WorldWideScience

Sample records for exploiting genetic variation

  1. Exploiting Genetic Variation of Fiber Components and Morphology in Juvenile Loblolly Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hou-Min; Kadia, John F.; Li, Bailian; Sederoff, Ron

    2005-06-30

    In order to ensure the global competitiveness of the Pulp and Paper Industry in the Southeastern U.S., more wood with targeted characteristics have to be produced more efficiently on less land. The objective of the research project is to provide a molecular genetic basis for tree breeding of desirable traits in juvenile loblolly pine, using a multidisciplinary research approach. We developed micro analytical methods for determine the cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness of a single ring in a 12 mm increment core. These methods allow rapid determination of these traits in micro scale. Genetic variation and genotype by environment interaction (GxE) were studied in several juvenile wood traits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Over 1000 wood samples of 12 mm increment cores were collected from 14 full-sib families generated by a 6-parent half-diallel mating design (11-year-old) in four progeny tests. Juvenile (ring 3) and transition (ring 8) for each increment core were analyzed for cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness. Transition wood had higher cellulose content, longer fiber and higher coarseness, but lower lignin than juvenile wood. General combining ability variance for the traits in juvenile wood explained 3 to 10% of the total variance, whereas the specific combining ability variance was negligible or zero. There were noticeable full-sib family rank changes between sites for all the traits. This was reflected in very high specific combining ability by site interaction variances, which explained from 5% (fiber length) to 37% (lignin) of the total variance. Weak individual-tree heritabilities were found for cellulose, lignin content and fiber length at the juvenile and transition wood, except for lignin at the transition wood (0.23). Coarseness had moderately high individual-tree heritabilities at both the juvenile (0.39) and transition wood (0.30). Favorable genetic correlations of volume and stem

  2. Exploiting genetic variation in milk-fat composition of milk from dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2010-01-01

    Milk fat contains many nutrients necessary for humans, including fat-soluble vitamins, energy, and bioactive lipids. It is important to understand the genetic basis for milk-fat composition in cows’ milk. Knowledge of these genetic parameters can be used to predict how different traits will respond

  3. Genetic analysis of environmental variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, W.G.; Mulder, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental variation (VE) in a quantitative trait – variation in phenotype that cannot be explained by genetic variation or identifiable genetic differences – can be regarded as being under some degree of genetic control. Such variation may be either between repeated expressions of the same trait

  4. Parentage assignment with genomic markers: a major advance for understanding and exploiting genetic variation of quantitative traits in farmed aquatic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eVandeputte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of the 1990s, parentage assignment using microsatellite markers has been introduced as a tool in aquaculture breeding. It now allows close to 100% assignment success, and offered new ways to develop aquaculture breeding using mixed family designs in industry conditions. Its main achievements are the knowledge and control of family representation and inbreeding, especially in mass spawning species, above all the capacity to estimate reliable genetic parameters in any species and rearing system with no prior investment in structures, and the development of new breeding programs in many species. Parentage assignment should not be seen as a way to replace physical tagging, but as a new way to conceive breeding programs, which have to be optimized with its specific constraints, one of the most important being to well define the number of individuals to genotype to limit costs, maximize genetic gain while minimizing inbreeding. The recent possible shift to (for the moment more costly SNP markers should benefit from future developments in genomics and MAS selection to combine parentage assignment and indirect prediction of breeding values.

  5. Exploiting a natural auxotrophy for genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Larry; Manoil, Colin

    2012-08-01

    We exploited the natural histidine auxotrophy of Francisella species to develop hisD (encodes histidinol dehydrogenase) as a positive selection marker. A shuttle plasmid (pBR103) carrying Escherichia coli hisD and designed for cloning of PCR fragments replicated in both attenuated and highly virulent Francisella strains. During this work, we formulated a simplified defined growth medium for Francisella novicida.

  6. Exploiting induced and natural epigenetic variation for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nathan M; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Plant breeding has traditionally relied on combining the genetic diversity present within a species to develop combinations of alleles that provide desired traits. Epigenetic diversity may provide additional sources of variation within a species that could be captured or created for crop improvement. It will be important to understand the sources of epigenetic variation and the stability of newly formed epigenetic variants over generations to fully use the potential of epigenetic variation to improve crops. The development and application of methods for widespread epigenome profiling and engineering may generate new avenues for using the full potential of epigenetics in crop improvement.

  7. Genetic engineering compared to natural genetic variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Werner

    2010-11-30

    By comparing strategies of genetic alterations introduced in genetic engineering with spontaneously occurring genetic variation, we have come to conclude that both processes depend on several distinct and specific molecular mechanisms. These mechanisms can be attributed, with regard to their evolutionary impact, to three different strategies of genetic variation. These are local nucleotide sequence changes, intragenomic rearrangement of DNA segments and the acquisition of a foreign DNA segment by horizontal gene transfer. Both the strategies followed in genetic engineering and the amounts of DNA sequences thereby involved are identical to, or at least very comparable with, those involved in natural genetic variation. Therefore, conjectural risks of genetic engineering must be of the same order as those for natural biological evolution and for conventional breeding methods. These risks are known to be quite low. There is no scientific reason to assume special long-term risks for GM crops. For future agricultural developments, a road map is designed that can be expected to lead, by a combination of genetic engineering and conventional plant breeding, to crops that can insure food security and eliminate malnutrition and hunger for the entire human population on our planet. Public-private partnerships should be formed with the mission to reach the set goals in the coming decades. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic variation in dieback resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobo, Albin; Hansen, Jon Kehlet; McKinney, Lea Vig

    2014-01-01

    -eastern Zealand, Denmark, and confirmed the presence of substantial genetic variation in ash dieback susceptibility. The average crown damage increased in the trial from 61% in 2009 to 66% in 2012 and 72% in 2014, while the estimated heritability was 0.42 in both 2009 and 2012 but increased to 0.53 in 2014....... Genetic correlation between assessments was 0.88 between 2009 and 2012 and 0.91 between 2009 and 2014, suggesting fairly good possibilities for early selection of superior genotypes in the presence of high infection levels in the trial. The level of crown damage had strong negative effect on growth...

  9. Genetic variation of Taeniolethrinops praeorbitalis (Chisawasawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethrinops spp flock is one of the major commercially important fish species exploited in Lake Malawi. It contributes a large portion of inshore and deep-water catches yet little is known about its population genetics, which could provide information for making management decisions for sustainable exploitation and ...

  10. Towards a genetic architecture of cryptic genetic variation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 84; Issue 3. Towards a genetic architecture of cryptic genetic variation and genetic assimilation: the contribution of K. G. Bateman. Ian Dworkin. Commentary on J. Genet. Classic Volume 84 Issue 3 December 2005 pp 223-226 ...

  11. Natural genetic variation in plant photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flood, P.J.; Harbinson, J.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Natural genetic variation in plant photosynthesis is a largely unexplored and as a result an underused genetic resource for crop improvement. Numerous studies show genetic variation in photosynthetic traits in both crop and wild species, and there is an increasingly detailed knowledge base

  12. Collecting genetic variation on a small island

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Kallow; C. Trivedi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation is the most powerful factor in ensuring the long term success of trees and forests in times of change. In order to protect against loss of genetic variation from threats, including pests and diseases and climate change, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, is developing a national tree seed collection for the United Kingdom. This paper...

  13. Genetic variations in multiple myeloma I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A.; Klausen, T.W.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Few risk factors have been established for the plasma cell disorder multiple myeloma, but some of these like African American ethnicity and a family history of B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases suggest a genetic component for the disease. Genetic variation represents the genetic basis...

  14. Exploitation of molecular genetics in microbial degradation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FISH) and PCR-DGGE yields a more precise understanding of the microbial community structure and genetic diversity present in domestic wastewater of a laboratory scale treatment process. Nitrogen mass balances indicated an upset in the ...

  15. Genetic variation: a laboratory manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiner, Michael P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Stephens, J. Claiborne

    2007-01-01

    ... alterations, including copy number variation. The early sections of the manual are devoted to study design and generating genotype data, the use of resources such as HapMap and dbSNP, as well as experimental, statistical, and bioinformatic...

  16. Sex reduces genetic variation: a multidisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry H Q

    2011-04-01

    For over a century, the paradigm has been that sex invariably increases genetic variation, despite many renowned biologists asserting that sex decreases most genetic variation. Sex is usually perceived as the source of additive genetic variance that drives eukaryotic evolution vis-à-vis adaptation and Fisher's fundamental theorem. However, evidence for sex decreasing genetic variation appears in ecology, paleontology, population genetics, and cancer biology. The common thread among many of these disciplines is that sex acts like a coarse filter, weeding out major changes, such as chromosomal rearrangements (that are almost always deleterious), but letting minor variation, such as changes at the nucleotide or gene level (that are often neutral), flow through the sexual sieve. Sex acts as a constraint on genomic and epigenetic variation, thereby limiting adaptive evolution. The diverse reasons for sex reducing genetic variation (especially at the genome level) and slowing down evolution may provide a sufficient benefit to offset the famed costs of sex. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Genetic variation and geographical differentiation revealed using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Zhang L., Lu S., Sun D., and Peng J. 2015 Genetic variation and geographical differentiation revealed using ISSR markers in tung tree,. Vernicia fordii. J. Genet. 94, e5–e9. Online only: http://www.ias.ac.in/jgenet/OnlineResources/94/e5.pdf]. Introduction. Tung tree, Vernicia fordii is an oil-bearing woody plant species of ...

  18. Genetic variation in bovine milk fat composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    In her thesis, Stoop shows that there is considerable genetic variation in milk fat composition, which opens opportunities to improve milk fat composition by selective breeding. Short and medium chain fatty acids had high heritabilities, whereas variation due to herd (mainly feed effects) was

  19. Genetic variation in WRN and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Werner syndrome, a premature genetic aging syndrome, shares many clinical features reminiscent of normal physiological aging, and ischemic vascular disease is a frequent cause of death. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the WRN gene was associated with risk of ischemic...... for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (P=0.06). In meta-analyses including 59,190 individuals in 5 studies, the hazard ratio for ischemic stroke for C1367R TT homozygotes versus CC/CT was 1.14 (1.04-1.25; P=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that common genetic variation in WRN is associated...

  20. linking genetic to phenotypic variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phenotypic variation. SHAMPA GHOSH and N. SHARMILA BHARATHI. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, P.O. Box 6436, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India. Immunity can be classified into two types, namely innate.

  1. Genetic variation in KCNA5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Ingrid E; Olesen, Morten S; Liang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    AimsGenetic factors may be important in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the young. KCNA5 encodes the potassium channel a-subunit K(V)1.5, which underlies the voltage-gated atrial-specific potassium current I(Kur). KCNAB2 encodes K(V)ß2, a ß-subunit of K(V)1.5, which increases I......(Kur). Three studies have identified loss-of-function mutations in KCNA5 in patients with idiopathic AF. We hypothesized that early-onset lone AF is associated with high prevalence of genetic variants in KCNA5 and KCNAB2.Methods and resultsThe coding sequences of KCNA5 and KCNAB2 were sequenced in 307 patients...

  2. Community Engagement about Genetic Variation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Metosky, Susan; Rudofsky, Gayle; Deignan, Kathleen P.; Martinez, Hulda; Johnson-Moore, Penelope; Citrin, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to describe the methods and effectiveness of the Public Engagement in Genetic Variation and Haplotype Mapping Issues (PEGV) Project, which engaged a community in policy discussion about genetic variation research. The project implemented a 6-stage community engagement model in New Rochelle, New York. First, researchers recruited community partners. Second, the project team created community oversight. Third, focus groups discussed concerns generated by genetic variation research. Fourth, community dialogue sessions addressed focus group findings and developed policy recommendations. Fifth, a conference was held to present these policy recommendations and to provide a forum for HapMap (haplotype mapping) researchers to dialogue directly with residents. Finally, findings were disseminated via presentations and papers to the participants and to the wider community beyond. The project generated a list of proposed guidelines for genetic variation research that addressed the concerns of New Rochelle residents. Project team members expressed satisfaction with the engagement model overall but expressed concerns about how well community groups were utilized and what segment of the community actually engaged in the project. The PEGV Project represents a model for researchers to engage the general public in policy development about genetic research. There are benefits of such a process beyond the desired genetic research. (Population Health Management 2012;15:78–89) PMID:21815821

  3. Antioxidant Phytochemicals in Fresh Produce: Exploitation of Genotype Variation and Advancements in Analytical Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Manganaris

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Horticultural commodities (fruit and vegetables are the major dietary source of several bioactive compounds of high nutraceutical value for humans, including polyphenols, carotenoids and vitamins. The aim of the current review was dual. Firstly, toward the eventual enhancement of horticultural crops with bio-functional compounds, the natural genetic variation in antioxidants found in different species and cultivars/genotypes is underlined. Notably, some landraces and/or traditional cultivars have been characterized by substantially higher phytochemical content, i.e., small tomato of Santorini island (cv. “Tomataki Santorinis” possesses appreciably high amounts of ascorbic acid (AsA. The systematic screening of key bioactive compounds in a wide range of germplasm for the identification of promising genotypes and the restoration of key gene fractions from wild species and landraces may help in reducing the loss of agro-biodiversity, creating a healthier “gene pool” as the basis of future adaptation. Toward this direction, large scale comparative studies in different cultivars/genotypes of a given species provide useful insights about the ones of higher nutritional value. Secondly, the advancements in the employment of analytical techniques to determine the antioxidant potential through a convenient, easy and fast way are outlined. Such analytical techniques include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR and infrared (IR spectroscopy, electrochemical, and chemometric methods, flow injection analysis (FIA, optical sensors, and high resolution screening (HRS. Taking into consideration that fruits and vegetables are complex mixtures of water- and lipid-soluble antioxidants, the exploitation of chemometrics to develop “omics” platforms (i.e., metabolomics, foodomics is a promising tool for researchers to decode and/or predict antioxidant activity of fresh produce. For industry, the use of optical sensors and IR spectroscopy is recommended to

  4. Analysis of genetic variation and potential applications in genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology......, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic...... variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented...

  5. Genetic variation in genes affecting milk composition and quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard

    In the past decade major advances in next generation sequencing technologies have provided new opportuneties for the detection of genetic variation. Combining the knowlegde of genetic variation with phenotypic distributions provides considerable possibilites for detection of candidate genes....... In addition, exploring genetic variation related to the major milk proteins of bovine milk indntified genetic variations with possitive effects on milk coagulation...

  6. A global reference for human genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auton, Adam; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; M. Altshuler, David

    2015-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals...... from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short...

  7. Characterization of Genetic Variation in Icelandic Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Das, Ashutosh; Momeni, Jamal

    Identification of genetic variation in cattle breeds using next-generation sequencing technology has focused on the modern production cattle breeds. We focused on one of the oldest indigenous breeds, the Icelandic cattle breed. Sequencing of two individuals enabled identification of more than 8...... million SNPs and more than one million short indels. Annotation of the genetic variants identified a substantial number of functional SNPs and variants. The number of genetic variants identified in the Icelandic cattle breed is on the same level as previously seen in other studies on Holstein cattle...

  8. Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Thomas G., Sreejayan, Joseph L. and Kuriachan P. 2001 Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza malampuzhaensis. Krish. et .... (Promega). Southern hybridization was carried out as reported earlier (Thomas et al. 2000). Results. DNA fingerprinting. A total of 33 decamer primers randomly selected from C,.

  9. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flood, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the gateway of the sun’s energy into the biosphere, it is where light becomes life. Genetic variation is the fuel of evolution, without it natural selection is powerless and adaptation impossible. In this thesis I have set out to study a relatively unexplored field

  10. A global reference for human genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auton, Adam; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; M. Altshuler, David

    2015-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals...

  11. Genetic variation in pea seed globulin composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzitzikas, E.; Vincken, J.P.; Groot, de J.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative characterization of seeds from 59 pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines and relative taxa with various external characteristics and wide geographical origin was performed to explore the genetic variation of pea concerning its starch and protein contents and globulin composition. Pea lines,

  12. Genetic sources of population epigenomic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taudt, Aaron; Colome-Tatche, Maria; Johannes, Frank

    The field of epigenomics has rapidly progressed from the study of individual reference epigenomes to surveying epigenomic variation in populations. Recent studies in a number of species, from yeast to humans, have begun to dissect the cis- and trans-regulatory genetic mechanisms that shape patterns

  13. The probability of parallel genetic evolution from standing genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, A; Nuismer, S L

    2017-02-01

    Parallel evolution is often assumed to result from repeated adaptation to novel, yet ecologically similar, environments. Here, we develop and analyse a mathematical model that predicts the probability of parallel genetic evolution from standing genetic variation as a function of the strength of phenotypic selection and constraints imposed by genetic architecture. Our results show that the probability of parallel genetic evolution increases with the strength of natural selection and effective population size and is particularly likely to occur for genes with large phenotypic effects. Building on these results, we develop a Bayesian framework for estimating the strength of parallel phenotypic selection from genetic data. Using extensive individual-based simulations, we show that our estimator is robust across a wide range of genetic and evolutionary scenarios and provides a useful tool for rigorously testing the hypothesis that parallel genetic evolution is the result of adaptive evolution. An important result that emerges from our analyses is that existing studies of parallel genetic evolution frequently rely on data that is insufficient for distinguishing between adaptive evolution and neutral evolution driven by random genetic drift. Overcoming this challenge will require sampling more populations and the inclusion of larger numbers of loci. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Selection for uniformity in livestock by exploiting genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.; Bijma, P.; Hill, W.G.

    2008-01-01

    In some situations, it is worthwhile to change not only the mean, but also the variability of traits by selection. Genetic variation in residual variance may be utilised to improve uniformity in livestock populations by selection. The objective was to investigate the effects of genetic parameters,

  15. Genetic variations and normal fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunger, D B; Petry, C J; Ong, K K

    2006-01-01

    Size at birth is said to be a highly heritable trait, with an estimated 30-70% of the variability a result of genetics. Data from family studies may be confounded, however, by potential interactions between fetal genes and the maternal uterine environment. Overall, the maternal environment tends to restrain fetal growth, and this is most evident in first pregnancies. Restraint of fetal growth appears to be inherited through the maternal line. Potential genetic candidates include the mitochondrial DNA 16189 variant, and common variants of exclusively maternally expressed genes, such as H19, which have been associated with size at birth. Maternal blood glucose levels and blood pressure are also correlated with size at birth, but the degree to which these changes relate to genetic variation in the mother is unclear. Elegant studies in mouse knockout models and rare genetic variants in humans have highlighted the importance of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II, insulin and their respective receptors in determining fetal growth. However, data linking common variation in the genes that regulate these proteins and receptors with size at birth are few and inconsistent. Interestingly, common variation in the insulin gene (INS) variable number tandem repeats, which regulates the transcription of insulin and IGF-II, has been associated with size at birth, largely in second and subsequent pregnancies, where maternal restraint is least evident. This suggests that fetal genes, and in particular paternally expressed genes, may have significant effects on fetal growth during pregnancies where maternal restraint of fetal growth is less evident. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Genetic variation of contact dermatitis in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    left and right scores was lower than 1 (FPD: 0.73 and HB: 0.57), and both left and right FPD and HB must, therefore, be evaluated. High prevalences of FPD, but also HB, were achieved in the field trial, but lower prevalences may be sufficient for genetic evaluations and would be less detrimental......This study aimed to investigate the presence of genetic variation in footpad dermatitis (FPD) and hock burns (HB) and the possibility to genetically select against these. A field trial including 10 commercial broiler lines (n = 102 to 265) was carried out at 2 Dutch farms. Footpad dermatitis and HB...... were subjectively scored at ~4, 5, and 7 wk on a scale from 0 through 5. Genetic parameters were estimated in 2 lines based on a larger data set. The overall agreement of repeated FPD and HB scores was high (0.66 to 0.86) and the scoring system was, therefore, considered reliable. Kendall's tau between...

  17. Genetic variation in healthy oldest-old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Halaschek-Wiener

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who live to 85 and beyond without developing major age-related diseases may achieve this, in part, by lacking disease susceptibility factors, or by possessing resistance factors that enhance their ability to avoid disease and prolong lifespan. Healthy aging is a complex phenotype likely to be affected by both genetic and environmental factors. We sequenced 24 candidate healthy aging genes in DNA samples from 47 healthy individuals aged eighty-five years or older (the 'oldest-old', to characterize genetic variation that is present in this exceptional group. These healthy seniors were never diagnosed with cancer, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, or Alzheimer disease. We re-sequenced all exons, intron-exon boundaries and selected conserved non-coding sequences of candidate genes involved in aging-related processes, including dietary restriction (PPARG, PPARGC1A, SIRT1, SIRT3, UCP2, UCP3, metabolism (IGF1R, APOB, SCD, autophagy (BECN1, FRAP1, stem cell activation (NOTCH1, DLL1, tumor suppression (TP53, CDKN2A, ING1, DNA methylation (TRDMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B Progeria syndromes (LMNA, ZMPSTE24, KL and stress response (CRYAB, HSPB2. We detected 935 variants, including 848 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 87 insertion or deletions; 41% (385 were not recorded in dbSNP. This study is the first to present a comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in aging-related candidate genes in healthy oldest-old. These variants and especially our novel polymorphisms are valuable resources to test for genetic association in models of disease susceptibility or resistance. In addition, we propose an innovative tagSNP selection strategy that combines variants identified through gene re-sequencing- and HapMap-derived SNPs.

  18. Genetic Variation in Virulence among Chalkbrood Strains Infecting Honeybees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Svjetlana; Jensen, Annette B.; Markussen, Bo; Eilenberg, Jørgen; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2011-01-01

    Ascosphaera apis causes chalkbrood in honeybees, a chronic disease that reduces the number of viable offspring in the nest. Although lethal for larvae, the disease normally has relatively low virulence at the colony level. A recent study showed that there is genetic variation for host susceptibility, but whether Ascosphaera apis strains differ in virulence is unknown. We exploited a recently modified in vitro rearing technique to infect honeybee larvae from three colonies with naturally mated queens under strictly controlled laboratory conditions, using four strains from two distinct A. apis clades. We found that both strain and colony of larval origin affected mortality rates. The strains from one clade caused 12–14% mortality while those from the other clade induced 71–92% mortality. Larvae from one colony showed significantly higher susceptibility to chalkbrood infection than larvae from the other two colonies, confirming the existence of genetic variation in susceptibility across colonies. Our results are consistent with antagonistic coevolution between a specialized fungal pathogen and its host, and suggest that beekeeping industries would benefit from more systematic monitoring of this chronic stress factor of their colonies. PMID:21966406

  19. Genetic variation in virulence among chalkbrood strains infecting honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svjetlana Vojvodic

    Full Text Available Ascosphaera apis causes chalkbrood in honeybees, a chronic disease that reduces the number of viable offspring in the nest. Although lethal for larvae, the disease normally has relatively low virulence at the colony level. A recent study showed that there is genetic variation for host susceptibility, but whether Ascosphaera apis strains differ in virulence is unknown. We exploited a recently modified in vitro rearing technique to infect honeybee larvae from three colonies with naturally mated queens under strictly controlled laboratory conditions, using four strains from two distinct A. apis clades. We found that both strain and colony of larval origin affected mortality rates. The strains from one clade caused 12-14% mortality while those from the other clade induced 71-92% mortality. Larvae from one colony showed significantly higher susceptibility to chalkbrood infection than larvae from the other two colonies, confirming the existence of genetic variation in susceptibility across colonies. Our results are consistent with antagonistic coevolution between a specialized fungal pathogen and its host, and suggest that beekeeping industries would benefit from more systematic monitoring of this chronic stress factor of their colonies.

  20. Population genetic variation in sainfoin (Fabaceae) revealed by RAPD markers

    OpenAIRE

    Houshang NOSRATI; Mohammad Ali Hosseinpour FEIZI; Sona Seyed TARRAH; Ahmad Razban HAGHIGHI

    2012-01-01

    Studies on plants show that populations growing on the stressful environments indicate higher levels of genetic diversity, and that in outcrossing species majority of total genetic variation allocated to within population rather than between populations. We compared the level of genetic variation between populations growing in stressful and normal environments, and measured levels of within- and between population genetic variations in Onobrychis viciifolia L. (Sainfoin, Fabaceae) based on RA...

  1. Analysis of genetic variation and potential applications in genome-scale metabolic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gonçalo Rocha Cardoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes.

  2. Genetic variation of white clover ( Trifolium repens L.) collections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    White clover is an important legume naturalized in China. But genetic variation of Chinese local white clover germplasm has not been reported. There is no information for parents' selection and genetic resource conservation. The objective of this study was to investigate and characterize genetic variation of ten local white ...

  3. Adaptive genetic variation, stress and glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriel, Roxanne C; Wiley, Christopher D; Dewey, Michael J; Vrana, Paul B

    2008-01-01

    Elevated glucose levels in the presence of insulin are indicative of type 2 diabetes and the more inclusive metabolic syndrome. Alleles conferring susceptibility to these and other common conditions may be adaptations to past environments. It is possible that other mammals exhibiting environmental diversity harbor similar variants; therefore, we assessed glucose regulation in two species of deer mice (Peromyscus), a diverse endemic North American group. The prairie deer mouse, P. maniculatus bairdii (BW), and the Oldfield mouse, P. polionotus subgriseus (PO) differ in sexual dimorphism, behavior and habitat. PO animals exhibit better regulatory ability than BW animals, particularly among males, although both species display equivalent insulin levels/responses and non-fasted glucose levels. Hybrid males exhibit a PO glucose challenge response and subsequent analysis of consomic animals implicates Y chromosome variation as the genetic cause. Two pieces of evidence indicate that the male glucose regulatory differences are mediated by stress response: (1) fasting and handling alone account for most of the variation; (2) an inhibitor of glucocorticoid (GC) stress hormone synthesis eliminates these differences. PO males have GC levels that are twice those of BW males, indicating the presence of alleles that attenuate the GC response. We hypothesize that the interspecific physiological and behavioral differences are interrelated and that similar human variants exist.

  4. Genetic variation in the population of three Polish cattle breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation in the population of three Polish cattle breeds included into the programme of genetic resources protection and Holstein-Friesian breed, estimation on the basis of polymorphism of 24 microsatellite DNA sequences.

  5. Decoding Genetic Variations: Communications-Inspired Haplotype Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljiz, Zrinka; Vikalo, Haris

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies allow fast and affordable sequencing of individual genomes and thus enable unprecedented studies of genetic variations. Information about variations in the genome of an individual is provided by haplotypes, ordered collections of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Knowledge of haplotypes is instrumental in finding genes associated with diseases, drug development, and evolutionary studies. Haplotype assembly from high-throughput sequencing data is challenging due to errors and limited lengths of sequencing reads. The key observation made in this paper is that the minimum error-correction formulation of the haplotype assembly problem is identical to the task of deciphering a coded message received over a noisy channel-a classical problem in the mature field of communication theory. Exploiting this connection, we develop novel haplotype assembly schemes that rely on the bit-flipping and belief propagation algorithms often used in communication systems. The latter algorithm is then adapted to the haplotype assembly of polyploids. We demonstrate on both simulated and experimental data that the proposed algorithms compare favorably with state-of-the-art haplotype assembly methods in terms of accuracy, while being scalable and computationally efficient.

  6. Genetic variation in the Critically Endangered velvet worm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onychophora: Peripatopsidae) ... Conservation implications of the present study are briefly discussed. Key words Opisthopatus roseus, Critically Endangered, invertebrate conservation, genetic variation, haplotypes, saproxylic habitats.

  7. Population genetics of four heavily exploited shark species around the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Spät, Julia L.Y.

    2015-05-01

    The northwestern Indian Ocean harbors a number of larger marine vertebrate taxa that warrant the investigation of genetic population structure given remarkable spatial heterogeneity in biological characteristics such as distribution, behavior, and morphology. Here, we investigate the genetic population structure of four commercially exploited shark species with different biological characteristics (Carcharhinus limbatus, Carcharhinus sorrah, Rhizoprionodon acutus, and Sphyrna lewini) between the Red Sea and all other water bodies surrounding the Arabian Peninsula. To assess intraspecific patterns of connectivity, we constructed statistical parsimony networks among haplotypes and estimated (1) population structure; and (2) time of most recent population expansion, based on mitochondrial control region DNA and a total of 20 microsatellites. Our analysis indicates that, even in smaller, less vagile shark species, there are no contemporary barriers to gene flow across the study region, while historical events, for example, Pleistocene glacial cycles, may have affected connectivity in C. sorrah and R. acutus. A parsimony network analysis provided evidence that Arabian S. lewini may represent a population segment that is distinct from other known stocks in the Indian Ocean, raising a new layer of conservation concern. Our results call for urgent regional cooperation to ensure the sustainable exploitation of sharks in the Arabian region.

  8. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  9. Genetic variation and recombination in Aichi virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Alexander N; Drexler, Jan Felix; Belalov, Ilya S; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Baumgarte, Sigrid; Drosten, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Aichi virus (AiV), a member of the genus Kobuvirus in the family Picornaviridae, causes gastroenteritis in humans. It was noted that AiV differs from other picornaviruses in its unusually high C content and a very high degree of genome-ordered RNA secondary structures. However, the genetic variability and mutational restrictions on a full-genome scale have not been studied. In addition to the available five complete AiV genomes, we determined here another five complete coding sequences of AiV sampled in Germany, 2004. Distinctive AiV genetic features included a low incidence of recombination along the genome without obvious hotspots or spared regions and very low rates of synonymous and non-synonymous variation, supporting an absence of AiV serotypes. In addition, the absence of recombination between AiV genotypes A and B suggested the existence of reproductive isolation between taxonomic units below the species level. In contrast to most other picornaviruses, AiV genomes strongly avoided the UpA dinucleotide, while there was no obvious selection against the CpG dinucleotide. AiV genomes also appeared to contain a codon usage bias (CUB) apparent as an effective number of codons of 39.5, which was amongst the most extreme among RNA viruses. A set of sequence scrambling algorithms was developed to determine the origin of CUB in AiV. While in most picornaviruses the genomic dinucleotide content contributed significantly to CUB, in AiV its extreme nucleotide content, i.e. 57 % third codon position C, was the main driving force behind the apparent CUB.

  10. Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetically isolated smaller populations and a narrow genetic base in O. malampuzhaensis point to its vulnerability to genetic drift and genetic depauperation. Thus O. malampuzhaensis appears to be under the threat of extinction and needs to be conserved by use of suitable methods. The present study also identified ...

  11. Population genetic variation in sainfoin (Fabaceae revealed by RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang NOSRATI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on plants show that populations growing on the stressful environments indicate higher levels of genetic diversity, and that in outcrossing species majority of total genetic variation allocated to within population rather than between populations. We compared the level of genetic variation between populations growing in stressful and normal environments, and measured levels of within- and between population genetic variations in Onobrychis viciifolia L. (Sainfoin, Fabaceae based on RAPDs. Our results show that populations growing on he stressful environment i.e. saline soils indicated either the lowest 0.2466 or highest (0.3186 within-population genetic variation based on Nei’s diversity. That disagrees with Niche-Width Variation Theory, which expects highest genetic diversity within stressful populations. Partitioning the total genetic variation by analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed that 89.03% of total genetic diversity allocated to within populations while 10.97% of this variation dedicated to among populations, indicating predominantly outcrossing mode of pollination in sainfoin. The two population pairs growing under similar environmental stresses (cold climate and saline soil showed higher genetic similarity. This may suggest that RAPDs patterns reflex selection rather than random drift.

  12. Genetic variation of mangrove species Avicennia marina in Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... In order to ensure conservation of mangroves, genetic diversity in remaining ... Key words: Avicennia marina, genetic variation, Iran, microsatellite, population. INTRODUCTION. Mangrove forests are a feature of the intertidal zone of ... grammes, and for the conservation of genetic resources. A major ...

  13. Landscape location affects genetic variation of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. K. Schwartz; L. S. Mills; Y. Ortega; L. F. Ruggiero; F. W. Allendorf

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a population's location on the landscape on genetic variation has been of interest to population genetics for more than half a century. However, most studies do not consider broadscale biogeography when interpreting genetic data. In this study, we propose an operational definition of a peripheral population, and then explore whether peripheral...

  14. Genetic variation of durum wheat landraces using morphological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variations of cultivars are very interesting in reducing genetic vulnerability and lead to stable control of production. The aim of this research was to study genetic diversity among six durum wheat cultivars. For the first assay we evaluated seven morphological traits which are: spikelet per spike, spike length, spike ...

  15. [Research progress of molecular genetic analysis in Schistosoma variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Su-Yue; Li, Fei

    2014-02-01

    The development of molecular biology techniques makes important contributions to the researches of heritable variation of Schistosoma. In recent years, the molecular genetic analysis in the Schistosoma variation researches mainly includes the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphism technology (RAPD), microsatellite anchored PCR (SSR-PCR), and polymerase reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). This article reviews the research progress of molecular genetic analysis in Schistosoma variation in recent years.

  16. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A.; Li, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation...... was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation......Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes...

  17. Selection for uniformity in livestock by exploiting genetic heterogeneity of residual variance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill William G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In some situations, it is worthwhile to change not only the mean, but also the variability of traits by selection. Genetic variation in residual variance may be utilised to improve uniformity in livestock populations by selection. The objective was to investigate the effects of genetic parameters, breeding goal, number of progeny per sire and breeding scheme on selection responses in mean and variance when applying index selection. Genetic parameters were obtained from the literature. Economic values for the mean and variance were derived for some standard non-linear profit equations, e.g. for traits with an intermediate optimum. The economic value of variance was in most situations negative, indicating that selection for reduced variance increases profit. Predicted responses in residual variance after one generation of selection were large, in some cases when the number of progeny per sire was at least 50, by more than 10% of the current residual variance. Progeny testing schemes were more efficient than sib-testing schemes in decreasing residual variance. With optimum traits, selection pressure shifts gradually from the mean to the variance when approaching the optimum. Genetic improvement of uniformity is particularly interesting for traits where the current population mean is near an intermediate optimum.

  18. Rapid Communication: Large exploitable genetic variability exists to shorten age at slaughter in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D P; Cromie, A R; Judge, M M

    2017-10-01

    Apprehension among consumers is mounting on the efficiency by which cattle convert feedstuffs into human edible protein and energy as well as the consequential effects on the environment. Most (genetic) studies that attempt to address these issues have generally focused on efficiency metrics defined over a certain time period of an animal's life cycle, predominantly the period representing the linear phase of growth. The age at which an animal reaches the carcass specifications for slaughter, however, is also known to vary between breeds; less is known on the extent of the within-breed variability in age at slaughter. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to quantify the phenotypic and genetic variability in the age at which cattle reach a predefined carcass weight and subcutaneous fat cover. A novel trait, labeled here as the deviation in age at slaughter (DAGE), was represented by the unexplained variability from a statistical model, with age at slaughter as the dependent variable and with the fixed effects, among others, of carcass weight and fat score (scale 1 to 15 scored by video image analysis of the carcass at slaughter). Variance components for DAGE were estimated using either a 2-step approach (i.e., the DAGE phenotype derived first and then variance components estimated) or a 1-step approach (i.e., variance components for age at slaughter estimated directly in a mixed model that included the fixed effects of, among others, carcass weight and carcass fat score as well as a random direct additive genetic effect). The raw phenotypic SD in DAGE was 44.2 d. The genetic SD and heritability for DAGE estimated using the 1-step or 2-step models varied from 14.2 to 15.1 d and from 0.23 to 0.26 (SE 0.02), respectively. Assuming the (genetic) variability in the number of days from birth to reaching a desired carcass specifications can be exploited without any associated unfavorable repercussions, considerable potential exists to improve not only the

  19. Genetic variation in natural honeybee populations, Apis mellifera capensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Randall; Neumann, Peter; Radloff, Sarah E.

    2004-09-01

    Genetic variation in honeybee, Apis mellifera, populations can be considerably influenced by breeding and commercial introductions, especially in areas with abundant beekeeping. However, in southern Africa apiculture is based on the capture of wild swarms, and queen rearing is virtually absent. Moreover, the introduction of European subspecies constantly failed in the Cape region. We therefore hypothesize a low human impact on genetic variation in populations of Cape honeybees, Apis mellifera capensis. A novel solution to studying genetic variation in honeybee populations based on thelytokous worker reproduction is applied to test this hypothesis. Environmental effects on metrical morphological characters of the phenotype are separated to obtain a genetic residual component. The genetic residuals are then re-calculated as coefficients of genetic variation. Characters measured included hair length on the abdomen, width and length of wax plate, and three wing angles. The data show for the first time that genetic variation in Cape honeybee populations is independent of beekeeping density and probably reflects naturally occurring processes such as gene flow due to topographic and climatic variation on a microscale.

  20. The genetics of canine skull shape variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-02-01

    A dog's craniofacial diversity is the result of continual human intervention in natural selection, a process that began tens of thousands of years ago. To date, we know little of the genetic underpinnings and developmental mechanisms that make dog skulls so morphologically plastic. In this Perspectives, we discuss the origins of dog skull shapes in terms of history and biology and highlight recent advances in understanding the genetics of canine skull shapes. Of particular interest are those molecular genetic changes that are associated with the development of distinct breeds.

  1. Towards a genetic architecture of cryptic genetic variation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Clearly spurred on by Waddington, Bateman (1959) con- tinued the work on the crossveinless phenocopy in Dro- sophila melanogaster and helped to establish it as a model system in quantitative genetics for threshold traits. In this commentary, I will discuss the context of this work examining the genetic architecture of the ...

  2. Genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Darren; Rodríguez, Rafael L

    2013-07-22

    Patterns of phenotypic variation arise in part from plasticity owing to social interactions, and these patterns contribute, in turn, to the form of selection that shapes the variation we observe in natural populations. This proximate-ultimate dynamic brings genetic variation in social environments to the forefront of evolutionary theory. However, the extent of this variation remains largely unknown. Here, we use a member of the Enchenopa binotata species complex of treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae) to assess how mate preferences are influenced by genetic variation in the social environment. We used full-sibling split-families as 'treatment' social environments, and reared focal females alongside each treatment family, describing the mate preferences of the focal females. With this method, we detected substantial genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences. The mate preferences of focal females varied according to the treatment families along with which they grew up. We discuss the evolutionary implications of the presence of such genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences, including potential contributions to the maintenance of genetic variation, the promotion of divergence, and the adaptive evolution of social effects on fitness-related traits.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic variations contributed by Alu retrotransposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Andrade Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De novo retrotransposition of Alu elements has been recognized as a major driver for insertion polymorphisms in human populations. In this study, we exploited Alu-anchored bisulfite PCR libraries to identify evolutionarily recent Alu element insertions, and to investigate their genetic and epigenetic variation. Results A total of 327 putatively recent Alu insertions were identified, altogether represented by 1,762 sequence reads. Nearly all such de novo retrotransposition events (316/327 were novel. Forty-seven out of forty-nine randomly selected events, corresponding to nineteen genomic loci, were sequence-verified. Alu element insertions remained hemizygous in one or more individuals in sixteen of the nineteen genomic loci. The Alu elements were found to be enriched for young Alu families with characteristic sequence features, such as the presence of a longer poly(A tail. In addition, we documented the occurrence of a duplication of the AT-rich target site in their immediate flanking sequences, a hallmark of retrotransposition. Furthermore, we found the sequence motif (TT/AAAA that is recognized by the ORF2P protein encoded by LINE-1 in their 5'-flanking regions, consistent with the fact that Alu retrotransposition is facilitated by LINE-1 elements. While most of these Alu elements were heavily methylated, we identified an Alu localized 1.5 kb downstream of TOMM5 that exhibited a completely unmethylated left arm. Interestingly, we observed differential methylation of its immediate 5' and 3' flanking CpG dinucleotides, in concordance with the unmethylated and methylated statuses of its internal 5' and 3' sequences, respectively. Importantly, TOMM5's CpG island and the 3 Alu repeats and 1 MIR element localized upstream of this newly inserted Alu were also found to be unmethylated. Methylation analyses of two additional genomic loci revealed no methylation differences in CpG dinucleotides flanking the Alu insertion sites in

  4. Genetic variation of Japanese loach inferred from restriction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    loop region in the mitochondrial DNA including the part of 12s RNA and cytochrome b genes was made to clarify genetic variations and relations and relationships among eleven populations of Japanese loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.

  5. Genetic Variation Within and Among Populations of Delmarva Fox Squirrels

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to provide important information about genetic variation in populations of the Delmarva Fox Squirrel in the context of a more general...

  6. Genetic variation among spiny-footed lizards in the Acanthodactylus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation among spiny-footed lizards in the Acanthodactylus pardalis group from North Africa. Miguel M. Fonseca, José C. Brito, Hugo Rebelo, Mohsen Kalboussi, Saïd Larbes, Miguel A. Carretero, D. James Harris ...

  7. Genetic variation in Pinus brutia Ten. seed stands and seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    . Res. 127: 315-325. Cornelius J (1994). Heritabilities and Genetic Coefficients of Variation in. Forest Trees. Canandian Journal of Forestry Research 24:372-379. Dean CA, Stonecypher RW (2006). Early Selection of Douglas- ...

  8. Molecular Darwinism: the contingency of spontaneous genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign DNA. In these processes, specific gene products are involved in cooperation with different nongenetic elements. Some genetic variations occur fully at random along the DNA filaments, others rather with a statistical reproducibility, although at many possible sites. We have to be aware that evolution in natural ecosystems is of higher complexity than under most laboratory conditions, not at least in view of symbiotic associations and the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer. The encountered contingency of genetic variation can possibly best ensure a long-term persistence of life under steadily changing living conditions.

  9. The genetics of regulatory variation in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Stranger Barbara E; Dermitzakis Emmanouil T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The regulation of gene expression plays an important role in complex phenotypes, including disease in humans. For some genes, the genetic mechanisms influencing gene expression are well elucidated; however, it is unclear how applicable these results are to gene expression on a genome-wide level. Studies in model organisms and humans have clearly documented gene expression variation among individuals and shown that a significant proportion of this variation has a genetic basis. Recent...

  10. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Yanjun Zan; Xia Shen; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Örjan Carlborg

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least o...

  11. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation.

  12. Genetic Variations and their Association with Diseases among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was therefore investigate the possible role genetics plays in disease, death and infections. The mode of study involved a combination of a retrospective study and the analysis of genetic variation among Kenyan ethnic populations using ABO blood group system. The results showed that there was ...

  13. Genetic variation and population structure of interleukin genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The extent of genetic variation and the degree of genetic differentiation among seven ethnic populations from Karnataka, India (Bunt, Havyak, Iyengar, Lingayath, Smartha, Vaishya, Vokkaliga), was investigated using four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: IL-1A 4845, IL-1B 3954, IL-1B 511 and IL-1RA 2018) of the ...

  14. Genetic variation in colchicine-treated regenerated plants of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 3. Genetic variation in colchicine-treated regenerated plants of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. X. Z. Liu X. Lin X. Y. Mo T. Long H. Y. Zhang.

  15. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-07

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as 'animal personality'. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects--including parental and epigenetic contributors--and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic architecture of sensory exploitation: QTL mapping of female and male receiver traits in an acoustic moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, S; Streiff, R; Courtois, B; Zenboudji, S; Limousin, D; Greenfield, M D

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of extravagant sexual traits by sensory exploitation occurs if males incidentally evolve features that stimulate females owing to a pre-existing environmental response that arose in the context of natural selection. The sensory exploitation process is thus expected to leave a specific genetic imprint, a pleiotropic control of the original environmental response and the novel sexual response in females. However, females may be subsequently selected to improve their discrimination of environmental and sexual stimuli. Accordingly, responses may have diverged and the original genetic architecture may have been modified. These possibilities may be considered by studying the genetic architecture of responses to male signals and to the environmental stimuli that were purportedly 'exploited' by those signals. However, no previous study has addressed the genetic control of sensory exploitation. We investigated this question in an acoustic pyralid moth, Achroia grisella, in which a male ultrasonic song attracts females and perception of ultrasound likely arose in the context of detecting predatory bats. We examined the genetic architecture of female response to bat echolocation signals and to male song via a cartographic study of quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing these receiver traits. We found several QTL for both traits, but none of them were colocalized on the same chromosomes. These results indicate that - to the extent to which male A. grisella song originated by the process of sensory exploitation - some modification of the female responses occurred since the origin of the male signal. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Genetic variations and evolutionary relationships among radishes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among red radishes, 37 accessions with different flesh colors were analyzed in terms of the red pigment content, karyotypes, and simple sequence repeat markers. Red pigment content of red radish was 3.4 to 28.8% with an average of 15.62%. The karyotype ...

  18. A Model of Genetic Variation in Human Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2008-01-01

    Social networks influence the evolution of cooperation and they exhibit strikingly systematic patterns across a wide range of human contexts. Both of these facts suggest that variation in the topological attributes of human social networks might have a genetic basis. While genetic variation accounts for a significant portion of the variation in many complex social behaviors, the heritability of egocentric social network attributes is unknown. Here we show that three of these attributes (in-degree, transitivity, and centrality) are heritable. We then develop a "mirror network" method to test extant network models and show that none accounts for observed genetic variation in human social networks. We propose an alternative "attract and introduce" model that generates significant heritability as well as other important network features, and we show that this model with two simple forms of heterogeneity is well suited to the modeling of real social networks in humans. These results suggest that natural selection ...

  19. An acenocoumarol dosing algorithm exploiting clinical and genetic factors in South Indian (Dravidian) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, Dhakchinamoorthi; Shewade, Deepak Gopal; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Beaune, Philippe; Sai Chandran, B V; Balachander, Jayaraman; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, and GGCX genetic polymorphisms on mean daily dose of acenocoumarol in South Indian patients and to develop a new pharmacogenetic algorithm based on clinical and genetic factors. Patients receiving acenocoumarol maintenance therapy (n = 230) were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, and GGCX were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. The mean daily acenocoumarol maintenance dose was found to be 3.7 ± 2.3 (SD) mg/day. The CYP2C9 *1*2, CYP2C9 *1*3, and CYP2C9 *2*3 variant genotypes significantly reduced the dose by 56.7 % (2.0 mg), 67.6 % (1.6 mg), and 70.3 % (1.5 mg) than wild-type carriers 4.1 mg, p genetic variants of CYP2C9 and GGCX (rs11676382) were found to be associated with lower acenocoumarol dose, whereas CYP4F2 (rs2108622) was associated with higher doses. Age, body mass index (BMI), variation of CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, and GGCX were the major determinants of acenocoumarol maintenance dose, accounting for 61.8 % of its variability (adjusted r (2) = 0.615, p algorithm was established to determine the acenocoumarol dose in South Indian population.

  20. Genetic variation in an individual human exome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline C Ng

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There is much interest in characterizing the variation in a human individual, because this may elucidate what contributes significantly to a person's phenotype, thereby enabling personalized genomics. We focus here on the variants in a person's 'exome,' which is the set of exons in a genome, because the exome is believed to harbor much of the functional variation. We provide an analysis of the approximately 12,500 variants that affect the protein coding portion of an individual's genome. We identified approximately 10,400 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs in this individual, of which approximately 15-20% are rare in the human population. We predict approximately 1,500 nsSNPs affect protein function and these tend be heterozygous, rare, or novel. Of the approximately 700 coding indels, approximately half tend to have lengths that are a multiple of three, which causes insertions/deletions of amino acids in the corresponding protein, rather than introducing frameshifts. Coding indels also occur frequently at the termini of genes, so even if an indel causes a frameshift, an alternative start or stop site in the gene can still be used to make a functional protein. In summary, we reduced the set of approximately 12,500 nonsilent coding variants by approximately 8-fold to a set of variants that are most likely to have major effects on their proteins' functions. This is our first glimpse of an individual's exome and a snapshot of the current state of personalized genomics. The majority of coding variants in this individual are common and appear to be functionally neutral. Our results also indicate that some variants can be used to improve the current NCBI human reference genome. As more genomes are sequenced, many rare variants and non-SNP variants will be discovered. We present an approach to analyze the coding variation in humans by proposing multiple bioinformatic methods to hone in on possible functional variation.

