts research, provides advice,educates at university level and contributes toinnovation in sustainable exploitation andmanagement of aquatic resources. The vision of DTUAqua is to enable ecologically and economicallysustainable exploitation of aquatic resourcesapplying an integrated...... ecosystem approach whichutilizes synergies in natural and technical sciencedisciplines. DTU Aqua advises the Danish Ministry ofFood, Agriculture and Fisheries and other publicauthorities, the commercial fisheries, theaquaculture industry and international commissions.DTU Aqua deals with all types ofaquatic...... in the ocean and how these factors impact the living conditions formarine organisms. Population genetics aims at gaining knowledge on how to preserve and managebiodiversity sustainably. Individual biology deals with the biology of aquatic organisms and theirinteraction with other organisms...

  1. Automatic exploitation system for photographic dosemeters; Systeme d`exploitation automatique des dosimetres photographiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magri, Y.; Devillard, D.; Godefroit, J.L.; Barillet, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Laboratory of Dosimetry Exploitation (LED) has realized an equipment allowing to exploit automatically photographic film dosemeters. This system uses an identification of the films by code-bars and gives the doses measurement with a completely automatic reader. The principle consists in putting in ribbon the emulsions to be exploited and to develop them in a circulation machine. The measurement of the blackening film is realized on a reading plate having fourteen points of reading, in which are circulating the emulsions in ribbon. The exploitation is made with the usual dose calculation method, with special computers codes. A comparison on 2000 dosemeters has shown that the results are the same in manual and automatical methods. This system has been operating since July 1995 by the LED. (N.C.).

  2. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Ha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  3. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D; Bidlingmaier, Scott M; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  4. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  5. Consequences of the mismatch between the depth at which planktonic foraminifera live and the calibration depth of SST transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, R. J.; Kucera, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although many palaeoceanographic proxies are described as sea-surface temperature (SST) proxies, there is a growing realisation that the seasonal and depth sensitivity of proxies may differ substantially. Exploiting information on the seasonal and depth sensitivity of proxies can give new insights into palaeoceanographic processes, and deliver more precise reconstructions. Transfer functions for quantitatively reconstructing past sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera assemblages are typically calibrated against temperatures at 10m water depth. However, planktonic foraminifera are not usually most abundant at 10m depth, but have a geographically variable peak in abundance often near or even below the thermocline. This discrepancy between the depth at which foraminifera live, and the depth against they are calibrated may bias SST reconstructions. With a collation of 18 North Atlantic foraminifera records that cover the time since the Last Glacial Maximum, we make reconstructions of summer and winter temperatures for each standard depth in the World Ocean Atlas down to 500m using the modern analogue technique. We test how much of the variance in the fossil data is explained by each reconstruction, and whether each reconstruction explains more than expected under the null hypothesis that temperature did not influence assemblage composition. We find that changes in North Atlantic foraminifera assemblages since the Last Glacial Maximum are, for most records, better explained by variability near the thermocline than at the surface, and that reconstructions of summer temperatures within the seasonal thermocline are often poor. If the thermal structure of the water column has changed over time, such that the relationship between 10m temperature and the temperature at the depth which most affects foraminifera assemblages is not constant, then reconstructions of SST calibrated to 10m temperature may be biased. This bias will propagate into, for example

  6. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  7. Reaction and fractal description of soil bio-indicator to human disturbance in lowland forests of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAKINEH MOLLAEI DARABI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mollaei-Darabi S, Kooch Y, Hosseini SM. 2014. Reaction and fractal description of soil bio-indicator to human disturbance in lowland forests of Iran. Biodiversitas 15: 58-64. Earthworms are expected to be good bio-indicators for forest site quality. The deforestation of land into another function could changes the soil features that could effect on earthworm population. This study was conducted to understand the changes of soil functions, resulting from exploitive management using some soil features and their fractal dimensions. Two sites were selected, consisting of an undisturbed forest site (FS and a completely deforested site (DS in lowland part of Khanikan forests located in Mazandaran province, north of Iran. Within each site 50 soil samples were obtained from 0-30cm depth along two sampling lines with 250 meter length for each. Deforestation brought a lower soil quality in the sites under the study. Decreasing silt, clay, moisture, pH, carbon to nitrogen ratio, available Ca, earthworm density and biomass, increasing bulk density and sand were few outcomes of the deforestation. Except for clay, the deforestation affect on fractal dimension of soil features. The fractal dimension of bulk density, silt, moisture, pH, earthworm density and biomass were decreased imposed by deforestation. Our results suggest that deforestation should be regarded as an effective factor on variability of soil features that are tied to forest ecology. This is significant for evaluating forest management policies and practices with respect to effects on soil and also for the use of soils as indicators, especially earthworms as bio-indicator, of forest ecosystems.

  8. Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, Baptiste; Oktem, Rusen; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tran, Anh Phuong; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2017-06-01

    Coincident monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution of and interactions between land, soil, and permafrost properties is important for advancing our understanding of ecosystem dynamics. In this study, a novel monitoring strategy was developed to quantify complex Arctic ecosystem responses to the seasonal freeze-thaw-growing season conditions. The strategy exploited autonomous measurements obtained through electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil properties, pole-mounted optical cameras to monitor vegetation dynamics, point probes to measure soil temperature, and periodic manual measurements of thaw layer thickness, snow thickness, and soil dielectric permittivity. The spatially and temporally dense monitoring data sets revealed several insights about tundra system behavior at a site located near Barrow, AK. In the active layer, the soil electrical conductivity (a proxy for soil water content) indicated an increasing positive correlation with the green chromatic coordinate (a proxy for vegetation vigor) over the growing season, with the strongest correlation (R = 0.89) near the typical peak of the growing season. Soil conductivity and green chromatic coordinate also showed significant positive correlations with thaw depth, which is influenced by soil and surface properties. In the permafrost, soil electrical conductivity revealed annual variations in solute concentration and unfrozen water content, even at temperatures well below 0°C in saline permafrost. These conditions may contribute to an acceleration of long-term thaw in Coastal permafrost regions. Demonstration of this first aboveground and belowground geophysical monitoring approach within an Arctic ecosystem illustrates its significant potential to remotely "visualize" permafrost, soil, and vegetation ecosystem codynamics in high resolution over field relevant scales.

  9. Water source utilization by Pinus jeffreyi and Arctostaphylos patula on thin soils over bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, K L; Graham, R C; Parker, D R

    2003-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to evaluate water sources for co-occurring Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Grev & Balf.) and greenleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula Greene) in the southern Sierra Nevada, California, where soils averaged only 75 cm thick but were underlain by up to 5 m of weathered granitic bedrock. Soils and underlying weathered bedrock were sampled three times during both the 1997 and 1998 growing seasons, in 25 cm increments, from 0 to 400 cm or until hard bedrock was reached, and plant stem tissue was sampled simultaneously. Extracted water from the soil/bedrock substrate and plant tissue was analyzed for delta(18)O and/or deltaD, and depth of water source was determined by inference in conjunction with moisture status of the substrate. Water source utilization over the growing seasons for both plants generally followed a pattern similar to that observed for water depletion. Predominant water use was initially from the surface soils. Progressively deeper water sources, including weathered bedrock to a depth of several meters, were exploited as the season progressed and the overlying substrate was depleted of moisture. Early in the growing season, stable isotope values were slightly lower for pine than for manzanita (e.g., average deltaD in June 1997 was -81 per thousand for pine and -77 per thousand for manzanita), and suggest that the functional rooting depth for pine may have been slightly greater than for manzanita. In September 1997, manzanita deltaD values averaged -57 per thousand while pine values averaged -85 per thousand, indicating that manzanita opportunistically utilized summer precipitation while pine used more dependable bedrock water. In 1998, soils remained moist through July due to a late snowfall. Unlike the previous year, pine and manzanita deltaD values were not significantly different in mid- and late-growing season, and both plants exploited bedrock-derived water as soil water was depleted. Water held within bedrock was essential

  10. Predictive modeling of freezing and thawing of frost-susceptible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Frost depth is an essential factor in design of various transportation infrastructures. In frost : susceptible soils, as soils freezes, water migrates through the soil voids below the freezing line : towards the freezing front and causes excessive he...

  11. An ecology-oriented exploitation mode of groundwater resources in the northern Tianshan Mountains, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Haimin; Wang, Wenke; Dai, Zhenxue; Duan, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Zhang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, ecological degradation caused by irrational groundwater exploitation has been of growing concern in arid and semiarid regions. To address the groundwater-ecological issues, this paper proposes a groundwater-resource exploitation mode to evaluate the tradeoff between groundwater development and ecological environment in the northern Tianshan Mountains, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Field surveys and remote sensing studies were conducted to analyze the relation between the distribution of hydrological conditions and the occurrence of ecological types. The results show that there is a good correlation between groundwater depth and the supergene ecological type. Numerical simulations and ecological assessment models were applied to develop an ecology-oriented exploitation mode of groundwater resources. The mode allows the groundwater levels in different zones to be regulated by optimizing groundwater exploitation modes. The prediction results show that the supergene ecological quality will be better in 2020 and even more groundwater can be exploited in this mode. This study provides guidance for regional groundwater management, especially in regions with an obvious water scarcity.

  12. Mass Transport within Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend

  13. Forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  14. Effects of anthropogenic groundwater exploitation on land surface processes: A case study of the Haihe River Basin, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Xie, Zhenghui; Zhan, Chesheng; Qin, Peihua; Sun, Qin; Jia, Binghao; Xia, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we incorporated a groundwater exploitation scheme into the land surface model CLM3.5 to investigate the effects of the anthropogenic exploitation of groundwater on land surface processes in a river basin. Simulations of the Haihe River Basin in northern China were conducted for the years 1965-2000 using the model. A control simulation without exploitation and three exploitation simulations with different water demands derived from socioeconomic data related to the Basin were conducted. The results showed that groundwater exploitation for human activities resulted in increased wetting and cooling effects at the land surface and reduced groundwater storage. A lowering of the groundwater table, increased upper soil moisture, reduced 2 m air temperature, and enhanced latent heat flux were detected by the end of the simulated period, and the changes at the land surface were related linearly to the water demands. To determine the possible responses of the land surface processes in extreme cases (i.e., in which the exploitation process either continued or ceased), additional hypothetical simulations for the coming 200 years with constant climate forcing were conducted, regardless of changes in climate. The simulations revealed that the local groundwater storage on the plains could not contend with high-intensity exploitation for long if the exploitation process continues at the current rate. Changes attributable to groundwater exploitation reached extreme values and then weakened within decades with the depletion of groundwater resources and the exploitation process will therefore cease. However, if exploitation is stopped completely to allow groundwater to recover, drying and warming effects, such as increased temperature, reduced soil moisture, and reduced total runoff, would occur in the Basin within the early decades of the simulation period. The effects of exploitation will then gradually disappear, and the variables will approach the natural state and

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  16. SMEX03 Surface and Soil Temperature Measurements: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land surface temperature and soil temperature data at depths of 1 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  17. Soil resilience mapping in selective wetlands, West Suez Canal, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    W.A. Abdel Kawy; Abdel-Aziz Belal

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study are: (1) producing a geometrically corrected physiographic-soil map scale 1:50,000 reduced to the attached map; (2) detecting some soil characteristics as (effective soil depth, salinity and alkalinity) of the investigated area during the last 28 years to produce the soil resilience maps. To fulfill the first aim, eight soil profiles were selected from 30 profiles to represent the different mapping units. Morphological description was carried out and soil samples wer...

  18. The variation of the unitary stresses occurring in the working part in relation to the type of soil, using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorescu, E.; Chiorescu, D.

    2017-08-01

    Agriculture brings a major contribution to the sustainable development of the economy, providing food to people. Because of the continuous growth of the population, there is an ever increasing need of food worldwide. For this reason, it is necessary to study the contact between the soil and the active tool of the cultivators, in relation to the type of soil and its parameters. The physical-mechanical characteristics of the soils are influenced by the moving velocity of the working part, as well as by the humidity of the soil. The humidity triggers the change of the friction coefficient at the soil-steel contact, being of significant importance for the decrease of the working resistance of the working tools and responsible for increasing exploitation costs. The model used for the soil has a non-linear plastic behavior of the Drucker Prager type, being different from the Mises model. The programming software Ansys was used for the simulation with the finite element method, allowing the study of the behavior of the active working part, the normal stress being analyzed in real conditions, at various depths and velocities for a soil with a clay-sandy texture.

  19. Depth estimation via stage classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedović, V.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Redert, A.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    We identify scene categorization as the first step towards efficient and robust depth estimation from single images. Categorizing the scene into one of the geometric classes greatly reduces the possibilities in subsequent phases. To that end, we introduce 15 typical 3D scene geometries, called

  20. Factors that affect keratotomy depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, U; Bordin, P; Rimondi, A P; Sichirollo, R

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigated nine factors which can affect the depth of incisions performed during refractive keratotomy: (1) vertical vs oblique-cutting edge of the knife blade, (2) direction of cutting, (3) cutting velocity, (4) American vs Russian technique, (5) intraocular pressure (IOP), (6) initial vs final incisions, (7) sharpness of knife blade, (8) single vs double footplate, and (9) square vs double-edged blade. These variables were examined independently, performing at least 40 incisions for each experimental parameter studied. The depth of the resulting incisions was measured histologically using the micrometer eyepiece. The average and the standard deviation were calculated. The paired Student's t-test was used to establish significant differences between the two conditions investigated for each parameter. Factors that were demonstrated to increase significantly the depth of the incisions included: the vertical-cutting edge, the triple-edged diamond knife, the sharpness of the knife, and the single foot knife. High velocity in performing the incisions and, to a lesser extent, low IOP were the main factors that induced irregularity in depth.

  1. Settlement of a foundation slab, non-uniform in depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ter-Martirosyan Zaven

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the formulation and solution of problems for the quantitative evaluation of settlements and bearing capacity of rectangular and circular foundation slabs constructed on the base with deformation (K, G or E, ν properties of continuously varying heterogeneity in the depth due to the conditions of its formation. It is shown that the inhomogeneity of the deformation properties of the foundation soils over depths has a significant effect on the formation of additional stress and strain states under the influence of a uniformly distributed external load over the area of a rectangle and circle, where, with growth of loading area (A relative settlement (S/√A depends nonlinearly on √A and decreases with growth of √A up to two or more times. As a computational model for the soil base, the paper considers the nonlinear geomechanical Klein model, according to which the stress-strain modulus of soils increases with depth according to the law of a power function of the form: E(z = E1zn, where n≤1. The solution of the SSC problems for an inhomogeneous ground half-space under the influence of a local load was obtained by an analytical method using the Mathcad software complex on the basis of the Boussinesq-Frohlich concentrated force problem. The results of the solution are presented in tables and distribution diagrams σ(zand S(z, as well as S = f2(√A, n.

  2. Characteristics and management of soils of Aakamkpa area, Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Study was carried out to evaluate the character rustics of the soils of Akamkpa local Government Area (LGA) in Cross River State Nigeria for sustainable Cocoyam production. Free survey method was applied in a reconnaissance soil survey to collect soil samples at 0-30cm depth. 300 soil samples were collected and ...

  3. Correlation between Soil Organic Matter, Total Organic Matter and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    paving stones. Geological data for Kota Bharu district showed that between 0 to 1.5m depth of soil containing mostly silt + clay type of soil (MGD, 1985). According .... classified based on hydrologic soil groups (HSGs) to indicate minimum rate of ..... composition of SOM are attributed to several natural factors that control soil ...

  4. Soil organic carbon covariance with soil water content; a geostatistical analysis in cropland fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, H. R.; Berg, A. A.; von Bertoldi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil texture has traditionally represented the rate of soil water drainage influencing soil water content (WC) in the soil characteristic curves, hydrological models and remote sensing field studies. Although soil organic carbon (OC) has been shown to significantly increase the water holding capacity of soil in individual field studies, evidence is required to consider soil OC as a significant factor in soil WC variability at the scale of a remote sensing footprint (25 km2). The relationship of soil OC to soil WC was evaluated over 50 fields during the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil WC field sampling campaign over southern Manitoba, Canada. On each field, soil WC was measured at 16 sample points, at 100 m spacing to 5 cm depth with Stevens hydra probe sensors on 16 sampling dates from June 7 to July 19, 2012. Soil cores were also taken at sampling sites on each field, each sampling day, to determine gravimetric moisture, bulk density and particle size distribution. On 4 of the sampling dates, soil OC was also determined by loss on ignition on the dried soil samples from all fields. Semivariograms were created from the field mean soil OC and field mean surface soil WC sampled at midrow, over all cropland fields and averaged over all sampling dates. The semivariogram models explained a distinct relationship of both soil OC and WC within the soil over a range of 5 km with a Gaussian curve. The variance in soil that soil OC and WC have in common was a similar Gaussian curve in the cross variogram. Following spatial interpolation with Kriging, the spatial maps of soil OC and WC were also very similar with high covariance over the majority of the sampling area. The close correlation between soil OC and WC suggests they are structurally related in the soil. Soil carbon could thus assist in improving downscaling methods for remotely sensed soil WC and act as a surrogate for interpolation of soil WC.

