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Sample records for explicit polarization potential

  1. Explicit description of polarization coupling in lidar applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Matthew; Thayer, Jeffrey P

    2009-03-01

    Depolarization lidar requires discrimination of received power in polarized and unpolarized components of backscattered light. This can be accomplished with only two polarization measurements. However, parallel- and cross-polarization channels in depolarization lidar cannot always be regarded as independent, because system optical components can cause coupling between these channels and transmitter and receiver polarization planes are rarely perfectly aligned. Calibration constants, while in some instances reasonable approximations, do not fully describe the physics of the receiver and potential for coupling between orthogonal polarization modes. We present an analysis of a general receiver design and introduce an algorithm for decoupling the received data, which only requires the parallel- and cross-polarization data typically recorded in depolarization lidar measurements.

  2. Explicit Second Partial Derivatives of the Ferrers Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Antonio Caritá

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the algebraic potentials most commonly used to represent a galactic bar in the stellar orbits integration is the Ferrers potential. Some researchers may be inclined to implement a numerical differentiation for it in the motion or variational equations, since it can be very laborious to calculate such derivatives algebraically, despite a possible polynomial form, and there are no publications showing the second partial explicit derivatives. The purpose of this work is to present the explicit algebraic form of the partial derivatives of the Ferrers potential using the simplifications suggested by Pfenniger.

  3. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazack, Michael J. M., E-mail: mazack@mazack.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Gao, Jiali, E-mail: gao@jialigao.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province 130028 (China)

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  4. Polar Rain Gradients and Field-Aligned Polar Cap Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Wing, S.; Newell, P. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    ACE SWEPAM measurements of solar wind field-aligned electrons have been compared with simultaneous measurements of polar rain electrons precipitating over the polar cap and detected by DMSP spacecraft. Such comparisons allow investigation of cross-polarcap gradients in the intensity of otherwise-steady polar rain. The generally good agreement of the distribution functions, f, from the two data sources confirms that direct entry of solar electrons along open field lines is indeed the cause of polar rain. The agreement between the data sets is typically best on the side of the polar cap with most intense polar rain but the DMSP f's in less intense regions can be brought into agreement with ACE measurements by shifting all energies by a fixed amounts that range from tens to several hundred eV. In most cases these shifts are positive which implies that field-aligned potentials of these amounts exist on polar cap field lines which tend to retard the entry of electrons and produce the observed gradients. These retarding potentials undoubtedly appear in order to prevent the entry of low-energy electrons and maintain charge quasi-neutrality that would otherwise be violated since most tailward flowing magnetosheath ions are unable to follow polar rain electrons down to the polar cap. In more limited regions near the boundary of the polar cap there is sometimes evidence for field-aligned potentials of the opposite sign that accelerate polar rain electrons. A solar electron burst is also studied and it is concluded that electrons from such bursts can enter the magnetotail and precipitate in the same manner as polar rain.

  5. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  6. Explicit Form of the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-10-01

    We consider the vector emissivity of the polarized radiation transfer in a Λ-type atomic transition, which we recently proposed to account for both complete frequency redistribution (CRD) and partial redistribution (PRD) contributions to the scattered radiation. This expression can concisely be written as ɛ = ( ɛ ( 1 ) - ɛ f . s . ( 2 ) ) + ɛ ( 2 ) , where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms describing, respectively, one-photon and two-photon processes in a Λ-type atom, and where “f.s.” means that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming an appropriate “flat spectrum” average of the incident radiation across the spectral line. In this follow-up study, we explicitly consider the expressions of these various terms for the case of a polarized multi-term atom to derive the algebraic forms of the branching ratios between the CRD and PRD contributions to the emissivity. In the limit of a two-term atom with non-coherent lower term, our results are shown to be in full agreement with those recently derived by Bommier.

  7. Effects of context on implicit and explicit lexical knowledge: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungmook; Kim, Jingu; Ryu, Kwangmin

    2014-10-01

    Although much is known about how contextualized and decontextualized learning affects explicit lexical knowledge, how these learning conditions contribute to implicit lexical knowledge remains unclear. To address this problem, Korean high school students were instructed to learn 30 English words by reading meaningful passages (i.e., in context) and another 30 English words using a wordlist (i.e., out of context). Five weeks later, implicit lexical knowledge was gauged by reaction time and the N400 event-related brain potential component, and explicit lexical knowledge was assessed with an explicit behavioral measure. Results showed that neither learning type was superior to the other in terms of implicit lexical knowledge acquisition, whereas learning words out of context was more effective than learning words in context for establishing explicit lexical knowledge. These results suggest that the presence or absence of context may lead to dissociation in the development of implicit and explicit lexical knowledge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulations of hydrogen sorption in rht-MOF-1: identifying the binding sites through explicit polarization and quantum rotation calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of hydrogen sorption were performed in rht-MOF-1, a metal-organic framework (MOF) that consists of isophthalate groups joined by copper paddlewheel clusters and Cu3O trimers through tetrazolate moeities. This is a charged rht-MOF that contains extra-framework nitrate counterions within the material. For the simulations performed herein, excellent agreement with experiment was achieved for the simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values only when using a polarizable potential. Thermodynamic agreement is demonstrated via comparing to experimental isotherms and binding sites are revealed by combining simulation and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data. Simulations involving explicit many-body polarization interactions assisted in the determination of the binding sites in rht-MOF-1 through the distribution of the induced dipoles that led to strong adsorbate interactions. Four distinct hydrogen sorption sites were determined from the polarization distribution: the nitrate ions located in the corners of the truncated tetrahedral cages, the Cu2+ ions of the paddlewheels that project into the truncated tetrahedral and truncated octahedral cages (Cu1 ions), the Cu2+ ions of the Cu3O trimers (Cu3 ions), and the sides of the paddlewheels in the cuboctahedral cage. The simulations revealed that the initial sorption sites for hydrogen in rht-MOF-1 are the nitrate ions; this site corresponds to the high initial Qst value for hydrogen (9.5 kJ mol-1) in the MOF. The radial distribution functions, g(r), about the Cu2+ ions at various loadings revealed that the Cu1 ions are the preferred open-metal sorption sites for hydrogen at low loading, while the Cu3 ions become occupied at higher loadings. The validation of the aforementioned sorption sites in rht-MOF-1 was confirmed by calculating the two-dimensional quantum rotational levels about each site and comparing the levels to the

  9. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  10. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  11. An improved treatment of empirical dispersion and a many-body energy decomposition scheme for the explicit polarization plus symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (XSAPT) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2013-07-21

    We recently introduced a low-cost quantum chemistry method for computing intermolecular interactions, combining a monomer-based self-consistent field calculation (the "explicit polarization" method, XPol) with pairwise-additive symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). The method uses Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals in the SAPT formalism but replaces the SAPT dispersion and exchange-dispersion terms with empirical potentials ("+D"), and we called this method XPol+SAPT(KS)+D. Here, we report a second-generation version of this approach, XPol+SAPT(KS)+D2 or XSAPT(KS)+D2 for short, in which we have modified the form of the empirical atom-atom dispersion potentials. Accurate binding energies are obtained for benchmark databases of dimer binding energies, and potential energy curves are captured accurately for a variety of challenging systems. We suggest that using different asymptotic corrections for different monomers is necessary to get good binding energies in general, especially for hydrogen-bonded complexes. As compared to our original "+D" formulation, the second-generation "+D2" method accurately reproduces not only total binding energies but also the various components of the interaction energy, and on this basis we introduce an energy decomposition scheme that extends traditional SAPT energy decomposition to systems containing more than two monomers. For (H2O)6, the many-body contribution to the interaction energy agrees well with that obtained from traditional Kitaura-Morokuma energy decomposition analysis in a large basis set.

  12. Predicting fish growth potential and identifying water quality constraints: a spatially-explicit bioenergetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budy, Phaedra; Baker, Matthew; Dahle, Samuel K

    2011-10-01

    Anthropogenic impairment of water bodies represents a global environmental concern, yet few attempts have successfully linked fish performance to thermal habitat suitability and fewer have distinguished co-varying water quality constraints. We interfaced fish bioenergetics, field measurements, and Thermal Remote Imaging to generate a spatially-explicit, high-resolution surface of fish growth potential, and next employed a structured hypothesis to detect relationships among measures of fish performance and co-varying water quality constraints. Our thermal surface of fish performance captured the amount and spatial-temporal arrangement of thermally-suitable habitat for three focal species in an extremely heterogeneous reservoir, but interpretation of this pattern was initially confounded by seasonal covariation of water residence time and water quality. Subsequent path analysis revealed that in terms of seasonal patterns in growth potential, catfish and walleye responded to temperature, positively and negatively, respectively; crappie and walleye responded to eutrophy (negatively). At the high eutrophy levels observed in this system, some desired fishes appear to suffer from excessive cultural eutrophication within the context of elevated temperatures whereas others appear to be largely unaffected or even enhanced. Our overall findings do not lead to the conclusion that this system is degraded by pollution; however, they do highlight the need to use a sensitive focal species in the process of determining allowable nutrient loading and as integrators of habitat suitability across multiple spatial and temporal scales. We provide an integrated approach useful for quantifying fish growth potential and identifying water quality constraints on fish performance at spatial scales appropriate for whole-system management.

  13. Explicit correlation treatment of the potential energy surface of CO{sub 2} dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalugina, Yulia N., E-mail: kalugina@phys.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Buryak, Ilya A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ajili, Yosra [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Vigasin, Andrei A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jaidane, Nejm Eddine [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Hochlaf, Majdi [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France)

    2014-06-21

    We present an extensive study of the four-dimensional potential energy surface (4D-PES) of the carbon dioxide dimer, (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}. This PES is developed over the set of intermolecular coordinates. The electronic computations are carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12] level of theory in connection with the augmented correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. An analytic representation of the 4D-PES is derived. Our extensive calculations confirm that “Slipped Parallel” is the most stable form and that the T-shaped structure corresponds to a transition state. Later on, this PES is employed for the calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the dimer. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the dimer second virial coefficient and of the first spectral moment of rototranslational collision-induced absorption spectrum is derived. For both quantities, a good agreement is found between our values and the experimental data for a wide range of temperatures. This attests to the high quality of our PES. Generally, our PES and results can be used for modeling CO{sub 2} supercritical fluidity and examination of its role in planetary atmospheres. It can be also incorporated into dynamical computations of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. This allows deep understanding, at the microscopic level, of these processes.

  14. Potentially inappropriate drug use in older people: a nationwide comparison of different explicit criteria for population-based estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lucas; Fastbom, Johan; Laroche, Marie-Laure; Johnell, Kristina

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication use among older people in Sweden according to five different published sets of explicit criteria from Europe and the US. This was a nationwide cross-sectional, register-based study across the whole of Sweden in 2008. All individuals aged 65 years and older were included (n = 1 346 709, both community-dwelling and institutionalized persons). We applied all drug-specific criteria included in the 2012 Beers Criteria, the Laroche's list, the PRISCUS list, the NORGEP criteria and the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare criteria. The main outcome was the potentially inappropriate drug use according to each set of criteria, separately and combined. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify individual factors associated with the use of potentially inappropriate drugs. The prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication use varied between the explicit criteria from 16% (NORGEP criteria) to 24% (2012 Beers criteria). Overall, 38% of the older people were exposed to potentially inappropriate drug use by at least one of the five sets of criteria. While controlling for other possible covariates, female gender, institutionalization and polypharmacy were systematically associated with inappropriate drug use, regardless of the set of explicit criteria we considered. Although explicit criteria for inappropriate drug use among older people have been reported to be quite different in their content, they provide similar measures of the prevalence of potentially inappropriate drug use at the population level. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Simple Physics-Based Analytical Formulas for the Potentials of Mean Force of the Interaction of Amino Acid Side Chains in Water. VII. Charged-Hydrophobic/Polar and Polar-Hydrophobic/Polar Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2017-01-19

    The physics-based potentials of side-chain-side-chain interactions corresponding to pairs composed of charged and polar, polar and polar, charged and hydrophobic, and hydrophobic and hydrophobic side chains have been determined. A total of 144 four-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMFs) of all possible pairs of molecules modeling these pairs were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water as functions of distance and orientation, and the analytical expressions were then fitted to the PMFs. Depending on the type of interacting sites, the analytical approximation to the PMF is a sum of terms corresponding to van der Waals interactions and cavity-creation involving the nonpolar sections of the side chains and van der Waals, cavity-creation, and electrostatic (charge-dipole or dipole-dipole) interaction energies and polarization energies involving the charged or polar sections of the side chains. The model used in this work reproduces all features of the interacting pairs. The UNited RESidue force field with the new side-chain-side-chain interaction potentials was preliminarily tested with the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDBL 1BDD ; a three-α-helix bundle) and UPF0291 protein YnzC from Bacillus subtilis (PDB: 2HEP ; an α-helical hairpin).

  16. Implicit and explicit selective attention to smoking cues in smokers indexed by brain potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Littel (Marianne); I.H.A. Franken (Ingmar)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Substance use disorders are characterized by cognitive processing biases, such as automatically detecting and orienting attention towards drug-related stimuli. However, it is unclear how, when and what kind of attention (i.e. implicit, explicit) interacts with the processing of

  17. Implicit and explicit selective attention to smoking cues in smokers indexed by brain potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Littel (Marianne); I.H.A. Franken (Ingmar)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Substance use disorders are characterized by cognitive processing biases, such as automatically detecting and orienting attention towards drug-related stimuli. However, it is unclear how, when and what kind of attention (i.e. implicit, explicit) interacts with the processing of

  18. Explicit calculation of indirect global warming potentials for halons using atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Wuebbles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Global Warming Potentials (GWPs has been extensively used in policy consideration as a relative index for comparing the climate impact of an emitted greenhouse gas (GHG, relative to carbon dioxide with equal mass emissions. Ozone depletion due to emission of chlorinated or brominated halocarbons leads to cooling of the climate system in the opposite direction to the direct warming contribution by halocarbons as GHGs. This cooling is a key indirect effect of the halocarbons on climatic radiative forcing, which is accounted for by indirect GWPs. With respect to climate, it is critical to understand net influences considering direct warming and indirect cooling effects especially for Halons due to the greater ozone-depleting efficiency of bromine over chlorine. Until now, the indirect GWPs have been calculated using a parameterized approach based on the concept of Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC and the observed ozone depletion over the last few decades. As a step towards obtaining indirect GWPs through a more robust approach, we use atmospheric models to explicitly calculate the indirect GWPs of Halon-1211 and Halon-1301 for a 100-year time horizon. State-of-the-art global chemistry-transport models (CTMs were used as the computational tools to derive more realistic ozone depletion changes caused by an added pulse emission of the two major Halons at the surface. The radiative forcings on climate from the ozone changes have been calculated for indirect GWPs using an atmospheric radiative transfer model (RTM. The simulated temporal variations of global average total column Halons after a pulse perturbation follow an exponential decay with an e-folding time which is consistent with the expected chemical lifetimes of the Halons. Our calculated indirect GWPs for the two Halons are much smaller than those from past studies but are within a single standard deviation of WMO (2007 values and the direct GWP values derived

  19. Oceanic signals in rapid polar motion: results from a barotropic forward model with explicit consideration of self-attraction and loading effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Quinn, Katherine J.; Ponte, Rui M.

    2017-04-01

    Numerical modeling of non-tidal variations in ocean currents and bottom pressure has played a key role in closing the excitation budget of Earth's polar motion for a wide range of periodicities. Non-negligible discrepancies between observations and model accounts of pole position changes prevail, however, on sub-monthly time scales and call for examination of hydrodynamic effects usually omitted in general circulation models. Specifically, complete hydrodynamic cores must incorporate self-attraction and loading (SAL) feedbacks on redistributed water masses, effects that produces ocean bottom pressure perturbations of typically about 10% relative to the computed mass variations. Here, we report on a benchmark simulation with a near-global, barotropic forward model forced by wind stress, atmospheric pressure, and a properly calculated SAL term. The latter is obtained by decomposing ocean mass anomalies on a 30-minute grid into spherical harmonics at each time step and applying Love numbers to account for seafloor deformation and changed gravitational attraction. The increase in computational time at each time step is on the order of 50%. Preliminary results indicate that the explicit consideration of SAL in the forward runs increases the fidelity of modeled polar motion excitations, in particular on time scales shorter than 5 days as evident from cross spectral comparisons with geodetic excitation. Definite conclusions regarding the relevance of SAL in simulating rapid polar motion are, however, still hampered by the model's incomplete domain representation that excludes parts of the highly energetic Arctic Ocean.

  20. Spin Polarization Spectroscopy of Alkali-Noble Gas Interatomic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Andrey E.; Goldshlag, William; Eden, J. Gary

    2017-06-01

    We report a new laser spectroscopic technique capable of detecting weak state-state interactions in diatomic molecules. Specifically, a weak interaction has been observed between the 6pσ antibonding orbital of the CsXe (B ^2Σ^+_{1/2}) state and a 5dσ MO associated with a 5dΛ (Λ = 0, 1) state. Thermal Cs-rare gas collision pairs are photoexcited by a circularly-polarized optical field having a wavelength within the B ^2Σ^+_{1/2} \\longleftarrow X ^2Σ^+_{1/2} (free\\longleftarrowfree) continuum. Subsequent dissociation of the B ^2Σ^+_{1/2} transient diatomic selectively populates the F= 4, 5 hyperfine levels of the Cs 6p ^2P_{3/2} state, and circularly-polarized (σ^+) amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is generated on the Cs D_2 line. The dependence of Cs 6p spin polarization on the Cs(6p)-Xe internuclear separation (R), clearly shows an interaction between the CsXe(B ^2Σ^+_{1/2}) state and a 5dΛ (Λ = 0, 1) potential of the diatomic molecule.

  1. Explicit and implicit memory in female college students with schizotypal traits: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Bit-Na; Kim, Myung-Sun

    2011-04-01

    The explicit and implicit memory of nonclinical individuals with schizotypal traits was investigated using event-related potentials. Explicit and implicit memory was measured with continuous recognition and categorization tasks, respectively. On the recognition task, the control group demonstrated a greater old/new effect in response to the old than to the new words during the 250-750 ms post-stimulus period, whereas schizotypal trait group did not exhibit an old/new effect during the 550-650 ms period. The control group demonstrated faster response times to the old than to the new words, whereas the schizotypal group demonstrated longer response times to the old than to the new words. On the categorization task, both groups showed old/new effects during the 250-550 ms after stimulus onset and responded more rapidly and with fewer errors to the old than to the new words. These results suggest that individuals with schizotypal traits have impaired explicit but preserved implicit memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential vorticity of the south polar vortex of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; García Muñoz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Venus' atmosphere shows highly variable warm vortices over both of the planet's poles. The nature of the mechanism behind their formation and properties is still unknown. Potential vorticity is a conserved quantity when advective processes dominate over friction and diabatic heating and is a quantity frequently used to model balanced flows. As a step toward understanding the vortices' dynamics, we present maps of Ertel's potential vorticity (EPV) at Venus' south polar region. We analyze three configurations of the south polar vortex at the upper cloud level (P ~ 240 mbar; z ~ 58 km), based on our previous analyses of cloud motions and thermal structure from data acquired by the Visual and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer instrument on board Venus Express. Additionally, we tentatively estimate EPV at the lower cloud level (P ~ 2200 mbar; z ~ 43 km), based on our previous wind measurements and on static stability data from Pioneer Venus and the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model. Values of EPV are on the order of 10-6 and 10-8 K m2 kg-1 s-1 at the upper and lower cloud levels, respectively, being 3 times larger than the estimated errors. The morphology observed in EPV maps is mainly determined by the structures of the vertical component of the relative vorticity. This is in contrast to the vortex's morphology observed in 3.8 or 5 µm images which are related to the thermal structure of the atmosphere at the cloud top. Some of the EPV maps point to a weak ringed structure in the upper cloud, while a more homogenous EPV field is found in the lower cloud.

  3. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  4. An explicit Ricci potential for the Universal Moduli Space of Vector Bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Poulsen, Niccolo Skovgård

    In this paper we modify the coordinate construction in [5] on the universal moduli space of pair consisting of a Riemann Surfaces and a stable holomorphic bundles on the Riemann Surface, so as to produce a new set of coordinates, which are in fact Kähler coordinates on this universal moduli space....... Further, we give a functional determinant formula for the Ricci potential of the universal moduli space....

  5. Explicit correlation treatment of the six-dimensional potential energy surface and predicted infrared spectra for OCS-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Min; Zhai, Yu; Li, Hui

    2017-07-01

    An effective six-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for H2-OCS which explicitly includes the intramolecular stretch normal modes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is presented. The electronic structure computations are carried out using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster [CCSD(T)-F12] method with the augmented correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, and the accuracy is critically tested by performing a series of benchmark calculations. Analytic four-dimensional PESs are obtained by least-squares fitting vibrationally averaged interaction energies to the Morse/long-range potential model. These fits to 13 485 points have a root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of 0.16 cm-1. The combined radial discrete variable representation/angular finite basis representation method and the Lanczos algorithm were employed to evaluate the rovibrational energy levels for five isotopic species of the OCS-hydrogen complexes. The predicted transition frequencies and intensities based on the resulting vibrationally averaged PESs are in good agreement with the available experimental values, whose RMSDs are smaller than 0.004 cm-1 for five different species of OCS-hydrogen complexes. The calculated infrared band origin shifts for all five species of OCS-hydrogen complexes are only 0.03 cm-1 smaller than the corresponding experimental values. These validate the high quality of our PESs which can be used for modeling OCS doped in hydrogen clusters to further study quantum solution and microscopic superfluidity. In addition, the analytic coordinate transformation functions between isotopologues are also derived due to the center of mass shifting of different isotope substitutes.

  6. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and phytotoxic potential of non-polar and polar fractions of seeds of Dioteryx odorata (Aubl.) Willd. from Venezuelan regions

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveros-Bastidas,Alberto de J.; Demuner, Antonio J.; Luiz Claudio Almeida Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Dipteryx odorata (Aubl.) Willd. is a tall arboreal species native to Central and Northern South America. This paper describes the chemical characterization and phytotoxic potential of polar and non-polar extracts from D. odorata seeds. Structural determinations were accomplished by chemical derivatization and analyzed by GC/MS. The chemical composition of the non-polar fraction (hexane and dichloromethane) presented fatty acids as major constituent. Medium polar and polar fractions (ethyl ace...

  7. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: polarization sensitivity and potential impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) current geostationary imagers for operational weather forecasting, the next generation imager, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R), will have six reflective solar bands - five more than currently available. These bands will be used for applications such as aerosol retrievals, which are influenced by polarization effects. These effects are determined by two factors: instrument polarization sensitivity and the polarization states of the observations. The former is measured as part of the pre-launch testing program performed by the instrument vendor. We analyzed the results of the pre-launch polarization sensitivity measurements of the 0.47 μm and 0.64 μm channels and used them in conjunction with simulated scene polarization states to estimate potential on-orbit radiometric impacts. The pre-launch test setups involved illuminating the ABI with an integrating sphere through either one or two polarizers. The measurement with one (rotating) polarizer yields the degree of linear polarization of ABI, and the measurements using two polarizers (one rotating and one fixed) characterized the non-ideal properties of the polarizer. To estimate the radiometric performance impacts from the instrument polarization sensitivity, we simulated polarized scenes using a radiative transfer code and accounted for the instrument polarization sensitivity over its field of regard. The results show the variation in the polarization impacts over the day and by regions of the full disk can reach up to 3.2% for the 0.47μm channel and 4.8% for the 0.64μm channel. Geostationary orbiters like the ABI give the unique opportunity to show these impacts throughout the day compared to low earth orbiters, which are more limited to certain times of day. This work may enhance the ability to diagnose anomalies on-orbit.

  8. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further...

  9. Generating relativistic pseudo-potentials with explicit incorporation of semi-core states using APE, the Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    We present a computer package designed to generate and test norm-conserving pseudo-potentials within Density Functional Theory. The generated pseudo-potentials can be either non-relativistic, scalar relativistic or fully relativistic and can explicitly include semi-core states. A wide range of exchange-correlation functionals is included. Program summaryProgram title: Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine (APE) Catalogue identifier: AEAC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 287 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 649 959 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C Computer: any computer architecture, running any flavor of UNIX Operating system: GNU/Linux RAM: APE also has a very sophisticated and user-friendly input system. Running time: The example given in this paper (Si) takes 10 s to run on a Pentium IV machine clocked at 2 GHz.

  10. Implicit and Explicit Mechanisms of Word Learning in a Narrative Context: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterink, Laura; Neville, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of word meanings are learned simply by extracting them from context rather than by rote memorization or explicit instruction. Although this skill is remarkable, little is known about the brain mechanisms involved. In the present study, ERPs were recorded as participants read stories in which pseudowords were presented multiple…

  11. Control of surface potential at polar domain walls in a nonpolar oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Hicher, P.; Haumont, R.; Aktas, O.; Salje, E. K. H.; Tortech, L.; Mathieu, C.; Martinotti, D.; Barrett, N.