  1. Inference of gene regulatory networks with sparse structural equation models exploiting genetic perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Cai

    Full Text Available Integrating genetic perturbations with gene expression data not only improves accuracy of regulatory network topology inference, but also enables learning of causal regulatory relations between genes. Although a number of methods have been developed to integrate both types of data, the desiderata of efficient and powerful algorithms still remains. In this paper, sparse structural equation models (SEMs are employed to integrate both gene expression data and cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL, for modeling gene regulatory networks in accordance with biological evidence about genes regulating or being regulated by a small number of genes. A systematic inference method named sparsity-aware maximum likelihood (SML is developed for SEM estimation. Using simulated directed acyclic or cyclic networks, the SML performance is compared with that of two state-of-the-art algorithms: the adaptive Lasso (AL based scheme, and the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG method. Computer simulations demonstrate that the novel SML algorithm offers significantly better performance than the AL-based and QDG algorithms across all sample sizes from 100 to 1,000, in terms of detection power and false discovery rate, in all the cases tested that include acyclic or cyclic networks of 10, 30 and 300 genes. The SML method is further applied to infer a network of 39 human genes that are related to the immune function and are chosen to have a reliable eQTL per gene. The resulting network consists of 9 genes and 13 edges. Most of the edges represent interactions reasonably expected from experimental evidence, while the remaining may just indicate the emergence of new interactions. The sparse SEM and efficient SML algorithm provide an effective means of exploiting both gene expression and perturbation data to infer gene regulatory networks. An open-source computer program implementing the SML algorithm is freely available upon request.

  2. Differential Regulation of Cryptic Genetic Variation Shapes the Genetic Interactome Underlying Complex Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-12-01

    Cryptic genetic variation (CGV) refers to genetic variants whose effects are buffered in most conditions but manifest phenotypically upon specific genetic and environmental perturbations. Despite having a central role in adaptation, contribution of CGV to regulation of quantitative traits is unclear. Instead, a relatively simplistic architecture of additive genetic loci is known to regulate phenotypic variation in most traits. In this paper, we investigate the regulation of CGV and its implication on the genetic architecture of quantitative traits at a genome-wide level. We use a previously published dataset of biparental recombinant population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenotyped in 34 diverse environments to perform single locus, two-locus, and covariance mapping. We identify loci that have independent additive effects as well as those which regulate the phenotypic manifestation of other genetic variants (variance QTL). We find that whereas additive genetic variance is predominant, a higher order genetic interaction network regulates variation in certain environments. Despite containing pleiotropic loci, with effects across environments, these genetic networks are highly environment specific. CGV is buffered under most allelic combinations of these networks and perturbed only in rare combinations resulting in high phenotypic variance. The presence of such environment specific genetic networks is the underlying cause of abundant gene–environment interactions. We demonstrate that overlaying identified molecular networks on such genetic networks can identify potential candidate genes and underlying mechanisms regulating phenotypic variation. Such an integrated approach applied to human disease datasets has the potential to improve the ability to predict disease predisposition and identify specific therapeutic targets.

  3. Intraspecific genetic variation and species coexistence in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K; Damgaard, Christian F; Laroche, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Many studies report that intraspecific genetic variation in plants can affect community composition and coexistence. However, less is known about which traits are responsible and the mechanisms by which variation in these traits affect the associated community. Focusing on plant-plant interactions, we review empirical studies exemplifying how intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits impacts plant coexistence. Intraspecific variation in chemical and architectural traits promotes species coexistence, by both increasing habitat heterogeneity and altering competitive hierarchies. Decomposing species interactions into interactions between genotypes shows that genotype × genotype interactions are often intransitive. The outcome of plant-plant interactions varies with local adaptation to the environment and with dominant neighbour genotypes, and some plants can recognize the genetic identity of neighbour plants if they have a common history of coexistence. Taken together, this reveals a very dynamic nature of coexistence. We outline how more traits mediating plant-plant interactions may be identified, and how future studies could use population genetic surveys of genotype distribution in nature and methods from trait-based ecology to better quantify the impact of intraspecific genetic variation on plant coexistence. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Genetic architecture of natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster aggressive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, John; Couch, Charlene; Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Peiffer, Jason; Anholt, Robert R. H.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression is an evolutionarily conserved complex behavior essential for survival and the organization of social hierarchies. With the exception of genetic variants associated with bioamine signaling, which have been implicated in aggression in many species, the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression is largely unknown. Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model system for exploring the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression. Here, we performed genome-wide association analyses using the inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and replicate advanced intercross populations derived from the most and least aggressive DGRP lines. We identified genes that have been previously implicated in aggressive behavior as well as many novel loci, including gustatory receptor 63a (Gr63a), which encodes a subunit of the receptor for CO2, and genes associated with development and function of the nervous system. Although genes from the two association analyses were largely nonoverlapping, they mapped onto a genetic interaction network inferred from an analysis of pairwise epistasis in the DGRP. We used mutations and RNAi knock-down alleles to functionally validate 79% of the candidate genes and 75% of the candidate epistatic interactions tested. Epistasis for aggressive behavior causes cryptic genetic variation in the DGRP that is revealed by changing allele frequencies in the outbred populations derived from extreme DGRP lines. This phenomenon may pertain to other fitness traits and species, with implications for evolution, applied breeding, and human genetics. PMID:26100892

  5. Genetics of body shape and armour variation in threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, T; Cano, J M; Merilä, J

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation and covariation can influence the rate and direction of phenotypic evolution. We explored the possibility that the parallel morphological evolution seen in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations colonizing freshwater environments is facilitated by patterns of genetic variation and covariation in the ancestral (marine) population. We estimated the genetic (G) and phenotypic (P) covariance matrices and directions of maximum additive genetic (g(max) ) and phenotypic (p(max) ) covariances of body shape and armour traits. Our results suggest a role for the ancestral G in explaining parallel morphological evolution in freshwater populations. We also found evidence of genetic constraints owing to the lack of variance in the ancestral G. Furthermore, strong genetic covariances and correlations among traits revealed that selective factors responsible for threespine stickleback body shape and armour divergence may be difficult to disentangle. The directions of g(max) and p(max) were correlated, but the correlations were not high enough to imply that phenotypic patterns of trait variation and covariation within populations are very informative of underlying genetic patterns. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Genetic architecture of natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, John; Couch, Charlene; Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Peiffer, Jason; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-07-07

    Aggression is an evolutionarily conserved complex behavior essential for survival and the organization of social hierarchies. With the exception of genetic variants associated with bioamine signaling, which have been implicated in aggression in many species, the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression is largely unknown. Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model system for exploring the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression. Here, we performed genome-wide association analyses using the inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and replicate advanced intercross populations derived from the most and least aggressive DGRP lines. We identified genes that have been previously implicated in aggressive behavior as well as many novel loci, including gustatory receptor 63a (Gr63a), which encodes a subunit of the receptor for CO2, and genes associated with development and function of the nervous system. Although genes from the two association analyses were largely nonoverlapping, they mapped onto a genetic interaction network inferred from an analysis of pairwise epistasis in the DGRP. We used mutations and RNAi knock-down alleles to functionally validate 79% of the candidate genes and 75% of the candidate epistatic interactions tested. Epistasis for aggressive behavior causes cryptic genetic variation in the DGRP that is revealed by changing allele frequencies in the outbred populations derived from extreme DGRP lines. This phenomenon may pertain to other fitness traits and species, with implications for evolution, applied breeding, and human genetics.

  7. Exploring and exploiting natural variation in the wings of a predatory ladybird beetle for biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, S.T.E.

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this PhD thesis is natural variation in the wing length of the predatory two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata. ‘Wingless’ individuals of this species occur occasionally. They possess truncated wing covers and flight wings and cannot fly, but the extent of the reduction is

  8. Genetic variation in dopaminergic reward in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Dagher, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine-based reward circuitry appears to play a role in encoding reward from eating and incentive sensitization, whereby cues associated with food reward acquire motivational value. Data suggest that low levels of dopamine D2 receptors and attenuated responsivity of dopamine-target regions (e.g. the striatum) to food and food cues are associated with elevated weight. There is mixed evidence that genotypes that appear to be associated with reduced signaling of dopamine circuitry, including DRD2, DRD4 and DAT, are correlated with obesity. In addition, there is emerging fMRI evidence that reduced responsivity in brain regions implicated in food reward increase risk for future weight gain among individuals who appear to be at genetic risk for attenuated dopamine signaling by virtue of DRD2 and DRD4 genotypes. However, it is vital for these relations to be replicated in larger, independent prospective studies and to use positron emission tomography to better characterize parameters of dopamine signaling, including dopamine receptor density, basal dopamine levels, and phasic dopamine release. Improved understanding of the role of dopamine-based reward circuitry and genotypes that influence the functioning of this circuitry may inform the design of more effective preventive and treatment interventions for obesity. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  10. Quantitative genetic variation in static allometry in the threespine stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Katrina; Nishimura, Nicole; Currey, Mark; Hurwit, Dan; Cresko, William A

    2010-12-01

    The common pattern of replicated evolution of a consistent shape-environment relationship might reflect selection acting in similar ways within each environment, but divergently among environments. However, phenotypic evolution depends on the availability of additive genetic variation as well as on the direction of selection, implicating a bias in the distribution of genetic variance as a potential contributor to replicated evolution. Allometry, the relationship between shape and size, is a potential source of genetic bias that is poorly understood. The threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, provides an ideal system for exploring the contribution of genetic variance in body shape allometry to evolutionary patterns. The stickleback system comprises marine populations that exhibit limited phenotypic variation, and young freshwater populations which, following independent colonization events, have often evolved similar phenotypes in similar environments. In particular, stickleback diversification has involved changes in both total body size and relative size of body regions (i.e., shape). In a laboratory-reared cohort derived from an oceanic Alaskan population that is phenotypically and genetically representative of the ancestor of the diverse freshwater populations in this region, we determined the phenotypic static allometry, and estimated the additive genetic variation about these population-level allometric functions. We detected significant allometry, with larger fish having relatively smaller heads, a longer base to their second dorsal fin, and longer, shallower caudal peduncles. There was additive genetic variance in body size and in size-independent body shape (i.e., allometric elevation), but typically not in allometric slopes. These results suggest that the parallel evolution of body shape in threespine stickleback is not likely to have been a correlated response to selection on body size, or vice versa. Although allometry is common in fishes, this

  11. A fourth generation of neuroanatomical tracing techniques: exploiting the offspring of genetic engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterlood, F.G.; Bloem, B.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Luchicchi, A.; Deisseroth, K.

    2014-01-01

    The first three generations of neuroanatomical tract-tracing methods include, respectively, techniques exploiting degeneration, retrograde cellular transport and anterograde cellular transport. This paper reviews the most recent development in third-generation tracing, i.e., neurochemical

  12. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J; Bodea, Corneliu A; Goldberg, Arthur P; Lee, Ann B; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-08-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (herein termed autism), the nature of the allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk-associated genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations. From this evidence, one might conclude that rare variation dominates the allelic spectrum in autism, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation this common variation has. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, new methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation and synthesis of results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism's genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ∼52.4%, with most due to common variation, and rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individual liability, yet their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to that for heritable variation.

  13. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, H.; Dekkers, O.M.; Peeters, R.P.; Schoones, J.W.; Smit, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple

  14. Chum and pink salmon genetics - Genetic and life history variation of southern chum and pink salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The distribution of genetic and life history variation in chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon in their southern range in North America is key to...

  15. Treatment response heterogeneity in asthma: the role of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijverberg, Susanne J H; Farzan, Niloufar; Slob, Elise M A; Neerincx, Anne H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H

    2018-01-01

    Asthmatic patients show a large heterogeneity in response to asthma medication. Rapidly evolving genotyping technologies have led to the identification of various genetic variants associated with treatment outcomes. Areas covered: This review focuses on the current knowledge of genetic variants influencing treatment response to the most commonly used asthma medicines: short- and long-acting beta-2 agonists (SABA/LABA), inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and leukotriene modifiers. This review shows that various genetic variants have been identified, but none are currently used to guide asthma treatment. One of the most promising genetic variants is the Arg16 variant in the ADRB2 gene to guide LABA treatment in asthmatic children. Expert commentary: Poor replication of initially promising results and the low fraction of variability accounted for by single genetic variants inhibit pharmacogenetic findings to reach the asthma clinic. Nevertheless, the identification of genetic variation influencing treatment response does provide more insights in the complex processes underlying response and might identify novel targets for treatment. There is a need to report measures of clinical validity, to perform precision-medicine guided trials, as well as to understand how genetic variation interacts with environmental factors. In addition, systems biology approaches might be able to show a more complete picture of these complex interactions.

  16. Natural genetic variation in Calligonum Tunisian genus analyzed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... from different regions of Tunisian desert using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker. In total, 46 polymorphic bands ... Key words: Calligonum, genetic diversity, Inter-specific variation, RAPD marker, Tunisian desert. .... generates entirely new variables (axes) and new linear combinations of ...

  17. Molecular genetic variation in the African wild rice Oryza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Molecular markers, complemented by appropriate Geographical Information System (GIS) software packages are powerful tools in mapping the geographical distribution of genetic variation and assessing its relationship with environmental variables. The objective of the study was therefore to investigate ...

  18. Genetic variation of 12 rice cultivars grown in Brunei Darussalam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dell

    2015-03-25

    Mar 25, 2015 ... Genetic variations of 12 different rice cultivars in Brunei Darussalam were studied using 15 different. SSR markers and their salinity tolerance mechanism was also assessed. Eight SSR markers, RM 151,. 187, 206, 226, 276, 310, 320 and 334, showed polymorphic alleles while the other seven were.

  19. Genetic variation in Toll-like receptors and disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, Mihai G.; Wijmenga, Cisca; O'Neill, Luke A. J.

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key initiators of the innate immune response and promote adaptive immunity. Much has been learned about the role of TLRs in human immunity from studies linking TLR genetic variation with disease. First, monogenic disorders associated with complete deficiency in certain

  20. Genetic variation within the olive ( Olea europaea L. ) cultivar Oblica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation within the olive ( Olea europaea L. ) cultivar Oblica detected using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. ... dendrogram based on UPGMA cluster analysis was constructed. Preliminary results of AFLP analysis indicate that the cultivar Oblica can be regarded as mixture of clonal variants.

  1. Analysis of genetic variation among accessions of critically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has been conducted on the biology of this threatened plant in order to understand better the factors that should be included in the development of conservation practices. The genetic variations were studied using RAPD markers and SDS-PAGE profiles of total seed proteins for three R. iconiensis populations and ...

  2. Genetic variation of mangrove species Avicennia marina in Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expected heterozygosity was larger than the observed heterozygosity leading to positive inbreeding coefficients in all three populations. Highly significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium were detected in populations. Reduced level of genetic variation was found in the central population indicating strong ...

  3. Analysis of genetic variation in different sheep breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation in three Egyptian indigenous sheep breeds namely: Barki, Ossimi and Rahmani were investigated using fourteen microsatellite loci. The total number of alleles ranged from 6 in CSSM47 locus to 14 in TGLA 377 locus. The fourteen tested loci were all polymorphic in the three breeds. Major differences ...

  4. [Genetic variations in alcohol dehydrogenase, drinking habits and alcoholism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Rasmussen, S.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. By genotyping 9,080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow versus fast alcohol degrad...

  5. Genetic architecture of flowering time variation in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transition to reproductive development is a crucial step of a plant’s life cycle, and the timing of this transition is an important factor in crop yields. Here, we report new insights into the genetic control of natural variation in flowering time in Brachypodium distachyon, a non-domesticated c...

  6. Genetic variation among Northern and Southern Egyptian buffaloes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The domestic water buffalo is a species of great economic potential, especially in developing countries like Egypt. Egyptian buffalo have been classified according to minor phenotypic differences and their geographical locations. Few studies have taken place to investigate the genetic variations in Egyptian buffalo using ...

  7. Genetic variation and population structure of willowy flounder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first hypervariable region (HVR-1) of the mitochondrial DNA control region was utilized for determination of genetic variation and population structure in willowy flounder (Tanakius kitaharai) collected from Aomori, Ibaraki and Niigata. A total of 35 haplotypes were detected among 66 individuals with a total of 30 variable ...

  8. Genetic variation among pelt sheep population using microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation in three Iranian pelt sheep breeds namely: Gray Shiraz, Zandi and Karakul were investigated using fifteen microsatellite loci. Genomic DNA was extracted from 360 blood samples by extraction kits and salting-out procedure with some modifications. The total number of alleles ranged from 6 to12 in loci.

  9. Genetic variation studies in Oryctes rhinoceros (L.) (Coleoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Randomly amplified microsatellite markers were used to study the genetic variation among six populations of Oryctes rhinoceros L. which were collected from oil palm plantations in Selangor, Perak, Pahang and Medan. Samples were collected using light and pheromone trapping for the purpose of obtaining two ...

  10. Capacities for population-genetic variation and ecological adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Dragoslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary science of population genetics it is equally complex and important to visualize how adaptive limits of individual variation are determined, as well as to describe the amount and sort of this variation. Almost all century the scientists devoted their efforts to explain the principles and structure of biological variation (genetic, developmental, environmental, interactive, etc., basing its maintenance within existing limits mostly on equilibria proclaimed by Hardy-Weinberg rules. Among numerous model-organisms that have been used to prove these rules and demonstrate new variants within mentioned concepts, Drosophila melanogaster is a kind of queen that is used in thousands of experiments for almost exactly 100 years (CARPENTER 1905, with which numerous discoveries and principles were determined that later turned out to be applicable to all other organisms. It is both, in nature and in laboratory, that Drosophilids were used to demonstrate the basic principles of population-genetic variation that was later applied to other species of animals. In ecological-genetic variation their richness in different environments could be used as an exact indicator of the status of a determined habitat, and its population-genetic structure may definitely point out to a possibility that specific resources of the environment start to be in danger to deteriorate, or to disappear in the near future. This paper shows clear-cut differences among environmental habitats, when populations of Drosophilidae are quantitatively observed in different wild, semi-domestic and domestic environments, demonstrating a highly expressed mutual dependence of these two parameters. A crucial approach is how to estimate the causes that determine the limits of biological, i.e. of individual and population-genetic variation. The realized, i.e. adaptive variation, is much lesser than a total possible variation of a polygenic trait, and in this study, using a moderately

  11. Natural variation, an underexploited resource of genetic variation for plant genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Koornneef, M.

    2000-01-01

    The definition of gene functions requires the phenotypic characterization of genetic variants. Currently, such functional analysis of Arabidopsis genes is based largely on laboratory-induced mutants that are selected in forward and reverse genetic studies. An alternative complementary source of

  12. Systems genetics analysis of pharmacogenomics variation during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Kogelman, L. J. A.; Kadarmideen, H. N.

    2018-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely used antidepressants, but the efficacy of the treatment varies significantly among individuals. It is believed that complex genetic mechanisms play a part in this variation. We have used a network based approach to unravel...... the involved genetic components. Moreover, we investigated the potential difference in the genetic interaction networks underlying SSRI treatment response over time. We found four hub genes (ASCC3, PPARGC1B, SCHIP1 and TMTC2) with different connectivity in the initial SSRI treatment period (baseline to week 4......) compared with the subsequent period (4-8 weeks after initiation), suggesting that different genetic networks are important at different times during SSRI treatment. The strongest interactions in the initial SSRI treatment period involved genes encoding transcriptional factors, and in the subsequent period...

  13. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Prize Lecture: Stability of inviscid flows from bifurcation diagrams exploiting a variational argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2011-11-01

    Steady fluid solutions play a special role in the dynamics of a flow: stable states may be realized in practice, while unstable ones may act as attractors. Unfortunately, determining stability is often a process far more laborious than finding steady states; indeed, even for simple vortex or wave flows, stability properties have often been the subject of debate. We consider here a stability idea originating with Lord Kelvin (1876), which involves using the second variation of the energy, δ2 E , to establish bounds on a perturbation. However, for numerically obtained flows, computing δ2 E explicitly is often not feasible. To circumvent this issue, Saffman & Szeto (1980) proposed an argument linking changes in δ2 E to turning points in a bifurcation diagram, for families of steady flows. Later work has shown that this argument is unreliable; the two key issues are associated with the absence of a formal turning-point theory, and with the inability to detect bifurcations (Dritschel 1995, and references therein). In this work, we build on ideas from bifurcation theory, and link turning points in a velocity-impulse diagram to changes in δ2 E ; in addition, this diagram delivers the direction of the change of δ2 E , thereby providing information as to whether stability is gained or lost. To detect hidden solution branches, we introduce to these fluid problems concepts from imperfection theory. The resulting approach, involving ``imperfect velocity-impulse'' diagrams, leads us to new and surprising results for a wide range of fundamental vortex and wave flows; we mention here the calculation of the first steady vortices without any symmetry, and the uncovering of the complete solution structure for vortex pairs. In addition, we find precise agreement with available results from linear stability analysis. Doctoral work advised by C.H.K. Williamson at Cornell University.

  14. Genetic and molecular dissection of naturally occurring variations in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Masahiro [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The progress for structural analysis of the rice genome has allowed us to embark on the sequencing of the whole rice genome. Resources - genetic markers, sequence data, and genomic clones - derived from many efforts will be used for the functional analysis of rice genes in the next decade. Although artificially induced variations, such as mutants, have been used mainly for genetic and physiological studies in rice and other plant species, the development of DNA markers has made possible access to naturally occurring allelic variations underlying complex traits. Such analysis is often referred to as quantitative traits locus (QTL) analysis. Many QTLs have been mapped for many complex traits in rice. During the analyses of several quantitative traits by the DNA marker-assisted strategy, two questions about QTL analysis have been raised: 1) Does a QTL represent a single Mendelian locus or a cluster of multiple loci? 2) Is it possible to precisely map a QTL and identify QTLs at the molecular level using map-based or other strategies? To answer these questions, a series of analyses on heading date, including the identification of putative QTLs, characterization and fine mapping of QTLs using nearly isogenic lines (NILs), and identification of genes at QTLs for heading date by the map-based strategy has been performed. In addition, several primary permanent mapping populations and secondary genetic resources, such as chromosomal segmental substitution lines, have been developed to facilitate the genetic analysis of naturally occurring allelic variation. (M. Suetake)

  15. Evolutionary developmental genetics of fruit morphological variation within the Solanaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Jing; Zhao, Jing; He, Chaoying

    2015-01-01

    Morphological variations of fruits such as shape and size, and color are a result of adaptive evolution. The evolution of morphological novelties is particularly intriguing. An understanding of these evolutionary processes calls for the elucidation of the developmental and genetic mechanisms that result in particular fruit morphological characteristics, which determine seed dispersal. The genetic and developmental basis for fruit morphological variation was established at a microevolutionary time scale. Here, we summarize the progress on the evolutionary developmental genetics of fruit size, shape and color in the Solanaceae. Studies suggest that the recruitment of a pre-existing gene and subsequent modification of its interaction and regulatory networks are frequently involved in the evolution of morphological diversity. The basic mechanisms underlying changes in plant morphology are alterations in gene expression and/or gene function. We also deliberate on the future direction in evolutionary developmental genetics of fruit morphological variation such as fruit type. These studies will provide insights into plant developmental processes and will help to improve the productivity and fruit quality of crops. PMID:25918515

  16. Genetic and phenotypic variation in reproductive traits of AI boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, William L

    2008-11-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to review our current understanding of phenotypic variation in reproductive traits of AI boars. The proportion of boars that cannot be trained for collection in commercial studs is low and differences among genetic lines are small. In contrast, there is a considerable variation in sperm production and significant differences are present among genotypes. The general pattern is for sperm numbers to increase rapidly between 9 and 13 months of age and then gradually reach a plateau. This initial period of enhanced production occurs over a longer period in some genetic lines, resulting in differences of 30 x 10(9) sperm cells or more per ejaculate. There also are genetic lines of boars that seem to have a high "heat tolerance". Decreases in sperm production during periods of high environmental temperatures average 5-7% in these lines, compared with 15-20% in others. Finally, there are boars currently being used in the industry that are capable of producing exceptional fertility results with low numbers of sperm. Unfortunately, several breeding practices common to swine AI make their routine identification difficult. Based on the phenotypic variation observed in modern terminal sire lines of AI boars, current prospects for influencing sperm production, boar fertility, and mounting behaviours through genetic selection are viewed as being good, moderate to low, and poor, respectively.

  17. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population.

  18. Hidden genetic nature of epigenetic natural variation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecinka, Ales; Abdelsamad, Ahmed; Vu, Giang T H

    2013-11-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is an epigenetic mechanism that suppresses the activity of repetitive DNA elements via accumulation of repressive chromatin marks. We discuss natural variation in TGS, with a particular focus on cases that affect the function of protein-coding genes and lead to developmental or physiological changes. Comparison of the examples described has revealed that most natural variation is associated with genetic determinants, such as gene rearrangements, inverted repeats, and transposon insertions that triggered TGS. Recent technical advances have enabled the study of epigenetic natural variation at a whole-genome scale and revealed patterns of inter- and intraspecific epigenetic variation. Future studies exploring non-model species may reveal species-specific evolutionary adaptations at the level of chromatin configuration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Variation in RNA Editing Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tongjun; Gatti, Daniel M; Srivastava, Anuj; Snyder, Elizabeth M; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Simecek, Petr; Svenson, Karen L; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Braun, Robert E; Churchill, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    RNA editing refers to post-transcriptional processes that alter the base sequence of RNA. Recently, hundreds of new RNA editing targets have been reported. However, the mechanisms that determine the specificity and degree of editing are not well understood. We examined quantitative variation of site-specific editing in a genetically diverse multiparent population, Diversity Outbred mice, and mapped polymorphic loci that alter editing ratios globally for C-to-U editing and at specific sites for A-to-I editing. An allelic series in the C-to-U editing enzyme Apobec1 influences the editing efficiency of Apob and 58 additional C-to-U editing targets. We identified 49 A-to-I editing sites with polymorphisms in the edited transcript that alter editing efficiency. In contrast to the shared genetic control of C-to-U editing, most of the variable A-to-I editing sites were determined by local nucleotide polymorphisms in proximity to the editing site in the RNA secondary structure. Our results indicate that RNA editing is a quantitative trait subject to genetic variation and that evolutionary constraints have given rise to distinct genetic architectures in the two canonical types of RNA editing. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Population genetic structure of an estuarine and a reef fish species exploited by Brazilian artisanal fishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina H.G. Priolli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used microsatellite markers to examine the genetic structures of Centropomus undecimalis (Bloch, 1792 and Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 populations collected from artisanal fishing sites along a stretch of coastline in southeastern Brazil. Based on F-statistics, there was no significant genetic differentiation evident in any C. undecimalis samples (FST=0.012. However, Bayesian clustering, principal component analysis (PCA and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC results suggested that there were most likely two clusters, with no relation to geographic areas. The bottleneck results showed no significant values and the effective population sizes (Ne for the two genetically differentiated groups were large and similar. In contrast, for E. marginatus populations, the microsatellite loci showed no population subdivisions. The FST value was low and non-significant (FST=0.008, a Bayesian analysis indicated one cluster, and a PCA showed that all samples from different geographical sites shared the same genetic structure. The bottleneck results exhibited significant differences, and a low Ne was observed. The results of the genetic study of these two species along the southeastern Brazilian coast suggest that the distinct genetic structure of each species should be taken into account as management units for the conservation of their genetic diversities.

  1. Genetic variation of Eryngium campestre L. (Apiaceae) in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylebyl, Kathrin; Poschlod, Peter; Reisch, Christoph

    2008-07-01

    In Germany, Eryngium campestre is restricted to dry habitats along the rivers Rhine and Elbe and to a few areas in Central Germany. This distribution pattern is usually regarded as a typical pattern of postglacial immigration. In the present study, we investigated whether these two geographically distinct distribution areas are genetically differentiated and whether conclusions can be drawn regarding colonization history. To analyse the phylogeographic structure of E. campestre in Central Europe, 278 individuals from 29 populations within Germany and from further reference populations within Europe were analysed. We applied amplified fragment length polymorphisms to examine their genetic relatedness. Our analyses revealed three groups: a Mediterranean group additionally including two Rhine populations; a Rhine-Main group which further includes the westernmost population from the central German dry area; and one group which includes all eastern populations. Our results show that the two geographically distinct areas are genetically differentiated. As genetic diversity within the Elbe populations is very low, we conclude that this area, which was strongly affected through the late glacial maximum, was colonized relatively recently. High genetic diversity in the Rhine populations indicates a contact zone where lineages of different origin met. This would imply that today's patterns of genetic variation were caused through glacial range contractions and expansions. The present study is one of the first studies that deal with the postglacial distribution pattern of a dry grassland plant species in Central Europe and the results suggest that a survival of E. campestre at least during the Dryas cold stage might be possible.

  2. Investigation on Genetic Variation of Iran Watermelon Accession

    OpenAIRE

    majid reza kiyani; gholamhoseyn jahanbin

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine of genetic variation in germplasm of 120 watermelon accessions, a field trial conducted at agricultural and natural resource research center of khorasan . These Accessions with four commercial cultivars as control were planted in agnomental design with six replications. 15 quantitative morphological traits were measured and some statistical parameter and analysis include of Mean, Coefficient variance, cluster analysis, correlation regression coefficients were determine f...

  3. Exploiting problem structure in a genetic algorithm approach to a nurse rostering problem

    OpenAIRE

    Aickelin, Uwe; Dowsland, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of genetic algorithms to solve problems arising in the areas of scheduling and timetabling. However, the classical genetic algorithm paradigm is not well equipped to handle the conflict between objectives and constraints that typically occurs in such problems. In order to overcome this, successful implementations frequently make use of problem specific knowledge. This paper is concerned with the development of a GA for a nurse rostering problem at a m...

  4. Genetic Variation of Echinococcus canadensis (G7) in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Prado, Ulises; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Diego Emiliano; Avila, Guillermina; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Martinez-Flores, Williams Arony; Mondragon de la Peña, Carmen; Hernandez-Castro, Rigoberto; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Flisser, Ana; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Maravilla, Pablo; Martinez-Maya, Jose Juan

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic variation of Echinococcus G7 strain in larval and adult stages using a fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gen. Viscera of pigs, bovines, and sheep and fecal samples of dogs were inspected for cystic and canine echinococcosis, respectively; only pigs had hydatid cysts. Bayesian inferences grouped the sequences in an E. canadensis G7 cluster, suggesting that, in Mexico, this strain might be mainly present. Additionally, the population genetic and network analysis showed that E. canadensis in Mexico is very diverse and has probably been introduced several times from different sources. Finally, a scarce genetic differentiation between G6 (camel strain) and G7 (pig strain) populations was identified. PMID:25266350

  5. Genetic component of flammability variation in a Mediterranean shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, B; Castellanos, M C; Pausas, J G

    2014-03-01

    Recurrent fires impose a strong selection pressure in many ecosystems worldwide. In such ecosystems, plant flammability is of paramount importance because it enhances population persistence, particularly in non-resprouting species. Indeed, there is evidence of phenotypic divergence of flammability under different fire regimes. Our general hypothesis is that flammability-enhancing traits are adaptive; here, we test whether they have a genetic component. To test this hypothesis, we used the postfire obligate seeder Ulex parviflorus from sites historically exposed to different fire recurrence. We associated molecular variation in potentially adaptive loci detected with a genomic scan (using AFLP markers) with individual phenotypic variability in flammability across fire regimes. We found that at least 42% of the phenotypic variation in flammability was explained by the genetic divergence in a subset of AFLP loci. In spite of generalized gene flow, the genetic variability was structured by differences in fire recurrence. Our results provide the first field evidence supporting that traits enhancing plant flammability have a genetic component and thus can be responding to natural selection driven by fire. These results highlight the importance of flammability as an adaptive trait in fire-prone ecosystems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Role of Noncoding Genetic Variation in Isolated Orofacial Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, F; Ludwig, K U

    2017-10-01

    In the past decade, medical genetic research has generated multiple discoveries, many of which were obtained via genome-wide association studies (GWASs). A major GWAS finding is that the majority of risk variants for complex traits map to noncoding regions. This has resulted in a paradigm shift in terms of the interpretation of human genomic sequence variation, with more attention now being paid to what was previously termed "junk DNA." Translation of genetic findings into biologically meaningful results requires 1) large-scale and cell-specific efforts to annotate non-protein-coding regions and 2) the integration of comprehensive genomic data sets. However, this represents an enormous challenge, particularly in the case of human traits that arise during embryonic development, such as orofacial clefts (OFCs). OFC is a multifactorial trait and ranks among the most common of all human congenital malformations. These 2 attributes apply in particular to its isolated forms (nonsyndromic OFC [nsOFC]). Although genetic studies (including GWASs) have yielded novel insights into the genetic architecture of nsOFC, few data are available concerning causality and affected biological pathways. Reasons for this deficiency include the complex genetic architecture at risk loci and the limited availability of functional data sets from human tissues that represent relevant embryonic sites and time points. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the role of noncoding regions in nsOFC etiology. We describe the identification of genetic risk factors for nsOFC and several of the approaches used to identify causal variants at these loci. These strategies include the use of biological and genetic information from public databases, the assessment of the full spectrum of genetic variability within 1 locus, and comprehensive in vitro and in vivo experiments. This review also highlights the role of the emerging research field "functional genomics" and its increasing contribution to

  7. A simple genetic architecture underlies morphological variation in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Boyko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs exhibit tremendous phenotypic diversity, including a greater variation in body size than any other terrestrial mammal. Here, we generate a high density map of canine genetic variation by genotyping 915 dogs from 80 domestic dog breeds, 83 wild canids, and 10 outbred African shelter dogs across 60,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Coupling this genomic resource with external measurements from breed standards and individuals as well as skeletal measurements from museum specimens, we identify 51 regions of the dog genome associated with phenotypic variation among breeds in 57 traits. The complex traits include average breed body size and external body dimensions and cranial, dental, and long bone shape and size with and without allometric scaling. In contrast to the results from association mapping of quantitative traits in humans and domesticated plants, we find that across dog breeds, a small number of quantitative trait loci (< or = 3 explain the majority of phenotypic variation for most of the traits we studied. In addition, many genomic regions show signatures of recent selection, with most of the highly differentiated regions being associated with breed-defining traits such as body size, coat characteristics, and ear floppiness. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of mapping multiple traits in the domestic dog using a database of genotyped individuals and highlight the important role human-directed selection has played in altering the genetic architecture of key traits in this important species.

  8. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation in hemoglobinopathies using the microattribution approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Giardine (Belinda); J. Borg (Joseph); D.R. Higgs (Douglas); K.R. Peterson (Kenneth R.); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); D. Maglott (Donna); B.K. Singleton (Belinda K.); D.J. Anstee (David J.); A.N. Basak (Nazli); B.H. Clark (Bruce); F.C. Costa (Flavia C.); P. Faustino (Paula); H. Fedosyuk (Halyna); A.E. Felice (Alex); A. Francina (Alain); R. Galanello (Renzo); M.V.E. Gallivan (Monica V. E.); M. Georgitsi (Marianthi); R.J. Gibbons (Richard J.); P.C. Giordano (Piero Carlo); C.L. Harteveld (Cornelis); J.D. Hoyer (James D.); M. Jarvis (Martin); P. Joly (Philippe); E. Kanavakis (Emmanuel); P. Kollia (Panagoula); S. Menzel (Stephan); W.G. Miller (William); K. Moradkhani (Kamran); J. Old (John); A. Papachatzpoulou (Adamantia); M.N. Papadakis (Manoussos); P. Papadopoulos (Petros); S. Pavlovic (Sonja); L. Perseu (Lucia); M. Radmilovic (Milena); C. Riemer (Cathy); S. Satta (Stefania); I.A. Schrijver (Ingrid); M. Stojiljkovic (Maja); S.L. Thein; J. Traeger-Synodinos (Joanne); R. Tully (Ray); T. Wada (Takahito); J.S. Waye (John); C. Wiemann (Claudia); B. Zukic (Branka); D.H.K. Chui (David H. K.); H. Wajcman (Henri); R. Hardison (Ross); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia and implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public

  9. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotti, Pedro P; Aterido, Adrià; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Gomollón, Fernando; García-Planella, Esther; Fernández, Emilia; Sanmartí, Raimon; Gratacós, Jordi; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luís; Palau, Núria; Tortosa, Raül; Corbeto, Mireia L; Lasanta, María L; Marsal, Sara; Julià, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA) on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways). The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  10. Genetic variation in southern USA rice genotypes for salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa B De Leon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of a rice breeding program in developing salt tolerant varieties depends on genetic variation and the salt stress response of adapted and donor rice germplasm. In this study, we used a combination of morphological and physiological traits in multivariate analyses to elucidate the phenotypic and genetic variation in salinity tolerance of thirty Southern USA rice genotypes, along with nineteen donor genotypes with varying degrees of tolerance. Significant genotypic variation and correlations were found among the salt injury score (SIS, ion leakage, chlorophyll reduction, shoot length reduction, shoot K+ concentration, and shoot Na+/K+ ratio. Using these parameters, the combined methods of cluster analysis and discriminant analysis validated the salinity response of known genotypes and classified most of the USA varieties into sensitive groups, except for three and seven varieties placed in the tolerant and moderately tolerant groups, respectively. Discriminant function and MANOVA delineated the differences in tolerance and suggested no differences between sensitive and highly sensitive groups. DNA profiling using simple sequence repeat markers showed narrow genetic diversity among USA genotypes. However, the overall genetic clustering was mostly due to subspecies and grain type differentiation and not by varietal grouping based on salinity tolerance. Among the donor genotypes, Nona Bokra, Pokkali, and its derived breeding lines remained the donors of choice for improving salinity tolerance during the seedling stage. However, due to undesirable agronomic attributes and photosensitivity of these donors, alternative genotypes such as TCCP266, Geumgangbyeo, and R609 are recommended as useful and novel sources of salinity tolerance for USA rice breeding programs.

  11. Comparative RNA sequencing reveals substantial genetic variation in endangered primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H.; Melsted, Páll; Marioni, John C.; Wang, Ying; Bainer, Russell; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Michelini, Katelyn; Zehr, Sarah; Yoder, Anne D.; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies in primates have yielded important insights into the evolutionary forces that shape genetic diversity and revealed the likely genetic basis for certain species-specific adaptations. To date, however, these studies have focused on only a small number of species. For the majority of nonhuman primates, including some of the most critically endangered, genome-level data are not yet available. In this study, we have taken the first steps toward addressing this gap by sequencing RNA from the livers of multiple individuals from each of 16 mammalian species, including humans and 11 nonhuman primates. Of the nonhuman primate species, five are lemurs and two are lorisoids, for which little or no genomic data were previously available. To analyze these data, we developed a method for de novo assembly and alignment of orthologous gene sequences across species. We assembled an average of 5721 gene sequences per species and characterized diversity and divergence of both gene sequences and gene expression levels. We identified patterns of variation that are consistent with the action of positive or directional selection, including an 18-fold enrichment of peroxisomal genes among genes whose regulation likely evolved under directional selection in the ancestral primate lineage. Importantly, we found no relationship between genetic diversity and endangered status, with the two most endangered species in our study, the black and white ruffed lemur and the Coquerel's sifaka, having the highest genetic diversity among all primates. Our observations imply that many endangered lemur populations still harbor considerable genetic variation. Timely efforts to conserve these species alongside their habitats have, therefore, strong potential to achieve long-term success. PMID:22207615

  12. Reproductive Flexibility: Genetic Variation, Genetic Costs and Long-Term Evolution in a Collembola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Thomas; Ferrière, Régis

    2008-01-01

    In a variable yet predictable world, organisms may use environmental cues to make adaptive adjustments to their phenotype. Such phenotypic flexibility is expected commonly to evolve in life history traits, which are closely tied to Darwinian fitness. Yet adaptive life history flexibility remains poorly documented. Here we introduce the collembolan Folsomia candida, a soil-dweller, parthenogenetic (all-female) microarthropod, as a model organism to study the phenotypic expression, genetic variation, fitness consequences and long-term evolution of life history flexibility. We demonstrate that collembola have a remarkable adaptive ability for adjusting their reproductive phenotype: when transferred from harsh to good conditions (in terms of food ration and crowding), a mother can fine-tune the number and the size of her eggs from one clutch to the next. The comparative analysis of eleven clonal populations of worldwide origins reveals (i) genetic variation in mean egg size under both good and bad conditions; (ii) no genetic variation in egg size flexibility, consistent with convergent evolution to a common physiological limit; (iii) genetic variation of both mean reproductive investment and reproductive investment flexibility, associated with a reversal of the genetic correlation between egg size and clutch size between environmental conditions ; (iv) a negative genetic correlation between reproductive investment flexibility and adult lifespan. Phylogenetic reconstruction shows that two life history strategies, called HIFLEX and LOFLEX, evolved early in evolutionary history. HIFLEX includes six of our 11 clones, and is characterized by large mean egg size and reproductive investment, high reproductive investment flexibility, and low adult survival. LOFLEX (the other five clones) has small mean egg size and low reproductive investment, low reproductive investment flexibility, and high adult survival. The divergence of HIFLEX and LOFLEX could represent different

  13. A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodea, Corneliu A; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Daly, Mark J; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2016-05-05

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic variation in domestic reindeer and wild caribou in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, M.; Renecker, L.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Patton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Reindeer were introduced into Alaska 100 years ago and have been maintained as semidomestic livestock. They have had contact with wild caribou herds, including deliberate cross-breeding and mixing in the wild. Reindeer have considerable potential as a domestic animal for meat or velvet antler production, and wild caribou are important to subsistence and sport hunters. Our objective was to quantify the genetic relationships of reindeer and caribou in Alaska. We identified allelic variation among five herds of wild caribou and three herds of reindeer with DNA sequencing and restriction enzymes for three loci: a DQA locus of the major histocompatibility complex (Rata-DQA1), k-casein and the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA. These loci are of interest because of their potential influence on domestic animal performance and the fitness of wild populations. There is considerable genetic variation in reindeer and caribou for all three loci, including five, three and six alleles for DQA, k-casein and D-loop respectively. Most alleles occur in both reindeer and caribou, which may be the result of recent common ancestry or genetic introgression in either direction. However, allele frequencies differ considerably between reindeer and caribou, which suggests that gene flow has been limited.

  15. Human genetic variation is associated with Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganotti, Giacomo M; Gallo, Baba C; Verra, Federica; Sirima, Bienvenu S; Nebié, Issa; Diarra, Amidou; Coluzzi, Mario; Modiano, David

    2011-12-01

    One approach to investigate if human genetic variation influences the selection of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is to compare the frequency of resistant infections among human populations differing in their genetic background and living in the same epidemiological context. A further complementary approach consists in comparing drug resistance among subjects differing for genes involved in drug metabolism. Here we report, from malariological surveys performed in Burkina Faso, that the prevalence of P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant infections (pfcrt 76T and/or pfmdr1 86Y alleles) differs among sympatric ethnic groups, being higher in the Mossi and Rimaibé groups than in the Fulani group (odds ratio [OR], 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-3.92; P = .007). The association analysis revealed that the human CYP2C8*2 variant, known to determine a poor drug metabolizer phenotype, was associated with P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant infections (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.13-2.43; P = .008). This variant is more frequent in the Mossi-Rimaibé group (23.7% ± 1.4%) than in the Fulani group (9.9% ± 2.5%; P = .0003). This study provides an example of how host genetic variation may influence the selection dynamics of a pathogen's drug resistance.

  16. A simple genetic architecture underlies morphological variation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Adam R; Quignon, Pascale; Li, Lin; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Zhao, Keyan; Brisbin, Abra; Parker, Heidi G; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Cargill, Michele; Auton, Adam; Reynolds, Andy; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Castelhano, Marta; Mosher, Dana S; Sutter, Nathan B; Johnson, Gary S; Novembre, John; Hubisz, Melissa J; Siepel, Adam; Wayne, Robert K; Bustamante, Carlos D; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2010-08-10

    Domestic dogs exhibit tremendous phenotypic diversity, including a greater variation in body size than any other terrestrial mammal. Here, we generate a high density map of canine genetic variation by genotyping 915 dogs from 80 domestic dog breeds, 83 wild canids, and 10 outbred African shelter dogs across 60,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Coupling this genomic resource with external measurements from breed standards and individuals as well as skeletal measurements from museum specimens, we identify 51 regions of the dog genome associated with phenotypic variation among breeds in 57 traits. The complex traits include average breed body size and external body dimensions and cranial, dental, and long bone shape and size with and without allometric scaling. In contrast to the results from association mapping of quantitative traits in humans and domesticated plants, we find that across dog breeds, a small number of quantitative trait loci (dog using a database of genotyped individuals and highlight the important role human-directed selection has played in altering the genetic architecture of key traits in this important species.

  17. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R S; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Young, Elizabeth H; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S

    2015-01-15

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterization of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project provides a resource with which to design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. The African Genome Variation Project represents dense genotypes from 1,481 individuals and whole-genome sequences from 320 individuals across sub-Saharan Africa. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across sub-Saharan Africa. We identify new loci under selection, including loci related to malaria susceptibility and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels (sets of reference genotypes from which unobserved or missing genotypes in study sets can be inferred) can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Using whole-genome sequencing, we demonstrate further improvements in imputation accuracy, strengthening the case for large-scale sequencing efforts of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa.

  18. The role of mutation in genetic copy number variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. K.; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean number of genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  19. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O.; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A.; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterization of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project provides a resource with which to design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. The African Genome Variation Project represents dense genotypes from 1,481 individuals and whole-genome sequences from 320 individuals across sub-Saharan Africa. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across sub-Saharan Africa. We identify new loci under selection, including loci related to malaria susceptibility and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels (sets of reference genotypes from which unobserved or missing genotypes in study sets can be inferred) can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Using whole-genome sequencing, we demonstrate further improvements in imputation accuracy, strengthening the case for large-scale sequencing efforts of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa.

  20. Conservation genetics and geographic patterns of genetic variation of the endangered officinal herb Fritillaria pallidiflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhihao Su; Borong Pan; Stewart C. Sanderson; Xiaolong Jiang; Mingli Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Fritillaria pallidiflora is an endangered officinal herb distributed in the Tianshan Mountains of northwestern China. We examined its phylogeography to study evolutionary processes and suggest implications for conservation. Six haplotypes were detected based on three chloroplast non-coding spacers (psbA-trnH, rps16, and trnS-trnG); genetic variation mainly occurred...

  1. Conservation genetics and geographic patterns of genetic variation of the vulnerable officinal herb Fritillaria walujewii (Liliaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhihao Su; Borong Pan; Stewart C. Sanderson; Xiaojun Shi; Xiaolong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese herb Fritillaria walujewii Regel is an important officinal species that is vulnerable because of over-harvesting. Here, we examined the geographic pattern of genetic variation across the species entire range, to study its evolution process and give implication needed for the conservation. Nine haplotypes were detected on the basis of three chloroplast...

  2. Exploiting Multisite Gateway and pENFRUIT plasmid collection for fruit genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estornell, Leandro H; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    MultiSite Gateway cloning techniques based on homologous recombination facilitate the combinatorial assembly of basic genetic pieces (i.e., promoters, CDS, and terminators) into gene expression or gene silencing cassettes. pENFRUIT is a collection of MultiSite Triple Gateway Entry vectors dedicated to genetic engineering in fruits. It comprises a number of fruit-operating promoters as well as C-terminal tags adapted to the Gateway standard. In this way, flanking regulatory/labeling sequences can be easily Gateway-assembled with a given gene of interest for its ectopic expression or silencing in fruits. The resulting gene constructs can be analyzed in stable transgenic plants or in transient expression assays, the latter allowing fast testing of the increasing number of combinations arising from MultiSite methodology. A detailed description of the use of MultiSite cloning methodology for the assembly of pENFRUIT elements is presented.

  3. Genomic selection exploits within-family genetic variation for disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiological agent causing bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) in salmonid fish. Previous breeding strategies to reduce losses due to BCWD involve testing and determining phenotypic differences between multiple families of rainbow trout. These results were used to ...

  4. Genetic variation and significance of hepatitis B surface antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhenhua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV is prone to genetic variation because there is reverse transcription in the process of HBV replication. The gene mutation of hepatitis B surface antigen may affect clinical diagnosis of HBV infection, viral replication, and vaccine effect. The current research and existing problems are discussed from the following aspects: the mechanism and biological and clinical significance of S gene mutation. Most previous studies focused on S gene alone, so S gene should be considered as part of HBV DNA in the future research on S gene mutation.

  5. [Intraspecific genetic and morphological variation of earthworm Eisenia foetida (Sav.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotetskiĭ, N M; Kodolova, O P

    2005-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to study the allelic frequency distribution of four polymorphic loci (Pox, Lap, Pgm, and Odh) in 22 samples of Eisenia foetida (Sav.) from distant parts of the range: European Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. A hierarchical population structure was demonstrated for this species: local populations are integrated into spatial groups. Statistical analysis of morphological variation demonstrated that recognition of the spatial groups on the basis of biochemical and genetic characters as individual taxa of any rank is not justified.