  5. Aggregate Stability and Erodibility of Purple Soil on Sloping Farmland as affected by different Soil Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinjun; Zhang, Qingwen; Chen, Shanghong; Dong, Yuequn; Xiao, Meijia; Hamed, Lamy Mamdoh Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Soil thickness is basic limiting condition for purple soil, not only due to its effect on crop production, but also its effect on soil structure. Steady-state of soil thickness will be achieved over time, as result the soil aggregate which the key factor of soil erodibility can be enhanced as well. However, the effect of soil thickness on aggregates stability and the characteristics of soil erodibility in sloping land have not yet fully understood.A field survey was conducted in hilly area of Sichuan region located in southeast China to study the relationship between soil aggregate stability and soil erodibility on sloping farmland under different four thickness (100cm, 80cm, 60cm, 30cm) of purple soil. Based on two different sieving methods (Dry and Wet sieving), we analyzed soil aggregate stability and its effect on soil erodibility within depth of 0-30cm soil layers. The results indicated that: Water stable aggregate on sloping farmland was ranged between 37.9% to 58.6%, where it increased with increasing the soil thickness. Moreover, fractal dimension calculated from dry-sieving and wet-sieving was 2.06-2.49 and 2.70-2.85 respectively, where it decreased with decreasing the soil thickness. The overall soil erodibility was 0.05-1.00 and a negative significant correlation was found between soil aggregate stability and erodibility(Psoil profile tended to be high in soil erodibility within the top soil layer (0-30cm). The results reveal that soil thickness can affect soil aggregate stability as well as erodibility. As soil thickness increased, the top soil became more stable and less erodible. Keywords:purple soil; soil thickness; soil aggregate;soil erodibility

  6. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  7. Declining atmospheric deposition of heavy metals over the last three decades is reflected in soil and foliage of 97 beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in the Vienna Woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold; Berger, Torsten W

    2017-11-01

    Rigorous studies on long-term changes of heavy metal distribution in forest soils since the implementation of emission controls are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining deposition of heavy metals is reflected in soil and foliar total contents of Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Mn and Fe. Mean soil contents of Pb in the stemflow area declined at the highest rate from 223 to 50 mg kg-1 within the last three decades. Soil contents of Pb and Ni decreased significantly both in the stemflow area and the between trees area down to 80-90 cm soil depth from 1984 to 2012. Top soil (0-5 cm) accumulation and simultaneous loss in the lower soil over time for the plant micro nutrients Cu and Zn are suggested to be caused by plant uptake from deep horizons. Reduced soil leaching, due to a mean soil pH (H2O) increase from 4.3 to 4.9, and increased plant cycling are put forward to explain the significant increase of total Mn contents in the infiltration zone of beech stemflow. Top soil Pb contents in the stemflow area presently exceed the critical value at which toxicity symptoms may occur at numerous sites. Mean foliar contents of all six studied heavy metals decreased within the last three decades, but plant supply with the micro nutrients Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe is still in the optimum range for beech trees. It is concluded that heavy metal pollution is not critical for the studied beech stands any longer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploiting Redundancy in an OFDM SDR Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Palenik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Common OFDM system contains redundancy necessary to mitigate interblock interference and allows computationally effective single-tap frequency domain equalization in receiver. Assuming the system implements an outer error correcting code and channel state information is available in the receiver, we show that it is possible to understand the cyclic prefix insertion as a weak inner ECC encoding and exploit the introduced redundancy to slightly improve error performance of such a system. In this paper, an easy way to implement modification to an existing SDR OFDM receiver is presented. This modification enables the utilization of prefix redundancy, while preserving full compatibility with existing OFDM-based communication standards.

  9. Art Therapy Exhibitions: Exploitation or Advocacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Promoting awareness of human trafficking by sharing trauma survivors' art and summaries of their life stories suggests ethical complexities that have been typically neglected by bioethicists. Although these survivors voluntarily share the objects they created during art therapy sessions, they are still at risk of harm, including further exploitation, due to their vulnerability, high rates of victim sensitivity, and the mental health consequences of their traumatic experiences. While some argue that the benefits of sublimation and art therapy for human trafficking survivors make sharing their art worth the risk, anti-trafficking organizations and supporters of such art exhibitions have responsibilities to be trauma informed. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Aphid Heritable Symbiont Exploits Defensive Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, Matthew R; Oliver, Kerry M

    2017-04-15

    Insects and other animals commonly form symbioses with heritable bacteria, which can exert large influences on host biology and ecology. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum , is a model for studying effects of infection with heritable facultative symbionts (HFS), and each of its seven common HFS species has been reported to provide resistance to biotic or abiotic stresses. However, one common HFS, called X-type, rarely occurs as a single infection in field populations and instead typically superinfects individual aphids with Hamiltonella defensa , another HFS that protects aphids against attack by parasitic wasps. Using experimental aphid lines comprised of all possible infection combinations in a uniform aphid genotype, we investigated whether the most common strain of X-type provides any of the established benefits associated with aphid HFS as a single infection or superinfection with H. defensa We found that X-type does not confer protection to any tested threats, including parasitoid wasps, fungal pathogens, or thermal stress. Instead, component fitness assays identified large costs associated with X-type infection, costs which were ameliorated in superinfected aphids. Together these findings suggest that X-type exploits the aphid/ H. defensa mutualism and is maintained primarily as a superinfection by "hitchhiking" via the mutualistic benefits provided by another HFS. Exploitative symbionts potentially restrict the functions and distributions of mutualistic symbioses with effects that extend to other community members. IMPORTANCE Maternally transmitted bacterial symbionts are widespread and can have major impacts on the biology of arthropods, including insects of medical and agricultural importance. Given that host fitness and symbiont fitness are tightly linked, inherited symbionts can spread within host populations by providing beneficial services. Many insects, however, are frequently infected with multiple heritable symbiont species, providing potential

  11. Geothermal resources: exploration and exploitation. A bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-07-01

    This comprehensive bibliography contains 5476 citations of foreign and domestic research reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books concerned with the exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources. The coverage dates back as far as useful references could be obtained and extends through June 1976. References are arranged in broad subject categories and are made up of complete bibliographic citations. These are followed by a listing of subject descriptors used to describe the subject content of each reference. Four indexes are included: Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number. Also included is a list of journals from which articles were selected. (LBS)

  12. Soil Quality Indicator: a new concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barão, Lúcia; Basch, Gottlieb

    2017-04-01

    During the last century, cultivated soils have been intensively exploited for food and feed production. This exploitation has compromised the soils' natural functions and many of the soil-mediated ecosystems services, including its production potential for agriculture. Also, soils became increasingly vulnerable and less resilient to a wide range of threats. To overcome this situation, new and better management practices are needed to prevent soil from degradation. However, to adopt the best management practices in a specific location, it is necessary to evaluate the soil quality status first. Different soil quality indicators have been suggested over the last decades in order to evaluate the soil status, and those are often based on the performance of soil chemical, physical and biological properties. However, the direct link between these properties and the associated soil functions or soil vulnerability to threats appears more difficult to be established. This present work is part of the iSQAPER project- Interactive Soil Quality Assessment in Europe and China for Agricultural Productivity and Environmental Resilience, where new soil quality concepts are explored to provide better information regarding the effects of the most promising agricultural management practices on soil quality. We have developed a new conceptual soil quality indicator which determines the soil quality status, regarding its vulnerability towards different threats. First, different indicators were specifically developed for each of the eight threats considered - Erosion, SOM decline, Poor Structure, Poor water holding capacity, Compaction, N-Leaching, Soil-borne pests and diseases and Salinization. As an example for the case of Erosion, the RUSLE equation for the estimate of the soil annual loss was used. Secondly, a reference classification was established for each indicator to integrate all possible results into a Good, Intermediate or Bad classification. Finally, all indicators were

  13. Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted systems: Exploiting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-12-29

    Dec 29, 2006 ... The irrepressible quest for a cheap source of energy to meet the ... Key words: Crude oil, pollution, environment, bioremediation. ... soils has been assessed to be an efficient, economic and ... (2) On-site bioremediation using land-farming or fully .... frequently used by the oil industry to decontaminate oily.

  14. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to water replacement of 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the crop evapotranspiration, with fertilizer levels of 0, 82, 164 and 246 g of calcium-magnesium silicate, with three replications. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with the irrigation depths distributed in bands while the silicon levels constituted the subplots. Corn yield was influenced by calcium-magnesium silicate and by irrigation depth, obtaining the greatest grain yield with the dose of 164 g pot-1 irrigated at the highest water level. The water-use efficiency of in corn production tended to decrease when the irrigation depth was increased. The best water-use efficiency was observed when the irrigation level was between 87 and 174 mm, and the dose of silicate was 164 g pot-1.

  15. Competing Discourses about Youth Sexual Exploitation in Canadian News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M; Miller, Bonnie B; Rivers, Robert; Matthews, Jennifer; Hilario, Carla; Hirakata, Pam

    2013-10-01

    Media holds the power to create, maintain, or break down stigmatizing attitudes, which affect policies, funding, and services. To understand how Canadian news media depicts the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, we examined 835 Canadian newspaper articles from 1989-2008 using a mixed methods critical discourse analysis approach, comparing representations to existing research about sexually exploited youth. Despite research evidence that equal rates of boys and girls experience exploitation, Canadian news media depicted exploited youth predominantly as heterosexual girls, and described them alternately as victims or workers in a trade, often both in the same story. News media mentioned exploiters far less often than victims, and portrayed them almost exclusively as male, most often called 'customers' or 'consumers,' and occasionally 'predators'; in contrast, research has documented the majority of sexually exploited boys report female exploiters. Few news stories over the past two decades portrayed the diversity of victims, perpetrators, and venues of exploitation reported in research. The focus on victims but not exploiters helps perpetuate stereotypes of sexual exploitation as business or a 'victimless crime,' maintains the status quo, and blurs responsibility for protecting youth under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Health care providers and researchers can be advocates for accuracy in media coverage about sexual exploitation; news reporters and editors should focus on exploiters more than victims, draw on existing research evidence to avoid perpetuating stereotypes, and use accurate terms, such as commercial sexual exploitation, rather than terms related to business or trade.

  16. Sensitivity of LISEM predicted catchment discharge to initial soil moisture content of soil profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheikh, V.; van Loon, E.; Hessel, R.; Jetten, V.

    2010-01-01

    This study conducts a broad sensitivity analysis, taking into account the influence of initial soil moisture content in two soil layers, layer depths, event properties, and two infiltration models. A distributed hydrology and soil erosion model (LISEM) is used. Using the terrain data from the Catsop

  17. Inversion of soil electrical conductivity data to estimate layered soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    CBulk apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) sensors respond to multiple soil properties, including clay content, water content, and salt content (i.e., salinity). They provide a single sensor value for an entire soil profile down to a sensor-dependent measurement depth, weighted by a nonlinear...

  18. Sex workers perspectives on strategies to reduce sexual exploitation and HIV risk: a qualitative study in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira M Goldenberg

    Full Text Available Globally, female sex workers are a population at greatly elevated risk of HIV infection, and the reasons for and context of sex industry involvement have key implications for HIV risk and prevention. Evidence suggests that experiences of sexual exploitation (i.e., forced/coerced sex exchange contribute to health-related harms. However, public health interventions that address HIV vulnerability and sexual exploitation are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elicit recommendations for interventions to prevent sexual exploitation and reduce HIV risk from current female sex workers with a history of sexual exploitation or youth sex work. From 2010-2011, we conducted in-depth interviews with sex workers (n = 31 in Tijuana, Mexico who reported having previously experienced sexual exploitation or youth sex work. Participants recommended that interventions aim to (1 reduce susceptibility to sexual exploitation by providing social support and peer-based education; (2 mitigate harms by improving access to HIV prevention resources and psychological support, and reducing gender-based violence; and (3 provide opportunities to exit the sex industry via vocational supports and improved access to effective drug treatment. Structural interventions incorporating these strategies are recommended to reduce susceptibility to sexual exploitation and enhance capacities to prevent HIV infection among marginalized women and girls in Mexico and across international settings.

  19. Sex workers perspectives on strategies to reduce sexual exploitation and HIV risk: a qualitative study in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Engstrom, David; Rolon, Maria Luisa; Silverman, Jay G; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2013-01-01

    Globally, female sex workers are a population at greatly elevated risk of HIV infection, and the reasons for and context of sex industry involvement have key implications for HIV risk and prevention. Evidence suggests that experiences of sexual exploitation (i.e., forced/coerced sex exchange) contribute to health-related harms. However, public health interventions that address HIV vulnerability and sexual exploitation are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elicit recommendations for interventions to prevent sexual exploitation and reduce HIV risk from current female sex workers with a history of sexual exploitation or youth sex work. From 2010-2011, we conducted in-depth interviews with sex workers (n = 31) in Tijuana, Mexico who reported having previously experienced sexual exploitation or youth sex work. Participants recommended that interventions aim to (1) reduce susceptibility to sexual exploitation by providing social support and peer-based education; (2) mitigate harms by improving access to HIV prevention resources and psychological support, and reducing gender-based violence; and (3) provide opportunities to exit the sex industry via vocational supports and improved access to effective drug treatment. Structural interventions incorporating these strategies are recommended to reduce susceptibility to sexual exploitation and enhance capacities to prevent HIV infection among marginalized women and girls in Mexico and across international settings.

  20. Distributed multi-hypothesis coding of depth maps using texture motion information and optical flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmistraro, Matteo; Zamarin, Marco; Rakêt, Lars Lau

    2013-01-01

    Distributed Video Coding (DVC) is a video coding paradigm allowing a shift of complexity from the encoder to the decoder. Depth maps are images enabling the calculation of the distance of an object from the camera, which can be used in multiview coding in order to generate virtual views, but also...... in single view coding for motion detection or image segmentation. In this work, we address the problem of depth map video DVC encoding in a single-view scenario. We exploit the motion of the corresponding texture video which is highly correlated with the depth maps. In order to extract the motion...

  1. A joint multi-view plus depth image coding scheme based on 3D-warping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamarin, Marco; Zanuttigh, Pietro; Milani, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Free viewpoint video applications and autostereoscopic displays require the transmission of multiple views of a scene together with depth maps. Current compression and transmission solutions just handle these two data streams as separate entities. However, depth maps contain key information...... on the scene structure that can be effectively exploited to improve the performance of multi-view coding schemes. In this paper we introduce a novel coding architecture that replaces the inter-view motion prediction operation with a 3D warping approach based on depth information to improve the coding...

  2. Soil salinity prediction using electromagnetic induction method in gypsiferous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouksila, Fethi; Persson, Magnus; Bahri, Akiça; Berndtsson, Ronny; Ben Slimane, Abir

    2017-04-01

    In arid and semiarid regions, secondary soil salinization is considered a main danger to the sustainability of irrigated land and agricultural production. Thus, accurate and rapid estimation of soil salinity should be readily available to farmers during crop development to increase productivity and to contribute to sustainable land planning aimed at mitigating soil degradation. Measurement of electrical conductivity in saturated paste extracts (ECe) is a standard method for which other salinity estimation methods are referenced. In the present study, we investigated the possibilities to use the EM38 to predict field ECe in a saline gypsiferous soil of the Saharian-climate Fatnassa oasis (Tunisia) under shallow and saline groundwater. On the 114 ha oasis, an experimental network system of 27 agricultural plots was chosen for monitoring soil properties (ECa-EM38, soil particle size, gypsum content, soil moisture, and ECe) and groundwater (depth, Dgw, electrical conductivity, and ECgw). Samples were taken during 4 years (2001 to 2004) at experimental plots and soil profiles were sampled at 0.2 m depth intervals to 1.2 m for physical and chemical analysis. The results showed that significant lnECe-EM relationships could be developed. However, results also indicated that for better accuracy of soil salinity prediction using the EM38, it is advisable to perform calibrations for each measurement period.

  3. Emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass and jimsonweed from two depths when switching from conventional to reduced and no-till conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios P. Vasileiadis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A cylinder experiment was conducted in northern Greece during 2005 and 2006 to assess emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L. Beauv. and jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. in the case of a switch from conventional to conservation tillage systems (CT. Emergence was surveyed from two burial depths (5 and 10 cm and with simulation of reduced tillage (i.e. by soil disturbance and no-till conditions. Barnyardgrass emergence was significantly affected by burial depth, having greater emergence from 5 cm depth (96% although even 78% of seedlings emerged from 10 cm depth after the two years of study. Emergence of barnyardgrass was stable across years from the different depths and tillage regimes. Jimsonweed seeds showed lower germination than barnyardgrass during the study period, whereas its emergence was significantly affected by soil disturbance having 41% compared to 28% without disturbance. A burial depth x soil disturbance interaction was also determined, which showed higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance. Jimsonweed was found to have significantly higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance in Year 2. Seasonal emergence timing of barnyardgrass did not vary between the different burial depth and soil disturbance regimes, as it started in April and lasted until end of May in both years. Jimsonweed showed a bimodal pattern, with first emergence starting end of April until mid-May and the second ranging from mid-June to mid-August from 10 cm burial depth and from mid-July to mid-August from 5 cm depth, irrespective of soil disturbance in both cases.

  4. Emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass and jimsonweed from two depths when switching from conventional to reduced and no-till conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasileiadis, V.; Froud-Williams, R.J.; Loddo, D.; Eleftherohorinos, I.G.