    2017-12-01

    Ferroic domain walls could play an important role in microelectronics, given their nanometric size and often distinct functional properties. Until now, devices and device concepts were mostly based on mobile domain walls in ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials. A less explored path is to make use of polar domain walls in nonpolar ferroelastic materials. Indeed, while the polar character of ferroelastic domain walls has been demonstrated, polarization control has been elusive. Here, we report evidence for the electrostatic signature of the domain-wall polarization in nonpolar calcium titanate (CaTi O3 ). Macroscopic mechanical resonances excited by an ac electric field are observed as a signature of a piezoelectric response caused by polar walls. On the microscopic scale, the polarization in domain walls modifies the local surface potential of the sample. Through imaging of surface potential variations, we show that the potential at the domain wall can be controlled by electron injection. This could enable devices based on nondestructive information readout of surface potential.

  12. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and phytotoxic potential of non-polar and polar fractions of seeds of Dioteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. from Venezuelan regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de J. Oliveros-Bastidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. is a tall arboreal species native to Central and Northern South America. This paper describes the chemical characterization and phytotoxic potential of polar and non-polar extracts from D. odorata seeds. Structural determinations were accomplished by chemical derivatization and analyzed by GC/MS. The chemical composition of the non-polar fraction (hexane and dichloromethane presented fatty acids as major constituent. Medium polar and polar fractions (ethyl acetate and ethanol: water contained carboxylic acid and high 6,7-Dyhidroxycoumarin-β-D-glucopyranoside content, not previously reported for seeds of D. odorata. Extracts showed a significant level of phytotoxic activity, correlated to the content of coumarin derivatives, predominantly in the polar fraction.

  13. Potential impacts of offshore oil spills on polar bears in the Chukchi Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R; Perham, Craig; French-McCay, Deborah P; Balouskus, Richard

    2018-01-12

    Sea ice decline is anticipated to increase human access to the Arctic Ocean allowing for offshore oil and gas development in once inaccessible areas. Given the potential negative consequences of an oil spill on marine wildlife populations in the Arctic, it is important to understand the magnitude of impact a large spill could have on wildlife to inform response planning efforts. In this study we simulated oil spills that released 25,000 barrels of oil for 30 days in autumn originating from two sites in the Chukchi Sea (one in Russia and one in the U.S.) and tracked the distribution of oil for 76 days. We then determined the potential impact such a spill might have on polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their habitat by overlapping spills with maps of polar bear habitat and movement trajectories. Only a small proportion (1-10%) of high-value polar bear sea ice habitat was directly affected by oil sufficient to impact bears. However, 27-38% of polar bears in the region were potentially exposed to oil. Oil consistently had the highest probability of reaching Wrangel and Herald islands, important areas of denning and summer terrestrial habitat. Oil did not reach polar bears until approximately 3 weeks after the spills. Our study found the potential for significant impacts to polar bears under a worst case discharge scenario, but suggests that there is a window of time where effective containment efforts could minimize exposure to bears. Our study provides a framework for wildlife managers and planners to assess the level of response that would be required to treat exposed wildlife and where spill response equipment might be best stationed. While the size of spill we simulated has a low probability of occurring, it provides an upper limit for planners to consider when crafting response plans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. On the fractional Jaulent-Miodek equation associated with energy-dependent Schrödinger potential: Lie symmetry reductions, explicit exact solutions and conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, A.; Roohani Ghehsareh, H.; Zaghian, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the Lie symmetry analysis is performed on a coupled system of nonlinear time-fractional Jaulent-Miodek equations associated with energy-dependent Schrödinger potential. The underlying problem is similarity reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with Erdelyi-Kober fractional derivatives. Employing the invariant subspace method, a set of explicit solutions for the problem has been well constructed. In addition, the new conservation theorem is used to construct the conservation laws of the problem.

  15. New parameter-free polarization potentials in low-energy positron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashok

    1990-01-01

    The polarization potential plays a decisive role in shaping up the cross sections in low energy positron collisions with atoms and molecules. However, its inclusion without involving any adjustable parameter, is still a challenge. Various other techniques employed so far for positron collisions are summarized, and a new, nonadjustable and very simple form of the polarization potential for positron-atom (molecule) collisions below the threshold of positronium formation is discussed. This new recently proposed potential is based on the correlation energy of a single positron in a homogeneous electron gas. The correlation energy was calculated by solving the Schrodinger equation of the positron-electron system and fitted to an analytical form in various ranges of the density parameter. In the outside region, the correlation energy is joined smoothly with the correct asymptotic form. This new positron correlation polarization (PCOP) potential was tested on several atomic and molecular targets such as the Ar, CO, and CH4. The results on the total and differential cross sections on these targets are shown along with the experimental data where available.

  16. Cross-Polar Aircraft Trajectory Optimization and the Potential Climate Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hok K.; Sridhar, Banavar; Grabbe, Shon; Chen, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Cross-Polar routes offer new opportunities for air travel markets. Transpolar flights reduce travel times, fuel burns, and associated environmental emissions by flying direct paths between many North American and Asian cities. This study evaluates the potential benefits of flying wind-optimal polar routes and assessed their potential impact on climate change. An optimization algorithm is developed for transpolar flights to generate wind-optimal trajectories that minimize climate impact of aircraft, in terms of global warming potentials (relative to warming by one kg of CO2) of several types of emissions, while avoiding regions of airspace that facilitate persistent contrail formation. Estimations of global warming potential are incorporated into the objective function of the optimization algorithm to assess the climate impact of aircraft emissions discharged at a given location and altitude. The regions of airspace with very low ambient temperature and areas favorable to persistent contrail formation are modeled as undesirable regions that aircraft should avoid and are formulated as soft state constraints. The fuel burn and climate impact of cross-polar air traffic flying various types of trajectory including flight plan, great circle, wind-optimal, and contrail-avoidance are computed for 15 origin-destination pairs between major international airports in the U.S. and Asia. Wind-optimal routes reduce average fuel burn of flight plan routes by 4.4% on December 4, 2010 and 8.0% on August 7, 2010, respectively. The tradeoff between persistent contrail formation and additional global warming potential of aircraft emissions is investigated with and without altitude optimization. Without altitude optimization, the reduction in contrail travel times is gradual with increase in total fuel consumption. When altitude is optimized, a one percent increase in additional global warming potential, a climate impact equivalent to that of 4070kg and 4220kg CO2 emission, reduces 135

  17. A spatially explicit whole-system model of the lignocellulosic bioethanol supply chain: an assessment of decentralised processing potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnett, Alex J; Adjiman, Claire S; Shah, Nilay

    2008-01-01

    Background Lignocellulosic bioethanol technologies exhibit significant capacity for performance improvement across the supply chain through the development of high-yielding energy crops, integrated pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation technologies and the application of dedicated ethanol pipelines. The impact of such developments on cost-optimal plant location, scale and process composition within multiple plant infrastructures is poorly understood. A combined production and logistics model has been developed to investigate cost-optimal system configurations for a range of technological, system scale, biomass supply and ethanol demand distribution scenarios specific to European agricultural land and population densities. Results Ethanol production costs for current technologies decrease significantly from $0.71 to $0.58 per litre with increasing economies of scale, up to a maximum single-plant capacity of 550 × 106 l year-1. The development of high-yielding energy crops and consolidated bio-processing realises significant cost reductions, with production costs ranging from $0.33 to $0.36 per litre. Increased feedstock yields result in systems of eight fully integrated plants operating within a 500 × 500 km2 region, each producing between 1.24 and 2.38 × 109 l year-1 of pure ethanol. A limited potential for distributed processing and centralised purification systems is identified, requiring developments in modular, ambient pretreatment and fermentation technologies and the pipeline transport of pure ethanol. Conclusion The conceptual and mathematical modelling framework developed provides a valuable tool for the assessment and optimisation of the lignocellulosic bioethanol supply chain. In particular, it can provide insight into the optimal configuration of multiple plant systems. This information is invaluable in ensuring (near-)cost-optimal strategic development within the sector at the regional and national scale. The framework is flexible and can thus

  18. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  19. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  20. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  1. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrayani Waghmare

    Full Text Available Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib- surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells.

  2. A new dipolar potential for numerical simulations of polar fluids on the 4D hypersphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillol, Jean-Michel; Trulsson, Martin

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for Monte Carlo or Molecular Dynamics numerical simulations of three-dimensional polar fluids. The simulation cell is defined to be the surface of the northern hemisphere of a four-dimensional (hyper)sphere. The point dipoles are constrained to remain tangent to the sphere and their interactions are derived from the basic laws of electrostatics in this geometry. The dipole-dipole potential has two singularities which correspond to the following boundary conditions: when a dipole leaves the northern hemisphere at some point of the equator, it reappears at the antipodal point bearing the same dipole moment. We derive all the formal expressions needed to obtain the thermodynamic and structural properties of a polar liquid at thermal equilibrium in actual numerical simulation. We notably establish the expression of the static dielectric constant of the fluid as well as the behavior of the pair correlation at large distances. We report and discuss the results of extensive numerical Monte Carlo simulations for two reference states of a fluid of dipolar hard spheres and compare these results with previous methods with a special emphasis on finite size effects.

  3. On the age of stratospheric air and ozone depletion potentials in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, W. H.; Heidt, L. E.; Lueb, R. A.; Vedder, J. F.; Mills, M. J.; Solomon, S.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the nearly inert, man-made chlorofluorocarbon CFC-115 obtained during January 1989 are used to infer the age of air in the lower stratosphere. These observations together with estimated release rates suggest an average age of high-latitude air at pressure altitudes near 17-21 km of about 3 to 5 yr. This information is used together with direct measurements of HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, CH3Br, H-1301, H-1211, and H-2402 to examine the fractional dissociation of these species within the Arctic polar lower stratosphere compared to that of CFC-11 and hence to estimate their local ozone depletion potentials in this region. It is shown that these HCFCs are much less efficiently dissociated within the stratosphere than CFC-11, lowering their ozone depletion potentials to only about 30-40 percent of their chlorine loading potentials. In contrast, the observations of CH3Br and the Halons considered confirm that they are rapidly dissociated within the stratosphere, with important implications for their ozone depletion potentials.

  4. Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korajac, Arman; Habibović, Dino; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa; Milošević, Dejan B.

    2017-10-01

    Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic (two-component) elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed in the frame of the S-matrix theory. The second Born approximation is applied in the expansion of the S-matrix element. The first term in the expansion corresponds to the single scattering, while the second term in the expansion corresponds to the double scattering of electrons on atomic targets. The double scattering is possible in the presence of a laser field. The electron that has scattered on an atomic target may be driven back by the laser field and scatter again on the same atom. The double-scattered electrons may have considerably higher energies than those that scattered only once. We have investigated the dependence of the energy spectrum on various laser-field and incident electron parameters. The calculated electron energy spectra show the plateau-like structures with abrupt cutoffs. These cutoffs are explained by a classical analysis.

  5. New explicit expressions for Dirac bilinears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2018-01-01

    We derive new explicit expressions for the Dirac bilinears based on a generic representation of the massive Dirac spinors with canonical polarization. These bilinears depend on a direction n in Minkowski space which specifies the form of dynamics. We argue that such a dependence is unavoidable in a relativistic theory with spin, since it originates from Wigner rotation effects. Contrary to most of the expressions found in the literature, ours are valid for all momenta and canonical polarizations of the spinors. As a byproduct, we also obtain a generic explicit expression for the covariant spin vector.

  6. Validating potential toxicity assays to assess petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity in polar soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alexis Nadine; Snape, Ian; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Potential microbial activities are commonly used to assess soil toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and are assumed to be a surrogate for microbial activity within the soil ecosystem. However, this assumption needs to be evaluated for frozen soil, in which microbial activity is limited by liquid water (θ(liquid)). Influence of θ(liquid) on in situ toxicity was evaluated and compared to the toxicity endpoints of potential microbial activities using soil from an aged diesel fuel spill at Casey Station, East Antarctica. To determine in situ toxicity, gross mineralization and nitrification rates were determined by the stable isotope dilution technique. Petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (0-8,000 mg kg(-1)), packed at bulk densities of 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0 g cm(-3) to manipulate liquid water content, was incubated at -5°C for one, two, and three months. Although θ(liquid) did not have a significant effect on gross mineralization or nitrification, gross nitrification was sensitive to PHC contamination, with toxicity decreasing over time. In contrast, gross mineralization was not sensitive to PHC contamination. Toxic response of gross nitrification was comparable to potential nitrification activity (PNA) with similar EC25 (effective concentration causing a 25% effect in the test population) values determined by both measurement endpoints (400 mg kg(-1) for gross nitrification compared to 200 mg kg(-1) for PNA), indicating that potential microbial activity assays are good surrogates for in situ toxicity of PHC contamination in polar regions. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  7. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-E. Mamouri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN and ice nucleating particle (INP number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius  > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols, n100, dry (particles with dry radius  >  100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN, and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius  >  250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP, as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5–2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25–50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input and available INP

  8. Assessing the potential of spectral induced polarization to detect in situ changes in iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, C. L.; Price, A.; Sharma, S.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The near surface geophysical technique Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP), provides promise as an effective method measuring in situ biofilm formation/development. Yet, potential mechanisms responsible for observed shifts in SIP response due to biofilm are not clearly understood. In order to address possible mechanisms we assessed the influence of Shewanella oneidensis (MR1) cell density (colony forming units; CFU), biofilm production (Bradford assay) and iron reduction metabolism (colorimetric assay) on SIP response. Laboratory measurements were collected over three months on columns packed with either iron-coated or iron-free sands and amended with artificial ground water and acetate in order to stimulate biofilm production and microbial iron reduction. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to confirm the presence of S. oneidensis cells and biofilm. Our results suggest that during early/initial stage (75 days) of column incubation, SIP measurements revealed that phase and imaginary conductivity responses decreased as the concentration of reduced iron decreased below 2.0 mM. In contrast, we observed only a moderate increase in phase and imaginary conductivity ( 30%) within iron-free columns as a result of increases in S. oneidensis cells (CFU 1.5 x 1011) and biofilm production (7.0 mg ml-1). SEM analysis confirmed the presence of biofilm and cells within both iron-coated and iron-free columns. We hypothesize that the production of microbial metabolic byproducts is a potential mechanism explaining large phase shits observed in previous studies ( 50 mrads) rather than the conductivity of cells or biofilm. Our findings provide support for the following: i) ratio of cells to biofilm production only moderately influences both phase and imaginary conductivity response and ii) largest phase and imaginary conductivity response resulted from microbial metabolism (i.e. iron reduction) and potentially biofilm trapping of conductive materials (i

  9. Circumpolar contaminant concentrations in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and potential population-level effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, R.J.M.; Hendriks, A.J.; Jenssen, B.M.; Schipper, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) currently receive much attention in the context of global climate change. However, there are other stressors that might threaten the viability of polar bear populations as well, such as exposure to anthropogenic pollutants. Lipophilic organic compounds

  10. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  11. A study of the transient plasma potential in a pulsed bi-polar dc magnetron discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J W; Karkari, S K; Vetushka, A [Department of Physics, UMIST, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    The temporal evolution of the plasma potential, V{sub p}, in a pulsed dc magnetron plasma has been determined using the emissive probe technique. The discharge was operated in the 'asymmetric bi-polar' mode, in which the discharge voltage changes polarity during part of the pulse cycle. The probe measurements, with a time-resolution of 20 ns or better, were made along a line above the racetrack, normal to the plane of the cathode target, for a fixed frequency (100 kHz), duty cycle (50%), argon pressure (0.74 Pa) and discharge power (583 W). At all the measured positions, V{sub p} was found to respond to the large and rapid changes in the cathode voltage, V{sub d}, during the different phases of the pulse cycle, with V{sub p} always more positive than V{sub d}. At a typical substrate position (>80 mm from the target), V{sub p} remains a few volts above the most positive surface in the discharge at all times. In the 'on' phase of the pulse, the measurements show a significant axial electric field is generated in the plasma, with the plasma potential dropping by a total of about 30 V over a distance of 70 mm, from the bulk plasma to a position close to the beginning of the cathode fall. This is consistent with measurements made in the dc magnetron. During the stable 'reverse' phase of the discharge, for distances greater than 18 mm from the target, the axial electric field is found to collapse, with V{sub p} elevated uniformly to about 3 V above V{sub d}. Between the target and this field-free region an ion sheath forms, and the current flowing to the target is still an ion current in this 'reverse' period. During the initial 200 ns of the voltage 'overshoot' phase (between 'on' and 'reverse' phases), V{sub d} reached a potential of +290 V; however, close to the target, V{sub p} was found to attain a much higher value, namely +378 V. Along the line of measurement, the axial electric field reverses

  12. Circumpolar contaminant concentrations in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and potential population-level effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijten, R J M; Hendriks, A J; Jenssen, B M; Schipper, A M

    2016-11-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) currently receive much attention in the context of global climate change. However, there are other stressors that might threaten the viability of polar bear populations as well, such as exposure to anthropogenic pollutants. Lipophilic organic compounds bio-accumulate and bio-magnify in the food chain, leading to high concentrations at the level of top-predators. In Arctic wildlife, including the polar bear, various adverse health effects have been related to internal concentrations of commercially used anthropogenic chemicals like PCB and DDT. The extent to which these individual health effects are associated to population-level effects is, however, unknown. In this study we assembled data on adipose tissue concentrations of ∑PCB, ∑DDT, dieldrin and ∑PBDE in individual polar bears from peer-reviewed scientific literature. Data were available for 14 out of the 19 subpopulations. We found that internal concentrations of these contaminants exceed threshold values for adverse individual health effects in several subpopulations. In an exploratory regression analysis we identified a clear negative correlation between polar bear population density and sub-population specific contaminant concentrations in adipose tissue. The results suggest that adverse health effects of contaminants in individual polar bears may scale up to population-level consequences. Our study highlights the need to consider contaminant exposure along with other threats in polar bear population viability analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Induced polarization and self-potential geophysical signature of bacterial activity in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The first part of the presentation will be dedicated to the spectral induced polarization signature of bacteria in porous media. We developed a quantitative model to investigate frequency-domain induced polarization response of suspensions of bacteria and bacteria growth in porous media. Induced polarization of bacteria (alpha-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer of the bacteria. Surface conductivity and alpha-polarization are due to the Stern layer of counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria. These phenomena can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. The mobility of the counterions in this Stern layer is found to be very small (4.7×10-10 m2s-1 V-1 at 25°C). This implies a very low relaxation frequency for the alpha-polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1 to 5 Hertz) in agreement with experimental observations. This new model can be coupled to reactive transport modeling codes in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics. We show that the growth rate and endogenous decay coefficients of bacteria in a porous sand can be inferred non-intrusively from time lapse frequency-domain induced polarization data. The second part of the presentation will concern the biogeobattery mechanism showing new data, the concept of transient biogeobattery and the influence of the concentration of the electron acceptors in the process.

  14. Erosion Potential of Tooth Whitening Regimens as Evaluated with Polarized Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambert, Patrick; Qian, Fang; Kwon, So Ran

    2015-11-01

    Tooth whitening is a widely utilized esthetic treatment in dentistry. With increased access to over-the-counter (OTC) systems concerns have been raised as to potential adverse effects associated with overuse of whitening materials. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate enamel erosion due to different whitening regimens when used in excess of recommended guidelines. Extracted human teeth (n = 66) were randomly divided into 11 groups (n = 6/group). Specimens were exposed to OTC products: Crest Whitestrips and 5-minute natural white and a do-it-yourself (DIY) strawberry whitening recipe. Within each regimen, groups were further divided per exposure time: specimens receiving the recommended product dosage; 5 times the recommended dosage; and 10 times the recommended dosage. Negative and positive controls were treated with grade 3 water and 1.0% citric acid, respectively. Specimens were nail-varnished to limit application to a 1 × 4 mm window. Following treatment, specimens were sectioned and erosion (drop in μm) measured using polarized light microscopy. Two-sample t-test was used to detect difference in amount of enamel erosion between negative and positive groups, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was used to detect difference between set of treatment groups and negative control groups or among all experimental groups. There was significant difference in mean amount of enamel erosion (p erosion for positive control group was significantly greater than that for negative control group (23.50 vs 2.65 μm). There was significant effect for type of treatments on enamel erosion [F(9,50) = 25.19; p 0.05 for all instances), except for Natural White_10 times treatment group (p erosion. Enamel erosion due to the overuse of whitening products varies for different modalities and products. Therefore, caution is advised when using certain over-the-counter products beyond recommended guidelines, as there is potential for enamel

  15. Potential causes for the extraordinarily cold and strong Arctic polar vortex in winter 2015/16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Vivien; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Stober, Gunter

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic polar vortex was extraordinarily cold and strong at the beginning of the winter 2015/16, strong and displaced in mid-winter and broke down in early March 2016. We investigate the characteristics of the polar vortex using global reanalysis data, satellite observations, and mesospheric radar wind measurements over northern Scandinavia. The results are related to previous winters of the last decades. The focus of this study is on finding the causes for the extraordinary behavior of the Arctic polar vortex in the early and late winter 2015/16. In early winter we found a correlation between the planetary wave (PW) activity and the strength and temperature of the Arctic polar vortex in the stratosphere and mesosphere. In Nov/Dec 2015, a reduced PW generation in the troposphere and a stronger PW filtering in the troposphere and stratosphere, caused by stronger zonal winds in mid-latitudes, resulted in a stronger polar vortex. Another peculiarity of the winter 2015/16 occurred after the unusually early breakdown of the Arctic polar vortex. Typically the zonal mean zonal wind remains easterly until autumn. However, the zonal wind in the mesosphere between 50 and 80 km became westerly again after the "final warming" for over 30 days. During this phenomenon there is no sign of planetary wave activity why other possible causes will be discussed.

  16. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R (2) Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R (2) > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  17. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  18. Mitochondrial acclimation potential to ocean acidification and warming of Polar cod (Boreogadus saida) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Elettra; Kunz, Kristina L; Schmidt, Matthias; Storch, Daniela; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2017-01-01

    Ocean acidification and warming are happening fast in the Arctic but little is known about the effects of ocean acidification and warming on the physiological performance and survival of Arctic fish. In this study we investigated the metabolic background of performance through analyses of cardiac mitochondrial function in response to control and elevated water temperatures and PCO2 of two gadoid fish species, Polar cod (Boreogadus saida), an endemic Arctic species, and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), which is a temperate to cold eurytherm and currently expanding into Arctic waters in the wake of ocean warming. We studied their responses to the above-mentioned drivers and their acclimation potential through analysing the cardiac mitochondrial function in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres after 4 months of incubation at different temperatures (Polar cod: 0, 3, 6, 8 °C and Atlantic cod: 3, 8, 12, 16 °C), combined with exposure to present (400μatm) and year 2100 (1170μatm) levels of CO2. OXPHOS, proton leak and ATP production efficiency in Polar cod were similar in the groups acclimated at 400μatm and 1170μatm of CO2, while incubation at 8 °C evoked increased proton leak resulting in decreased ATP production efficiency and decreased Complex IV capacity. In contrast, OXPHOS of Atlantic cod increased with temperature without compromising the ATP production efficiency, whereas the combination of high temperature and high PCO2 depressed OXPHOS and ATP production efficiency. Polar cod mitochondrial efficiency decreased at 8 °C while Atlantic cod mitochondria were more resilient to elevated temperature; however, this resilience was constrained by high PCO2. In line with its lower habitat temperature and higher degree of stenothermy, Polar cod has a lower acclimation potential to warming than Atlantic cod.

  19. Calculations on the threshold anomaly of weakly bound projectiles with Sao Paulo and Woods-Saxon polarization potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Camacho, A; Aguilera, E F; Martinez-Quiroz, E [Departamento de Aceleradores, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gomes, P R S; Lubian, J [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminenese, Avenida Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, RJ, cep 24210-340 (Brazil); Canto, L F, E-mail: arturo.gomez@inin.gob.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528, Rio de Janeiro, R.J., cep 21941-972 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    A thorough study of the energy dependence of the nuclear optical potential in reactions involving the weakly bound projectiles {sup 8}B, {sup 7}Be and {sup 6}Li on the target {sup 58}Ni and {sup 9}Be on {sup 27}Al is carried out by performing a {chi}{sup 2}-analysis of recent measurements of elastic scattering cross sections for energies around and above the Coulomb barrier. For this purpose two different potential types are used: the double folding Sao Paulo potential and the Woods-Saxon potential. The calculations performed for the energy dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the polarization potentials show that these potentials besides satisfying the dispersion relation, for some nuclear systems the uncertainties on the energy dependence of the polarization potentials allow to conclude that these systems present a behavior consistent with the Breakup Theshold Anomaly. In other cases, due to the large uncertainties, it is not possible to make a definitive conclusion about the anomalies.