  6. The genetics of ray pattern variation in Caenorhabditis briggsae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Cynthia R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How does intraspecific variation relate to macroevolutionary change in morphology? This question can be addressed in species in which derived characters are present but not fixed. In rhabditid nematodes, the arrangement of the nine bilateral pairs of peripheral sense organs (rays in tails of males is often the most highly divergent character between species. The development of ray pattern involves inputs from hometic gene expression patterns, TGFβ signalling, Wnt signalling, and other genetic pathways. In Caenorhabditis briggsae, strain-specific variation in ray pattern has provided an entrée into the evolution of ray pattern. Some strains were fixed for a derived pattern. Other strains were more plastic and exhibited derived and ancestral patterns at equal frequencies. Results Recombinant inbred lines (RILs constructed from crosses between the variant C. briggsae AF16 and HK104 strains exhibited a wide range of phenotypes including some that were more extreme than either parental strain. Transgressive segregation was significantly associated with allelic variation in the C. briggsae homolog of abdominal B, Cb-egl-5. At least two genes that affected different elements of ray pattern, ray position and ray fusion, were linked to a second gene, mip-1. Consistent with this, the segregation of ray position and ray fusion phenotypes were only partially correlated in the RILs. Conclusions The evolution of ray pattern has involved allelic variation at multiple loci. Some of these loci impact the specification of ray identities and simultaneously affect multiple ray pattern elements. Others impact individual characters and are not constrained by covariance with other ray pattern elements. Among the genetic pathways that may be involved in ray pattern evolution is specification of anteroposterior positional information by homeotic genes.

  7. Improving Roadside Unit Deployment in Vehicular Networks by Exploiting Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fogue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular networks make use of the Roadside Units (RSUs to enhance the communication capabilities of the vehicles in order to forward control messages and/or to provide Internet access to vehicles, drivers and passengers. Unfortunately, within vehicular networks, the wireless signal propagation is mostly affected by buildings and other obstacles (e.g., urban fixtures, in particular when considering the IEEE 802.11p standard. Therefore, a crowded RSU deployment may be required to ensure vehicular communications within urban environments. Furthermore, some applications, notably those applications related to safety, require a fast and reliable warning data transmission to the emergency services and traffic authorities. However, communication is not always possible in vehicular environments due to the lack of connectivity even employing multiple hops. To overcome the signal propagation problem and delayed warning notification time issues, an effective, smart, cost-effective and all-purpose RSU deployment policy should be put into place. In this paper, we propose the genetic algorithm for roadside unit deployment (GARSUD system, which uses a genetic algorithm that is capable of automatically providing an RSU deployment suitable for any given road map layout. Our simulation results show that GARSUD is able to reduce the warning notification time (the time required to inform emergency authorities in traffic danger situations and to improve vehicular communication capabilities within different density scenarios and complexity layouts.

  8. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno D Pires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict.

  9. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno D; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict.

  10. Exploitation of genetic interaction network topology for the prediction of epistatic behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2013-10-01

    Genetic interaction (GI) detection impacts the understanding of human disease and the ability to design personalized treatment. The mapping of every GI in most organisms is far from complete due to the combinatorial amount of gene deletions and knockdowns required. Computational techniques to predict new interactions based only on network topology have been developed in network science but never applied to GI networks.We show that topological prediction of GIs is possible with high precision and propose a graph dissimilarity index that is able to provide robust prediction in both dense and sparse networks.Computational prediction of GIs is a strong tool to aid high-throughput GI determination. The dissimilarity index we propose in this article is able to attain precise predictions that reduce the universe of candidate GIs to test in the lab. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Genetic and metabolic determinants of human epigenetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggarty, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics has emerged in recent years as one of the most important biological mechanisms linking exposures across the life course to long-term health. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the metabolic and genetic determinants of epigenetic variation in human populations. Epigenetic status is influenced by a range of environmental exposures, including diet and nutrition, social status, the early emotional environment, and infertility and its treatment. The period around conception is particularly sensitive to environmental exposures with evidence for effects on epigenetic imprinting within the offspring. Epigenetic status is also influenced by genotype, and genetic variation in methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and the DNA methytransferase and ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase proteins has been linked to the epigenetic status, biological function and disease. Epigenetics is at the heart of a series of feedback loops linking the environment to the human genome in a way that allows crosstalk between the genome and the environment it exists within. It offers the potential for modification of adverse epigenetic states resulting from events/exposures at earlier life stages. We need to better understand the nutritional programming of epigenetic states, the persistence of these marks in time and their effect on biological function and health in current and future generations.

  12. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hull

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  13. Genetic variation and association mapping of waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiangshuo; Zhang, Fei; Li, Pirui; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-12-01

    Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum' waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded by waterlogging soils, which has driven a search for germplasm showing an enhanced level of waterlogging tolerance (WT). As yet little is known regarding the mode of inheritance of WT in chrysanthemum. The study set out to characterize the extent of genetic variation for WT represented in a collection of one hundred chrysanthemum accessions by testing them under both greenhouse and field conditions. A membership function value of waterlogging (MFVW), which integrated a wilting index, a chlorosis score and the proportion of dead leaf in waterlogged plants, was used as a measure of WT. The variation for MFVW among plants grown in the greenhouse (two experiments) was generally higher than that generated in field-grown (one experiment) plants. The MFVW broad sense heritability was 0.82, and the phenotypic coefficient of variation (31.8 %) was larger than the genetic one (28.8 %). Association mapping (AM) identified 45 markers related to WT: 25 by applying the general linear model (GLM) + principal component (PC) model, 16 by applying the mixed linear model (MLM), 31 by applying the MLM + Q matrix model and 12 by applying the MLM + PC model. Of the associated markers, eight and two were predictive in two and three experiments within all models, respectively; the proportion of the phenotypic variance explained by the eight associations ranged from 6.3 to 16.4 %. On the basis of their harboring all four of the leading markers E2M16-2, SSR150-6, E19M16-1 and E10M10-12, the varieties 'Nannong Xuefeng', 'Qx097', 'Nannong Xunzhang' and 'Finch' were identified as potential donors for future improvement of WT in chrysanthemum.

  14. Production of genetically and developmentally modified seaweeds: Exploiting the potential of artificial selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte eCharrier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant feedstock with specific, modified developmental features has been a quest for centuries. Since the development and spread of agriculture, there has been a desire for plants producing disproportionate — or more abundant and more nutritional — biomass that meet human needs better than their native counterparts. Seaweed aquaculture, targeted for human consumption and the production of various raw materials, is a rapidly expanding field and its stakeholders have increasing vested interest for cost-effective and lucrative seaweed cultivation processes. Thus, scientific research on seaweed development is particularly timely: the potential for expansion of seaweed cultivation depends on the sector’s capacity to produce seaweeds with modified morphological features (e.g. thicker blades, higher growth rates or delayed (or even no fertility. Here, we review the various technical approaches used to modify development in macroalgae, which have attracted little attention from developmental biologists to date. Because seaweed (or marine macroalgae anatomy is much less complex than that of land plants and because seaweeds belong to three different eukaryotic phyla, the mechanisms controlling their morphogenesis are key to understanding their development. Here, we present efficient sources of developmentally and genetically modified seaweeds — somatic variants, artificial hybrids and mutants — as well as the future potential of these techniques.

  15. [Genetic ecological monitoring in human populations: heterozygosity, mtDNA haplotype variation, and genetic load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanovskiĭ, O P; Koshel', S M; Zaporozhchenko, V V; Pshenichnov, A S; Frolova, S A; Kuznetsova, M A; Baranova, E E; Teuchezh, I E; Kuznetsova, A A; Romashkina, M V; Utevskaia, O M; Churnosov, M I; Villems, R; Balanovskaia, E V

    2011-11-01

    Yu. P. Altukhov suggested that heterozygosity is an indicator of the state of the gene pool. The idea and a linked concept of genetic ecological monitoring were applied to a new dataset on mtDNA variation in East European ethnic groups. Haplotype diversity (an analog of the average heterozygosity) was shown to gradually decrease northwards. Since a similar trend is known for population density, interlinked changes were assumed for a set of parameters, which were ordered to form a causative chain: latitude increases, land productivity decreases, population density decreases, effective population size decreases, isolation of subpopulations increases, genetic drift increases, and mtDNA haplotype diversity decreases. An increase in genetic drift increases the random inbreeding rate and, consequently, the genetic load. This was confirmed by a significant correlation observed between the incidence of autosomal recessive hereditary diseases and mtDNA haplotype diversity. Based on the findings, mtDNA was assumed to provide an informative genetic system for genetic ecological monitoring; e.g., analyzing the ecology-driven changes in the gene pool.

  16. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Herman; Dekkers, Olaf M; Peeters, Robin P; Schoones, Jan W; Smit, Johannes W A

    2014-09-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clinical endpoints. Interest in clinical effects of genetic variation in deiodinases has clearly increased. We aimed to provide an overview for the role of deiodinase polymorphisms in human physiology and morbidity. In this systematic review, studies evaluating the relationship between deiodinase polymorphisms and clinical parameters in humans were eligible. No restrictions on publication date were imposed. The following databases were searched up to August 2013: Pubmed, EMBASE (OVID-version), Web of Science, COCHRANE Library, CINAHL (EbscoHOST-version), Academic Search Premier (EbscoHOST-version), and ScienceDirect. Deiodinase physiology at molecular and tissue level is described, and finally the role of these polymorphisms in pathophysiological conditions is reviewed. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) polymorphisms particularly show moderate-to-strong relationships with thyroid hormone parameters, IGF1 production, and risk for depression. D2 variants correlate with thyroid hormone levels, insulin resistance, bipolar mood disorder, psychological well-being, mental retardation, hypertension, and risk for osteoarthritis. D3 polymorphisms showed no relationship with inter-individual variation in serum thyroid hormone parameters. One D3 polymorphism was associated with risk for osteoarthritis. Genetic deiodinase profiles only explain a small proportion of inter-individual variations in serum thyroid hormone levels. Evidence suggests a role of genetic deiodinase variants in certain pathophysiological conditions. The value for determination of deiodinase polymorphism in clinical practice needs further investigation. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  17. Statistical Genetics of an Annual Plant, Impatiens Capensis. I. Genetic Basis of Quantitative Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell-Olds, T.; Bergelson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of quantitative genetics in natural populations has been hindered by computational and methodological problems in statistical analysis. We developed and validated a jackknife procedure to test for existence of broad sense heritabilities and dominance or maternal effects influencing quantitative characters in Impatiens capensis. Early life cycle characters showed evidence of dominance and/or maternal effects, while later characters exhibited predominantly environmental variation. Mont...

  18. Genetic variation in the nuclear and organellar genomes modulates stochastic variation in the metabolome, growth, and defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies are starting to show that genetic control over stochastic variation is a key evolutionary solution of single celled organisms in the face of unpredictable environments. This has been expanded to show that genetic variation can alter stochastic variation in transcriptional processes within multi-cellular eukaryotes. However, little is known about how genetic diversity can control stochastic variation within more non-cell autonomous phenotypes. Using an Arabidopsis reciprocal RIL population, we showed that there is significant genetic diversity influencing stochastic variation in the plant metabolome, defense chemistry, and growth. This genetic diversity included loci specific for the stochastic variation of each phenotypic class that did not affect the other phenotypic classes or the average phenotype. This suggests that the organism's networks are established so that noise can exist in one phenotypic level like metabolism and not permeate up or down to different phenotypic levels. Further, the genomic variation within the plastid and mitochondria also had significant effects on the stochastic variation of all phenotypic classes. The genetic influence over stochastic variation within the metabolome was highly metabolite specific, with neighboring metabolites in the same metabolic pathway frequently showing different levels of noise. As expected from bet-hedging theory, there was more genetic diversity and a wider range of stochastic variation for defense chemistry than found for primary metabolism. Thus, it is possible to begin dissecting the stochastic variation of whole organismal phenotypes in multi-cellular organisms. Further, there are loci that modulate stochastic variation at different phenotypic levels. Finding the identity of these genes will be key to developing complete models linking genotype to phenotype.

  19. Discovering epistasis in large scale genetic association studies by exploiting graphics cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary K Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous investments made in collecting DNA samples and generating germline variation data across thousands of individuals in modern genome wide association studies (GWAS, progress has been frustratingly slow in explaining much of the heritability in common disease. Today’s paradigm of testing independent hypotheses on each SNP marker is unlikely to adequately reflect the complex biological processes in disease risk. Alternatively, modeling risk as an ensemble of SNPs that act in concert in a pathway, and/or interact non-additively on log risk for example, may be a more sensible way to approach gene mapping in modern studies. Implementing such analyses genome-wide can quickly become intractable due to the fact that even modest size SNP panels on modern genotype arrays (500k markers pose a combinatorial nightmare, require tens of billions of models to be tested for evidence of interaction. In this article, we provide an in-depth analysis of programs that have been developed to explicitly overcome these enormous computational barriers through the use of processors on graphics cards known as Graphics Processing Units (GPU. We include tutorials on GPU technology, which will convey why they are growing in appeal with today’s numerical scientists. One obvious advantage is the impressive density of microprocessor cores that are available on only a single GPU. Whereas high end servers feature up to 24 Intel or AMD CPU cores, the latest GPU offerings from nVidia feature over 2,600 cores. Each compute node may be outfitted with up to 4 GPU devices. Success on GPUs varies across problems. However epistasis screens fare well due to the high degree of parallelism exposed in these problems. Papers that we review routinely report GPU speedups of over two orders of magnitude (>100x over standard CPU implementations.

  20. Conservation genetics of bull trout: Geographic distribution of variation at microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Spruell; A.R. Hemmingsen; P.J. Howell; N. Kanda; F.W. Allendorf

    2003-01-01

    We describe the genetic population structure of 65 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations from the northwestern United States using four microsatellite loci. The distribution of genetic variation as measured by microsatellites is consistent with previous allozyme and mitochondrial DNA analysis. There is relatively little genetic variation...

  1. Population genetic variation in gene expression is associated withphenotypic variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, Justin C.; McCullough, Heather L.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-02-25

    The relationship between genetic variation in gene expression and phenotypic variation observable in nature is not well understood. Identifying how many phenotypes are associated with differences in gene expression and how many gene-expression differences are associated with a phenotype is important to understanding the molecular basis and evolution of complex traits. Results: We compared levels of gene expression among nine natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the presence or absence of copper sulfate. Of the nine strains, two show a reduced growth rate and two others are rust colored in the presence of copper sulfate. We identified 633 genes that show significant differences in expression among strains. Of these genes,20 were correlated with resistance to copper sulfate and 24 were correlated with rust coloration. The function of these genes in combination with their expression pattern suggests the presence of both correlative and causative expression differences. But the majority of differentially expressed genes were not correlated with either phenotype and showed the same expression pattern both in the presence and absence of copper sulfate. To determine whether these expression differences may contribute to phenotypic variation under other environmental conditions, we examined one phenotype, freeze tolerance, predicted by the differential expression of the aquaporin gene AQY2. We found freeze tolerance is associated with the expression of AQY2. Conclusions: Gene expression differences provide substantial insight into the molecular basis of naturally occurring traits and can be used to predict environment dependent phenotypic variation.

  2. Genetic sorting of subordinate species in grassland modulated by intraspecific variation in dominant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny J Gustafson

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in a single species can have predictable and heritable effects on associated communities and ecosystem processes, however little is known about how genetic variation of a dominant species affects plant community assembly. We characterized the genetic structure of a dominant grass (Sorghastrum nutans and two subordinate species (Chamaecrista fasciculata, Silphium integrifolium, during the third growing season in grassland communities established with genetically distinct (cultivated varieties or local ecotypes seed sources of the dominant grasses. There were genetic differences between subordinate species growing in the cultivar versus local ecotype communities, indicating that intraspecific genetic variation in the dominant grasses affected the genetic composition of subordinate species during community assembly. A positive association between genetic diversity of S. nutans, C. fasciculata, and S. integrifolium and species diversity established the role of an intraspecific biotic filter during community assembly. Our results show that intraspecific variation in dominant species can significantly modulate the genetic composition of subordinate species.

  3. Building high resolution genetic variation map for Mongolians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaosen

    As one of representative population in East Asia and a typical nomadic ethnic group of the world, Mongolians played a pivotal role in human evolution, including early peopling of Native Americans (at least 10,000 years ago) and recent shaping of population genetic structure of Eurasians (around 1...... Asian distribution of spreading from north to south, which evidently supports the hypothesis of southward dispersal after entering East Asia. In final study, We performed association study for 28 T2D related SNPs reported previous in 966 Mongolian samples, including 469 samples of control group and 497...... of referred variation catalogue, inference of demographic history, pilot study on T2D in the population and other studies on human population genomics we participated, not only gave us a new understanding to this human ethnic group who live in the northern of East Asia and therefore laid a good foundation...

  4. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  5. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R 2=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding. PMID:24302710

  6. Estimating mobility using sparse data: Application to human genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loog, Liisa; Mirazón Lahr, Marta; Kovacevic, Mirna; Manica, Andrea; Eriksson, Anders; Thomas, Mark G

    2017-11-14

    Mobility is one of the most important processes shaping spatiotemporal patterns of variation in genetic, morphological, and cultural traits. However, current approaches for inferring past migration episodes in the fields of archaeology and population genetics lack either temporal resolution or formal quantification of the underlying mobility, are poorly suited to spatially and temporally sparsely sampled data, and permit only limited systematic comparison between different time periods or geographic regions. Here we present an estimator of past mobility that addresses these issues by explicitly linking trait differentiation in space and time. We demonstrate the efficacy of this estimator using spatiotemporally explicit simulations and apply it to a large set of ancient genomic data from Western Eurasia. We identify a sequence of changes in human mobility from the Late Pleistocene to the Iron Age. We find that mobility among European Holocene farmers was significantly higher than among European hunter-gatherers both pre- and postdating the Last Glacial Maximum. We also infer that this Holocene rise in mobility occurred in at least three distinct stages: the first centering on the well-known population expansion at the beginning of the Neolithic, and the second and third centering on the beginning of the Bronze Age and the late Iron Age, respectively. These findings suggest a strong link between technological change and human mobility in Holocene Western Eurasia and demonstrate the utility of this framework for exploring changes in mobility through space and time. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Transformation of natural genetic variation into Haemophilus influenzae genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chang Mell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria are able to efficiently bind and take up double-stranded DNA fragments, and the resulting natural transformation shapes bacterial genomes, transmits antibiotic resistance, and allows escape from immune surveillance. The genomes of many competent pathogens show evidence of extensive historical recombination between lineages, but the actual recombination events have not been well characterized. We used DNA from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus influenzae to transform competent cells of a laboratory strain. To identify which of the ~40,000 polymorphic differences had recombined into the genomes of four transformed clones, their genomes and their donor and recipient parents were deep sequenced to high coverage. Each clone was found to contain ~1000 donor polymorphisms in 3-6 contiguous runs (8.1±4.5 kb in length that collectively comprised ~1-3% of each transformed chromosome. Seven donor-specific insertions and deletions were also acquired as parts of larger donor segments, but the presence of other structural variation flanking 12 of 32 recombination breakpoints suggested that these often disrupt the progress of recombination events. This is the first genome-wide analysis of chromosomes directly transformed with DNA from a divergent genotype, connecting experimental studies of transformation with the high levels of natural genetic variation found in isolates of the same species.

  8. Global Characterization of Genetic Variation by Using High-Throughput Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Bujie

    . This projekt aimed to characterize large scale of genetic vaiations in complex genomes by applying hig-throughput technologies and bioinformatic approache4s, to help investigate genetic foundation of disease susceptibility and product traits in livestock species. This PhD project provide a comprehensive sight......Genetic variation, variation in alleles of genomes, occurs bith within and among populations and individuals. Genetic variation is important because it provides the "raw material" for evolution. Discovery of vatiants that determine phenotypes became a fundamental premise of genetic research...... into genetic variation in bovine and swine genomes and relevant methodologies; valuable resources such as novel genome sequences of pathogens, genome annotations and genetic variations were produced for research communities regard to animal health and welfare in animal breeding industriy...

  9. Ethnic variation of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kheng Seang; Ng, Ching Ching; Chan, Chung Kin; Foo, Wee Shean; Low, Joyce Siew Yong; Tan, Chong Tin

    2017-02-01

    Ethnic variation in epilepsy classification was reported in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. This study aimed to determine the ethnic variation in the prevalence of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy (GGE) and GGE with family history in a multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia. In this cross-sectional study, 392 patients with a clinical diagnosis of GGE were recruited in the neurology outpatient clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), from January 2011 till April 2016. In our epilepsy cohort (n=2100), 18.7% were diagnosed to have GGE. Of those, 28.6% >(N=112) had family history of epilepsy with a mean age of seizure onset of 16.5 years old, and 42.0% had myoclonic seizures (N=47). The lifetime prevalence of epilepsy among first-degree relative of those with GGE and positive family history was 15.0%. Analysis according to ethnicity showed that Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE among those with epilepsy (12.3%), as compared with Indian and Malay (25.3% and 21.3%, p<0.001). In addition, 32.1% of these Indian patients with GGE had positive family history, which is more than the Malay (26.4%) and Chinese (27.5%) ethnic groups. Consanguineous marriage was noted in 5 Indian families with positive family history (9.6%). There was ethnic variation in the prevalence of GGE, whereby the Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE as compared with Indian and Malay. A substantial proportion of GGE had positive family history among the three ethnics groups. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Achilles' heel of pluripotent stem cells: genetic, genomic and epigenetic variations during prolonged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Garagna, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells differentiate into almost any specialized adult cell type of an organism. PSCs can be derived either from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-giving rise to embryonic stem cells-or after reprogramming of somatic terminally differentiated cells to obtain ES-like cells, named induced pluripotent stem cells. The potential use of these cells in the clinic, for investigating in vitro early embryonic development or for screening the effects of new drugs or xenobiotics, depends on capability to maintain their genome integrity during prolonged culture and differentiation. Both human and mouse PSCs are prone to genomic and (epi)genetic instability during in vitro culture, a feature that seriously limits their real potential use. Culture-induced variations of specific chromosomes or genes, are almost all unpredictable and, as a whole, differ among independent cell lines. They may arise at different culture passages, suggesting the absence of a safe passage number maintaining genome integrity and rendering the control of genomic stability mandatory since the very early culture passages. The present review highlights the urgency for further studies on the mechanisms involved in determining (epi)genetic and chromosome instability, exploiting the knowledge acquired earlier on other cell types.

  11. Transcriptomes reveal genetic signatures underlying physiological variations imposed by different fermentation conditions in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Bron

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are utilized widely for the fermentation of foods. In the current post-genomic era, tools have been developed that explore genetic diversity among LAB strains aiming to link these variations to differential phenotypes observed in the strains investigated. However, these genotype-phenotype matching approaches fail to assess the role of conserved genes in the determination of physiological characteristics of cultures by environmental conditions. This manuscript describes a complementary approach in which Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was fermented under a variety of conditions that differ in temperature, pH, as well as NaCl, amino acid, and O(2 levels. Samples derived from these fermentations were analyzed by full-genome transcriptomics, paralleled by the assessment of physiological characteristics, e.g., maximum growth rate, yield, and organic acid profiles. A data-storage and -mining suite designated FermDB was constructed and exploited to identify correlations between fermentation conditions and industrially relevant physiological characteristics of L. plantarum, as well as the associated transcriptome signatures. Finally, integration of the specific fermentation variables with the transcriptomes enabled the reconstruction of the gene-regulatory networks involved. The fermentation-genomics platform presented here is a valuable complementary approach to earlier described genotype-phenotype matching strategies which allows the identification of transcriptome signatures underlying physiological variations imposed by different fermentation conditions.

  12. Transcriptomes Reveal Genetic Signatures Underlying Physiological Variations Imposed by Different Fermentation Conditions in Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Roger S.; van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Wiersma, Anne; Overmars, Lex; Marco, Maria L.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are utilized widely for the fermentation of foods. In the current post-genomic era, tools have been developed that explore genetic diversity among LAB strains aiming to link these variations to differential phenotypes observed in the strains investigated. However, these genotype-phenotype matching approaches fail to assess the role of conserved genes in the determination of physiological characteristics of cultures by environmental conditions. This manuscript describes a complementary approach in which Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was fermented under a variety of conditions that differ in temperature, pH, as well as NaCl, amino acid, and O2 levels. Samples derived from these fermentations were analyzed by full-genome transcriptomics, paralleled by the assessment of physiological characteristics, e.g., maximum growth rate, yield, and organic acid profiles. A data-storage and -mining suite designated FermDB was constructed and exploited to identify correlations between fermentation conditions and industrially relevant physiological characteristics of L. plantarum, as well as the associated transcriptome signatures. Finally, integration of the specific fermentation variables with the transcriptomes enabled the reconstruction of the gene-regulatory networks involved. The fermentation-genomics platform presented here is a valuable complementary approach to earlier described genotype-phenotype matching strategies which allows the identification of transcriptome signatures underlying physiological variations imposed by different fermentation conditions. PMID:22802930

  13. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Ying; Lee, Siu F.; Blanc, Eric; Reuter, Caroline; Wertheim, Bregje; Martinez-Diaz, Pedro; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Partridge, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation

  14. Foliar Nitrogen and Potassium Variation in Cottonwood as Affected by Genetic and Site Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Baker; W. K. Randall

    1975-01-01

    Genetic and soil factors accounted for 49 percent of the variation in foliar N and 60 percent of the variation in foliar K among four good and four poor cottonwood clones grown on productive and unproductive soils in Mississippi. Variation in foliar N was associated primarily with the clone X soil interaction; variation in foliar K was related chiefly to clonal...

  15. Plant-species diversity correlates with genetic variation of an oligophagous seed predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Laukkanen

    Full Text Available Several characteristics of habitats of herbivores and their food-plant communities, such as plant-species composition and plant quality, influence population genetics of both herbivores and their host plants. We investigated how different ecological and geographic factors affect genetic variation in and differentiation of 23 populations of the oligophagous seed predator Lygaeus equestris (Heteroptera in southwestern Finland and in eastern Sweden. We tested whether genetic differentiation of the L. equestris populations was related to the similarity of vegetation, and whether there was more within-population genetic variation in habitats with a high number of plant species or in those with a large population of the primary food plant, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria. We also tested whether genetic differentiation of the populations was related to the geographic distance, and whether location of the populations on islands or on mainland, island size, or population size affected within-population genetic variation. Pairwise FST ranged from 0 to 0.1 indicating low to moderate genetic differentiation of populations. Differentiation increased with geographic distance between the populations, but was not related to the similarity of vegetation between the habitats. Genetic variation within the L. equestris populations did not increase with the population size of the primary food plant. However, the more diverse the plant community the higher was the level of genetic variation within the L. equestris population. Furthermore, the level of genetic variation did not vary significantly between island and mainland populations. The effect of the population size on within-population genetic variation was related to island size. Usually small populations are susceptible to loss of genetic variation, but small L. equestris populations on large islands seemed to maintain a relatively high level of within-population genetic variation. Our findings suggest that, in

  16. Statistical genetics of an annual plant, Impatiens capensis. I. Genetic basis of quantitative variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Olds, T; Bergelson, J

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of quantitative genetics in natural populations has been hindered by computational and methodological problems in statistical analysis. We developed and validated a jackknife procedure to test for existence of broad sense heritabilities and dominance or maternal effects influencing quantitative characters in Impatiens capensis. Early life cycle characters showed evidence of dominance and/or maternal effects, while later characters exhibited predominantly environmental variation. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that these jackknife tests of variance components are extremely robust to heterogeneous error variances. Statistical methods from human genetics provide evidence for either a major locus influencing germination date, or genes that affect phenotypic variability per se. We urge explicit consideration of statistical behavior of estimation and testing procedures for proper biological interpretation of statistical results.

  17. Transferrin variation and genetic structure of reindeer populations in Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut H. Røed

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyse transferrin variation in herds of semi-domestic reindeer from Scandinavia. The results are compared with previously reported values for other populations of both semi-domestic and wild reindeer using the same techniques as in the present study. In all populations the number of alleles was high, ranging from seven to eleven, and the heterozygosity was correspondingly high, with a mean of 0.749. This high genetic variation in all populations suggests that inbreeding is not widespread among Scandinavian reindeer. The pattern of allele frequency distribution indicates a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in the transferrin locus, both between the different semi-domestic herds and between the different wild populations. The mean value of genetic distance was 0.069 between semi-domestic herds and 0.091 between wild populations. Between semi-domestic and wild populations the genetic distance was particularly high, with a mean of 0.188. This high value was mainly due to a different pattern in the distribution of the two most common transferrin alleles: Tfu was most common among semi-domestic herds, while TfEI was most common among wild populations. These differences in transferrin allele distribution are discussed in relation to possible different origins of semi-domestic and wild reindeer in Scandinavia, or alternatively, to different selection forces acting on transferrin genotypes in semi-domestic and wild populations.Transferrin-variasjon og genetisk struktur hos rein i Skandinavia.Abstact in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Transferrin-variasjon i tamreinflokker ble analysert ved hjelp av polyacrylamid gel elektroforese. Resultatene er sammenlignet med verdier som tidligere er beskrevet for både tamrein og villrein hvor det ble benyttet samme metode som i denne undersøkelsen. I alle populasjonene ble det registrert et høyt antall alleler (7-11 og heterozygositeten var tilsvarende høy med en

  18. Mine, yours, ours? Sharing data on human genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Nicola; Congiu, Alessandra; Anagnostou, Paolo; Montinaro, Francesco; Capocasa, Marco; Sanna, Emanuele; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The achievement of a robust, effective and responsible form of data sharing is currently regarded as a priority for biological and bio-medical research. Empirical evaluations of data sharing may be regarded as an indispensable first step in the identification of critical aspects and the development of strategies aimed at increasing availability of research data for the scientific community as a whole. Research concerning human genetic variation represents a potential forerunner in the establishment of widespread sharing of primary datasets. However, no specific analysis has been conducted to date in order to ascertain whether the sharing of primary datasets is common-practice in this research field. To this aim, we analyzed a total of 543 mitochondrial and Y chromosomal datasets reported in 508 papers indexed in the Pubmed database from 2008 to 2011. A substantial portion of datasets (21.9%) was found to have been withheld, while neither strong editorial policies nor high impact factor proved to be effective in increasing the sharing rate beyond the current figure of 80.5%. Disaggregating datasets for research fields, we could observe a substantially lower sharing in medical than evolutionary and forensic genetics, more evident for whole mtDNA sequences (15.0% vs 99.6%). The low rate of positive responses to e-mail requests sent to corresponding authors of withheld datasets (28.6%) suggests that sharing should be regarded as a prerequisite for final paper acceptance, while making authors deposit their results in open online databases which provide data quality control seems to provide the best-practice standard. Finally, we estimated that 29.8% to 32.9% of total resources are used to generate withheld datasets, implying that an important portion of research funding does not produce shared knowledge. By making the scientific community and the public aware of this important aspect, we may help popularize a more effective culture of data sharing.

  19. Moose body mass variation revisited: disentangling effects of environmental conditions and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, Ivar; Haanes, Hallvard; Solberg, Erling J; Røed, Knut H; Høgda, Kjell Arild; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2014-02-01

    Large-scale geographical variation in phenotypic traits within species is often correlated to local environmental conditions and population density. Such phenotypic variation has recently been shown to also be influenced by genetic structuring of populations. In ungulates, large-scale geographical variation in phenotypic traits, such as body mass, has been related to environmental conditions and population density, but little is known about the genetic influences. Research on the genetic structure of moose suggests two distinct genetic lineages in Norway, structured along a north-south gradient. This corresponds with many environmental gradients, thus genetic structuring provides an additional factor affecting geographical phenotypic variation in Norwegian moose. We investigated if genetic structure explained geographical variation in body mass in Norwegian moose while accounting for environmental conditions, age and sex, and if it captured some of the variance in body mass that previously was attributed to environmental factors. Genetic structuring of moose was the most important variable in explaining the geographic variation in body mass within age and sex classes. Several environmental variables also had strong explanatory power, related to habitat diversity, environmental seasonality and winter harshness. The results suggest that environmental conditions, landscape characteristics, and genetic structure should be evaluated together when explaining large-scale patterns in phenotypic characters or life history traits. However, to better understand the role of genetic and environmental effects on phenotypic traits in moose, an extended individual-based study of variation in fitness-related characters is needed, preferably in an area of convergence between different genetic lineages.

  20. Genetic variations between indigenous fat-tailed sheep populations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... In: Karlin S, Nevo E (Eds), Population Genetic and. Ecology.Acodemic Press, New York, pp. 723-7766. Nguyen TC, Morera L, Llanes D, Leger P (1992). Sheep blood polymorphism and genetic divergence between French Ramboullet and Spanish Merino: role of genetic, Drift Anim. Genet. 23: 325-332.

  1. Association of mitochondrial genetic variation with carotid atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Sobenin

    Full Text Available In human pathology, several diseases are associated with somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA. Even though mitochondrial dysfunction leads to increased oxidative stress, the role of mitochondrial mutations in atherosclerosis has not received much attention so far. In this study we analyzed the association of mitochondrial genetic variation with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT and the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD in 190 subjects from Moscow, Russia, a population with high CHD occurrence. cIMT was measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography and mtDNA heteroplasmies by a pyrosequencing-based method. We found that heteroplasmies for several mutations in the mtDNA in leukocytes, including C3256T, T3336C, G12315A, G13513A, G14459A, G14846A, and G15059A mutations, were significantly (p<0.001 associated with both the severity of carotid atherosclerosis and the presence of CHD. These findings indicate that somatic mitochondrial mutations have a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  2. Genetic copy number variation and general cognitive ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K MacLeod

    Full Text Available Differences in genomic structure between individuals are ubiquitous features of human genetic variation. Specific copy number variants (CNVs have been associated with susceptibility to numerous complex psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, autism-spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. These disorders often display co-morbidity with low intelligence. Rare chromosomal deletions and duplications are associated with these disorders, so it has been suggested that these deletions or duplications may be associated with differences in intelligence. Here we investigate associations between large (≥500kb, rare (<1% population frequency CNVs and both fluid and crystallized intelligence in community-dwelling older people. We observe no significant associations between intelligence and total CNV load. Examining individual CNV regions previously implicated in neuropsychological disorders, we find suggestive evidence that CNV regions around SHANK3 are associated with fluid intelligence as derived from a battery of cognitive tests. This is the first study to examine the effects of rare CNVs as called by multiple algorithms on cognition in a large non-clinical sample, and finds no effects of such variants on general cognitive ability.

  3. Genetic copy number variation and general cognitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Andrew K; Davies, Gail; Payton, Antony; Tenesa, Albert; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David; Ke, Xiayi; Luciano, Michelle; Lopez, Lorna M; Gow, Alan J; Corley, Janie; Redmond, Paul; McNeill, Geraldine; Pickles, Andrew; Ollier, William; Horan, Michael; Starr, John M; Pendleton, Neil; Thomson, Pippa A; Porteous, David J; Deary, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Differences in genomic structure between individuals are ubiquitous features of human genetic variation. Specific copy number variants (CNVs) have been associated with susceptibility to numerous complex psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, autism-spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. These disorders often display co-morbidity with low intelligence. Rare chromosomal deletions and duplications are associated with these disorders, so it has been suggested that these deletions or duplications may be associated with differences in intelligence. Here we investigate associations between large (≥500kb), rare (crystallized intelligence in community-dwelling older people. We observe no significant associations between intelligence and total CNV load. Examining individual CNV regions previously implicated in neuropsychological disorders, we find suggestive evidence that CNV regions around SHANK3 are associated with fluid intelligence as derived from a battery of cognitive tests. This is the first study to examine the effects of rare CNVs as called by multiple algorithms on cognition in a large non-clinical sample, and finds no effects of such variants on general cognitive ability.

  4. Towards an optimal sampling strategy for assessing genetic variation within and among white clover (Trifolium repens L. cultivars using AFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Mehdi Khanlou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost reduction in plant breeding and conservation programs depends largely on correctly defining the minimal sample size required for the trustworthy assessment of intra- and inter-cultivar genetic variation. White clover, an important pasture legume, was chosen for studying this aspect. In clonal plants, such as the aforementioned, an appropriate sampling scheme eliminates the redundant analysis of identical genotypes. The aim was to define an optimal sampling strategy, i.e., the minimum sample size and appropriate sampling scheme for white clover cultivars, by using AFLP data (283 loci from three popular types. A grid-based sampling scheme, with an interplant distance of at least 40 cm, was sufficient to avoid any excess in replicates. Simulations revealed that the number of samples substantially influenced genetic diversity parameters. When using less than 15 per cultivar, the expected heterozygosity (He and Shannon diversity index (I were greatly underestimated, whereas with 20, more than 95% of total intra-cultivar genetic variation was covered. Based on AMOVA, a 20-cultivar sample was apparently sufficient to accurately quantify individual genetic structuring. The recommended sampling strategy facilitates the efficient characterization of diversity in white clover, for both conservation and exploitation.

  5. Genetic variation facilitates seedling establishment but not population growth rate of a perennial invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shou-Li; Vasemägi, Anti; Ramula, Satu

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the demographic consequences of genetic variation is fundamental to invasion biology. However, genetic and demographic approaches are rarely combined to explore the effects of genetic variation on invasive populations in natural environments. This study combined population genetics, demographic data and a greenhouse experiment to investigate the consequences of genetic variation for the population fitness of the perennial, invasive herb Lupinus polyphyllus. Genetic and demographic data were collected from 37 L. polyphyllus populations representing different latitudes in Finland, and genetic variation was characterized based on 13 microsatellite loci. Associations between genetic variation and population size, population density, latitude and habitat were investigated. Genetic variation was then explored in relation to four fitness components (establishment, survival, growth, fecundity) measured at the population level, and the long-term population growth rate (λ). For a subset of populations genetic variation was also examined in relation to the temporal variability of λ. A further assessment was made of the role of natural selection in the observed variation of certain fitness components among populations under greenhouse conditions. It was found that genetic variation correlated positively with population size, particularly at higher latitudes, and differed among habitat types. Average seedling establishment per population increased with genetic variation in the field, but not under greenhouse conditions. Quantitative genetic divergence (Q(ST)) based on seedling establishment in the greenhouse was smaller than allelic genetic divergence (F'(ST)), indicating that unifying selection has a prominent role in this fitness component. Genetic variation was not associated with average survival, growth or fecundity measured at the population level, λ or its variability. The study suggests that although genetic variation may facilitate plant invasions by

  6. Levels of genetic variation in trees: influence of life history characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L Hamrick; J. B. Milton; Y. B. Linhart

    1981-01-01

    In a previous study, levels of genetic variation, as measured by isozyme analyses, were compared for 113 taxa of vascular plants. Each species was classified for 12 life history and ecological traits and three measures of genetic variation were calculated. Plants with large ranges, high fecundities, an outcrossing mode of reproduction, wind pollination, a long...

  7. Genetic basis of variation for seedling traits in Gossypium hirsutum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 6 × 6 complete diallel analysis was performed to study the inheritance of seedling traits in cotton. Significant differences among genotypes showed the genetic variation and formal analysis predicted the presence of both additive and non-additive genetic variation for inheritance of seedling traits. Further, the estimates of ...

  8. Large intraspecific genetic variation within the Saffron-Crocus group (Crocus L., Series Crocus; Iridaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Orabi, Jihad; Pedersen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Series Crocus comprises ten autumn-flowering species, including the cultivated Crocus sativus, Saffron-Crocus. Interspecific genetic variation was examined in all species of the series, except for C. naqabensis. Intraspecific genetic and morphological variation was considered in the three Greek...

  9. Unexpectedly high genetic variation in large unisexual clumps of the subdioecious plant Honckenya peploides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Vilas, Julia; Philipp, Marianne; Retuerto, Rubén

    2010-01-01

    Honckenya peploides is a subdioecious dune plant that reproduces both sexually and by clonal growth. In northwest Spain this species was found to exhibit an extreme spatial segregation of the sexes, and our objective was to investigate genetic variation in unisexual clumps. Genetic variation was ...

  10. Next-generation sequencing approaches in genetic rodent model systems to study functional effects of human genetic variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing improve existing techniques and enable new approaches in genetics and functional genomics, bringing about unprecedented coverage, resolution and sensitivity. Enhanced toolsets can facilitate the untangling of connections between genomic variation, environmental

  11. Next-generation sequencing approaches in genetic rodent model systems to study functional effects of human genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing improve existing techniques and enable new approaches in genetics and functional genomics, bringing about unprecedented coverage, resolution and sensitivity. Enhanced toolsets can facilitate the untangling of connections between genomic variation, environmental

  12. The reproductive performance of Bali cattle and it’s genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Rahayu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bali cattle ( Bos sondaicus is one of the Indonesia native cattle which is the result of wild banteng domestication. The advantages of Bali cattle, among others, are having a high fertility rate (80-82% and good adaptability to the new environment. It was found that there are genetic variation in several genes associated with reproductive function in Bali cattle. Some studies have reported an association between genetic variation in reproductive function of cattle. However, studies on the correlation between genetic variation reproductive genes with reproductive performance of Bali cattle are still low. This article aims to provide an overview of Bali cattle genetic variation reproductive genes and making it possible as candidate marker for selection and improving reproductive performance of Bali cattle. Key words: Bali cattle, reproductive performance, genetic variation

  13. Genetic variation among populations of Pythium irregulare in southern Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harvey, P. R; Butterworth, P. J; Hawke, B. G; Pankhurst, C. E

    2000-01-01

    Isolates of Pythium irregulare were sampled from seven cereal crops throughout South Australia to determine the extent of genetic diversity within this pathogen and the scale of genetic differentiation among populations...

  14. Genetic variation in Coffea canephora L. (Var. Robusta) accessions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of the coffee grown in the world. Most genetic diversity of robusta coffee accessions conserved in ex situ collections has been estimated from morphological characteristics. There are limited studies on genetic variability and diversity in C.

  15. Genetic Variation Among Open-Pollinated Progeny of Eastern Cottonwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Farmer

    1970-01-01

    Improvement programs in eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) are most frequently designed to produce genetically superior clones for direct commercial use. This paper describes a progeny test to assess genetic variability on which selection might be based.

  16. [Genetic variation and clustal analysis of Trichomonas vaginalis cysteine proteases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wan-Zhong; Li, Zhi; Zhao, Liang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2008-06-30

    To clone the genes coding for cysteine proteases (CPs, TvCPs) from Trichomonas vaginalis and to analyze their genetic variations with the related sequences from NCBI database (GenBank) and T. vaginalis Genome Project database from The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR). TvCP genes were amplified using PCR, and inserted into vector pET28b or pBS-T. The recombinant plasmids were then transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 or Topl0 strain. The recombinant plasmids were used for sequencing. Homologous TvCP genes were blasted based on NCBI GenBank and TIGR T. vaginalis Genome Project database. The sequences of cloned TvCP genes were aligned and clustered by Clustal X (1.83 version) with retrieved sequences. Comparisons of amino acids among cathepsin L-like TvCPs, human L-like cathepsins and papaya papain were performed using DNAstar software, and their phylogenic tree was constructed based on neighbor-joining method using Clustal X. Two TvCP3 clones and one TvCP2 had a high identity of more than 99% with their responding TvCPs. Three clones of TvCP4 genes, GZ-CP4-clone 1-3, belonged to two members of a family showing a high percentage identity of more than 97.5% with the sequences of TvCP4 genes from databases (GenBank and TIGR) both at amino acid and nucleotide levels. Nine homologous TvCP4 pro-enzymes with 304 amino acids and other two members with deletions of N-terminal sequence existed in T. vaginalis sharing a similarity of 62.3-96.7% amino acids, which may evolve by means of gene replication and deletion. TvCP1-4, TvCP12, TvCP25 and CP65 had an identity of 61-88.2% at amino acid levels. So far, all reported sequences of C1 family from T. vaginalis belonged to capanthesin L-like subfamily with the same enzymatic active sites, conserved cysteine residues and similar structural features such as ERFNIN-like motif in pro-enzyme region, suggesting that they might result from gene duplication and mutations. TvCPs belong to cathepsin L-like family with genetic diversity

  17. Clinical findings and genetic screening for copy number variation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD), with a prevalence of up to 4% in Western countries, appears to be less common in Africa, possibly in part because of genetic factors. African studies investigating the genetic causation of PD are limited. Objective. To describe the clinical and genetic findings in a group of black South ...

  18. Habitat Fragmentation Differentially Affects Genetic Variation, Phenotypic Plasticity and Survival in Populations of a Gypsum Endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matesanz, Silvia; Rubio Teso, María Luisa; García-Fernández, Alfredo; Escudero, Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation, i.e., fragment size and isolation, can differentially alter patterns of neutral and quantitative genetic variation, fitness and phenotypic plasticity of plant populations, but their effects have rarely been tested simultaneously. We assessed the combined effects of size and connectivity on these aspects of genetic and phenotypic variation in populations of Centaurea hyssopifolia , a narrow endemic gypsophile that previously showed performance differences associated with fragmentation. We grew 111 maternal families sampled from 10 populations that differed in their fragment size and connectivity in a common garden, and characterized quantitative genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity to drought for key functional traits, and plant survival, as a measure of population fitness. We also assessed neutral genetic variation within and among populations using eight microsatellite markers. Although C. hyssopifolia is a narrow endemic gypsophile, we found substantial neutral genetic variation and quantitative variation for key functional traits. The partition of genetic variance indicated that a higher proportion of variation was found within populations, which is also consistent with low population differentiation in molecular markers, functional traits and their plasticity. This, combined with the generally small effect of habitat fragmentation suggests that gene flow among populations is not restricted, despite large differences in fragment size and isolation. Importantly, population's similarities in genetic variation and plasticity did not reflect the lower survival observed in isolated populations. Overall, our results indicate that, although the species consists of genetically variable populations able to express functional plasticity, such aspects of adaptive potential may not always reflect populations' survival. Given the differential effects of habitat connectivity on functional traits, genetic variation and fitness, our study highlights

  19. Habitat Fragmentation Differentially Affects Genetic Variation, Phenotypic Plasticity and Survival in Populations of a Gypsum Endemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Matesanz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation, i.e., fragment size and isolation, can differentially alter patterns of neutral and quantitative genetic variation, fitness and phenotypic plasticity of plant populations, but their effects have rarely been tested simultaneously. We assessed the combined effects of size and connectivity on these aspects of genetic and phenotypic variation in populations of Centaurea hyssopifolia, a narrow endemic gypsophile that previously showed performance differences associated with fragmentation. We grew 111 maternal families sampled from 10 populations that differed in their fragment size and connectivity in a common garden, and characterized quantitative genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity to drought for key functional traits, and plant survival, as a measure of population fitness. We also assessed neutral genetic variation within and among populations using eight microsatellite markers. Although C. hyssopifolia is a narrow endemic gypsophile, we found substantial neutral genetic variation and quantitative variation for key functional traits. The partition of genetic variance indicated that a higher proportion of variation was found within populations, which is also consistent with low population differentiation in molecular markers, functional traits and their plasticity. This, combined with the generally small effect of habitat fragmentation suggests that gene flow among populations is not restricted, despite large differences in fragment size and isolation. Importantly, population’s similarities in genetic variation and plasticity did not reflect the lower survival observed in isolated populations. Overall, our results indicate that, although the species consists of genetically variable populations able to express functional plasticity, such aspects of adaptive potential may not always reflect populations’ survival. Given the differential effects of habitat connectivity on functional traits, genetic variation and fitness

  20. Seasonal genetic variation associated with population dynamics of a poecilogonous polychaete worm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thonig, Anne; Banta, Gary Thomas; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2017-01-01

    Poecilogonous species show variation in developmental mode, with larvae that differ both morphologically and ecologically. The spionid polychaete Pygospio elegans shows variation in developmental mode not only between populations, but also seasonally within populations. We investigated...... differentiation at two of the sites. The seasonal genetic shift correlated with the appearance of new size cohorts in the populations. Additionally, we found that the genetic composition of reproductive individuals did not always reflect the genetic composition of the entire sample, indicating that variance...