    2016-11-01

    A cylinder experiment was conducted in northern Greece during 2005 and 2006 to assess emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv.) and jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L.) in the case of a switch from conventional to conservation tillage systems (CT). Emergence was surveyed from two burial depths (5 and 10 cm) and with simulation of reduced tillage (i.e. by soil disturbance) and no-till conditions. Barnyardgrass emergence was significantly affected by burial depth, having greater emergence from 5 cm depth (96%) although even 78% of seedlings emerged from 10 cm depth after the two years of study. Emergence of barnyardgrass was stable across years from the different depths and tillage regimes. Jimsonweed seeds showed lower germination than barnyardgrass during the study period, whereas its emergence was significantly affected by soil disturbance having 41% compared to 28% without disturbance. A burial depth x soil disturbance interaction was also determined, which showed higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance. Jimsonweed was found to have significantly higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance in Year 2. Seasonal emergence timing of barnyardgrass did not vary between the different burial depth and soil disturbance regimes, as it started in April and lasted until end of May in both years. Jimsonweed showed a bimodal pattern, with first emergence starting end of April until mid-May and the second ranging from mid-June to mid-August from 10 cm burial depth and from mid-July to mid-August from 5 cm depth, irrespective of soil disturbance in both cases. (Author)

  5. Ultrasonic Flaw Imaging via Multipath Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin D. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider ultrasonic imaging for the visualization of flaws in a material. Ultrasonic imaging is a powerful nondestructive testing (NDT tool which assesses material conditions via the detection, localization, and classification of flaws inside a structure. We utilize reflections of ultrasonic signals which occur when encountering different media and interior boundaries. These reflections can be cast as direct paths to the target corresponding to the virtual sensors appearing on the top and bottom side of the target. Some of these virtual sensors constitute a virtual aperture, whereas in others, the aperture changes with the transmitter position. Exploitations of multipath extended virtual array apertures provide enhanced imaging capability beyond the limitation of traditional multisensor approaches. The waveforms observed at the physical as well as the virtual sensors yield additional measurements corresponding to different aspect angles, thus allowing proper multiview imaging of flaws. We derive the wideband point spread functions for dominant multipaths and show that fusion of physical and virtual sensor data improves the flaw perimeter detection and localization performance. The effectiveness of the proposed multipath exploitation approach is demonstrated using real data.

  6. Compressed sensing MRI exploiting complementary dual decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2014-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) MRI exploits the sparsity of an image in a transform domain to reconstruct the image from incoherently under-sampled k-space data. However, it has been shown that CS suffers particularly from loss of low-contrast image features with increasing reduction factors. To retain image details in such degraded experimental conditions, in this work we introduce a novel CS reconstruction method exploiting feature-based complementary dual decomposition with joint estimation of local scale mixture (LSM) model and images. Images are decomposed into dual block sparse components: total variation for piecewise smooth parts and wavelets for residuals. The LSM model parameters of residuals in the wavelet domain are estimated and then employed as a regional constraint in spatially adaptive reconstruction of high frequency subbands to restore image details missing in piecewise smooth parts. Alternating minimization of the dual image components subject to data consistency is performed to extract image details from residuals and add them back to their complementary counterparts while the LSM model parameters and images are jointly estimated in a sequential fashion. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method in preserving low-contrast image features even at high reduction factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ROUNDTABLE - SESSION 2 EXPLOITATION, CONSERVATION AND LEGISLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDSMAN L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between socioeconomics and conservation and the role of legislation in conservation work was discussed in the group with participants from nine European countries. Interest and knowledge among the general public, stakeholders and managers is the key to successful conservation of native crayfish species. Exploitation and conservation do not necessarily exclude each other. A controlled fishery, where it can be sustained, may be an essential tool for conservation by increasing the general awareness and involving more people in the task of protecting the native crayfish species. This strategy is mainly possible for the noble crayfish in the northern part of its distribution, where strong traditions connected to crayfish also exist. A balance between utilisation and overexploitation has to be found and local guidelines for sustainable exploitation produced. Media, the Internet and educational material aimed at schools and stakeholders are excellent ways of reaching a wide audience with information. Universal objectives, rules and regulations at the European level are desirable and the noble crayfish and the stone crayfish should be included in Annex II of the Habitat Directive. Based on this framework detailed regulations are best worked out at the national level, considering the specific crayfish situation in the country. Information about the legislation, the purpose of the legislation and the consequences when not obeying it should be distributed. Stricter regulation of the trade with live alien crayfish is vital because of the associated risk of introducing new diseases and species.

  8. Exploiting time in electronic health record correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J; Perotte, Adler

    2011-12-01

    To demonstrate that a large, heterogeneous clinical database can reveal fine temporal patterns in clinical associations; to illustrate several types of associations; and to ascertain the value of exploiting time. Lagged linear correlation was calculated between seven clinical laboratory values and 30 clinical concepts extracted from resident signout notes from a 22-year, 3-million-patient database of electronic health records. Time points were interpolated, and patients were normalized to reduce inter-patient effects. The method revealed several types of associations with detailed temporal patterns. Definitional associations included low blood potassium preceding 'hypokalemia.' Low potassium preceding the drug spironolactone with high potassium following spironolactone exemplified intentional and physiologic associations, respectively. Counterintuitive results such as the fact that diseases appeared to follow their effects may be due to the workflow of healthcare, in which clinical findings precede the clinician's diagnosis of a disease even though the disease actually preceded the findings. Fully exploiting time by interpolating time points produced less noisy results. Electronic health records are not direct reflections of the patient state, but rather reflections of the healthcare process and the recording process. With proper techniques and understanding, and with proper incorporation of time, interpretable associations can be derived from a large clinical database. A large, heterogeneous clinical database can reveal clinical associations, time is an important feature, and care must be taken to interpret the results.

  9. PROBA-V Mission Exploitation Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Goor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As an extension of the PROBA-Vegetation (PROBA-V user segment, the European Space Agency (ESA, de Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO, and partners TRASYS and Spacebel developed an operational Mission Exploitation Platform (MEP to drastically improve the exploitation of the PROBA-V Earth Observation (EO data archive, the archive from the historical SPOT-VEGETATION mission, and derived products by researchers, service providers, and thematic users. The analysis of the time series of data (petabyte range is addressed, as well as the large scale on-demand processing of the complete archive, including near real-time data. The platform consists of a private cloud environment, a Hadoop-based processing environment and a data manager. Several applications are released to the users, e.g., a full resolution viewing service, a time series viewer, pre-defined on-demand processing chains, and virtual machines with powerful tools and access to the data. After an initial release in January 2016 a research platform was deployed gradually, allowing users to design, debug, and test applications on the platform. From the PROBA-V MEP, access to, e.g., Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3 data will be addressed as well.

  10. Toward creating a global map of drainage rate using satellite soil moisture data as the only input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilvand, Ehsan; Brocca, Luca; Massari, Christian; Ghazi Zadeh Hashemi, SedighehAlSadat; Ciabatta, Luca; Tajrishy, Masoud

    2017-04-01

    The parameterization of hydrological processes over large areas is extremely difficult. The large heterogeneities in soil surface conditions makes impracticable to obtain reliable estimates of soil hydraulic parameters for areas larger than few squared kilometers. However, the knowledge of these parameters on a global scale is essential for a number of hydrological and climatic applications. For instance, their use within SM2RAIN algorithm (Brocca et al., 2014) would allow to obtain a self-calibrated precipitation product based on soil moisture data and independent from any other data sources. In this study, a new approach is suggested to estimate the coefficients of the drainage rate at satellite footprint scale ( 25 km) by using only satellite soil moisture data. To this end, discrete dry down events after rainfall are selected during the periods in which surface runoff and evapotranspiration rates are negligible compared to the drainage rate. Then, by exploiting the water balance equation, soil moisture recession curves are analyzed to derive the coefficients of a power law model of drainage rate. Scientific challenge here is the selection of dry down intervals, mainly because no ancillary data, like precipitation, is used to identify the drying periods. In-situ soil moisture data from 10 sites across the world characterized by different soils, land uses and climatic regimes, and three satellite soil moisture datasets from the Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and the Soil moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are considered as the soil moisture datasets. Finally, to validate the model results at satellite footprint, an indirect method is used to determine the correlation between model outputs and some relating parameters (e.g., soil texture, vegetation cover). The preliminary results show that the model can capture the dynamic of drying process at point and satellite footprint scale. However, the drainage rates

  11. Depth measurement in integral images.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, ChunHong

    2003-01-01

    The development of a satisfactory the three-dimensional image system is a constant pursuit of the scientific community and entertainment industry. Among the many different methods of producing three-dimensional images, integral imaging is a technique that is capable of creating and encoding a true volume spatial optical model of the object scene in the form of a planar intensity distribution by using unique optical components. The generation of depth maps from three-dimensional integral image...

  12. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  13. Topsoil depth substantially influences the responses to drought of the foliar metabolomes of Mediterranean forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Barbeta, Adrià; Sardans, Jordi; Guenther, Alex; Ogaya, Romà; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Soils provide physical support, water, and nutrients to terrestrial plants. Upper soil layers are crucial for forest dynamics, especially under drought conditions, because many biological processes occur there and provide support, water and nutrients to terrestrial plants. We postulated that tree size and overall plant function manifested in the metabolome composition, the total set of metabolites, were dependent on the depth of upper soil layers and on water availability. We sampled leaves for stoichiometric and metabolomic analyses once per season from differently sized Quercus ilex trees under natural and experimental drought conditions as projected for the coming decades. Different sized trees had different metabolomes and plots with shallower soils had smaller trees. Soil moisture of the upper soil did not explain the tree size and smaller trees did not show higher concentrations of biomarker metabolites related to drought stress. However, the impact of drought treatment on metabolomes was higher in smaller trees in shallower soils. Our results suggested that tree size was more dependent on the depth of the upper soil layers, which indirectly affect the metabolomes of the trees, than on the moisture content of the upper soil layers. Metabolomic profiling of Q. ilex supported the premise that water availability in the upper soil layers was not necessarily correlated with tree size. The higher impact of drought on trees growing in shallower soils nevertheless indicates a higher vulnerability of small trees to the future increase in frequency, intensity, and duration of drought projected for the Mediterranean Basin and other areas. Metabolomics has proven to be an excellent tool detecting significant metabolic changes among differently sized individuals of the same species and it improves our understanding of the connection between plant metabolomes and environmental variables such as soil depth and moisture content.

  14. Effect of soil coarseness on soil base cations and available micronutrients in a semi-arid sandy grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Linyou; Wang, Ruzhen; Liu, Heyong; Yin, Jinfei; Xiao, Jiangtao; Wang, Zhengwen; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Guoqing; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Soil coarseness is the main process decreasing soil organic matter and threatening the productivity of sandy grasslands. Previous studies demonstrated negative effect of soil coarseness on soil carbon storage, but less is known about how soil base cations (exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, and Na) and available micronutrients (available Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) response to soil coarseness. In a semi-arid grassland of Northern China, a field experiment was initiated in 2011 to mimic the effect of soil coarseness on soil base cations and available micronutrients by mixing soil with different mass proportions of sand: 0 % coarse elements (C0), 10 % (C10), 30 % (C30), 50 % (C50), and 70 % (C70). Soil coarseness significantly increased soil pH in three soil depths of 0-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm with the highest pH values detected in C50 and C70 treatments. Soil fine particles (smaller than 0.25 mm) significantly decreased with the degree of soil coarseness. Exchangeable Ca and Mg concentrations significantly decreased with soil coarseness degree by up to 29.8 % (in C70) and 47.5 % (in C70), respectively, across three soil depths. Soil available Fe, Mn, and Cu significantly decreased with soil coarseness degree by 62.5, 45.4, and 44.4 %, respectively. As affected by soil coarseness, the increase of soil pH, decrease of soil fine particles (including clay), and decline in soil organic matter were the main driving factors for the decrease of exchangeable base cations (except K) and available micronutrients (except Zn) through soil profile. Developed under soil coarseness, the loss and redistribution of base cations and available micronutrients along soil depths might pose a threat to ecosystem productivity of this sandy grassland.

  15. Quantifying the impact of groundwater depth on evapotranspiration in a semi-arid grassland region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Soylu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between shallow groundwater and land surface processes play an important role in the ecohydrology of riparian zones. Some recent land surface models (LSMs incorporate groundwater-land surface interactions using parameterizations at varying levels of detail. In this paper, we examine the sensitivity of land surface evapotranspiration (ET to water table depth, soil texture, and two commonly used soil hydraulic parameter datasets using four models with varying levels of complexity. The selected models are Hydrus-1D, which solves the pressure-based Richards equation, the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS, which simulates interactions among multiple soil layers using a (water-content variant of the Richards equation, and two forms of a steady-state capillary flux model coupled with a single-bucket soil moisture model. These models are first evaluated using field observations of climate, soil moisture, and groundwater levels at a semi-arid site in south-central Nebraska, USA. All four models are found to compare reasonably well with observations, particularly when the effects of groundwater are included. We then examine the sensitivity of modelled ET to water table depth for various model formulations, node spacings, and soil textures (using soil hydraulic parameter values from two different sources, namely Rawls and Clapp-Hornberger. The results indicate a strong influence of soil texture and water table depth on groundwater contributions to ET. Furthermore, differences in texture-specific, class-averaged soil parameters obtained from the two literature sources lead to large differences in the simulated depth and thickness of the "critical zone" (i.e., the zone within which variations in water table depth strongly impact surface ET. Depending on the depth-to-groundwater, this can also lead to large discrepancies in simulated ET (in some cases by more than a factor of two. When the Clapp-Hornberger soil parameter dataset is used, the

  16. Virtual Exploitation Environment Demonstration for Atmospheric Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Stefano; Mantovani, Simone; Hirtl, Marcus; Santillan, Daniel; Triebnig, Gerhard; Fehr, Thorsten; Lopes, Cristiano

    2017-04-01

    The scientific and industrial communities are being confronted with a strong increase of Earth Observation (EO) satellite missions and related data. This is in particular the case for the Atmospheric Sciences communities, with the upcoming Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor, Sentinel-4, -5 and -3, and ESA's Earth Explorers scientific satellites ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE. The challenge is not only to manage the large volume of data generated by each mission / sensor, but to process and analyze the data streams. Creating synergies among the different datasets will be key to exploit the full potential of the available information. As a preparation activity supporting scientific data exploitation for Earth Explorer and Sentinel atmospheric missions, ESA funded the "Technology and Atmospheric Mission Platform" (TAMP) [1] [2] project; a scientific and technological forum (STF) has been set-up involving relevant European entities from different scientific and operational fields to define the platforḿs requirements. Data access, visualization, processing and download services have been developed to satisfy useŕs needs; use cases defined with the STF, such as study of the SO2 emissions for the Holuhraun eruption (2014) by means of two numerical models, two satellite platforms and ground measurements, global Aerosol analyses from long time series of satellite data, and local Aerosol analysis using satellite and LIDAR, have been implemented to ensure acceptance of TAMP by the atmospheric sciences community. The platform pursues the "virtual workspace" concept: all resources (data, processing, visualization, collaboration tools) are provided as "remote services", accessible through a standard web browser, to avoid the download of big data volumes and for allowing utilization of provided infrastructure for computation, analysis and sharing of results. Data access and processing are achieved through standardized protocols (WCS, WPS). As evolution toward a pre

  17. Total exploitation of an ornamental granite quarry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taboada, J.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a methodology to estimate the recovery percentage for each of the products which can be obtained from the exploitation of an ornamental granite quarry: block, semiblock, masonry-transverse stone, and the smaller materials that can be used to obtain construction aggregates. This methodology ensures that quarry exploitation is exhaustive, thereby minimising the production of spoils and the consequent negative impact on the environment. The analysis is based on a detailed and exhaustive compilation of discontinuity data from the research fronts, which are then interpreted statistically and projected over the three weakness planes that are a particular feature of ornamental granite deposits. Using this information, and bearing in mind the minimum commercially viable sizes for each kind of granite, the corresponding recovery rates are calculated for each material in each plane. The results are then integrated using spatial techniques, and the result is an evaluation of quarry contents with a view to total exploitation. This methodology was applied to a quarry in the opening phase in order to carry out an a priori assessment of the economic feasibility of the quarry.