  20. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I; Lee, Tim K

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  1. Microbial Competition in Polar Soils: A Review of an Understudied but Potentially Important Control on Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Greer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intermicrobial competition is known to occur in many natural environments, and can result from direct conflict between organisms, or from differential rates of growth, colonization, and/or nutrient acquisition. It has been difficult to extensively examine intermicrobial competition in situ, but these interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the many biogeochemical processes that are tied to microbial communities in polar soils. A greater understanding of how competition influences productivity will improve projections of gas and nutrient flux as the poles warm, may provide biotechnological opportunities for increasing the degradation of contaminants in polar soil, and will help to predict changes in communities of higher organisms, such as plants.

  2. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lee, Tim K.

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  3. Self-energy effect and Coulomb potential modulation of the exciton in monolayer MoS2 on polar substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Xiao, Yao; Li, Run-Ze; Li, Wei-Ping; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the correction of exciton binding energy in monolayer MoS2 resulting from the exciton couples with surface optical (SO) phonons induced by polar substrate. The total correction of binding energy can be divided into the self-energy effect and modification of Coulomb potential using the unitary transformation method. We find that both the self-energy and Coulomb potential vary from tens of meV to several hundreds of meV depending on the cut-off wave vector of SO phonon modes, polarizability of substrate materials and internal distance between the monolayer MoS2 and polar substrate. An effective Coulomb potential is obtained by combining the modified term into the Coulomb potential. This potentially could be widely used in various two-dimensional materials. Our theoretical results not only propose the ways to externally control the exciton binding energy in experiment, but also enrich the understanding of the exciton properties in the dielectric environment.

  4. Explicit behavioral detection of visual changes develops without their implicit neurophysiological detectability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessi eLyyra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Change blindness is a failure of explicitly detecting changes between consecutively presented images when separated, e.g., by a brief blank screen. There is a growing body of evidence of implicit detection of even explicitly undetectable changes, pointing to the possibility of the implicit change detection as a prerequisite for its explicit counterpart. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs of the electroencephalography in adults during an oddball-variant of change blindness flicker paradigm. In this variant, rare pictures with a change were interspersed with frequent pictures with no change. In separate stimulus blocks, the blank screen between the change and no-change picture was either of 100 ms or 500 ms in duration. In both stimulus conditions the participants eventually explicitly detect the changed pictures, the blank screen of the longer duration only requiring in average 10 % longer exposure to the picture series until the ability emerged. However, during the change blindness, ERPs were displaced towards negative polarity at 200–260 ms after the stimulus onset (visual mismatch negativity only with the blank screens of the shorter ISI. Our finding of ‘implicit change blindness’ for pictorial material that, nevertheless, successfully prepares the visual system for explicit change detection suggests that implicit change detection may not be a necessary condition for explicit change detection and that they may recruit at least partially distinct memory mechanisms.

  5. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IPPP, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.a.moortgat-pick@durham.ac.uk; Abe, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Alexander, G. [University of Tel-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ananthanarayan, B. [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Babich, A.A. [Pavel Sukhoi Technical University, Gomel, 246746 (Belarus); Bharadwaj, V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Barber, D. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bartl, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Brachmann, A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Chen, S. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Clarke, J. [CCLRC, ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Clendenin, J.E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dainton, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Desch, K. [Phys. Institut, Albert-Ludwigs Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Diehl, M. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dobos, B.; Dorland, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Dreiner, H.K. [Phys. Institut, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Eberl, H. [Inst. f. Hochenergiephysik, Osterr. Akademie d. Wissenschaften, A-1050 Wien (Austria); Ellis, J. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  6. Allee effect in polar bears: a potential consequence of polychlorinated biphenyl contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Viola; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Grimm, Volker

    2016-11-30

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland and Svalbard exhibited very high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the 1980s and 1990s. In Svalbard, slow population growth during that period was suspected to be linked to PCB contamination. In this case study, we explored how PCBs could have impacted polar bear population growth and/or male reproductive success in Svalbard during the mid-1990s by reducing the fertility of contaminated males. A dose-response relationship linking the effects of PCBs to male polar bear fertility was extrapolated from studies of the effects of PCBs on sperm quality in rodents. Based on this relationship, an individual-based model of bear interactions during the breeding season predicted fertilization success under alternative assumptions regarding male-male competition for females. Contamination reduced pregnancy rates by decreasing the availability of fertile males, thus triggering a mate-finding Allee effect, particularly when male-male competition for females was limited or when infertile males were able to compete with fertile males for females. Comparisons of our model predictions on age-dependent reproductive success of males with published empirical observations revealed that the low representation of 10-14-year-old males among breeding males documented in Svalbard in mid-1990s could have resulted from PCB contamination. We conclude that contamination-related male infertility may lead to a reduction in population growth via an Allee effect. The magnitude of the effect is largely dependent on the population-specific mating system. In eco-toxicological risk assessments, appropriate consideration should therefore be given to negative effects of contaminants on male fertility and male mating behaviour. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Potentially Missing Physics of the Early Universe: Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization in Intense Blackbody Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S Q; Hartemann, F V

    2010-04-13

    The standard Big Bang universe model is mainly based on linear interactions, except during exotic periods such as inflation. The purpose of the present proposal is to explore the effects, if any, of vacuum polarization in the very high energy density environment of the early universe. These conditions can be found today in astrophysical settings and may also be emulated in the laboratory using high intensity advanced lasers. Shortly after the Big Bang, there once existed a time when the energy density of the universe corresponded to a temperature in the range 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 9} K, sufficient to cause vacuum polarization effects. During this period, the nonlinear vacuum polarization may have had significant modifications on the propagation of radiation. Thus the thermal spectrum of the early universe may have been starkly non-Planckian. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background today show a spectrum relatively close to an ideal blackbody. Could the early universe have shown spectral deviations due to nonlinear vacuum effects? If so, is it possible to detect traces of those relic photons in the universe today? Found in galactic environments, compact objects such as blazars and magnetars can possess astronomically large energy densities that far exceed anything that can be created in the laboratory. Their field strengths are known to reach energy levels comparable to or surpassing the energy corresponding to the Schwinger critical field E {approx} 10{sup 18} V/m. Nonlinear vacuum effects become prominent under these conditions and have garnered much interest from the astronomical and theoretical physics communities. The effects of a nonlinear vacuum may be of crucial importance for our understanding of these objects. At energies of the order of the electron rest mass, the most important interactions are described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is predicted that nonlinear photon-photon interactions will occur at energies approaching the Schwinger

  8. Microglia M2A Polarization as Potential Link between Food Allergy and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans O. Kalkman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic diseases are frequently co-morbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Allergic responses are associated with an activation of mast cells, innate lymphoid cells, and Th2 cells. These cells produce type-2 cytokines (IL4 and IL13, which stimulate microglia and macrophages to adopt a phenotype referred to as ‘alternative activation’ or ‘M2A’. M2A-polarized macrophages and microglia play a physiological role in tissue repair by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1. In ASD there is evidence for increased type-2 cytokines, microglia activation, M2A polarization, and increased levels of growth factors. In neurons, these growth factors drive a signal transduction pathway that leads to activation of the enzyme mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR, and thereby to the inhibition of autophagy. Activation of mTOR is an effect that is also common to several of the genetic forms of autism. In the central nervous system, redundant synapses are removed via an autophagic process. Activation of mTOR would diminish the pruning of redundant synapses, which in the context of ASD is likely to be undesired. Based on this line of reasoning, atopic diseases like food allergy, eczema or asthma would represent risk factors for autism spectrum disorders.

  9. Assessment on the rates and potentials of soil organic carbon sequestration in agricultural lands in Japan using a process-based model and spatially explicit land-use change inventories - Part 2: Future potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Y.; Shirato, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Future potentials of the sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in agricultural lands in Japan were estimated using a simulation system we recently developed to simulate SOC stock change at country-scale under varying land-use change, climate, soil, and agricultural practices, in a spatially explicit manner. Simulation was run from 1970 to 2006 with historical inventories, and subsequently to 2020 with future scenarios of agricultural activity comprised of various agricultural policy targets advocated by the Japanese government. Furthermore, the simulation was run subsequently until 2100 while forcing no temporal changes in land-use and agricultural activity to investigate duration and course of SOC stock change at country scale. A scenario with an increased rate of organic carbon input to agricultural fields by intensified crop rotation in combination with the suppression of conversion of agricultural lands to other land-use types was found to have a greater reduction of CO2 emission by enhanced soil carbon sequestration, but only under a circumstance in which the converted agricultural lands will become settlements that were considered to have a relatively lower rate of organic carbon input. The size of relative reduction of CO2 emission in this scenario was comparable to that in another contrasting scenario (business-as-usual scenario of agricultural activity) in which a relatively lower rate of organic matter input to agricultural fields was assumed in combination with an increased rate of conversion of the agricultural fields to unmanaged grasslands through abandonment. Our simulation experiment clearly demonstrated that net-net-based accounting on SOC stock change, defined as the differences between the emissions and removals during the commitment period and the emissions and removals during a previous period (base year or base period of Kyoto Protocol), can be largely influenced by variations in future climate. Whereas baseline-based accounting, defined

  10. Device for geophysical prospecting of ore deposits. [for deposits featuring electronic conductivity; based on polarization curves to determine electrochemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryss, J.M.; Bakhtin, J.G.; Chamaev, V.N.; Panteleimonov, V.M.

    1976-03-30

    A device is described for geophysical prospecting of ore deposits, wherein the supply circuit is made up of a direct-current source provided with apparatus for changing current intensity, a main current-carrying electrode having electrical contact with an ore body, and an auxiliary current-carrying electrode electrically connected with the medium enclosing said ore body. Connected in said supply circuit at the main current carrying electrode is a current intensity detector connected whereto is a series circuit made up of a compensating voltage generator, a summing unit and a unit for measuring the potentials of electrochemical reactions on the surface of the ore body. A recording unit is connected to the unit for setting values of the potentials of electrochemical reactions and to record in the form of polarization curves the relationships between the set potentials of electrochemical reactions on the surface of the ore body and the currents flowing through the surface of that body. (DDA)

  11. Distribution of convection potential around the polar cap boundary as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Reiff, P. H.; Karty, J. L.; Hairston, M. R.; Heelis, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of the convection potential around the polar cap boundary was investigated under a variety of different IMF conditions, using plasma flow data from the AE-C, AE-D, and DE 2 satellites. The data examined reveal that the potential drop at the duskside boundary is essentially always larger than that at the dawnside boundary. It was found that the sinusoidal and arc-tangent fits represent the data equally well, implying that the convection 'throat' is wide and/or that it moves randomly in MLT. In response to the IMF B(y) component, the zero potential line was found to be displaced toward the prenoon or postnoon sector. Finally, it was found that, as the IMF changes from the 'garden hose' to the 'ortho-garden hose' condition, a slight duskward shift of the pattern occurs.

  12. Potential for α -induced nuclear scattering, reaction and decay, and a resonance-pole-decay model with exact explicit analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Basudeb; Bhoi, Swagatika

    2017-10-01

    The decay of α particle from a nucleus is viewed as a quantum resonance state of a two-body scattering process of the α +daughter nucleus pair governed by a novel nucleus-nucleus potential in squared Woods-Saxon form. By the application of the rigorous optical model (OM) potential scattering (S -matrix) theory the genuineness of the potential for the system is established by giving a good explanation of the elastic scattering and reaction cross sections data of the α +nucleus pair. From the pole position in the complex momentum (k ) plane of the S matrix of the real part of the OM potential defined above, the energy and width of the resonance state akin to the decaying state of emission of α particle are extracted and from this width, the result of the α -decay half-life is derived to account for the experimental result of the half-life in the cases of a large number of α emitters including heavy and superheavy nuclei. The S matrix of the real OM potential is replaced by an analytical function expressed in terms of exact Schrödinger solutions of a global potential that closely represents the real Coulomb-nuclear interaction in the interior and the pure Coulomb wave functions outside, and the resonant poles of this S matrix in the complex momentum plane are used to give satisfactory results of decay half-lives of α coming out from varieties of nuclei.

  13. The Polarization-Sensitive Bolometers for SPICA and their Potential Use for Ground-Based Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveret, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    CEA is leading the development of Safari-POL, an imaging-polarimeter aboard the SPICA space observatory (ESA M5). SPICA will be able to reach unprecedented sensitivities thanks to its cooled telescope and its ultra-sensitive detectors. The detector assembly of Safari-POL holds three arrays that are cooled down to 50 mK and correspond to three spectral bands : 100, 200 and 350 microns. The detectors (silicon bolometers), benefit from the Herschel/PACS legacy and are also a big step forward in term of sensitivity (improved by two orders of magnitude compared to PACS bolometers) and for polarimetry capabilities. Indeed, each pixel is intrinsically sensitive to two polarization components (Horizontal and Vertical). We will present the Safari-POL concept, the first results of measurements made on the detectors, and future plans for possible ground-based instruments using this technology. We will also present the example of the ArTéMiS camera, installed at APEX, that was developped as a ground-based conterpart of the PACS photometer.

  14. Potential spin-polarized transport in gold-doped armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Pankaj, E-mail: pankajs@iiitm.ac.in [Nanomaterials Research Group, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management (IIITM), Gwalior 474015, MP (India); Dhar, Subhra [Nanomaterials Research Group, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management (IIITM), Gwalior 474015, MP (India); Jaiswal, Neeraj K. [Discipline of Physics, PDPM-Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing (IIITDM), Jabalpur 482005 (India)

    2015-04-17

    Based on NEGF-DFT computations, systematic investigation of electronic, magnetic and transport properties of AGNRs are done by employing Au through different doping mechanisms. Remarkable Au–AGNR bonding is observed in case of substitution due to the presence of impurity at the edges. Both substitution and adsorption of Au on AGNR surface induce significant changes in the electronic spin transport of the sp{sup 2} hybridized carbon sheets. AGNRs are semiconducting with lower total energy for the FM configuration, and the I–V characteristics reveal semiconductor to metal transition of Au-doped AGNR. The spin injection is voltage controlled in all the investigated Au-doped AGNRs. - Highlights: • Edge Au-substitution promotes semiconductor–metal transition in AGNR. • NDR due to bias-dependent transmission in Au-substituted AGNRs. • Voltage controlled spin injection in all investigated Au-doped AGNRs. • Strong spin polarization occurs at 0.5 V in Au-hole adsorbed AGNRs.

  15. Drivers and potential predictability of summer time North Atlantic polar front jet variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J.; Jones, Julie M.; Hanna, Edward; Scaife, Adam A.; Erdélyi, Róbert

    2017-06-01

    The variability of the North Atlantic polar front jet stream is crucial in determining summer weather around the North Atlantic basin. Recent extreme summers in western Europe and North America have highlighted the need for greater understanding of this variability, in order to aid seasonal forecasting and mitigate societal, environmental and economic impacts. Here we find that simple linear regression and composite models based on a few predictable factors are able to explain up to 35 % of summertime jet stream speed and latitude variability from 1955 onwards. Sea surface temperature forcings impact predominantly on jet speed, whereas solar and cryospheric forcings appear to influence jet latitude. The cryospheric associations come from the previous autumn, suggesting the survival of an ice-induced signal through the winter season, whereas solar influences lead jet variability by a few years. Regression models covering the earlier part of the twentieth century are much less effective, presumably due to decreased availability of data, and increased uncertainty in observational reanalyses. Wavelet coherence analysis identifies that associations fluctuate over the study period but it is not clear whether this is just internal variability or genuine non-stationarity. Finally we identify areas for future research.

  16. Event-related potentials reveal task-dependence and inter-individual differences in negation processing during silent listening and explicit truth-value evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, C; Kissler, J

    2014-09-26

    In sentences such as dogs cannot fly/bark, evaluation of the truth-value of the sentence is assumed to appear after the negation has been integrated into the sentence structure. Moreover negation processing and truth-value processing are considered effortful processes, whereas processing of the semantic relatedness of the words within sentences is thought to occur automatically. In the present study, modulation of event-related brain potentials (N400 and late positive potential, LPP) was investigated during an implicit task (silent listening) and active truth-value evaluation to test these theoretical assumptions and determine if truth-value evaluation will be modulated by the way participants processed the negated information implicitly prior to truth-value verification. Participants first listened to negated sentences and then evaluated these sentences for their truth-value in an active evaluation task. During passive listening, the LPP was generally more pronounced for targets in false negative (FN) than true negative (TN) sentences, indicating enhanced attention allocation to semantically-related but false targets. N400 modulation by truth-value (FN>TN) was observed in 11 out of 24 participants. However, during active evaluation, processing of semantically-unrelated but true targets (TN) elicited larger N400 and LPP amplitudes as well as a pronounced frontal negativity. This pattern was particularly prominent in those 11 individuals, whose N400 modulation during silent listening indicated that they were more sensitive to violations of the truth-value than to semantic priming effects. The results provide evidence for implicit truth-value processing during silent listening of negated sentences and for task dependence related to inter-individual differences in implicit negation processing. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The rectangular potential well (hat) model: application to the dielectric spectra of non-associated polar liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, W. T.; Gaiduk, V. I.; Tseitlin, B. M.; Walsh, M. E.

    2000-07-01

    A theory of the wideband dielectric response of polar molecules in a hat-like rectangular well potential with perfectly elastic (reflecting) conical surface of finite depth is presented. The well represents molecular interaction in terms of the mean-field potential. Thus, escape of dipoles across the potential barrier, so they may execute complete rotations outside the cone, is also accounted for. This model is a generalisation of the cone-confined rotator and hybrid models, described previously by Gaiduk and Tseitlin [Adv. Chem. Phys. 87 (1994) 125; Mendeleev Commun. 1997, No. 2, p. 76]. In this work it is shown that the model, in which both the bottom of the potential well and its rim are flat, so that it resembles a hat, provides an adequate description of the wideband spectrum (comprising the Debye relaxation and far infra-red regions) of orientational polarisation. The applicability of the hat model has been demonstrated for strongly absorbing liquids, such as methyl chloride, for which wideband dielectric spectra due to molecular reorientation were calculated in the [0, THz] frequency region.

  18. Making the Tacit Explicit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes an approach, broadly inspired by culturally inclusive pedagogy, to facilitate international student academic adaptation based on rendering tacit aspects of local learning cultures explicit to international full degree students, rather than adapting them. Preliminary findings...... are presented from a focus group-based exploratory study of international student experiences at different stages of their studies at a Danish business school, one of Denmark’s most international universities. The data show how a major source of confusion for these students has to do with the tacit logics...... and expectations that shape how the formal steps of the learning cycle are understood and enacted locally, notably how learning and assessment moments are defined and related to one another. Theoretically, the article draws on tacit knowledge and sense-making theories to analyse student narratives...

  19. Using Linked Data for polarity classification of patients' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noferesti, Samira; Shamsfard, Mehrnoush

    2015-10-01

    Polarity classification is the main subtask of sentiment analysis and opinion mining, well-known problems in natural language processing that have attracted increasing attention in recent years. Existing approaches mainly rely on the subjective part of text in which sentiment is expressed explicitly through specific words, called sentiment words. These approaches, however, are still far from being good in the polarity classification of patients' experiences since they are often expressed without any explicit expression of sentiment, but an undesirable or desirable effect of the experience implicitly indicates a positive or negative sentiment. This paper presents a method for polarity classification of patients' experiences of drugs using domain knowledge. We first build a knowledge base of polar facts about drugs, called FactNet, using extracted patterns from Linked Data sources and relation extraction techniques. Then, we extract generalized semantic patterns of polar facts and organize them into a hierarchy in order to overcome the missing knowledge issue. Finally, we apply the extracted knowledge, i.e., polar fact instances and generalized patterns, for the polarity classification task. Different from previous approaches for personal experience classification, the proposed method explores the potential benefits of polar facts in domain knowledge aiming to improve the polarity classification performance, especially in the case of indirect implicit experiences, i.e., experiences which express the effect of one entity on other ones without any sentiment words. Using our approach, we have extracted 9703 triplets of polar facts at a precision of 92.26 percent. In addition, experiments on drug reviews demonstrate that our approach can achieve 79.78 percent precision in polarity classification task, and outperforms the state-of-the-art sentiment analysis and opinion mining methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polar metabolites of polycyclic aromatic compounds from fungi are potential soil and groundwater contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Esther Sørensen; Johnsen, Anders R.; Christensen, Jan H.

    2015-01-01

    and either hydroxylated or oxidized to carboxylic acids at the methyl group. The metabolism of the sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC resulted in sulfate conjugates. The sorption of the PAC metabolites to three soils was determined using a batch equilibrium method, and partition coefficients (Kd's) were......-methylphenanthrene, 1-methylpyrene), and one sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC (dibenzothiophene). Fifty-eight metabolites were tentatively identified; metabolites from the un-substituted PACs were hydroxylated and sulfate conjugated, whereas metabolites from alkyl-substituted PACs were sulfate conjugated...... calculated for fourteen representative metabolites. Sulfate conjugated metabolites displayed Kd's below 70 whereas the metabolites with both a sulfate and a carboxylic acid group had Kd's below 2.8. The low Kd's of water-soluble PAC metabolites indicate high mobility in soil and a potential for leaching...

  1. Approximate energy expression for spin-polarized Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, M; Endo, T; Kimura, R

    2003-01-01

    An approximate energy expression is proposed for arbitrarily spin-polarized Fermi liquids with central two-body forces. It is explicitly expression as a functional of spin-dependent radial distribution functions and can be used conveniently in the variational method. It includes the potential energies completely and the kinetic energies up to main parts of the three-body cluster terms. This approximation is similar to that used previously for spin-unpolarized and fully polarized matter. A notable feature of this expressed is that it guarantees the necessary conditions on arbitrarily spin-polarized structure functions automatically. The Euler-Lagrange equations are derived from this energy expression and are numerically solved for arbitrarily spin-polarized liquid sup 3 He. The results for liquid sup 3 He with the HFDHE2 potential are consistent with the nearly ferromagnetic property. (author)

  2. Polar metabolites of polycyclic aromatic compounds from fungi are potential soil and groundwater contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Esther S; Johnsen, Anders R; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sorption to soil of water-soluble metabolites from polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). The soil fungus Cunninghamella elegans was used to produce PAC metabolites from two un-substituted PACs (phenanthrene, pyrene), three alkyl-substituted PACs (2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylphenanthrene, 1-methylpyrene), and one sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC (dibenzothiophene). Fifty-eight metabolites were tentatively identified; metabolites from the un-substituted PACs were hydroxylated and sulfate conjugated, whereas metabolites from alkyl-substituted PACs were sulfate conjugated and either hydroxylated or oxidized to carboxylic acids at the methyl group. The metabolism of the sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC resulted in sulfate conjugates. The sorption of the PAC metabolites to three soils was determined using a batch equilibrium method, and partition coefficients (Kd's) were calculated for fourteen representative metabolites. Sulfate conjugated metabolites displayed Kd's below 70 whereas the metabolites with both a sulfate and a carboxylic acid group had Kd's below 2.8. The low Kd's of water-soluble PAC metabolites indicate high mobility in soil and a potential for leaching to surface- and groundwaters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Allen White III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase. The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 0.900. These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  4. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  5. Multicore Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Oligomeric Micelles: Characterization and Potential for the Extraction of Contaminants over a Wide Polarity Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naous, Mohamed; García-Gómez, Diego; López-Jiménez, Francisco José; Bouanani, Farida; Lunar, María Loreto; Rubio, Soledad

    2017-01-17

    Oligomeric micelles from sodium undecylenate (oSUD) were chemisorbed to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) through a single-step synthetic route involving the simultaneous nanoparticle formation and functionalization in an aqueous medium. The resulting spherical nanoparticles (MNPs-oSUD) consisted of a concatenation of iron oxide cores, with an average size of 7.7 nm, bound by oSUD micelles (particle average diameter of ca. 200 nm). Micellar coverage was ∼50% of the MNP-oSUD (by weight) and offered multiple retention mechanisms (e.g., dispersion, hydrogen bonding, polar, and ionic) for solute solubilization while keeping it intact during analyte elution. The high density of micelles and variety of interactions provided by this sorbent rendered it highly efficient for the extraction of aromatic amines in a wide polarity range (log K ow values from -0.80 to 4.05) from textiles, urine, and wastewater. Extraction took 5 min, no cleanup or evaporation of the extracts was needed and the method, based on LC-MS/MS quantitation, proved matrix-independent. Recoveries for 17 aromatic amines in samples were in the range of 93%-123% while those with negative log K ow values were in the range of 69%-87%. Detection limits for aromatic amines in textiles (0.007-2 mg kg -1 ) were well below the limits legislated by the European Union (EU) (30 mg kg -1 ) and those in urine and wastewater (0.004-1.5 μg L -1 ) were at the level usually found in real-world applications. All the analyzed samples were positive in aromatic amines. The easy synthesis and excellent extraction properties of MNPs-oSUD anticipate their high potential not only for multiresidue analysis but also in other fields such as water remediation.