  1. Genetic Variation Underlying Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0588 TITLE: Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD...14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury...accelerating individual’s memory decline and possibly accelerating LOAD like neuro-degeneration. In addition, genetic risk factors including non- coding and

  2. Genetic variation in coding regions between and within commonly used inbred rat strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; van Zutphen, B.F.; Plasterk, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2004-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common genetic variation in mammalian populations. Their significance is illustrated by their potential contribution to common disease but also by their potential for use in genetic association and mapping experiments. We have examined the genetic

  3. Habitat-specific sensory-exploitative signals in birds: propensity of dipteran prey to cause evolution of plumage variation in flush-pursuit insectivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Piotr G; Lasater, Kelly; Mumme, Ronald L; Borowiec, Marta; Cygan, Jakub P; Pereira, Janice; Sergiej, Ewa

    2006-12-01

    Sensory exploitation occurs when signals trigger behavioral reactions that diminish the receiver's fitness. Research in this area focuses on the match between the signal's form and the receiver's sensitivity, but the effect of habitat on interspecific sensory exploitation is rarely addressed. Myioborus redstarts use conspicuous wing and tail displays of contrasting black-and-white plumage patches to flush dipteran insects, which are then pursued and captured in flight. Previous studies have shown that by increasing the distance at which insects perform an escape response, conspicuous visual displays improve the birds' foraging performance. We tested the hypothesis that selection for a visual signal that maximizes prey escape distance under local habitat conditions can lead to the evolution of geographic variation in plumage pattern among Myioborus redstarts. Using models of foraging birds, we recorded the escape responses of Dipterous insects to a range of plumage patterns and background tones (from light to dark) to determine whether the plumage pattern that maximizes prey flushing is dependent upon that habitat (background) against which birds are viewed by their prey. Our results indicate that the effectiveness of a particular plumage pattern in flushing dipteran prey depends strongly on the background against which that plumage pattern is displayed, and darker habitat (background) conditions generally favor plumages with more extensive patches of white in the tail. However, the addition of white wing patches that imitate the plumage of the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus) generally increases insect escape responses but reduces the effect that tail pattern variation and background tone have on escape behavior. These experiments support the hypothesis that habitat-specific natural selection to enhance sensory exploitation of prey escape responses could produce geographic variation in plumage patterns of flush-pursuers.

  4. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Tong; Qiang He; Yong-Jin Park

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucle...

  5. Fractal and Transgenerational Genetic Effects on Phenotypic Variation and Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Joe

    To understand human biology and to manage heritable diseases, a complete picture of the genetic basis for phenotypic variation and disease risk is needed. Unexpectedly however, most of these genetic variants, even for highly heritable traits, continue to elude discovery for poorly understood reasons. The genetics community is actively exploring the usual explanations for missing heritability. But given the extraordinary work that has already been done and the exceptional magnitude of the problem, it seems likely that unconventional genetic properties are involved.

  6. Low genetic variation among killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the eastern north Pacific and genetic differentiation between foraging specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzel, A R; Dahlheim, M; Stern, S J

    1998-01-01

    Killer whales from the coastal waters off California through Alaska were compared for genetic variation at three nuclear DNA markers and sequenced for a total of 520 bp from the mitochondrial control region. Two putative sympatric populations that range throughout this region were compared. They can be distinguished by social and foraging behavior and are known as "residents" and "transients". We found low levels of variation within populations compared to other cetacean species. Comparisons between fish (resident) versus marine mammal (transient) foraging specialists indicated highly significant genetic differentiation at both nuclear and mitochondrial loci. This differentiation is at a level consistent with intraspecific variation. A comparison between two parapatric resident populations showed a small but fixed mtDNA haplotype difference. Together these data suggest low levels of genetic dispersal between foraging specialists and a pattern of genetic differentiation consistent with matrifocal population structure and small effective population size.

  7. Genetic variation for oviposition behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. I. Quantitative genetic analysis of insertion behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamping, A; van Delden, W

    1990-09-01

    The genetic basis of egg insertion behavior was analyzed in two Drosophila melanogaster strains (N and E strain), which were homozygous for the Slow allele of the alcohol dehydrogenase locus. The E strain had been selected for increased tolerance to ethanol. This study originated from the observation that nearly all of the eggs laid by females of the E strain were inserted, while in the control strain (N strain) which was kept on regular food, considerable variation for egg insertion occurred. Crosses between the E and the N strains were made, and quantitative genetic tests were performed. It was shown that the inheritance of egg insertion is polygenic, some of the genes are probably sex linked, and in-laying is partly dominant over on-laying. The heritability of the trait, derived from mother-daughter regression analysis, was .59 +/- .18. The repeatability was high. Bidirectional selection in the E strain was unsuccessful, but an asymmetrical response to selection was obtained in the N strain and in lines derived from crosses between the N and the E strains. Selection for in-laying was more successful than for on-laying. The realized heritability in the former lines was .35 +/- .10.

  8. Genetic variation and population structure of willowy flounder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Key words: Tanakius kitaharai, mitochondrial DNA control region, genetic variability, genetic structure. INTRODUCTION. Willowy ... to nuclear DNA (Brown et al., 1982; Wilson et al., 1985). The highest rates of base ... based on morphological features, and a piece of muscle tissue was obtained from each ...

  9. Provenance variation in growth and genetic potential of Aquilaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARUN KUMAR

    2015-06-17

    Jun 17, 2015 ... The genetic advance was high for shoot length followed by number of branches which indicated the reliability of these two parameters for inclusion in future improvement programme. Key words: Aquilaria malaccensis, provenances, variability, heritability, genetic divergence, intra and inter cluster distance.

  10. Genetic variation within and among three ostrich breeds, estimated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Southern African ostrich (S. c. australis) to improve feather production in the early 1900s (Deurden, 1913). ... to confirm this genetic distinction among the three breeds, where a breed can be defined as a group of animals within a .... stage or because of possible mutations occurring at these loci (Beuzen et al., 2000). Genetic ...

  11. Genetic variation of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) collections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Genetic variability of forage grass cultivars: A comparison of Festuca pratensis Huds., Lolium perenne L. and Dactylis glomerata L. Euphytica, 106: 261-270. Kölliker R, Jones ES, Jahufer MZZ, Forster (2001). Bulked AFLP analysis for the assessment of genetic diversity in white clover. (Trifolium repens L).

  12. Genetic variation within and among five natural populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of genetic diversity is important for successful conservation and domestication of species. In order to determine genetic diversity within and among Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Htochst. subsp. birrea populations in Sudan, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used. Leaf materials from 75 ...

  13. Genetic variation within and among five natural populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-20

    Jun 20, 2011 ... 3Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Post Code 11115, P. O. Box: 321 Khartoum, Sudan. Accepted 6 May, 2011. Knowledge of genetic diversity is important for successful conservation and domestication of species. In order to determine genetic diversity within and among Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) ...

  14. Analysis of genetic variation in Erianthus arundinaceum by random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... Key words: Erianthus arundinaceum, genetic diversity, RAPD, UPGMA. INTRODUCTION. Saccharum spp. is one ... pro-grams, information on the genetic diversity within and among closely related crop ... accession code was shown in the Table 1, and M is 100 bp DNA ladder. Individual RAPD fragments for ...

  15. Molecular genetic variation in the African wild rice Oryza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the level of genetic diversity and rainfall. The clear association of genetic diversity with rainfall allows the extrapolation of the potential impacts of global warming on diversity when empirical data on predicted climate models, particularly rainfall, are available. This knowledge would therefore be useful in the development of

  16. Genetic variation in Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrman 1784) - an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    genetic differentiation (F st) of 0.459 and the low mean value for the effective number of migrants (Nm) of 0.179 indicated low levels of gene flow between the different localities of R. pummo. The negative, near zero F,S value of -0.01 indicated a balance between heterozygotes and homozygotes. Rogers (1972) genetic ...

  17. Exploring and mapping genetic variation in wild barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhala, T.

    2004-01-01

    Wild barley represents an important genetic resource for cultivated barley, which has a narrowed gene pool due to intensive breeding. Therefore, it is imperative to study the genetics of different traits in wild barley, if it is to be used for cultivar improvement. This thesis describes studies of

  18. Genetic variation of twenty autosomal STR loci and evaluate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was of twofold. One was to determine the genetic structure of Iraq population and the second objective of the study was to evaluate the importance of these loci for forensic genetic purposes. FTA® Technology (FTA™ paper DNA extraction) utilized to extract DNA. Twenty (20) STR loci and Amelogenin), ...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA genetic variations among four horse populations in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman E. Othman

    2017-12-01

    It is concluded that sequence analysis of mtDNA control region is still the most informative tool for the identification of genetic biodiversity and phylogeny of different horse breeds and populations. The horse populations reared in Egypt possess low genetic diversity and all of them are belonged to Equus caballus breed.

  20. Genetic variation in ecoraces of tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. RENUKA

    genetic relationships of different ecoraces and genetic vari- ... (see electronic supplementary data at http://www.ias.ac.in/ jgenet/). ... E. F. G. D. Figure 1. (a) Cocoons of various tasar ecoraces- (A–G) Andhra local, Daba TV, Daba. BV, Modal, Sukinda, Raily and Bhandara. (b) Moths of various tasar ecoraces: Andhra.

  1. SSR markers reveal genetic variation between improved cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cassava genotypes at 0.93 similarity coefficient. These five primers clustered the 36 cassavas into 16 groups at 0.70 similarity coefficient. Application of this few SSR primers would ultimately reduce the cost and time of research for genetic diversity and genotype identification studies for the genetic improvement program of ...

  2. Perspectives on human genetic variation from the HapMap Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVean, Gil; Spencer, Chris C A; Chaix, Raphaelle

    2005-10-01

    The completion of the International HapMap Project marks the start of a new phase in human genetics. The aim of the project was to provide a resource that facilitates the design of efficient genome-wide association studies, through characterising patterns of genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 270 individuals across four geographical populations. In total, over one million SNPs have been typed across these genomes, providing an unprecedented view of human genetic diversity. In this review we focus on what the HapMap Project has taught us about the structure of human genetic variation and the fundamental molecular and evolutionary processes that shape it.

  3. Dissecting dynamic genetic variation that controls temporal gene response in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Brodt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in regulatory circuits controlling gene expression is a powerful source of functional information. The study of associations among genetic variants and gene expression provides important insights about cell circuitry but cannot specify whether and when potential variants dynamically alter their genetic effect during the course of response. Here we develop a computational procedure that captures temporal changes in genetic effects, and apply it to analyze transcription during inhibition of the TOR signaling pathway in segregating yeast cells. We found a high-order coordination of gene modules: sets of genes co-associated with the same genetic variant and sharing a common temporal genetic effect pattern. The temporal genetic effects of some modules represented a single state-transitioning pattern; for example, at 10-30 minutes following stimulation, genetic effects in the phosphate utilization module attained a characteristic transition to a new steady state. In contrast, another module showed an impulse pattern of genetic effects; for example, in the poor nitrogen sources utilization module, a spike up of a genetic effect at 10-20 minutes following stimulation reflected inter-individual variation in the timing (rather than magnitude of response. Our analysis suggests that the same mechanism typically leads to both inter-individual variation and the temporal genetic effect pattern in a module. Our methodology provides a quantitative genetic approach to studying the molecular mechanisms that shape dynamic changes in transcriptional responses.

  4. Genetic variations in marine natural population - Measurement and utility in resource management and conservation: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Parulekar, A

    A number of molecular and biochemical tools which can be applied to the identification of species and the detection of genetic variation within species have been developed in recent years. All these methods rely on the ability to distinguish between...

  5. High levels of genetic variation in Indian field and house mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, S; Sharma, T

    1997-01-01

    Genetic variation in the Indian pygmy field miceMus booduga and theMus terricolor complex and in the house mouseMus musculus tytleri was analysed electro phoretically at 20 enzymatic and nonenzymatic protein loci...

  6. Genetic variation in strains of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the implications for ecotoxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, T S; Hamilton, P B; Griffiths, A M; Hodgson, D J; Wahab, M A; Tyler, C R

    2009-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that genetic variation, at both the level of the individual and population, has a significant effect on behaviour, fitness and response to toxicants. Using DNA microsatellites, we examined the genetic variation in samples of several commonly used laboratory strains of zebrafish, Danio rerio, a model species in toxicological studies. We compared the genetic variation to that found in a sample of wild fish from Bangladesh. Our findings show that the wild fish were significantly more variable than the laboratory strains for several measures of genetic variability, including allelic richness and expected heterozygosity. This lack of variation should be given due consideration for any study which attempts to extrapolate the results of ecotoxicological laboratory tests to wild populations.

  7. Salmon and steelhead genetics and genomics - Epigenetic and genomic variation in salmon and steelhead

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct analyses of epigenetic and genomic variation in Chinook salmon and steelhead to determine influence on phenotypic expression of life history traits. Genetic,...

  8. Genetic Variation Among Natural Populations of Tilletia controversa and T. bromi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pimentel, G; Peever, T L; Carris, L M

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Tilletia controversa and T. bromi were sampled from wheat and two Bromus species hosts, respectively, in the Pacific Northwest, and genetic variation within and among populations was determined...

  9. A functional genetic variation of the 5-HT2a receptor affects human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Henke, Katharina; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Wollmer, M Axel; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    Human memory capacity is highly variable across individuals and is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. A roughly 50% heritability estimate indicates that naturally occurring genetic variations have an important impact on this cognitive ability. Therefore, we investigated a functional variation of a memory-related serotonin receptor in 349 healthy young volunteers, and found 21% poorer memory performance in subjects with the rare variant.

  10. Genetic variation among agamid lizards of the trapelus agiliscomplex in the caspian-aral basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macey, J. Robert; Ananjeva, Natalia B.

    2004-05-19

    Allozyme variation is examined in eight populations of Trapelus from the Caspian-Aral Basin of the former USSR. Thirty-one loci (15 variable) exhibit remarkably low levels of genetic variation with only a Nei's genetic distance of 0.117 across 2500 km. An isolated population on the European side of the Caspian Sea is found to phenetically cluster inside the Asian populations examined, suggesting that it should not be considered taxonomically distinct.

  11. Genetic variation and population structure in native Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Wang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians--signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1 a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2 a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3 a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4 a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas.

  12. Genes contributing to genetic variation of muscling in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross L Tellam

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Selective breeding programs aiming to increase the productivity and profitability of the sheep meat industry use elite, progeny tested sires. The broad genetic traits of primary interest in the progeny of these sires include skeletal muscle yield, fat content, eating quality and reproductive efficiency. Natural mutations in sheep that enhance muscling have been identified, while a number of genome scans have identified and confirmed quantitative trait loci for skeletal muscle traits. The detailed phenotypic characteristics of sheep carrying these mutations or quantitative trait loci affecting skeletal muscle show a number of common biological themes, particularly changes in developmental growth trajectories, alterations of whole animal morphology and a shift towards fast twitch glycolytic fibres. The genetic, developmental and biochemical mechanisms underpinning the actions of some of these genetic variants are described. This review critically assesses this research area, identifies gaps in knowledge and highlights mechanistic linkages between genetic polymorphisms and skeletal muscle phenotypic changes. This knowledge may aid the discovery of new causal genetic variants and in some cases lead to the development of biochemical and immunological strategies aimed at enhancing skeletal muscle.

  13. Genes contributing to genetic variation of muscling in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellam, Ross L; Cockett, Noelle E; Vuocolo, Tony; Bidwell, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Selective breeding programs aiming to increase the productivity and profitability of the sheep meat industry use elite, progeny tested sires. The broad genetic traits of primary interest in the progeny of these sires include skeletal muscle yield, fat content, eating quality, and reproductive efficiency. Natural mutations in sheep that enhance muscling have been identified, while a number of genome scans have identified and confirmed quantitative trait loci (QTL) for skeletal muscle traits. The detailed phenotypic characteristics of sheep carrying these mutations or QTL affecting skeletal muscle show a number of common biological themes, particularly changes in developmental growth trajectories, alterations of whole animal morphology, and a shift toward fast twitch glycolytic fibers. The genetic, developmental, and biochemical mechanisms underpinning the actions of some of these genetic variants are described. This review critically assesses this research area, identifies gaps in knowledge, and highlights mechanistic linkages between genetic polymorphisms and skeletal muscle phenotypic changes. This knowledge may aid the discovery of new causal genetic variants and in some cases lead to the development of biochemical and immunological strategies aimed at enhancing skeletal muscle.

  14. Human Genetic Variation and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Ju Chung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with multifactorial etiology. In the past decade, the genetic causes of monogenic forms of familial PD have been defined. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic PD cases that occur in outbred populations have yet to be clarified. The recent development of resources such as the International HapMap Project and technological advances in high-throughput genotyping have provided new basis for genetic association studies of common complex diseases, including PD. A new generation of genome-wide association studies will soon offer a potentially powerful approach for mapping causal genes and will likely change treatment and alter our perception of the genetic determinants of PD. However, the execution and analysis of such studies will require great care.

  15. Spatial arrangement of genetic variation in the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, Pieternella Christina

    2003-01-01

    Phenotypic similarities come in two kinds: those that are partially based on genetic differences and those that are not. Genetic variation is inherently heritable and without it, evolution by means of natural selection could not occur. It is therefore important to understand the origin and

  16. Genetic variation and differentiation of bison (Bison bison) subspecies and cattle (Bos taurus) breeds and subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variation was quantified at 29 polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci in nine herds of plains bison (Bison bison bison), three herds of wood bison (B. b. athabascae), fourteen breeds of taurine cattle (Bos taurus taurus), and two breeds of indicine cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Genetic distances...

  17. Genetic variation in a population of Bipolaris oryzae based on RAPD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... analyzed species presented high genetic similarity in their electrophoretic profiles when compared to the respective anamorph of each species. According to Burdon and Silk. (1997), plant pathogenic fungi most commonly rely on mutation and recombination as the main source of genetically based variation ...

  18. Genetic variation in susceptibility to fusiform rust in seedlings from a wild population of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch Jr.; Roy W. Stonecypher

    1969-01-01

    Striking genetic variation in susceptibility to fusiform rust was observed among SS controlled-pollinated (CP) and 48 wind-pollinated (WP) families from parent trees of loblolly pine selected at random in a natural forest stand in southwest Georgia. The mating design permitted statistical tests for estimating both additive and total genetic variance. WP families were...

  19. An integrated map of genetic variation from 1.092 human genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    By characterizing the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help to understand the genetic contribution to disease. Here we describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination ...

  20. Incorporating latitudinal and central–marginal trends in assessing genetic variation across species ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo

    2012-01-01

    The genetic variation across a species’ range is an important factor in speciation and conservation, yet searching for general patterns and underlying causes remains challenging. While the majority of comparisons between central and marginal populations have revealed a general central–marginal (C-M) decline in genetic diversity, others show no clear pattern. Similarly...

  1. Natural genetic variation for acclimation of photosynthetic light use efficiency to growth irradiance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van R.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Harbinson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are known to be able to acclimate their photosynthesis to the level of irradiance. Here we present the analysis of natural genetic variation for photosynthetic light use efficiency (FPSII) in response to five light environments among 12 genetically diverse Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We

  2. Genetic variation in bison (bison bison) subspecies and cattle (Bos taurus) breeds and subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variation was quantified at 29 polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci in nine herds of plains bison (Bison bison bison), three herds of wood bison (B.b. athabascae), fourteen breeds of taurine cattle (Bos Taurus Taurus), and two breeds of indicine cattle (Bos Taurus indicus). Genetic distances,...

  3. Framework for Interpretation of Genetic Variations in Pancreatitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWhitcomb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is defined by irreversible damage to the pancreas as a result of inflammation-driven pancreatic tissue destruction and fibrosis occurring over many years. The disorder is complex, with multiple etiologies leading to the same tissue pathology, and unpredictable clinical courses with variable pain, exocrine and endocrine organ dysfunction and cancer. Underlying genetic variants are central CP susceptibility and progression. Three genes, with Mendelian genetic biology (PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1 have been recognized for over a decade, and little progress has been made since then.. Furthermore, application of high-throughput genetic techniques, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS and next generation sequencing (NGS will provide a large volume of new genetic variants that are associated with CP, but with small independent effect that are impossible to apply in the clinic. The problem of interpretation is using the old framework of the germ theory of disease to understand complex genetic disorders. To understand these variants and translate them into clinically useful information requires a new framework based on modeling and simulation of physiological processes with or without genetic, metabolic and environmental variables considered at the cellular and organ levels, with integration of the immune system, nervous system, tissue injury and repair system and DNA repair system. The North American Pancreatitis Study II (NAPS2 study was designed to capture this type of date and construct a time line to understand and later predict rates of disease progression from the initial symptom to end-stage disease. This effort is needed to target the etiology of pancreatic dysfunction beginning at the first signs of disease and thereby prevent the development of irreversible damage and the complications of CP. The need for a new framework and the rational for implementing it into clinical practice are described.

  4. Conservation genetics of the Philippine tarsier: cryptic genetic variation restructures conservation priorities for an island archipelago primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafe M Brown

    Full Text Available Establishment of conservation priorities for primates is a particular concern in the island archipelagos of Southeast Asia, where rates of habitat destruction are among the highest in the world. Conservation programs require knowledge of taxonomic diversity to ensure success. The Philippine tarsier is a flagship species that promotes environmental awareness and a thriving ecotourism economy in the Philippines. However, assessment of its conservation status has been impeded by taxonomic uncertainty, a paucity of field studies, and a lack of vouchered specimens and genetic samples available for study in biodiversity repositories. Consequently, conservation priorities are unclear. In this study we use mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to empirically infer geographic partitioning of genetic variation and to identify evolutionarily distinct lineages for conservation action. The distribution of Philippine tarsier genetic diversity is neither congruent with expectations based on biogeographical patterns documented in other Philippine vertebrates, nor does it agree with the most recent Philippine tarsier taxonomic arrangement. We identify three principal evolutionary lineages that do not correspond to the currently recognized subspecies, highlight the discovery of a novel cryptic and range-restricted subcenter of genetic variation in an unanticipated part of the archipelago, and identify additional geographically structured genetic variation that should be the focus of future studies and conservation action. Conservation of this flagship species necessitates establishment of protected areas and targeted conservation programs within the range of each genetically distinct variant of the Philippine tarsier.

  5. Plant-Species Diversity Correlates with Genetic Variation of an Oligophagous Seed Predator

    OpenAIRE

    Liisa Laukkanen; Pia Mutikainen; Anne Muola; Roosa Leimu

    2014-01-01

    Several characteristics of habitats of herbivores and their food-plant communities, such as plant-species composition and plant quality, influence population genetics of both herbivores and their host plants. We investigated how different ecological and geographic factors affect genetic variation in and differentiation of 23 populations of the oligophagous seed predator Lygaeus equestris (Heteroptera) in southwestern Finland and in eastern Sweden. We tested whether genetic differentiation of ...

  6. Variation, "evolution", immortality and genetic instabilities in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, L P

    2007-08-18

    The pathological characteristics of tumour cells often include variation of their histopathological features (i.e. "degrees of de-differentiation") between cases of the same tumour type and between different foci within individual tumours. Usually, only a few cell lines from tumours are immortal. Currently, somatic mutation, replicative infidelity of DNA and aneuploidy are suggested as alternative mechanisms of genomic disturbance underlying tumours. Nevertheless, apart from Hansemann's ideas of "anaplasia" and "de-differentiation" (proposed in the 1890s), and supposed "evolutionary themes" in cancer cell biology, little has been published concerning how histopathologic variation and immortality in tumour cells might arise. This paper reviews applications of the concepts of "variation" to tumours, including concepts of "evolution" and "cellular Darwinism". It is proposed that combinations of somatic mutation, DNA replicative infidelity and aneuploidy may explain the variabilities in tumours, and provide immortality in occasional tumour cells. A possible model involves (i) an initial somatic mutation causing reduced replicative fidelity of DNA, which could be variable in intensity, and thus give rise to variations between cases; (ii) a phase of replicative infidelity of DNA causing daughter cells lines to develop various abnormalities to different degrees, and hence provide for variation between areas of the same tumour. As a last event (iii) occasional asymmetric chromosomal distributions (aneuploidy) might "refresh" the ability of a daughter cell to replicate DNA faithfully causing them to become immortal. Thus extensively mutant and variable, hyperploid, and occasionally immortal cells might arise.

  7. IVF: exploiting intensity variation function for high-performance pedestrian tracking in forward-looking infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Belluccini, Luca

    2014-02-01

    Tracking pedestrian targets in forward-looking infrared video sequences is a crucial component of a growing number of applications. At the same time, it is particularly challenging, since image resolution and signal-to-noise ratio are generally very low, while the nonrigidity of the human body produces highly variable target shapes. Moreover, motion can be quite chaotic with frequent target-to-target and target-to-scene occlusions. Hence, the trend is to design ever more sophisticated techniques, able to ensure rather accurate tracking results at the cost of a generally higher complexity. However, many of such techniques might not be suitable for real-time tracking in limited-resource environments. This work presents a technique that extends an extremely computationally efficient tracking method based on target intensity variation and template matching originally designed for targets with a marked and stable hot spot by adapting it to deal with much more complex thermal signatures and by removing the native dependency on configuration choices. Experimental tests demonstrated that, by working on multiple hot spots, the designed technique is able to achieve the robustness of other common approaches by limiting drifts and preserving the low-computational footprint of the reference method.

  8. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and

  9. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs

  10. Spatially structured genetic variation in a broadcast spawning bivalve : quantitative vs. molecular traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Drent, J; van Delden, W; Piersma, T

    Understanding the origin, maintenance and significance of phenotypic variation is one of the central issues in evolutionary biology. An ongoing discussion focuses on the relative roles of isolation and selection as being at the heart of genetically based spatial variation. We address this issue in a

  11. Genetic and phenotypically flexible components of seasonal variation in immune function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, M. A.; Helm, B.; Kleynhans, E. J.; Gwinner, E.; Tieleman, B. I.

    Animals cope with seasonal variation in environmental factors by adjustments of physiology and life history. When seasonal variation is partly predictable, such adjustments can be based on a genetic component or be phenotypically flexible. Animals have to allocate limited resources over different

  12. The quantitative genetics of phenotypic variation in animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, W.G.; Mulder, H.A.; Zhang, X.S.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to estimating genetic variability in quantitative traits and to how it is maintained and changed by selection in natural and domesticated populations, but rather little attention has been paid to how levels of environmental and phenotypic variance are influenced.

  13. Genetic variation in hawthorn ( Crataegus spp.) using RAPD markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we report the use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to determine genetic relationships in the genus Crataegus. Five species, including Crataegus monogyna, Crataegus meyeri, Crataegus aronia, Crataegus pentagyna and Crataegus pontica were chosen from northwest forests of Iran and ...

  14. Analysis of genetic variation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... The genetic diversity of 100 Malaysian native chickens was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for two candidate genes: ... INOS and NRAMP1 PCR products were digested by AluI and SacI restriction enzymes, respectively.

  15. Genetic Variation of 28 microsatellite markers in Australian merino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ratiyat

    2016-02-26

    Feb 26, 2016 ... inbreeding depends on Ne, for example, when Ne is very small, genetic drift would often be too strong for natural selection to operate efficiently. Thus, populations with small Ne might exhibit inbreeding depression. Although these three populations had low Ne, they did not show a great deal of inbreeding.

  16. Genetic variations in androgen metabolism genes and associations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the role of genetic variants in the androgen metabolism genes and the probability of developing PCa in South African coloured and white men. Methods. Genotype and allele counts and frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP3A5, CYP3A4 and CYP3A43 were assessed in coloured ...

  17. Assessment of Genetic Variation Among East African Cercospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid flagement length polymorphism (RFLP) and amplified flagement length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses were used to study genetic diversity of Cercospora zeae-maydis isolates collected from Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda. For comparative purposes, isolates from Zimbabwe and the United States of America (USA) ...

  18. Genetic variation and bottleneck in Japanese quail ( Coturnix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic structure of four strains of Japanese quail (Pharach, Panda, Tuxedo and Golden) was investigated by 12 microsatellite markers in Iran. Whole blood samples were collected from 200 individuals belonging to four strains and genomic DNA was extracted by salting out procedure. The 12 microsatellite markers ...

  19. Genetic and phenotypic variation of some reproductive traits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of season, year of calving and parity on lactation period, calving interval, number of days open and dry period in Egyptian buffalo, and to estimate genetic and phenotypic parameters for these traits using a multi-trait animal model. Season of calving, year of calving ...

  20. Genetic Variation among Broiler Genotypes in susceptibility to colibacillosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ask, B.; Waaij, van der E.H.; Stegeman, J.A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Selection for reduced susceptibility to colibacillosis in broilers may contribute to the prevention of colibacillosis. Such selection should focus on the responses to Escherichia coli rather than the associated primary agent(s). The purpose of the current study was to examine whether genetic

  1. Natural and induced genetic variation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Bartholomeus Mathijs Godefridus

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most studied model organisms for human heath and disease. Researchers have developed many inbred strains that specifically mimic aspects of human genetic disease, like hypertension, diabetes, and neurological disorders, like anxiety, schizophrenia, and many others.

  2. Genetic variation may influence the development of persistent postsurgical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Persistent postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem. It is not fully understood why some patients develop persistent postsurgical pain while others do not. The genetic profile might play an important role in this development. In this article, we summarize the existing studies examining...

  3. Genetic Variation in Bile Acid Metabolism: Implications for Lipoprotein Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the homeostasis of cholesterol in the human body. An important pathway for eliminating cholesterol from the body is to convert it into bile acids in the liver. The rate-limiting enzyme in this catabolism of cholesterol is CYP7A1. In the gene of CYP7A1, a

  4. Genetic variation of indigenous chicken breeds in China and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphic bands, breed-specific bands and genetic similarity coefficients of 13 chicken breeds were derived from the AFLP data. A total of 280 polymorphic bands was generated from which nine specific bands were observed for the Shouguang and the Dongxiang Dark chicken. One specific band was observed in the ...

  5. Natural genetic variation in Calligonum Tunisian genus analyzed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Calligonum genus is one of the most economically important resources of the Tunisian desert, playing an important role in the lives of desert local population. A great range of genetic diversity could be seen in diverse populations of this genus which are spread all over Tunisian areas. DNA-based molecular markers are ...

  6. CYP/PON genetic variations as determinant of organophosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Centre for Environmental Science and Technology, 2Centre for Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Central. University of Punjab, Bathinda 151001, India. Abstract. In the present scenario of increased accumulation of pesticides in the environment, it is important to understand its impact on human health. The focus is ...

  7. CYP/PON genetic variations as determinant of organophosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The focus is on gene–environment interaction, highlighting the consequences and factors that may halt the biotransformation of some pesticides and change their ... Centre for Environmental Science and Technology,Central University of Punjab, Bathinda 151001, India; Centre for Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, ...

  8. Analysis of genetic variation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... The genetic diversity of 100 Malaysian native chickens was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for two candidate genes: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS) and natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1). The two genes.

  9. Study of genetic variation in population of Bipolaris victoriae , the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates of Bipolaris victoriae were analysed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques to determine the amount of intraspecific genetic variability. Seven primers were applied and DNA bands of 200-5000 bp were produced. Cluster analysis using UPGMA method gave five groups. Levels of polymorphism ...

  10. Genetic variation patterns of Medicago ruthenica populations from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to GST, gene flow at population level was 1.4427 for allozymes and 1.2040 for SSR markers, which indicated there was definite gene flow between populations. Low differentiations among ... in M. ruthenica populations. Key words: Medicago ruthenica, genetic diversity, allozyme, micro-satellite, North China.

  11. Genetic variation in ecoraces of tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have been extensively used in the diversity analysis of ani- mal and plant system, these molecular markers are selected in this study. This work has been undertaken to characterize the ecoraces of Antheraea mylitta from different parts of tropical forest zones, as basis for identification and genetic diversity among the tasar ...

  12. Genetic variation within and between three Vietnamese pine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pinus merkusii is an important species in Vietnam with many economic and biological contributions. The information on diversity within and between populations of a species is necessary for plantation programs, breeding and conservation strategies. Genetic diversity of three Vietnamese populations (NA, QB and QN) was ...

  13. Genetic variation within a collection of Nigerian accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... extent of genetic diversity of Nigerian accession of African yam bean (AYB) particularly using molecular markers. In this study ... has a potential for supplemen- ting the protein requirements of many family throughout .... cluster groups using tree plot option in the same software package. A three-dimension ...

  14. Genetic variation and relationship in Staphylococcus aureus isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A genetic characterization of 18 different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus using random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) was carried out. Out of one hundred primers tested, ten showed polymorphism. The amplification reactions with the 10 primers generated 88 bands, 51 of which is polymorphic with band size ...

  15. Ecological genetics of floret mass variation in Bromus tectorum (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer

    2010-01-01

    Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass, downy brome) is a highly invasive inbreeding annual grass that dominates millions of hectares of former shrubland in interior western North America. Factors contributing to its success include strong genetic regulation of key adaptive traits coupled with high phenotypic plasticity in response to resource availability (Meyer and Allen...

  16. Genetic variation and DNA markers in forensic analysis | Hameed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The light has been focused and directed in this study to establish the basic forensic genetic information, knowledge, data and statistics which might be so ultimately helpful practically in forensic science and criminology and to let evaluate and present the DNA weight evidences in medico-legal institute and courts of law.

  17. Genetic variation for drought resistance in small red seeded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) productivity is low in major growing regions of Ethiopia mainly due to drought, caused by low and erratic rainfall. A field experiment was carried out at Gofa in Southern Ethiopia, to assess genetic variability for drought resistance in forty-nine small red seeded common bean genotypes ...

  18. Genetic variation of calsarcin-1 gene and association with carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... ficial selection, migration, and genetic drift and that the artificial selection had put little pressure on this gene locus. Hence, the artificial selection must be strength-. Yang et al. 2715 ened in the process of the improvement for Chinese cattle. Effect of the CS-1 genotypes on carcass traits. Allele frequencies of ...

  19. Genetic variation within and among three ostrich breeds, estimated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    obtained from two local producers (Cloete et al., 2008b). These birds originated from .... The lower genetic variability observed in the ZB population may be because no prior knowledge was available of .... Western Cape Department of Agriculture during the course of the study and for the laboratory costs of the microsatellite ...

  20. Genetic and phenotypic variation of some reproductive traits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    1Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 2 Department of. Animal Science ... genetic and phenotypic parameters for these traits using a multi-trait animal model. Season of calving, year ... were evaluated using the Duncan Multiple Range Test (Steel & Torrie, 1980).

  1. Genetic variation in ecoraces of tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tasar culture is a traditional livelihood for lakhs of tribal populace in the areas of Jharkhand, Chhatisgarh, Orissa, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh. In the present study, the genetic diversity of these ecoraces is identified by DNA markers, namely simple sequence repeats (SSRs), most of which ...

  2. Provenance variation in growth and genetic potential of Aquilaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty two open pollinated families in A. malaccensis were selected and evaluated for growth attributes and genetic divergence. The experiment was conducted at Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University; Mettupalayam situated at 11° 19' N longitude, 76° 56' E latitude at 300 MSL during ...

  3. Genetic variation in hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) using RAPD markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... Genetica. 97: 313-320. Tamura K, Dudley J, Nei M, Kumar S (2007). MEGA 4: Molecular. Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) Software version 4.0. Mol. Biol. Evol. 24: 1596-1599. Zhao B (2005). Natural antioxidants for neurodegenerative diseases. Mol. Neurobiol. 31: 283-293. Zuo Z, Zhang L, Zhou L, ...

  4. Genetic variation of Mehraban sheep using two intersimple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity within Mehraban sheep populations, as one of the main breeds of Iranian sheep, was studied using (AG)9C and (GA)9C as two inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Blood samples were collected from 210 animals in 6 flocks, 35 heads each, in different parts of Hamedan province.

  5. Analysis of genetic variation in different banana ( Musa species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The banana (Musa acuminata Colla) is considered as an important crop plant due to its high economic value as good dietary source. Here, we analyze the genetic relationship of four different banana varieties that are cultivated in south India. Random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) fingerprinting of these banana ...

  6. SSR markers reveal genetic variation between improved cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-03

    Dec 3, 2007 ... passport data for various end uses. This may also go a long way to developing a core collection (from the germ- plasm) that is easier to manage and utilize for development of better varieties for genetic improvement program of cassava in Nigeria. Traditional characterization of local varieties in Nigeria.

  7. Variation and Genetic Structure in Platanus mexicana (Platanaceae along Riparian Altitudinal Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce M. Galván-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platanus mexicana is a dominant arboreal species of riparian ecosystems. These ecosystems are associated with altitudinal gradients that can generate genetic differences in the species, especially in the extremes of the distribution. However, studies on the altitudinal effect on genetic variation to riparian species are scarce. In Mexico, the population of P. mexicana along the Colipa River (Veracruz State grows below its reported minimum altitude range, possibly the lowest where this tree grows. This suggests that altitude might be an important factor in population genetics differentiation. We examined the genetic variation and population structuring at four sites with different altitudes (70, 200, 600 and 1700 m a.s.l. using ten inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR markers. The highest value for Shannon index and Nei’s gene diversity was obtained at 1700 m a.s.l. (He = 0.27, Ne = 1.47, I = 0.42 and polymorphism reached the top value at the middle altitude (% p = 88.57. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and STRUCTURE analysis indicated intrapopulation genetic differentiation. The arithmetic average (UPGMA dendrogram identified 70 m a.s.l. as the most genetically distant site. The genetic structuring resulted from limited gene flow and genetic drift. This is the first report of genetic variation in populations of P. mexicana in Mexico. This research highlights its importance as a dominant species, and its ecological and evolutionary implications in altitudinal gradients of riparian ecosystems.

  8. Variation and Genetic Structure in Platanus mexicana (Platanaceae) along Riparian Altitudinal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Hernández, Dulce M.; Lozada-García, J. Armando; Flores-Estévez, Norma; Galindo-González, Jorge; Vázquez-Torres, S. Mario

    2015-01-01

    Platanus mexicana is a dominant arboreal species of riparian ecosystems. These ecosystems are associated with altitudinal gradients that can generate genetic differences in the species, especially in the extremes of the distribution. However, studies on the altitudinal effect on genetic variation to riparian species are scarce. In Mexico, the population of P. mexicana along the Colipa River (Veracruz State) grows below its reported minimum altitude range, possibly the lowest where this tree grows. This suggests that altitude might be an important factor in population genetics differentiation. We examined the genetic variation and population structuring at four sites with different altitudes (70, 200, 600 and 1700 m a.s.l.) using ten inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. The highest value for Shannon index and Nei’s gene diversity was obtained at 1700 m a.s.l. (He = 0.27, Ne = 1.47, I = 0.42) and polymorphism reached the top value at the middle altitude (% p = 88.57). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and STRUCTURE analysis indicated intrapopulation genetic differentiation. The arithmetic average (UPGMA) dendrogram identified 70 m a.s.l. as the most genetically distant site. The genetic structuring resulted from limited gene flow and genetic drift. This is the first report of genetic variation in populations of P. mexicana in Mexico. This research highlights its importance as a dominant species, and its ecological and evolutionary implications in altitudinal gradients of riparian ecosystems. PMID:25607732

  9. Genetic variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT4 receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennings, Katie Ann; Licht, Cecilie Löe; Bruce, Aynsley

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) expression is a key risk factor for psychiatric disorder and has been linked to changes in the expression of certain 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study investigated the effect of variation in 5-HTT expression on 5-HT4 receptor levels in both 5-HTT......). Together, these findings suggest that variation in 5-HTT expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT4 receptor levels which are directly linked to alterations in 5-HT availability....

  10. Pathogenic and genetic variation in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and its fuscans variant, X. axonopodis pv. phaseoli var. fuscans is a widespread disease of dry beans in South Africa. Variation within pathogen populations has been reported and in order to breed for resistance it is important to investigate ...

  11. Genetic variation of inbreeding depression among floral and fitness traits in Silene nutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Jan; Hansen, Thomas Møller; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude and variation of inbreeding depression (ID) within populations is important for the evolution and maintenance of mixed mating systems. We studied ID and its genetic variation in a range of floral and fitness traits in a small and large population of the perennial herb Silene nutans......, using controlled pollinations in a fully factorial North Carolina II design. Floral traits and early fitness traits, that is seed mass and germination rate, were not much affected by inbreeding (delta0.4). Lack of genetic correlations indicated that ID in floral, early and late traits is genetically...... decoupled. There was a trend that the smaller population was less affected by ID than the large one, although the differences were not significant for most traits. Hence, evidence for purging of deleterious alleles remains inconclusive in this study. Genetic variation in ID among paternal families...

  12. Emotional voice processing: investigating the role of genetic variation in the serotonin transporter across development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grossmann

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively respond to emotional information carried in the human voice plays a pivotal role for social interactions. We examined how genetic factors, especially the serotonin transporter genetic variation (5-HTTLPR, affect the neurodynamics of emotional voice processing in infants and adults by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs. The results revealed that infants distinguish between emotions during an early perceptual processing stage, whereas adults recognize and evaluate the meaning of emotions during later semantic processing stages. While infants do discriminate between emotions, only in adults was genetic variation associated with neurophysiological differences in how positive and negative emotions are processed in the brain. This suggests that genetic association with neurocognitive functions emerges during development, emphasizing the role that variation in serotonin plays in the maturation of brain systems involved in emotion recognition.

  13. Representing genetic variation as continuous surfaces: An approach for identifying spatial dependency in landscape genetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie A. Murphy; Jeffrey S. Evans; Samuel A. Cushman; Andrew Storfer

    2008-01-01

    Landscape genetics, an emerging field integrating landscape ecology and population genetics, has great potential to influence our understanding of habitat connectivity and distribution of organisms. Whereas typical population genetics studies summarize gene flow as pairwise measures between sampling localities, landscape characteristics that influence population...

  14. Moderate multiple parentage and low genetic variation reduces the potential for genetic incompatibility avoidance despite high risk of inbreeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuni, Cristina; Goodacre, Sara; Bechsgaard, Jesper; Bilde, Trine

    2012-01-01

    Polyandry is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. In the absence of direct benefits of mating with different males, the underlying basis for polyandry is enigmatic because it can carry considerable costs such as elevated exposure to sexual diseases, physical injury or other direct fitness costs. Such costs may be balanced by indirect genetic benefits to the offspring of polyandrous females. We investigated polyandry and patterns of parentage in the spider Stegodyphus lineatus. This species experiences relatively high levels of inbreeding as a result of its spatial population structure, philopatry and limited male mating dispersal. Polyandry may provide an opportunity for post mating inbreeding avoidance that reduces the risk of genetic incompatibilities arising from incestuous matings. However, multiple mating carries direct fitness costs to females suggesting that genetic benefits must be substantial to counter direct costs. Genetic parentage analyses in two populations from Israel and a Greek island, showed mixed-brood parentage in approximately 50% of the broods. The number of fathers ranged from 1-2 indicating low levels of multiple parentage and there was no evidence for paternity bias in mixed-broods from both populations. Microsatellite loci variation suggested limited genetic variation within populations, especially in the Greek island population. Relatedness estimates among females in the maternal generation and potentially interacting individuals were substantial indicating full-sib and half-sib relationships. Three lines of evidence indicate limited potential to obtain substantial genetic benefits in the form of reduced inbreeding. The relatively low frequency of multiple parentage together with low genetic variation among potential mates and the elevated risk of mating among related individuals as corroborated by our genetic data suggest that there are limited actual outbreeding opportunities for polyandrous females. Polyandry in S. lineatus is

  15. Moderate multiple parentage and low genetic variation reduces the potential for genetic incompatibility avoidance despite high risk of inbreeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Tuni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyandry is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. In the absence of direct benefits of mating with different males, the underlying basis for polyandry is enigmatic because it can carry considerable costs such as elevated exposure to sexual diseases, physical injury or other direct fitness costs. Such costs may be balanced by indirect genetic benefits to the offspring of polyandrous females. We investigated polyandry and patterns of parentage in the spider Stegodyphus lineatus. This species experiences relatively high levels of inbreeding as a result of its spatial population structure, philopatry and limited male mating dispersal. Polyandry may provide an opportunity for post mating inbreeding avoidance that reduces the risk of genetic incompatibilities arising from incestuous matings. However, multiple mating carries direct fitness costs to females suggesting that genetic benefits must be substantial to counter direct costs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic parentage analyses in two populations from Israel and a Greek island, showed mixed-brood parentage in approximately 50% of the broods. The number of fathers ranged from 1-2 indicating low levels of multiple parentage and there was no evidence for paternity bias in mixed-broods from both populations. Microsatellite loci variation suggested limited genetic variation within populations, especially in the Greek island population. Relatedness estimates among females in the maternal generation and potentially interacting individuals were substantial indicating full-sib and half-sib relationships. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Three lines of evidence indicate limited potential to obtain substantial genetic benefits in the form of reduced inbreeding. The relatively low frequency of multiple parentage together with low genetic variation among potential mates and the elevated risk of mating among related individuals as corroborated by our genetic data suggest that there are limited

  16. Genetic variations among Mycoplasma bovis strains isolated from Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Kokotovic, Branko; Ojeniyi, B.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of Mycoplasma bovis strains isolated in Denmark over a 17-year period was investigated. Forty-two field strains isolated from different geographic locations and specimens, including strains from 21 herds involved in two outbreaks of M. bovis-induced mastitis, and the type....... Among the analyzed strains, 18 different AFLP profiles were detected. The similarity between individual fingerprints, calculated by Dice similarity coefficient, ranged from 0.9 to 1.0. Twenty-five strains, including 23 which were isolated during two outbreaks of M. bovis-induced mastitis which occurred...... 2 years apart; showed indistinguishable AFLP patterns. More genetic diversify was observed among the recent strains. The similarity of the genotypes of the field strains to that of the M. bovis type strain (PG45(T)) was 97.7%. The results of this study have demonstrated a remarkable genomic...

  17. Y genetic variation and phenotypic diversity in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Case, Laure K; Teuscher, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic traits arise through the combined effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on sex-biased gene expression, and experimental mouse models have been instrumental in determining their relative contribution in modulating sex differences. A role for the Y chromosome (ChrY) in mediating sex differences outside of development and reproduction has historically been overlooked due to its unusual genetic composition and the predominant testes-specific expression of ChrY-encoded gen...

  18. Genetic parameters for within-litter variation in piglet birth weight and change in within-litter variation during suckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, L H; Rydhmer, L; Løvendahl, P; Grandinson, K

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain whether maternal additive genetic variance exists for within-litter variation in birth weight and for change in within-litter variation in piglet weight during suckling. A further objective was to estimate maternal genetic correlations of these two traits with mortality, birth weight, growth, and number of piglets born alive. Data were obtained from Lövsta research station, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and included 22,521 piglets born in 2,003 litters by 1,074 Swedish Yorkshire sows. No cross fostering was used in the herd. The following seven traits were analysed in a multivariate animal (sow) model: number of piglets born alive, within-litter SD in birth weight, within-litter SD in piglet weight at 3 wk of age, mean weight at birth, mean weight at 3 wk of age, proportion of stillborn piglets, and proportion of dead piglets during suckling. Maternal genetic variance for the change in within-litter SD in piglet weight during suckling was assessed from the estimated additive genetic covariance components by conditioning on within-litter SD in birth weight. Similarly, mean growth of piglets during suckling was assessed from the additive genetic covariance components by conditioning on mean weight at birth. The heritability for within-litter SD in birth weight was 0.08 and 0.06 for within-litter SD in piglet weight at 3 wk. The genetic correlation between these two traits was 0.71. Little maternal genetic variance was found for the change in within-litter SD in piglet weight during suckling, and opportunity for genetic improvement of this trait by selective breeding seems limited. The genetic correlation of within-litter SD in birth weight with proportion of dead piglets during suckling was 0.25 and of within-litter SD in birth weight with mean growth of piglets was -0.31. The maternal genetic variance and heritability found for within-litter SD in birth weight indicates that genetic improvement of this

  19. Is there genetic variation in mycorrhization of Medicago truncatula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Dorothée; Yadav, Heena; Zander, Sindy; Hause, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Differences in the plant's response among ecotypes or accessions are often used to identify molecular markers for the respective process. In order to analyze genetic diversity of Medicago truncatula in respect to interaction with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, mycorrhizal colonization was evaluated in 32 lines of the nested core collection representing the genetic diversity of the SARDI collection. All studied lines and the reference line Jemalong A17 were inoculated with R. irregularis and the mycorrhization rate was determined at three time points after inoculation. There were, however, no reliable and consistent differences in mycorrhization rates among all lines. To circumvent possible overlay of potential differences by use of the highly effective inoculum, native sandy soil was used in an independent experiment. Here, significant differences in mycorrhization rates among few of the lines were detectable, but the overall high variability in the mycorrhization rate hindered clear conclusions. To narrow down the number of lines to be tested in more detail, root system architecture (RSA) of in vitro-grown seedlings of all lines under two different phosphate (Pi) supply condition was determined in terms of primary root length and number of lateral roots. Under high Pi supply (100 µM), only minor differences were observed, whereas in response to Pi-limitation (3 µM) several lines exhibited a drastically changed number of lateral roots. Five lines showing the highest alterations or deviations in RSA were selected and inoculated with R. irregularis using two different Pi-fertilization regimes with either 13 mM or 3 mM Pi. Mycorrhization rate of these lines was checked in detail by molecular markers, such as transcript levels of RiTubulin and MtPT4. Under high phosphate supply, the ecotypes L000368 and L000555 exhibited slightly increased fungal colonization and more functional arbuscules, respectively. To address the question

  20. Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Baud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of the social environment on health and disease is challenging. As social effects are in part determined by the genetic makeup of social partners, they can be studied from associations between genotypes of one individual and phenotype of another (social genetic effects, SGE, also called indirect genetic effects. For the first time we quantified the contribution of SGE to more than 100 organismal phenotypes and genome-wide gene expression measured in laboratory mice. We find that genetic variation in cage mates (i.e. SGE contributes to variation in organismal and molecular measures related to anxiety, wound healing, immune function, and body weight. Social genetic effects explained up to 29% of phenotypic variance, and for several traits their contribution exceeded that of direct genetic effects (effects of an individual's genotypes on its own phenotype. Importantly, we show that ignoring SGE can severely bias estimates of direct genetic effects (heritability. Thus SGE may be an important source of "missing heritability" in studies of complex traits in human populations. In summary, our study uncovers an important contribution of the social environment to phenotypic variation, sets the basis for using SGE to dissect social effects, and identifies an opportunity to improve studies of direct genetic effects.