    En este trabajo se propone una metodología para estimar el porcentaje de recuperación de cada uno de los productos que se pueden obtener en la explotación de una cantera de granito ornamental: bloque, semibloque, manpostería y per piaños, y material restante destinado a la obtención de áridos. De esta manera se logra un aprovechamiento integral de la cantera, evitándose la generación de estériles y el subsiguiente impacto ambiental producido por éstos. La metodología de análisis se basa en la recopilación detallada y exhaustiva de datos de discontinuidades en los frentes de investigación, que se interpretan estadísticamente y se proyectan sobre los tres planos de debilidad propios del granito ornamental. Con esta información, y las

  18. Variation of curve number with storm depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, K.; Hejduk, L.

    2012-04-01

    The NRCS Curve Number (known also as SCS-CN) method is well known as a tool in predicting flood runoff depth from small ungauged catchment. The traditional way of determination the CNs, based on soil characteristics, land use and hydrological conditions, seemed to have tendency to overpredict the floods in some cases. Over 30 year rainfall-runoff data, collected in two small (A=23.4 & 82.4 km2), lowland, agricultural catchments in Center of Poland (Banasik & Woodward 2010), were used to determine runoff Curve Number and to check a tendency of changing. The observed CN declines with increasing storm size, which according recent views of Hawkins (1993) could be classified as a standard response of watershed. The analysis concluded, that using CN value according to the procedure described in USDA-SCS Handbook one receives representative value for estimating storm runoff from high rainfall depths in the analyzes catchments. This has been confirmed by applying "asymptotic approach" for estimating the watershed curve number from the rainfall-runoff data. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that CN, estimated from mean retention parameter S of recorded events with rainfall depth higher than initial abstraction, is also approaching the theoretical CN. The observed CN, ranging from 59.8 to 97.1 and from 52.3 to 95.5, in the smaller and the larger catchment respectively, declines with increasing storm size, which has been classified as a standard response of watershed. The investigation demonstrated also changeability of the CN during a year, with much lower values during the vegetation season. Banasik K. & D.E. Woodward (2010). "Empirical determination of curve number for a small agricultural watrshed in Poland". 2nd Joint Federal Interagency Conference, Las Vegas, NV, June 27 - July 1, 2010 (http://acwi.gov/sos/pubs/2ndJFIC/Contents/10E_Banasik_ 28_02_10. pdf). Hawkins R. H. (1993). "Asymptotic determination of curve numbers from data". Journal of Irrigation and Drainage

  19. Application of digital soil mapping in Argentina: An example using apparent soil electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Marisa; Castro Franco, Mauricio; Costa, Jose Luis; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) has been used to capture soil data in several Argentinean Pampas locations. The aim of this study was to generate digital soil mapping on the basis of understanding the relation among ECa and soil properties in three farming fields of the southeast Buenos Aires province. We carried out a geostatistical analysis using ECa data obtained at two depths 0-30cm (ECa_30cm) and 0-90cm (ECa_90cm). Then, two zones derived from ECa measurements were delimited in each field. A soil-sampling scheme was applied in each zone using two depths: 0-30cm and 30-90cm. Texture, Organic Matter Content (OMC), cation-exchange capacity (CEC), pH, saturated paste electrical conductivity (ECe) and effective depth were analyzed. The relation between zones and soil properties were studied using nested factor ANOVA. Our results indicated that clay content and effective depth showed significant differences among ECa_30 zones in all fields. In Argentine Pampas, the presence of petrocalcic horizons limits the effective soil depth at field scale. These horizons vary in depth, structure, hardness and carbonates content. In addition, they influence the spatial pattern of clay content. The relation among other physical and chemical soil properties was not consistent. Two soil unit maps were delimited in each field. These results might support irrigation management due to clay content and effective depth would be controlling soil water storage. Our findings highlight the high accuracy use of soil sensors in developing digital soil mapping at field scale, irrigation management zones, precision agriculture and hydrological modeling in Pampas region conditions.

  20. Effects of Hurricane-Felled Tree Trunks on Soil Carbon, Nitrogen, Microbial Biomass, and Root Length in a Wet Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jean Lodge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Decaying coarse woody debris can affect the underlying soil either by augmenting nutrients that can be exploited by tree roots, or by diminishing nutrient availability through stimulation of microbial nutrient immobilization. We analyzed C, N, microbial biomass C and root length in closely paired soil samples taken under versus 20–50 cm away from large trunks of two species felled by Hugo (1989 and Georges (1998 three times during wet and dry seasons over the two years following the study conducted by Georges. Soil microbial biomass, % C and % N were significantly higher under than away from logs felled by both hurricanes (i.e., 1989 and 1998, at all sampling times and at both depths (0–10 and 10–20 cm. Frass from wood boring beetles may contribute to early effects. Root length was greater away from logs during the dry season, and under logs in the wet season. Root length was correlated with microbial biomass C, soil N and soil moisture (R = 0.36, 0.18, and 0.27, respectively; all p values < 0.05. Microbial biomass C varied significantly among seasons but differences between positions (under vs. away were only suggestive. Microbial C was correlated with soil N (R = 0.35. Surface soil on the upslope side of the logs had significantly more N and microbial biomass, likely from accumulation of leaf litter above the logs on steep slopes. We conclude that decaying wood can provide ephemeral resources that are exploited by tree roots during some seasons.

  1. Benchmark values for forest soil carbon stocks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vos, Bruno; Cools, Nathalie; Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in forest floors and in mineral and peat forest soils were estimated at the European scale. The assessment was based on measured C concentration, bulk density, coarse fragments and effective soil depth data originating from 4914 plots in 22 EU countries belonging...... to the UN/ECE ICP Forests 16 × 16 km Level I network. Plots were sampled and analysed according to harmonized methods during the 2nd European Forest Soil Condition Survey. Using continuous carbon density depth functions, we estimated SOC stocks to 30-cm and 1-m depth, and stratified these stocks according...... to 22 WRB Reference Soil Groups (RSGs) and 8 humus forms to provide European scale benchmark values. Average SOC stocks amounted to 22.1 t C ha− 1 in forest floors, 108 t C ha− 1 in mineral soils and 578 t C ha− 1 in peat soils, to 1 m depth. Relative to 1-m stocks, the vertical SOC distribution...

  2. Land use impact on soil quality in eastern Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A K; Bordoloi, L J; Kumar, Manoj; Hazarika, S; Parmar, Brajendra

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of soil quality is required to determine the sustainability of land uses in terms of environmental quality and plant productivity. Our objective was to identify the most appropriate soil quality indicators and to evaluate the impact of six most prevalent land use types (natural forestland, cultivated lowland, cultivated upland terrace, shifting cultivation, plantation land, and grassland) on soil quality in eastern Himalayan region of India. We collected 120 soil samples (20 cm depth) and analyzed them for 29 physical, chemical, and biological soil attributes. For selection of soil quality indicators, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the measured attributes, which provided four principal components (PC) with eigenvalues >1 and explaining at least 5% of the variance in dataset. The four PCs together explained 92.6% of the total variance. Based on rotated factor loadings of soil attributes, selected indicators were: soil organic carbon (SOC) from PC-1, exchangeable Al from PC-2, silt content from PC-3, and available P and Mn from PC-4. Indicators were transformed into scores (linear scoring method) and soil quality index (SQI) was determined, on a scale of 0-1, using the weighting factors obtained from PCA. SQI rating was the highest for the least-disturbed sites, i.e., natural forestland (0.93) and grassland (0.87), and the lowest for the most intensively cultivated site, i.e., cultivated upland terrace (0.44). Ratings for the other land uses were shifting cultivation (0.60) > cultivated low land (0.57) > plantation land (0.54). Overall contribution (in percent) of the indicators in determination of SQI was in the order: SOC (58%) > exch. Al (17.1%) > available P (8.9%) > available Mn (8.2%) > silt content (7.8%). Results of this study suggest SOC and exch. Al as the two most powerful indicators of soil quality in study area. Thus, organic C and soil acidity management holds the key to improve soil

  3. How to attract pupils for soil education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskova, Beata

    2013-04-01

    At present time is the protection of the environment more and more important. Soil as integral part of the environment has to be protected and exploited according to the principles of sustainability. Soil is considered as non renewable resource because of very long time (more than the human life) of its creation. Also degradation processes of soil need very long time for removal of their effect and the result is not always the same soil as it was before degradation - quality of many soil properties is lost and the recovery process is time and many consuming. People simply need healthy soil for their existence of the Earth. Because of these facts the soil protection and sustainable use is crucial. Thus crucial is also education of young generation to be able to understand the value of soil for human beings.Soil is very multifunctional subject, thus also education of its protection can be variable. One way which we used was to attract children via painting competition with the topic: Soil importance and protection. Children had to create pictures by use colours made directly from different soils. The response was very positive. Children understand very well the importance of soil protection. What they do not understand, but what they recognized is that sometimes adults use soil in such a way which leads to soil degradation.

  4. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas systems for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Timothy R; Weiss, David S

    2014-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is the central component of the Type II CRISPR/Cas system, a prokaryotic adaptive restriction system against invading nucleic acids, such as those originating from bacteriophages and plasmids. Recently, this RNA-directed DNA endonuclease has been harnessed to target DNA sequences of interest. Here, we review the development of Cas9 as an important tool to not only edit the genomes of a number of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic species, but also as an efficient system for site-specific transcriptional repression or activation. Additionally, a specific Cas9 protein has been observed to target an RNA substrate, suggesting that Cas9 may have the ability to be programmed to target RNA as well. Cas proteins from other CRISPR/Cas subtypes may also be exploited in this regard. Thus, CRISPR/Cas systems represent an effective and versatile biotechnological tool, which will have significant impact on future advancements in genome engineering. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Exploiting HRM in support of lean manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Matthiesen, Rikke

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in HRM practices are-and could potentially be-exploited to support lean manufacturing in practice. First, a review of the pertinent literature regarding HRM, SHRM, and lean manufacturing is presented to provide an understanding of the mechanisms...... by which HRM practices could, theoretically, be used to support a lean implementation. Data presented in the paper are derived from 1) a longitudinal case study on lean implementation and 2) from managers currently involved with lean manufacturing in a second company. The relevant literature and the data......'s contribution to the change process itself and through bundling particular HRM practices that are aligned with the lean strategy. The paper contributes to both theory and practice, by suggesting specific ways in which HRM can be strategically aligned with a major change implementation such as lean manufacturing....

  6. Automatic image exploitation system for small UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, N.; Esswein, M.; Krüger, W.; Saur, G.

    2008-04-01

    For surveillance and reconnaissance tasks small UAVs are of growing importance. These UAVs have an endurance of several hours, but a small payload of about some kilograms. As a consequence lightweight sensors and cameras have to be used without having a mechanical stabilized high precision sensor-platform, which would exceed the payload and cost limitations. An example of such a system is the German UAV Luna with optical and IR sensors on board. For such platforms we developed image exploitation algorithms. The algorithms comprise mosaiking, stabilization, image enhancement, video based moving target indication, and stereo-image generation. Other products are large geo-coded image mosaics, stereo mosaics, and 3-D-model generation. For test and assessment of these algorithms the experimental system ABUL has been developed, in which the algorithms are integrated. The ABUL system is used for tests and assessment by military PIs.

  7. Protocol to Exploit Waiting Resources for UASNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ling Hung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transmission speed of acoustic waves in water is much slower than that of radio waves in terrestrial wireless sensor networks. Thus, the propagation delay in underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASN is much greater. Longer propagation delay leads to complicated communication and collision problems. To solve collision problems, some studies have proposed waiting mechanisms; however, long waiting mechanisms result in low bandwidth utilization. To improve throughput, this study proposes a slotted medium access control protocol to enhance bandwidth utilization in UASNs. The proposed mechanism increases communication by exploiting temporal and spatial resources that are typically idle in order to protect communication against interference. By reducing wait time, network performance and energy consumption can be improved. A performance evaluation demonstrates that when the data packets are large or sensor deployment is dense, the energy consumption of proposed protocol is less than that of existing protocols as well as the throughput is higher than that of existing protocols.

  8. Intertemporal Choice of Marine Ecosystem Exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Jonsen, Lars

    Management, however, requires models that can link the ecosystem level to the operation level, so this paper examines an ecosystem production model and shows that it is suitable for applying ground rent theory. This model is the simplest possible that incorporates the principles of size as the main...... at the ecosystem level in the present management. Therefore, economic predictions for an ecosystem managed as a common pool resource must be that  the exploitation probably are conducted at lower sized than optimum. In addition, given its population stock approach, the present management probably overlooks...... the ability of an ecosystem to sustain total volume of harvest. Given the two aspects of intertemporal choice revealed by the model, the conclusion must be that the Fishing Down Marine Food Webs is probably driven by the current management's inability to conduct adequate intertemporal balancing; therefore...

  9. CHARACTERISTICS OF HYDROCARBON EXPLOITATION IN ARCTIC CIRCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lež

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of large quantities of hydrocarbons is supposed within the Arctic Circle. Assumed quantities are 25% of the total undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves on Earth, mostly natural gas. Over 500 major and minor gas accumulations within the Arctic Circle were discovered so far, but apart from Snøhvit gas field, there is no commercial exploitation of natural gas from these fields. Arctic gas projects are complicated, technically hard to accomplish, and pose a great threat to the return of investment, safety of people and equipment and for the ecosystem. Russia is a country that is closest to the realization of the Arctic gas projects that are based on the giant gas fields. The most extreme weather conditions in the seas around Greenland are the reason why this Arctic region is the least explored and furthest from the realization of any gas project (the paper is published in Croatian .

  10. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  11. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  12. Impact of mercury mine and smelter St. Ana – Podljubelj on spatial distribution of chemical elements in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Teršič

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research project was to establish the extension of Hg pollution as a consequence of mining and smelting activities in a narrow Alpine valley. The St. Ana mine was first exploited as early as in 1557 and was finally abandoned in 1902. The entire operating period yielded about 110.000 tons of ore, from which 360 tons of Hg was produced. By soil sampling it was established that on about 9 ha the Hg contents in soil exceed the Slovenian critical values for soil (10 mg/kg. The estimated mercury mean for the studied area is 1.3 mg/kg (0.17 – 718 mg/kg. The highest contents of mercury in soilswere found in the area of the mercury smelter.That is a consequence of former atmospheric emissions and technological losses. High values of Hg were found also in soil on the mine and smelter waste dump. The highest determined contents of Hg (108 mg/kg in this area are almost 7-times lower than thecontents of Hg in the area of the smelter. Mercury in soils generally decrease with depth and distance from the mine and smelter. Apart from the area around the former mine and smelter, mercury appear in higher concentrations also along the road that runs along thevalley, which is due to the use of Hg bearing mine tailings in road construction.

  13. Uranium Concentration of Contaminated Zone due to the Cover Depth for Self-Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Sung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Il Gook; Han, Gyu Seong; Choi, Jong Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To acquire radiation dose under self disposal from them, the study on decontamination of some uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes was performed using electrokinetic-electrodialytic. In this study, we evaluated radiation dose due to cover depth on contaminated zone such as uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit using RESRAD Version 6.5. At first, the calculation of the radiation dose on the contaminated zone are carried out. The second, the uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth are also analyzed. The uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit by decontaminating them have application to self-disposal of contaminated zone. The area of contaminated zone is 1,500 m{sup 2}. The thickness of contaminated zone is 2 m. The length parallel to aquifer flow is 43.702m. The age of the residents on contaminated zone is 15 years old. The period of evaluation on the contaminated zone is from regulation exemption of uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes till 1,000 years. The calculation of the radiation dose on contaminated zone are carried out. The uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth was also analyzed. as the cover depth increases, the uranium concentration has an increasing trend. As the cover depth increases, radiation dose of a person has a decreasing trend. As the cover depth increases, the radiation dose of residents has also a decreasing trend.

  14. Subdivision depth for triangular surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this attempt was to present an efficient algorithm for the evaluation of error bound of triangular subdivision surfaces. The error estimation technique is based on first order difference and this process is independent of parametrization. This technique can be easily generalized to higher arity triangular surfaces. The estimated error bound is expressed in-terms of initial control point sequence and constants. Here, we efficiently estimate error bound between triangular surface and its control polygon after k-fold subdivision and further extended to evaluate subdivision depth of the scheme.

  15. Structural modeling from depth images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Reitmayr, Gerhard; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present a new automatic system for scene reconstruction of high-level structural models. We start with identifying planar regions in depth images obtained with a SLAM system. Our main contribution is an approach which identifies constraints such as incidence and orthogonality of planar surfaces and uses them in an incremental optimization framework to extract high-level structural models. The result is a manifold mesh with a low number of polygons, immediately useful in many Augmented Reality applications such as inspection, interior design or spatial interaction.

  16. Static stereo vision depth distortions in teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, D. B.; Von Sydow, M.

    1988-01-01

    A major problem in high-precision teleoperation is the high-resolution presentation of depth information. Stereo television has so far proved to be only a partial solution, due to an inherent trade-off among depth resolution, depth distortion and the alignment of the stereo image pair. Converged cameras can guarantee image alignment but suffer significant depth distortion when configured for high depth resolution. Moving the stereo camera rig to scan the work space further distorts depth. The 'dynamic' (camera-motion induced) depth distortion problem was solved by Diner and Von Sydow (1987), who have quantified the 'static' (camera-configuration induced) depth distortion. In this paper, a stereo image presentation technique which yields aligned images, high depth resolution and low depth distortion is demonstrated, thus solving the trade-off problem.

  17. Coastal plain soils and geomorphology: a key to understanding forest hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Williams; Devendra M. Amatya

    2016-01-01

    In the 1950s, Coile published a simple classification of southeastern coastal soils using three characteristics: drainage class, sub-soil depth, and sub-soil texture. These ideas were used by Warren Stuck and Bill Smith to produce a matrix of soils with drainage class as one ordinate and subsoil texture as the second for the South Carolina coastal plain. Soils...

  18. Winter soil respiration in a humid temperate forest: The roles of moisture, temperature, and snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contosta, Alexandra R.; Burakowski, Elizabeth A.; Varner, Ruth K.; Frey, Serita D.

    2016-12-01

    Winter soil respiration at midlatitudes can comprise a substantial portion of annual ecosystem carbon loss. However, winter soil carbon dynamics in these areas, which are often characterized by shallow snow cover, are poorly understood due to infrequent sampling at the soil surface. Our objectives were to continuously measure winter CO2 flux from soils and the overlying snowpack while also monitoring drivers of winter soil respiration in a humid temperate forest. We show that the relative roles of soil temperature and moisture in driving winter CO2 flux differed within a single soil-to-snow profile. Surface soil temperatures had a strong, positive influence on CO2 flux from the snowpack, while soil moisture exerted a negative control on soil CO2 flux within the soil profile. Rapid fluctuations in snow depth throughout the winter likely created the dynamic soil temperature and moisture conditions that drove divergent patterns in soil respiration at different depths. Such dynamic conditions differ from many previous studies of winter soil microclimate and respiration, where soil temperature and moisture are relatively stable until snowmelt. The differential response of soil respiration to temperature and moisture across depths was also a unique finding as previous work has not simultaneously quantified CO2 flux from soils and the snowpack. The complex interplay we observed among snow depth, soil temperature, soil moisture, and CO2 flux suggests that winter soil respiration in areas with shallow seasonal snow cover is more variable than previously understood and may fluctuate considerably in the future given winter climate change.