  6. Pre-edge structure analysis of Ti K-edge polarized X-ray absorption spectra in TiO{sub 2} by full-potential XANES calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaret, D. [Univ. Paris VI et VII, Paris Cedex (France); Joly, Y.; Renevier, H. [l`Universite Joseph Fourier, Lab. de Cristallographie, Grenoble Cedex (France); Natoli, C.R. [Lab. Nazionali de Frascati, INFN, Frascati (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    The pre-edge region of Ti K-edge polarized XANES spectra in TiO{sub 2}-rutile is investigated by full-potential calculations based on the finite-difference method. Both dipolar and quadrupolar transitions are considered. The use of `non muffin-tin` potential allows a clear interpretation of the pre-edge features. The results are consistent with Full-potential LAPW band structure calculations, and are also compared with multiple-scattering calculations. (au) 19 refs.

  7. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou) that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1) prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  8. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gormezano

    Full Text Available Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1 prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  9. Polar Ice Sheets Drive Paleohydroclimate Affecting Terrestrial Plant Distribution and CO2 Exchange Potential during the Upper Carboniferous

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. D.; Poulsen, C. J.; Montanez, I. P.; McElwain, J.; Wilson, J. P.; Hren, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Variation in atmospheric CO2 concentration and presence or absence of polar ice sheets simulated for 310 mya using the GENESIS model show changes in terrestrial temperature, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration at mid and lower latitudes. Classifying the data into Holdridge life zones for simulations with 280, 560, and 1120 ppm CO2, in the presence of a southern Gondwanan ice sheet resulted in progressive increase of cool temperate, humid-to-subhumid and tropical subhumid zones. Without the ice sheet, subtropical subhumid to semiarid zones expanded. Simulation results show that approximately 50% of the land area was classified as polar or tundra followed by 35 to 42%, depending on the scenario, classified as sub-tropical semiarid-to-subhumid. Only 5-8% were classified as temperate humid-to-subhumid or tropical humid-to-perhumid. Also, the absence of ice sheets reduced the moister sub-climates, such as within the tropical climate zone. Because different plant assemblages dominated each climate zone, for example cordaitaleans in the subtropical and medullosans and lycophytes in the tropics, physiological differences in these plants may have resulted in unequal CO2 exchange feedbacks to the atmosphere during climate shifts. Previous physiological modeling based on plant foliar traits indicates that late Paleozoic plant species differed in CO2 uptake capacity with highest sensitivity to water availability during periods with low atmospheric CO2 concentration. This implies that vegetation climate feedbacks during this period may have been non-uniform during climate change events. Inference of plant contribution to climate forcing must rely on understanding geographic distribution of affected vegetation, inherent vegetation physiological properties, and antecedent atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our results indicate that seasonally dry climates prevailed in the low-latitude land area, and that slightly cooler temperatures than today must be considered. This

  10. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  11. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  12. Polarity directed optimization of phytochemical and in vitro biological potential of an indigenous folklore: Quercus dilatata Lindl. ex Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Madiha; Fatima, Humaira; Qasim, Muhammad; Gul, Bilquees; Ihsan-Ul-Haq

    2017-08-03

    Plants have served either as a natural templates for the development of new chemicals or a phytomedicine since antiquity. Therefore, the present study was aimed to appraise the polarity directed antioxidant, cytotoxic, protein kinase inhibitory, antileishmanial and glucose modulatory attributes of a Himalayan medicinal plant- Quercus dilatata. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined colorimetrically and various polyphenols were identified by RP-HPLC analysis. Brine shrimp lethality, SRB and MTT assays were employed to test cytotoxicity against Artemia salina and human cancer cell lines respectively. Antileishmanial activity was determined using standard MTT protocol. Glucose modulation was assessed by α-amylase inhibition assay while disc diffusion assay was used to establish protein kinase inhibitory and antifungal spectrum. Among 14 extracts of aerial parts, distilled water-acetone extract demonstrated maximum extract recovery (10.52% w/w), phenolic content (21.37 ± 0.21 μg GAE/mg dry weight (DW)), total antioxidant capacity (4.81 ± 0.98 μg AAE/mg DW) and reducing power potential (20.03 ± 2.4 μg/mg DW). On the other hand, Distilled water extract proficiently extracted flavonoid content (4.78 ± 0.51 μg QE/mg DW). RP-HPLC analysis revealed the presence of significant amounts of phenolic metabolites (0.049 to 15.336 μg/mg extract) including, pyrocatechol, gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid and quercetin. Highest free radical scavenging capacity was found in Methanol-Ethyl acetate extract (IC 50 8.1 ± 0.5 μg/ml). In the brine shrimp toxicity assay, most of the tested extracts (57%) showed high cytotoxicity. Among these, Chloroform-Methanol extract had highest cytotoxicity against THP-1 cell line (IC 50 3.88 ± 0.53 μg/ml). About 50% of the extracts were found to be moderately antiproliferative against Hep G2 cell line. Methanol extract exhibited considerable protein kinase inhibitory

  13. Deformation potentials in AlGaN and InGaN alloys and their impact on optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Łepkowski, S. P.; Gorczyca, I.; Stefańska-Skrobas, K.

    2013-01-01

    superlinear behavior on composition is found foract−D2, D4, and D5 in AlGaN, and act−D2and D5 in InGaN. The optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells are very well described by the k·p method when the obtained deformation potentials are included. In m-plane AlGaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum wells...

  14. An Example of the Informative Potential of Polar Coordinate Analysis: Sprint Tactics in Elite 1,500-m Track Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Sonia; Lapresa, Daniel; Arana, Javier; Anguera, M. Teresa; Garzón, Belén

    2017-01-01

    Polar coordinate analysis is a powerful data reduction technique based on the Zsum statistic, which is calculated from adjusted residuals obtained by lag sequential analysis. Its use has been greatly simplified since the addition of a module in the free software program HOISAN for performing the necessary computations and producing…

  15. The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    A geodynamic model exists, the westward lithospheric drift model, in which the variety of overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angles is explained by the polarity of subduction zones. The model predicts overriding plate extension, a fixed trench and a steep slab dip for

  16. Potential of polarization/Raman lidar to separate fine dust, coarse dust, maritime, and anthropogenic aerosol profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2017-09-01

    We applied the recently introduced polarization lidar-photometer networking (POLIPHON) technique for the first time to triple-wavelength polarization lidar measurements at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The lidar observations were performed at Barbados during the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in the summer of 2014. The POLIPHON method comprises the traditional lidar technique to separate mineral dust and non-dust backscatter contributions and the new, extended approach to separate even the fine and coarse dust backscatter fractions. We show that the traditional and the advanced method are compatible and lead to a consistent set of dust and non-dust profiles at simplified, less complex aerosol layering and mixing conditions as is the case over the remote tropical Atlantic. To derive dust mass concentration profiles from the lidar observations, trustworthy extinction-to-volume conversion factors for fine, coarse, and total dust are needed and obtained from an updated, extended Aerosol Robotic Network sun photometer data analysis of the correlation between the fine, coarse and total dust volume concentration and the respective fine, coarse, and total dust extinction coefficient for all three laser wavelengths. Conversion factors (total volume to extinction) for pure marine aerosol conditions and continental anthropogenic aerosol situations are presented in addition. As a new feature of the POLIPHON data analysis, the Raman lidar method for particle extinction profiling is used to identify the aerosol type (marine or anthropogenic) of the non-dust aerosol fraction. The full POLIPHON methodology was successfully applied to a SALTRACE case and the results are discussed. We conclude that the 532 nm polarization lidar technique has many advantages in comparison to 355 and 1064 nm polarization lidar approaches and leads to the most robust and accurate POLIPHON products.

  17. Polarization Ratio Determination with Two Identical Linearly Polarized Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Fourier transform analysis of 21 measurements with one of the antennas rotating about its axis a circular polarization ratio is derived which can be... transformed into an equivalent linear polarization ratio. A linearly polarized reference antenna is not required. The technique was verified by...systems the polarization ratio of an an- tenna is of interest for potential frequency / polarization re-use. Newell [1] and Joy [2] developed the three

  18. Tumour cell derived effects on monocyte/macrophage polarization and function and modulatory potential of Viscum album lipophilic extract in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estko, Myriam; Baumgartner, Stephan; Urech, Konrad; Kunz, Matthias; Regueiro, Ursula; Heusser, Peter; Weissenstein, Ulrike

    2015-04-24

    Macrophages are highly versatile cells that play an important role in tumour microenvironment. Tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) have been linked to both, good or bad prognosis of several cancer types depending on their number, composition and polarization. Viscum album lipophilic extract (VALE) contains several pentacyclic triterpenes known to modulate the activity of monocytes and other immune cells and to exhibit anticancer properties. In our in vitro study, we investigated the effect of tumour cell lines on macrophage polarization and monocyte chemotactic transmigration and examined the modulatory potential of VALE and its predominant triterpene oleanolic acid (OA). Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) using M-CSF and polarized into M1 by IFN-γ and LPS and into M2 macrophages by IL-4 and IL-13 or by co-culture with two different tumour cell lines. Polarized macrophages were subsequently treated with VALE or OA. Phenotypic markers and cytokines were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoanalysis. Migration of human peripheral blood monocytes induced by monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) or supernatants of different tumour cell lines under the influence of VALE or OA was measured in a chemotaxis transmigration assay. In vitro polarized M1 and M2 type macrophages revealed specific phenotypic patterns and tumour cell co-cultured MDM displayed ambiguous phenotypes with M1 as well as M2 associated markers. VALE and OA showed modest influence on cell surface marker profile and cytokine expression of tumour cell co-cultured macrophages. All tumour cell supernatants markedly enhanced the migratory activity of monocytes. VALE and OA significantly inhibited MCP-1 induced monocyte transmigration, whereas monocyte migration initiated by tumour cell derived supernatants was not affected. In our study we reconfirmed that co-culture with different tumour cell lines can result in a mixed macrophage phenotype with M1

  19. Potentiation of ecological factors on the disruption of thyroid hormones by organo-halogenated contaminants in female polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeon, Sophie; Riemer, Astrid Kolind; Tartu, Sabrina; Aars, Jon; Polder, Anuschka; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Routti, Heli

    2017-10-01

    As apex predators, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are among the most heavily polluted organisms in the Arctic. In addition to this anthropogenic stressor, climate warming has been shown to negatively affect their body condition, reproductive output and survival. Among potential underlying physiological mechanisms, thyroid hormones (THs), which control thermoregulation, metabolism and reproduction, can be affected by a variety of both natural and anthropogenic factors. While THs have been extensively used as proxies for pollution exposure in mammals, including polar bears, there is a lack of knowledge of their natural variations. In this context, we examined seasonal variations in body condition and circulating TH concentrations in free-ranging female polar bears. Females with variable reproductive status (i.e., solitary, with cubs of the year or with yearlings) were sampled from locations with contrasted sea ice conditions. Furthermore, we studied THs in relation to levels of organo-halogenated contaminants. As predicted, solitary females were in better condition than females caring for offspring, especially in spring. In addition, TH levels were lower in autumn compared to spring, although this seasonal effect was mainly observed in solitary females. Finally, the negative relationships between organochlorine and perfluoroalkyl substances and some THs suggest a possible alteration of homeostasis of THs. Since the latter relationships were only observed during spring, we emphasize the importance of considering the ecological factors when using THs as proxies for pollution exposure. Yet, the combined effects of natural and anthropogenic stressors on THs might impair the ability of polar bears to adapt to ongoing climate changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Building an explicit de Sitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Jan [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik; Rummel, Markus; Valandro, Roberto [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Westphal, Alexander [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2012-11-15

    We construct an explicit example of a de Sitter vacuum in type IIB string theory that realizes the proposal of Kaehler uplifting. As the large volume limit in this method depends on the rank of the largest condensing gauge group we carry out a scan of gauge group ranks over the Kreuzer-Skarke set of toric Calabi-Yau threefolds. We find large numbers of models with the largest gauge group factor easily exceeding a rank of one hundred. We construct a global model with Kaehler uplifting on a two-parameter model on CP{sup 4}{sub 11169}, by an explicit analysis from both the type IIB and F-theory point of view. The explicitness of the construction lies in the realization of a D7 brane configuration, gauge flux and RR and NS flux choices, such that all known consistency conditions are met and the geometric moduli are stabilized in a metastable de Sitter vacuum with spontaneous GUT scale supersymmetry breaking driven by an F-term of the Kaehler moduli.

  1. Exploring potentialities and limitations of stapled o-oligo(phenyleneethynylene)s (o-OPEs) as efficient circularly polarized luminescence emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiné, Pablo; Justicia, José; Morcillo, Sara P; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; García-Fernández, Emilio; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Abbate, Sergio; Cuerva, Juan M; Longhi, Giovanna; Miguel, Delia

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the chiroptical properties of a family of o-oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (o-OPE) derivatives with different steric hindrance. Experimental results show high dissymmetry factors (g abs and g lum up to 1.1 × 10 -2 ) and very similar electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) for all the derivatives that make this basic o-OPE scaffold a robust pure organic emitter. Vibrational circular dichroism spectra are used to characterize conformational properties in solution. Density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations support experimental results also proving that ECD and CPL are almost exclusively linked to helical moiety and not to size or conformation of substituents. As chiroptical properties of these emitters are independent of substituents, this OPE scaffold can be used as basic skeleton for the design of sensing probes with high CPL efficiencies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Measuring Explicit Word Learning of Preschool Children: A Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Elizabeth Spencer

    2017-08-15

    The purpose of this article is to present preliminary results related to the development of a new measure of explicit word learning. The measure incorporated elements of explicit vocabulary instruction and dynamic assessment and was designed to be sensitive to differences in word learning skill and to be feasible for use in clinical settings. The explicit word learning measure included brief teaching trials and repeated fine-grained measurement of semantic knowledge and production of 3 novel words (2 verbs and 1 adjective). Preschool children (N = 23) completed the measure of explicit word learning; standardized, norm-referenced measures of expressive and receptive vocabulary; and an incidental word learning task. The measure of explicit word learning provided meaningful information about word learning. Performance on the explicit measure was related to existing vocabulary knowledge and incidental word learning. Findings from this development study indicate that further examination of the measure of explicit word learning is warranted. The measure may have the potential to identify children who are poor word learners. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5170738.

  3. Chemical Profile and Biological Potential of Non-Polar Fractions from Centroceras clavulatum (C. Agardh Montagne (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosana M. Debonsi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS evaluation of the hexanes and dichloromethane fractions from extracts of the red alga Centroceras clavulatum (C. Agardh Montagne. Twenty three compounds were identified, totaling ca. 42% of both fractions (0.18 g mass extract. The main constituents of the fractions were hexadecanoic acid (17.6% and pentadecanoic acid (15.9%. Several secondary metabolites with interesting biological activity, such as (--loliolide, neophytadiene, phytol were identified. In addition, several classes of secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds (e.g., phenylacetic acid, terpene derivatives, fatty acids, halogenated compound (e.g., 2-chlorocyclohexenol, lignoids, steroids, esters, amides (e.g., hexadecanamide, ketones, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and alcohols were observed. The occurrence of several of these structural classes is described for the first time in this species. The same fractions analyzed by GC-MS, and a separate set of polar fractions, were evaluated against two life cycle stages (epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and against phytopatogenic fungi Cladosporium cladosporiodes and C. sphaerospermum. The dichloromethane fraction was active against both T. cruzi forms (epimastigote IC50 = 19.1 μg.mL−1 and trypomastigote IC50 = 76.2 μg.mL−1. The hexanes and ethyl acetate fractions also displayed activity against both fungi species (200 μg by TLC-bioautography.

  4. Highly transparent twist polarizer metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniayeu, Ihar; Khakhomov, Sergei; Semchenko, Igor; Mizeikis, Vygantas

    2017-09-01

    A twist polarizer metasurface for polarization rotation by an angle of 90 ° is proposed and realized at microwave frequencies. The metasurface consists of sub-wavelength metallic helices arranged periodically in a single layer and operates in transmission geometry with a nearly unity cross-polarization conversion coefficient at resonance. The structure exhibits low reflectivity R polarization orientation of the incident wave. Moreover, it can operate with high efficiency at oblique incidence angles of up to 35 ° . Such twist polarizer metasurfaces are potentially applicable as electromagnetic/optical isolators and frequency-selective polarization antennas.

  5. Parallel Explicit and Implicit Control of Reaching

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro Mazzoni; Wexler, Nancy S

    2009-01-01

    Background Human movement can be guided automatically (implicit control) or attentively (explicit control). Explicit control may be engaged when learning a new movement, while implicit control enables simultaneous execution of multiple actions. Explicit and implicit control can often be assigned arbitrarily: we can simultaneously drive a car and tune the radio, seamlessly allocating implicit or explicit control to either action. This flexibility suggests that sensorimotor signals, including t...

  6. Parallel explicit and implicit control of reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Wexler, Nancy S

    2009-10-22

    Human movement can be guided automatically (implicit control) or attentively (explicit control). Explicit control may be engaged when learning a new movement, while implicit control enables simultaneous execution of multiple actions. Explicit and implicit control can often be assigned arbitrarily: we can simultaneously drive a car and tune the radio, seamlessly allocating implicit or explicit control to either action. This flexibility suggests that sensorimotor signals, including those that encode spatially overlapping perception and behavior, can be accurately segregated to explicit and implicit control processes. We tested human subjects' ability to segregate sensorimotor signals to parallel control processes by requiring dual (explicit and implicit) control of the same reaching movement and testing for interference between these processes. Healthy control subjects were able to engage dual explicit and implicit motor control without degradation of performance compared to explicit or implicit control alone. We then asked whether segregation of explicit and implicit motor control can be selectively disrupted by studying dual-control performance in subjects with no clinically manifest neurologic deficits in the presymptomatic stage of Huntington's disease (HD). These subjects performed successfully under either explicit or implicit control alone, but were impaired in the dual-control condition. The human nervous system can exert dual control on a single action, and is therefore able to accurately segregate sensorimotor signals to explicit and implicit control. The impairment observed in the presymptomatic stage of HD points to a possible crucial contribution of the striatum to the segregation of sensorimotor signals to multiple control processes.

  7. Parallel explicit and implicit control of reaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mazzoni

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human movement can be guided automatically (implicit control or attentively (explicit control. Explicit control may be engaged when learning a new movement, while implicit control enables simultaneous execution of multiple actions. Explicit and implicit control can often be assigned arbitrarily: we can simultaneously drive a car and tune the radio, seamlessly allocating implicit or explicit control to either action. This flexibility suggests that sensorimotor signals, including those that encode spatially overlapping perception and behavior, can be accurately segregated to explicit and implicit control processes.We tested human subjects' ability to segregate sensorimotor signals to parallel control processes by requiring dual (explicit and implicit control of the same reaching movement and testing for interference between these processes. Healthy control subjects were able to engage dual explicit and implicit motor control without degradation of performance compared to explicit or implicit control alone. We then asked whether segregation of explicit and implicit motor control can be selectively disrupted by studying dual-control performance in subjects with no clinically manifest neurologic deficits in the presymptomatic stage of Huntington's disease (HD. These subjects performed successfully under either explicit or implicit control alone, but were impaired in the dual-control condition.The human nervous system can exert dual control on a single action, and is therefore able to accurately segregate sensorimotor signals to explicit and implicit control. The impairment observed in the presymptomatic stage of HD points to a possible crucial contribution of the striatum to the segregation of sensorimotor signals to multiple control processes.

  8. Explicit and implicit reinforcement learning across the psychosis spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barch, Deanna M; Carter, Cameron S; Gold, James M; Johnson, Sheri L; Kring, Ann M; MacDonald, Angus W; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Ragland, J Daniel; Silverstein, Steven M; Strauss, Milton E

    2017-07-01

    Motivational and hedonic impairments are core features of a variety of types of psychopathology. An important aspect of motivational function is reinforcement learning (RL), including implicit (i.e., outside of conscious awareness) and explicit (i.e., including explicit representations about potential reward associations) learning, as well as both positive reinforcement (learning about actions that lead to reward) and punishment (learning to avoid actions that lead to loss). Here we present data from paradigms designed to assess both positive and negative components of both implicit and explicit RL, examine performance on each of these tasks among individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder with psychosis, and examine their relative relationships to specific symptom domains transdiagnostically. None of the diagnostic groups differed significantly from controls on the implicit RL tasks in either bias toward a rewarded response or bias away from a punished response. However, on the explicit RL task, both the individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder performed significantly worse than controls, but the individuals with bipolar did not. Worse performance on the explicit RL task, but not the implicit RL task, was related to worse motivation and pleasure symptoms across all diagnostic categories. Performance on explicit RL, but not implicit RL, was related to working memory, which accounted for some of the diagnostic group differences. However, working memory did not account for the relationship of explicit RL to motivation and pleasure symptoms. These findings suggest transdiagnostic relationships across the spectrum of psychotic disorders between motivation and pleasure impairments and explicit RL. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  10. Investigation of nitrosactive compounds influence on polarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane in the rat uterus myocytes using potential sensitive fluorescent probe DіOC(6(3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Danylovych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrosactive compounds (sodium nitroprusside and sodium nitrite on the polarization level of the uterus myocytes inner mitochondrial membrane using the confocal laser microscopy and fluorescent probe potentialsensitive DiOC6(3 (3,3′-dihexyloxacarbocyanine was ivestigated. Colocalisation of mitochondrial membranes specific fluorescent probes (MitoTracker Orange CM H2TMRos­, 10 – nonyl acridine orange and DiOC6(3 was demon­strated. It was shown that sodium nitroprusside at 0.1 mM concentration caused a moderate decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential. That observation was confirmed by flow cytometry. Action efficiency of sodium nitrite in a similar concentration was significantly lower than that of sodium nitroprusside. It is shown that it was sodium nitroprusside which caused a slight swelling of the mitochondria. A possible protecting role of nitric oxi­de as to mitochondria was discussed.

  11. PEPSI-Dock: a detailed data-driven protein-protein interaction potential accelerated by polar Fourier correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Emilie; Ritchie, David W; Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    Docking prediction algorithms aim to find the native conformation of a complex of proteins from knowledge of their unbound structures. They rely on a combination of sampling and scoring methods, adapted to different scales. Polynomial Expansion of Protein Structures and Interactions for Docking (PEPSI-Dock) improves the accuracy of the first stage of the docking pipeline, which will sharpen up the final predictions. Indeed, PEPSI-Dock benefits from the precision of a very detailed data-driven model of the binding free energy used with a global and exhaustive rigid-body search space. As well as being accurate, our computations are among the fastest by virtue of the sparse representation of the pre-computed potentials and FFT-accelerated sampling techniques. Overall, this is the first demonstration of a FFT-accelerated docking method coupled with an arbitrary-shaped distance-dependent interaction potential. First, we present a novel learning process to compute data-driven distant-dependent pairwise potentials, adapted from our previous method used for rescoring of putative protein-protein binding poses. The potential coefficients are learned by combining machine-learning techniques with physically interpretable descriptors. Then, we describe the integration of the deduced potentials into a FFT-accelerated spherical sampling provided by the Hex library. Overall, on a training set of 163 heterodimers, PEPSI-Dock achieves a success rate of 91% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions. On a subset of the protein docking benchmark v5, it achieves 44.4% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions when starting from bound structures and 20.5% when starting from unbound structures. The method runs in 5-15 min on a modern laptop and can easily be extended to other types of interactions. https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/PEPSI-Dock sergei.grudinin@inria.fr. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  12. Three-dimensional polarization algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Sheppard, Colin J; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    If light is focused or collected with a high numerical aperture lens, as may occur in imaging and optical encryption applications, polarization should be considered in three dimensions (3D). The matrix algebra of polarization behavior in 3D is discussed. It is useful to convert between the Mueller matrix and two different Hermitian matrices, representing an optical material or system, which are in the literature. Explicit transformation matrices for converting the column vector form of these different matrices are extended to the 3D case, where they are large (81×81) but can be generated using simple rules. It is found that there is some advantage in using a generalization of the Chandrasekhar phase matrix treatment, rather than that based on Gell-Mann matrices, as the resultant matrices are of simpler form and reduce to the two-dimensional case more easily. Explicit expressions are given for 3D complex field components in terms of Chandrasekhar-Stokes parameters.