  1. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of artificial insemination in cattle breeding Worldwide leads to reduced effective population sizes and increased inbreeding levels. Increased inbreeding result in increased probalility of expression of recessive defective alleles, which probably is reflected in a decline...... in fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...

  2. Genetic architecture of natural variation in cuticular hydrocarbon composition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Böröczky, Katalin; Huang, Wen; Schal, Coby; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-14

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) prevent desiccation and serve as chemical signals that mediate social interactions. Drosophila melanogaster CHCs have been studied extensively, but the genetic basis for individual variation in CHC composition is largely unknown. We quantified variation in CHC profiles in the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and identified novel CHCs. We used principal component (PC) analysis to extract PCs that explain the majority of CHC variation and identified polymorphisms in or near 305 and 173 genes in females and males, respectively, associated with variation in these PCs. In addition, 17 DGRP lines contain the functional Desat2 allele characteristic of African and Caribbean D. melanogaster females (more 5,9-C27:2 and less 7,11-C27:2, female sex pheromone isomers). Disruption of expression of 24 candidate genes affected CHC composition in at least one sex. These genes are associated with fatty acid metabolism and represent mechanistic targets for individual variation in CHC composition.

  3. Genetic variation in mitochondrial DNA among Enterobius vermicularis in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mario Rodrıguez; Röser, Dennis; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Olsen, Annette; Nejsum, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most prevalent nematode infections of man in Western Europe and North America, our knowledge of the genetic variability in Enterobius vermicularis is fragmented. We here report on a genetic study of pinworms in Denmark, performed using the cytochrome oxidase I (cox1) gene, with DNA extracted from individual eggs collected from clinical (human) samples. We collected cellophane-tape-test samples positive for pinworm eggs from 14 Departments of Clinical Microbiology in Denmark and surface-sterilized the eggs using a 1% hypochlorite solution before performing conventional PCR. Twenty-two haplotypes were identified from a total of 58 Danish patients. Cluster analysis showed that all Danish worms grouped together with human samples from Germany and Greece and with samples from Japanese chimpanzees designated as 'type B'. Analysis of molecular variance showed no significant difference or trends in geographical distribution of the pinworms in Denmark, and several haplotypes were identical or closely related to samples collected in Germany, Greece and Japan. However, worms from the 4 countries were found to belong to different populations, with Fst values in the range of 0·16 to 0·47. This study shows pinworms in Denmark to be a homogenous population, when analysed using the cox1 mitochondrial gene.

  4. Genetic variation for seed protein and amino acid composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'objectif du présent travail était donc d'étudier la variation génétique de certains parents de sorgho et leurs hybrides F1, les effets de l'Aptitude Générale à la Combinaison et de l'Aptitude Spécifique à la Combinaison. L'expérimentation arrangée d'un dispositif en blocs complets randomisés et utilisant quatre variétés de ...

  5. Impact of restricted marital practices on genetic variation in an endogamous Gujarati group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Trevor J; Li, Fang-Yuan; Hanson, Erin K; Mehta, Niyati U; Choi, Sunju; Ballantyne, Jack; Belmont, John W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Patel, Pragna I

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have examined the influence on patterns of human genetic variation of a variety of cultural practices. In India, centuries-old marriage customs have introduced extensive social structuring into the contemporary population, potentially with significant consequences for genetic variation. Social stratification in India is evident as social classes that are defined by endogamous groups known as castes. Within a caste, there exist endogamous groups known as gols (marriage circles), each of which comprises a small number of exogamous gotra (lineages). Thus, while consanguinity is strictly avoided and some randomness in mate selection occurs within the gol, gene flow is limited with groups outside the gol. Gujarati Patels practice this form of "exogamic endogamy." We have analyzed genetic variation in one such group of Gujarati Patels, the Chha Gaam Patels (CGP), who comprise individuals from six villages. Population structure analysis of 1,200 autosomal loci offers support for the existence of distinctive multilocus genotypes in the CGP with respect to both non-Gujaratis and other Gujaratis, and indicates that CGP individuals are genetically very similar. Analysis of Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial haplotypes provides support for both patrilocal and patrilineal practices within the gol, and a low-level of female gene flow into the gol. Our study illustrates how the practice of gol endogamy has introduced fine-scale genetic structure into the population of India, and contributes more generally to an understanding of the way in which marriage practices affect patterns of genetic variation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. HPA axis in major depression: cortisol, clinical symptomatology and genetic variation predict cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J; Gomez, R; Williams, G; Lembke, A; Lazzeroni, L; Murphy, G M; Schatzberg, A F

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of mood and cognitive disorders. Neuroendocrine studies have demonstrated HPA axis overactivity in major depression, a relationship of HPA axis activity to cognitive performance and a potential role of HPA axis genetic variation in cognition. The present study investigated the simultaneous roles HPA axis activity, clinical symptomatology and HPA genetic variation play in cognitive performance. Patients with major depression with psychotic major depression (PMD) and with nonpsychotic major depression (NPMD) and healthy controls (HC) were studied. All participants underwent a diagnostic interview and psychiatric ratings, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, overnight hourly blood sampling for cortisol and genetic assessment. Cognitive performance differed as a function of depression subtype. Across all subjects, cognitive performance was negatively correlated with higher cortisol, and PMD patients had higher cortisol than did NPMDs and HCs. Cortisol, clinical symptoms and variation in genes, NR3C1 (glucocorticoid receptor; GR) and NR3C2 (mineralocorticoid receptor; MR) that encode for GRs and MRs, predicted cognitive performance. Beyond the effects of cortisol, demographics and clinical symptoms, NR3C1 variation predicted attention and working memory, whereas NR3C2 polymorphisms predicted memory performance. These findings parallel the distribution of GR and MR in primate brain and their putative roles in specific cognitive tasks. HPA axis genetic variation and activity were important predictors of cognition across the entire sample of depressed subjects and HR. GR and MR genetic variation predicted unique cognitive functions, beyond the influence of cortisol and clinical symptoms. GR genetic variation was implicated in attention and working memory, whereas MR was implicated in verbal memory.

  7. Allozyme and RAPD Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Geographic Variation in Wild Populations of the American Chestnut (Fagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongwen Huang; Fenny Dane; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    1998-01-01

    Genetic variation among 12 populations of the American chestnut (Custanea dentata) was investigated. Population genetic parameters estimated from allozyme variation suggest that C. dentata at both the population and species level has narrow genetic diversity as compared to other species in the genus. Average expected heterozygosity...

  8. Compatibility of breeding for increased wood production and longterm sustainability: the genetic variation of seed orchard seed and associated risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Johnson; S. Lipow

    2002-01-01

    Because breeding imposes strong artificial selection for a narrow suite of economically important traits, genetic variation is reduced in seedlings derived from operational seed orchards. Both quantitative genetics theory and studies of allozyme variation show that seed orchards contain most of the genetic diversity found in natural populations, although low-frequency...

  9. Age-Specific Variation in Immune Response in Drosophila melanogaster Has a Genetic Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Tashauna M.; Hughes, Kimberly A.; Stone, Eric A.; Drnevich, Jenny M.; Leips, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Immunosenescence, the age-related decline in immune system function, is a general hallmark of aging. While much is known about the cellular and physiological changes that accompany immunosenescence, we know little about the genetic influences on this phenomenon. In this study we combined age-specific measurements of bacterial clearance ability following infection with whole-genome measurements of the transcriptional response to infection and wounding to identify genes that contribute to the natural variation in immunosenescence, using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Twenty inbred lines derived from nature were measured for their ability to clear an Escherichia coli infection at 1 and 4 weeks of age. We used microarrays to simultaneously determine genome-wide expression profiles in infected and wounded flies at each age for 12 of these lines. Lines exhibited significant genetically based variation in bacterial clearance at both ages; however, the genetic basis of this variation changed dramatically with age. Variation in gene expression was significantly correlated with bacterial clearance ability only in the older age group. At 4 weeks of age variation in the expression of 247 genes following infection was associated with genetic variation in bacterial clearance. Functional annotation analyses implicate genes involved in energy metabolism including those in the insulin signaling/TOR pathway as having significant associations with bacterial clearance in older individuals. Given the evolutionary conservation of the genes involved in energy metabolism, our results could have important implications for understanding immunosenescence in other organisms, including humans. PMID:22554890

  10. Genetic variations of gpx-4 and male infertility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Matilde; Bosello, Valentina; Ursini, Fulvio; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea; Scapin, Margherita; Sztajer, Helena; Flohe, Leopold

    2003-04-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx), the product of gpx-4, is the major selenoprotein in sperm and is considered essential for fertilization because of its multiple roles in spermatogenesis, such as hydroperoxide detoxification, formation of the mitochondrial capsule, and chromatin condensation. Genomic DNA sequences of 3.148 kilobases covering the whole gpx-4 and its flanking regions were amplified from 63 men using the polymerase chain reaction and were analyzed for polymorphisms by direct sequencing. A total of 23 variant sites were detected; 2 were present only in control men (proven fathers; n = 21) and 10 were common to fertile controls and infertile patients (n = 42). A further 11 variant sites were seen in five of the infertile men only. Four of the gpx-4 variants were considered irrelevant to GPx-4-related fertility problems because they occurred homozygously in controls. The majority of the remaining variant sites are also of questionable relevance because they are located in introns or, as third base exchanges, do not affect the protein sequence. However, one of the exon variations leads to an Ala93-Thr exchange that reduces activity in a porcine GPx-4 homologue. Two detected promoter variations were shown by reporter gene constructs to affect transcription in somatic cell lines. These results indicate that gpx-4 polymorphism cannot generally account for the correlation of PHGPx content of sperm and fertility-related parameters, but further examination of this gene as a potential cause of infertility in particular cases is warranted.

  11. Genetic and epigenetic variation in Spartina alterniflora following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Marta; Schrey, Aaron; Shayter, Ashley; Moss, Christina J; Richards, Christina

    2017-09-01

    Catastrophic events offer unique opportunities to study rapid population response to stress in natural settings. In concert with genetic variation, epigenetic mechanisms may allow populations to persist through severe environmental challenges. In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill devastated large portions of the coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. However, the foundational salt marsh grass, Spartina alterniflora, showed high resilience to this strong environmental disturbance. Following the spill, we simultaneously examined the genetic and epigenetic structure of recovering populations of S. alterniflora to oil exposure. We quantified genetic and DNA methylation variation using amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation sensitive fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP) to test the hypothesis that response to oil exposure in S. alterniflora resulted in genetically and epigenetically based population differentiation. We found high genetic and epigenetic variation within and among sites and found significant genetic differentiation between contaminated and uncontaminated sites, which may reflect nonrandom mortality in response to oil exposure. Additionally, despite a lack of genomewide patterns in DNA methylation between contaminated and uncontaminated sites, we found five MS-AFLP loci (12% of polymorphic MS-AFLP loci) that were correlated with oil exposure. Overall, our findings support genetically based differentiation correlated with exposure to the oil spill in this system, but also suggest a potential role for epigenetic mechanisms in population differentiation.

  12. Range-wide population genetics and variation in morph ratio in style-dimorphic Narcissus papyraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Porcar, Violeta I; Picó, F Xavier; Arroyo, Juan

    2015-03-01

    • Theoretical models state that natural selection and mating patterns account for floral morph ratio in style-polymorphic plants. However, the demographic history of populations can also influence variation in morph ratios. If so, we hypothesize an association between the morph ratios and the genetic structure across populations.• We used nuclear microsatellites to assess genetic variation and structure in populations of Narcissus papyraceus, a style-dimorphic plant whose floral morph ratios (L-morph to S-morph) gradually vary throughout its distribution range in the southwestern Mediterranean Basin. We implemented analyses to relate the genetic features of populations with their morph ratios.• We found greater frequencies of the S-morph in central populations and declining frequencies toward the periphery. This geographic pattern was not associated with the genetic structure of populations. Instead, we found two distinct genetic groups, mainly separated by the Strait of Gibraltar, with a mixture of morph ratios within each one. Overall, there was a weak genetic structure. Genetic diversity was greater in central and southern dimorphic populations than in northern L-monomorphic populations.• Altogether, our results do not support the hypothesis that the demographic history of populations can account for the observed geographical pattern of morph ratios in N. papyraceus. We suggest that adaptive processes shown in previous studies in the species are the main determinant of the existing variation in the morph composition of populations. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  13. Genetic diversity is related to climatic variation and vulnerability in threatened bull trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ryan; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Wade, Alisa A.; Hand, Brian K.; Whited, Diane C.; DeHaan, Patrick W.; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how climatic variation influences ecological and evolutionary processes is crucial for informed conservation decision-making. Nevertheless, few studies have measured how climatic variation influences genetic diversity within populations or how genetic diversity is distributed across space relative to future climatic stress. Here, we tested whether patterns of genetic diversity (allelic richness) were related to climatic variation and habitat features in 130 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations from 24 watersheds (i.e., ~4–7th order river subbasins) across the Columbia River Basin, USA. We then determined whether bull trout genetic diversity was related to climate vulnerability at the watershed scale, which we quantified on the basis of exposure to future climatic conditions (projected scenarios for the 2040s) and existing habitat complexity. We found a strong gradient in genetic diversity in bull trout populations across the Columbia River Basin, where populations located in the most upstream headwater areas had the greatest genetic diversity. After accounting for spatial patterns with linear mixed models, allelic richness in bull trout populations was positively related to habitat patch size and complexity, and negatively related to maximum summer temperature and the frequency of winter flooding. These relationships strongly suggest that climatic variation influences evolutionary processes in this threatened species and that genetic diversity will likely decrease due to future climate change. Vulnerability at a watershed scale was negatively correlated with average genetic diversity (r = −0.77;P bull trout and other imperiled species. Genetic diversity is already depressed where climatic vulnerability is highest; it will likely erode further in the very places where diversity may be most needed for future persistence.

  14. Phenotypic and genetic variation in longevity of Polish Landrace sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyńska, M; Blicharski, T

    2015-08-01

    The influence of some production traits on the longevity of Polish Landrace sows was evaluated using survival analysis. Estimates of genetic parameters were obtained from the sire and animal components in linear and survival methodologies. Comparison between survival and linear models was based on heritabilities and ranking of estimated breeding values of sires. The same data set, 13,031 sows, was used for both methodologies, even in the presence of censored observations. The effects of herd*year and year*season of the first farrowing had the largest influence on the risk of culling of sows. Sows born in spring season (March-May) had a 24% (p methodology. A stronger correlations within methodologies (0.83-0.99) than within models with different methodologies (0.51-0.63) were obtained. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  16. Temporal genetic variation as revealed by a microsatellite analysis of European sardine ( Sardina pilchardus) archived samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Splendiani, Andrea; Bonanomi, Sara

    2012-01-01

    ) that explain the genetic diversity variation, while the same parameters turned out to be more stable in the southern samples. In addition, we detected the presence of a genetic bottleneck and low effective population size ( Ne) values in several northern samples. Even if the northern and southern Adriatic...... of otoliths and scales from sampling locations of northern (Chioggia) and southern (Vieste) Adriatic Sea, with the aim to investigate the genetic effects of these stock biomass fluctuations. The northern samples showed significant reduction in observed heterozygosity ( HO) and mean number of alleles ( Na...... sardine samples belong to the same genetic stock, the more pronounced decrease in genetic variability recorded in the northern sample led us to speculate that a more intensive fishing pressure and a more pronounced oceanographic isolation of this area could have accentuated the effects of the genetic...

  17. Field testing and exploitation of genetically modified cassava with low-amylose or amylose-free starch in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehorst-van Putten, H J J; Sudarmonowati, E; Herman, M; Pereira-Bertram, I J; Wolters, A M A; Meima, H; de Vetten, N; Raemakers, C J J M; Visser, R G F

    2012-02-01

    The development and testing in the field of genetically modified -so called- orphan crops like cassava in tropical countries is still in its infancy, despite the fact that cassava is not only used for food and feed but is also an important industrial crop. As traditional breeding of cassava is difficult (allodiploid, vegetatively propagated, outbreeding species) it is an ideal crop for improvement through genetic modification. We here report on the results of production and field testing of genetically modified low-amylose transformants of commercial cassava variety Adira4 in Indonesia. Twenty four transformants were produced and selected in the Netherlands based on phenotypic and molecular analyses. Nodal cuttings of these plants were sent to Indonesia where they were grown under biosafety conditions. After two screenhouse tests 15 transformants remained for a field trial. The tuberous root yield of 10 transformants was not significantly different from the control. Starch from transformants in which amylose was very low or absent showed all physical and rheological properties as expected from amylose-free cassava starch. The improved functionality of the starch was shown for an adipate acetate starch which was made into a tomato sauce. This is the first account of a field trial with transgenic cassava which shows that by using genetic modification it is possible to obtain low-amylose cassava plants with commercial potential with good root yield and starch quality.

  18. Field testing and exploitation of genetically modified cassava with low-amylose or amylose-free starch in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehorst-van Putten, H.J.J.; Sudarmonowati, E.; Herman, M.; Pereira-Bertram, I.J.; Wolters, A.M.A.; Meima, H.; Vetten, de N.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2012-01-01

    The development and testing in the field of genetically modified -so called- orphan crops like cassava in tropical countries is still in its infancy, despite the fact that cassava is not only used for food and feed but is also an important industrial crop. As traditional breeding of cassava is

  19. Genetic Variation in the Free-Living Amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélandakis, Michel; De Jonckheere, Johan F.; Pernin, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    In this study, 30 strains of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri were investigated by using the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. The present study confirmed our previous finding that RAPD variation is not correlated with geographical origin. In particular, Mexican strains belong to the variant previously detected in Asia, Europe, and the United States. In France, surprisingly, strains from Cattenom gave RAPD patterns identical to those of the Japanese strains. In addition, all of these strains, together with an additional French strain from Chooz, exhibited similarities to South Pacific strains. The results also confirmed the presence of numerous variants in Europe, whereas only two variants were detected in the United States. The two variants found in the United States were different from the South Pacific variants. These findings do not support the previous hypothesis concerning the origin and modes of dispersal of N. fowleri. PMID:9687460

  20. Genetic variation and population genetic structure of Rhizophora apiculata (Rhizophoraceae) in the Greater Sunda Islands, Indonesia using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Andi Fadly; Hyun, Jung Oh; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Yong Yul; Lee, Kyung Mi; Hong, Kyung Nak; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Genetic variations within and among Rhizophora apiculata populations in the Greater Sunda Islands of Indonesia were studied using microsatellite markers. The study found 38 alleles on five loci in 15 populations. The observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) heterozygosity values are 0.338 and 0.378, respectively. Inbreeding effect from self-pollination might explain its heterozygote deficiency. Population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.381) was similar to other mangrove species. The genetic diversity of R. apiculata populations along the coastline inside the archipelago (e.g., Buleleng, Donggala, Mamuju, and Takalar) was higher than those of population along the coastline outside the archipelago, especially northern Sumatra populations (i.e., Langkat, Tapanuli Tengah, Dumai, and Padang). The isolation by distances and sea currents directions as well as their connectivity might affect the gene flow and genetic exchange. The more isolated with fewer connections by sea currents, the smaller gene flow and genetic exchange observed between populations. The higher genetic exchange, on the contrary, occurred when population location was closer to the meeting point of the sea currents. The study also showed that the patterns of sea current movement seemed to have influence genetic clustering of populations which fell into three main groups (Sunda Shelf Mangroves) and one isolated population (New Guinea Mangroves).

  1. Human genetic variation influences vitamin C homeostasis by altering vitamin C transport and antioxidant enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Alexander J; Hagen, Tory M; Frei, Balz

    2013-01-01

    New evidence for the regulation of vitamin C homeostasis has emerged from several studies of human genetic variation. Polymorphisms in the genes encoding sodium-dependent vitamin C transport proteins are strongly associated with plasma ascorbate levels and likely impact tissue cellular vitamin C status. Furthermore, genetic variants of proteins that suppress oxidative stress or detoxify oxidatively damaged biomolecules, i.e., haptoglobin, glutathione-S-transferases, and possibly manganese superoxide dismutase, affect ascorbate levels in the human body. There also is limited evidence for a role of glucose transport proteins. In this review, we examine the extent of the variation in these genes, their impact on vitamin C status, and their potential role in altering chronic disease risk. We conclude that future epidemiological studies should take into account genetic variation in order to successfully determine the role of vitamin C nutriture or supplementation in human vitamin C status and chronic disease risk.

  2. Genetic variation in V gene of class II Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huafang; Chen, Shengli; Liu, Peng; Ren, Shanhui; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Xinglong; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic variation and molecular evolution of the V gene of the class II Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates with genotypes I-XVIII were determined using bioinformatics. Results indicated that low homology existed in different genotype viruses, whereas high homology often for the same genotypes, exception may be existed within genotypes I, V, VI, and XII. Sequence analysis showed that the genetic variation of V protein was consistent with virus genotype, and specific signatures on the V protein for nine genotypes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the phylogenetic trees were highly consistent between the V and F genes, with slight discrepancies in the sub-genotypes. Evolutionary rate analyses based on V and F genes revealed the evolution rates varied in genotypes. These data indicate that the genetic variation of V protein is genotype-related and will help in elucidating the molecular evolution of NDV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A multivariate analysis of genetic variation in the advertisement call of the gray treefrog, Hyla versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Allison M; Smith, Michael J; Gerhardt, H Carl

    2014-06-01

    Genetic variation in sexual displays is crucial for an evolutionary response to sexual selection, but can be eroded by strong selection. Identifying the magnitude and sources of additive genetic variance underlying sexually selected traits is thus an important issue in evolutionary biology. We conducted a quantitative genetics experiment with gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) to investigate genetic variances and covariances among features of the male advertisement call. Two energetically expensive traits showed significant genetic variation: call duration, expressed as number of pulses per call, and call rate, represented by its inverse, call period. These two properties also showed significant genetic covariance, consistent with an energetic constraint to call production. Combining the genetic variance-covariance matrix with previous estimates of directional sexual selection imposed by female preferences predicts a limited increase in call duration but no change in call rate despite significant selection on both traits. In addition to constraints imposed by the genetic covariance structure, an evolutionary response to sexual selection may also be limited by high energetic costs of long-duration calls and by preferences that act most strongly against very short-duration calls. Meanwhile, the persistence of these preferences could be explained by costs of mating with males with especially unattractive calls. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Genetic variation for clonal propagation and trait association with field performance in sainfoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayareh Irani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonal plant materials with identical genotypes may be used to precisely detect environmental effects and genotype x environment interactions resulting in a more accurate estimate of genetic parameters in plant genetic analysis. In sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, knowledge on genetic variation for clonal propagation and its association with field performance is limited. Eleven natural ecotypes of sainfoin from wide geographical areas of Iran were used to evaluate genetic variation for clonal propagation and its association with related traits. From each ecotype 11‒21 genotypes were cloned via cuttings. Then, clones of a hundred genotypes from 10 ecotypes were transplanted to the field. High genetic variation was found between ecotypes of sainfoin for producing viable clones. The mean values for viable clones varied from 50% (Borujen ecotype to 97% (Najafabad ecotype. The values of within-ecotype coefficient of variation were higher than the genetic coefficient of variation. The highest heritability estimates were obtained for sensitivity to powdery mildew, plant height and number of stems per plant. Dry matter yield (DMY in the field was significantly and positively correlated with plant height and number of stems per plant, inflorescence length and growth score. An association between DMY and percent of viable clones was found indicating the possibility of selection during the early stages of clonal propagation. According to principal component analysis, Baft and Fereydunshahr ecotypes have potential for improving production of sainfoin if introduced into breeding programs. These issues warrant further study.Keywords: Clone viability, genetic variability, Onobrychis viciifolia, phenotypic  correlation, principal component analysis.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(438-46

  5. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation using the microattribution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardine, Belinda; Borg, Joseph; Higgs, Douglas R.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Maglott, Donna; Basak, A. Nazli; Clark, Barnaby; Faustino, Paula; Felice, Alex E.; Francina, Alain; Gallivan, Monica V. E.; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Gibbons, Richard J.; Giordano, Piero C.; Harteveld, Cornelis L.; Joly, Philippe; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Kollia, Panagoula; Menzel, Stephan; Miller, Webb; Moradkhani, Kamran; Old, John; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Papadakis, Manoussos N.; Papadopoulos, Petros; Pavlovic, Sonja; Philipsen, Sjaak; Radmilovic, Milena; Riemer, Cathy; Schrijver, Iris; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Thein, Swee Lay; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan; Tully, Ray; Wada, Takahito; Waye, John; Wiemann, Claudia; Zukic, Branka; Chui, David H. K.; Wajcman, Henri; Hardison, Ross C.; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to these disorders, and then implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public repositories 1. A total of 1,941 unique genetic variants in 37 genes, encoding globins (HBA2, HBA1, HBG2, HBG1, HBD, HBB) and other erythroid proteins (ALOX5AP, AQP9, ARG2, ASS1, ATRX, BCL11A, CNTNAP2, CSNK2A1, EPAS1, ERCC2, FLT1, GATA1, GPM6B, HAO2, HBS1L, KDR, KL, KLF1, MAP2K1, MAP3K5, MAP3K7, MYB, NOS1, NOS2, NOS3, NOX3, NUP133, PDE7B, SMAD3, SMAD6, and TOX) are currently documented in these databases with reciprocal attribution of microcitations to data contributors. Our project provides the first example of implementing microattribution to incentivise submission of all known genetic variation in a defined system. It has demonstrably increased the reporting of human variants and now provides a comprehensive online resource for systematically describing human genetic variation in the globin genes and other genes contributing to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias. The large repository of previously reported data, together with more recent data, acquired by microattribution, demonstrates how the comprehensive documentation of human variation will provide key insights into normal biological processes and how these are perturbed in human genetic disease. Using the microattribution process set out here, datasets which took decades to accumulate for the globin genes could be assembled rapidly for other genes and disease systems. The principles established here for the globin gene system will serve as a model for other systems and the analysis of other common and/or complex human genetic diseases. PMID:21423179

  6. Genetic variation analysis of the Bali street dog using microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Alan N

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 800,000 primarily feral dogs live on the small island of Bali. To analyze the genetic diversity in this population, forty samples were collected at random from dogs in the Denpasar, Bali region and tested using 31 polymorphic microsatellites. Australian dingoes and 28 American Kennel Club breeds were compared to the Bali Street Dog (BSD for allelic diversity, heterozygosities, F-statistics, GST estimates, Nei's DA distance and phylogenetic relationships. Results The BSD proved to be the most heterogeneous, exhibiting 239 of the 366 total alleles observed across all groups and breeds and had an observed heterozygosity of 0.692. Thirteen private alleles were observed in the BSD with an additional three alleles observed only in the BSD and the Australian dingo. The BSD was related most closely to the Chow Chow with a FST of 0.088 and also with high bootstrap support to the Australian dingo and Akita in the phylogenetic analysis. Conclusions This preliminary study into the diversity and relationship of the BSD to other domestic and feral dog populations shows the BSD to be highly heterogeneous and related to populations of East Asian origin. These results indicate that a viable and diverse population of dogs existed on the island of Bali prior to its geographic isolation approximately 12,000 years ago and has been little influenced by domesticated European dogs since that time.

  7. Forward Genetics by Sequencing EMS Variation-Induced Inbred Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Addo-Quaye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to leverage novel sequencing techniques for cloning genes in eukaryotic organisms with complex genomes, the false positive rate of variant discovery must be controlled for by experimental design and informatics. We sequenced five lines from three pedigrees of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-mutagenized Sorghum bicolor, including a pedigree segregating a recessive dwarf mutant. Comparing the sequences of the lines, we were able to identify and eliminate error-prone positions. One genomic region contained EMS mutant alleles in dwarfs that were homozygous reference sequences in wild-type siblings and heterozygous in segregating families. This region contained a single nonsynonymous change that cosegregated with dwarfism in a validation population and caused a premature stop codon in the Sorghum ortholog encoding the gibberellic acid (GA biosynthetic enzyme ent-kaurene oxidase. Application of exogenous GA rescued the mutant phenotype. Our method for mapping did not require outcrossing and introduced no segregation variance. This enables work when line crossing is complicated by life history, permitting gene discovery outside of genetic models. This inverts the historical approach of first using recombination to define a locus and then sequencing genes. Our formally identical approach first sequences all the genes and then seeks cosegregation with the trait. Mutagenized lines lacking obvious phenotypic alterations are available for an extension of this approach: mapping with a known marker set in a line that is phenotypically identical to starting material for EMS mutant generation.

  8. Perspectives on Human Genetic Variation from the HapMap Project

    OpenAIRE

    Gil McVean; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Raphaelle Chaix

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT The completion of the International HapMap Project marks the start of a new phase in human genetics. The aim of the project was to provide a resource that facilitates the design of efficient genome-wide association studies, through characterising patterns of genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 270 individuals across four geographical populations. In total, over one million SNPs have been typed across these genomes, providing an unprecedented view of human gene...

  9. GENETIC VARIATION IN TASTE PERCEPTION AND ITS ROLE IN FOOD LIKING AND HEALTH STATUS

    OpenAIRE

    Robino, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    2012/2013 Taste has been described as the body's “nutritional gatekeeper”, affecting the identification of nutrients and toxins and guiding food choices. Genetic variation in taste receptor genes can influence perception of sweet, umami and bitter tastes, whereas less is known about the genetics of sour and salty taste. Differences in taste perception, influencing food selection and dietary behavior, have also shown important long-term health implications, especially for food-related disea...

  10. Evaluating the Genetic, Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy Number Variation in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0579 TITLE: Evaluating the Genetic , Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy Number Variation in...Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluating the Genetic , Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy...progress in subaim 1a, substantially improving the design of our proposed transgenic animal , the “deletion reporter mouse”, and are finalizing cloning

  11. Redefining Exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwala, Rina

    2016-01-01

    -employed workers are organizing as workers. They are fighting labor exploitation by redefining the concept to include additional exploitation axes (from the state and middle class) and forms (including sexual). In doing so, they are redefining potential solutions, including identities and material benefits, to fit...... their unique needs. By expanding the category of “workers” beyond those defined by a narrow focus on a standard employer-employee relationship, these movements are also fighting exclusion from earlier labor protections by increasing the number of entitled beneficiaries. These struggles provide an important...

  12. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Trevon L.; Thomassen, Henri A.; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M.; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E. Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M.; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J.; Pollinger, John P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H.; Wayne, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible. PMID:23595273

  13. Genetic factors account for most of the variation in serum tryptase—a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; van der Sluis, Sophie; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mast cells are involved in a number of diseases, including inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Tryptase is a known marker of mast cell burden and activity. However, little is known about the genetic influence on serum tryptase variation. Also, only few and conflicting data exist...... on serum tryptase in asthma. Objective: To estimate the overall contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in serum tryptase and to examine the correlation between serum tryptase and asthma, rhinitis, markers of allergy, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR...

  14. MetaRanker 2.0: a web server for prioritization of genetic variation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pers, Tune H; Dworzyński, Piotr; Thomas, Cecilia Engel; Lage, Kasper; Brunak, Søren

    2013-07-01

    MetaRanker 2.0 is a web server for prioritization of common and rare frequency genetic variation data. Based on heterogeneous data sets including genetic association data, protein-protein interactions, large-scale text-mining data, copy number variation data and gene expression experiments, MetaRanker 2.0 prioritizes the protein-coding part of the human genome to shortlist candidate genes for targeted follow-up studies. MetaRanker 2.0 is made freely available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaRanker-2.0.

  15. MetaRanker 2.0: a web server for prioritization of genetic variation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune Hannes; Dworzynski, Piotr; Thomas, Cecilia Engel

    2013-01-01

    MetaRanker 2.0 is a web server for prioritization of common and rare frequency genetic variation data. Based on heterogeneous data sets including genetic association data, protein–protein interactions, large-scale text-mining data, copy number variation data and gene expression experiments, MetaR......Ranker 2.0 prioritizes the protein-coding part of the human genome to shortlist candidate genes for targeted follow-up studies. MetaRanker 2.0 is made freely available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaRanker-2.0....

  16. THE GENETIC VARIATIONS OF INDIGENOUS BALINESE (BALI MULA COMMUNITY AT SEMBIRAN VILLAGE USING MICROSATELITE DNA MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Çri Dwitiari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the genetic variations of the indigenous Balinese (Bali Mula population in Sembiran village utilizing four DNA microsatellite: D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818 and D13S317. Amplified DNA analyzed with PCR SuperMix Kit, Invitrogen. Total alleles found in Bali Mula population at Sembiran village were 19 alleles. Genetic variations were determined using heterozygosity formulae, and the mean of heterozygosity of the four loci was 0,6145. Keywords: DNA Amplified, DNA microsatellite, heterozygosity.

  17. No loss of genetic diversity in the exploited and recently collapsed population of Bay of Biscay anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus, L.)

    KAUST Repository

    Montes, Iratxe

    2016-04-11

    The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, in the Bay of Biscay suffered a collapse in census population size (Nc) starting in 2002, from which it did not recover until 2010. The slow recovery raised concern over sustainability, potential reduction in adaptive potential, and vulnerability to local extirpation. Long- and short-term effective population size (Ne), Ne/Nc ratio, and other genetic parameters were estimated to evaluate demographic signals of population decline. A total of 349 neutral single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened in 330 anchovy individuals from the Bay of Biscay distributed across a 20-year period. We show that Nc fluctuations have not significantly affected short-term Ne, and therefore, genetic diversity has remained stable throughout the recent collapse. This study illustrates that Ne estimates should be incorporated into management plans. Our results on short-term Ne suggested that the anchovy in the Bay of Biscay has not faced any recent severe threat of losing evolutionary potential due to genetic drift. However, differences between short- and long-term Ne estimates suggested that the Bay of Biscay anchovy population may be currently much smaller than in the historical past. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Epigenetic/Genetic Mismatch: Using Transdifferentiation as a Potential Cancer Therapy to Exploit the Cell Type Specificity of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Lei, Jennifer L; Chatterjee, Devasis

    2015-01-01

    Every cell type capable of proliferation can be malignantly transformed. However, there appears to be no naturally occurring universal set of genetic mutations capable of converting every cell type to a malignant state. Any specific cell type is generally resistant to transformation by the cancer mutations accumulated by cells of different lineages, presumably due to epigenetic differences. Evidence for this idea derives from experiments in which the developmental fates of cancer cells are altered to reduce malignancy. Reprogramming cancer cells to more primitive developmental states using pluripotency factors (IPS) or somatic nuclear transfer suppresses the malignant phenotype, as does subsequent directed differentiation to mature cells of lineages distinct from the originating cell. Direct transdifferentiation to an alternative cell fate also reduces tumorigenicity. In contrast, after reprogramming, cells induced to redifferentiate toward the original tumor cell type are tumorigenic. In these types of experiments an epigenetic/genetic mismatch often results in suppression of malignancy or cell death. Elucidating the specific transcription and cell signaling network incompatibilities will identify new targets for cancer therapy. Moreover, novel strategies to induce an incompatible transdifferentiated state, in which expression of thousands of genes are altered, will prove useful in controlling malignancies that otherwise easily evolve resistance to single target-based therapeutics. Engineering small molecules, genetic vectors, cytokines, growth factors, targeted extracellular vesicles, and cell fusion will help realize transdifferentiation-based therapeutics for cancer.

  19. Genetic architecture of variation in the lateral line sensory system of threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Abigail R; Mills, Margaret G; Dang, Lam-Ha; Chan, Yingguang Frank; Jones, Felicity C; Brady, Shannon D; Absher, Devin M; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Kingsley, David M; Peichel, Catherine L

    2012-09-01

    Vertebrate sensory systems have evolved remarkable diversity, but little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms. The lateral line sensory system of aquatic vertebrates is a promising model for genetic investigations of sensory evolution because there is extensive variation within and between species, and this variation is easily quantified. In the present study, we compare the lateral line sensory system of threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from an ancestral marine and a derived benthic lake population. We show that lab-raised individuals from these populations display differences in sensory neuromast number, neuromast patterning, and groove morphology. Using genetic linkage mapping, we identify regions of the genome that influence different aspects of lateral line morphology. Distinct loci independently affect neuromast number on different body regions, suggesting that a modular genetic structure underlies the evolution of peripheral receptor number in this sensory system. Pleiotropy and/or tight linkage are also important, as we identify a region on linkage group 21 that affects multiple aspects of lateral line morphology. Finally, we detect epistasis between a locus on linkage group 4 and a locus on linkage group 21; interactions between these loci contribute to variation in neuromast pattern. Our results reveal a complex genetic architecture underlying the evolution of the stickleback lateral line sensory system. This study further uncovers a genetic relationship between sensory morphology and non-neural traits (bony lateral plates), creating an opportunity to investigate morphological constraints on sensory evolution in a vertebrate model system.

  20. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Danafar, Amirhossein; Dianat, Tahere; Farahmand, Ghazaleh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys , MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly , MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L) for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  1. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Danafar, Amirhossein; Dianat, Tahere; Farahmand, Ghazaleh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys , MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly , MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L) for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility. PMID:27695613

  2. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  3. Genetic variation in an endemic salamander, Salamandra atra, using amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riberon, Alexandre; Miaud, Claude; Guyetant, R; Taberlet, P

    2004-06-01

    The pattern of genetic differentiation of the endemic alpine salamander, Salamandra atra, has been studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) from 11 populations throughout the range of the two currently recognized subspecies, atra and aurorae. Five different primer combinations produced 706 bands and were analyzed by constructing a phylogenetic tree using NJ and principal component analysis. Significant genetic variation was revealed by AFLP between and within populations but, our results show a lack of genetic structure. AFLP markers seems to be unsuitable to investigate complex and recent diversification.

  4. Genetic variation of male reproductive success in a laboratory population of Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voordouw Maarten J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For Anopheline mosquitoes, the vectors of human malaria, genetic variation in male reproductive success can have important consequences for any control strategy based on the release of transgenic or sterile males. Methods A quantitative genetics approach was used to test whether there was a genetic component to variation in male reproductive success in a laboratory population of Anopheles gambiae. Swarms of full sibling brothers were mated with a fixed number of females and their reproductive success was measured as (1 proportion of ovipositing females, (2 proportion of ovipositing females that produced larvae, (3 proportion of females that produced larvae, (4 number of eggs laid per female, (5 number of larvae per ovipositing female and (6 number of larvae per female. Results The proportion of ovipositing females (trait 1 and the proportion of ovipositing females that produced larvae (trait 2 differed among full sib families, suggesting a genetic basis of mating success. In contrast, the other measures of male reproductive success showed little variation due to the full sib families, as their variation are probably mostly due to differences among females. While age at emergence and wing length of the males were also heritable, they were not associated with reproductive success. Larger females produced more eggs, but males did not prefer such partners. Conclusion The first study to quantify genetic variation for male reproductive success in A. gambiae found that while the initial stages of male reproduction (i.e. the proportion of ovipositing females and the proportion of ovipositing females that produced larvae had a genetic basis, the overall reproductive success (i.e. the mean number of larvae per female did not.

  5. Engineering of a genetically encodable fluorescent voltage sensor exploiting fast Ci-VSP voltage-sensing movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Mutoh, Hiroki; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2008-01-01

    Ci-VSP contains a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) homologous to that of voltage-gated potassium channels. Using charge displacement ('gating' current) measurements we show that voltage-sensing movements of this VSD can occur within 1 ms in mammalian membranes. Our analysis lead to development of a g...... of a genetically encodable fluorescent protein voltage sensor (VSFP) in which the fast, voltage-dependent conformational changes of the Ci-VSP voltage sensor are transduced to similarly fast fluorescence read-outs....

  6. Population genetic variation in the tree fern Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae: effects of reproductive strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Essentially all ferns can perform both sexual and asexual reproduction. Their populations represent suitable study objects to test the population genetic effects of different reproductive systems. Using the diploid homosporous fern Alsophila spinulosa as an example species, the main purpose of this study was to assess the relative impact of sexual and asexual reproduction on the level and structure of population genetic variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inter-simple sequence repeats analysis was conducted on 140 individuals collected from seven populations (HSG, LCH, BPC, MPG, GX, LD, and ZHG in China. Seventy-four polymorphic bands discriminated a total of 127 multilocus genotypes. Character compatibility analysis revealed that 50.0 to 70.0% of the genotypes had to be deleted in order to obtain a tree-like structure in the data set from populations HSG, LCH, MPG, BPC, GX, and LD; and there was a gradual decrease of conflict in the data set when genotypes with the highest incompatibility counts were successively deleted. In contrast, in population ZHG, only 33.3% of genotypes had to be removed to achieve complete compatibility in the data set, which showed a sharp decline in incompatibility upon the deletion of those genotypes. All populations examined possessed similar levels of genetic variation. Population ZHG was not found to be more differentiated than the other populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sexual recombination is the predominant source of genetic variation in most of the examined populations of A. spinulosa. However, somatic mutation contributes most to the genetic variation in population ZHG. This change of the primary mode of reproduction does not cause a significant difference in the population genetic composition. Character compatibility analysis represents an effective approach to separate the role of sexual and asexual components in shaping the genetic pattern of fern populations.

  7. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  8. Exploiting fine-scale genetic and physiological variation of closely related microbes to reveal unknown enzyme functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badur, Ahmet H; Plutz, Matthew J; Yalamanchili, Geethika; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Schweder, Thomas; Unfried, Frank; Markert, Stephanie; Polz, Martin F; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Rao, Christopher V

    2017-08-04

    Polysaccharide degradation by marine microbes represents one of the largest and most rapid heterotrophic transformations of organic matter in the environment. Microbes employ systems of complementary carbohydrate-specific enzymes to deconstruct algal or plant polysaccharides (glycans) into monosaccharides. Because of the high diversity of glycan substrates, the functions of these enzymes are often difficult to establish. One solution to this problem may lie within naturally occurring microdiversity; varying numbers of enzymes, due to gene loss, duplication, or transfer, among closely related environmental microbes create metabolic differences akin to those generated by knock-out strains engineered in the laboratory used to establish the functions of unknown genes. Inspired by this natural fine-scale microbial diversity, we show here that it can be used to develop hypotheses guiding biochemical experiments for establishing the role of these enzymes in nature. In this work, we investigated alginate degradation among closely related strains of the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus One strain, V. splendidus 13B01, exhibited high extracellular alginate lyase activity compared with other V. splendidus strains. To identify the enzymes responsible for this high extracellular activity, we compared V. splendidus 13B01 with the previously characterized V. splendidus 12B01, which has low extracellular activity and lacks two alginate lyase genes present in V. splendidus 13B01. Using a combination of genomics, proteomics, biochemical, and functional screening, we identified a polysaccharide lyase family 7 enzyme that is unique to V. splendidus 13B01, secreted, and responsible for the rapid digestion of extracellular alginate. These results demonstrate the value of querying the enzymatic repertoires of closely related microbes to rapidly pinpoint key proteins with beneficial functions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Preliminary insights into the level of genetic variation retained in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined a suite of microsatellite markers, originally developed for other parrot species, for their usefulness in providing details about the amount of genetic variation that has been retained in the endangered echo parakeet of Mauritius. Biological samples were available from previous studies and management ...

  10. Natural Selection and Evolution: Using Multimedia Slide Shows to Emphasize the Role of Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Most middle school students comprehend that organisms have adaptations that enable their survival and that successful adaptations prevail in a population over time. Yet they often miss that those bird beaks, moth-wing colors, or whatever traits are the result of random, normal genetic variations that just happen to confer a negative, neutral, or…

  11. Genetic variation of milk fatty acid composition between and within dairy cattle breeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice - Van Eijndhoven, M.H.T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Maurice – Van Eijndhoven, M.H.T. (2014). Genetic variation of milk fatty acid composition between and within dairy cattle breeds. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands Fat is one of the main components in bovine milk and comprises a large number of

  12. Diversity and population-genetic properties of copy number variations and multicopy genes in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diversity and population-genetics of copy number variation (CNV) in domesticated animals are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed 75 genomes of major taurine and indicine cattle breeds (including Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, Romagnola), sequenced to 11-fold...

  13. Genetic variation in Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal) revealed by DNA fingerprinting and RAPDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, A.L.; van de Zande, L.; Vedder, E.J.; Bijlsma, R.; van Delden, Wilke

    Genetic variation in two harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) populations from the Dutch Wadden Sea and Scotland was examined by RAPD analysis and DNA fingerprinting. For comparison a population of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) was studied. The RAPD method revealed a very low number of polymorphic bands.

  14. Needle parameter variation of mature black spruce families displaying a genetic x environment interaction in growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Major; Kurt H. Johnsen; Debby C. Barsi; Moira Campbell

    2013-01-01

    To examine soil moisture stress, light, and genetic effects on individual needle parameters and investigate total needle contribution to productivity, individual and total needle parameter variation were quantified in 32-year-old black spruce from five crown positions from four full-sib families studied previously for drought tolerance and differential productivity on...

  15. Genetic variation in nodule size at different sites on the skins of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schalk Cloete

    Abstract. Nodule size is an important indicator of leather quality in the ostrich leather trade. The present study investigated genetic variation in nodule size at five sites on the skin, namely the neck, back, upper leg, flank and butt. Nodule size increased with an increased chronological age at all sites. Estimates of h² for nodule.

  16. Genetic variation in nodule size at different sites on the skins of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodule size is an important indicator of leather quality in the ostrich leather trade. The present study investigated genetic variation in nodule size at five sites on the skin, namely the neck, back, upper leg, flank and butt. Nodule size increased with an increased chronological age at all sites. Estimates of h² for nodule size ...

  17. Genetic variation at Exon2 of TLR4 gene and its association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to analyze the polymorphisms of chicken Toll-like receptors 4(TLR4) gene and aimed to provide a theoretical foundation for a further research on correlation between chicken TLR4 gene and disease resistance. Genetic variations at exon 2 of TLR4 gene in 14 chicken breeds and the red jungle ...

  18. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  19. Genetic variation in the hTAS2R38 taste receptor and brassica vegetable intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorovic, Nela; Afzal, Shoaib; Tjonneland, Anne

    2011-01-01

    investigated the relationship between genetic variation in the hTAS2R38 receptor and the actual consumption of brassica vegetables with the hypothesis that taster status was associated with intake of these vegetables. Furthermore, secondary intake information on alcohol, chocolate, coffee, smoking, BMI...

  20. Relationship between Genetic Variation at PPP1R3B and Liver Glycogen and Triglyceride Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Smagris, Eriks; Lauridsen, Bo K

    2018-01-01

    Genetic variation at rs4240624 on chromosome 8 is associated with an attenuated signal on hepatic computerized tomography (CT), which has been attributed to changes in hepatic fat. The closest coding gene to rs4240624, PPP1R3B, encodes a protein that promotes hepatic glycogen synthesis. Here we...

  1. Classification, genetic variation and pathogenicity of Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus isolates from Asia, Europe, and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Harrison; Melody A. Keena; Daniel L. Rowley

    2014-01-01

    Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) has been formulated and applied to control outbreaks of the gypsy moth, L. dispar. To classify and determine the degree of genetic variation among isolates of L. dispar NPVs from different parts of the range of the gypsy moth, partial sequences of the

  2. Rare genetic variation in UNC13A may modify survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, Benjamin; Shatunov, Aleksey; Pulit, Sara; Jones, Ashley R; Sproviero, William; Gillett, Alexandra; Chen, Zhongbo; Kirby, Janine; Fogh, Isabella; Powell, John F; Leigh, P Nigel; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Shaw, Christopher E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H; Lewis, Cathryn M; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify whether rare genetic variation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) candidate survival genes modifies ALS survival. Candidate genes were selected based on evidence for modifying ALS survival. Each tail of the extreme 1.5% of survival was selected from the UK MND DNA

  3. Nuclear genetic variation across the range of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa): Phylogeographic, taxonomic and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Valerie D. Hipkins; Mary F. Mahalovich; Robert E. Means

    2015-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is among the most broadly distributed conifer species of western North America, where it possesses considerable ecological, esthetic, and commercial value. It exhibits complicated patterns of morphological and genetic variation, suggesting that it may be in the process of differentiating into distinct regional...