  19. Evaluation of Unknown Tube Well Depth Using Electrical Resistivity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Mohd Hazreek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistivity method has increasingly adopted in engineering, environmental, mining and archaeological studies. Systematic and proper studies of unknown civil engineering structure evaluation particularly on tube well depth was rarely being established. Conventionally, camera test or string with weight approach has been used to evaluate unknown tube well depth thus exposed to several restriction due to its expensive and time consuming. Hence, this study focused on evaluation of unknown tube well depth using indirect test with particular reference to electrical resistivity method (ERM.A single spread line of electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS 4000 equipment set based on Wenner and Pole-dipole array in line with the tube well position. Electrical resistivity raw data was processed using RES2DINV software producing electrical resistivity tomography (ERT of the subsurface profile studied. Then, electrical resistivity value (ERV obtained from RES2DINV analyses (ERT was extracted and analysed using plotted graph (depth versus ERV specifically at tube well position based on electrical resistivity spread line performed. It was found that both array have shown some good similarity results in term of tube well depth (20 m thus able to verify the result interpreted. Both array have shown some good similarity of ERV representing groundwater (ERV = 10 – 100 Ωm and soil with water (ERV > 100 Ωm at depth of 0 – 20 m and >20 m respectively. All those interpretation have shown good agreement based on verification thru established ERV of earth materials references, geological map and nearest available boreholes data. Hence, this study has shown that the application of ERM was applicable in evaluation of unknown tube well depth which efficient in term of cost, time and environmental sustainable.

  20. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  1. Study of greenhouse gases reduction alternatives for the exploitation of non conventional oil sands in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchonneau, Deborah [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    High energy prices and greenhouse gases reduction represent the main challenges the current worldwide energetic situation has to face. As a consequence, paradox strategies can be highlighted: oil prices are sufficiently high to exploit non conventional oil resources, like extra heavy oils and oil sands. But the production of these resources emits larger GHG than the conventional oil path and implies other major environmental issues (water management, risks of soil pollution, destruction of the boreal forest), incompatible with the rules validated by the protocol of Kyoto. At the light of the new greenhouse gases reduction regulation framework announced by the Canadian Federal government, this work focuses on the study of greenhouse gases reduction alternatives applied to the non conventional oil sands exploitation in Canada. (author)

  2. Area- and Depth-Weighted Averages of Selected SSURGO Variables for the Conterminous United States and District of Columbia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data release consists of seven national data files of area- and depth-weighted averages of select soil attributes for every available county in the...

  3. Linking Carbon Flux Dynamics and Soil Structure in Dryland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Caylor, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    Biological sources in the form of microbes and plants play a fundamental role in determining the magnitude of carbon flux. However, the geophysical structure of the soil (which the carbon must pass through before entering the atmosphere) often serves as a constraining entity, which has the potential to serve as instigators or mitigators of those carbon and hydrologic flux processes. We characterized soil carbon dynamics in three dryland soil systems: bioturbated soils, biocompacted soils, and undisturbed soils. Carbon fluxes were characterized using a closed-system respiration chamber, with CO2 concentration differences measured using an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA). Structure of the soil systems, with a focus on the macro-crack structure, were characterized using a combined resin-casting/X-ray imaging technique. Results show fundamental differences in carbon dynamics between the different soil systems/structures: control soils have gaussian distributions of carbon flux that decrease with progressive drying of the soil, while biocompacted soils exhibit exponentially distributed fluxes that do not regularly decrease with increased drying of the soil. Bioturbated soils also exhibit an exponential distribution of carbon flux, though at a much higher magnitude. These differences are evaluated in the context of the underlying soil structure: while the control soils exhibit a shallow and narrow crack structure, the biocompacted soils exhibit a "systematic" crack network with moderate cracking intensity and large depth. The deep crack networks of the biocompacted soils may serve to physically enhance an otherwise weak source of carbon via advection and/or convection, inducing fluxes that are equal or greater than an otherwise carbon-rich soil. The bioturbated soils exhibit a "surficial" crack network that is shallow but extensive, but additionally have deep holes known to convectively vent carbon, which may explain their periodically large carbon fluxes. Our results

  4. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0-10, 10-20, and 20-40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0-10 cm soil layer to 20-40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20-40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with re

  5. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    Full Text Available Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0-10, 10-20, and 20-40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0-10 cm soil layer to 20-40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20-40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased

  6. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0–10, 10–20, and 20–40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0–10 cm soil layer to 20–40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0–10 and 10–20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20–40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased

  7. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  8. Modeling Soil Temperature Variations | Ogunlela | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the annual cycle; the lowest average absolute error (1.230C) was obtained at the soil surface, with the highest average error (3.520C) obtained at the 10cm soil depth. For the diurnal cycle; the average error was 1.070C at 9am while it was 3.670C at 3p.m. The damping depths for the study area (Ilorin) were 224cm, ...

  9. Mission Exploitation Platform PROBA-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goor, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    VITO and partners developed an end-to-end solution to drastically improve the exploitation of the PROBA-V EO-data archive (http://proba-v.vgt.vito.be/), the past mission SPOT-VEGETATION and derived vegetation parameters by researchers, service providers and end-users. The analysis of time series of data (+1PB) is addressed, as well as the large scale on-demand processing of near real-time data. From November 2015 an operational Mission Exploitation Platform (MEP) PROBA-V, as an ESA pathfinder project, will be gradually deployed at the VITO data center with direct access to the complete data archive. Several applications will be released to the users, e.g. - A time series viewer, showing the evolution of PROBA-V bands and derived vegetation parameters for any area of interest. - Full-resolution viewing services for the complete data archive. - On-demand processing chains e.g. for the calculation of N-daily composites. - A Virtual Machine will be provided with access to the data archive and tools to work with this data, e.g. various toolboxes and support for R and Python. After an initial release in January 2016, a research platform will gradually be deployed allowing users to design, debug and test applications on the platform. From the MEP PROBA-V, access to Sentinel-2 and landsat data will be addressed as well, e.g. to support the Cal/Val activities of the users. Users can make use of powerful Web based tools and can self-manage virtual machines to perform their work on the infrastructure at VITO with access to the complete data archive. To realise this, private cloud technology (openStack) is used and a distributed processing environment is built based on Hadoop. The Hadoop ecosystem offers a lot of technologies (Spark, Yarn, Accumulo, etc.) which we integrate with several open-source components. The impact of this MEP on the user community will be high and will completely change the way of working with the data and hence open the large time series to a larger

  10. SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF SOIL IN COIMBATORE FOR GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING PURPOSES

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhimathi. A.; Arumairaj. P. D; Lakshmi Priya. L; Meenambal. T.

    2010-01-01

    An adequate knowledge of the soil at a site proposed for a new structure is essential. The selection of type of foundation and its performance depend on the characteristics of underlying soil. The depth at which the foundation can be laid, the allowable bearing pressure of soil and swell potential of the soil are the three important parameters carried out to asses the general suitability of the site for construction. A Soil Characteristics Prediction Model(SCPM) is developed to estimate the a...

  11. Comparing measured with simulated vertical soil stress under vehicle load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Lamandé, Mathieu; Arvidsson, Johan

    in the soil profile at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m depth was measured during wheeling at field capacity on five soils (13-66% clay). Stress propagation was then simulated with the semi-analytical model, using vertical stress at 0.1 m depth estimated from tyre characteristics as upper boundary condition, and v...

  12. [Correlation Among Soil Organic Carbon, Soil Inorganic Carbon and the Environmental Factors in a Typical Oasis in the Southern Edge of the Tarim Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lu; Zhu, Mei-ling; Liu, Zeng-yuan; Zhang, Xue-ni; Xie, Li-na

    2016-04-15

    We analyzed the differentiation among the environmental factors and soil organic/inorganic carbon contents of irrigated desert soil, brown desert soil, saline soil and aeolian sandy soil by classical statistics methods, and studied the correlation between soil carbon contents and the environmental factor by redundancy analysis (RDA) in a typical oasis of Yutian in the southern edge of the Tarim Basin. The results showed that the average contents of soil organic carbon and soil inorganic carbon were 2.51 g · kg⁻¹ and 25.63 g · kg⁻¹ respectively. The soil organic carbon content of the irrigated desert soil was significantly higher than those of brown desert soil, saline soil and aeolian sandy soil, while the inorganic carbon content of aeolian sandy soil was significantly higher than those of other soil types. The soil moisture and nutrient content were the highest in the irrigated desert soil and the lowest in the aeolian sandy sail. All soil types had high degree of salinization except the irrigated desert soil. The RDA results showed that the impacts of environmental factors on soil carbon contents ranked in order of importance were total nitrogen > available phosphorus > soil moisture > ground water depth > available potassium > pH > total salt. The soil carbon contents correlated extremely significantly with total nitrogen, available phosphorus, soil moisture and ground water depth (P 0.05).

  13. Simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data

    KAUST Repository

    López-Pintado, Sara

    2014-03-05

    We propose notions of simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data that extend the univariate functional band depth. The proposed simplicial band depths provide simple and natural criteria to measure the centrality of a trajectory within a sample of curves. Based on these depths, a sample of multivariate curves can be ordered from the center outward and order statistics can be defined. Properties of the proposed depths, such as invariance and consistency, can be established. A simulation study shows the robustness of this new definition of depth and the advantages of using a multivariate depth versus the marginal depths for detecting outliers. Real data examples from growth curves and signature data are used to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed depths. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Soil CO2 Dynamics in a Tree Island Soil of the Pantanal: The Role of Soil Water Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark S.; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães; Pinto Jr, Osvaldo B.; Milesi, Juliana; Santos Amorim, Ricardo S.; Messias, Indira A. M.; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2013-01-01

    The Pantanal is a biodiversity hotspot comprised of a mosaic of landforms that differ in vegetative assemblages and flooding dynamics. Tree islands provide refuge for terrestrial fauna during the flooding period and are particularly important to the regional ecosystem structure. Little soil CO2 research has been conducted in this region. We evaluated soil CO2 dynamics in relation to primary controlling environmental parameters (soil temperature and soil water). Soil respiration was computed using the gradient method using in situ infrared gas analyzers to directly measure CO2 concentration within the soil profile. Due to the cost of the sensors and associated equipment, this study was unreplicated. Rather, we focus on the temporal relationships between soil CO2 efflux and related environmental parameters. Soil CO2 efflux during the study averaged 3.53 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1, and was equivalent to an annual soil respiration of 1220 g C m−2 y−1. This efflux value, integrated over a year, is comparable to soil C stocks for 0–20 cm. Soil water potential was the measured parameter most strongly associated with soil CO2 concentrations, with high CO2 values observed only once soil water potential at the 10 cm depth approached zero. This relationship was exhibited across a spectrum of timescales and was found to be significant at a daily timescale across all seasons using conditional nonparametric spectral Granger causality analysis. Hydrology plays a significant role in controlling CO2 efflux from the tree island soil, with soil CO2 dynamics differing by wetting mechanism. During the wet-up period, direct precipitation infiltrates soil from above and results in pulses of CO2 efflux from soil. The annual flood arrives later, and saturates soil from below. While CO2 concentrations in soil grew very high under both wetting mechanisms, the change in soil CO2 efflux was only significant when soils were wet from above. PMID:23762259

  15. Assessment of the potential for exploitation of the remaining reserves of coal in Poland; Valoracion de las posibilidades de explotacion de las reservas remanentes de carbon en Polonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodarski, K.; Bijanska, J.

    2014-07-01

    In mining areas belonging to the Polish mining companies, there is a significant amount of coal, contained in remaining reserves, that have not been exploited so far. For years, the mines have been evaluating the possibility of its exploitation, since it would expand its resource base and would extend its useful life. In addition, exploitation of the remaining reserves can minimize stress concentration zones in the soil, the rebel y improving conditions for maintenance of excavations and limiting the risk of shock rock. (Author)

  16. Tonic dopamine modulates exploitation of reward learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A Beeler

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of dopamine on adaptive behavior in a naturalistic environment is largely unexamined. Experimental work suggests that phasic dopamine is central to reinforcement learning whereas tonic dopamine may modulate performance without altering learning per se; however, this idea has not been developed formally or integrated with computational models of dopamine function. We quantitatively evaluate the role of tonic dopamine in these functions by studying the behavior of hyperdopaminergic DAT knockdown mice in an instrumental task in a semi-naturalistic homecage environment. In this closed economy paradigm, subjects earn all of their food by pressing either of two levers, but the relative cost for food on each lever shifts frequently. Compared to wild-type mice, hyperdopaminergic mice allocate more lever presses on high-cost levers, thus working harder to earn a given amount of food and maintain their body weight. However, both groups show a similarly quick reaction to shifts in lever cost, suggesting that the hyperdominergic mice are not slower at detecting changes, as with a learning deficit. We fit the lever choice data using reinforcement learning models to assess the distinction between acquisition and expression the models formalize. In these analyses, hyperdopaminergic mice displayed normal learning from recent reward history but diminished capacity to exploit this learning: a reduced coupling between choice and reward history. These data suggest that dopamine modulates the degree to which prior learning biases action selection and consequently alters the expression of learned, motivated behavior.

  17. Efficient Media Exploitation Towards Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, Phivos; Solachidis, Vassilios; Geyer-Schulz, Andreas; Hoser, Bettina; Chapman, Sam; Ciravegna, Fabio; Staab, Steffen; Smrz, Pavel; Kompatsiaris, Yiannis; Avrithis, Yannis

    In this work we propose intelligent, automated content analysis techniques for different media to extract knowledge from the multimedia content. Information derived from different sources/modalities will be analyzed and fused, in terms of spatiotemporal, personal and even social contextual information. In order to achieve this goal, semantic analysis will be applied to the content items, taking into account the content itself (e.g., text, images and video), as well as existing personal, social and contextual information (e.g., semantic and machine-processable metadata and tags). The above process exploits the so-called “Media Intelligence” towards the ultimate goal of identifying “Collective Intelligence”, emerging from the collaboration and competition among people, empowering innovative services and user interactions. The utilization of “Media Intelligence” constitutes a departure from traditional methods for information sharing, since semantic multimedia analysis has to fuse information from both the content itself and the social context, while at the same time the social dynamics have to be taken into account. Such intelligence provides added-value to the available multimedia content and renders existing procedures and research efforts more efficient.

  18. Exploitation of parallelism in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, F.; Tribbia, J.J.; Williamson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) through its CHAMMP initiative, hopes to develop the capability to make meaningful regional climate forecasts on time scales exceeding a decade, such capability to be based on numerical prediction type models. We propose research to contribute to each of the specific items enumerated in the CHAMMP announcement (Notice 9103); i.e., to consider theoretical limits to prediction of climate and climate change on appropriate time scales, to develop new mathematical techniques to utilize massively parallel processors (MPP), to actually utilize MPP's as a research tool, and to develop improved representations of some processes essential to climate prediction. To explore these initiatives, we will exploit all available computing technology, and in particular MPP machines. We anticipate that significant improvements in modeling of climate on the decadal and longer time scales for regional space scales will result from our efforts. This report summarizes the activities of our group during a part of the first year's effort to meet the objectives stated in our proposal. We will comment on three research foci, time compression studies, subgrid scale model studies, and distributed climate ensemble studies and additional significant technical matters.

  19. The Spanish network for Gaia Science Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.; Luri, X.; Torra, J.; REG Executive Committee Team; Gaia UB Team

    2017-03-01

    The ''Red Española de Explotación Científica de Gaia'' (REG) continues to intensify its activities facing the imminent publication of the first and second Gaia data releases (14 September, 2016 and Q4-2017, respectively). The network, supported by the MINECO under contract Acciones de dinamizaci ´on, Redes de Excelencia (2016-2017), has as major priority the task to coordinate and support the collective activities developed by its more than 150 members. At present, REG plays a prominent role in the preparation of the Spanish community for the use of the Gaia data archive (a task lead by the Spanish team), in the work to exploit the Gaia-ESO survey collected during the last four years and in supporting the preparation of the science case and survey plan for WEAVE, the new multi-object spectrograph for the WHT at Canary Islands (commissioning, 2018). These activities are described together with the schedule of future national and international science meetings and the outreach activities being organized for the first and second Data Releases

  20. Exploiting Genome Structure in Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A genome-wide association study involves examining a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify SNPs that are significantly associated with the given phenotype, while trying to reduce the false positive rate. Although haplotype-based association methods have been proposed to accommodate correlation information across nearby SNPs that are in linkage disequilibrium, none of these methods directly incorporated the structural information such as recombination events along chromosome. In this paper, we propose a new approach called stochastic block lasso for association mapping that exploits prior knowledge on linkage disequilibrium structure in the genome such as recombination rates and distances between adjacent SNPs in order to increase the power of detecting true associations while reducing false positives. Following a typical linear regression framework with the genotypes as inputs and the phenotype as output, our proposed method employs a sparsity-enforcing Laplacian prior for the regression coefficients, augmented by a first-order Markov process along the sequence of SNPs that incorporates the prior information on the linkage disequilibrium structure. The Markov-chain prior models the structural dependencies between a pair of adjacent SNPs, and allows us to look for association SNPs in a coupled manner, combining strength from multiple nearby SNPs. Our results on HapMap-simulated datasets and mouse datasets show that there is a significant advantage in incorporating the prior knowledge on linkage disequilibrium structure for marker identification under whole-genome association. PMID:21548809

  1. Understanding Online Child Sexual Exploitation Offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thanh; Murphy, Lisa; Fedoroff, J Paul

    2016-08-01

    In the past three decades, there has been an exponential increase in the worldwide availability of Internet access and devices that are able to access online materials. This literature review investigated whether increased accessibility of Internet child pornography (CP) increases the risk of in-person child sexual exploitation. The current review found little to no evidence that availability of the Internet has increased the worldwide incidence or prevalence of in-person child sexual abuse. In fact, during the time period in which the Internet has flourished, international crime statistics have shown a steady decrease of in-person child sexual abuse. The only exception to this trend is an increase in Internet child pornography or luring offenses (e.g., Stats Can, 2014), which involves child abuse by definition. This article reviews the impact of the Internet on child sexual abuse. It also reviews the characteristics of online CP offenders. Treatment of these offenders and prevention of such offenses is also discussed.