  13. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  14. Extraction of site-site bridge functions and effective pair potentials from simulations of polar molecular liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, Gennady N; Vyalov, Ivan; Georgi, Nikolaj

    2014-05-15

    We develop an efficient method to extract site-site bridge functions from molecular simulations. The method is based on the inverse solution of the reference site interaction model. Using the exact long-range asymptotics of site-site direct correlation functions defined by the site-site Ornstein-Zernike equations, we regularize the ill-posed inverse problem, and then calculate site-site bridge functions and effective pair potentials for ambient water, methanol, and ethanol. We have tested the proposed algorithm and checked its performance. Our study has revealed various peculiarities of the site-site bridge functions, such as long-range behavior, strong dependence on the electrostatic interactions. Using the obtained data, we have calculated thermodynamic properties of the solvents, namely, isothermal compressibility, internal energy, and Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The obtained values are in excellent agreement not only with molecular simulations but also with available experimental data. Further extensions of the method are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The pathogenic potential of Helicobacter cinaedi isolated from non-human sources: adherence, invasion and translocation ability in polarized intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Takako; Yamazaki, Wataru; Saeki, Yuji; Takajo, Ichiro; Okayama, Akihiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Misawa, Naoaki

    2016-05-03

    Helicobacter cinaedi infection has been recognized as an increasingly important emerging disease in humans. Infection with H. cinaedi causes bacteremia, cellulitis and enteritis. H. cinaedi has been isolated from non-human sources, including dogs, cats and rodents; however, it remains unclear whether animal strains are pathogenic in humans and as zoonotic pathogens. In this study, H. cinaedi isolates were recovered from a dog and a hamster, and the ability of these isolates to adhere to, invade and translocate across polarized human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was examined in vitro. To better understand the pathogenic potential of animal H. cinaedi isolates, these results were compared with those for a human strain that was isolated from a patient with bacteremia. The animal and human strains adhered to and invaded Caco-2 cells, but to a lesser degree than the C. jejuni 81-176 strain, which was used as a control. The integrity of tight junctions was monitored by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) with a membrane insert system. The TER values for all H. cinaedi strains did not change during the experimental periods compared with those of the controls; however, translocation of H. cinaedi from the apical side to the basolateral side was confirmed by cultivation and H. cinaedi-specific PCR, suggesting that the H. cinaedi strains translocated by transcellular route. This study demonstrated that H. cinaedi strains of animal origin might have a pathogenic potential in human epithelial cells as observed in a translocation assay in vitro with a human isolate.

  16. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  17. A HYBRID APPROACH FOR POLARITY SHIFT DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mistry

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Now-a-days sentiment analysis has become a hot research area. With the increasing use of internet, people express their views by using social media, blogs, etc. So there is a dire need to analyze people’s opinions. Sentiment classification is the main task of sentiment analysis. But while classifying sentiments, the problem of polarity shift occurs. Polarity shift is considered as a very crucial problem. Polarity shift changes a text from positive to negative and vice versa. In this paper, a hybrid approach is proposed for polarity shift detection of negation (explicit and implicit and contrast. The hybrid approach consists of a rule-based approach for detecting explicit negation and contrast and a lexicon called SentiWordNet for detecting implicit negation. The proposed approach outperforms its baselines.

  18. Perspective: Explicitly correlated electronic structure theory for complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneis, Andreas; Hirata, So; Ohnishi, Yu-Ya; Ten-No, Seiichiro

    2017-02-28

    The explicitly correlated approach is one of the most important breakthroughs in ab initio electronic structure theory, providing arguably the most compact, accurate, and efficient ansatz for describing the correlated motion of electrons. Since Hylleraas first used an explicitly correlated wave function for the He atom in 1929, numerous attempts have been made to tackle the significant challenges involved in constructing practical explicitly correlated methods that are applicable to larger systems. These include identifying suitable mathematical forms of a correlated wave function and an efficient evaluation of many-electron integrals. R12 theory, which employs the resolution of the identity approximation, emerged in 1985, followed by the introduction of novel correlation factors and wave function ansätze, leading to the establishment of F12 theory in the 2000s. Rapid progress in recent years has significantly extended the application range of explicitly correlated theory, offering the potential of an accurate wave-function treatment of complex systems such as photosystems and semiconductors. This perspective surveys explicitly correlated electronic structure theory, with an emphasis on recent stochastic and deterministic approaches that hold significant promise for applications to large and complex systems including solids.

  19. Effect of Alignment on Polarized Infrared Emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thiem

    2017-04-01

    Polarized emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) potentially provides a new way to test the basic physics of the alignment of ultrasmall grains. In this paper, we present a new model of polarized PAH emission that takes into account the effect of PAH alignment with the magnetic field. We first generate a large sample of the grain angular momentum {\\boldsymbol{J}} by simulating the alignment of PAHs due to resonance paramagnetic relaxation that accounts for various interaction processes. We then calculate the polarization level of the PAH emission features for the different phases of the interstellar medium, including the cold neutral medium (CNM), reflection nebulae (RNe), and photodissociation regions. We find that a moderate degree of PAH alignment can significantly enhance the polarization degree of the PAH emission compared to the previous results obtained with randomly oriented angular momentum. In particular, we find that the smallest negatively charged PAHs in RNe can be excited to slightly suprathermal rotation due to enhanced ion collisional excitation, resulting in an increase of the polarization with the ionization fraction. Our results suggest that an RN is the most favorable environment in which to observe polarized PAH emission and to test the alignment physics of nanoparticles. Finally, we present an explicit relationship between the polarization level of PAH emission and the degree of external alignment for the CNM and RNe. The obtained relationship will be particularly useful for testing the alignment physics of PAHs in future observations.

  20. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  1. Development of Implicit and Explicit Category Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Maddox, W. Todd; Karalunas, Sarah L.

    2011-01-01

    We present two studies that examined developmental differences in the implicit and explicit acquisition of category knowledge. College-attending adults consistently outperformed school-age children on two separate information-integration paradigms due to children's more frequent use of an explicit rule-based strategy. Accuracy rates were also…

  2. Implicit and explicit instruction of spelling rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, M.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a

  3. Implicit and Explicit Instruction of Spelling Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M. J.; Verhoeven, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-intervention-posttest control group design. Experiment 1…

  4. Polar predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Crame, Alistair; Francis, Jane; Robinson, Stuart; Bowman, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve understanding of faunal evolution and its relationship to climate change, the PALEOPOLAR project is challenging existing theories about the Early Cenozoic era using an integrated, multidisciplinary approach in the polar regions

  5. Human iPS-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression pattern similar to native RPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, Maria; Sahibzada, Niaz; Golestaneh, Nady

    2012-01-01

    Aged-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of blindness in aging population and progresses with death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor degeneration inducing impairment of central vision. Discovery of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells has opened new avenues for the treatment of degenerative diseases using patient specific stem cells to generate tissues and cells for autologous cell-based therapy. Recently, RPE cells were generated from hiPS cells. However, there is no evidence that those hiPS-derived RPE possess specific RPE functions that fully distinguish them from other type of cells. Here we show for the first time that RPE generated from hiPS under defined conditions exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression profile similar to those of native RPE. The hiPS-RPE could therefore be a very good candidate for RPE replacement therapy in AMD. However, these cells show rapid telomere shortening, DNA chromosomal damage and increased p21 expression that cause cell growth arrest. This rapid senescence might affect the survival of the transplanted cells in vivo and therefore, only the very early passages should be used for regeneration therapies. Future research needs to focus on the generation of “safe” as well as viable hiPS-derived somatic cells. PMID:21480547

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Explicit Instruction on Implicit and Explicit L2 Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakura, Motoko

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of explicit instruction on second language (L2) learners' implicit and explicit knowledge of English. Explicit instruction on the generic and non-generic use of English articles was delivered by CALL activities. Four tasks assessed acquisition: elicited imitation, oral production, grammaticality judgement, and…

  7. 2-D inversion of P-wave polarization data to obtain maps of velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xili; Li, Li

    2017-11-01

    Gradient mapping is a technique employed in the interpretation of tomographic velocity images for delineating geological structures. In this paper, a tomographic method is proposed for determining relative velocity gradient field from seismic polarization directions. This inverse problem is iteratively resolved by the damped least squares method. With Hamiltonian formulation of ray theory and under the assumption that the medium is weakly inhomogeneous, the problem formulation for polarization direction is approximately expressed as a function of relative velocity gradient. Explicit expressions of the Frechet derivatives of polarization directions with respect to model parameters are given. The proposed tomographic method is illustrated by conducting synthetic experiments for showing the ability of our method to recover relative velocity gradient field as well as its potential applicability to complex media. The test results demonstrate that the proposed method is a promising approach for imaging geological structures.

  8. A Polarizable and Transferable PHAST CO 2 Potential for Materials Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Mullen, Ashley L.

    2013-12-10

    Reliable PHAST (Potentials with High Accuracy Speed and Transferability) intermolecular potential energy functions for CO2 have been developed from first principles for use in heterogeneous systems, including one with explicit polarization. The intermolecular potentials have been expressed in a transferable form and parametrized from nearly exact electronic structure calculations. Models with and without explicit many-body polarization effects, known to be important in simulation of interfacial processes, are constructed. The models have been validated on pressure-density isotherms of bulk CO 2 and adsorption in three metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The present models appear to offer advantages over high quality fluid/liquid state potentials in describing CO2 interactions in interfacial environments where sorbates adopt orientations not commonly explored in bulk fluids. Thus, the nonpolar CO2-PHAST and polarizable CO 2-PHAST* potentials are recommended for materials/interfacial simulations. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Explicit free‐floating beam element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Bjerre; Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    A two‐node free‐floating beam element capable of undergoing arbitrary large displacements and finite rotations is presented in explicit form. The configuration of the beam in three‐dimensional space is represented by the global components of the position of the beam nodes and an associated set of...... interpolation of kinematic variables, resulting in a locking‐free formulation in terms of three explicit matrices. A set of classic benchmark examples illustrates excellent performance of the explicit beam element. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Explicit equations of some elliptic modular surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Top, Jaap; Yui, Noriko

    2007-01-01

    We present explicit equations of semi-stable elliptic surfaces (i.e., having only type In singular fibers) which are associated to the torsion-free genus zero congruence subgroups of a modular group as previously classified.

  11. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP reading lessons. This study sought to answer the question: What elements of explicit instruction or instructional moves are included in the five most...

  12. Topology Optimization using an Explicit Interface Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Bærentzen, J. Andreas

    Current methods for topology optimization primarily represent the interface between solid and void implicitly on fixed grids. In contrast, shape optimization methods represent the interface explicitly, but do not allow for any topological changes to the structure. Using an explicit interface repr...... seconds on an ordinary laptop utilizing a single thread. In addition, a coarse solution to the same problem has been obtained in approximately 10 seconds....

  13. Geomorphology of Triton's polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    One of Triton's most debated puzzles is the nature, distribution, and transport of its atmospheric volatiles. The full potential of constraints provided by detailed observations of the morphology and distribution of the polar deposits has not been realized. The objective of this study is characterization of the morphology, distribution, stratigraphy, and geologic setting of Triton's polar materials.

  14. Approximate explicit analytic solution of the Elenbaas-Heller equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng-Ran; Li, Hui; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The Elenbaas-Heller equation describing the temperature field of a cylindrically symmetrical non-radiative electric arc has been solved, and approximate explicit analytic solutions are obtained. The radial distributions of the heat-flux potential and the electrical conductivity have been figured out briefly by using some special simplification techniques. The relations between both the core heat-flux potential and the electric field with the total arc current have also been given in several easy explicit formulas. Besides, the special voltage-ampere characteristic of electric arcs is explained intuitionally by a simple expression involving the Lambert W-function. The analyses also provide a preliminary estimation of the Joule heating per unit length, which has been verified in previous investigations. Helium arc is used to examine the theories, and the results agree well with the numerical computations.

  15. Polar Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  16. A Thermodynamic Theory for Dense Silicate Liquids That Includes Explicit Provision for Variation in Composition and Fluid Structure, Derived From the Rosenfeld-Tarazona Potential Energy-Temperature Scaling Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, M. S.; Cutler, I.; Creamer, J. B.; Nevins, D.; Martin, G. B.; Spera, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    Rosenfeld and Tarazona (1998, Molecular Physics 95:141) derive an expression from a fundamental- measure energy functional for hard spheres and thermodynamic perturbation theory for the scaling of the potential energy (U) on temperature (T) in a dense classical liquid: U = a + bT3/5, where a and b are functions of volume (V). From this expression we have formulated a general theory of the thermodynamic properties of dense liquids, and have applied this theory successfully to both polymerized and depolymerized silicate melts over the temperature range 2000-6000 K and at pressures (P) up to 130 GPa, using data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of molten MgSiO3, Mg2SiO4, CaMgSi2O6, and CaAl2Si2O8. In this work we extend the thermodynamic treatment to account for the compositional variability of multicomponent liquids and to deal with the mixing of melt species characterized by both composition and distinct cation-oxygen coordination number (CO-CN). We posit that the relation V = Σ Vi Xi holds, where Xi is the mole fraction of an endmember component with a particular CO-CN and Vi is the volume of that species; note that Vi is only a function of T and P, and that the posited relation embodies the concept of ideal volume-mixing of melt species. In combination with Rosenfeld-Tarazona theory, a self-consistent formalism for the solution thermodynamics is obtained, and in particular the equilibrium distribution of species of fixed stoichiometry but variable CO-CN is determined from the condition of homogeneous equilibrium. The resulting thermodynamic model must be calibrated from data documenting both the variation in macroscopic properties (U, V) as well as structural characteristics (CO-CN) of liquids as a function of T and P. We demonstrate application of the theory to a set of MD simulation data on MgSiO3 liquid. Unique measures of structural variation are explored for this and other MD data sets to ascertain an optimal set of endmember species that should be

  17. Explicit water based quasi-continuum approach for electric double layers (EDLs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayak, Sikandar Y.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    Electrostatic interactions of interfacial water molecules play a dominant role in determining the distribution of ions in EDLs. Most theories for EDLs are inaccurate because they fail to include molecular effects of water, such as dielectric permittivity variation and ion hydration. On the other hand, a detailed atomic-level study of EDLs using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be prohibitively expensive. To address these issues, we propose a multiscale approach to simulate EDLs based on point dipole coarse-grained (CG) water model and an empirical potential-based quasi-continuum theory (EQT), which incorporates the polarization and hydration effects of water explicitly. To reproduce hydration of ions, ion-water CG potentials are developed. We demonstrate EQT for EDL by simulating NaCl aqueous electrolyte confined in slit-like capacitor channels at various ion concentrations and surface charge densities. We show that the ion and water densities from EQT agree well with the reference MD simulations. EQT is not only as accurate as MD but also orders of magnitude faster than MD. Therefore, EQT provides a multiscale framework to accurately model EDLs, which are fundamental to technological applications such as energy storage, water desalination, and biological systems. This work was supported by AFOSR (Grant No. FA9550- 12-1-0464) and by NSF (Grant Nos. 1264282, 1420882, 1506619, and 1545907). The authors acknowledge the use of the Taub cluster provided by CSE at the University of Illinois.

  18. A novel method for polarization squeezing with Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanovic, Josip; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Crystal Fibers can be tailored to increase the effective Kerr nonlinearity, while producing smaller amounts of excess noise compared to standard silicon fibers. Using these features of Photonic Crystal Fibers we create polarization squeezed states with increased purity compared to standard...... fiber squeezing experiments. Explicit we produce squeezed states in counter propagating pulses along the same fiber axis to achieve near identical dispersion properties. This enables the production of polarization squeezing through interference in a polarization type Sagnac interferometer. We observe...

  19. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    CERN Document Server

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the $^8$B nucleus.

  20. Control of boiler temperature with explicit MPC; Panntemperaturreglering med explicit MPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaetteke, Ola; Velut, Stefan; Raaberg, Martin

    2012-02-15

    MPC is the multivariable controller that has been most successful in the process industry and particularly the petrochemical industry. It has been described as one of the most significant developments in process control and the main reasons for this are: 1. It handles multivariable control problems in a natural manner. 2. It is relative easy to understand the structure of the controller, which is the same whether it is a simple loop or a multivariable system. 3. It handles limitations of both the process and other practical constraints in a systematic way. Examples of this is that a valve can only work between 0 and 100 %, but also that the CO-level in the flue gas must not exceed a certain level. 4. It allows for operating conditions near critical process boundaries, which in many cases is synonymous with increased production rates, reduced raw material consumption, better energy utilization, and faster process transitions. The aim of the project is to evaluate the potential of multivariable control in the form of explicit MPC in a boiler at Stora Enso Hylte Bruk. This research task can be divided into two sub-tasks: 1. General evaluation of explicit MPC. 2. Evaluation of multivariable control of boiler temperature The purpose of subtask one is to evaluate what is required of a facility owner to implement explicit MPC in a control system. This includes everything from available calculation tools, what is important to consider during the design phase of the controller, different pitfalls that exist, management of different operating modes, to how the controller should be implemented and commissioned. Subtask two is intended to evaluate the multivariable control of a boiler of CFB type (circulating fluidized bed). MPC controller will regulate the temperature in the boiler. In order to maintain the waste incineration directive, the temperature in the upper part of the boiler is controlled. This is done by means of changes in the flow of natural gas injection and

  1. Doubling the spectrum of time-domain induced polarization: removal of non-linear self-potential drift, harmonic noise and spikes, tapered gating, and uncertainty estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Larsen, Jakob Juul

    This paper presents an advanced signal processing scheme for time-domain induced polarization full waveform data. The scheme includes several steps with an improved induced polarization (IP) response gating design using convolution with tapered windows to suppress high frequency noise......, a logarithmic gate width distribution for optimizing IP data quality and an estimate of gating uncertainty. Additional steps include modelling and cancelling of non-linear background drift and harmonic noise and a technique for efficiently identifying and removing spikes. The cancelling of non-linear background...... drift is based on a Cole-Cole model which effectively handles current induced electrode polarization drift. The model-based cancelling of harmonic noise reconstructs the harmonic noise as a sum of harmonic signals with a common fundamental frequency. After segmentation of the signal and determining...

  2. The interaction of implicit learning, explicit hypothesis testing learning and implicit-to-explicit knowledge extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ron; Zhang, Xi; Slusarz, Paul; Mathews, Robert

    2007-01-01

    To further explore the interaction between the implicit and explicit learning processes in skill acquisition (which have been tackled before, e.g. in [Sun, R., Merrill, E., & Peterson, T. (2001). From implicit skill to explicit knowledge: A bottom-up model of skill learning. Cognitive Science, 25(2), 203-244; Sun, R., Slusarz, P., & Terry, C. (2005). The interaction of the explicit and the implicit in skill learning: A dual-process approach. Psychological Review, 112(1), 159-192]), this paper explores details of the interaction of different learning modes: implicit learning, explicit hypothesis testing learning, and implicit-to-explicit knowledge extraction. Contrary to the common tendency in the literature to study each type of learning in isolation, this paper highlights the interaction among them and various effects of the interaction on learning, including the synergy effect. This work advocates an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit learning processes; moreover, it also uniquely embodies a bottom-up (implicit-to-explicit) learning approach in addition to other types of learning. The paper shows that this model accounts for various effects in the human behavioural data from the psychological experiments with the process control task, in addition to accounting for other data in other psychological experiments (which has been reported elsewhere). The paper shows that to account for these effects, implicit learning, bottom-up implicit-to-explicit extraction and explicit hypothesis testing learning are all needed.

  3. Polar Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    added by the decoder is K/ρ+Td. By the last assumption, Td and Te are both ≤ K/ρ, so the total latency added is between 2K/ρ and 4K /ρ. For example...better resolution near the decision point. Reference [12] showed that in decoding a (1024, 512) polar code, using 6-bit LLRs resulted in per- formance

  4. Polar source analysis : technical memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The following technical memorandum describes the development, testing and analysis of various polar source data sets. The memorandum also includes recommendation for potential inclusion in future releases of AEDT. This memorandum is the final deliver...

  5. A two-dimensional fully analytical model with polarization effect for off-state channel potential and electric field distributions of GaN-based field-plated high electron mobility transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; She, Wei-Bo; Yang, Cui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Hong-Xia; Yang, Lin-An; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Yong-He; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Hao, Yue

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a two-dimensional (2D) fully analytical model with consideration of polarization effect for the channel potential and electric field distributions of the gate field-plated high electron mobility transistor (FP-HEMT) on the basis of 2D Poisson's solution. The dependences of the channel potential and electric field distributions on drain bias, polarization charge density, FP structure parameters, AlGaN/GaN material parameters, etc. are investigated. A simple and convenient approach to designing high breakdown voltage FP-HEMTs is also proposed. The validity of this model is demonstrated by comparison with the numerical simulations with Silvaco—Atlas. The method in this paper can be extended to the development of other analytical models for different device structures, such as MIS-HEMTs, multiple-FP HETMs, slant-FP HEMTs, etc.

  6. Brain Networks of Explicit and Implicit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Are explicit versus implicit learning mechanisms reflected in the brain as distinct neural structures, as previous research indicates, or are they distinguished by brain networks that involve overlapping systems with differential connectivity? In this functional MRI study we examined the neural correlates of explicit and implicit learning of artificial grammar sequences. Using effective connectivity analyses we found that brain networks of different connectivity underlie the two types of learning: while both processes involve activation in a set of cortical and subcortical structures, explicit learners engage a network that uses the insula as a key mediator whereas implicit learners evoke a direct frontal-striatal network. Individual differences in working memory also differentially impact the two types of sequence learning. PMID:22952624

  7. Effect of phosphatidylcholine on explicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, S L; Sommer, S A; LaBerge, S; Toscano, W

    1993-12-01

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent relationship between precursors to acetylcholine (ACh) and memory function in normal human subjects. This experiment (N = 80, college students) employed a double-blind mixed design to test the effect of phosphatidylcholine (PCh) on explicit memory. Dose of placebo and PCh was compared at two levels (10 and 25 g) as was time of testing postingestion (60 and 90 min). With 25 g of PCh, which supplies 3.75 g of choline, significant improvement in explicit memory, as measured by a serial learning task, was observed at 90 min postingestion and slight improvement was observed at 60 min postigestion. Further analyses indicated that this improvement may have been due to the responses of slow learners. This is the first study to test the relationship between a single dose of PCh and explicit memory on normal human subjects.

  8. Shielding Electrostatic Fields in Polar Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, G. M. O.; Westerkamp, S.; Hoffmann, A.; Callsen, G.

    2017-02-01

    Polar semiconductor materials enable a variety of classic and quantum-light sources, which are optimized continuously. However, one key problem—the inherent electric crystal polarization of such materials—remains unsolved and deteriorates the radiative exciton decay rate. We suggest a sequence of reverse interfaces to compensate these polarization effects, while the polar, natural crystal growth direction is maintained. Former research approaches, like growth on less-polar crystal planes or even the stabilization of unnatural phases, never reached industrial maturity. In contrast, our concept provides a way for the development of ultrafast devices based on established growth processes for polar materials, while the electric potential landscape becomes adjustable.

  9. Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma exposure and association with hematological parameters for southern Beaufort Sea polar bears: potential response to infectious agents in a sentinel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Cassandra M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Swor, Rhonda; Holcomb, Darce; O'Hara, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    Arctic temperatures are increasing in response to greenhouse gas forcing and polar bears have already responded to changing conditions. Declines in body stature and vital rates have been linked to warming-induced loss of sea-ice. As food webs change and human activities respond to a milder Arctic, exposure of polar bears and other arctic marine organisms to infectious agents may increase. Because of the polar bear’s status as arctic ecosystem sentinel, polar bear health could provide an index of changing pathogen occurrence throughout the Arctic, however, exposure and monitoring protocols have yet to be established. We examine prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, and four morbilliviruses (canine distemper [CDV], phocine distemper [PDV], dolphin morbillivirus [DMV], porpoise morbillivirus [PMV]) including risk factors for exposure. We also examine the relationships between antibody levels and hematologic values established in the previous companion article. Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and morbilliviruses were found in both sample years. We found a significant inverse relationship between CDV titer and total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils, and a significant positive relationship between eosinophils and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. Morbilliviral prevalence varied significantly among age cohorts, with 1–2 year olds least likely to be seropositive and bears aged 5–7 most likely. Data suggest that the presence of CDV and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies is associated with polar bear hematologic values. We conclude that exposure to CDV-like antigen is not randomly distributed among age classes and suggest that differing behaviors among life history stages may drive probability of specific antibody presence.

  10. Implicit and explicit processes in social cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Frith, Uta

    2008-01-01

    In this review we consider research on social cognition in which implicit processes can be compared and contrasted with explicit, conscious processes. In each case, their function is distinct, sometimes complementary and sometimes oppositional. We argue that implicit processes in social interaction...... are automatic and are often opposed to conscious strategies. While we are aware of explicit processes in social interaction, we cannot always use them to override implicit processes. Many studies show that implicit processes facilitate the sharing of knowledge, feelings, and actions, and hence, perhaps...