  4. Patterns of Genetic Variation in Woody Plant Species in the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria L. Sork; Anthony Koop; Marie Ann de la Fuente; Paul Foster; Jay. Raveill

    1997-01-01

    We quantified current patterns of genetic variation of three woody plant species—Carya tomentosa (Juglandaceae), Quercus alba (Fagaceae), and Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae)—distributed throughout the nine Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) study sites and evaluated the data in light of the MOFEP...

  5. Genetic variation in ABC transporter A1 contributes to HDL cholesterol in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2004-01-01

    Homozygosity for mutations in ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) causes Tangier disease, a rare HDL-deficiency syndrome. Whether heterozygosity for genetic variation in ABCA1 also contributes to HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in the general population is presently unclear. We determined whether mutations...

  6. Genetic variation in lipid desaturases and its impact on the development of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutch David M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perturbations in lipid metabolism characterize many of the chronic diseases currently plaguing our society, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Thus interventions that target plasma lipid levels remain a primary goal to manage these diseases. The determinants of plasma lipid levels are multi-factorial, consisting of both genetic and lifestyle components. Recent evidence indicates that fatty acid desaturases have an important role in defining plasma and tissue lipid profiles. This review will highlight the current state-of-knowledge regarding three desaturases (Scd-1, Fads1 and Fads2 and their potential roles in disease onset and development. Although research in rodent models has provided invaluable insight into the regulation and functions of these desaturases, the extent to which murine research can be translated to humans remains unclear. Evidence emerging from human-based research demonstrates that genetic variation in human desaturase genes affects enzyme activity and, consequently, disease risk factors. Moreover, this genetic variation may have a trans-generational effect via breastfeeding. Therefore inter-individual variation in desaturase function is attributed to both genetic and lifestyle components. As such, population-based research regarding the role of desaturases on disease risk is challenged by this complex gene-lifestyle paradigm. Unravelling the contribution of each component is paramount for understanding the inter-individual variation that exists in plasma lipid profiles, and will provide crucial information to develop personalized strategies to improve health management.

  7. Distribution, ecology, life history, genetic variation, and risk of extinction of nonhuman primates from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldívar, Maria E; Rocha, Oscar; Glander, Kenneth E; Aguilar, Gabriel; Huertas, Ana S; Sánchez, Ronald; Wong, Grace

    2004-09-01

    We examined the association between geographic distribution, ecological traits, life history, genetic diversity, and risk of extinction in nonhuman primate species from Costa Rica. All of the current nonhuman primate species from Costa Rica are included in the study; spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi), howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata), capuchins (Cebus capucinus), and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedii). Geographic distribution was characterized accessing existing databases. Data on ecology and life history traits were obtained through a literature review. Genetic diversity was characterized using isozyme electrophoresis. Risk of extinction was assessed from the literature. We found that species differed in all these traits. Using these data, we conducted a Pearson correlation between risk of extinction and ecological and life history traits, and genetic variation, for widely distributed species. We found a negative association between risk of extinction and population birth and growth rates; indicating that slower reproducing species had a greater risk of extinction. We found a positive association between genetic variation and risk of extinction; i.e., species showing higher genetic variation had a greater risk of extinction. The relevance of these traits for conservation efforts is discussed.

  8. Stress-induced variation in evolution: from behavioural plasticity to genetic assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyaev, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Extreme environments are closely associated with phenotypic evolution, yet the mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Several themes and approaches in recent studies significantly further our understanding of the importance that stress-induced variation plays in evolution. First, stressful environments modify (and often reduce) the integration of neuroendocrinological, morphological and behavioural regulatory systems. Second, such reduced integration and subsequent accommodation of stress-induced variation by developmental systems enables organismal ‘memory’ of a stressful event as well as phenotypic and genetic assimilation of the response to a stressor. Third, in complex functional systems, a stress-induced increase in phenotypic and genetic variance is often directional, channelled by existing ontogenetic pathways. This accounts for similarity among individuals in stress-induced changes and thus significantly facilitates the rate of adaptive evolution. Fourth, accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variation might be a common property of locally adapted and complex organismal systems, and extreme environments facilitate the phenotypic expression of this variance. Finally, stress-induced effects and stress-resistance strategies often persist for several generations through maternal, ecological and cultural inheritance. These transgenerational effects, along with both the complexity of developmental systems and stressor recurrence, might facilitate genetic assimilation of stress-induced effects. Accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variance by developmental systems and phenotypic accommodation of stress-induced effects, together with the inheritance of stress-induced modifications, ensure the evolutionary persistence of stress–response strategies and provide a link between individual adaptability and evolutionary adaptation. PMID:16024341

  9. Intraspecific genetic variation in Paramecium revealed by mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase I sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Dana; Krenek, Sascha; Fokin, Sergei I; Berendonk, Thomas U

    2006-01-01

    Studies of intraspecific genetic diversity of ciliates, such as population genetics and biogeography, are particularly hampered by the lack of suitable DNA markers. For example, sequences of the non-coding ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions are often too conserved for intraspecific analyses. We have therefore identified primers for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and applied them for intraspecific investigations in Paramecium caudatum and Paramecium multimicronucleatum. Furthermore, we obtained sequences of the ITS regions from the same strains and carried out comparative sequence analyses of both data sets. The mitochondrial sequences revealed substantially higher variation in both Paramecium species, with intraspecific divergences up to 7% in P. caudatum and 9.5% in P. multimicronucleatum. Moreover, an initial survey of the population structure discovered different mitochondrial haplotypes of P. caudatum in one pond, thereby demonstrating the potential of this genetic marker for population genetic analyses. Our primers successfully amplified the COI gene of other Paramecium. This is the first report of intraspecific variation in free-living protozoans based on mitochondrial sequence data. Our results show that the high variation in mitochondrial DNA makes it a suitable marker for intraspecific and population genetic studies.

  10. Patterns of genetic variation in isolated Danish populations of the endangered butterfly Euphydryas aurinia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard, Peter; Pertoldi, Cino; Madsen, Aksel Bo

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we report an investigation on molecular variation in the endangered univoltine butterfly Euphydryas aurinia (Rottemburg, 1775), a species heavily affected by habitat degradation and fragmentation in Denmark. Levels of genetic variation in extant populations were estimated...... using six variable number tandem repeat loci and were found to be low compared to other butterfly species with low migration rates. An analysis of genetic structure, based on both allele frequencies and genotype distributions, divided the entire sample into four distinct clusters. This was partially....../founder events. One population deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting a possible Wahlund effect or the presence of null alleles. The results suggest habitat fragmentation, resulting in genetic drift and possibly inbreeding. Future management is therefore recommended to increase gene...

  11. Using induced pluripotent stem cells to explore genetic and epigenetic variation associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imm, Jennifer; Kerrigan, Talitha L; Jeffries, Aaron; Lunnon, Katie

    2017-11-01

    It is thought that both genetic and epigenetic variation play a role in Alzheimer's disease initiation and progression. With the advent of somatic cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells it is now possible to generate patient-derived cells that are able to more accurately model and recapitulate disease. Furthermore, by combining this with recent advances in (epi)genome editing technologies, it is possible to begin to examine the functional consequence of previously nominated genetic variants and infer epigenetic causality from recently identified epigenetic variants. In this review, we explore the role of genetic and epigenetic variation in Alzheimer's disease and how the functional relevance of nominated loci can be investigated using induced pluripotent stem cells and (epi)genome editing techniques.

  12. Differences in genetic and environmental variation in adult BMI by sex, age, time period, and region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    and women increased from young adulthood to old age. The heritability of BMI was largely similar between cultural-geographic regions and measurement years, despite large differences in mean BMI and variances in BMI. Our results show a strong influence of genetic factors on BMI, especially in early adulthood......Background: Genes and the environment contribute to variation in adult body mass index [BMI (in kg/m(2))], but factors modifying these variance components are poorly understood.Objective: We analyzed genetic and environmental variation in BMI between men and women from young adulthood to old age...... from the 1940s to the 2000s and between cultural-geographic regions representing high (North America and Australia), moderate (Europe), and low (East Asia) prevalence of obesity.Design: We used genetic structural equation modeling to analyze BMI in twins ≥20 y of age from 40 cohorts representing 20...

  13. Genetic Variation in DNA of Coho Salmon from the Lower Columbia River : Final Report 1993.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobes, Stephen; Knudsen, Kathy; Allendorf, Fred

    1993-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop techniques to provide the information needed to determine if Lower Columbia River coho salmon represent a 'species' under the Endangered Species Act. Our report features two new nuclear DNA approaches to the improved detection of genetic variation: (1) Studies of DNA-level genetic variation for two nuclear growth hormone genes; (2) Use of arbitrary DNA primers (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, or 'RAPD' primers) to detect variation at large numbers of nuclear genes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify variable sections (introns) of two growth hormone genes (GH-I and G/f-Z) in several salmonid species. Coho salmon had three DNA length variants for G/-I intron C. Restriction analysis and sequencing provided valuable information about the mode of evolution of these DNA sequences. We tested segregation of the variants in captive broods of coho salmon, and demonstrated that they are alleles at a single Mendelian locus. Population studies using the GH-1 alleles showed highly significant frequency differences between Lower Columbia River and Oregon Coast coho salmon, and marginal differences among stocks within these regions. These new markers are adequately defined and tested to use in coho salmon population studies of any size. The nature of the variation at GH-1 (Variable Number Tandem Repeats, or 'VNTRs') suggests that more genetic variants will be found in coho salmon from other areas. GH-2 intron C also showed length variation in coho salmon, and this variation was found to be sex-linked. Because PCR methods require minute amounts of tissue, this discovery provides a technique to determine the gender of immature coho salmon without killing them. Chinook salmon had restriction patterns and sequence divergences similar to coho salmon. Thus, we expect that sex linkage of GH-2 alleles predates the evolutionary divergence of Pacific salmon species, and that gender testing with

  14. Deciphering the Genic Basis of Yeast Fitness Variation by Simultaneous Forward and Reverse Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Calum J; Metzger, Brian P H; Yang, Jian-Rong; Ho, Wei-Chin; Moyers, Bryan; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2017-10-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the best studied eukaryote in molecular and cell biology, but its utility for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic variation in natural populations is limited by inefficient association mapping due to strong and complex population structure. To overcome this challenge, we generated genome sequences for 85 strains and performed a comprehensive population genomic survey of a total of 190 diverse strains. We identified considerable variation in population structure among chromosomes and identified 181 genes that are absent from the reference genome. Many of these nonreference genes are expressed and we functionally confirmed that two of these genes confer increased resistance to antifungals. Next, we simultaneously measured the growth rates of over 4,500 laboratory strains, each of which lacks a nonessential gene, and 81 natural strains across multiple environments using unique DNA barcode present in each strain. By combining the genome-wide reverse genetic information gained from the gene deletion strains with a genome-wide association analysis from the natural strains, we identified genomic regions associated with fitness variation in natural populations. To experimentally validate a subset of these associations, we used reciprocal hemizygosity tests, finding that while the combined forward and reverse genetic approaches can identify a single causal gene, the phenotypic consequences of natural genetic variation often follow a complicated pattern. The resources and approach provided outline an efficient and reliable route to association mapping in yeast and significantly enhance its value as a model for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation and evolution in natural populations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, Nuno D.; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M.; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can

  16. Effect of Heavy Metals Pollution on Soil Microbial Diversity and Bermudagrass Genetic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Fan, Jibiao; Zhu, Weixi; Amombo, Erick; Lou, Yanhong; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a serious global environmental problem as it adversely affects plant growth and genetic variation. It also alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. The objectives of this study were to determine the soil microbial diversity, bermudagrass genetic variation in Cd contaminated or uncontaminated soils from Hunan province of China, and to evaluate Cd-tolerance of bermudagrass at different soils. The Biolog method, hydroponic experiments and simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the functional diversity of microorganisms, Cd-tolerance and the genetic diversity of bermudagrass, respectively. Four of the sampling sites were heavily contaminated with heavy metals. The total bioactivity, richness, and microbial diversity decreased with increasing concentration of heavy metal. The hydroponic experiment revealed that bermudagrass populations collected from polluted sites have evolved, encompassing the feature of a higher resistance to Cd toxicity. Higher genetic diversity was observed to be more in contaminated populations than in uncontaminated populations. Heavy metal pollution can result in adverse effects on plant growth, soil microbial diversity and activity, and apparently has a stronger impact on the genetic structure. The results of this study provide new insights and a background to produce a genetic description of populations in a species that is suitable for use in phytoremediation practices.

  17. Effect of heavy metals pollution on soil microbial diversity and bermudagrass genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eXie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is a serious global environmental problem as it adversely affects plant growth and genetic variation. It also alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. The objectives of this study were to determine the soil microbial diversity, bermudagrass genetic variation in Cd contaminated or uncontaminated soils from Hunan province of China, and to evaluate Cd tolerance of bermudagrass at different soils. The Biolog method, hydroponic experiments and simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the functional diversity of microorganisms, Cd tolerance and the genetic diversity of bermudagrass, respectively. Four of the sampling sites were heavily contaminated with heavy metal. The total bioactivity, richness, and microbial diversity decreased with increasing concentration of heavy metal. The hydroponic experiment revealed that bermudagrass populations collected from polluted sites have evolved, encompassing the feature of a higher resistance to Cd toxicity. Higher genetic diversity was observed to be more in contaminated populations than in uncontaminated populations. Heavy metal pollution can result in adverse effects on plant growth, soil microbial diversity and activity, and apparently has a stronger impact on the genetic structure. The results of this study provide new insights and a background to produce a genetic description of populations in a species that is suitable for use in phytoremediation practices.

  18. Assessment of genetic variation for pathogen-specific mastitis resistance in Valle del Belice dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolone, Marco; Larrondo, Cristian; Yáñez, José M; Newman, Scott; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Portolano, Baldassare

    2016-07-28

    Mastitis resistance is a complex and multifactorial trait, and its expression depends on both genetic and environmental factors, including infection pressure. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic basis of mastitis resistance to specific pathogens using a repeatability threshold probit animal model. The most prevalent isolated pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); 39 % of records and 77 % of the animals infected at least one time in the whole period of study. There was significant genetic variation only for Streptococci (STR). In addition, there was a positive genetic correlation between STR and all pathogens together (ALL) (0.36 ± 0.22), and CNS and ALL (0.92 ± 0.04). The results of our study support the presence of significant genetic variation for mastitis caused by Streptococci and suggest the importance of discriminating between different pathogens causing mastitis due to the fact that they most likely influence different genetic traits. Low heritabilities for pathogen specific-mastitis resistance may be considered when including bacteriological status as a measure of mastitis presence to implement breeding strategies for improving udder health in dairy ewes.

  19. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Kijas

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  20. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, James W; Townley, David; Dalrymple, Brian P; Heaton, Michael P; Maddox, Jillian F; McGrath, Annette; Wilson, Peter; Ingersoll, Roxann G; McCulloch, Russell; McWilliam, Sean; Tang, Dave; McEwan, John; Cockett, Noelle; Oddy, V Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W; Raadsma, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  1. Does advertisement call variation coincide with genetic variation in the genetically diverse frog taxon currently known as Leptodactylus fuscus (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. RONALD HEYER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The frog Leptodactylus fuscus is found throughout much of South America in open and disturbed habitats. Previous study of genetic differentiation in L. fuscus demonstrated that there was lack of genetic exchange among population units consistent with multiple species, rather than a single species. We examine advertisement vocalizations of L. fuscus to determine whether call variation coincides with genetic differentiation. Calls were analyzed for 32 individual frogs from 25 localities throughout the distributional range of L. fuscus. Although there is variation in calls among geographic samples, call variation is not concordant with genetic variation or geographic distance and the call variation observed is less than that typically found among other closely related species of Leptodactylus. This study is an example of the rare pattern of strong genetic differentiation unaccompanied by salient differences in advertisement calls. The relative infrequency of this pattern as currently understood may only reflect the lack of detailed analyses of genetic and acoustic differentiation within population systems currently understood as single species with substantial geographic distributions.A rã Leptodactylus fuscus é encontrada na maior parte da América do Sul em formações abertas ou em ambientes perturbados. Estudos anteriores de diferenciação genética mostraram ausência de fluxo gênico entre unidades populacionais, o que é compatível com a existência de diversas espécies em vez de uma única. Examinamos a vocalização de anúncio de L. fuscus com a finalidade de verificar se variações na vocalização coincidiam com a diferenciação genética. Foram analisadas vocalizações de 32 indivíduos provenientes de 25 localidades distribuídas em toda a área de distribuição da espécie. Embora exista variação geográfica na vocalização, essa diversificação não corresponde à diferenciação genética ou à distância geogr

  2. Identifying tagging SNPs for African specific genetic variation from the African Diaspora Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Henry Richard; Hu, Yi-Juan; Gao, Jingjing; O'Connor, Timothy D; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Wojcik, Genevieve L; Gignoux, Christopher R; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Lizee, Antoine; Hansen, Mark; Genuario, Rob; Bullis, Dave; Lawley, Cindy; Kenny, Eimear E; Bustamante, Carlos; Beaty, Terri H; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen C; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2017-04-21

    A primary goal of The Consortium on Asthma among African-ancestry Populations in the Americas (CAAPA) is to develop an 'African Diaspora Power Chip' (ADPC), a genotyping array consisting of tagging SNPs, useful in comprehensively identifying African specific genetic variation. This array is designed based on the novel variation identified in 642 CAAPA samples of African ancestry with high coverage whole genome sequence data (~30× depth). This novel variation extends the pattern of variation catalogued in the 1000 Genomes and Exome Sequencing Projects to a spectrum of populations representing the wide range of West African genomic diversity. These individuals from CAAPA also comprise a large swath of the African Diaspora population and incorporate historical genetic diversity covering nearly the entire Atlantic coast of the Americas. Here we show the results of designing and producing such a microchip array. This novel array covers African specific variation far better than other commercially available arrays, and will enable better GWAS analyses for researchers with individuals of African descent in their study populations. A recent study cataloging variation in continental African populations suggests this type of African-specific genotyping array is both necessary and valuable for facilitating large-scale GWAS in populations of African ancestry.

  3. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively peutral sites across the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui

    2011-01-01

    A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries...... and that human diversity, human-chimp divergence, and average minor allele frequency are reduced near genes. Population genetic simulations show that either positive natural selection acting on favorable mutations or negative natural selection acting against deleterious mutations can explain these correlations...... throughout the genome. Further, we show that the widespread presence of weakly deleterious alleles, rather than a small number of strongly positively selected mutations, is responsible for the correlation between neutral genetic diversity and recombination rate. This work suggests that natural selection has...

  4. Genetic variation of Melia azedarach in community forests of West Java assessed by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YULIANTI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Yulianti, Siregar IZ, Wijayanto N, Tapa Darma IGK, Syamsuwida D (2011 Genetic variation of Melia azedarach in community forests of West Java assessed by RAPD. Biodiversitas 12: 64-69. Melia azedarach L. or mindi (local name is one of the widely planted exotic species in Indonesia, mostly found in community forests in West Java. However, improving and increasing the productivity of mindi commmunity plantation in West Java requires information on patterns of existing genetic diversity. The present work was aimed at estimating the genetic variation of mindi by using RAPD markers. Outcome of the activities was to propose appropriate conservation and management strategies of genetic resources in order to support the establishment of seed sources. Six populations of mindi plantation in the community forests were chosen for this research, i.e Sukaraja (Bogor-1, Megamendung (Bogor-2, Bandung, Purwakarta, Sumedang and Kuningan. Five primers (OPA-07, OPY-13, OPY-16, OPA-09 and OPO-05 producing reproducible bands were analysed for 120 selected mother trees in total, in which 20 trees per locality were sampled. Data were analysed using Popgene ver 1.31, NTSYS 2.02 and GenAlEx 6.3. Based on the analysis, the observed number of alleles per locus ranging from 1.43 to 1.60, and percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL ranging from 43.33 to 60.00.%. The levels of genetic variation were considered as moderate for all populations (He range from 0.1603 to 0.1956 and the the mean level of genetic diversity between population (Gst was 0.3005. Cluster analysis and Principal Coordinates showed three main groups, the first group consists of 4 populations i.e Bandung, Kuningan, Purwakarta and Megamendung, the second was Sukaraja and the third was Sumedang. Based on Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA, the Percentages of Molecular Variance within population (69% is higher than that of between populations (31%. The moderate level of genetic variation in the community

  5. Surviving in isolation: genetic variation, bottlenecks and reproductive strategies in the Canarian endemic Limonium macrophyllum (Plumbaginaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Ares; Weigelt, Barbara; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo; Caujapé-Castells, Juli; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Conti, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Oceanic archipelagos are typically rich in endemic taxa, because they offer ideal conditions for diversification and speciation in isolation. One of the most remarkable evolutionary radiations on the Canary Islands comprises the 16 species included in Limonium subsection Nobiles, all of which are subject to diverse threats, and legally protected. Since many of them are single-island endemics limited to one or a few populations, there exists a risk that a loss of genetic variation might limit their long-term survival. In this study, we used eight newly developed microsatellite markers to characterize the levels of genetic variation and inbreeding in L. macrophyllum, a species endemic to the North-east of Tenerife that belongs to Limonium subsection Nobiles. We detected generally low levels of genetic variation over all populations (H T = 0.363), and substantial differentiation among populations (F ST = 0.188; R ST = 0.186) coupled with a negligible degree of inbreeding (F = 0.042). Obligate outcrossing may have maintained L. macrophyllum relatively unaffected by inbreeding despite the species' limited dispersal ability and the genetic bottlenecks likely caused by a prolonged history of grazing. Although several factors still constitute a risk for the conservation of L. macrophyllum, the lack of inbreeding and the recent positive demographic trends observed in the populations of this species are factors that favour its future persistence.

  6. Identification of genetic variations of a Chinese family with paramyotonia congenita via whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxin; Huang, Qinghai; Ge, Liang; Xu, Jing; Shi, Xingjuan; Xie, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Xiangdong

    2015-06-01

    Paramyotonia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by juvenile onset and development of cold-induced myotonia after repeated activities. The disease is mostly caused by genetic mutations of the sodium channel, voltage-gated, type IV, alpha subunit (SCN4A) gene. This study intended to systematically identify the causative genetic variations of a Chinese Han PC family. Seven members of this PC family, including four patients and three healthy controls, were selected for whole exome sequencing (WES) using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Sequence variations were identified using the SoftGenetics program. The mutation R1448C of SCN4A was found to be the only causative mutation. This study applied WES technology to sequence multiple members of a large PC family and was the first to systematically confirm that the genetic change in SCN4A is the only causative variation in this PC family and the SCN4A mutation is sufficient to lead to PC.

  7. Genetic variation and structure of the endangered Lady Fern Athyrium viridescentipes based on ubiquitous genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuno, Ayako; Takamiya, Masayuki; Kaneko, Shingo; Isagi, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    To clarify the genetic status and provide effective information for the conservation of Athyrium viridescentipes, a critically endangered fern species with only 103 individuals remaining in the wild, we conducted ubiquitous genotyping to determine the genotypes of all remnant individuals of the target species. We analyzed the genetic variation of the 103 known individuals in four populations by using 13 microsatellite loci. The genotypes of single spores from a sporophytic individual were also determined in order to reveal the breeding system of this species. The level of allelic variation in A. viridescentipes was significantly lower than that of closely related Athyrium species. The genetic composition of the four populations was rather similar. Sixty-nine individuals (67%) possessed an identical pattern in the allele combinations at 13 microsatellite loci. The mean pairwise F (ST) among four populations was 0.018. The segregated pattern of alleles, determined by single-spore genotyping, revealed that allelic recombination occurs through meiosis. The results indicate that this species contains a low level of genetic variation, has low population differentiation, and maintains populations by sexual reproduction. These findings could lead to more effective conservation programs, the selection of the most appropriate individuals for ex situ conservation efforts, and separate management of extant populations.

  8. Recommendations for Genetic Variation Data Capture in Developing Countries to Ensure a Comprehensive Worldwide Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Al Aama, Jumana; Al Aqeel, Aida; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Borg, Joseph; Devereux, Andrew; Felice, Alex E; Macrae, Finlay; Marafie, Makia J; Petersen, Michael B; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar S; Zlotogora, Joel; Cotton, Richard GH

    2011-01-01

    Developing countries have significantly contributed to the elucidation of the genetic basis of both common and rare disorders, providing an invaluable resource of cases due to large family sizes, consanguinity, and potential founder effects. Moreover, the recognized depth of genomic variation in indigenous African populations, reflecting the ancient origins of humanity on the African continent, and the effect of selection pressures on the genome, will be valuable in understanding the range of both pathological and nonpathological variations. The involvement of these populations in accurately documenting the extant genetic heterogeneity is more than essential. Developing nations are regarded as key contributors to the Human Variome Project (HVP; http://www.humanvariomeproject.org), a major effort to systematically collect mutations that contribute to or cause human disease and create a cyber infrastructure to tie databases together. However, biomedical research has not been the primary focus in these countries even though such activities are likely to produce economic and health benefits for all. Here, we propose several recommendations and guidelines to facilitate participation of developing countries in genetic variation data documentation, ensuring an accurate and comprehensive worldwide data collection. We also summarize a few well-coordinated genetic data collection initiatives that would serve as paradigms for similar projects. Hum Mutat 31:1–8, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21089065

  9. Genetic Variation in Growth Traits of Two Years Old Ficus variegata Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliek Haryjanto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A progeny trial of nyawai (Ficus variegata Blume with subline system was established in Mangunan, Bantul, Yogyakarta and designed as a Randomized Completely Block Design. Lombok subline comprised of 17 families and Cilacap-Pangandaran subline comprised of 19 families. This study was aimed to observe  growth variation and genetic parameter of these sublines  at two years after planting. Varians analysis was performed  to find out family  effect on survival,  height, and diameter traits.  Component varians analysis was used to estimate coefficient of genetic variation and heritability. This study showed that survival rate of the trial ranged from 89.01%  to 91.42%. Family effect on height and diameter variation was very significant at both sublines. Estimation coefficient of genetic variation for height and diameter traits ranged from 4.41% to 9.04% or categorized as intermediate. Individual heritabilities for height traits ranged from 0.15 to 0.22;  diameter ranged from 0.18 to 0.09, while family heritabilities for height and diameter traits  ranged from 0.49 to 0.60 and 0.29 to 0.66 respectively.

  10. Implications of stress-induced genetic variation for minimizing multidrug resistance in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obolski Uri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Recent evidence shows that when exposed to stressful conditions, some bacteria perform higher rates of horizontal gene transfer and mutation, and thus acquire antibiotic resistance more rapidly. Methods We incorporate this new notion into a mathematical model for the emergence of antibiotic multi-resistance in a hospital setting. Results We show that when stress has a considerable effect on genetic variation, the emergence of antibiotic resistance is dramatically affected. A strategy in which patients receive a combination of antibiotics (combining is expected to facilitate the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria when genetic variation is stress-induced. The preference between a strategy in which one of two effective drugs is assigned randomly to each patient (mixing, and a strategy where only one drug is administered for a specific period of time (cycling is determined by the resistance acquisition mechanisms. We discuss several features of the mechanisms by which stress affects variation and predict the conditions for success of different antibiotic treatment strategies. Conclusions These findings should encourage research on the mechanisms of stress-induced genetic variation and establish the importance of incorporating data about these mechanisms when considering antibiotic treatment strategies.

  11. Genetic variation for parental effects on the propensity to gregarise in Locusta migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foucart Antoine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental parental effects can have important ecological and evolutionary consequences, yet little is known about genetic variation among populations in the plastic responses of offspring phenotypes to parental environmental conditions. This type of variation may lead to rapid phenotypic divergence among populations and facilitate speciation. With respect to density-dependent phenotypic plasticity, locust species (Orthoptera: family Acrididae, exhibit spectacular developmental and behavioural shifts in response to population density, called phase change. Given the significance of phase change in locust outbreaks and control, its triggering processes have been widely investigated. Whereas crowding within the lifetime of both offspring and parents has emerged as a primary causal factor of phase change, less is known about intraspecific genetic variation in the expression of phase change, and in particular in response to the parental environment. We conducted a laboratory experiment that explicitly controlled for the environmental effects of parental rearing density. This design enabled us to compare the parental effects on offspring expression of phase-related traits between two naturally-occurring, genetically distinct populations of Locusta migratoria that differed in their historical patterns of high population density outbreak events. Results We found that locusts from a historically outbreaking population of L. migratoria expressed parentally-inherited density-dependent phase changes to a greater degree than those from a historically non-outbreaking population. Conclusion Because locusts from both populations were raised in a common environment during our experiment, a genetically-based process must be responsible for the observed variation in the propensity to express phase change. This result emphasizes the importance of genetic factors in the expression of phase traits and calls for further investigations on density

  12. Sexual variation in heritability and genetic correlations of morphological traits in house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, H; Saether, B E; Ringsby, T H; Tufto, J; Griffith, S C; Ellegren, H

    2003-11-01

    Estimates of genetic components are important for our understanding of how individual characteristics are transferred between generations. We show that the level of heritability varies between 0.12 and 0.68 in six morphological traits in house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.) in northern Norway. Positive and negative genetic correlations were present among traits, suggesting evolutionary constraints on the evolution of some of these characters. A sexual difference in the amount of heritable genetic variation was found in tarsus length, wing length, bill depth and body condition index, with generally higher heritability in females. In addition, the structure of the genetic variance-covariance matrix for the traits differed between the sexes. Genetic correlations between males and females for the morphological traits were however large and not significantly different from one, indicating that sex-specific responses to selection will be influenced by intersexual differences in selection differentials. Despite this, some traits had heritability above 0.1 in females, even after conditioning on the additive genetic covariance between sexes and the additive genetic variances in males. Moreover, a meta-analysis indicated that higher heritability in females than in males may be common in birds. Thus, this indicates sexual differences in the genetic architecture of birds. Consequently, as in house sparrows, the evolutionary responses to selection will often be larger in females than males. Hence, our results suggest that sex-specific additive genetic variances and covariances, although ignored in most studies, should be included when making predictions of evolutionary changes from standard quantitative genetic models.

  13. Individual genetic and genomic variation: a new opportunity for personalized nursing interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Cindy L

    2015-01-01

    A discussion of the potential for improving nursing interventions through tailoring in consideration of patients' individual genetic/genomic variation. Nurses have not yet maximized use of genetic/genomic information in planning and delivering nursing care outside of the context of monogenetic disease. Approaches from personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics have not yet been applied to development or delivery of nursing interventions. There are potentially many nursing interventions that would be more effective if they were individually tailored to the patient's genetic/genomic profile. Discussion paper. Published literature from 2008-2014 (one legacy paper from 1994 is also cited); Wellcome Trust and Genome.gov websites. There is a need for development of genetic/genomic research that directly addresses questions vital to nursing science, including biological plausibility studies. Research is also needed to inform the design and delivery of nursing interventions for common complex diseases tailored to consider genetic/genomic variability. Predicting responses to nursing interventions based on genetic/genomic variability may increase the probability that the first intervention employed will lead to optimal outcomes for each patient. Integrating genetic/genomic variability, from biological plausibility research through intervention research into evidence-based practice, has the potential to move nursing forward. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Natural Genetic Variation of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris Pathogenicity on Arabidopsis Revealed by Association and Reverse Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Endrick; Genissel, Anne; Hajri, Ahmed; Chabannes, Matthieu; David, Perrine; Carrere, Sébastien; Lautier, Martine; Roux, Brice; Boureau, Tristan; Arlat, Matthieu; Poussier, Stéphane; Noël, Laurent D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot of Brassicaceae, manipulates the physiology and the innate immunity of its hosts. Association genetic and reverse-genetic analyses of a world panel of 45 X. campestris pv. campestris strains were used to gain understanding of the genetic basis of the bacterium’s pathogenicity to Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the compositions of the minimal predicted type III secretome varied extensively, with 18 to 28 proteins per strain. There were clear differences in aggressiveness of those X. campestris pv. campestris strains on two Arabidopsis natural accessions. We identified 3 effector genes (xopAC, xopJ5, and xopAL2) and 67 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that were associated with variations in disease symptoms. The nature and distribution of the AFLP markers remain to be determined, but we observed a low linkage disequilibrium level between predicted effectors and other significant markers, suggesting that additional genetic factors make a meaningful contribution to pathogenicity. Mutagenesis of type III effectors in X. campestris pv. campestris confirmed that xopAC functions as both a virulence and an avirulence gene in Arabidopsis and that xopAM functions as a second avirulence gene on plants of the Col-0 ecotype. However, we did not detect the effect of any other effector in the X. campestris pv. campestris 8004 strain, likely due to other genetic background effects. These results highlight the complex genetic basis of pathogenicity at the pathovar level and encourage us to challenge the agronomical relevance of some virulence determinants identified solely in model strains. PMID:23736288

  15. Variation in the gut microbiota of laboratory mice is related to both genetic and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hufeldt, Majbritt Ravn; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2010-01-01

    During recent years, the composition of the gut microbiota (GM) has received increasing attention as a factor in the development of experimental inflammatory disease in animal models. Because increased variation in the GM might lead to increased variation in disease parameters, determining...... and reducing GM variation between laboratory animals may provide more consistent models. Both genetic and environmental aspects influence the composition of the GM and may vary between laboratory animal breeding centers and within an individual breeding center. This study investigated the variation in cecal...... microbiota in 8-wk-old NMRI and C57BL/6 mice by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to profile PCR-derived amplicons from bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Comparison of the cecal microbiotas revealed that the similarity index of the inbred C57BL/6Sca strain was 10% higher than that of the outbred Sca...

  16. The distribution of nuclear genetic variation and historical demography of sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, A.; Jessup, David A.; Estes, J.; Garza, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The amount and distribution of population genetic variation is crucial information for the design of effective conservation strategies for endangered species and can also be used to provide inference about demographic processes and patterns of migration. Here, we describe variation at a large number of nuclear genes in sea otters Enhydra lutris ssp. We surveyed 14 variable microsatellite loci and two genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in up to 350 California sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis, which represents ∼10% of the subspecies' population, and 46 otters from two Alaskan sites. We utilized methods for detecting past reductions in effective population size to examine the effects of near extinction from the fur trade. Summary statistic tests largely failed to find a signal of a recent population size reduction (within the past 200 years), but a Bayesian method found a signal of a strong reduction over a longer time scale (up to 500 years ago). These results indicate that the reduction in size began long enough ago that much genetic variation was lost before the 19th century fur trade. A comparison of geographic distance and pairwise relatedness for individual otters found no evidence of kin-based spatial clustering for either gender. This indicates that there is no population structure, due to extended family groups, within the California population. A survey of population genetic variation found that two of the MHC genes, DQB and DRB, had two alleles present and one of the genes, DRA, was monomorphic in otters. This contrasts with other mammals, where they are often the most variable coding genes known. Genetic variation in the sea otter is among the lowest observed for a mammal and raises concerns about the long-term viability of the species, particularly in the face of future environmental changes.

  17. Inter-chromosomal variation in the pattern of human population genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baye Tesfaye M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emerging technologies now make it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of genetic variations in individuals, across the genome. The study of loci at finer scales will facilitate the understanding of genetic variation at genomic and geographic levels. We examined global and chromosomal variations across HapMap populations using 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms to search for the most stratified genomic regions of human populations and linked these regions to ontological annotation and functional network analysis. To achieve this, we used five complementary statistical and genetic network procedures: principal component (PC, cluster, discriminant, fixation index (FST and network/pathway analyses. At the global level, the first two PC scores were sufficient to account for major population structure; however, chromosomal level analysis detected subtle forms of population structure within continental populations, and as many as 31 PCs were required to classify individuals into homogeneous groups. Using recommended population ancestry differentiation measures, a total of 126 regions of the genome were catalogued. Gene ontology and networks analyses revealed that these regions included the genes encoding oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2, hect domain and RLD 2 (HERC2, ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR and solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2. These genes are associated with melanin production, which is involved in the development of skin and hair colour, skin cancer and eye pigmentation. We also identified the genes encoding interferon-γ (IFNG and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1, which are associated with cell death, inflammatory and immunological diseases. An in-depth understanding of these genomic regions may help to explain variations in adaptation to different environments. Our approach offers a comprehensive strategy for analysing chromosome-based population structure and differentiation, and demonstrates the

  18. Genetic variation for stress-response hormesis in C. elegans lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Miriam; Snoek, L Basten; Riksen, Joost A G; Bevers, Roel P; Kammenga, Jan E

    2012-08-01

    Increased lifespan can be associated with greater resistance to many different stressors, most notably thermal stress. Such hormetic effects have also been found in C. elegans where short-term exposure to heat lengthens the lifespan. Genetic investigations have been carried out using mutation perturbations in a single genotype, the wild type Bristol N2. Yet, induced mutations do not yield insight regarding the natural genetic variation of thermal tolerance and lifespan. We investigated the genetic variation of heat-shock recovery, i.e. hormetic effects on lifespan and associated quantitative trait loci (QTL) in C. elegans. Heat-shock resulted in an 18% lifespan increase in wild type CB4856 whereas N2 did not show a lifespan elongation. Using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between wild types N2 and CB4856 we found natural variation in stress-response hormesis in lifespan. Approx. 28% of the RILs displayed a hormesis effect in lifespan. We did not find any hormesis effects for total offspring. Across the RILs there was no relation between lifespan and offspring. The ability to recover from heat-shock mapped to a significant QTL on chromosome II which overlapped with a QTL for offspring under heat-shock conditions. The QTL was confirmed by introgressing relatively small CB4856 regions into chromosome II of N2. Our observations show that there is natural variation in hormetic effects on C. elegans lifespan for heat-shock and that this variation is genetically determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic variation in Danish populations of Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei: estimation of gene diversity and effective population size using RFLP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, C.; Giese, Nanna Henriette

    1996-01-01

    Genetic variation of the barley powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei) was estimated in three Danish local populations. Genetic variation was estimated from the variation amongst clones of Egh, and was therefore an estimate of the maximum genetic variation in the local populations...

  20. Epigenetic Variation May Compensate for Decreased Genetic Variation with Introductions: A Case Study Using House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) on Two Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aaron W; Coon, Courtney A C; Grispo, Michael T; Awad, Mohammed; Imboma, Titus; McCoy, Earl D; Mushinsky, Henry R; Richards, Christina L; Martin, Lynn B

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms impact several phenotypic traits and may be important for ecology and evolution. The introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus) exhibits extensive phenotypic variation among and within populations. We screened methylation in populations from Kenya and Florida to determine if methylation varied among populations, varied with introduction history (Kenyan invasion genetic variation with introductions. While recent literature has speculated on the importance of epigenetic effects for biological invasions, this is the first such study among wild vertebrates. Methylation was more frequent in Nairobi, and outlier loci suggest that populations may be differentiated. Methylation diversity was similar between populations, in spite of known lower genetic diversity in Nairobi, which suggests that epigenetic variation may compensate for decreased genetic diversity as a source of phenotypic variation during introduction. Our results suggest that methylation differences may be common among house sparrows, but research is needed to discern whether methylation impacts phenotypic variation.

  1. Genetic variation in a wild population of the 'sleep' passion fruit (Passiflora setacea) based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Santos, E S L; Conceição, L D H C S; Cardoso-Silva, C B; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, A C; Corrêa, R X

    2012-03-22

    Little is known about the molecular genetic diversity of most Passiflora species. We used RAPD markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of 24 genotypes of the 'sleep' passion fruit (Passiflora setacea). Twelve primers generated 95 markers, 88% of which were polymorphic. The genetic distance estimated by the complement of the Dice index ranged from 0.29 (among accessions Ps-G1 and Ps-G13) to 0.69 (among accessions Ps-G21 and Ps-G23). Genotype grouping based on the UPGMA algorithm showed considerable variability among genotypes. We conclude that P. setacea has a broad genetic base that could be exploited in breeding programs.

  2. Genetic variation of common walnut (Juglans regia in Piedmont, Northwestern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrazzini D

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The European or common walnut is a large tree prized as a multipurpose species: it provides valuable timber and produces a high-quality edible nut. The diffusion of the species in Italy has been largely influenced by the human activity, mainly through germplasm movement, selection of genotypes most suited for wood or fruit production and adaptation induced on fruit crop reproductive materials. As a consequence, genetic variability has been reduced, so that programs aimed at its preservation appear of the utmost importance. 104 walnut plants growing in Piedmont, northwestern Italy, were investigated through genetic variation scored at RAPD loci, yielded by PCR amplification of 10 decamer primers. Among the 101 studied loci, only 53 were polymorphic, showing a low level of genetic variation within the studied material. Genetic differentiation was estimated both at individual and geographical area level. Only in few cases trees growing in the same area showed to be genetically similar, while the differentiation between areas accounted for about 10% of the total variation, according to AMOVA. No significant correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances. The results of the study showed that also in Piedmont (such as it was already demonstrated in other parts of Italy the distribution of common walnut is a direct consequence of the human activity. The selection of individual trees, to be used as basic materials for seed supply, should therefore be based mainly on phenotypic traits, rather than ecological features of the location: in species characterized by artificial diffusion, the adoption of Region of Provenance has a scarce significance and prominence should be given to the phenotype selection.

  3. Genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system and response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for child anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Roberts, Susanna; Keers, Robert; Breen, Gerome; Bögels, Susan; Creswell, Cathy; Hudson, Jennifer L; McKinnon, Anna; Nauta, Maaike; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne H; Eley, Thalia C

    2017-03-01

    Extinction learning is an important mechanism in the successful psychological treatment of anxiety. Individual differences in response and relapse following Cognitive Behavior Therapy may in part be explained by variability in the ease with which fears are extinguished or the vulnerability of these fears to re-emerge. Given the role of the endocannabinoid system in fear extinction, this study investigates whether genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system explains individual differences in response to CBT. Children (N = 1,309) with a primary anxiety disorder diagnosis were recruited. We investigated the relationship between variation in the CNR1, CNR2, and FAAH genes and change in primary anxiety disorder severity between pre- and post-treatment and during the follow-up period in the full sample and a subset with fear-based anxiety disorder diagnoses. Change in symptom severity during active treatment was nominally associated (P Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Cowpea Landraces (Vigna unguiculata from Western Cameroon Using Qualitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toscani NGOMPE-DEFFO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the genetic diversity and analysis of the genetic relationship between accessions of a crop species is a key step in breeding superior cultivars. The main objective of the hereby study was to determine the genetic variation between 30 cowpea accessions collected throughout the eight divisions of the Western Region of Cameroon using qualitative traits. Phenotypic variation of these accessions was evaluated using diversity indices and cluster analyses. A total of twenty qualitative traits were used for the study. Fifteen of them (75% were polymorphic, displaying each at least two phenotypic classes. The monomorphic characters were growth pattern, leaf color, leaf hairiness, plant hairiness and pod hairiness, each with only one phenotypic class. Results showed a relatively significant level of genetic diversity among the studied cowpea accessions. Overall, the average of the observed and effective number of phenotypic classes per qualitative trait were Na = 2.350 and Ne = 1.828 respectively. The Nei’s genetic diversity and the Shannon weaver diversity index were He = 0.369, ranging from zero (monomorphic trait to 0.655 (growth habit and H’ = 0.609, ranging from zero (monomorphic trait to 0.996 (seed crowding, respectively. The dendrogram constructed from the twenty qualitative traits revealed 05 accessions clusters with the number of accessions in each cluster varying from one to eleven. Information obtained from this study is likely be useful for future cowpea breeding program.

  5. Genetic diversity and variation of mitochondrial DNA in native and introduced bighead carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Fa; Yang, Qin-Ling; Xu, Jia-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hui; Chapman, Duane C.; Lu, Guoping

    2010-01-01

    The bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis is native to China but has been introduced to over 70 countries and is established in many large river systems. Genetic diversity and variation in introduced bighead carp have not previously been evaluated, and a systematic comparison among fish from different river systems was unavailable. In this study, 190 bighead carp specimens were sampled from five river systems in three countries (Yangtze, Pearl, and Amur rivers, China; Danube River, Hungary; Mississippi River basin, USA) and their mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene and D-loop region were sequenced (around 1,345 base pairs). Moderate genetic diversity was found in bighead carp, ranging from 0.0014 to 0.0043 for nucleotide diversity and from 0.6879 to 0.9333 for haplotype diversity. Haplotype analysis provided evidence that (1) multiple haplotype groups might be present among bighead carp, (2) bighead carp probably originated from the Yangtze River, and (3) bighead carp in the Mississippi River basin may have some genetic ancestry in the Danube River. The analysis of molecular variance showed significant genetic differentiation among these five populations but also revealed limited differentiation between the Yangtze and Amur River bighead carp. This large-scale study of bighead carp genetic diversity and variation provides the first global perspective of bighead carp in the context of biodiversity conservation as well as invasive species control and management.

  6. From homothally to heterothally: Mating preferences and genetic variation within clones of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Rosa Isabel; Rengefors, Karin; Bravo, Isabel; Bensch, Staffan

    2010-02-01

    The chain-forming dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum Graham is responsible for outbreaks of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), a human health threat in coastal waters. Sexuality in this species is of great importance in its bloom dynamics, and has been shown to be very complex but lacks an explanation. For this reason, we tested if unreported homothallic behavior and rapid genetic changes may clarify the sexual system of this alga. To achieve this objective, 12 clonal strains collected from the Spanish coast were analyzed for the presence of sexual reproduction. Mating affinity results, self-compatibility studies, and genetic fingerprinting (amplified fragment length polymorphism, AFLP) analysis on clonal strains, showed three facts not previously described for this species: (i) That there is a continuous mating system within G. catenatum, with either self-compatible strains (homothallic), or strains that needed to be outcrossed (heterothallic), and with a range of differences in cyst production among the crosses. (ii) There was intraclonal genetic variation, i.e. genetic variation within an asexual lineage. Moreover, the variability among homothallic clones was smaller than among the heterothallic ones. (iii) Sibling strains (the two strains established by the germination of one cyst) increased their intra- and inter-sexual compatibility with time. To summarize, we have found that G. catenatum's sexual system is much more complex than previously described, including complex homothallic/heterothallic behaviors. Additionally, high rates of genetic variability may arise in clonal strains, although explanations for the mechanisms responsible are still lacking.

  7. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex genes in the endangered red-crowned crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Nishida, Chizuko; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2017-07-01

    Populations that have drastically decreased in the past often have low genetic variation, which may increase the risk of extinction. The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play an important role in the adaptive immune response of jawed vertebrates. Maintenance of adaptive genetic diversity such as that of MHC genes is important for wildlife conservation. Here, we determined genotypes of exon 3 of MHC class IA genes (MHCIA) and exon 2 of MHC class IIB genes (MHCIIB) to evaluate genetic variation of the endangered red-crowned crane population on Hokkaido Island, Japan, which experienced severe population decline in the past. We identified 16 and 6 alleles of MHCIA and MHCIIB, respectively, from 152 individuals. We found evidence of a positive selection at the antigen-binding sites in MHCIA exon 3 and MHCIIB exon 2. The phylogenetic analyses indicated evidence of trans-species polymorphism among the crane MHC genes. The genetic variability in both classes of MHC genes at the population level was low. No geographic structure was found based on the genetic diversity of microsatellite and MHC genes. Our study provides useful data for the optimal management of the red-crowned crane population in Hokkaido and can contribute to future studies on MHC genes of the continental populations of the red-crowned crane and other crane species.

  8. Hidden diversity in diatoms of Kenyan Lake Naivasha: a genetic approach detects temporal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R; Epp, Laura S; Trauth, Martin H; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    This study provides insights into the morphological and genetic diversity in diatoms occurring in core sediments from tropical lakes in Kenya. We developed a genetic survey technique specific for diatoms utilizing a short region (76-67 bp) of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) gene as genetic barcode. Our analyses (i) validated the use of rbcL as a barcoding marker for diatoms, applied to sediment samples, (ii) showed a significant correlation between the results obtained by morphological and molecular data and (iii) indicated temporal variation in diatom assemblages on the inter- and intra-specific level. Diatom assemblages from a short core from Lake Naivasha show a drastic shift over the last 200 years, as littoral species (e.g. Navicula) are replaced by more planktonic ones (e.g. Aulacoseira). Within that same period, we detected periodic changes in the respective frequencies of distinct haplotype groups of Navicula, which coincide with wet and dry periods of Lake Naivasha between 1820 and 1938 AD. Our genetic analyses on historical lake sediments revealed inter- and intra-specific variation in diatoms, which is partially hidden behind single morphotypes. The occurrence of particular genetic lineages is probably correlated with environmental factors. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Genetic and environmental variation in Eysenck Personality Questionnaire scales measured on Australian adolescent twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, G T; Hopper, J L; White, V; Hill, D J

    1994-11-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was administered to 1400 Australian twin pairs aged 11 to 18, and the data were analyzed by a multivariate normal model using the software FISHER. For each scale, attempts were made to transform to normality, about a mean modeled separately for each sex as a quadratic function of age. Variances and covariances were estimated for each sex-zygosity group as a monotone function of age. Evidence for genetic sources of variation were assessed in part by fitting models which allowed for age-dependent, sex-specific, and correlated additive genetic factors, and age-dependent and sex-specific environmental factors, under the assumption that effects of environmental factors common to twin pairs are independent of zygosity. Evidence for genetic factors independent of age and sex was most compelling for Psychoticism and Neuroticism. For Extraversion, if genetic factors exist they would be mostly sex-specific and age-dependent. For the Lie scale there was evidence for, at most, a small component of genetic variation.