  2. Exploiting epigenetic vulnerabilities for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Barbara; Kubicek, Stefan; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is a hallmark of cancer, and there has been increasing interest in therapeutics that target chromatin-modifying enzymes and other epigenetic regulators. The rationale for applying epigenetic drugs to treat cancer is twofold. First, epigenetic changes are reversible, and drugs could therefore be used to restore the normal (healthy) epigenetic landscape. However, it is unclear whether drugs can faithfully restore the precancerous epigenetic state. Second, chromatin regulators are often mutated in cancer, making them attractive drug targets. However, in most instances it is unknown whether cancer cells are addicted to these mutated chromatin proteins, or whether their mutation merely results in epigenetic instability conducive to the selection of secondary aberrations. An alternative incentive for targeting chromatin regulators is the exploitation of cancer-specific vulnerabilities, including synthetic lethality, caused by epigenetic deregulation. We review evidence for the hypothesis that mechanisms other than oncogene addiction are a basis for the application of epigenetic drugs, and propose future research directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Torsten W; Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining acidic deposition is reflected in soil and foliar chemistry. Top soil pH within the stemflow area increased significantly by 0.6 units in both H2O and KCl extracts from 1984 to 2012. Exchangeable Ca and Mg increased markedly in the stemflow area and to a lower extent in the top soil of the between trees area. Trends of declining base cations in the lower top soil were probably caused by mobilization of organic S and associated leaching with high amounts of sulfate. Contents of C, N and S decreased markedly in the stemflow area from 1984 to 2012, suggesting that mineralization rates of organic matter increased due to more favorable soil conditions. It is concluded that the top soil will continue to recover from acidic deposition. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed. The beech trees of the Vienna Woods showed no sign of recovery from acidification although S deposition levels decreased. Release of historic S even increased foliar S contents. Base cation levels in the foliage declined but are still adequate for beech trees. Increasing N/nutrient ratios over time were considered not the result of marginally higher N foliar contents in 2012 but of diminishing nutrient uptake due to the decrease in ion concentration in soil solution. The mean foliar N/P ratio already increased to the alarming value of 31. Further nutritional imbalances will predispose trees to vitality loss. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatiotemporal Variability of Snow Depth across Eurasian Continent from 1966 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, X.; Zhang, T.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Snow depth is one of the important parameters of snow cover, and it affects the surface energy balance, assessment of snow water equivalent, ecosystem, soil temperatures, and water cycle as a whole. In this study, the long-term observed snow depth from 1972 meteorological stations and snow course sites were used to investigate snow depth climatology and its spatiotemporal variations over Eurasian Continent from 1966 to 2008. Preliminary results showed that snow depth was affected by latitude, which in general snow depth increased with the increasing latitude. The higher values of snow depth were found in the northeastern European Russia, the east of western Siberia, the west of central Siberia, Kamchatka Peninsula, and some areas of Sakhalin. While the lower snow accumulation occurred in most areas of China except for the north of Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China, Northeast China, and some regions of the southwestern Tibet. Both of the trends in inter-annual variability of annual mean snow depth and annual maximum snow depth were not significant. However, the long-term monthly mean snow depth had obvious increasing trends from February to May. There were similar spatial distributions of linear trend coefficients of annual mean snow depth and annual maximum snow depth across the former Soviet Union (USSR). The most significant trends of changes in annual mean snow depth and annual maximum snow depth were found between 40° to 70°N. The obvious trends of variability in monthly mean snow depth appeared in the areas between 50° to 60°N. The significant decreasing trends in monthly mean snow depth were observed in most areas of China from February to March. This may be largely influenced by climate change, which leads to an advancing of the end date of snow cover.

  5. Transnational gestational surrogacy: does it have to be exploitative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the controversial practice of transnational gestational surrogacy and poses a provocative question: Does it have to be exploitative? Various existing models of exploitation are considered and a novel exploitation-evaluation heuristic is introduced to assist in the analysis of the potentially exploitative dimensions/elements of complex health-related practices. On the basis of application of the heuristic, I conclude that transnational gestational surrogacy, as currently practiced in low-income country settings (such as rural, western India), is exploitative of surrogate women. Arising out of consideration of the heuristic's exploitation conditions, a set of public education and enabled choice, enhanced protections, and empowerment reforms to transnational gestational surrogacy practice is proposed that, if incorporated into a national regulatory framework and actualized within a low income country, could possibly render such practice nonexploitative.

  6. The effect of shallow groundwater on soil temperature and soil heat flux near land surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaier, F.; Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Using soil temperature oscillations, the present study investigates the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface. Although some previous studies restricted the effect of shallow groundwater on soil temperature to one meter depth, this study showed that this effect can be up to the very near land surface. Soil temperature readings (taken every ten minutes for six days at two depths -approximately 5 and 10 cm- and in seven locations of different water table depth) were analysed and correlated to water table depth. The results showed strong relations between water table depth and both average and amplitudes of soil temperature oscillations at land surface. This study also showed that shallow groundwater can affect the energy balance at land surface by affecting the magnitude of soil heat flux. These effects were explained using both conceptual and numerical models. The findings of this study pave the way for future studies of detecting shallow groundwater depth using remote sensing. Also they recommend further attention to including the effect of shallow groundwater on energy balance in land surface models. Keywords: Shallow groundwater, Soil temperature, Soil heat flux.

  7. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klingmüller

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD satellite product of the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. We relate the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface winds to identify regions where these attributes are directly related to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. Regarding precipitation and soil moisture, a relatively small area in and surrounding Iraq turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD over these countries. Regarding surface wind speed, the African Red Sea coastal area is relevant for the Saudi Arabian AOD. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trends and interannual variability can be attributed to soil moisture, precipitation and surface winds, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle. Our results confirm the dust driven AOD trends and variability, supported by a decreasing MODIS-derived Ångström exponent and a decreasing AERONET-derived fine mode fraction that accompany the AOD increase over Saudi Arabia. The positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. As a lower soil moisture translates into enhanced dust emissions, it is not needed to assume growing anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions to explain the observations. Instead, our results suggest that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change.

  8. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    KAUST Repository

    Klingmüller, Klaus

    2016-04-22

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. We relate the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface winds to identify regions where these attributes are directly related to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. Regarding precipitation and soil moisture, a relatively small area in and surrounding Iraq turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD over these countries. Regarding surface wind speed, the African Red Sea coastal area is relevant for the Saudi Arabian AOD. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trends and interannual variability can be attributed to soil moisture, precipitation and surface winds, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle. Our results confirm the dust driven AOD trends and variability, supported by a decreasing MODIS-derived Ångström exponent and a decreasing AERONET-derived fine mode fraction that accompany the AOD increase over Saudi Arabia. The positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. As a lower soil moisture translates into enhanced dust emissions, it is not needed to assume growing anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions to explain the observations. Instead, our results suggest that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change.

  9. Soil organic carbon distribution in roadside soils of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Ow, Lai Fern

    2016-12-01

    Soil is the largest pool of organic carbon in terrestrial systems and plays a key role in carbon cycle. Global population living in urban areas are increasing substantially; however, the effects of urbanization on soil carbon storage and distribution are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the soil organic carbon (SOC) in roadside soils across the city-state of Singapore. We tested three hypotheses that SOC contents (concentration and density) in Singapore would be positively related to aboveground tree biomass, soil microbial biomass and land-use patterns. Overall mean SOC concentrations and densities (0-100 cm) of Singapore's roadside soils were 29 g kg(-1) (4-106 g kg(-1)) and 11 kg m(-2) (1.1-42.5 kg m(-2)) with median values of 26 g kg(-1) and 10 kg m(-2), respectively. There was significantly higher concentration of organic carbon (10.3 g kg(-1)) in the top 0-30 cm soil depth compared to the deeper (30-50 cm, and 50-100 cm) soil depths. Singapore's roadside soils represent 4% of Singapore's land, but store 2.9 million Mg C (estimated range of 0.3-11 million Mg C). This amount of SOC is equivalent to 25% of annual anthropogenic C emissions in Singapore. Soil organic C contents in Singapore's soils were not related to aboveground vegetation or soil microbial biomass, whereas land-use patterns to best explain variance in SOC in Singapore's roadside soils. We found SOC in Singapore's roadside soils to be inversely related to urbanization. We conclude that high SOC in Singapore roadside soils are probably due to management, such as specifications of high quality top-soil, high use of irrigation and fertilization and also due to an optimal climate promoting rapid growth and biological activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proba-V Mission Exploitation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goor, Erwin; Dries, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    VITO and partners developed the Proba-V Mission Exploitation Platform (MEP) as an end-to-end solution to drastically improve the exploitation of the Proba-V (a Copernicus contributing mission) EO-data archive (http://proba-v.vgt.vito.be/), the past mission SPOT-VEGETATION and derived vegetation parameters by researchers, service providers and end-users. The analysis of time series of data (+1PB) is addressed, as well as the large scale on-demand processing of near real-time data on a powerful and scalable processing environment. Furthermore data from the Copernicus Global Land Service is in scope of the platform. From November 2015 an operational Proba-V MEP environment, as an ESA operation service, is gradually deployed at the VITO data center with direct access to the complete data archive. Since autumn 2016 the platform is operational and yet several applications are released to the users, e.g. - A time series viewer, showing the evolution of Proba-V bands and derived vegetation parameters from the Copernicus Global Land Service for any area of interest. - Full-resolution viewing services for the complete data archive. - On-demand processing chains on a powerfull Hadoop/Spark backend e.g. for the calculation of N-daily composites. - Virtual Machines can be provided with access to the data archive and tools to work with this data, e.g. various toolboxes (GDAL, QGIS, GrassGIS, SNAP toolbox, …) and support for R and Python. This allows users to immediately work with the data without having to install tools or download data, but as well to design, debug and test applications on the platform. - A prototype of jupyter Notebooks is available with some examples worked out to show the potential of the data. Today the platform is used by several third party projects to perform R&D activities on the data, and to develop/host data analysis toolboxes. In parallel the platform is further improved and extended. From the MEP PROBA-V, access to Sentinel-2 and landsat data will

  11. EOP TDRs (Temperature-Depth-Recordings) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature-depth-recorders (TDRs) were attached to commercial longline and research Cobb trawl gear to obtain absolute depth and temperature measurement during...

  12. Postural Hand Synergies during Environmental Constraint Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Della Santina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to intuitively exploit the shape of an object and environmental constraints to achieve stable grasps and perform dexterous manipulations. In doing that, a vast range of kinematic strategies can be observed. However, in this work we formulate the hypothesis that such ability can be described in terms of a synergistic behavior in the generation of hand postures, i.e., using a reduced set of commonly used kinematic patterns. This is in analogy with previous studies showing the presence of such behavior in different tasks, such as grasping. We investigated this hypothesis in experiments performed by six subjects, who were asked to grasp objects from a flat surface. We quantitatively characterized hand posture behavior from a kinematic perspective, i.e., the hand joint angles, in both pre-shaping and during the interaction with the environment. To determine the role of tactile feedback, we repeated the same experiments but with subjects wearing a rigid shell on the fingertips to reduce cutaneous afferent inputs. Results show the persistence of at least two postural synergies in all the considered experimental conditions and phases. Tactile impairment does not alter significantly the first two synergies, and contact with the environment generates a change only for higher order Principal Components. A good match also arises between the first synergy found in our analysis and the first synergy of grasping as quantified by previous work. The present study is motivated by the interest of learning from the human example, extracting lessons that can be applied in robot design and control. Thus, we conclude with a discussion on implications for robotics of our findings.

  13. Exploitation of Parallelism in Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, F.; Tribbia, J.J.; Williamson, D.L.

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through its CHAMMP initiative, hopes to develop the capability to make meaningful regional climate forecasts on time scales exceeding a decade, such capability to be based on numerical prediction type models. We propose research to contribute to each of the specific items enumerated in the CHAMMP announcement (Notice 91-3); i.e., to consider theoretical limits to prediction of climate and climate change on appropriate time scales, to develop new mathematical techniques to utilize massively parallel processors (MPP), to actually utilize MPPs as a research tool, and to develop improved representations of some processes essential to climate prediction. In particular, our goals are to: (1) Reconfigure the prediction equations such that the time iteration process can be compressed by use of MMP architecture, and to develop appropriate algorithms. (2) Develop local subgrid scale models which can provide time and space dependent parameterization for a state- of-the-art climate model to minimize the scale resolution necessary for a climate model, and to utilize MPP capability to simultaneously integrate those subgrid models and their statistics. (3) Capitalize on the MPP architecture to study the inherent ensemble nature of the climate problem. By careful choice of initial states, many realizations of the climate system can be determined concurrently and more realistic assessments of the climate prediction can be made in a realistic time frame. To explore these initiatives, we will exploit all available computing technology, and in particular MPP machines. We anticipate that significant improvements in modeling of climate on the decadal and longer time scales for regional space scales will result from our efforts.

  14. Friend or foe: exploiting sensor failures for transparent object localization and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, Viktor; Barthen, Andreas; Marohn, Philipp; Paulus, Dietrich

    2017-02-01

    In this work we address the problem of detecting and recognizing transparent objects using depth images from an RGB-D camera. Using this type of sensor usually prohibits the localization of transparent objects since the structured light pattern of these cameras is not reflected by transparent surfaces. Instead, transparent surfaces often appear as undefined values in the resulting images. However, these erroneous sensor readings form characteristic patterns that we exploit in the presented approach. The sensor data is fed into a deep convolutional neural network that is trained to classify and localize drinking glasses. We evaluate our approach with four different types of transparent objects. To our best knowledge, no datasets offering depth images of transparent objects exist so far. With this work we aim at closing this gap by providing our data to the public.

  15. Beyond Fair Benefits: Reconsidering Exploitation Arguments Against Organ Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplin, Julian J

    2018-03-01

    One common objection to establishing regulated live donor organ markets is that such markets would be exploitative. Perhaps surprisingly, exploitation arguments against organ markets have been widely rejected in the philosophical literature on the subject. It is often argued that concerns about exploitation should be addressed by increasing the price paid to organ sellers, not by banning the trade outright. I argue that this analysis rests on a particular conception of exploitation (which I refer to as 'fair benefits' exploitation), and outline two additional ways that the charge of exploitation can be understood (which I discuss in terms of 'fair process' exploitation and complicity in injustice). I argue that while increasing payments to organ sellers may mitigate or eliminate fair benefits exploitation, such measures will not necessarily address fair process exploitation or complicity in injustice. I further argue that each of these three forms of wrongdoing is relevant to the ethics of paid living organ donation, as well as the design of public policy more generally.

  16. A Systematic Review of Financial Exploitation Measures in Prevalence Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Shelly L

    2016-05-01

    The financial exploitation of older adults has garnered the attention of society as well as state and federal governments in a way that elder abuse has never been able to achieve. It is frequently asserted that financial exploitation deserves this attention in part because it is the most prevalent form of elder abuse. This article systematically reviews the measurement of financial exploitation in comparison with other forms of elder abuse and concludes that its measurement is considerably more variable than other forms of abuse. Consequently, improvements in the measurement of financial exploitation are warranted.

  17. Topsoil depth substantially influences the responses to drought of the foliar metabolomes of Mediterranean forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rivas-Ubach, A.; Barbeta, A.; Sardans, J.; Guenther, A.; Ogaya, R.; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Peňuelas, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, aug (2016), s. 41-54 ISSN 1433-8319 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : vegetation structure * soil depth * soil moisture * metabolomics * Quercus ilex Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2016

  18. The problems of over exploitation of aquifers in semi-arid areas: characteristics and proposals for mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Estrella, T.