  11. Electromagnetic radiation under explicit symmetry breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2015-04-10

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  12. An explicit MOT scheme for solving the TD-EFVIE on nonlinear and dispersive scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Sadeed Bin

    2017-10-25

    An explicit marching-on-in-time (MOT) scheme for solving the time domain electric field volume integral equation (TD-EFVIE) on nonlinear and dispersive scatterers is described. The unknown electric field intensity, electric flux density, and polarization densities representing Kerr nonlinearity along with Lorentz dispersion relation, all of which are induced inside the scatterer upon excitation, are expanded using half and full Schaubert-Wilton-Glisson functions in space. The TD-EFVIE and the constitutive relations between polarization, field, and flux terms are cast in the form of a first-order ordinary differential equation. The resulting matrix system is integrated in time using a predictor-corrector scheme to obtain the time dependent unknown expansion coefficients. The resulting MOT scheme is explicit and accounts for nonlinearity by simple function evaluations.

  13. Predictive Validity of Explicit and Implicit Threat Overestimation in Contamination Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer S.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the predictive validity of explicit and implicit measures of threat overestimation in relation to contamination-fear outcomes using structural equation modeling. Undergraduate students high in contamination fear (N = 56) completed explicit measures of contamination threat likelihood and severity, as well as looming vulnerability cognitions, in addition to an implicit measure of danger associations with potential contaminants. Participants also completed measures of contamination-fear symptoms, as well as subjective distress and avoidance during a behavioral avoidance task, and state looming vulnerability cognitions during an exposure task. The latent explicit (but not implicit) threat overestimation variable was a significant and unique predictor of contamination fear symptoms and self-reported affective and cognitive facets of contamination fear. On the contrary, the implicit (but not explicit) latent measure predicted behavioral avoidance (at the level of a trend). Results are discussed in terms of differential predictive validity of implicit versus explicit markers of threat processing and multiple fear response systems. PMID:24073390

  14. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP…

  15. Sexually explicit media use and relationship satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veit, Maria; Stulhofer, Aleksandar; Hald, Gert Martin

    2017-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional questionnaire design and a sample of 2284 coupled Croatian adults, this study investigated the association between Sexually Explicit Media (SEM) use and relationship satisfaction. Further, possible moderation of emotional intimacy on the relationship between SEM use and re...

  16. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Wolf M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three levels of complexity: (1) an event-based binomial model that considers only the occurrence of mortality or arrival, (2) a temporally explicit exponential model that employs mortality and arrival rates, and (3) a spatially explicit grid-walk model that simulates the movement of animals through an artificial landscape. Each model was fitted to the same set of field data. A first objective of the paper is to illustrate how the maximum-likelihood method can be used in all three cases to estimate the means and confidence limits for the relevant model parameters, given a particular set of data on dispersal survival. Using this framework we show that the structure of the uncertainty for all three models is strikingly similar. In fact, the results of our unified approach imply that spatially explicit dispersal models, which take advantage of information on landscape details, suffer less from uncertainly than do simpler models. Moreover, we show that the proposed strategy of model development safeguards one from error propagation in these more complex models. Finally, our approach shows that all models related to animal dispersal, ranging from simple to complex, can be related in a hierarchical fashion, so that the various approaches to modeling such dispersal can be viewed from a unified perspective.

  17. Refinement of protein structures in explicit solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linge, J.P.; Williams, M.A.; Spronk, C.A.E.M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Nilges, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a CPU efficient protocol for refinement of protein structures in a thin layer of explicit solvent and energy parameters with completely revised dihedral angle terms. Our approach is suitable for protein structures determined by theoretical (e.g., homology modeling or threading) or

  18. Antichrist, Explicit Sex, Anxiety, and Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes how von Trier's Antichrist uses explicit sex to discuss the relation between fear of human embodiment and a longing for care and spiritual intimacy. It discusses how lyrical episodes contrasts descriptions of embodied degradation and experiences of being imprisoned in the body....

  19. Explicit and implicit assessment of gender roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Juan; Quiroga, M Ángeles; Escorial, Sergio; Privado, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Gender roles have been assessed by explicit measures and, recently, by implicit measures. In the former case, the theoretical assumptions have been questioned by empirical results. To solve this contradiction, we carried out two concatenated studies based on a relatively well-founded theoretical and empirical approach. The first study was designed to obtain a sample of genderized activities of the domestic sphere by means of an explicit assessment. Forty-two raters (22 women and 20 men, balanced on age, sex, and level of education) took part as raters. In the second study, an implicit assessment of gender roles was carried out, focusing on the response time given to the sample activities obtained from the first study. A total of 164 adults (90 women and 74 men, mean age = 43), with experience in living with a partner and balanced on age, sex, and level of education, participated. Taken together, results show that explicit and implicit assessment converge. The current social reality shows that there is still no equity in some gender roles in the domestic sphere. These consistent results show considerable theoretical and empirical robustness, due to the double implicit and explicit assessment.

  20. Implicit and explicit prejudice and interracial interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovidio, J.F.; Kawakami, K.L.; Gaertner, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The present research examined how implicit racial associations and explicit racial attitudes of Whites relate to behaviors and impressions in interracial interactions, Specifically, the authors examined how response latency and self-report measures predicted bias and perceptions of bias in verbal

  1. Orchestrating Semiotic Resources in Explicit Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Lynn E.; Flury-Kashmanian, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Research and pedagogical information provided to teachers on implementing explicit strategy instruction has primarily focused on teachers' speech, with limited attention to other modes of communication, such as gesture and artefacts. This interpretive case study investigates two teachers' use of different semiotic resources when introducing…

  2. Sleep Enhances Explicit Recollection in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosopoulos, Spyridon; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory is considered to be supported by two different memory processes, i.e., the explicit recollection of information about a previous event and an implicit process of recognition based on a contextual sense of familiarity. Both types of memory supposedly rely on distinct memory systems. Sleep is known to enhance the consolidation of…

  3. Polar Unconformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 19 August 2004 The arrows (see Figure 1) in this July 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image indicate the location of an unconformity in the layered sequence of the martian north polar cap. An unconformity is a geologic term that indicates a break in the depositional record of a sedimentary deposit. In this case, the change is recorded by the presence of a series of polar layers that are truncated (cut off) along the line of arrows. The erosion that cut these layers along a gentle slope were later covered by a new set of layers that occur from the arrow tips upward to the top of the sequence shown here. The image is located near 85.2oN, 7.3oW. The bright features in the lower third of the image are frost-covered sand dunes. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the top/upper right.

  4. Multifrequency Behaviour of Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Reinsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic variables emit over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper I will review observations of polars in relevant passbands obtained during the last decade and will discuss their diagnostical potential to access the physics of the main components within the binary systems. This will include a discussion of intrinsic source variability and the quest for simultaneous multi-frequency observations.

  5. Explicit formulas for regularized products and series

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgenson, Jay; Goldfeld, Dorian

    1994-01-01

    The theory of explicit formulas for regularized products and series forms a natural continuation of the analytic theory developed in LNM 1564. These explicit formulas can be used to describe the quantitative behavior of various objects in analytic number theory and spectral theory. The present book deals with other applications arising from Gaussian test functions, leading to theta inversion formulas and corresponding new types of zeta functions which are Gaussian transforms of theta series rather than Mellin transforms, and satisfy additive functional equations. Their wide range of applications includes the spectral theory of a broad class of manifolds and also the theory of zeta functions in number theory and representation theory. Here the hyperbolic 3-manifolds are given as a significant example.

  6. Implicit and explicit memory bias in anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, A; Mogg, K; May, J; Eysenck, M

    1989-08-01

    Previous investigations of recall and recognition for threatening information in clinically anxious subjects have yielded equivocal results. The present study contrasts implicit (word completion) with explicit (cued recall) memory and shows that indices of bias for emotional material derived from the two types of memory are independent of one another. The explicit measure was correlated with trait anxiety scores, but did not clearly distinguish between subjects with clinical anxiety states and normal control subjects. On the implicit memory measure, clinically anxious subjects produced more threat word completions, but only from a set to which they had recently been exposed. These results are taken as evidence that internal representations of threat words are more readily or more persistently activated in anxiety states, although they are not necessarily better elaborated.

  7. Extrapolated stabilized explicit Runge-Kutta methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Vaquero, J.; Kleefeld, B.

    2016-12-01

    Extrapolated Stabilized Explicit Runge-Kutta methods (ESERK) are proposed to solve multi-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). In such methods it is necessary to evaluate the function nt times per step, but the stability region is O (nt2). Hence, the computational cost is O (nt) times lower than for a traditional explicit algorithm. In that way stiff problems can be integrated by the use of simple explicit evaluations in which case implicit methods usually had to be used. Therefore, they are especially well-suited for the method of lines (MOL) discretizations of parabolic nonlinear multi-dimensional PDEs. In this work, first s-stages first-order methods with extended stability along the negative real axis are obtained. They have slightly shorter stability regions than other traditional first-order stabilized explicit Runge-Kutta algorithms (also called Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev codes). Later, they are used to derive nt-stages second- and fourth-order schemes using Richardson extrapolation. The stability regions of these fourth-order codes include the interval [ - 0.01nt2, 0 ] (nt being the number of total functions evaluations), which are shorter than stability regions of ROCK4 methods, for example. However, the new algorithms neither suffer from propagation of errors (as other Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev codes as ROCK4 or DUMKA) nor internal instabilities. Additionally, many other types of higher-order (and also lower-order) methods can be obtained easily in a similar way. These methods also allow adaptation of the length step with no extra cost. Hence, the stability domain is adapted precisely to the spectrum of the problem at the current time of integration in an optimal way, i.e., with minimal number of additional stages. We compare the new techniques with other well-known algorithms with good results in very stiff diffusion or reaction-diffusion multi-dimensional nonlinear equations.

  8. Isogeometric Collocation for Elastostatics and Explicit Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    of stresses at quadrature points. In this case, storage and compute cost are directly pro- portional to the number of quadrature points. Typical...that is, the one-point Gauss rule. This minimizes storage of stresses and the number of constitutive evaluations and results in an efficient...We confirm the higher-order con- vergence rates of the explicit multi-corrector method on a one-dimensional example and a two dimensional plane strain

  9. Sleep enhances explicit recollection in recognition memory

    OpenAIRE

    Drosopoulos, Spyridon; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory is considered to be supported by two different memory processes, i.e., the explicit recollection of information about a previous event and an implicit process of recognition based on an acontextual sense of familiarity. Both types of memory supposedly rely on distinct memory systems. Sleep is known to enhance the consolidation of memories, with the different sleep stages affecting different types of memory. In the present study, we used the process-dissociation procedure to...

  10. Explicit solvers in an implicit code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Montesinos, Beatriz; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Many geodynamic processes occur over long timescales (millions of years), and are best solved with implicit solvers. Yet, some processes, such as hydrofracking, or wave propagation, occur over smaller timescales. In those cases, it might be advantageous to use an explicit rather than an implicit approach as it requires significantly less memory and computational costs. Here, we discuss our ongoing work to include explicit solvers in the parallel software package LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model). As a first step, we focus on modelling seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous 3D poro-elasto-plastic models. To do that, we add inertial terms to the momentum equations as well as elastic compressibility to the mass conservation equations in an explicit way using the staggered grid finite difference discretization method. Results are similar to that of existing wave propagation codes and are capable to simulate wave propagation in heterogeneous media. To simulate geomechanical problems, timestep restrictions posed by the seismic wave speed are usually too severe to allow simulating deformation on a timescale of months-years. The classical (FLAC) method introduces a mass-density scaling in which a non-physical (larger) density is employed in the momentum equations. We will discuss how this method fits simple benchmarks for elastic and elastoplastic deformation. As an application, we use the code to model different complex media subject to compression and we investigate how mass scaling influence in our results.

  11. Towards an explicit account of implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkstam, Christian; Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2005-08-01

    The human brain supports acquisition mechanisms that can extract structural regularities implicitly from experience without the induction of an explicit model. Reber defined the process by which an individual comes to respond appropriately to the statistical structure of the input ensemble as implicit learning. He argued that the capacity to generalize to new input is based on the acquisition of abstract representations that reflect underlying structural regularities in the acquisition input. We focus this review of the implicit learning literature on studies published during 2004 and 2005. We will not review studies of repetition priming ('implicit memory'). Instead we focus on two commonly used experimental paradigms: the serial reaction time task and artificial grammar learning. Previous comprehensive reviews can be found in Seger's 1994 article and the Handbook of Implicit Learning. Emerging themes include the interaction between implicit and explicit processes, the role of the medial temporal lobe, developmental aspects of implicit learning, age-dependence, the role of sleep and consolidation. The attempts to characterize the interaction between implicit and explicit learning are promising although not well understood. The same can be said about the role of sleep and consolidation. Despite the fact that lesion studies have relatively consistently suggested that the medial temporal lobe memory system is not necessary for implicit learning, a number of functional magnetic resonance studies have reported medial temporal lobe activation in implicit learning. This issue merits further research. Finally, the clinical relevance of implicit learning remains to be determined.

  12. Intersection Type Systems and Explicit Substitutions Calculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Daniel Lima; Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio; Kamareddine, Fairouz

    The λ-calculus with de Bruijn indices, called λ dB , assembles each α-class of λ-terms into a unique term, using indices instead of variable names. Intersection types provide finitary type polymorphism satisfying important properties like principal typing, which allows the type system to include features such as data abstraction (modularity) and separate compilation. To be closer to computation and to simplify the formalisation of the atomic operations involved in β-contractions, several explicit substitution calculi were developed most of which are written with de Bruijn indices. Although untyped and simply types versions of explicit substitution calculi are well investigated, versions with more elaborate type systems (e.g., with intersection types) are not. In previous work, we presented a version for λ dB of an intersection type system originally introduced to characterise principal typings for β-normal forms and provided the characterisation for this version. In this work we introduce intersection type systems for two explicit substitution calculi: the λσ and the λs e . These type system are based on a type system for λ dB and satisfy the basic property of subject reduction, which guarantees the preservation of types during computations.

  13. Age effects on explicit and implicit memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eWard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that explicit memory (e.g., recognition declines with age. In contrast, many argue that implicit memory (e.g., priming is preserved in healthy aging. For example, priming on tasks such as perceptual identification is often not statistically different in groups of young and older adults. Such observations are commonly taken as evidence for distinct explicit and implicit learning/memory systems. In this article we discuss several lines of evidence that challenge this view. We describe how patterns of differential age-related decline may arise from differences in the ways in which the two forms of memory are commonly measured, and review recent research suggesting that under improved measurement methods, implicit memory is not age-invariant. Formal computational models are of considerable utility in revealing the nature of underlying systems. We report the results of applying single and multiple-systems models to data on age effects in implicit and explicit memory. Model comparison clearly favours the single-system view. Implications for the memory systems debate are discussed.

  14. Polar Business Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  15. Intuition and the correspondence between implicit and explicit self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Christian H; Whitfield, Mervyn; Zeigler-Hill, Virgil

    2007-12-01

    Four studies tested whether the perceived validity of intuition increases the correspondence between implicit and explicit self-esteem. Studies 1 and 2 found, with 2 different measures of implicit self-esteem, that people who chronically view their intuition as valid have more consistent implicit and explicit self-esteem. In contrast, people with relatively low faith in their intuition had a negative relation between implicit and explicit self-esteem, suggesting that they may overcorrect their explicit self-views for the potential bias posed by implicit self-esteem. In Studies 3 and 4, participants who were induced to view their intuition as valid reported explicit self-views (self-evaluations made under time pressure, or state self-esteem) that were more consistent with their implicit self-esteem. These results suggest that people experience implicit self-esteem as intuitive evaluations. The correspondence between implicit and explicit self-esteem among individuals who view their intuition as valid may suggest that these individuals incorporate implicit self-esteem into their explicit self-views. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Electrokinetics of Polar Liquids in Contact with Non-Polar Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chih-Hsiu; Ferguson, Gregory S.; Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    2014-01-01

    Zeta potentials of several polar protic (water, ethylene glycol, formamide) as well as polar aprotic (dimethyl sulfoxide) liquids were measured in contact with three non-polar surfaces using closed-cell electro-osmosis. The test surfaces were chemisorbed monolayers of alkyl siloxanes, fluoroalkyl siloxanes and polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) grafted on glass slides. All these liquids exhibited substantial electrokinetics in contact with the non-polar surfaces with these observations: the electro...

  17. Explicit criteria for prioritization of cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escobar Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consensus techniques have been used previously to create explicit criteria to prioritize cataract extraction; however, the appropriateness of the intervention was not included explicitly in previous studies. We developed a prioritization tool for cataract extraction according to the RAND method. Methods Criteria were developed using a modified Delphi panel judgment process. A panel of 11 ophthalmologists was assembled. Ratings were analyzed regarding the level of agreement among panelists. We studied the effect of all variables on the final panel score using general linear and logistic regression models. Priority scoring systems were developed by means of optimal scaling and general linear models. The explicit criteria developed were summarized by means of regression tree analysis. Results Eight variables were considered to create the indications. Of the 310 indications that the panel evaluated, 22.6% were considered high priority, 52.3% intermediate priority, and 25.2% low priority. Agreement was reached for 31.9% of the indications and disagreement for 0.3%. Logistic regression and general linear models showed that the preoperative visual acuity of the cataractous eye, visual function, and anticipated visual acuity postoperatively were the most influential variables. Alternative and simple scoring systems were obtained by optimal scaling and general linear models where the previous variables were also the most important. The decision tree also shows the importance of the previous variables and the appropriateness of the intervention. Conclusion Our results showed acceptable validity as an evaluation and management tool for prioritizing cataract extraction. It also provides easy algorithms for use in clinical practice.

  18. Implicit and explicit timing in oculomotor control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhame Ameqrane

    Full Text Available The passage of time can be estimated either explicitly, e.g. before leaving home in the morning, or implicitly, e.g. when catching a flying ball. In the present study, the latency of saccadic eye movements was used to evaluate differences between implicit and explicit timing. Humans were required to make a saccade between a central and a peripheral position on a computer screen. The delay between the extinction of a central target and the appearance of an eccentric target was the independent variable that could take one out of four different values (400, 900, 1400 or 1900 ms. In target trials, the delay period lasted for one of the four durations randomly. At the end of the delay, a saccade was initiated by the appearance of an eccentric target. Cue&target trials were similar to target trials but the duration of the delay was visually cued. In probe trials, the duration of the upcoming delay was cued, but there was no eccentric target and subjects had to internally generate a saccade at the estimated end of the delay. In target and cue&target trials, the mean and variance of latency distributions decreased as delay duration increased. In cue&target trials latencies were shorter. In probe trials, the variance increased with increasing delay duration and scalar variability was observed. The major differences in saccadic latency distributions were observed between visually-guided (target and cue&target trials and internally-generated saccades (probe trials. In target and cue&target trials the timing of the response was implicit. In probe trials, the timing of the response was internally-generated and explicitly based on the duration of the visual cue. Scalar timing was observed only during probe trials. This study supports the hypothesis that there is no ubiquitous timing system in the brain but independent timing processes active depending on task demands.

  19. Sleep promotes offline enhancement of an explicitly learned discrete but not an explicitly learned continuous task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siengsukon CF

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Catherine F Siengsukon, Alham Al-SharmanDepartment of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USABackground: Healthy young individuals benefit from sleep to promote offline enhancement of a variety of explicitly learned discrete motor tasks. It remains unknown if sleep will promote learning of other types of explicit tasks. The purpose of this study is to verify the role of sleep in learning an explicitly instructed discrete motor task and to determine if participants who practice an explicitly instructed continuous tracking task demonstrate sleep-dependent offline learning of this task.Methods: In experiment 1, 28 healthy young adults (mean age 25.6 ± 3.8 years practiced a serial reaction time (SRT task at either 8 am (SRT no-sleep group or 8 pm (SRT sleep group and underwent retention testing 12 ± 1 hours later. In experiment 2, 20 healthy young individuals (mean age 25.6 ± 3.3 years practiced a continuous tracking task and were similarly divided into a no-sleep (continuous tracking no-sleep group or sleep group (continuous tracking sleep group. Individuals in both experiments were provided with explicit instruction on the presence of a sequence in their respective task prior to practice.Results: Individuals in the SRT sleep group demonstrated a significant offline reduction in reaction time whereas the SRT no-sleep group did not. Results for experiment 1 provide concurrent evidence that explicitly learned discrete tasks undergo sleep-dependent offline enhancement. Individuals in the continuous tracking sleep group failed to demonstrate a significant offline reduction in tracking error. However, the continuous tracking no-sleep group did demonstrate a significant offline improvement in performance. Results for experiment 2 indicate that sleep is not critical for offline enhancement of an explicit learned continuous task.Conclusion: The findings that individuals who practiced an

  20. Spatially explicit non-Mendelian diploid model

    OpenAIRE

    Lanchier, N.; Neuhauser, C.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a spatially explicit model for the competition between type $a$ and type $b$ alleles. Each vertex of the $d$-dimensional integer lattice is occupied by a diploid individual, which is in one of three possible states or genotypes: $aa$, $ab$ or $bb$. We are interested in the long-term behavior of the gene frequencies when Mendel's law of segregation does not hold. This results in a voter type model depending on four parameters; each of these parameters measures the strength of comp...

  1. Implicit vs explicit renormalization and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Arriola, E., E-mail: earriola@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Szpigel, S., E-mail: szpigel@mackenzie.br [Faculdade de Computação e Informática, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (Brazil); Timóteo, V.S., E-mail: varese@ft.unicamp.br [Grupo de Óptica e Modelagem Numérica – GOMNI, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    Effective interactions can be obtained from a renormalization group analysis in two complementary ways. One can either explicitly integrate out higher energy modes or impose given conditions at low energies for a cut-off theory. While the first method is numerically involved, the second one can be solved almost analytically. In both cases we compare the outcoming effective interactions for the two nucleon system as functions of the cut-off scale and find a strikingly wide energy region where both approaches overlap, corresponding to relevant scales in light nuclei Λ≲200 MeV. This amounts to a great simplification in the determination of the effective interaction parameters.

  2. Terahertz broadband polarization converter based on metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Zhao, Guozhong

    2018-01-01

    Based on the metamaterial composed of symmetrical split resonant ring, a broadband reflective terahertz polarization converter is proposed. The numerical simulation shows that it can rotate the polarization direction of linear polarized wave 90° in the range of 0.7-1.8THz and the polarization conversion ratio is over 90%. The reflection coefficient of the two electric field components in the diagonal direction is the same and the phase difference is 180° ,which leads to the cross-polarization rotation.In order to further study the physical mechanism of high polarization conversion, we analyze the surface current distribution of the resonant ring. The polarization converter has potential applications in terahertz wave plate and metamaterial antenna design.

  3. The emergence of explicit memory during learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael; Haider, Hilde; Büchel, Christian

    2010-12-01

    In incidental learning situations, contingencies are extracted from the environment without the intention to learn and can change behavior without awareness for the extracted regularity. The development of explicit access to the learned regularity is an important learning mechanism that is rarely examined. With a series of behavioral, electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, we were able to show that the emergence of awareness for a hidden regularity is accompanied by an increase in neural activity and in high-frequency coupling between distant brain areas as observed with a time-frequency resolved EEG analysis. More importantly, the increase in neural coupling was observed before awareness for the learned material was established behaviorally. In addition, coupling increases were paralleled by an fMRI-signal increase in the ventral striatum and the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex directly preceding the emergence of awareness. The involvement of this system, which has already been linked to the processing of predictions and prediction errors, indicates the relevance of a reinforcement signal to generate awareness for the learned contingencies. Thus, our data provide direct evidence for the necessity of large-scale coupling and the evaluation of a predictive stimulus value as the basis for a transition from implicit to explicit memory.

  4. Spatially explicit modelling of cholera epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, F.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Knox, A. C.; Gatto, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological models can provide crucial understanding about the dynamics of infectious diseases. Possible applications range from real-time forecasting and allocation of health care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. We apply a spatially explicit model to the cholera epidemic that struck Haiti in October 2010 and is still ongoing. The dynamics of susceptibles as well as symptomatic and asymptomatic infectives are modelled at the scale of local human communities. Dissemination of Vibrio cholerae through hydrological transport and human mobility along the road network is explicitly taken into account, as well as the effect of rainfall as a driver of increasing disease incidence. The model is calibrated using a dataset of reported cholera cases. We further model the long term impact of several types of interventions on the disease dynamics by varying parameters appropriately. Key epidemiological mechanisms and parameters which affect the efficiency of treatments such as antibiotics are identified. Our results lead to conclusions about the influence of different intervention strategies on the overall epidemiological dynamics.

  5. Does Sexually Explicit Media (SEM) Affect Me?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Træen, Bente; Noor, Syed W

    2015-01-01

    Using a self-selected online sample of 448 Norwegian men who have sex with men(MSM) and a cross-sectional design, the present study investigated first-person effectsof sexually explicit media (SEM) consumption on sexual knowledge, enjoyment of andinterest in sex, attitudes towards sex and underst......Using a self-selected online sample of 448 Norwegian men who have sex with men(MSM) and a cross-sectional design, the present study investigated first-person effectsof sexually explicit media (SEM) consumption on sexual knowledge, enjoyment of andinterest in sex, attitudes towards sex...... Scale (PCES). The study found that 93% of MSM reported smallto-largepositive effects from their SEM consumption on their sexual knowledge,enjoyment of and interest in sex, attitudes towards sex and understanding of theirsexual orientation. Only 7% reported any negative effects from their SEM...... consumptionon these outcomes. Furthermore, the psychometric properties of the revisedversion of the PCES were found to be very satisfactory. The results of the studyindicate that SEM consumption among MSM may play a positive role in MSM’ssexuality by enhancing their sex life, being a major source of sexual...