  10. Genetic variations in taste perception modify alcohol drinking behavior in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Jeonghee; Yang, Sarah; Kim, Jeongseon

    2017-06-01

    The sensory components of alcohol affect the onset of individual's drinking. Therefore, variations in taste receptor genes may lead to differential sensitivity for alcohol taste, which may modify an individual's drinking behavior. This study examined the influence of genetic variants in the taste-sensing mechanism on alcohol drinking behavior and the choice of alcoholic beverages. A total of 1829 Koreans were analyzed for their alcohol drinking status (drinker/non-drinker), total alcohol consumption (g/day), heavy drinking (≥30 g/day) and type of regularly consumed alcoholic beverages. Twenty-one genetic variations in bitterness, sweetness, umami and fatty acid sensing were also genotyped. Our findings suggested that multiple genetic variants modified individuals' alcohol drinking behavior. Genetic variations in the T2R bitterness receptor family were associated with overall drinking behavior. Subjects with the TAS2R38 AVI haplotype were less likely to be a drinker [odds ratio (OR): 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.59-0.95], and TAS2R5 rs2227264 predicted the level of total alcohol consumption (p = 0.01). In contrast, the T1R sweet and umami receptor family was associated with heavy drinking. TAS1R3 rs307355 CT carriers were more likely to be heavy drinkers (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.06-2.19). The genetic variants were also associated with the choice of alcoholic beverages. The homo-recessive type of TAS2R4 rs2233998 (OR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.11-2.37) and TAS2R5 rs2227264 (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.14-2.58) were associated with consumption of rice wine. However, TAS1R2 rs35874116 was associated with wine drinking (OR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.43-0.98) and the consumption level (p = 0.04). These findings suggest that multiple genetic variations in taste receptors influence drinking behavior in Koreans. Genetic variations are also responsible for the preference of particular alcoholic beverages, which may contribute to an individual's alcohol drinking behavior. Copyright © 2017

  11. Can genetic differences explain vocal dialect variation in sperm whales, Physeter macrocephalus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Luke; Mesnick, Sarah L; Dalebout, Merel L; Burtenshaw, Jessica; Whitehead, Hal

    2012-03-01

    Sperm whale social groups can be assigned to vocal clans based on their production of codas, short stereotyped patterns of clicks. It is currently unclear whether genetic variation could account for these behavioural differences. We studied mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation among sympatric vocal clans in the Pacific Ocean, using sequences extracted from sloughed skin samples. We sampled 194 individuals from 30 social groups belonging to one of three vocal clans. As in previous studies of sperm whales, mtDNA control region diversity was low (π = 0.003), with just 14 haplotypes present in our sample. Both hierarchical AMOVAs and partial Mantel tests showed that vocal clan was a more important factor in matrilineal population genetic structure than geography, even though our sampling spanned thousands of kilometres. The variance component attributed to vocal dialects (7.7%) was an order of magnitude higher than those previously reported in birds, while the variance component attributed to geographic area was negligible. Despite this, the two most common haplotypes were present in significant quantities in each clan, meaning that variation in the control region cannot account for behavioural variation between clans, and instead parallels the situation in humans where parent-offspring transmission of language variation has resulted in correlations with neutral genes. Our results also raise questions for the management of sperm whale populations, which has traditionally been based on dividing populations into geographic 'stocks', suggesting that culturally-defined vocal clans may be more appropriate management units.

  12. Combined examination of sequence and copy number variations in human deafness genes improves diagnosis for cases of genetic deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Haiting; Lu, Jingqiao; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs) are the major type of structural variation in the human genome, and are more common than DNA sequence variations in populations. CNVs are important factors for human genetic and phenotypic diversity. Many CNVs have been associated with either resistance to diseases or identified as the cause of diseases. Currently little is known about the role of CNVs in causing deafness. CNVs are currently not analyzed by conventional genetic analysis methods to stud...

  13. Genetic Variation Linked to Lung Cancer Survival in White Smokers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR investigators have discovered evidence that links lung cancer survival with genetic variations (called single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the MBL2 gene, a key player in innate immunity. The variations in the gene, which codes for a protein called the mannose-binding lectin, occur in its promoter region, where the RNA polymerase molecule binds to start transcription, and in the first exon that is responsible for the correct structure of MBL. The findings appear in the September 19, 2007, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  14. Genetic Variation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from Multiple Crops in the North Central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich-Wolfe, Laura; Travers, Steven; Nelson, Berlin D

    2015-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen of numerous crops in the North Central region of the United States. The objective of this study was to examine the genetic diversity of 145 isolates of the pathogen from multiple hosts in the region. Mycelial compatibility groups (MCG) and microsatellite haplotypes were determined and analyzed for standard estimates of population genetic diversity and the importance of host and distance for genetic variation was examined. MCG tests indicated there were 49 different MCGs in the population and 52 unique microsatellite haplotypes were identified. There was an association between MCG and haplotype such that isolates belonging to the same MCG either shared identical haplotypes or differed at no more than 2 of the 12 polymorphic loci. For the majority of isolates, there was a one-to-one correspondence between MCG and haplotype. Eleven MCGs shared haplotypes. A single haplotype was found to be prevalent throughout the region. The majority of genetic variation in the isolate collection was found within rather than among host crops, suggesting little genetic divergence of S. sclerotiorum among hosts. There was only weak evidence of isolation by distance. Pairwise population comparisons among isolates from canola, dry bean, soybean and sunflower suggested that gene flow between host-populations is more common for some crops than others. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium in the isolates from the four major crops indicated primarily clonal reproduction, but also evidence of genetic recombination for isolates from canola and sunflower. Accordingly, genetic diversity was highest for populations from canola and sunflower. Distribution of microsatellite haplotypes across the study region strongly suggest that specific haplotypes of S. sclerotiorum are often found on multiple crops, movement of individual haplotypes among crops is common and host identity is not a barrier to gene flow for S. sclerotiorum in the north central United

  15. Genetic Variation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from Multiple Crops in the North Central United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aldrich-Wolfe

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen of numerous crops in the North Central region of the United States. The objective of this study was to examine the genetic diversity of 145 isolates of the pathogen from multiple hosts in the region. Mycelial compatibility groups (MCG and microsatellite haplotypes were determined and analyzed for standard estimates of population genetic diversity and the importance of host and distance for genetic variation was examined. MCG tests indicated there were 49 different MCGs in the population and 52 unique microsatellite haplotypes were identified. There was an association between MCG and haplotype such that isolates belonging to the same MCG either shared identical haplotypes or differed at no more than 2 of the 12 polymorphic loci. For the majority of isolates, there was a one-to-one correspondence between MCG and haplotype. Eleven MCGs shared haplotypes. A single haplotype was found to be prevalent throughout the region. The majority of genetic variation in the isolate collection was found within rather than among host crops, suggesting little genetic divergence of S. sclerotiorum among hosts. There was only weak evidence of isolation by distance. Pairwise population comparisons among isolates from canola, dry bean, soybean and sunflower suggested that gene flow between host-populations is more common for some crops than others. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium in the isolates from the four major crops indicated primarily clonal reproduction, but also evidence of genetic recombination for isolates from canola and sunflower. Accordingly, genetic diversity was highest for populations from canola and sunflower. Distribution of microsatellite haplotypes across the study region strongly suggest that specific haplotypes of S. sclerotiorum are often found on multiple crops, movement of individual haplotypes among crops is common and host identity is not a barrier to gene flow for S. sclerotiorum in the

  16. Genetic variation in structure-function relationships for the inbred mouse lumbar vertebral body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, Steven M; Morgan, Timothy G; van der Meulen, Marjolein Ch; Jepsen, Karl J

    2005-05-01

    Structure-function relationships were determined for L(5) vertebral bodies from three inbred mouse strains. Genetic variability in whole bone mechanical properties could be explained by a combination of the traits specifying the amount, distribution, and quality of the cortical and trabecular bone tissue. Although phenotypically correlated with fracture, BMD may be disadvantageous to use in genetic and biomechanical analyses because BMD does not distinguish the contributions of the underlying morphological and compositional bone traits. Developing functional relationships between the underlying bone traits and whole bone mechanical properties should further our understanding of the genetics of bone fragility. Microarchitecture and composition of L(5) vertebral bodies (n = 10/strain) from A/J, C57BL/6J, and C3H/HeJ inbred mouse strains were determined using muCT with an isotropic voxel size of 16 mum(3). Failure load, stiffness, and total deformation as a measure of ductility were measured in compression using a noncontact strain extensometer imaging system. A correlation analysis related morphological and compositional bone traits to whole bone mechanical properties. A multivariate analysis identified structure-function relationships for each genotype. No single bone trait accurately explained the genetic variation in mechanical properties. However, a combination of traits describing the amount, distribution, and quality of cortical and trabecular bone tissue explained >70% of the variation in vertebral mechanical properties. Importantly, structure-function relationships were unique among genotypes. Different genetic backgrounds use different combinations of underlying bone traits to create mechanically functional structures. Using a single complex trait such as BMD or BV/TV as the sole phenotypic marker in genetic analyses may prove to be disadvantageous because of the complex relationship between mechanical properties and the underlying bone traits. Therefore

  17. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  18. Interactions between meat intake and genetic variation in relation to colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Meat intake is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate interactions between meat intake and genetic variation in order to identify biological pathways involved in meat carcinogenesis. We performed a literature search of Pub......Med and Embase using "interaction", "meat", "polymorphisms", and "colorectal cancer", and data on meat-gene interactions were extracted. The studies were divided according to whether information on meat intake was collected prospectively or retrospectively. In prospective studies, interactions between meat...... a polymorphism in XPC and meat was found in one prospective and one case-control study; however, the directions of the risk estimates were opposite. Thus, none of the findings were replicated. The results from this systematic review suggest that genetic variation in the inflammatory response and DNA repair...

  19. Female guppies agree to differ: phenotypic and genetic variation in mate-choice behavior and the consequences for sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R; Endler, J A

    2001-08-01

    Variation among females in mate choice may influence evolution by sexual selection. The genetic basis of this variation is of interest because the elaboration of mating preferences requires additive genetic variation in these traits. Here we measure the repeatability and heritability of two components of female choosiness (responsiveness and discrimination) and of female preference functions for the multiple ornaments borne by male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that there is significant repeatable variation in both components of choosiness and in some preference functions but not in others. There appear to be several male ornaments that females find uniformly attractive and others for which females differ in preference. One consequence is that there is no universally attractive male phenotype. Only responsiveness shows significant additive genetic variation. Variation in responsiveness appears to mask variation in discrimination and some preference functions and may be the most biologically relevant source of phenotypic and genetic variation in mate-choice behavior. To test the potential evolutionary importance of the phenotypic variation in mate choice that we report, we estimated the opportunity for and the intensity of sexual selection under models of mate choice that excluded and that incorporated individual female variation. We then compared these estimates with estimates based on measured mating success. Incorporating individual variation in mate choice generally did not predict the outcome of sexual selection any better than models that ignored such variation.

  20. Sex and Genetic Background Influence Superoxide Dismutase (cSOD-Related Phenotypic Variation in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney E. Lessel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations often have drastically different effects in different genetic backgrounds; understanding a gene’s biological function then requires an understanding of its interaction with genetic diversity. The antioxidant enzyme cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (cSOD catalyzes the dismutation of the superoxide radical, a molecule that can induce oxidative stress if its concentration exceeds cellular control. Accordingly, Drosophila melanogaster lacking functional cSOD exhibit a suite of phenotypes including decreased longevity, hypersensitivity to oxidative stress, impaired locomotion, and reduced NADP(H enzyme activity in males. To date, cSOD-null phenotypes have primarily been characterized using males carrying one allele, cSodn108red, in a single genetic background. We used ANOVA, and the effect size partial eta squared, to partition the amount of variation attributable to cSOD activity, sex, and genetic background across a series of life history, locomotor, and biochemical phenotypes associated with the cSOD-null condition. Overall, the results demonstrate that the cSOD-null syndrome is largely consistent across sex and genetic background, but also significantly influenced by both. The sex-specific effects are particularly striking and our results support the idea that phenotypes cannot be considered to be fully defined if they are examined in limited genetic contexts.

  1. A Drosophila model for toxicogenomics: Genetic variation in susceptibility to heavy metal exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic factors that give rise to variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins remain largely unexplored. Studies on genetic variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins are challenging in human populations, due to the variety of clinical symptoms and difficulty in determining which symptoms causally result from toxic exposure; uncontrolled environments, often with exposure to multiple toxicants; and difficulty in relating phenotypic effect size to toxic dose, especially when symptoms become manifest with a substantial time lag. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model that enables genome-wide studies for the identification of allelic variants that contribute to variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins, since the genetic background, environmental rearing conditions and toxic exposure can be precisely controlled. Here, we used extreme QTL mapping in an outbred population derived from the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel to identify alleles associated with resistance to lead and/or cadmium, two ubiquitous environmental toxins that present serious health risks. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with variation in resistance to both heavy metals as well as SNPs associated with resistance specific to each of them. The effects of these SNPs were largely sex-specific. We applied mutational and RNAi analyses to 33 candidate genes and functionally validated 28 of them. We constructed networks of candidate genes as blueprints for orthologous networks of human genes. The latter not only provided functional contexts for known human targets of heavy metal toxicity, but also implicated novel candidate susceptibility genes. These studies validate Drosophila as a translational toxicogenomics gene discovery system.

  2. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    Chunfang, Qiu; GELAYE, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Ananth, Cande V.; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to e...

  3. Elucidating Genetic Variation and Mechanism of Virus Infection of Emiliania huxleyi via Genomic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica U Kegel

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aimed at the identification of genes involved in the host-virus interaction of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and the virus EhV-86 by taking advantage of EST libraries and DNA microarrays. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to investigate the genetic variation of several E. huxleyi strains and to identify genes with respect to virus susceptibility and morphology, e.g. formation of coccoliths.Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was perfo...

  4. Genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system and response to cognitive behavior therapy for child anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lester, Kathryn J; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Roberts, Susanna; Keers, Robert; Breen, Gerome; Bögels, Susan; Creswell, Cathy; Hudson, Jennifer L; McKinnon, Anna; Nauta, Maaike; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Waite, Polly

    2017-01-01

    Extinction learning is an important mechanism in the successful psychological treatment of anxiety. Individual differences in response and relapse following Cognitive Behavior Therapy may in part be explained by variability in the ease with which fears are extinguished or the vulnerability of these fears to re?emerge. Given the role of the endocannabinoid system in fear extinction, this study investigates whether genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system explains individual differences ...

  5. Genetic variation in ABC transporter A1 contributes to HDL cholesterol in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Jensen, Gorm B; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Homozygosity for mutations in ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) causes Tangier disease, a rare HDL-deficiency syndrome. Whether heterozygosity for genetic variation in ABCA1 also contributes to HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in the general population is presently unclear. We determined whether mutations or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCA1 were overrepresented in individuals with the lowest 1% (n = 95) or highest 1% (n = 95) HDL-C levels in the general population by screening the core ...

  6. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively neutral sites across the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui; Kim, Su Yeon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Vinckenbosch, Nicolas; Tian, Geng; Huerta-Sanchez, Emilia; Feder, Alison F; Grarup, Niels; Jørgensen, Torben; Jiang, Tao; Witte, Daniel R; Sandbæk, Annelli; Hellmann, Ines; Lauritzen, Torsten; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Wang, Jun; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2011-10-01

    A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries of genetic variation, like allele frequencies, are also correlated with recombination rate and whether these correlations can be explained solely by negative selection against deleterious mutations or whether positive selection acting on favorable alleles is also required. Here we attempt to address these questions by analyzing three different genome-wide resequencing datasets from European individuals. We document several significant correlations between different genomic features. In particular, we find that average minor allele frequency and diversity are reduced in regions of low recombination and that human diversity, human-chimp divergence, and average minor allele frequency are reduced near genes. Population genetic simulations show that either positive natural selection acting on favorable mutations or negative natural selection acting against deleterious mutations can explain these correlations. However, models with strong positive selection on nonsynonymous mutations and little negative selection predict a stronger negative correlation between neutral diversity and nonsynonymous divergence than observed in the actual data, supporting the importance of negative, rather than positive, selection throughout the genome. Further, we show that the widespread presence of weakly deleterious alleles, rather than a small number of strongly positively selected mutations, is responsible for the correlation between neutral genetic diversity and recombination rate. This work suggests that natural selection has affected multiple aspects of linked neutral variation throughout the human genome and that positive selection is not required to explain these observations.

  7. Genetic variation for farrowing rate in pigs in response to change in photoperiod and ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, C A; Mulder, H A; Rashidi, H; Mathur, P K; Knol, E F

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal infertility is often observed as anestrus and a lower conception rate resulting in a reduced farrowing rate (FR) during late summer and early autumn. This is often regarded as an effect of heat stress; however, we observed a reduction in the FR of sows even after correcting for ambient temperature in our data. Therefore, we added change in photoperiod in the analysis of FR considering its effect on sow fertility. Change in photoperiod was modeled using the cosine of the day of first insemination within a year. On an average, the FR decreased by 2% during early autumn with decreasing daily photoperiod compared with early summer with almost no change in daily photoperiod. It declined 0.2% per degree Celsius of ambient temperature above 19.2°C. This result is a step forward in disentangling the 2 environmental components responsible for seasonal infertility. Our next aim was to estimate the magnitude of genetic variation in FR in response to change in photoperiod and ambient temperature to explore opportunities for selecting pigs to have a constant FR throughout the year. We used reaction norm models to estimate additive genetic variation in response to change in photoperiod and ambient temperature. The results revealed a larger genetic variation at stressful environments when daily photoperiod decreased and ambient temperatures increased above 19.2°C compared with neutral environments. Genetic correlations between stressful environments and nonstressful environments ranged from 0.90 (±0.03) to 0.46 (±0.13) depending on the severity of the stress, indicating changes in expression of FR depending on the environment. The genetic correlation between responses of pigs to changes in photoperiod and to those in ambient temperature were positive, indicating that pigs tolerant to decreasing daily photoperiod are also tolerant to high ambient temperatures. Therefore, selection for tolerance to decreasing daily photoperiod should also increase tolerance to high

  8. Molecular genetics of coat colour variations in White Galloway and White Park cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenig, B; Beck, J; Floren, C; Bornemann-Kolatzki, K; Wiedemann, I; Hennecke, S; Swalve, H; Schütz, E

    2013-08-01

    White Galloway cattle exhibit three different white coat colour phenotypes, that is, well marked, strongly marked and mismarked. However, mating of individuals with the preferred well or strongly marked phenotype also results in offspring with the undesired mismarked and/or even fully black coat colour. To elucidate the genetic background of the coat colour variations in White Galloway cattle, we analysed four coat colour relevant genes: mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (KIT), KIT ligand (KITLG), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and tyrosinase (TYR). Here, we show that the coat colour variations in White Galloway cattle and White Park cattle are caused by a KIT gene (chromosome 6) duplication and aberrant insertion on chromosome 29 (Cs29 ) as recently described for colour-sided Belgian Blue. Homozygous (Cs29 /Cs29 ) White Galloway cattle and White Park cattle exhibit the mismarked phenotype, whereas heterozygous (Cs29 /wt29 ) individuals are either well or strongly marked. In contrast, fully black individuals are characterised by the wild-type chromosome 29. As known for other cattle breeds, mutations in the MC1R gene determine the red colouring. Our data suggest that the white coat colour variations in White Galloway cattle and White Park cattle are caused by a dose-dependent effect based on the ploidy of aberrant insertions and inheritance of the KIT gene on chromosome 29. © 2013 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Modeling variation in early life mortality in the western lowland gorilla: Genetic, maternal and other effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Monica H; Blomquist, Gregory E

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering sources of variation in gorilla infant mortality informs conservation and life history research efforts. The international studbook for the western lowland gorilla provides information on a sample of captive gorillas large enough for which to analyze genetic, maternal, and various other effects on early life mortality in this critically endangered species. We assess the importance of variables such as sex, maternal parity, paternal age, and hand rearing with regard to infant survival. We also quantify the proportions of variation in mortality influenced by heritable variation and maternal effects from these pedigree and survival data using variance component estimation. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of generalized linear mixed models produce variance component distributions in an animal model framework that employs all pedigree information. Two models, one with a maternal identity component and one with both additive genetic and maternal identity components, estimate variance components for different age classes during the first 2 years of life. This is informative of the extent to which mortality risk factors change over time during gorilla infancy. Our results indicate that gorilla mortality is moderately heritable with the strongest genetic influence just after birth. Maternal effects are most important during the first 6 months of life. Interestingly, hand-reared infants have lower mortality for the first 6 months of life. Aside from hand rearing, we found other predictors commonly used in studies of primate infant mortality to have little influence in these gorilla data. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Contribution of FKBP5 genetic variation to gemcitabine treatment and survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Ellsworth

    Full Text Available FKBP51, (FKBP5, is a negative regulator of Akt. Variability in FKBP5 expression level is a major factor contributing to variation in response to chemotherapeutic agents including gemcitabine, a first line treatment for pancreatic cancer. Genetic variation in FKBP5 could influence its function and, ultimately, treatment response of pancreatic cancer.We set out to comprehensively study the role of genetic variation in FKBP5 identified by Next Generation DNA resequencing on response to gemcitabine treatment of pancreatic cancer by utilizing both tumor and germline DNA samples from 43 pancreatic cancer patients, including 19 paired normal-tumor samples. Next, genotype-phenotype association studies were performed with overall survival as well as with FKBP5 gene expression in tumor using the same samples in which resequencing had been performed, followed by functional genomics studies.In-depth resequencing identified 404 FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in normal and tumor DNA. SNPs with the strongest associations with survival or FKBP5 expression were subjected to functional genomic study. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs73748206 "A(T" SNP altered DNA-protein binding patterns, consistent with significantly increased reporter gene activity, possibly through its increased binding to Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR. The effect of rs73748206 was confirmed on the basis of its association with FKBP5 expression by affecting the binding to GR in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the same patients for whom DNA was used for resequencing.This comprehensive FKBP5 resequencing study provides insights into the role of genetic variation in variation of gemcitabine response.

  11. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth J Voss

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4% and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  12. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Gareth J; Kump, D Kevin; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  13. Pubertal onset in girls is strongly influenced by genetic variation affecting FSH action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Age at pubertal onset varies substantially in healthy girls. Although genetic factors are responsible for more than half of the phenotypic variation, only a small part has been attributed to specific genetic polymorphisms identified so far. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates ovarian...... follicle maturation and estradiol synthesis which is responsible for breast development. We assessed the effect of three polymorphisms influencing FSH action on age at breast deveopment in a population-based cohort of 964 healthy girls. Girls homozygous for FSHR -29AA (reduced FSH receptor expression......) entered puberty 7.4 (2.5-12.4) months later than carriers of the common variants FSHR -29GG+GA, p = 0.003. To our knowledge, this is the strongest genetic effect on age at pubertal onset in girls published to date....

  14. Genetic variation and population structure in the endangered greater horseshoe bat Rhinolophus ferrumequinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, S J; Jones, G; Ransome, R D; Barratt, E M

    2000-08-01

    Following a dramatic decline last century, the British population of the endangered greater horseshoe bat Rhinolophus ferrumequinum is highly fragmented. To examine the consequences of fragmentation and limited dispersal on patterns of genetic structure and variation, we used microsatellite markers to screen bats from around 50% of the known maternity colonies in Britain, and two areas from continental Europe. Analyses revealed that Welsh and English colonies were genetically isolated. This, and lower variability in Britain than north France, may result from either genetic drift, or the species' colonization history. Gene flow among most neighbouring colonies was not generally restricted, with one exception. These findings have important implications for the ongoing conservation management of this species.

  15. Natural Genetic Variation for Growth and Development Revealed by High-Throughput Phenotyping in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Hause, Ronald J; Borevitz, Justin O

    2012-01-01

    Leaf growth and development determines a plant's capacity for photosynthesis and carbon fixation. These morphological traits are the integration of genetic and environmental factors through time. Yet fine dissection of the developmental genetic basis of leaf expansion throughout a growing season is difficult, due to the complexity of the trait and the need for real time measurement. In this study, we developed a time-lapse image analysis approach, which traces leaf expansion under seasonal light variation. Three growth traits, rosette leaf area, circular area, and their ratio as compactness, were measured and normalized on a linear timescale to control for developmental heterogeneity. We found high heritability for all growth traits that changed over time. Our study highlights a cost-effective, high-throughput phenotyping approach that facilitates the dissection of genetic basis of plant shoot growth and development under dynamic environmental conditions.

  16. Genetic risk for autism spectrum disorders and neuropsychiatric variation in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Elise B; St Pourcain, Beate; Anttila, Verneri

    2016-01-01

    Almost all genetic risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can be found in the general population, but the effects of this risk are unclear in people not ascertained for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Using several large ASD consortium and population-based resources (total n > 38,000), we...... find genome-wide genetic links between ASDs and typical variation in social behavior and adaptive functioning. This finding is evidenced through both LD score correlation and de novo variant analysis, indicating that multiple types of genetic risk for ASDs influence a continuum of behavioral...... and developmental traits, the severe tail of which can result in diagnosis with an ASD or other neuropsychiatric disorder. A continuum model should inform the design and interpretation of studies of neuropsychiatric disease biology....

  17. Genetic variations in the serotoninergic system contribute to body-mass index in Chinese adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity has become a worldwide health problem in the past decades. Human and animal studies have implicated serotonin in appetite regulation, and behavior genetic studies have shown that body mass index (BMI has a strong genetic component. However, the roles of genes related to the serotoninergic (5-hydroxytryptamine,5-HT system in obesity/BMI are not well understood, especially in Chinese subjects. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: With a sample of 478 healthy Chinese volunteers, this study investigated the relation between BMI and genetic variations of the serotoninergic system as characterized by 136 representative polymorphisms. We used a system-level approach to identify SNPs associated with BMI, then estimated their overall contribution to BMI by multiple regression and verified it by permutation. RESULTS: We identified 12 SNPs that made statistically significant contributions to BMI. After controlling for gender and age, four of these SNPs accounted for 7.7% additional variance of BMI. Permutation analysis showed that the probability of obtaining these findings by chance was low (p = 0.015, permuted for 1000 times. CONCLUSION: These results showed that genetic variations in the serotoninergic system made a moderate contribution to individual differences in BMI among a healthy Chinese sample, suggesting that a similar approach can be used to study obesity.

  18. Pheno-morphological variation, genetic diversity and population structure of Tunisian Echinus Medic (Medicago ciliaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, C; Sbei, H; Zitouna, N; Trifi-Farah, N; Zoghlami Khelil, A

    2016-08-26

    Medicago ciliaris L., considered as a valuable genetic resource, is a good candidate for the improvement of marginal or degraded lands with low fertility or high salinity. In this study, the pheno-morphological and genetic diversity were investigated in 14 Tunisian populations of M. ciliaris for the first time. Fourteen morphological traits showed significant differentiation between populations and high levels of diversity. Two amplified fragment length polymorphism primer combinations (E-AGC/M-CAA; E-AAG/M-CTG) were analyzed using an automated capillary electrophoresis system. A total of 528 loci were generated, of which 54% were polymorphic. Allelic polymorphism ranged from 0.02 to 0.5. Significant variation between populations was found for gene diversity, mean number of alleles per locus and Shannon index for which mean values were 0.17, 0.26, and 1.57, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance revealed a high rate of genetic variation within populations. Principal component analysis and genotypic clustering discriminated M. ciliaris populations according to their geographical origin. M. ciliaris clustered into three main groups. The first group was associated with high inland and cold areas, the second was defined by low areas with mild winters while the third described low coastal areas. Similarity of morphological and molecular results indicated that either markers could be used for the study of genetic diversity in this species.

  19. Genetic Variation and Biological Control of Fusarium graminearum Isolated from Wheat in Assiut-Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer F. Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum Schwabe causes Fusarium head blight (FHB, a devastating disease that leads to extensive yield and quality loss of wheat and other cereal crops. Twelve isolates of F. graminearum were collected from naturally infected spikes of wheat from Assiut Egypt. These isolates were compared using SRAP. The results indicated distinct genetic groups exist within F. graminearum, and demonstrated that these groups have different biological properties, especially with respect to their pathogenicity on wheat. There were biologically significant differences between the groups; with group (B isolates being more aggressive towards wheat than groups (A and (C. Furthermore, Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai and Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg which isolated from wheat kernels were screened for antagonistic activity against F. graminearum. They significantly reduced the growth of F. graminearum colonies in culture. In order to gain insight into biological control effect in situ, highly antagonistic isolates of T. harzianum and B. subtilis were selected, based on their in vitro effectiveness, for greenhouse test. It was revealed that T. harzianum and B. subtilis significantly reduced FHB severity. The obtained results indicated that T. harzianum and B. subtilis are very effective biocontrol agents that offer potential benefit in FHB and should be harnessed for further biocontrol applications. The accurate analysis of genetic variation and studies of population structures have significant implications for understanding the genetic traits and disease control programs in wheat. This is the first known report of the distribution and genetic variation of F. graminearum on wheat spikes in Assiut Egypt.

  20. Genetic Variation and Biological Control of Fusarium graminearum Isolated from Wheat in Assiut-Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amer F

    2016-04-01

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe causes Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease that leads to extensive yield and quality loss of wheat and other cereal crops. Twelve isolates of F. graminearum were collected from naturally infected spikes of wheat from Assiut Egypt. These isolates were compared using SRAP. The results indicated distinct genetic groups exist within F. graminearum, and demonstrated that these groups have different biological properties, especially with respect to their pathogenicity on wheat. There were biologically significant differences between the groups; with group (B) isolates being more aggressive towards wheat than groups (A) and (C). Furthermore, Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai) and Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg) which isolated from wheat kernels were screened for antagonistic activity against F. graminearum. They significantly reduced the growth of F. graminearum colonies in culture. In order to gain insight into biological control effect in situ, highly antagonistic isolates of T. harzianum and B. subtilis were selected, based on their in vitro effectiveness, for greenhouse test. It was revealed that T. harzianum and B. subtilis significantly reduced FHB severity. The obtained results indicated that T. harzianum and B. subtilis are very effective biocontrol agents that offer potential benefit in FHB and should be harnessed for further biocontrol applications. The accurate analysis of genetic variation and studies of population structures have significant implications for understanding the genetic traits and disease control programs in wheat. This is the first known report of the distribution and genetic variation of F. graminearum on wheat spikes in Assiut Egypt.

  1. Impact of human management on the genetic variation of wild pepper, Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo González-Jara

    Full Text Available Management of wild peppers in Mexico has occurred for a long time without clear phenotypic signs of domestication. However, pre-domestication management could have implications for the population's genetic richness. To test this hypothesis we analysed 27 wild (W, let standing (LS and cultivated (C populations, plus 7 samples from local markets (LM, with nine polymorphic microsatellite markers. Two hundred and fifty two alleles were identified, averaging 28 per locus. Allele number was higher in W, and 15 and 40% less in LS and C populations, respectively. Genetic variation had a significant population structure. In W populations, structure was associated with ecological and geographic areas according to isolation by distance. When LM and C populations where included in the analysis, differentiation was no longer apparent. Most LM were related to distant populations from Sierra Madre Oriental, which represents their probable origin. Historical demography shows a recent decline in all W populations. Thus, pre-domestication human management is associated with a significant reduction of genetic diversity and with a loss of differentiation suggesting movement among regions by man. Measures to conserve wild and managed populations should be implemented to maintain the source and the architecture of genetic variation in this important crop relative.

  2. Genetic Variation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Action Is Associated With Age at Testicular Growth in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Alexander S; Hagen, Casper P; Main, Katharina M

    2017-01-01

    Context: Although genetic factors play a pivotal role in male pubertal timing, genome-wide association studies have identified only a few loci. Genetic variation of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action affects adult reproductive parameters and female pubertal timing. Objective: To investigate...... whether genetic variation affecting FSH action is associated with onset of puberty in boys. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal study of two cohorts of healthy boys. Setting: This was a population-based study. Patients or Other Participants: Danish (n = 1130) and Chilean (n = 424) boys were followed......), genetic variation affecting FSH production (FSHB c.-211G>T) was associated with age at pubertal onset, as assessed by testicular enlargement, in both cohorts. The effect appeared further modified by coexistence of genetic variation affecting FSH sensitivity (FSHR c.-29G>A): After correcting for body mass...

  3. The Genetic Variation of Bali Cattle (Bos javanicus Based on Sex Related Y Chromosome Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Winaya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bali cattle is very popular Indonesian local beef related to their status in community living process of farmers in Indonesia, especially as providers of meat and exotic animal. Bali cattle were able to adapt the limited environment and becoming local livestock that existed until recently.  In our early study by microsatellites showed that Bali cattle have specific allele. In this study we analyzed the variance of partly sex related Y (SRY gene sequence in Bali cattle bull as a source of cement for Artificial Insemination (AI.  Blood from 17 two location of AI center, Singosari, Malang and Baturiti, Bali was collected and then extracted to get the DNA genome.  PCR reaction was done to amplify partially of SRY gene segment and followed by sequencing PCR products to get the DNA sequence of SRY gene. The SRY gene sequence was used to determine the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationship.  We found that Bali cattle bull from Singosari has relatively closed genetic relationship with Baturiti. It is also supported that in early data some Bali bulls of Singosari were came from Baturiti. It has been known that Baturiti is the one source of Bali cattle bull with promising genetic potential. While, in general that Bali bull where came from two areas were not different on reproductive performances. It is important to understand about the genetic variation of Bali cattle in molecular level related to conservation effort and maintaining the genetic characters of the local cattle. So, it will not become extinct or even decreased the genetic quality of Indonesian indigenous cattle.   Key Words : Bali cattle, SRY gene, artificial insemination, phylogenetic, allele   Animal Production 13(3:150-155 (2011

  4. From micro- to macroevolution through quantitative genetic variation: positive evidence from field crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégin, Mattieu; Roff, Derek A

    2004-10-01

    Quantitative genetics has been introduced to evolutionary biologists with the suggestion that microevolution could be directly linked to macroevolutionary patterns using, among other parameters, the additive genetic variance/ covariance matrix (G) which is a statistical representation of genetic constraints to evolution. However, little is known concerning the rate and pattern of evolution of G in nature, and it is uncertain whether the constraining effect of G is important over evolutionary time scales. To address these issues, seven species of field crickets from the genera Gryllus and Teleogryllus were reared in the laboratory, and quantitative genetic parameters for morphological traits were estimated from each of them using a nested full-sibling family design. We used three statistical approaches (T method, Flury hierarchy, and Mantel test) to compare G matrices or genetic correlation matrices in a phylogenetic framework. Results showed that G matrices were generally similar across species, with occasional differences between some species. We suggest that G has evolved at a low rate, a conclusion strengthened by the consideration that part of the observed across-species variation in G can be explained by the effect of a genotype by environment interaction. The observed pattern of G matrix variation between species could not be predicted by either morphological trait values or phylogeny. The constraint hypothesis was tested by comparing the multivariate orientation of the reconstructed ancestral G matrix to the orientation of the across-species divergence matrix (D matrix, based on mean trait values). The D matrix mainly revealed divergence in size and, to a much smaller extent, in a shape component related to the ovipositor length. This pattern of species divergence was found to be predictable from the ancestral G matrix in agreement with the expectation of the constraint hypothesis. Overall, these results suggest that the G matrix seems to have an influence

  5. Genetic variation and biogeography of the spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus from core and peripheral populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Solomon R; Wright, Jeremy J

    2017-11-01

    The spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) shows a disjunct natural distribution, with a core population extending from the central Mississippi River Basin to the U.S. gulf coast and a peripheral population in the southern Great Lakes Basin. Despite significant conservation concerns for this species in the Great Lakes watersheds where it occurs, few genetic examinations and comparisons of these populations have been performed. We investigated inter- and intrapopulational variation in several mitochondrial genetic markers (cytochrome oxidase subunit I, COI; cytochrome oxidase subunit II, COII; and 16S rRNA, 16S) from spotted gars taken from core and peripheral populations. Genetic diversity was highest in the Mississippi River Basin and lowest in the Great Lakes Basin, while the Nueces River Basin (Texas) population showed the greatest level of divergence from other populations. Average genetic distance among core and peripheral populations was over an order of magnitude less than that seen between L. oculatus and its sister species, the Florida gar (L. platyrhincus), although a significant correlation was found between genetic and geographical distance in L. oculatus. Genetic divergence in spotted gars is likely to be related to a combination of geographic isolation and founder effects associated with recent colonization following glacial retreat. Despite its apparent lack of significant genetic differentiation or haplotype diversity, the Great Lakes population of spotted gars has previously been shown to be a unique component of the species, and additional studies are needed to determine the genetic mechanisms underlying regional adaptations as well as potential morphological differentiation among spotted gar populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Genetic variation but weak genetic covariation between pre- and post-copulatory episodes of sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, L M; Garcia-Gonzalez, F; Simmons, L W

    2016-08-01

    When females mate polyandrously, male reproductive success depends both on the male's ability to attain matings and on his ability to outcompete rival males in the fertilization of ova post-copulation. Increased investment in  ejaculate components may trade off with investment in precopulatory traits due to resource allocation. Alternatively, pre- and post-copulatory traits could be positively related if individuals can afford to invest heavily in traits advantageous at both episodes of selection. There is empirical evidence for both positive and negative associations between pre- and post-copulatory episodes, but little is known about the genetic basis of these correlations. In this study, we measured morphological, chemical and behavioural precopulatory male traits and investigated their relationship with measures of male fitness (male mating success, remating inhibition and offensive sperm competitiveness) across 40 isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster. We found significant variation among isofemale lines, indicating a genetic basis for most of the traits investigated. However, we found weak evidence for genetic correlations between precopulatory traits and our indices of male fitness. Moreover, pre- and post-copulatory episodes of selection were uncorrelated, suggesting selection may act independently at the different episodes to maximize male reproductive success. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Evidence that natural selection maintains genetic variation for sleep in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetec, Nicolas; Zhao, Li; Saelao, Perot; Chiu, Joanna C; Begun, David J

    2015-03-13

    Drosophila melanogaster often shows correlations between latitude and phenotypic or genetic variation on different continents, which suggests local adaptation with respect to a heterogeneous environment. Previous phenotypic analyses of latitudinal clines have investigated mainly physiological, morphological, or life-history traits. Here, we studied latitudinal variation in sleep in D. melanogaster populations from North and Central America. In parallel, we used RNA-seq to identify interpopulation gene expression differences. We found that in D. melanogaster the average nighttime sleep bout duration exhibits a latitudinal cline such that sleep bouts of equatorial populations are roughly twice as long as those of temperate populations. Interestingly, this pattern of latitudinal variation is not observed for any daytime measure of activity or sleep. We also found evidence for geographic variation for sunrise anticipation. Our RNA-seq experiment carried out on heads from a low and high latitude population identified a large number of gene expression differences, most of which were time dependent. Differentially expressed genes were enriched in circadian regulated genes and enriched in genes potentially under spatially varying selection. Our results are consistent with a mechanistic and selective decoupling of nighttime and daytime activity. Furthermore, the present study suggests that natural selection plays a major role in generating transcriptomic variation associated with circadian behaviors. Finally, we identified genomic variants plausibly causally associated with the observed behavioral and transcriptomic variation.

  8. Detecting genetic association of common human facial morphological variation using high density 3D image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouneng; Tan, Jingze; Hu, Sile; Zhou, Hang; Guo, Jing; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ∼30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation.

  9. The Genetic Basis of Natural Variation in Caenorhabditis elegans Telomere Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel E; Zdraljevic, Stefan; Tanny, Robyn E; Seo, Beomseok; Riccardi, David D; Noble, Luke M; Rockman, Matthew V; Alkema, Mark J; Braendle, Christian; Kammenga, Jan E; Wang, John; Kruglyak, Leonid; Félix, Marie-Anne; Lee, Junho; Andersen, Erik C

    2016-09-01

    Telomeres are involved in the maintenance of chromosomes and the prevention of genome instability. Despite this central importance, significant variation in telomere length has been observed in a variety of organisms. The genetic determinants of telomere-length variation and their effects on organismal fitness are largely unexplored. Here, we describe natural variation in telomere length across the Caenorhabditis elegans species. We identify a large-effect variant that contributes to differences in telomere length. The variant alters the conserved oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold of protection of telomeres 2 (POT-2), a homolog of a human telomere-capping shelterin complex subunit. Mutations within this domain likely reduce the ability of POT-2 to bind telomeric DNA, thereby increasing telomere length. We find that telomere-length variation does not correlate with offspring production or longevity in C. elegans wild isolates, suggesting that naturally long telomeres play a limited role in modifying fitness phenotypes in C. elegans. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Genetic variation in functional traits influences arthropod community composition in aspen (Populus tremula L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Robinson

    Full Text Available We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  11. Morphological and molecular genetic variations of oat genotypes grown in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhehpour, Saeid; Bahraminejad, Sohbat; Cheghamirza, Kianoosh

    2014-06-01

    Morphological traits and molecular markers are two common methods for genetic variation studies. Molecular markers, morphological traits methods and relationship between the two were used to study genetic variation among 43 oat genotypes and varieties. For this purpose, an augmented design was conducted in three replicates at 2008-2009 cropping season in the experimental field of Campus of Agriculture and Natural Resources of Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran. Four wild oat accessions (Avena sterilis) were added to evaluated genotypes in molecular experiment. Results showed a significant variation among genotypes for all morphological traits and they were classified based on this variation in four groups by WARD cluster analysis. In molecular experiment, 28 inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers amplified 206 polymorph bands. Based on Jaccard similarity matrix, similarity among genotypes was varied from 0.23 to 0.66 and cluster analysis classified genotypes in seven groups by complete linkage method. The correlation between ISSR marker and morphological traits classifications was not significant. ISSR showed to be a helpful marker for genotype identity and separation as it put wild accessions in a group.

  12. Meningococcal genetic variation mechanisms viewed through comparative analysis of serogroup C strain FAM18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Bentley

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is commonly found harmlessly colonising the mucosal surfaces of the human nasopharynx. Occasionally strains can invade host tissues causing septicaemia and meningitis, making the bacterium a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world. The species is known to be diverse in many ways, as a product of its natural transformability and of a range of recombination and mutation-based systems. Previous work on pathogenic Neisseria has identified several mechanisms for the generation of diversity of surface structures, including phase variation based on slippage-like mechanisms and sequence conversion of expressed genes using information from silent loci. Comparison of the genome sequences of two N. meningitidis strains, serogroup B MC58 and serogroup A Z2491, suggested further mechanisms of variation, including C-terminal exchange in specific genes and enhanced localised recombination and variation related to repeat arrays. We have sequenced the genome of N. meningitidis strain FAM18, a representative of the ST-11/ET-37 complex, providing the first genome sequence for the disease-causing serogroup C meningococci; it has 1,976 predicted genes, of which 60 do not have orthologues in the previously sequenced serogroup A or B strains. Through genome comparison with Z2491 and MC58 we have further characterised specific mechanisms of genetic variation in N. meningitidis, describing specialised loci for generation of cell surface protein variants and measuring the association between noncoding repeat arrays and sequence variation in flanking genes. Here we provide a detailed view of novel genetic diversification mechanisms in N. meningitidis. Our analysis provides evidence for the hypothesis that the noncoding repeat arrays in neisserial genomes (neisserial intergenic mosaic elements provide a crucial mechanism for the generation of surface antigen variants. Such variation will have an

  13. PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN CHRYSOPERLA: GENETIC VARIATION IN THE SENSORY MECHANISM AND IN CORRELATED REPRODUCTIVE TRAITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Catherine A; Tauber, Maurice J

    1992-12-01

    A genetically variable sensory mechanism provides phenotypic plasticity in the seasonal cycle of the Chrysoperla carnea species-complex of green lacewings. The mechanism functions as a switch during the pupal and early imaginal stages to determine aestival reproduction versus aestival dormancy, and it has two major components: (1) response to photoperiod and (2) response to a stimulus(i) associated with the prey of the larvae. Ultimately, the switch is based on the response to photoperiod-an all-or-nothing trait whose variation (long-day reproduction versus a short-day/long-day requirement for reproduction) is determined by alleles at two unlinked autosomal loci. In eastern North America, variation in this component of the switch differentiates two reproductively isolated "species" that are sympatric throughout the region: Chrysoperla carnea, in which both loci are homozygous for the dominant alleles that determine long-day, spring and summer reproduction and thus multivoltinism, and C. downesi, which has a very high incidence of the recessive alleles for the short-day/long-day requirement, and thus univoltine spring breeding. In contrast, geographical populations in western North America harbor variable amounts of within-and among-family genetic variation for the photoperiodic responses and also for the switch's second component-adult responsiveness to the prey of the larvae. The geographic pattern of genetic variation in the two components of the switch indicates that it is a highly integrated adaptation to environmental heterogeneity. Expression of among-family variation in the prey component of the switch is highly dependent on photoperiodic conditions and genotype (it requires a constant long daylength and the recessive short-day/long-day genotype). Thus, we infer that responsiveness to prey evolved as a modifier of the photoperiodic trait. The switch has a significant negative effect on a major determinant of fitness; it lengthens the preoviposition period in

  14. Traceability of marketable Japanese shoro in New Zealand: using multiplex PCR to exploit phylogeographic variation among taxa in the Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnovsky, Sandra B; Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Wang, Yun; Pitman, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Rhizopogon roseolus Corda (synonym Rhizopogon rubescens Tul.), an economically important edible mushroom associated with the Pinaceae (mostly Pinus sp.), has a global distribution resulting from the introduction of exotic trees into the Southern Hemisphere for plantation forestry. However, the marketability of R. roseolus varies with the place of origin. R. roseolus strains cultivated in New Zealand from local carpophores for the Japanese market are morphologically and biologically distinct from those produced in Japan and are consequently considered less valuable. In this study, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA (internal transcribed spacer [ITS]) region was used to examine the phylogenetic relationships of R. roseolus and other closely related fungi belonging to Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli to determine the genetic basis for phenotypic differences among R. roseolus isolates from different geographic regions. Phylogenetic comparison revealed phylogeographic variation within Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli. Collections from the United States and Europe grouped into four distinct clades. Rhizopogon roseolus isolates found in New Zealand were closely related to those from the United States, likely due to introduction of Pinus radiata from its native California in the United States. In contrast, Japanese R. roseolus isolates clustered closely with European collections. Phylogenetic differences between Japanese and New Zealand R. roseolus isolates may explain the morphological and biological properties attributed to these geographical variants. The ITS region was subsequently used to design a multiplex PCR for the simultaneous identification of Japanese and New Zealand R. roseolus isolates to track the establishment of ectomycorrhiza on P. radiata seedlings inoculated with commercially valuable R. roseolus. This diagnostic demonstrated the first fruiting of Japanese shoro cultivated on P. radiata in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijo John

    Full Text Available Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS (Cyprinidae: Puntius endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  16. Morphological and Genetic Evidence for Multiple Evolutionary Distinct Lineages in the Endangered and Commercially Exploited Red Lined Torpedo Barbs Endemic to the Western Ghats of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahanukar, Neelesh; Anvar Ali, Palakkaparambil Hamsa; Tharian, Josin; Raghavan, Rajeev; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBs) (Cyprinidae: Puntius) endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their ‘Endangered’ listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa. PMID:23894533

  17. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lijo; Philip, Siby; Dahanukar, Neelesh; Anvar Ali, Palakkaparambil Hamsa; Tharian, Josin; Raghavan, Rajeev; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS) (Cyprinidae: Puntius) endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  18. From genome to gene: A review of genes and genetic variations associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Safarpour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the valuable results achieved in identification of genes and genetic changes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D, lack of consistency and reproducibility of these results in different populations is one of the challenges lie ahead in introduction of T2D candidate genes. Therefore, the present review article aimed to provide an overview of the most important genes and genetic variations associated with development of T2D based on a systematic search in well-known genetic databases. For this purpose, the National Center for Biotechnology Information, Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (NCBI dbGaP and Human Genome Epidemiology Network (HuGENet database were searched to find the most important genes associated with T2D. In addition, a gray literature search was conducted to collect any available information released by laboratories offering genetic tests such as deCODE genetics and 23andMe. Candidate genes were selected among the results of all databases based on the highest level of similarity. Subsequently, without any time restriction, PubMed, Scopus and Google scholar databases were searched using relevant Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms to access related articles. The relevant articles were screened to make a conclusion about the genes and genetic variations associated with T2D. The results revealed that four selected candidate genes, in order of importance, were TCF7L2, CDKAL1, KCNJ11, and FTO. The most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associated with T2D in the TCF7L2 gene was rs7903146; however, the results showed a wide range of variation from slight association in the Amish (P= 5.0×10-2 to strong association in European descent populations (P= 2.0×10-51. Then, rs10440833 mapping to the intronic region of the CDKAL1 gene showed significant association with T2D (P= 2.0×10-22. In the KCNJ11 gene, a missense variation (rs5215 in exon one was found to have the highest association with T2D compared with other

  19. Geographic variation of melanisation patterns in a hornet species: genetic differences, climatic pressures or aposematic constraints?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, Adrien; Arca, Mariangela; Rome, Quentin; Muller, Franck; Tan, Jiangli; Bista, Sanjaya; Nugroho, Hari; Baudoin, Raymond; Baylac, Michel; Silvain, Jean-François; Carpenter, James M; Villemant, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Coloration of stinging insects is often based on contrasted patterns of light and black pigmentations as a warning signal to predators. However, in many social wasp species, geographic variation drastically modifies this signal through melanic polymorphism potentially driven by different selective pressures. To date, surprisingly little is known about the geographic variation of coloration of social wasps in relation to aposematism and melanism and to genetic and developmental constraints. The main objectives of this study are to improve the description of the colour variation within a social wasp species and to determine which factors are driving this variation. Therefore, we explored the evolutionary history of a polymorphic hornet, Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836, using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, and we analysed its melanic variation using a colour space based on a description of body parts coloration. We found two main lineages within the species and confirmed the previous synonymy of V. auraria Smith, 1852, under V. velutina, differing only by the coloration. We also found that the melanic variation of most body parts was positively correlated, with some segments forming potential colour modules. Finally, we showed that the variation of coloration between populations was not related to their molecular, geographic or climatic differences. Our observations suggest that the coloration patterns of hornets and their geographic variations are determined by genes with an influence of developmental constraints. Our results also highlight that Vespa velutina populations have experienced several convergent evolutions of the coloration, more likely influenced by constraints on aposematism and Müllerian mimicry than by abiotic pressures on melanism.