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a general analysis of the problems arising from overexploited aquifers in semi-arid areas, based on research carried out in the Region of Murcia (one of the most over-exploited areas in Europe). Among the negative impacts of this over exploitation are: the drying up of springs, the continuous drawdown of water levels (up to 10 m/y), piezo metric drops (over 30 m in one year if it is a karstic aquifer), an increase in pumping costs (elevating water from a depth of more than 450 m), abandonment of wells, diminishing groundwater reserves, deteriorating water quality, presence of CO{sub 2}, compartmentalizing of aquifers, etc. A series of internal measures is proposed to alleviate the over exploitation of the region. (Author)

  19. [Soil moisture content and fine root biomass of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations at different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xi-Hao; Chen, Qiu-Bo; Hua, Yuan-Gang; Yang, Li-Fu; Wang, Zhen-Hui

    2011-02-01

    By using soil core sampling method, this paper studied the soil moisture regime of rubber plantations and the fine root biomass of Hevea brasiliensis in immature period (5 a), early yielding period (9 a), and peak yielding period (16 a). With the increasing age of rubber trees, the soil moisture content of rubber plantations increased but the fine root biomass decreased. The soil moisture content at the depth of 0-60 cm in test rubber plantations increased with soil depth, and presented a double-peak pattern over the period of one year. The fine root biomass of rubber trees at different ages had the maximum value in the top 10 cm soil layers and decreased with soil depth, its seasonal variation also showed a double-peak pattern, but the peak values appeared at different time. Soil moisture content and soil depth were the main factors affecting the fine root biomass of H. brasiliensis.

  20. 3D Aware Correction and Completion of Depth Maps in Piecewise Planar Scenes

    KAUST Repository

    Thabet, Ali Kassem

    2015-04-16

    RGB-D sensors are popular in the computer vision community, especially for problems of scene understanding, semantic scene labeling, and segmentation. However, most of these methods depend on reliable input depth measurements, while discarding unreliable ones. This paper studies how reliable depth values can be used to correct the unreliable ones, and how to complete (or extend) the available depth data beyond the raw measurements of the sensor (i.e. infer depth at pixels with unknown depth values), given a prior model on the 3D scene. We consider piecewise planar environments in this paper, since many indoor scenes with man-made objects can be modeled as such. We propose a framework that uses the RGB-D sensor’s noise profile to adaptively and robustly fit plane segments (e.g. floor and ceiling) and iteratively complete the depth map, when possible. Depth completion is formulated as a discrete labeling problem (MRF) with hard constraints and solved efficiently using graph cuts. To regularize this problem, we exploit 3D and appearance cues that encourage pixels to take on depth values that will be compatible in 3D to the piecewise planar assumption. Extensive experiments, on a new large-scale and challenging dataset, show that our approach results in more accurate depth maps (with 20 % more depth values) than those recorded by the RGB-D sensor. Additional experiments on the NYUv2 dataset show that our method generates more 3D aware depth. These generated depth maps can also be used to improve the performance of a state-of-the-art RGB-D SLAM method.

  1. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, A.; Koenderink, J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of “pictorial depth” in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of “depth” is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The

  2. Saline soils spectral library as a tool for digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, María Victoria; Meléndez-Pastor, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedreño, José; Gómez, Ignacio; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Hernández, Encarni

    2013-04-01

    Soil information is needed at regional to global scales for proper land management. Soil scientist has been historically interested in mapping soil classes and properties to represent and explore the spatial distribution of soil characteristics. Fortunately, soil mapping came into the digital era decades ago, enabling the dissemination of computationally intensive techniques (e.g., geostatistics). Digital soil mapping is moving forward in recent decades. Digital soil mapping has evolved from "traditional" studies that employed a set of soils to build soil maps, to more recent approaches that exploit the increasing computing facilities to combine soil databases with ancillary data such as digital elevation models, remote sensing imagery and proximal sensing datasets. The inclusion of VNIR spectroscopy in digital soil mapping approaches is an outstanding research field. VNIR spectroscopy has largely been employed to quantify soil properties with proximal sensor and remote sensor (i.e., imaging spectroscopy). One of the traditional problems in soil mapping is the time needed to compile a soil database large enough to allow for mapping with robustness. Therefore there is a growing interest in using the less time consuming, immutability of the sample and increasing accuracy of soil spectroscopy to obtain accurate enough soil maps but with lower data requirements. This research trend is particularly interesting for the study of highly dynamic soil processes for which is necessary to know the spatial and temporal changes of certain properties for a correct soil assessment. The objective of this work was the study of soil salinity which is a dynamic property responding to seasonal (i.e., vertical upwelling) and inter-annual (i.e., salinization) changes. Soil salinity is a major constraint for agriculture by limiting or excluding certain crops. Thus, a continuous monitoring of soil salinity is needed to select the most suitable crops and to prevent future salinization

  3. Aeration equipment for small depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluše Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena „algal bloom“ appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  4. On the use of nonlinear soil models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert T.F.

    1981-01-01

    The basic definitions of, and the differences between, currently available soil models are reviewed. These models are applied to site response analyses where two depths and two levels of base input motion are considered. Computational results are presented and compared with regard to the effects of using different soil models on computed site response. Other implications resulting from the choice of soil model for seismic response analysis are also discussed. 

  5. FEM analysis of soil-pipe interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, P.; Chun, Wu; Burkov, V.; Burkova, S.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most important factors of the pipeline buckling is soil distortion. The paper presents the model of the stress-strain state of the pipeline simulated with ANSYS software package and the finite element model of soil-pipe interaction. The analysis of soil distortions nearby the pipeline and its passive resistance is presented herein with due regard for the different pipe depths.

  6. Effect of soil reclamation process on soil C fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Covelo, E F

    2014-01-01

    Mine soils are notable for their low organic matter content. Soils in the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, Spain) were vegetated with trees (eucalyptuses and pines) and amended with wastes (sewage sludge and paper mill residues) to increase their carbon concentration. Two different zones at the mine (settling pond and mine tailing) and their respective treated areas (vegetated and/or amended) were sampled and analysed with the aim of evaluating in depth the effect of the reclamation treatments on both the concentration and quality of soil organic matter under field conditions. The results showed that the two treatments (tree vegetation and waste amendment) significantly increased the organic C in the mine soils from 1.4-6.6 to 10-112 g kg(-1). However, only the soil amended with wastes in the settling pond reached the usual values of undisturbed soils (92-126 g TOC kg(-1) soil). Amending with wastes was also the only treatment that increased the soil humified organic C concentration to proper values and therefore also the microbial biomass C. We recommend the use of organic wastes for amending soils poor in organic matter as well as the regular application of this treatment, as the nitrogen supply can be more limiting for plant growth than the organic C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  8. Bacteriological and chemical properties of soil amended with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result suggested that soil treated with poultry feather increased the plate count of Bacillus sp, Proteus sp, Staphylococcus sp and Actinomyces sp. Poultry feather which is a waste by-product can provide essential nutrients for the survival of soil microorganisms, plant growth and therefore can be exploited as biofertilizer.

  9. Soil properties, soil functions and soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Soil plays a crucial role in the ecosystem functioning such as food production, capture and storage of water, carbon and nutrients and in the realisation of a number of UN Sustainable Developments Goals. In this work we present an approach to spatially and jointly assess the multiple contributions of soil to the delivery of ecosystem services within multiple land-use system. We focussed on the modelling of the impact of soil on sediment retention, carbon storage, storing and filtering of nutrients, habitat for soil organisms and water regulation, taking into account examples of land use and climate scenarios. Simplified models were used for the single components. Spatialised Bayesian Belief networks were used for the jointly assessment and mapping of soil contribution to multiple land use and ecosystem services. We integrated continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping approaches covering the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Uncertainty was accounted for and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils and provides an example of integrated study assessing the contributions of soil. The results show the importance of the multi-functional analysis of the contribution of soils to the ecosystem service delivery and UN SDGs.

  10. Metals in European roadside soils and soil solution--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkenthin, Moritz; Kluge, Björn; Wessolek, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    This review provides a summary of studies analysing metal concentrations in soils and soil solution at European roadsides. The data collected during 27 studies covering a total of 64 sites across a number of European countries were summarised. Highest median values of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in the top soil layer at the first 5 m beside the road. Generally, the influence of traffic on soil contamination decreased with increasing soil depth and distance to the road. The concentration patterns of metals in soil solution were independent from concentrations in the soil matrix. At 10-m distance, elevated soil metal concentrations, low pH, and low percolation rates led to high solute concentrations. Directly beside the road, high percolation rates lead to high annual loadings although solute concentrations are comparatively low. These loadings might be problematic, especially in regions with acidic sandy soils and a high groundwater table. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulated population responses of common carp to commercial exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Michael J.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Brown, Michael L.

    2011-12-01

    Common carp Cyprinus carpio is a widespread invasive species that can become highly abundant and impose deleterious ecosystem effects. Thus, aquatic resource managers are interested in controlling common carp populations. Control of invasive common carp populations is difficult, due in part to the inherent uncertainty of how populations respond to exploitation. To understand how common carp populations respond to exploitation, we evaluated common carp population dynamics (recruitment, growth, and mortality) in three natural lakes in eastern South Dakota. Common carp exhibited similar population dynamics across these three systems that were characterized by consistent recruitment (ages 3 to 15 years present), fast growth (K = 0.37 to 0.59), and low mortality (A = 1 to 7%). We then modeled the effects of commercial exploitation on size structure, abundance, and egg production to determine its utility as a management tool to control populations. All three populations responded similarly to exploitation simulations with a 575-mm length restriction, representing commercial gear selectivity. Simulated common carp size structure modestly declined (9 to 37%) in all simulations. Abundance of common carp declined dramatically (28 to 56%) at low levels of exploitation (0 to 20%) but exploitation >40% had little additive effect and populations were only reduced by 49 to 79% despite high exploitation (>90%). Maximum lifetime egg production was reduced from 77 to 89% at a moderate level of exploitation (40%), indicating the potential for recruitment overfishing. Exploitation further reduced common carp size structure, abundance, and egg production when simulations were not size selective. Our results provide insights to how common carp populations may respond to exploitation. Although commercial exploitation may be able to partially control populations, an integrated removal approach that removes all sizes of common carp has a greater chance of controlling population abundance

  12. Physicochemical Properties of the Soils of Wassaniya Forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collected at the depth of 0 to 15cm from each plot using a soil auger for laboratory analyses. Four other undisturbed soil samples were collected for bulk density determination using a core sampler. The soils at the four locations varied in texture from sandy loam (SL) at Yartagimba, clay loam (CL) at Wassaniya and Daiji to ...

  13. Estimation of bare soil surface temperature from air temperature and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil surface temperature has critical influence on climate, agricultural and hydrological activities since it serves as a good indicator of the energy budget of the earth's surface. Two empirical models for estimating soil surface temperature from air temperature and soil depth temperature were developed. The coefficient of ...

  14. Field, laboratory and estimated soil-water content limits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the field method involved measuring simultaneously the soil-water content (using a frequency domain reflectometer with the PR1 profile probe that relies on changes in the dielectric constant of soil), and soil-water potential (using Watermark granular matrix sensors and tensiometers) at three depths (100, 300 ...

  15. The effects of boron management on soil microbial population and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of different levels of boron fertilizer on microbial population, microbial respiration and soil enzyme activities in different soil depths in cultivated wheat soils. A randomized block design with three replications was used in this experiment. Field experiments were conducted ...

  16. Response of grasslands conversion to croplands on soil organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of two types of grasslands conversion to croplands on soil organic carbon (SOC) in Bashang area where it is a typical agro-pastoral ecotone of Northern China using a pare-site method. The results showed that the SOC contents and densities decreased with increasing soil depth. The soil ...

  17. Assessing Soil Salinity with the use of WorldView-2 Hyperspectral Images in Timpaki, Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Panagea, Ioanna S.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Salinization is one of the major soil degradation threats occurring worldwide, with its effects being observed in numerous vital ecological and non-ecological soil functions. Traditionally, soil salinity is assessed by laboratory determination of the soil electrical conductivity (ECe), rendering large scale studies labor and cost intensive. This study evaluates the feasibility of surface soil salinity estimation, monitoring, and mapping based on images acquired by the WorldView-2 and Landsat 8 multispectral sensors after calibration with a limited number of soil samples. A range of satellite image processing techniques are applied, starting with geometric, radiometric and atmospheric preprocessing corrections. More than 10 spectral salinity indices (algebric equations between visible and infrared band) including three newly introduced salinity indices, as well as vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, etc.) are implemented to detect surface salt deposition and vegetation health. Spectral unmixing is used to monitor salinity employing sophisticated classification approaches. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied to a WorldView-2 images in order to determine the initial axes used for the orthogonal transformation, followed by a subsequent 3D rotation of the PCA axes. The linear coefficients of the transformation are retrieved and adjusted to detect salinity in all the range of WorldView-2 image. Furthermore, Landsat 8 images are used to establish and compare the diachronic vegetation regime and plant health in both brackish irrigation and salinity-free olive groves areas. The proposed methods are tested in the RECARE FP7 Project Case Study of Timpaki, a coastal semi-arid region in south-central Crete. Long term agricultural over-exploitation in the area and little irrigation alternatives have led to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinization. EO products are calibrated using soil samples collected from bare soil plots at 0-5 cm depth and representing a

  18. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  19. Controls on deep versus near-surface soil CO2 production and soil organic matter turnover (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIX, J. W.; Berhe, A.; Yanni, S.; Gillabel, J.; van oost, K.

    2013-12-01

    At the soil profile scale, driving factors of decomposition and C turnover can change independently with depth, making a depth-specific assessment of controlling factors, such as temperature, dry-wet cycles, and vertical soil movement, is essential. In a set of depth explicit experiments and modeling exercises, we have tried to elucidate the effects of these controlling factors within the soil profile. In a first experiment, we combined 13C- and 14C-methodology with fractionation techniques to assess the C turnover of labile versus resistant C across the soil profile. As expected, the turnover of labile C increased drastically with increasing soil depth and had a Q10 of 2.8 in the surface layer. In a second experiment, we measured CO2, O2, temperature, and soil water content in two plots at 15, 30, 50, 70, and 90 cm depths to further elucidate the temperature sensitivity of soil C across the profile. Under non-limiting moisture (θ>20%) the Q10 value for the A horizon was 5.3 decreasing to 1.3 at θ20%, Q10 was 3.1 indicating that it is less sensitive to temperature variations than topsoil when moisture is non-limiting. In a follow-up third experiment, we conducted a wetting and drying experiment to assess the effect of changing moisture regimes on deep soil C dynamics. We found that soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil moisture during the drying than wetting phases, especially in the top 30 cm of soil. On the contrary, soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil temperature during wetting than drying phase. Deep soil CO2 production was significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature during the wetting phase, compared to SOM in topsoil layers. Finally, we developed a depth-explicit SOM model based on carbon isotopes and radionuclides. We found that it was essential to include vertical soil transport and its depth attenuation in order to correctly predict SOM dynamics across

  20. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Andrea; Koenderink, Jan; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of "pictorial depth" in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of "depth" is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The pictorial space for this study was evoked by a capriccio (imaginary landscape) by Francesco Guardi (1712-1793). In such a drawing pictorial space is suggested by the artist through a small set of conventional depth cues. As a result typical Western observers tend to agree largely in their visual awareness when looking at such art. We rank depths for locations that are not on a single surface and far apart in pictorial space. We find that observers resolve about 40 distinct depth layers and agree largely in this. From a previous experiment we have metrical data for the same observers. The rank correlations between the results are high. Perhaps surprisingly, we find no correlation between the number of distinct depth layers and the total metrical depth range. Thus, the relation between subjective magnitude and discrimination threshold fails to hold for pictorial depth.