  6. Does exposure to sexually explicit Internet material increase body dissatisfaction? A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, J.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the consequences of exposure to sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) has neglected body dissatisfaction as a potential outcome. Additionally, research on body dissatisfaction has ignored exposure to SEIM as a potential predictor. Within a social comparison framework, we studied

  7. Profiling of Polar Lipids in Marine Oleaginous Diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580: Prediction of the Potential Mechanism for Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Incorporation into Triacylglycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580 is a candidate for biodiesel production because of its high lipid productivity. However, the substantial eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA content in this strain would affect the biodiesel quality. On the other hand, EPA is also known as the essential health supplement for humans. EPAs are mainly incorporated into glycerolipids in the microalgal cell instead of the presence as free fatty acids. Therefore, the understanding of the EPA biosynthesis including the incorporation of the EPA into glycerolipids especially triacylglycerol (TAG is fundamental for regulating EPA content for different purposes. In this study, in order to identify the biosynthesis pathway for the EPA-containing TAG species, a lipidomic characterization of the EPA-enriched polar lipids was performed by using direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI-Q-TRAP-MS and MS/MS analyses. The determination of the fatty acid positional distribution showed that the sn-2 position of all the chloroplast lipids and part of phosphatidylcholine (PC species was occupied by C16 fatty acids. This result suggested the critical role of the chloroplast on the lipid synthesis in F. solaris. Furthermore, the exclusive presence of C18 fatty acids in PC highly indicated the biosynthesis of EPA on PC. Finally, the PC-based acyl-editing and head group exchange processes were proposed to be essential for the incorporation of EPA into TAG and chloroplast lipids.

  8. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further, for both speaker identification and verification tasks the explicit modelling provides relatively more complimentary information to the state-of-the-art vocal tract features. The contribution of the explicit features is relatively more robust against noise. We suggest that the explicit approach can be used to model the ...

  9. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  10. Certain Verbs Are Syntactically Explicit Quantifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szabolcsi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantification over individuals, times, and worlds can in principle be made explicit in the syntax of the object language, or left to the semantics and spelled out in the meta-language. The traditional view is that quantification over individuals is syntactically explicit, whereas quantification over times and worlds is not. But a growing body of literature proposes a uniform treatment. This paper examines the scopal interaction of aspectual raising verbs (begin, modals (can, and intensional raising verbs (threaten with quantificational subjects in Shupamem, Dutch, and English. It appears that aspectual raising verbs and at least modals may undergo the same kind of overt or covert scope-changing operations as nominal quantifiers; the case of intensional raising verbs is less clear. Scope interaction is thus shown to be a new potential diagnostic of object-linguistic quantification, and the similarity in the scope behavior of nominal and verbal quantifiers supports the grammatical plausibility of ontological symmetry, explored in Schlenker (2006.ReferencesBen-Shalom, D. 1996. Semantic Trees. Ph.D. thesis, UCLA.Bittner, M. 1993. Case, Scope, and Binding. Dordrecht: Reidel.Cresswell, M. 1990. Entities and Indices. Dordrecht: Kluwer.Cresti, D. 1995. ‘Extraction and reconstruction’. Natural Language Semantics 3: 79–122.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01252885Curry, B. H. & Feys, R. 1958. Combinatory Logic I. Dordrecht: North-Holland.Dowty, D. R. 1988. ‘Type raising, functional composition, and non-constituent conjunction’. In Richard T. Oehrle, Emmon W. Bach & Deirdre Wheeler (eds. ‘Categorial Grammars and Natural Language Structures’, 153–197. Dordrecht: Reidel.Fox, D. 2002. ‘TOn Logical Form’. In Randall Hendrick (ed. ‘Minimalist Syntax’, 82–124. Oxford: Blackwell.Gallin, D. 1975. Intensional and higher-order modal logic: with applications to Montague semantics. North Holland Pub. Co.; American Elsevier Pub. Co., Amsterdam

  11. Saturable Lorentz model for fully explicit three-dimensional modeling of nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Charles; Bart, Graeme; Emms, Rhys; Brabec, Thomas

    2015-02-09

    Inclusion of the instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity in the FDTD framework leads to implicit equations that have to be solved iteratively. In principle, explicit integration can be achieved with the use of anharmonic oscillator equations, but it tends to be unstable and inappropriate for studying strong-field phenomena like laser filamentation. In this paper, we show that nonlinear susceptibility can be provided instead by a harmonic oscillator driven by a nonlinear force, chosen in a way to reproduce the polarization obtained from the solution of the quantum mechanical two-level equations. The resulting saturable, nonlinearly-driven, harmonic oscillator model reproduces quantitatively the quantum mechanical solutions of harmonic generation in the under-resonant limit, up to the 9th harmonic. Finally, we demonstrate that fully explicit leapfrog integration of the saturable harmonic oscillator is stable, even for the intense laser fields that characterize laser filamentation and high harmonic generation.

  12. Constrained Unfolding of a Helical Peptide: Implicit versus Explicit Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey R Bureau

    Full Text Available Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD has been seen to provide the potential of mean force (PMF along a peptide unfolding pathway effectively but at significant computational cost, particularly in all-atom solvents. Adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD has been seen to provide a significant computational advantage by limiting the spread of the trajectories in a staged approach. The contraction of the trajectories at the end of each stage can be performed by taking a structure whose nonequilibrium work is closest to the Jarzynski average (in naive ASMD or by relaxing the trajectories under a no-work condition (in full-relaxation ASMD--namely, FR-ASMD. Both approaches have been used to determine the energetics and hydrogen-bonding structure along the pathway for unfolding of a benchmark peptide initially constrained as an α-helix in a water environment. The energetics are quite different to those in vacuum, but are found to be similar between implicit and explicit solvents. Surprisingly, the hydrogen-bonding pathways are also similar in the implicit and explicit solvents despite the fact that the solvent contact plays an important role in opening the helix.

  13. Fast isogeometric solvers for explicit dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2014-06-01

    In finite element analysis, solving time-dependent partial differential equations with explicit time marching schemes requires repeatedly applying the inverse of the mass matrix. For mass matrices that can be expressed as tensor products of lower dimensional matrices, we present a direct method that has linear computational complexity, i.e., O(N), where N is the total number of degrees of freedom in the system. We refer to these matrices as separable matrices. For non-separable mass matrices, we present a preconditioned conjugate gradient method with carefully designed preconditioners as an alternative. We demonstrate that these preconditioners, which are easy to construct and cheap to apply (O(N)), can deliver significant convergence acceleration. The performances of these preconditioners are independent of the polynomial order (p independence) and mesh resolution (h independence) for maximum continuity B-splines, as verified by various numerical tests. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. [Explicit model for searching behavior of predator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunov, Iu V; Sapukhina, N Iu; Senina, I N; Arditi, R

    2002-01-01

    The authors present an approach for explicit modeling of spatio-temporal dynamics of predator-prey community. This approach is based on a reaction-diffusion-adjection PD (prey dependent) system. Local kinetics of population is determined by logistic reproduction function of prey, constant natural mortality of predator and Holling type 2 trophic function. Searching behavior of predator is described by the advective term in predator balance equation assuming the predator acceleration to be proportional to the prey density gradient. The model was studied with zero-flux boundary conditions. The influence of predator searching activity on the community dynamics, in particular, on the emergence of spatial heterogeneity, has been investigated by linear analysis and numerical simulations. It has been shown how searching activity may effect the persistence of species, stabilizing predator-prey interactions at very low level of pest density. It has been demonstrated that obtaining of such dynamic regimes does not require the use of complex trophic functions.

  15. Academic Publishing: Making the Implicit Explicit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Badenhorst

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For doctoral students, publishing in peer-reviewed journals is a task many face with anxiety and trepidation. The world of publishing, from choosing a journal, negotiating with editors and navigating reviewers’ responses is a bewildering place. Looking in from the outside, it seems that successful and productive academic writers have knowledge that is inaccessible to novice scholars. While there is a growing literature on writing for scholarly publication, many of these publications promote writing and publishing as a straightforward activity that anyone can achieve if they follow the rules. We argue that the specific and situated contexts in which academic writers negotiate publishing practices is more complicated and messy. In this paper, we attempt to make explicit our publishing processes to highlight the complex nature of publishing. We use autoethnographic narratives to provide discussion points and insights into the challenges of publishing peer reviewed articles. One narrative is by a doctoral student at the beginning of her publishing career, who expresses her desires, concerns and anxieties about writing for publication. The other narrative focuses on the publishing practices of a more experienced academic writer. Both are international scholars working in the Canadian context. The purpose of this paper is to explore academic publishing through the juxtaposition of these two narratives to make explicit some of the more implicit processes. Four themes emerge from these narratives. To publish successfully, academic writers need: (1 to be discourse analysts; (2 to have a critical competence; (3 to have writing fluency; and (4 to be emotionally intelligent.

  16. Polarization-sensitive color in butterfly scales: polarization conversion from ridges with reflecting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Tang, Yiwen; Meng, Jinsong; Wang, Ge; Zhou, Han; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2014-11-03

    Polarization-sensitive color originates from polarization-dependent reflection or transmission, exhibiting abundant light information, including intensity, spectral distribution, and polarization. A wide range of butterflies are physiologically sensitive to polarized light, but the origins of polarized signal have not been fully understood. Here we systematically investigate the colorful scales of six species of butterfly to reveal the physical origins of polarization-sensitive color. Microscopic optical images under crossed polarizers exhibit their polarization-sensitive characteristic, and micro-structural characterizations clarify their structural commonality. In the case of the structural scales that have deep ridges, the polarization-sensitive color related with scale azimuth is remarkable. Periodic ridges lead to the anisotropic effective refractive indices in the parallel and perpendicular grating orientations, which achieves form-birefringence, resulting in the phase difference of two different component polarized lights. Simulated results show that ridge structures with reflecting elements reflect and rotate the incident p-polarized light into s-polarized light. The dimensional parameters and shapes of grating greatly affect the polarization conversion process, and the triangular deep grating extends the outstanding polarization conversion effect from the sub-wavelength period to the period comparable to visible light wavelength. The parameters of ridge structures in butterfly scales have been optimized to fulfill the polarization-dependent reflection for secret communication. The structural and physical origin of polarization conversion provides a more comprehensive perspective on the creation of polarization-sensitive color in butterfly wing scales. These findings show great potential in anti-counterfeiting technology and advanced optical material design.

  17. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.; Stock, Jonathan D.; McKean, Jim; Kazian, Brian; Hargrove, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so it has generated downscaled precipitation maps for the storm. To predict the corresponding pattern of shallow landslide susceptibility across the state, we have used the model Shalstab (a coupled steady state runoff and infinite slope stability model) which susceptibility spatially explicit estimates of relative potential instability. Such slope stability models that include the effects of subsurface runoff on potentially destabilizing pore pressure evolution require water routing and hence the definition of upslope drainage area to each potential cell. To calculate drainage area efficiently over a large area we developed a parallel framework to scale-up Shalstab and specifically introduce a new efficient parallel drainage area algorithm which produces seamless results. The single seamless shallow landslide susceptibility map for all of California was accomplished in a short run time, and indicates that much larger areas can be efficiently modelled. As landslide maps generally over predict the extent of instability for any given storm. Local empirical data on the fraction of predicted unstable cells that failed for observed rainfall intensity can be used to specify the likely extent of hazard for a given storm. This suggests that campaigns to collect local precipitation data and detailed shallow landslide location maps after major storms could be used to calibrate models and improve their use in hazard assessment for individual storms.

  18. Beta Regression Finite Mixture Models of Polarization and Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Michael; Merkle, Edgar C.; Verkuilen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the application of finite-mixture general linear models based on the beta distribution to modeling response styles, polarization, anchoring, and priming effects in probability judgments. These models, in turn, enhance our capacity for explicitly testing models and theories regarding the aforementioned phenomena. The mixture…

  19. Variational calculation of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy with electronic polarization of solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-04-07

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculation presents a significant challenge due to an excessive number of QM calculations. A useful approach for reducing the computational cost is that based on the mean field approximation to the QM subsystem. Here, we describe such a mean-field QM/MM theory for electronically polarizable systems by starting from the Hartree product ansatz for the total system and invoking a variational principle of free energy. The MM part is then recast to a classical polarizable model by introducing the charge response kernel. Numerical test shows that the potential of mean force (PMF) thus obtained agrees quantitatively with that obtained from a direct QM/MM calculation, indicating the utility of self-consistent mean-field approximation. Next, we apply the obtained method to prototypical reactions in several qualitatively different solvents and make a systematic comparison of polarization effects. The results show that in aqueous solution the PMF does not depend very much on the water models employed, while in nonaqueous solutions the PMF is significantly affected by explicit polarization. For example, the free energy barrier for a phosphoryl dissociation reaction in acetone and cyclohexane is found to increase by more than 10 kcal/mol when switching the solvent model from an empirical to explicitly polarizable one. The reason for this is discussed based on the parametrization of empirical nonpolarizable models.

  20. Clustering recommenders in collaborative filtering using explicit trust information

    KAUST Repository

    Pitsilis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we explore the benefits of combining clustering and social trust information for Recommender Systems. We demonstrate the performance advantages of traditional clustering algorithms like k-Means and we explore the use of new ones like Affinity Propagation (AP). Contrary to what has been used before, we investigate possible ways that social-oriented information like explicit trust could be exploited with AP for forming clusters of high quality. We conducted a series of evaluation tests using data from a real Recommender system Epinions.com from which we derived conclusions about the usefulness of trust information in forming clusters of Recommenders. Moreover, from our results we conclude that the potential advantages in using clustering can be enlarged by making use of the information that Social Networks can provide. © 2011 International Federation for Information Processing.

  1. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  2. Electrochemical Regulation of Budding Yeast Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Matthieu; Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs) at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs), which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization. PMID:25548923

  3. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...... inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live...

  4. Polarized potential and electrode materials implication on electro-fermentative di-hydrogen production: Microbial assemblages and hydrogenase gene copy variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunasri, Kotakonda; Annie Modestra, J; Yeruva, Dileep Kumar; Vamshi Krishna, K; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the changes in microbial diversity in response to different electrode materials viz., stainless steel mesh (SS) and graphite plate as anodes in two microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) each poised at 0.2V, 0.4V, 0.6V and 0.8V. Changes in microbiota prior to and after pretreatment along with microbiota enriched in response to various poised potentials with SS and graphite are monitored by 16S rRNA gene based DGGE profiling. Significant shifts in microbial community were noticed at all these experimental conditions. Correspondingly, the level of hydrogenase belonging to genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Rhodopseudomonas and Clostridium was studied by quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) at various applied potentials. DGGE based 16S rRNA gene profiling revealed enriched members belonging to phylum Firmicutes predominantly present at 0.8V in both MECs contributing to high hydrogen production. This study first time explored the growth behavior of mixed consortia in response to poised potentials and electrode materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Terahertz polarization imaging for colon cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. The terahertz reflectance measurements of fresh 3 - 5 mm thick human colonic excisions were acquired using a continuous-wave polarization imaging technique. A CO2 optically pumped Far- Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz was used to illuminate the colon tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. Both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance from the samples was collected using wire grid polarizers in the experiment. The experimental analysis of 2D images obtained from THz reflection polarization imaging techniques showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions based on increased reflection from the tumor. Also, the study demonstrates that the cross-polarized terahertz images not only correlates better with the histology, but also provide consistent relative reflectance difference values between normal and cancerous regions for all the measured specimens.

  6. Spatially explicit dynamic N-mixture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Royle, Andy; Boomer, G. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of demographic parameters such as survival, reproduction, emigration, and immigration is essential to understand metapopulation dynamics. Traditionally the estimation of these demographic parameters requires intensive data from marked animals. The development of dynamic N-mixture models makes it possible to estimate demographic parameters from count data of unmarked animals, but the original dynamic N-mixture model does not distinguish emigration and immigration from survival and reproduction, limiting its ability to explain important metapopulation processes such as movement among local populations. In this study we developed a spatially explicit dynamic N-mixture model that estimates survival, reproduction, emigration, local population size, and detection probability from count data under the assumption that movement only occurs among adjacent habitat patches. Simulation studies showed that the inference of our model depends on detection probability, local population size, and the implementation of robust sampling design. Our model provides reliable estimates of survival, reproduction, and emigration when detection probability is high, regardless of local population size or the type of sampling design. When detection probability is low, however, our model only provides reliable estimates of survival, reproduction, and emigration when local population size is moderate to high and robust sampling design is used. A sensitivity analysis showed that our model is robust against the violation of the assumption that movement only occurs among adjacent habitat patches, suggesting wide applications of this model. Our model can be used to improve our understanding of metapopulation dynamics based on count data that are relatively easy to collect in many systems.

  7. Explicit constructions of automorphic L-functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gelbart, Stephen; Rallis, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this research monograph is to derive the analytic continuation and functional equation of the L-functions attached by R.P. Langlands to automorphic representations of reductive algebraic groups. The first part of the book (by Piatetski-Shapiro and Rallis) deals with L-functions for the simple classical groups; the second part (by Gelbart and Piatetski-Shapiro) deals with non-simple groups of the form G GL(n), with G a quasi-split reductive group of split rank n. The method of proof is to construct certain explicit zeta-integrals of Rankin-Selberg type which interpolate the relevant Langlands L-functions and can be analyzed via the theory of Eisenstein series and intertwining operators. This is the first time such an approach has been applied to such general classes of groups. The flavor of the local theory is decidedly representation theoretic, and the work should be of interest to researchers in group representation theory as well as number theory.

  8. Explicit logic circuits discriminate neural states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Yoder

    Full Text Available The magnitude and apparent complexity of the brain's connectivity have left explicit networks largely unexplored. As a result, the relationship between the organization of synaptic connections and how the brain processes information is poorly understood. A recently proposed retinal network that produces neural correlates of color vision is refined and extended here to a family of general logic circuits. For any combination of high and low activity in any set of neurons, one of the logic circuits can receive input from the neurons and activate a single output neuron whenever the input neurons have the given activity state. The strength of the output neuron's response is a measure of the difference between the smallest of the high inputs and the largest of the low inputs. The networks generate correlates of known psychophysical phenomena. These results follow directly from the most cost-effective architectures for specific logic circuits and the minimal cellular capabilities of excitation and inhibition. The networks function dynamically, making their operation consistent with the speed of most brain functions. The networks show that well-known psychophysical phenomena do not require extraordinarily complex brain structures, and that a single network architecture can produce apparently disparate phenomena in different sensory systems.

  9. Explicit information reduces discounting behavior in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePearson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are notoriously impulsive in common laboratory experiments, preferring smaller, sooner rewards to larger, delayed rewards even when this reduces average reward rates. By contrast, the same animals often engage in natural behaviors that require extreme patience, such as food caching, stalking prey, and traveling long distances to high quality food sites. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that standard laboratory delay discounting tasks artificially inflate impulsivity by subverting animals’ common learning strategies. To test this idea, we examined choices made by rhesus macaques in two variants of a standard delay discounting task. In the conventional variant, post-reward delays were uncued and adjusted to render total trial length constant; in the second, all delays were cued explicitly. We found that measured discounting was significantly reduced in the cued task, with discount rates well below those reported in studies using the standard uncued design. When monkeys had complete information, their decisions were more consistent with a strategy of reward rate maximization. These results indicate that monkeys, and perhaps other animals, are more patient than is normally assumed, and that laboratory measures of delay discounting may overstate impulsivity.

  10. From Explicit to Symbolic Types for Communication Protocols in CCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming; Kreiker, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    We study communication protocols having several rounds and expressed in value passing CCS. We develop a type-based analysis for providing an explicit record of all communications and show the usual subject reduction result. Since the explicit records can be infinitely large, we also develop a type......-based analysis for providing a finite, symbolic record of all communications. We show that it correctly approximates the explicit record and prove an adequacy result for it....

  11. Spatially explicit modeling in ecology: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Yurek, Simeon

    2017-01-01

    The use of spatially explicit models (SEMs) in ecology has grown enormously in the past two decades. One major advancement has been that fine-scale details of landscapes, and of spatially dependent biological processes, such as dispersal and invasion, can now be simulated with great precision, due to improvements in computer technology. Many areas of modeling have shifted toward a focus on capturing these fine-scale details, to improve mechanistic understanding of ecosystems. However, spatially implicit models (SIMs) have played a dominant role in ecology, and arguments have been made that SIMs, which account for the effects of space without specifying spatial positions, have an advantage of being simpler and more broadly applicable, perhaps contributing more to understanding. We address this debate by comparing SEMs and SIMs in examples from the past few decades of modeling research. We argue that, although SIMs have been the dominant approach in the incorporation of space in theoretical ecology, SEMs have unique advantages for addressing pragmatic questions concerning species populations or communities in specific places, because local conditions, such as spatial heterogeneities, organism behaviors, and other contingencies, produce dynamics and patterns that usually cannot be incorporated into simpler SIMs. SEMs are also able to describe mechanisms at the local scale that can create amplifying positive feedbacks at that scale, creating emergent patterns at larger scales, and therefore are important to basic ecological theory. We review the use of SEMs at the level of populations, interacting populations, food webs, and ecosystems and argue that SEMs are not only essential in pragmatic issues, but must play a role in the understanding of causal relationships on landscapes.

  12. Spatially explicit methane inventory for Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Bretscher, Daniel; DelSontro, Tonya; Eugster, Werner; Henne, Stephan; Henneberger, Ruth; Künzle, Thomas; Merbold, Lutz; Neininger, Bruno; Schellenberger, Andreas; Schroth, Martin; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner1, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Spatially explicit greenhouse gas inventories are gaining in importance as a tool for policy makers to plan and control mitigation measures, and are a required input for atmospheric models used to relate atmospheric concentration measurements with upstream sources. In order to represent the high spatial heterogeneity in Switzerland, we compiled the national methane inventory into a 500 m x 500 m cadaster. In addition to the anthropogenic emissions reported to the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), we also included natural and semi-natural methane fluxes, i.e., emissions from lakes and reservoirs, wetlands, wild animals as well as forest uptake. Methane emissions were disaggregated according to geostatistical information about source location and extent. In Switzerland, highest methane emissions originate from the agricultural sector (152 Gg CH4 yr-1), followed by emissions from waste management (16 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from landfills, and the energy sector (13 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from the distribution of natural gas. Natural and semi-natural emissions only add a small amount (inventory was evaluated against methane concentrations measured from a small research aircraft (METAIR-DIMO) above the Swiss Plateau on 18 different days from May 2009 to August 2010 over. Source sensitivities of the air measured were determined by backward runs of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-COSMO. Source sensitivities were multiplied with the methane inventory to derive simulated methane concentration time series. While the pattern of the variations can be reproduced well for some flight days (correlation coefficient up to 0.75), the amplitude of the variations for the simulated time series is underestimated by at least 20% suggesting an underestimation of CH4 emissions by the inventory, which is also concluded from inverse estimation using a Bayesian approach.

  13. Educational Researchers' Personal Explicit Theories on Creativity and Its Development: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksic, Slavica; Pavlovic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate implicit theories of educational researchers on creativity and the potential to support creativity in schools. We used qualitative thematic analysis of material produced by 27 educational experts from Serbia. Personal explicit theories about manifestations of creativity are mainly based on qualities and…

  14. Adolescents’ exposure to sexually explicit internet material and sexual preoccupancy: a three-wave panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, J.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate whether adolescents' use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) increased their sexual preoccupancy (i.e., a strong cognitive engagement in sexual issues). Further, we wanted to know (a) whether subjective sexual arousal mediated a potential

  15. Adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit internet material and sexual satisfaction: A Longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, J.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, within a social comparison framework, the causal relationship between adolescents’ use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) and their sexual satisfaction. In addition, we tested which adolescents were most susceptible to a potential influence of

  16. Adolescents' Exposure to Sexually Explicit Internet Material and Sexual Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jochen; Valkenburg, Patti M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, within a social comparison framework, the causal relationship between adolescents' use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) and their sexual satisfaction. In addition, we tested which adolescents were most susceptible to a potential influence of SEIM on sexual satisfaction. Between May 2006 and…

  17. Graphing Polar Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  18. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references.