  20. Geographic variation of melanisation patterns in a hornet species: genetic differences, climatic pressures or aposematic constraints?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Perrard

    Full Text Available Coloration of stinging insects is often based on contrasted patterns of light and black pigmentations as a warning signal to predators. However, in many social wasp species, geographic variation drastically modifies this signal through melanic polymorphism potentially driven by different selective pressures. To date, surprisingly little is known about the geographic variation of coloration of social wasps in relation to aposematism and melanism and to genetic and developmental constraints. The main objectives of this study are to improve the description of the colour variation within a social wasp species and to determine which factors are driving this variation. Therefore, we explored the evolutionary history of a polymorphic hornet, Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836, using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, and we analysed its melanic variation using a colour space based on a description of body parts coloration. We found two main lineages within the species and confirmed the previous synonymy of V. auraria Smith, 1852, under V. velutina, differing only by the coloration. We also found that the melanic variation of most body parts was positively correlated, with some segments forming potential colour modules. Finally, we showed that the variation of coloration between populations was not related to their molecular, geographic or climatic differences. Our observations suggest that the coloration patterns of hornets and their geographic variations are determined by genes with an influence of developmental constraints. Our results also highlight that Vespa velutina populations have experienced several convergent evolutions of the coloration, more likely influenced by constraints on aposematism and Müllerian mimicry than by abiotic pressures on melanism.

  1. Genetic variation in flowering phenology and avoidance of seed predation in native populations of Ulex europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlan, A; Barat, M; Legionnet, A S; Parize, L; Tarayre, M

    2010-02-01

    The genetic variation in flowering phenology may be an important component of a species' capacity to colonize new environments. In native populations of the invasive species Ulex europaeus, flowering phenology has been shown to be bimodal and related to seed predation. The aim of the present study was to determine if this bimodality has a genetic basis, and to investigate whether the polymorphism in flowering phenology is genetically linked to seed predation, pod production and growth patterns. We set up an experiment raising maternal families in a common garden. Based on mixed analyses of variance and correlations among maternal family means, we found genetic differences between the two main flowering types and confirmed that they reduced seed predation in two different ways: escape in time or predator satiation. We suggest that this polymorphism in strategy may facilitate maintain high genetic diversity for flowering phenology and related life-history traits in native populations of this species, hence providing high evolutionary potential for these traits in invaded areas.

  2. Genetic variation in the response of the weed Ruellia nudiflora (Acanthaceae) to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zapata, José Alberto; Campos-Navarrete, María José; Parra-Tabla, Víctor; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Navarro-Alberto, Jorge

    2010-04-01

    The main goal of this work was to test for plant genetic variation in the phenotypic plasticity response of the weed Ruellia nudiflora to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation. We collected plants in the field, kept them under homogeneous conditions inside a nursery, and then collected seeds from these parent plants to generate five inbred lines (i.e., genetic families). Half of the plants of each inbred line were inoculated with AM fungi while the other half were not (controls); a fully crossed experimental design was then used to test for the effects of treatment (with or without AM fungi inoculation) and inbred line (genetic family). For each plant, we recorded the number of leaves produced and the number of days it survived during a 2-month period. Results showed a strong positive treatment effect (plastic response to AM fungi inoculation) for leaf production and survival. Moreover, in terms of survival, the treatment effect differed between genetic families (significant genetic family by treatment interaction). These findings indicate that the positive effect of AM fungi on plant survival (and potentially also growth) differs across plant genotypes and that such condition may contribute to R. nudiflora's capacity to colonize new environments.

  3. Genetic Variation Among Natural Populations of Tilletia controversa and T. bromi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, G; Peever, T L; Carris, L M

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Tilletia controversa and T. bromi were sampled from wheat and two Bromus species hosts, respectively, in the Pacific Northwest, and genetic variation within and among populations was determined. Fifty-one random amplified polymorphic DNA markers from eleven primers were treated as phenotypic 1 and 0 character state data to estimate similarities and analyze molecular variance (AMOVA) among populations and as putative genetic loci to carry out analyses of gene diversity. Phenotypic analysis of T. controversa and T. bromi isolates revealed two distinct clusters that were 37% similar. The T. bromi cluster was subdivided further into two groups, corresponding to host, with 40% similarity. Cluster analysis based on allele frequencies produced similar results and also supported two T. bromi groups based on host. No evidence of natural hybridization and introgression was detected between the T. controversa and T. bromi populations. Both AMOVA and gene diversity analyses detected moderate levels of differentiation among T. controversa populations, whereas T. bromi populations were highly differentiated. The level of genetic differentiation observed between the T. bromi populations on different Bromus species hosts supports the hypothesis that a high degree of host specificity exists in the wild grass-infecting smuts. We speculate that the higher level of genetic differentiation among the T. bromi populations compared with the T. controversa populations on wheat may be due to selection by a more genetically diverse host population.

  4. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  5. Learned vocal variation is associated with abrupt cryptic genetic change in a parrot species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul F H Ribot

    Full Text Available Contact zones between subspecies or closely related species offer valuable insights into speciation processes. A typical feature of such zones is the presence of clinal variation in multiple traits. The nature of these traits and the concordance among clines are expected to influence whether and how quickly speciation will proceed. Learned signals, such as vocalizations in species having vocal learning (e.g. humans, many birds, bats and cetaceans, can exhibit rapid change and may accelerate reproductive isolation between populations. Therefore, particularly strong concordance among clines in learned signals and population genetic structure may be expected, even among continuous populations in the early stages of speciation. However, empirical evidence for this pattern is often limited because differences in vocalisations between populations are driven by habitat differences or have evolved in allopatry. We tested for this pattern in a unique system where we may be able to separate effects of habitat and evolutionary history. We studied geographic variation in the vocalizations of the crimson rosella (Platycercus elegans parrot species complex. Parrots are well known for their life-long vocal learning and cognitive abilities. We analysed contact calls across a ca 1300 km transect encompassing populations that differed in neutral genetic markers and plumage colour. We found steep clinal changes in two acoustic variables (fundamental frequency and peak frequency position. The positions of the two clines in vocal traits were concordant with a steep cline in microsatellite-based genetic variation, but were discordant with the steep clines in mtDNA, plumage and habitat. Our study provides new evidence that vocal variation, in a species with vocal learning, can coincide with areas of restricted gene flow across geographically continuous populations. Our results suggest that traits that evolve culturally can be strongly associated with reduced gene flow

  6. Genetic differentiation, clinal variation and phenotypic associations with growth cessation across the Populus tremula photoperiodic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Fei; Hall, David; Onge, Katherine R St; Jansson, Stefan; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2010-11-01

    Perennial plants monitor seasonal changes through changes in environmental conditions such as the quantity and quality of light. To ensure a correct initiation of critical developmental processes, such as the initiation and cessation of growth, plants have adapted to a spatially variable light regime and genes in the photoperiodic pathway have been implicated as likely sources for these adaptations. Here we examine genetic variation in genes from the photoperiodic pathway in Populus tremula (Salicaceae) for signatures diversifying selection in response to varying light regimes across a latitudinal gradient. We fail to identify any loci with unusually high levels of genetic differentiation among populations despite identifying four SNPs that show significant allele frequency clines with latitude. We do, however, observe large covariance in allelic effects across populations for growth cessation, a highly adaptive trait in P. tremula. High covariance in allelic effects is a signature compatible with diversifying selection along an environmental gradient. We also observe significantly higher heterogeneity in genetic differentiation among SNPs from the photoperiod genes than among SNPs from randomly chosen genes. This suggests that spatially variable selection could be affecting genes from the photoperiod pathway even if selection is not strong enough to cause individual loci to be identified as outliers. SNPs from three genes in the photoperiod pathway (PHYB2, LHY1, and LHY2) show significant associations with natural variation in growth cessation. Collectively these SNPs explain 10-15% of the phenotypic variation in growth cessation. Covariances in allelic effects across populations help explain an additional 5-7% of the phenotypic variation in growth cessation.

  7. Spatial structure of morphological and neutral genetic variation in Brook Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazyak, David C.; Hilderbrand, Robert H.; Keller, Stephen R.; Colaw, Mark C.; Holloway, Amanda E.; Morgan, Raymond P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis exhibit exceptional levels of life history variation, remarkable genetic variability, and fine-scale population structure. In many cases, neighboring populations may be highly differentiated from one another to an extent that is comparable with species-level distinctions in other taxa. Although genetic samples have been collected from hundreds of populations and tens of thousands of individuals, little is known about whether differentiation at neutral markers reflects phenotypic differences among Brook Trout populations. We compared differentiation in morphology and neutral molecular markers among populations from four geographically proximate locations (all within 24 km) to examine how genetic diversity covaries with morphology. We found significant differences among and/or within streams for all three morphological axes examined and identified the source stream of many individuals based on morphology (52.3% classification efficiency). Although molecular and morphological differentiation among streams ranged considerably (mean pairwise FST: 0.023–0.264; pairwise PST: 0.000–0.339), the two measures were not significantly correlated. While in some cases morphological characters appear to have diverged to a greater extent than expected by neutral genetic drift, many traits were conserved to a greater extent than were neutral genetic markers. Thus, while Brook Trout exhibit fine-scale spatial patterns in both morphology and neutral genetic diversity, these types of biological variabilities are being structured by different ecological and evolutionary processes. The relative influences of genetic drift versus selection and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology appear to vary among populations occupying nearby streams.

  8. Genetic variation in South Indian castes: evidence from Y-chromosome, mitochondrial, and autosomal polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirupati S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major population movements, social structure, and caste endogamy have influenced the genetic structure of Indian populations. An understanding of these influences is increasingly important as gene mapping and case-control studies are initiated in South Indian populations. Results We report new data on 155 individuals from four Tamil caste populations of South India and perform comparative analyses with caste populations from the neighboring state of Andhra Pradesh. Genetic differentiation among Tamil castes is low (RST = 0.96% for 45 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR markers, reflecting a largely common origin. Nonetheless, caste- and continent-specific patterns are evident. For 32 lineage-defining Y-chromosome SNPs, Tamil castes show higher affinity to Europeans than to eastern Asians, and genetic distance estimates to the Europeans are ordered by caste rank. For 32 lineage-defining mitochondrial SNPs and hypervariable sequence (HVS 1, Tamil castes have higher affinity to eastern Asians than to Europeans. For 45 autosomal STRs, upper and middle rank castes show higher affinity to Europeans than do lower rank castes from either Tamil Nadu or Andhra Pradesh. Local between-caste variation (Tamil Nadu RST = 0.96%, Andhra Pradesh RST = 0.77% exceeds the estimate of variation between these geographically separated groups (RST = 0.12%. Low, but statistically significant, correlations between caste rank distance and genetic distance are demonstrated for Tamil castes using Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal data. Conclusion Genetic data from Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal STRs are in accord with historical accounts of northwest to southeast population movements in India. The influence of ancient and historical population movements and caste social structure can be detected and replicated in South Indian caste populations from two different geographic regions.

  9. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Jamunapari Goats Using Microsatellites, Mitochondrial DNA, and Milk Protein Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, P. K.; Thangraj, K.; Mandal, A.; Roy, R.

    2012-01-01

    Jamunapari, a dairy goat breed of India, has been gradually declining in numbers in its home tract over the years. We have analysed genetic variation and population history in Jamunapari goats based on 17 microsatellite loci, 2 milk protein loci, mitochondrial hypervariable region I (HVRI) sequencing, and three Y-chromosomal gene sequencing. We used the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mismatch distribution, microsatellite data, and bottleneck tests to infer the population history and demography. The mean number of alleles per locus was 9.0 indicating that the allelic variation was high in all the loci and the mean heterozygosity was 0.769 at nuclear loci. Although the population size is smaller than 8,000 individuals, the amount of variability both in terms of allelic richness and gene diversity was high in all the microsatellite loci except ILST 005. The gene diversity and effective number of alleles at milk protein loci were higher than the 10 other Indian goat breeds that they were compared to. Mismatch analysis was carried out and the analysis revealed that the population curve was unimodal indicating the expansion of population. The genetic diversity of Y-chromosome genes was low in the present study. The observed mean M ratio in the population was above the critical significance value (Mc) and close to one indicating that it has maintained a slowly changing population size. The mode-shift test did not detect any distortion of allele frequency and the heterozygosity excess method showed that there was no significant departure from mutation-drift equilibrium detected in the population. However, the effects of genetic bottlenecks were observed in some loci due to decreased heterozygosity and lower level of M ratio. There were two observed genetic subdivisions in the population supporting the observations of farmers in different areas. This base line information on genetic diversity, bottleneck analysis, and mismatch analysis was obtained to assist the conservation

  10. Seasonal time constraints reduce genetic variation in life-history traits along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniegula, Szymon; Golab, Maria J; Drobniak, Szymon M; Johansson, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Time constraints cause strong selection on life-history traits, because populations need to complete their life cycles within a shorter time. We therefore expect lower genetic variation in these traits in high- than in low-latitude populations, since the former are more time-constrained. The aim was to estimate life-history traits and their genetic variation in an obligately univoltine damselfly along a latitudinal gradient of 2730 km. Populations were grown in the laboratory at temperatures and photoperiods simulating those at their place of origin. In a complementary experiment, individuals from the same families were grown in constant temperature and photoperiod that mimicked average conditions across the latitude. Development time and size was faster and smaller, respectively, and growth rate was higher at northern latitudes. Additive genetic variance was very low for life-history traits, and estimates for egg development time and larval growth rate showed significant decreases towards northern latitudes. The expression of genetic effects in life-history traits differed considerably when individuals were grown in constant rather than simulated and naturally variable conditions. Our results support strong selection by time constraints. They also highlight the importance of growing organisms in their native environment for correct estimates of genetic variance at their place of origin. Our results also suggest that the evolutionary potential of life-history traits is very low at northern compared to southern latitudes, but that changes in climate could alter this pattern. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  11. Genetic variation detected by RAPD markers in natural populations of babassu palm (Attalea speciosa Mart.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F; Damasceno-Silva, K J; Carvalhaes, M A; Lima, P S C

    2015-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of management on the genetic structure of natural populations of Attalea speciosa in the State of Piauí, Brazil, using random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Three babassu populations under different management systems were selected. Polymerase chain reactions were performed for 20 RAPD primers. A total of 146 bands were generated, 141 of which were polymorphic (96.58%), with a variation of 4 and 12 loci and an average of 7 bands per primer. A dendrogram revealed a clear separation between the three populations (0.57). Data reliability and node consistency were verified by bootstrap values and the cophenetic correlation coefficient (88.15%). Coefficients of similarity between pairs of genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, with a mean of 0.57. Nei's genetic diversity index (HE) value of the population sampled in Teresina was 0.212, of Esperantina it was 0.195, and of José de Freitas it was 0.207. After the HE was decomposed, the complete diversity was found to be 0.3213. Genetic differentiation between populations was 0.362, and the estimation of gene flow between populations was low (0.879). Analysis of molecular variance revealed that 59.52% of the variation was contained within populations, and 40.48% was between populations. RAPD markers were effective for genetic diversity analysis within and between natural babassu populations, and exhibited a high level of polymorphism. Genetic diversity was the highest within populations; variability was lower in the managed populations than in the undisturbed populations.

  12. Evaluation of Genetic Variation of the Breeding Lines Isolated from Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Nasiri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the genetic diversity of the breeding lines isolated from the sesame landraces. Seventy genotypes were evaluated in randomized complete block design with two replications in 2008. The results showed that there were significant differences among the genotypes for all of the studied traits such as days to maturity, plant height and seed yield. There was no difference between the phenotypic and genetic coefficients of variations for most of the traits, thus it was concluded that the majority of their observed variations was due to the genetic factors. The grain yield of the genotypes ranged from 1089 to 4650 kg/ha. One of the breeding line isolated from Birjand landrace had the highest mean of days to maturity (170 days and Yekta genotype had the lowest mean for this trait (118 days. The range of plant height among genotypes was 123 to 179 cm and the mean of capsule per plant was ranged from 46 to 181. Branches per plant had the highest broad-sense heritability (81.1 % and the estimated broad-sense heritability for grain yield was 75.5%. Cluster analysis classified the genotypes in three distinct groups and there were significant differences among these groups for all of the traits, except days to maturity. Genotypes classified in the second group had the most capsule per plant and grain yield and they can be used for genetic improvement of this trait. Meanwhile genotypes of the first group can be used for genetic improvement of plant height and branches per plant.

  13. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation between North and South that might contribute to the clinal phenotypic variation, we compared RNA expression patterns during development of D. melanogaster from tropical northern and temperate southern populations using whole genome tiling arrays. We found that genes that were differentially expressed between the cline ends were generally associated with metabolism and growth, and experimental alteration of expression of a sample of them generally resulted in altered body size in the predicted direction, sometimes significantly so. We further identified the serpent (srp transcription factor binding sites to be enriched near genes up-regulated in expression in the south. Analysis of clinal populations revealed a significant cline in the expression level of srp. Experimental over-expression of srp increased body size, as predicted from its clinal expression pattern, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating adaptive clinal variation in Drosophila. This study identified a handful of genes that contributed to clinal phenotypic variation through altered gene expression level, yet misexpression of individual gene led to modest body size change.

  14. Population genomics fits the bill: genetics of adaptive beak variation in Darwin's finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Nicholas I

    2016-11-01

    Darwin's finches are an iconic case of adaptive radiation. The size and shape of their beaks are key adaptive traits related to trophic niche that vary among species and evolve rapidly when the food supply changes. Building on recent studies, a paper in this issue of Molecular Ecology (Chaves et al. ) investigates the genomic basis of beak size variation in sympatric populations of three species of ground finch (Geospiza) by performing a Genome-wide association study using RAD-seq data. The authors find that variation in a small number of markers can explain a substantial proportion of variation in beak size. Some of these markers are in genomic regions that have previously been implicated in beak size variation in Darwin's finches, whereas other markers have not, suggesting both conservation and divergence in the genetic basis of morphological evolution. Overall, the study confirms that loci of large effect are involved in beak size variation, which helps to explain the high heritability and rapid response to selection of this trait. The independent identification of regions containing HMGA2 and DLK1 loci in a GWAS makes them prime targets for functional studies. The study also shows that under the right conditions, RAD-seq can be a viable alternative to genome sequencing for GWAS in wild vertebrate populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cryptic genetic variation can make "irreducible complexity" a common mode of adaptation in sexual populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Meredith V; Weissman, Daniel B; Peterson, Grant I; Peck, Kayla M; Masel, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    The existence of complex (multiple-step) genetic adaptations that are "irreducible" (i.e., all partial combinations are less fit than the original genotype) is one of the longest standing problems in evolutionary biology. In standard genetics parlance, these adaptations require the crossing of a wide adaptive valley of deleterious intermediate stages. Here, we demonstrate, using a simple model, that evolution can cross wide valleys to produce "irreducibly complex" adaptations by making use of previously cryptic mutations. When revealed by an evolutionary capacitor, previously cryptic mutants have higher initial frequencies than do new mutations, bringing them closer to a valley-crossing saddle in allele frequency space. Moreover, simple combinatorics implies an enormous number of candidate combinations exist within available cryptic genetic variation. We model the dynamics of crossing of a wide adaptive valley after a capacitance event using both numerical simulations and analytical approximations. Although individual valley crossing events become less likely as valleys widen, by taking the combinatorics of genotype space into account, we see that revealing cryptic variation can cause the frequent evolution of complex adaptations. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Population genetics of immune-related multilocus copy number variation in Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccherato, Luciana W; Schneider, Silvana; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Hardwick, Robert J; Berg, Douglas E; Bogle, Helen; Gouveia, Mateus H; Machado, Lee R; Machado, Moara; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Soares-Souza, Giordano B; Togni, Diego L; Zamudio, Roxana; Gilman, Robert H; Duarte, Denise; Hollox, Edward J; Rodrigues, Maíra R

    2017-03-01

    While multiallelic copy number variation (mCNV) loci are a major component of genomic variation, quantifying the individual copy number of a locus and defining genotypes is challenging. Few methods exist to study how mCNV genetic diversity is apportioned within and between populations (i.e. to define the population genetic structure of mCNV). These inferences are critical in populations with a small effective size, such as Amerindians, that may not fit the Hardy-Weinberg model due to inbreeding, assortative mating, population subdivision, natural selection or a combination of these evolutionary factors. We propose a likelihood-based method that simultaneously infers mCNV allele frequencies and the population structure parameter f, which quantifies the departure of homozygosity from the Hardy-Weinberg expectation. This method is implemented in the freely available software CNVice, which also infers individual genotypes using information from both the population and from trios, if available. We studied the population genetics of five immune-related mCNV loci associated with complex diseases (beta-defensins, CCL3L1/CCL4L1, FCGR3A, FCGR3B and FCGR2C) in 12 traditional Native American populations and found that the population structure parameters inferred for these mCNVs are comparable to but lower than those for single nucleotide polymorphisms studied in the same populations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Temporal patterns of genetic and phenotypic variation in the epidemiologically important drone fly, Eristalis tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francuski, Lj; Matić, I; Ludoški, J; Milankov, V

    2011-06-01

    Eristalis tenax L. (Diptera: Syrphidae) is commonly known as the drone fly (adult) or rat-tailed maggot (immature). Both adults and immature stages are identified as potential mechanical vectors of mycobacterial pathogens, and early-stage maggots cause accidental myiasis. We compared four samples from Mount Fruška Gora, Serbia, with the aim of obtaining insights into the temporal variations and sexual dimorphism in the species. This integrative approach was based on allozyme loci, morphometric wing parameters (shape and size) and abdominal colour patterns. Consistent sexual dimorphism was observed, indicating that male specimens had lighter abdomens and smaller and narrower wings than females. The distribution of genetic diversity at polymorphic loci indicated genetic divergence among collection dates. Landmark-based geometric morphometrics revealed, contrary to the lack of divergence in wing size, significant wing shape variation throughout the year. In addition, temporal changes in the frequencies of the abdominal patterns observed are likely to relate to the biology of the species and ecological factors in the locality. Hence, the present study expands our knowledge of the genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of E. tenax. The quantification of such variability represents a step towards the evaluation of the adaptive potential of this species of medical and epidemiological importance.

  18. ELOVL6 Genetic Variation Is Related to Insulin Sensitivity: A New Candidate Gene in Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Sonsoles; Martín-Núñez, Gracia María; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Almaraz, María Cruz; García-Escobar, Eva; Mansego, María Luisa; de Marco, Griselda; Chaves, Felipe J.; Soriguer, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Background The elongase of long chain fatty acids family 6 (ELOVL6) is an enzyme that specifically catalyzes the elongation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids with 12, 14 and 16 carbons. ELOVL6 is expressed in lipogenic tissues and it is regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1). Objective We investigated whether ELOVL6 genetic variation is associated with insulin sensitivity in a population from southern Spain. Design We undertook a prospective, population-based study collecting phenotypic, metabolic, nutritional and genetic information. Measurements were made of weight and height and the body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Insulin resistance was measured by homeostasis model assessment. The type of dietary fat was assessed from samples of cooking oil taken from the participants' kitchens and analyzed by gas chromatography. Five SNPs of the ELOVL6 gene were analyzed by SNPlex. Results Carriers of the minor alleles of the SNPs rs9997926 and rs6824447 had a lower risk of having high HOMA_IR, whereas carriers of the minor allele rs17041272 had a higher risk of being insulin resistant. An interaction was detected between the rs6824447 polymorphism and the intake of oil in relation with insulin resistance, such that carriers of this minor allele who consumed sunflower oil had lower HOMA_IR than those who did not have this allele (P = 0.001). Conclusions Genetic variations in the ELOVL6 gene were associated with insulin sensitivity in this population-based study. PMID:21701577

  19. Genetic variation in two conserved local Romanian pig breeds using type 1 DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wales Richard

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of the genetic variation of an endangered population is an important component for the success of conservation. Animals from two local Romanian pig breeds, the Mangalitsa and Bazna, were analysed for variation at a number of genetic loci using PCR-based DNA tests. Polymorphism was assessed at loci which 1 are known to cause phenotypic variation, 2 are potentially involved in trait differences or 3 are putative candidate genes. The traits considered are disease resistance, growth, coat colour, meat quality and prolificacy. Even though the populations are small and the markers are limited to specific genes, we found significant differences in five of the ten characterised loci. In some cases the observed allele frequencies were interesting in relation to gene function and the phenotype of the breed. These breeds are part of a conservation programme in Romania and marker information may be useful in preserving a representative gene pool in the populations. The use of polymorphisms in type 1 (gene markers may be a useful complement to analysis based on anonymous markers.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Kenyan pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbiri, Kenneth O; Smith, Nicholas A; Otieno, Richard; Wohlford, Eric E M; Daud, Ibrahim I; Odada, Sumba P; Middleton, Frank; Rochford, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), and in regions of sub-Saharan Africa where endemic BL is common, both the EBV Type 1 (EBV-1) and EBV Type 2 strains (EBV-2) are found. Little is known about genetic variation of EBV strains in areas of sub-Saharan Africa. In the present study, spontaneous lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were generated from samples obtained from Kenya. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the EBV genome was done using multiple primers and sequenced by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Phylogenetic analyses against the published EBV-1 and EBV-2 strains indicated that one sample, LCL10 was closely related to EBV-2, while the remaining 3 LCL samples were more closely related to EBV-1. Moreover, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses showed clustering of LCL variants. We further show by analysis of EBNA-1, BLLF1, BPLF1, and BRRF2 that latent genes are less conserved than lytic genes in these LCLs from a single geographic region. In this study we have shown that NGS is highly useful for deciphering detailed inter and intra-variations in EBV genomes and that within a geographic region different EBV genetic variations can co-exist, the implications of which warrant further investigation. The findings will enhance our understanding of potential pathogenic variants critical to the development and maintenance of EBV-associated malignancies.

  1. Genetic variation in the NOC gene is associated with body mass index in Chinese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liu, Pi-Hua; Hee, Siow Wei; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Jiang, Yi-Der; Lee, Wei-Jei; Lee, Po-Chu; Kao, Hui-Yi; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clock genes are critical regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism. However, whether variation in the circadian genes is associated with metabolic phenotypes in humans remains to be explored. In this study, we systemically genotyped 20 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8 candidate genes involved in circadian clock, including CLOCK, BMAL1(ARNTL), PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1E,, and NOC(CCRN4L) in 1,510 non-diabetic Chinese subjects in Taipei and Yunlin populations in Taiwan. Their associations with metabolic phenotypes were analyzed. We found that genetic variation in the NOC gene, rs9684900 was associated with body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.0016, Bonferroni corrected P = 0.032). Another variant, rs135764 in the CSNK1E gene was associated with fasting glucose (P = 0.0023, Bonferroni corrected P = 0.046). These associations were consistent in both Taipei and Yunlin populations. Significant epistatic and joint effects between SNPs on BMI and related phenotypes were observed. Furthermore, NOC mRNA levels in human abdominal adipose tissue were significantly increased in obese subjects compared to non-obese controls. Genetic variation in the NOC gene is associated with BMI in Chinese subjects.

  2. Genetic variation and haplotype structures of innate immunity genes in eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagya, Bijan B.; Bhattacharya, Paramita; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.; Dey, Biplab; Dey, Uposoma; Ghosh, Trina; Maiti, Sujit; Majumder, Partha P.; Mishra, Kankadeb; Mukherjee, Sinchita; Mukherjee, Souvik; Narayanasamy, K.; Poddar, Sonia; Roy, Neeta Sarkar; Sengupta, Priya; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sur, Dipika; Sutradhar, Debabrata; Wagener, Diane K.

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of an extensive and comprehensive study of genetic diversity in 12 genes of the innate immune system in a population of eastern India. Genomic variation was assayed in 171 individuals by resequencing ~75 kb of DNA comprising these genes in each individual. Almost half of the 548 DNA variants discovered was novel. DNA sequence comparisons with human and chimpanzee reference sequences revealed evolutionary features indicative of natural selection operating among individuals, who are residents of an area with a high load of microbial and other pathogens. Significant differences in allele and haplotype frequencies of the study population were observed with the HapMap populations. Gene and haplotype diversities were observed to be high. The genetic positioning of the study population among the HapMap populations based on data of the innate immunity genes substantially differed from what has been observed for Indian populations based on data of other genes. The reported range of variation in SNP density in the human genome is one SNP per 1.19 kb (chromosome 22) to one SNP per 2.18 kb (chromosome 19). The SNP density in innate immunity genes observed in this study (>3 SNPs kb−1) exceeds the highest density observed for any autosomal chromosome in the human genome. The extensive genomic variation and the distinct haplotype structure of innate immunity genes observed among individuals have possibly resulted from the impact of natural selection. PMID:18396467

  3. A genomic overview of short genetic variations in a basal chordate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satou Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Ciona intestinalis genome contains many allelic polymorphisms, there is only limited data analyzed systematically. Establishing a dense map of genetic variations in C. intestinalis is necessary not only for linkage analysis, but also for other experimental biology including molecular developmental and evolutionary studies, because animals from natural populations are typically used for experiments. Results Here, we identified over three million candidate short genomic variations within a 110 Mb euchromatin region among five C. intestinalis individuals. The average nucleotide diversity was approximately 1.1%. Genetic variations were found at a similar density in intergenic and gene regions. Non-synonymous and nonsense nucleotide substitutions were found in 12,493 and 1,214 genes accounting for 81.9% and 8.0% of the entire gene set, respectively, and over 60% of genes in the single animal encode non-identical proteins between maternal and paternal alleles. Conclusions Our results provide a framework for studying evolution of the animal genome, as well as a useful resource for a wide range of C. intestinalis researchers.

  4. A thesaurus of genetic variation for interrogation of repetitive genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzendorfer, Claudia; Konopka, Tomasz; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2015-05-26

    Detecting genetic variation is one of the main applications of high-throughput sequencing, but is still challenging wherever aligning short reads poses ambiguities. Current state-of-the-art variant calling approaches avoid such regions, arguing that it is necessary to sacrifice detection sensitivity to limit false discovery. We developed a method that links candidate variant positions within repetitive genomic regions into clusters. The technique relies on a resource, a thesaurus of genetic variation, that enumerates genomic regions with similar sequence. The resource is computationally intensive to generate, but once compiled can be applied efficiently to annotate and prioritize variants in repetitive regions. We show that thesaurus annotation can reduce the rate of false variant calls due to mappability by up to three orders of magnitude. We apply the technique to whole genome datasets and establish that called variants in low mappability regions annotated using the thesaurus can be experimentally validated. We then extend the analysis to a large panel of exomes to show that the annotation technique opens possibilities to study variation in hereto hidden and under-studied parts of the genome. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Population structure and genetic diversity in tristylous Narcissus triandrus: insights from microsatellite and chloroplast DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2007-06-01

    We investigated cpDNA sequence and nuclear microsatellite variation among populations of the wild daffodil Narcissus triandrus to examine the role of historical vs. contemporary forces in shaping population structure, morphological differentiation and sexual-system evolution. This wide-ranging heterostylous species of the Iberian Peninsula is largely composed of two allopatric varieties (vars. cernuus and triandrus), and populations with either stylar trimorphism or dimorphism. Dimorphic populations only occur in var. triandrus, are mainly restricted to the northwestern portion of the species range, and uniformly lack the mid-styled morph (M-morph). Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence variation revealed strong geographical structuring and evidence for a fragmentation event associated with differentiation of the two varieties. In var. triandrus, population fragmentation, restricted gene flow and isolation-by-distance were also inferred. Significant differences in genetic diversity and population structure between the two varieties likely reflect historical and contemporary differences in demography and gene flow among populations. Discordance between cpDNA markers and both microsatellite and morphological variation indicate that hybridization has occurred between the two varieties at contact zones. There were no differences in genetic diversity or population structure between dimorphic and trimorphic populations, and chloroplast haplotypes were not associated with either sexual system, indicating transitions in morph structure within each maternal lineage. M-morph frequencies were positively correlated with differentiation at microsatellite loci, indicating that the evolutionary processes influencing these neutral markers also influence alleles controlling the style morphs.

  6. Mapping the Genetic Basis of Symbiotic Variation in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Amanda J.; Heath, Katy D.; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies. PMID:23173081

  7. A comprehensive analysis of rare genetic variation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sarah; Shatunov, Aleksey; Sproviero, William; Jones, Ashley R; Shoai, Maryam; Hughes, Deborah; Al Khleifat, Ahmad; Malaspina, Andrea; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Shaw, Christopher E; Sidle, Katie; Orrell, Richard W; Fratta, Pietro; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. About 25 genes have been verified as relevant to the disease process, with rare and common variation implicated. We used next generation sequencing and repeat sizing to comprehensively assay genetic variation in a panel of known amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genes in 1126 patient samples and 613 controls. About 10% of patients were predicted to carry a pathological expansion of the C9orf72 gene. We found an increased burden of rare variants in patients within the untranslated regions of known disease-causing genes, driven by SOD1, TARDBP, FUS, VCP, OPTN and UBQLN2. We found 11 patients (1%) carried more than one pathogenic variant (P = 0.001) consistent with an oligogenic basis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These findings show that the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is complex and that variation in the regulatory regions of associated genes may be important in disease pathogenesis. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  8. Genetic variation in tree structure and its relation to size in Douglas-fir: I. Biomass partitioning, foliage efficiency, stem form, and wood density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.B. St. Clair

    1994-01-01

    Genetic variation and covariation among traits of tree size and structure were assessed in an 18-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) genetic test in the Coast Range of Oregon. Considerable genetic variation was found in size, biomass partitioning, and wood density, and genetic gains may be...

  9. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment

    OpenAIRE

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Wei?enbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone ...

  10. Patterns of genetic variation in the endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola L., 1761).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabria, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Elena G; Gomez-Moliner, Benjamin J; Michaux, Johan R; Skumatov, Dimitry; Kranz, Andreas; Fournier, Pascal; Palazon, Santiago; Zardoya, Rafael

    2015-07-17

    The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for

  11. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Marine S. O.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Palmer, Alexander D.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h2 = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h2 = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  12. Autosomal STR variations reveal genetic heterogeneity in the Mon-Khmer speaking group of Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampuansai, Jatupol; Völgyi, Antónia; Kutanan, Wibhu; Kangwanpong, Daoroong; Pamjav, Horolma

    2017-03-01

    Since prehistoric times, Mon-Khmer speaking people have been recognized as indigenous ethnic groups living in northern Thailand. After the period of Tai colonization in the thirteenth century CE, the Mon-Khmer inhabitants were fragmented; some were expelled to rural areas while some were integrated into the mainstream of Tai society. Autosomal STR variations revealed that the present-day Mon-Khmer people could be genetically divided into two clusters. This finding appears to be consistent with the level of historical contact with the Tai majority ethnic groups. The cluster consisting of the Khamu, Lua, Paluang and Htin people, indicate that they have lived in remote areas and have had little historical contact with the Tai people. In this way, they appeared to have maintained aspects of their Mon-Khmer ancestral genetic bloodline but have genetically diverged from the Tai people. The cluster comprised of the Mon and Lawa people had an exclusively close relationship with the Tai people during the establishment of the prosperous Lan Na Kingdom. A fraction of the Tai genetic component investigated among the Mon people and some Lawa populations reflected the evidence of genetic admixture. However, some Lawa people, who have lived in the mountainous area of Mae Hong Son Province have exhibited a unique gene pool, which might have been shaped by the founder effect that occurred during their historical fragmentation. The rise of the genetic assimilation of the hill-tribe Karen people into the Mon-Khmer and the Tai gene pools indicated that different languages, cultures, and geographical distances have lost their power as barriers of inter-ethnic marriages in the present day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region variations in four tribes of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Shahzad; Aslamkhan, M; Abbas, Sana; Attimonelli, Marcella; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; de Souza, Erica Martinha Silva

    2017-09-01

    Due to its geo strategic position at the crossroad of Asia, Pakistan has gained crucial importance of playing its pivotal role in subsequent human migratory events, both prehistoric and historic. This human movement became possible through an ancient overland network of trails called "The Silk Route" linking Asia Minor, Middle East China, Central Asia and Southeast Asia. This study was conducted to analyze complete mitochondrial control region samples of 100 individuals of four major Pashtun tribes namely, Bangash, Khattak, Mahsuds and Orakzai in the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. All Pashtun tribes revealed high genetic diversity which is comparable to the other Central Asian, Southeast Asian and European populations. The configuration of genetic variation and heterogeneity further unveiled through Multidimensional Scaling, Principal Component Analysis and phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that Pashtun are the composite mosaic of West Eurasian ancestry of numerous geographic origin. They received substantial gene flow during different invasive movements and have a high element of the Western provenance. The most common haplogroups reported in this study are: South Asian haplogroups M (28%) and R (8%); whereas, West Asians haplogroups are present, albeit in high frequencies (67%) and widespread over all; HV (15%), U (17%), H (9%), J (8%), K (8%), W (4%), N (3%) and T (3%). Moreover, we linked the unexplored genetic connection between Ashkenazi Jews and Pashtun. The presence of specific haplotypes J1b (4%) and K1a1b1a (5%) pointed to a genetic connection of Jewish conglomeration in Khattak tribe. This was a result of an ancient genetic influx in the early Neolithic period that led to the formation of a diverse genetic substratum in present day Pashtun.

  14. Local and regional scale genetic variation in the Cape dune mole-rat, Bathyergus suillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jacobus H; Bennett, Nigel C; Jansen van Vuuren, Bettine

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of genetic variation is determined through the interaction of life history, morphology and habitat specificity of a species in conjunction with landscape structure. While numerous studies have investigated this interplay of factors in species inhabiting aquatic, riverine, terrestrial, arboreal and saxicolous systems, the fossorial system has remained largely unexplored. In this study we attempt to elucidate the impacts of a subterranean lifestyle coupled with a heterogeneous landscape on genetic partitioning by using a subterranean mammal species, the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus), as our model. Bathyergus suillus is one of a few mammal species endemic to the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of the Western Cape of South Africa. Its distribution is fragmented by rivers and mountains; both geographic phenomena that may act as geographical barriers to gene-flow. Using two mitochondrial fragments (cytochrome b and control region) as well as nine microsatellite loci, we determined the phylogeographic structure and gene-flow patterns at two different spatial scales (local and regional). Furthermore, we investigated genetic differentiation between populations and applied Bayesian clustering and assignment approaches to our data. Nearly every population formed a genetically unique entity with significant genetic structure evident across geographic barriers such as rivers (Berg, Verlorenvlei, Breede and Gourits Rivers), mountains (Piketberg and Hottentots Holland Mountains) and with geographic distance at both spatial scales. Surprisingly, B. suillus was found to be paraphyletic with respect to its sister species, B. janetta-a result largely overlooked by previous studies on these taxa. A systematic revision of the genus Bathyergus is therefore necessary. This study provides a valuable insight into how the biology, life-history and habitat specificity of animals inhabiting a fossorial system may act in concert with the structure of the surrounding

  15. Genetic variation for worm burdens in laying hens naturally infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongrak, K; Daş, G; von Borstel, U König; Gauly, M

    2015-01-01

    1. Genetic parameters were determined for the worm burden of the most common gastro-intestinal nematodes in two chicken genotypes after being exposed to free-range farming conditions for a laying period. 2. Seventeen-week-old hens of 2 brown genotypes, Lohmann Brown (LB) plus (n = 230) and LB classic (n = 230), were reared for a laying period and subjected to post-mortem parasitological examinations at 79 weeks (LB plus) or 88 weeks (LB classic) of age. 3. There was no significant difference in faecal egg counts between the genotypes. Almost all hens (>99%) were infected with at least one nematode species. Species-specific nematode prevalence ranged from 85.8% to 99.1% between the two genotypes. Heterakis gallinarum was the most prevalent nematode (98.5%), followed by Ascaridia galli (96.2%) and Capillaria spp. (86.1%). Capillaria spp. were composed of C. obsignata (79%), C. caudinflata (16%) and C. bursata (5%). 4. All phenotypic and genetic correlations among worm counts of different parasite species were positive in combined genotypes (rP ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 and rG ranged from 0.29 to 0.88). A strong genetic correlation (rG = 0.88 ± 0.34) between counts of A. galli and H. gallinarum was quantified. Heritability for total worm burden for LB plus and LB classic, respectively, were 0.55 ± 0.18 and 0.55 ± 0.34. Across both genotypes, the heritability of total worm burden was 0.56 ± 0.16. 5. In conclusion, there is a high variation attributable to genetic background of chickens in their responses to naturally acquired nematode infections. The high positive genetic correlation between counts of closely related worm species (e.g. A. galli and H. gallinarum) may indicate existence of similar genetically determined mechanism(s) in chickens for controlling these nematodes.

  16. Genetic and environmental correlates of morphological variation in a marine fish: the case of Baltic Sea herring ( Clupea harengus )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H.B.H.; Pertoldi, C.; Hansen, Michael Møller

    2008-01-01

    Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) have been shown to exhibit morphological differences across the marked salinity and temperature gradients in the region. Here we analyse genetic (nine microsatellite loci), morpho metric (skull shape), and meristic (pectoral fin rays and number of vertebrae......) variations across seven samples of spawning herring collected from four spawning locations in the Baltic Sea to examine whether morphological variation correlates with genetic and (or) environmental factors. Results suggest that herring is adapting to its environment through a combination of selection...... and plastic responses. Skull shape, including and excluding size variation, differed significantly among samples, both temporally and spatially. Genetic and morphometric distances were correlated, especially when size variation was excluded from the analysis. When size variation was included, skull shape...

  17. Genetic variation underlies temperature tolerance of embryos in the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymbery, R A; Evans, J P

    2013-10-01

    Ocean warming can alter natural selection on marine systems, and in many cases, the long-term persistence of affected populations will depend on genetic adaptation. In this study, we assess the potential for adaptation in the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma armigera, an Australian endemic, that is experiencing unprecedented increases in ocean temperatures. We used a factorial breeding design to assess the level of heritable variation in larval hatching success at two temperatures. Fertilized eggs from each full-sibling family were tested at 22 °C (current spawning temperature) and 25 °C (upper limit of predicted warming this century). Hatching success was significantly lower at higher temperatures, confirming that ocean warming is likely to exert selection on this life-history stage. Our analyses revealed significant additive genetic variance and genotype-by-environment interactions underlying hatching success. Consistent with prior work, we detected significant nonadditive (sire-by-dam) variance in hatching success, but additionally found that these interactions were modified by temperature. Although these findings suggest the potential for genetic adaptation, any evolutionary responses are likely to be influenced (and possibly constrained) by complex genotype-by-environment and sire-by-dam interactions and will additionally depend on patterns of genetic covariation with other fitness traits. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Host genetic variation in mucosal immunity pathways influences the upper airway microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igartua, Catherine; Davenport, Emily R; Gilad, Yoav; Nicolae, Dan L; Pinto, Jayant; Ober, Carole

    2017-02-01

    The degree to which host genetic variation can modulate microbial communities in humans remains an open question. Here, we performed a genetic mapping study of the microbiome in two accessible upper airway sites, the nasopharynx and the nasal vestibule, during two seasons in 144 adult members of a founder population of European decent. We estimated the relative abundances (RAs) of genus level bacteria from 16S rRNA gene sequences and examined associations with 148,653 genetic variants (linkage disequilibrium [LD] r 2 microbiome quantitative trait loci (mbQTLs) that showed evidence of association with the RAs of 22 genera (q < 0.05) and were enriched for genes in mucosal immunity pathways. The most significant association was between the RA of Dermacoccus (phylum Actinobacteria) and a variant 8 kb upstream of TINCR (rs117042385; p = 1.61 × 10-8; q = 0.002), a long non-coding RNA that binds to peptidoglycan recognition protein 3 (PGLYRP3) mRNA, a gene encoding a known antimicrobial protein. A second association was between a missense variant in PGLYRP4 (rs3006458) and the RA of an unclassified genus of family Micrococcaceae (phylum Actinobacteria) (p = 5.10 × 10-7; q = 0.032). Our findings provide evidence of host genetic influences on upper airway microbial composition in humans and implicate mucosal immunity genes in this relationship.

  19. Pseudomonas viridiflava, a multi host plant pathogen with significant genetic variation at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis F Sarris

    Full Text Available The pectinolytic species Pseudomonas viridiflava has a wide host range among plants, causing foliar and stem necrotic lesions and basal stem and root rots. However, little is known about the molecular evolution of this species. In this study we investigated the intraspecies genetic variation of P. viridiflava amongst local (Cretan, as well as international isolates of the pathogen. The genetic and phenotypic variability were investigated by molecular fingerprinting (rep-PCR and partial sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoD and rpoB, and by biochemical and pathogenicity profiling. The biochemical tests and pathogenicity profiling did not reveal any variability among the isolates studied. However, the molecular fingerprinting patterns and housekeeping gene sequences clearly differentiated them. In a broader phylogenetic comparison of housekeeping gene sequences deposited in GenBank, significant genetic variability at the molecular level was found between isolates of P. viridiflava originated from different host species as well as among isolates from the same host. Our results provide a basis for more comprehensive understanding of the biology, sources and shifts in genetic diversity and evolution of P. viridiflava populations and should support the development of molecular identification tools and epidemiological studies in diseases caused by this species.

  20. Individual identification and genetic variation of lions (Panthera leo from two protected areas in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talatu Tende

    Full Text Available This survey was conducted in two protected areas in Nigeria to genetically identify individual lions and to determine the genetic variation within and between the populations. We used faecal sample DNA, a non-invasive alternative to the risky and laborious task of taking samples directly from the animals, often preceded by catching and immobilization. Data collection in Yankari Game Reserve (YGR spanned through a period of five years (2008 -2012, whereas data in Kainji Lake National Park (KLNP was gathered for a period of three years (2009, 2010 and 2012. We identified a minimum of eight individuals (2 males, 3 females, 3 unknown from YGR and a minimum of ten individuals (7 males, 3 females from KLNP. The two populations were found to be genetically distinct as shown by the relatively high fixation index (FST  = 0.17 with each population exhibiting signs of inbreeding (YGR FIS  = 0.49, KLNP FIS  = 0.38. The genetic differentiation between the Yankari and Kainji lions is assumed to result from large spatial geographic distance and physical barriers reducing gene flow between these two remaining wild lion populations in Nigeria. To mitigate the probable inbreeding depression in the lion populations within Nigeria it might be important to transfer lions between parks or reserves or to reintroduce lions from the zoos back to the wild.