  1. Exploiting for medical and biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giano, Michael C.

    Biotherapeutics are an emerging class of drug composed of molecules ranging in sizes from peptides to large proteins. Due to their poor stability and mucosal membrane permeability, biotherapeutics are administered by a parenteral method (i.e., syringe, intravenous or intramuscular). Therapeutics delivered systemically often experience short half-lives. While, local administration may involve invasive surgical procedures and suffer from poor retention at the site of application. To compensate, the patient receives frequent doses of highly concentrated therapeutic. Unfortunately, the off-target side effects and discomfort associated with multiple injections results in poor patient compliance. Therefore, new delivery methods which can improve therapeutic retention, reduce the frequency of administration and may aid in decreasing the off-target side effects is a necessity. Hydrogels are a class of biomaterials that are gaining interests for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogel materials are defined as porous, 3-dimensional networks that are primarily composed of water. Generally, they are mechanically rigid, cytocompatible and easily chemically functionalized. Collectively, these properties make hydrogels fantastic candidates to perform as drug delivery depots. Current hydrogel delivery systems physically entrap the target therapeutic which is then subsequently released over time at the site of administration. The swelling and degradation of the material effect the diffusion of the therapy from the hydrogel, and therefore should be controlled. Although these strategies provide some regulation over therapeutic release, full control of the delivery is not achieved. Newer approaches are focused on designing hydrogels that exploit known interactions, covalently attach the therapy or respond to an external stimulus in an effort to gain improved control over the therapy's release. Unfortunately, the biotherapeutic is typically required to be chemically

  2. Soil Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killham, Ken

    1994-04-01

    Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

  3. The Dark Side of Courtship: Violence and Sexual Exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Sally A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature on physical violence and sexual exploitation between premarital partners. Suggests that two features of dating encourage exploitative behavior: different context of courtship for males versus females encourages male control of relationships and female compliance, and highly romanticized nature of courtship encourages partners to…

  4. A Descriptive Study on Sexually Exploited Children in Residential Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twill, Sarah E.; Green, Denise M.; Traylor, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Sexual exploitation and prostitution of children and adolescents is a multibillion dollar industry in the United States (Estes and Weiner in "Medical, legal & social science aspects of child sexual exploitation: A comprehensive review of pornography, prostitution, and internet crimes, vol I," G.W. Medical Publishing, Inc, St Louis,…

  5. A simple model for predicting soil temperature in snow-covered and seasonally frozen soil: model description and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rankinen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial processes in soil are moisture, nutrient and temperature dependent and, consequently, accurate calculation of soil temperature is important for modelling nitrogen processes. Microbial activity in soil occurs even at sub-zero temperatures so that, in northern latitudes, a method to calculate soil temperature under snow cover and in frozen soils is required. This paper describes a new and simple model to calculate daily values for soil temperature at various depths in both frozen and unfrozen soils. The model requires four parameters: average soil thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity of soil, specific heat capacity due to freezing and thawing and an empirical snow parameter. Precipitation, air temperature and snow depth (measured or calculated are needed as input variables. The proposed model was applied to five sites in different parts of Finland representing different climates and soil types. Observed soil temperatures at depths of 20 and 50 cm (September 1981–August 1990 were used for model calibration. The calibrated model was then tested using observed soil temperatures from September 1990 to August 2001. R2-values of the calibration period varied between 0.87 and 0.96 at a depth of 20 cm and between 0.78 and 0.97 at 50 cm. R2-values of the testing period were between 0.87 and 0.94 at a depth of 20cm, and between 0.80 and 0.98 at 50cm. Thus, despite the simplifications made, the model was able to simulate soil temperature at these study sites. This simple model simulates soil temperature well in the uppermost soil layers where most of the nitrogen processes occur. The small number of parameters required means that the model is suitable for addition to catchment scale models. Keywords: soil temperature, snow model

  6. Estimation of soil permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Elhakim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils are permeable materials because of the existence of interconnected voids that allow the flow of fluids when a difference in energy head exists. A good knowledge of soil permeability is needed for estimating the quantity of seepage under dams and dewatering to facilitate underground construction. Soil permeability, also termed hydraulic conductivity, is measured using several methods that include constant and falling head laboratory tests on intact or reconstituted specimens. Alternatively, permeability may be measured in the field using insitu borehole permeability testing (e.g. [2], and field pumping tests. A less attractive method is to empirically deduce the coefficient of permeability from the results of simple laboratory tests such as the grain size distribution. Otherwise, soil permeability has been assessed from the cone/piezocone penetration tests (e.g. [13,14]. In this paper, the coefficient of permeability was measured using field falling head at different depths. Furthermore, the field coefficient of permeability was measured using pumping tests at the same site. The measured permeability values are compared to the values empirically deduced from the cone penetration test for the same location. Likewise, the coefficients of permeability are empirically obtained using correlations based on the index soil properties of the tested sand for comparison with the measured values.

  7. Effect of a controlled burn on the thermophysical properties of a dry soil using a new model of soil heat flow and a new high temperature heat flux sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman; J. M. Frank

    2004-01-01

    Some fires can be beneficial to soils but, if a fire is sufficiently intense, soil can be irreversible altered. We measured soil temperatures and heat fluxes at several soil depths before, during, and after a controlled surface burn at Manitou Experimental Forest (southern Colorado, USA) to evaluate its effects on the soil's thermophysical properties (thermal...

  8. [Ecotourism exploitation model in Bita Lake Natural Reserve of Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Wang, Y; Zhong, L

    2000-12-01

    Bita lake provincial natural reserve is located in Shangri-La region of North-western Yunnan, and was set as a demonstrating area for ecotourism exploitation in 1998. After a year's exploitation construction and half a year's operation as a branch of the 99' Kunming International Horticulture Exposition to accept tourists, it was proved that the ecotourism demonstrating area attained four integrated functions of ecotourism, i.e., tourism, protection, poverty clearing and environment education. Five exploitation and management models including function zoned exploitation model, featured tourism communication model signs system designing model, local Tibetan family reception model and environmental monitoring model, were also successful, which were demonstrated and spreaded to the whole province. Bita lake provincial natural reserve could be a good sample for the ecotourism exploitation natural reserves of the whole country.

  9. Exploit and ignore the consequences: A mother of planetary issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-07-01

    Many environmental and planetary issues are due to an exploitation strategy based on exploit, consume and ignore the consequences. As many natural and environmental resources are limited in time and space, such exploitation approach causes important damages on earth, in the sea and maybe soon in the space. To sustain conditions under which humans and other living species can coexist in productive and dynamic harmony with their environments, terrestrial and space exploration programs may need to be based on 'scrutinize the consequences, prepare adequate solutions and then, only then, exploit'. Otherwise, the exploitation of planetary resources may put the environmental stability and sustainability at a higher risk than it is currently predicted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    for optimal friability. There is a strong need to get more detailed knowledge about effects of soil water content on soil friability and especially to be able to quantify the least limiting water range for soil friability and therefore soil tillage. A strong relationship between organic matter and friability...... has been found but it is not possible to identify a specific lower critical level of organic matter across soil types. Sustainable management of soil requires continuous and adequate inputs of organic matter to sustain or improve soil friability. Intensive tillage and traffic in unfavorable conditions...... threatens soil friability and may initiate a vicious cycle where increasingly higher intensity of tillage is needed to produce a proper seedbed....

  11. Anion Exchange Capacity As a Mechanism for Deep Soil Carbon Storage in Variable Charge Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzen, C.; James, J. N.; Ciol, M.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is the most important long-term sink for carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, containing more C than plant biomass and the atmosphere combined. However, soil has historically been under-represented in C cycling literature, especially in regards to information about subsurface (>1.0 m) layers and processes. Previous research has indicated that Andisols with large quantities of noncrystalline, variable-charge minerals, including allophane, imogolite, and ferrihydrite, contain more C both in total and at depth than other soil types in the Pacific Northwest. The electrostatic charge of variable-charge soils depends on pH and is sometimes net positive, particularly in acid conditions, such as those commonly developed under the coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. However, even soils with a net negative charge may contain a mixture of negative and positive exchange sites and can hold some nutrient anions through the anion exchange capacity. To increase our understanding of the effects of variable-charge on soil organic matter stabilization, deep sampling is under way at the Fall River Long-Term Soil Productivity Site in western Washington. This site has a deep, well-drained soil with few rocks, which developed from weathered basalt and is classified as an Andisol of the Boistfort Series. Samples have been taken to a depth of 3 m at eight depth intervals. In addition to analyzing total soil C, these soils will be analyzed to determine functional groups present, cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capacity, and non-crystalline mineral content. These data will be analyzed to determine any correlations that may exist between these mineralogical characteristics, total soil C, and types of functional groups stored at depth. The most abundant organic functional groups, including carboxylic and phenolic groups, are anionic in nature, and soil positive charge may play an important role in binding and stabilizing soil organic matter and sequestering C.

  12. Paleosols can promote root growth of recent vegetation - a case study from the sandy soil-sediment sequence Rakt, the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocke, Martina I.; Kessler, Fabian; van Mourik, Jan M.; Jansen, Boris; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2016-10-01

    Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing, e.g., soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of, e.g., nutrient contents, thus supporting their utilization and exploitation by deep roots. We aimed to decipher the different phases of soil formation in Dutch drift sands and cover sands. The study site is located at Bedafse Bergen (southeastern Netherlands) in a 200-year-old oak stand. A recent Podzol developed on drift sand covering a Plaggic Anthrosol that was piled up on a relict Podzol on Late Glacial eolian cover sand. Root-free soil and sediment samples, collected in 10-15 cm depth increments, were subjected to a multi-proxy physical and geochemical approach. The Plaggic Anthrosol revealed low bulk density and high phosphorous and organic carbon contents, whereas the relict Podzol was characterized by high iron and aluminum contents. Frequencies of fine (diameter ≤ 2 mm) and medium roots (2-5 mm) were determined on horizontal levels and the profile wall for a detailed pseudo-three-dimensional insight. On horizontal levels, living roots were most abundant in the uppermost part of the relict Podzol with ca. 4450 and 220 m-2, significantly exceeding topsoil root abundances. Roots of oak trees thus benefited from the favorable growth conditions in the nutrient-rich Plaggic Anthrosol, whereas increased compactness and high aluminum contents of the relict Podzol caused a strong decrease of roots. The approach demonstrated the benefit of comprehensive root investigation to support interpretation of soil profiles, as fine roots can be significantly underestimated when quantified at the profile wall. The possible rooting of soil parent material and paleosols long after their burial confirmed recent studies on the potential influence of rooting to overprint

  13. Sketch on dynamic gesture tracking and analysis exploiting vision-based 3D interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Woontack; Kim, Namgyu; Wong, Karen; Tadenuma, Makoto

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based 3D interface exploiting invisible 3D boxes, arranged in the personal space (i.e. reachable space by the body without traveling), which allows robust yet simple dynamic gesture tracking and analysis, without exploiting complicated sensor-based motion tracking systems. Vision-based gesture tracking and analysis is still a challenging problem, even though we have witnessed rapid advances in computer vision over the last few decades. The proposed framework consists of three main parts, i.e. (1) object segmentation without bluescreen and 3D box initialization with depth information, (2) movement tracking by observing how the body passes through the 3D boxes in the personal space and (3) movement feature extraction based on Laban's Effort theory and movement analysis by mapping features to meaningful symbols using time-delay neural networks. Obviously, exploiting depth information using multiview images improves the performance of gesture analysis by reducing the errors introduced by simple 2D interfaces In addition, the proposed box-based 3D interface lessens the difficulties in both tracking movement in 3D space and in extracting low-level features of the movement. Furthermore, the time-delay neural networks lessens the difficulties in movement analysis by training. Due to its simplicity and robustness, the framework will provide interactive systems, such as ATR I-cubed Tangible Music System or ATR Interactive Dance system, with improved quality of the 3D interface. The proposed simple framework also can be extended to other applications requiring dynamic gesture tracking and analysis on the fly.

  14. Effects of burial depth on seed germination and seedling emergence of Mexican oaks: A glasshouse experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores-Cano J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the interest in restoring oak forests in Mexico, very little is known about their regeneration ecology. We assessed the influence of acorn burial depth on seed germination and seedling emergence for eight Mexican oak species (Q. affinis, Q. castanea, Q. coccolobifolia, Q. laeta, Q. mexicana, Q. polymorpha, Q. tinkhamii and Q. viminea. We performed a glasshouse experiment in which acorns were buried at five soil depths (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 cm. After four months, acorn germination and seedling emergence were recorded. Buried acorns showed higher germination and seedling emergence than unburied ones, but burial depth also influenced these responses. The optimum burial depth for seedling emergence of each species was 2, 4, 6 and 8 cm depth for four species (Q. castanea, Q. mexicana, Q. tinkhamii, and Q. viminea; 2 and 4 cm for Q. laeta; as well as 2, 4 and 8 cm for Q. coccolobifolia.

  15. SoilGrids1km — Global Soil Information Based on Automated Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; de Jesus, Jorge Mendes; MacMillan, Robert A.; Batjes, Niels H.; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Ribeiro, Eloi; Samuel-Rosa, Alessandro; Kempen, Bas; Leenaars, Johan G. B.; Walsh, Markus G.; Gonzalez, Maria Ruiperez

    2014-01-01

    Background Soils are widely recognized as a non-renewable natural resource and as biophysical carbon sinks. As such, there is a growing requirement for global soil information. Although several global soil information systems already exist, these tend to suffer from inconsistencies and limited spatial detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We present SoilGrids1km — a global 3D soil information system at 1 km resolution — containing spatial predictions for a selection of soil properties (at six standard depths): soil organic carbon (g kg−1), soil pH, sand, silt and clay fractions (%), bulk density (kg m−3), cation-exchange capacity (cmol+/kg), coarse fragments (%), soil organic carbon stock (t ha−1), depth to bedrock (cm), World Reference Base soil groups, and USDA Soil Taxonomy suborders. Our predictions are based on global spatial prediction models which we fitted, per soil variable, using a compilation of major international soil profile databases (ca. 110,000 soil profiles), and a selection of ca. 75 global environmental covariates representing soil forming factors. Results of regression modeling indicate that the most useful covariates for modeling soils at the global scale are climatic and biomass indices (based on MODIS images), lithology, and taxonomic mapping units derived from conventional soil survey (Harmonized World Soil Database). Prediction accuracies assessed using 5–fold cross-validation were between 23–51%. Conclusions/Significance SoilGrids1km provide an initial set of examples of soil spatial data for input into global models at a resolution and consistency not previously available. Some of the main limitations of the current version of SoilGrids1km are: (1) weak relationships between soil properties/classes and explanatory variables due to scale mismatches, (2) difficulty to obtain covariates that capture soil forming factors, (3) low sampling density and spatial clustering of soil profile locations. However, as the Soil

  16. SoilGrids1km--global soil information based on automated mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Hengl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soils are widely recognized as a non-renewable natural resource and as biophysical carbon sinks. As such, there is a growing requirement for global soil information. Although several global soil information systems already exist, these tend to suffer from inconsistencies and limited spatial detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present SoilGrids1km--a global 3D soil information system at 1 km resolution--containing spatial predictions for a selection of soil properties (at six standard depths: soil organic carbon (g kg-1, soil pH, sand, silt and clay fractions (%, bulk density (kg m-3, cation-exchange capacity (cmol+/kg, coarse fragments (%, soil organic carbon stock (t ha-1, depth to bedrock (cm, World Reference Base soil groups, and USDA Soil Taxonomy suborders. Our predictions are based on global spatial prediction models which we fitted, per soil variable, using a compilation of major international soil profile databases (ca. 110,000 soil profiles, and a selection of ca. 75 global environmental covariates representing soil forming factors. Results of regression modeling indicate that the most useful covariates for modeling soils at the global scale are climatic and biomass indices (based on MODIS images, lithology, and taxonomic mapping units derived from conventional soil survey (Harmonized World Soil Database. Prediction accuracies assessed using 5-fold cross-validation were between 23-51%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SoilGrids1km provide an initial set of examples of soil spatial data for input into global models at a resolution and consistency not previously available. Some of the main limitations of the current version of SoilGrids1km are: (1 weak relationships between soil properties/classes and explanatory variables due to scale mismatches, (2 difficulty to obtain covariates that capture soil forming factors, (3 low sampling density and spatial clustering of soil profile locations. However, as the SoilGrids system is

  17. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  18. Soil Science and Global Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rattan

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable management of soil is integral to any rational approach to addressing global issues of the 21st century. A high quality soil is essential to: i) advancing food and nutritional security, ii) mitigating and adapting to climate change, iii) improving quality and renewability of water, iv) enriching biodiversity, v) producing biofuel feedstocks for reducing dependence on fossil fuel, and vi) providing cultural, aesthetical and recreational opportunities. Being the essence of all terrestrial life, soil functions and ecosystem services are essential to wellbeing of all species of plants and animals. Yet, soil resources are finite, unequally distributed geographically, and vulnerable to degradation by natural and anthropogenic perturbations. Nonetheless, soil has inherent resilience, and its ecosystem functions and services can be restored over time. However, soil resilience depends on several key soil properties including soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration and pool, plant-available water capacity (PWAC), nutrient reserves, effective rooting depth, texture and clay mineralogy, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) etc. There is a close inter-dependence among these properties. For example, SOC concentration strongly affects, PWAC, nutrient reserve, activity and species diversity of soil flora and fauna, CEC etc. Thus, judicious management of SOC concentration to maintain it above the threshold level (~1.5-2%) in the root zone is critical to sustaining essential functions and ecosystem services. Yet, soils of some agroecosystems (e.g., those managed by resources-poor farmers and small landholders in the tropics and sub-tropics) are severely depleted of their SOC reserves. Consequently. Agronomic productivity and wellbeing of people dependent on degraded soils is jeopardized. The ecosystem C pool of the terrestrial biosphere has been mined by extractive practices, the nature demands recarbonization of its biosphere for maintenance of its functions and

  19. Electrical Resistivity Based Empirical Model For Delineating Some Selected Soil Properties On Sandy-Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Resistivity ER survey was conducted on a Sandy-loam soil with a view to evaluate some selected soil properties. Electrical Resistivity was measured from the soil surface at 0 0.3 m ER30 and 0 0.9 m ER90 soil depths using multi-electrode Wenner array and Miller 400D resistance meter. Soil samples were collected to a depth 0.3 m at points where ER was measured and analyzed for properties such as Organic Matter OM Cation Exchange Capacity CEC Soil Water Content SWC Sand Silt and Clay contents using standard methods. The results indicated that lower ER areas exhibit higher content of soil properties than higher ER areas. The ER90 correlates insignificantly to the soil properties while ER30 correlates significantly to the soil properties except clay r 0.63 - 0.75. The relationship between ER30 and soil properties were best fitted to multiple linear regression R2 0.90 and Boltzmann distribution R2 0.80 - 0.84. The study indicates the ability of ER to delineate some soil properties influencing yield on sandy-loam soil. This will help farmers take decisions that can improve yields.

  20. Carbon Sequestration in Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.

    2006-05-01

    enhancement and water management in the root zone are critical to exploiting the CO2 fertilization effect on forest growth. Fire is also a useful tool which can be judiciously managed to maximize NPP and the SOC pool, and increase the recalcitrant black C. The importance of SOC sequestration in forest soils can not be over-emphasized.