  19. Polarization-mediated Debye-screening of surface potential fluctuations in dual-channel AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, David A.; Miller, Ross A.; Osinsky, Andrei V.; Downey, Brian P.; Storm, David F.; Meyer, David J.; Scott Katzer, D.; Nepal, Neeraj

    2016-12-01

    A dual-channel AlN/GaN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) architecture is proposed, simulated, and demonstrated that suppresses gate lag due to surface-originated trapped charge. Dual two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channels are utilized such that the top 2DEG serves as an equipotential that screens potential fluctuations resulting from surface trapped charge. The bottom channel serves as the transistor's modulated channel. Two device modeling approaches have been performed as a means to guide the device design and to elucidate the relationship between the design and performance metrics. The modeling efforts include a self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger solution for electrostatic simulation as well as hydrodynamic three-dimensional device modeling for three-dimensional electrostatics, steady-state, and transient simulations. Experimental results validated the HEMT design whereby homo-epitaxial growth on free-standing GaN substrates and fabrication of the same-wafer dual-channel and recessed-gate AlN/GaN HEMTs have been demonstrated. Notable pulsed-gate performance has been achieved by the fabricated HEMTs through a gate lag ratio of 0.86 with minimal drain current collapse while maintaining high levels of dc and rf performance.

  20. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J V; Valeev, Edward F

    2017-09-28

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  1. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J. V.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2017-09-01

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  2. A lunar polar expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Thomas

    This paper reviews issues related to a five-person expedition to the lunar north pole which primarily addresses site selection and the requirements for transportation, power, and life support. A one-year stay on the lunar surface is proposed based on available technology, and proposals are detailed for incorporating flight-proven systems, abort or rescue options, and the use of the base as the nucleus for subsequent operations. Specific details are given regarding lunar orbital data, the characteristics of the proposed base, power and consumables requirements, and equipment such as two-person lunar roving vehicles and space suits. During the expedition: (1) water is recycled; (2) Autolanders are used to deliver equipment; (3) two rovers are included in the mass budget; (4) the lunar surface is studied in detail. A polar lunar-base site offers the advantages of unobstructed astronomy, enhanced heat rejection, and the potential for reuse.

  3. Monte Carlo implementation of polarized hadronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Kotzinian, Aram; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2017-01-01

    We study the polarized quark hadronization in a Monte Carlo (MC) framework based on the recent extension of the quark-jet framework, where a self-consistent treatment of the quark polarization transfer in a sequential hadronization picture has been presented. Here, we first adopt this approach for MC simulations of the hadronization process with a finite number of produced hadrons, expressing the relevant probabilities in terms of the eight leading twist quark-to-quark transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) splitting functions (SFs) for elementary q →q'+h transition. We present explicit expressions for the unpolarized and Collins fragmentation functions (FFs) of unpolarized hadrons emitted at rank 2. Further, we demonstrate that all the current spectator-type model calculations of the leading twist quark-to-quark TMD SFs violate the positivity constraints, and we propose a quark model based ansatz for these input functions that circumvents the problem. We validate our MC framework by explicitly proving the absence of unphysical azimuthal modulations of the computed polarized FFs, and by precisely reproducing the earlier derived explicit results for rank-2 pions. Finally, we present the full results for pion unpolarized and Collins FFs, as well as the corresponding analyzing powers from high statistics MC simulations with a large number of produced hadrons for two different model input elementary SFs. The results for both sets of input functions exhibit the same general features of an opposite signed Collins function for favored and unfavored channels at large z and, at the same time, demonstrate the flexibility of the quark-jet framework by producing significantly different dependences of the results at mid to low z for the two model inputs.

  4. CXCL4 Exposure Potentiates TLR-Driven Polarization of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells and Increases Stimulation of T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Cardoso, Sandra C; Affandi, Alsya J; Spel, Lotte; Cossu, Marta; van Roon, Joel A G; Boes, Marianne; Radstake, Timothy R D J

    2017-07-01

    Chemokines have been shown to play immune-modulatory functions unrelated to steering cell migration. CXCL4 is a chemokine abundantly produced by activated platelets and immune cells. Increased levels of circulating CXCL4 are associated with immune-mediated conditions, including systemic sclerosis. Considering the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in immune activation, in this article we addressed the effect of CXCL4 on the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). To this end, we compared innate and adaptive immune responses of moDCs with those that were differentiated in the presence of CXCL4. Already prior to TLR- or Ag-specific stimulation, CXCL4-moDCs displayed a more matured phenotype. We found that CXCL4 exposure can sensitize moDCs for TLR-ligand responsiveness, as illustrated by a dramatic upregulation of CD83, CD86, and MHC class I in response to TLR3 and TLR7/8-agonists. Also, we observed a markedly increased secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α by CXCL4-moDCs exclusively upon stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, R848, and CL075 ligands. Next, we analyzed the effect of CXCL4 in modulating DC-mediated T cell activation. CXCL4-moDCs strongly potentiated proliferation of autologous CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells and production of IFN-γ and IL-4, in an Ag-independent manner. Although the internalization of Ag was comparable to that of moDCs, Ag processing by CXCL4-moDCs was impaired. Yet, these cells were more potent at stimulating Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. Together our data support that increased levels of circulating CXCL4 may contribute to immune dysregulation through the modulation of DC differentiation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun eYu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedbacks to update initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN, identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential techniques combined with social tasks in which participants make explicit prediction (whether others will accept their ‘friend request’ or not, Experiment 1 or implicit prediction (whether they would like this person or not, Experiment 2 respectively and then receive social feedback. We found that the FRN is sensitive to social rejection and explicit social prediction error in Experiment 1 but not implicit social prediction error in Experiment 2. We conclude that the FRN encodes social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation.

  6. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sai; Yu, Rongjun

    2014-01-01

    Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedback to validate initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN), identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential (ERP) techniques combined with social tasks in which participants were required to make explicit predictions (whether others will accept their “friend request” or not, Experiment 1) or implicit predictions (whether they would like this person or not, Experiment 2) respectively, and then received social feedback. We found that the FRN is sensitive to social rejection and explicit social prediction error in Experiment 1 but not implicit social prediction error in Experiment 2. We conclude that the FRN encodes social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation. PMID:25120457

  7. Explicit-ion Effects in the Coil-Globule Transition of Weak Polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Benjamin J.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    The first-order coil-globule transition in weak (annealed) polyelectrolytes involves a subtle balance of pH, charge strength, and solvation forces. In this work, we utilize a coarse-grain hybrid grand-canonical Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics approach to explore the free energetic topography of a model hydrophobic polybase [representing poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP)] and explore the role of salt concentration/valency in influencing polyelectrolyte conformations using both an implicit Debye-Hückel and explicit salt approach. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally measured behavior for dilute annealed polyelectrolytes, and present a solid foundation for understanding pH responsive polyelectrolyte materials.

  8. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  9. CDPOP: A spatially explicit cost distance population genetics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin L. Landguth; S. A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    Spatially explicit simulation of gene flow in complex landscapes is essential to explain observed population responses and provide a foundation for landscape genetics. To address this need, we wrote a spatially explicit, individual-based population genetics model (CDPOP). The model implements individual-based population modelling with Mendelian inheritance and k-allele...

  10. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the explicit and implicit modelling of the subsegmental excitation information are experimentally compared. For explicit modelling, the static and dynamic values of the standard Liljencrants–Fant (LF) parameters that model the glottal flow derivative (GFD) are used. A simplified approximation method is.

  11. Explicit and Implicit Grammar Instructions in Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ayuni Madarina Abdul; Rashid, Radzuwan Ab

    2017-01-01

    Two universally accepted approaches to grammar instruction are explicit and implicit teaching of the grammar. Both approaches have their own strengths and limitations. Educators may face a dilemma whether to teach grammar explicitly or implicitly. This paper aims to provide insights into the educators' beliefs towards grammar teaching in Malaysian…

  12. "Make It Explicit!": Improving Collaboration through Increase of Script Coercion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, P. M.; Demetriadis, S. N.; Weinberger, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the proposed "Make It Explicit!" technique on students' learning when participating in scripted collaborative activities. The method posits that when asking students to proactively articulate their own positions explicitly, then improved peer interaction is triggered in a subsequent…

  13. Age and time effects on implicit and explicit learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verneau, M.; Kamp, J. van der; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Looze, M.P. de

    2014-01-01

    Study Context: It has been proposed that effects of aging are more pronounced for explicit than for implicit motor learning. The authors evaluated this claim by comparing the efficacy of explicit and implicit learning of a movement sequence in young and older adults, and by testing the resilience

  14. Age and Time Effects on Implicit and Explicit Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verneau, M.M.N.; van der Kamp, J.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; de Looze, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Study Context: It has been proposed that effects of aging are more pronounced for explicit than for implicit motor learning. The authors evaluated this claim by comparing the efficacy of explicit and implicit learning of a movement sequence in young and older adults, and by testing the resilience

  15. Progress in Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2003-06-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets have been operated in several particle physics experiments over extended periods of time. They proved to be very robust and reliable. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in fully deuterated polystyrene based scintillator have been reached in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access. New choices of materials and preparation procedures show potential for an improvement of the scintillation and polarization properties.

  16. Characterization of polarized THP-1 macrophages and polarizing ability of LPS and food compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chanput, W.; Mes, J.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the polarizing potential of currently used human macrophage cell lines, while a better understanding phenomena can support the prediction of effects in vivo based on in vitro analysis. To test the polarization capability of PMA differentiated-THP-1 macrophages (M0), cells were

  17. Apicobasal polarity of brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzfeld, Thomas; Schwaninger, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Normal brain homeostasis depends on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier that controls the access of nutrients, humoral factors, and immune cells to the CNS. The blood-brain barrier is composed mainly of brain endothelial cells. Forming the interface between two compartments, they are highly polarized. Apical/luminal and basolateral/abluminal membranes differ in their lipid and (glyco-)protein composition, allowing brain endothelial cells to secrete or transport soluble factors in a polarized manner and to maintain blood flow. Here, we summarize the basic concepts of apicobasal cell polarity in brain endothelial cells. To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying apicobasal polarity in brain endothelial cells, we draw on investigations in epithelial cells and discuss how polarity may go awry in neurological diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  19. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  20. Black Hole Quantum Vacuum Polarization in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Flachi, Antonino; Lemos, José P S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to extend to higher dimensionality the methods and computations of vacuum polarization effects in black hole spacetimes. We focus our attention on the case of five dimensional Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black holes, for which we adapt the general method initially developed by Candelas and later refined by Anderson and others. We make use of point splitting regularization and of the WKB approximation to extract the divergences occuring in the coincidence limit of the Green function and, after calculating the counter-terms using the Schwinger - De Witt expansion, we explicitly prove the cancellation of the divergences and the regularity of the vacuum polarization once counter-terms are added up. We finally handle numerically the renormalized expression of the vacuum polarization. As a check on the method we also prove the regularity of the vacuum polarization in the six dimensional case in the large mass limit.

  1. Multidisciplinary Views on Applying Explicit and Implicit Motor Learning in Practice: An International Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kleynen

    Full Text Available A variety of options and techniques for causing implicit and explicit motor learning have been described in the literature. The aim of the current paper was to provide clearer guidance for practitioners on how to apply motor learning in practice by exploring experts' opinions and experiences, using the distinction between implicit and explicit motor learning as a conceptual departure point.A survey was designed to collect and aggregate informed opinions and experiences from 40 international respondents who had demonstrable expertise related to motor learning in practice and/or research. The survey was administered through an online survey tool and addressed potential options and learning strategies for applying implicit and explicit motor learning. Responses were analysed in terms of consensus (≥ 70% and trends (≥ 50%. A summary figure was developed to illustrate a taxonomy of the different learning strategies and options indicated by the experts in the survey.Answers of experts were widely distributed. No consensus was found regarding the application of implicit and explicit motor learning. Some trends were identified: Explicit motor learning can be promoted by using instructions and various types of feedback, but when promoting implicit motor learning, instructions and feedback should be restricted. Further, for implicit motor learning, an external focus of attention should be considered, as well as practicing the entire skill. Experts agreed on three factors that influence motor learning choices: the learner's abilities, the type of task, and the stage of motor learning (94.5%; n = 34/36. Most experts agreed with the summary figure (64.7%; n = 22/34.The results provide an overview of possible ways to cause implicit or explicit motor learning, signposting examples from practice and factors that influence day-to-day motor learning decisions.

  2. Multidisciplinary Views on Applying Explicit and Implicit Motor Learning in Practice: An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleynen, Melanie; Braun, Susy M; Rasquin, Sascha M C; Bleijlevens, Michel H C; Lexis, Monique A S; Halfens, Jos; Wilson, Mark R; Masters, Rich S W; Beurskens, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    A variety of options and techniques for causing implicit and explicit motor learning have been described in the literature. The aim of the current paper was to provide clearer guidance for practitioners on how to apply motor learning in practice by exploring experts' opinions and experiences, using the distinction between implicit and explicit motor learning as a conceptual departure point. A survey was designed to collect and aggregate informed opinions and experiences from 40 international respondents who had demonstrable expertise related to motor learning in practice and/or research. The survey was administered through an online survey tool and addressed potential options and learning strategies for applying implicit and explicit motor learning. Responses were analysed in terms of consensus (≥ 70%) and trends (≥ 50%). A summary figure was developed to illustrate a taxonomy of the different learning strategies and options indicated by the experts in the survey. Answers of experts were widely distributed. No consensus was found regarding the application of implicit and explicit motor learning. Some trends were identified: Explicit motor learning can be promoted by using instructions and various types of feedback, but when promoting implicit motor learning, instructions and feedback should be restricted. Further, for implicit motor learning, an external focus of attention should be considered, as well as practicing the entire skill. Experts agreed on three factors that influence motor learning choices: the learner's abilities, the type of task, and the stage of motor learning (94.5%; n = 34/36). Most experts agreed with the summary figure (64.7%; n = 22/34). The results provide an overview of possible ways to cause implicit or explicit motor learning, signposting examples from practice and factors that influence day-to-day motor learning decisions.

  3. The effect of explicit financial incentives on physician behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, B S; Pitts, M M; Maclean, R; Cangialose, C; Kishel, M; Imai, H; Etchason, J

    2001-05-28

    Managed care organizations use explicit financial incentives to influence physicians' use of resources. This has contributed to concerns regarding conflicts of interest for physicians and adverse effects on the quality of patient care. In light of recent publicized legislative and legal battles about this issue, we reviewed the literature and analyzed studies that examine the effect of these explicit financial incentives on the behavior of physicians. The method used to undertake the literature review followed the approach set forth in the Cochrane Collaboration handbook. Our literature review revealed a paucity of data on the effect of explicit financial incentives. Based on this limited evidence, explicit incentives that place individual physicians at financial risk appear to be effective in reducing physician resource use. However, the empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of bonus payments on physician resource use is mixed. Similarly, our review revealed mixed effects of the influence of explicit financial incentives on the quality of patient care. The effect of explicit financial incentives on physician behavior is complicated by a lack of understanding of the incentive structure by the managed care organization and the physician. The lack of a universally acceptable definition of quality renders it important that future researchers identify the term explicitly.

  4. Explicit representation of confidence informs future value-based decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Tomas; Jacobsen, Catrine; Fleming, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    follow a more consistent pattern (fewer transitivity violations). Finally, by tracking participants’ eye movements, we demonstrate that lower-level gaze dynamics can track uncertainty but do not directly impact changes of mind. These results suggest that an explicit and accurate representation......Humans can reflect on decisions and report variable levels of confidence. But why maintain an explicit representation of confidence for choices that have already been made and therefore cannot be undone? Here we show that an explicit representation of confidence is harnessed for subsequent changes...... of confidence has a positive impact on the quality of future value-based decisions....

  5. Explicit strong stability preserving multistep Runge–Kutta methods

    KAUST Repository

    Bresten, Christopher

    2015-10-15

    High-order spatial discretizations of hyperbolic PDEs are often designed to have strong stability properties, such as monotonicity. We study explicit multistep Runge-Kutta strong stability preserving (SSP) time integration methods for use with such discretizations. We prove an upper bound on the SSP coefficient of explicit multistep Runge-Kutta methods of order two and above. Numerical optimization is used to find optimized explicit methods of up to five steps, eight stages, and tenth order. These methods are tested on the linear advection and nonlinear Buckley-Leverett equations, and the results for the observed total variation diminishing and/or positivity preserving time-step are presented.

  6. Compensatory heterogeneity in spatially explicit capture-recapture data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efford, M G; Mowat, G

    2014-05-01

    Spatially explicit capture-recapture methods, used widely to estimate the abundance of large carnivores, allow for movement within home ranges during sampling. Probability of detection is a decreasing function of distance from the home range center, with one parameter for magnitude and another for spatial scale. Sex-based and other differences in home range size potentially cause heterogeneity in individual detection and bias in estimates of density. The two parameters of detection have hitherto been treated as independent, but we suggest that an inverse relation is expected when detection probability depends on time spent near the detector. Variation in the spatial scale of detection is then compensated by reciprocal variation in the magnitude parameter. We define a net measure of detection ("single-detector sampling area," a(0)), and show by simulation that its coefficient of variation (CV) is a better predictor of bias than the CV of either component or the sum of their squared CVs. In an example using the grizzly bear Ursus arctos, the estimated sex variation in a(0) was small despite large variation in each component. From the simulations, the relative bias of density estimates was generally negligible (< 5%) when CV(a(0)) < 30%. Parameterization of the detection model in terms of a(0) and spatial scale can be more parsimonious and significantly aids the biological interpretation of detection parameters.

  7. Explicit Estimates for Solutions of Mixed Elliptic Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Consiglieri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal with the existence of quantitative estimates for solutions of mixed problems to an elliptic second-order equation in divergence form with discontinuous coefficients. Our concern is to estimate the solutions with explicit constants, for domains in ℝn (n≥2 of class C0,1. The existence of L∞ and W1,q estimates is assured for q=2 and any qpotential theory, we derive W1,p estimates for different ranges of the exponent p depending on the fact that the coefficient is either Dini-continuous or only measurable and bounded. In this process, we establish new existences of Green functions on such domains. The last but not least concern is to unify (whenever possible the proofs of the estimates to the extreme Dirichlet and Neumann cases of the mixed problem.

  8. Face Puzzle – Two new video-based tasks for measuring explicit and implicit aspects of facial emotion recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit eKliemann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing others’ emotional states is crucial for effective social interaction. While most facial emotion recognition tasks use explicit prompts that trigger consciously controlled processing, emotional faces are almost exclusively processed implicitly in real life. Recent attempts in social cognition suggest a dual process perspective, whereby explicit and implicit processes largely operate independently. However, due to differences in methodology the direct comparison of implicit and explicit social cognition has remained a challenge.Here, we introduce a new tool to comparably measure implicit and explicit processing aspects comprising basic and complex emotions in facial expressions. We developed two video-based tasks with similar answer formats to assess performance in respective facial emotion recognition processes: Face Puzzle, implicit and explicit. To assess the tasks’ sensitivity to atypical social cognition and to infer interrelationship patterns between explicit and implicit processes in typical and atypical development, we included healthy adults (NT, n= 24 and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, n = 24.Item analyses yielded good reliability of the new tasks. Group-specific results indicated sensitivity to subtle social impairments in high-functioning ASD. Correlation analyses with established implicit and explicit socio-cognitive measures were further in favor of the tasks’ external validity. Between group comparisons provide first hints of differential relations between implicit and explicit aspects of facial emotion recognition processes in healthy compared to ASD participants. In addition, an increased magnitude of between group differences in the implicit task was found for a speed-accuracy composite measure. The new Face Puzzle tool thus provides two new tasks to separately assess explicit and implicit social functioning, for instance, to measure subtle impairments as well as potential improvements due to social

  9. Polarization modulators for CMBPol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P A R; Savini, G [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Chuss, D T [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Hanany, S [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota/Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Haynes, V; Pisano, G [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy - Alan Turing Building, Upper Brooke street, Manchester, M13 4PL (United Kingdom); Keating, B G [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Kogut, A [Code 665 Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ruhl, J E [Physics Department, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 44106 (United States); Wollack, E J [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    We review a number of technologies that are candidates for active polarization modulators for CMBPol. The technologies are appropriate for instruments that use bolometric detectors and include birefringent crystal-based and metal-mesh-based half-wave plates, variable phase polarization modulator, Faraday rotator, and photolithographed modulators. We also give a current account of the status of millimeter-wave orthomode transducers.

  10. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  11. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission ...

  12. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  13. Explicit Dynamic DDA Method considering Dynamic Contact Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jian Zhao; Ming Xiao; Juntao Chen; Dongdong Li

    2016-01-01

      This paper proposes an explicit dynamic DDA method considering dynamic contact force, which aims at solving the problems of low efficiency of dynamic contact detection and the simulation of dynamic...

  14. Lightweight Solar Vehicle Impact Analysis Using ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossi Passarella; Zahari Taha

    2012-01-01

    Makalah ini menggambarkan the Abaqus/Explicit 6.7 simulasi performa kinerja untuk mempelajari dampak kondisi kecelakaan frontal untuk sebuah rancangan dan produksi struktur badan utama kendaraan ringan tenaga surya ringan rumahan...

  15. Optimal Explicit Binomial Confidence Interval with Guaranteed Coverage Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinjia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach for optimizing the explicit binomial confidence interval recently derived by Chen et al. The optimization reduces conservativeness while guaranteeing prescribed coverage probability.

  16. Explicit Nonlinear Model Predictive Control Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grancharova, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) has become the accepted methodology to solve complex control problems related to process industries. The main motivation behind explicit NMPC is that an explicit state feedback law avoids the need for executing a numerical optimization algorithm in real time. The benefits of an explicit solution, in addition to the efficient on-line computations, include also verifiability of the implementation and the possibility to design embedded control systems with low software and hardware complexity. This book considers the multi-parametric Nonlinear Programming (mp-NLP) approaches to explicit approximate NMPC of constrained nonlinear systems, developed by the authors, as well as their applications to various NMPC problem formulations and several case studies. The following types of nonlinear systems are considered, resulting in different NMPC problem formulations: Ø  Nonlinear systems described by first-principles models and nonlinear systems described by black-box models; �...

  17. Polarization Mode Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Galtarossa, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    This book contains a series of tutorial essays on polarization mode dispersion (PMD) by the leading experts in the field. It starts with an introductory review of the basic concepts and continues with more advanced topics, including a thorough review of PMD mitigation techniques. Topics covered include mathematical representation of PMD, how to properly model PMD in numerical simulations, how to accurately measure PMD and other related polarization effects, and how to infer fiber properties from polarization measurements. It includes discussions of other polarization effects such as polarization-dependent loss and the interaction of PMD with fiber nonlinearity. It additionally covers systems issues like the impact of PMD on wavelength division multiplexed systems. This book is intended for research scientists or engineers who wish to become familiar with PMD and its system impacts.

  18. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    CERN Document Server

    She, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristi...

  19. Polarization Optics in Telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Damask, Jay N

    2005-01-01

    The strong investments into optical telecommunications in the late 1990s resulted in a wealth of new research, techniques, component designs, and understanding of polarization effects in fiber. Polarization Optics in Telecommunications brings together recent advances in the field to create a standard, practical reference for component designers and optical fiber communication engineers. Beginning with a sound foundation in electromagnetism, the author offers a dissertation of the spin-vector formalism of polarization and the interaction of light with media. Applications discussed include optical isolators, optical circulators, fiber collimators, and a variety of applied waveplate and prism combinations. Also included in an extended discussion of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization-dependent loss (PDL), their representation, behavior, statistical properties, and measurement. This book draws extensively from the technical and patent literature and is an up-to-date reference for researchers and c...

  20. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  1. A shortcut for IMEX methods: integrate the residual explicitly

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Savio B.

    2017-01-01

    In numerical time-integration with implicit-explicit (IMEX) methods, a within-step adaptable decomposition called residual balanced decomposition is introduced. This decomposition allows any residual occurring in the implicit equation of the implicit-step to be moved into the explicit part of the decomposition. By balancing the residual, the accuracy of the local truncation error of the time-stepping method becomes independent from the accuracy by which the implicit equation is solved. In thi...

  2. Explicit signal to noise ratio in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Chova, Luis; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Camps-Valls, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    an alternative kernel MNF (KMNF) in which the noise is explicitly estimated in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space. This enables KMNF dealing with non-linear relations between the noise and the signal features jointly. Results show that the proposed KMNF provides the most noise-free features when confronted...... with PCA, MNF, KPCA, and the previous version of KMNF. Extracted features with the explicit KMNF also improve hyperspectral image classification....

  3. Recent Advances in Explicit Multiparametric Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

    KAUST Repository

    Domínguez, Luis F.

    2011-01-19

    In this paper we present recent advances in multiparametric nonlinear programming (mp-NLP) algorithms for explicit nonlinear model predictive control (mp-NMPC). Three mp-NLP algorithms for NMPC are discussed, based on which novel mp-NMPC controllers are derived. The performance of the explicit controllers are then tested and compared in a simulation example involving the operation of a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR). © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Molecular content of polar-ring galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, F.; Moiseev, A.; Reshetnikov, V.

    2013-06-01

    We have searched for CO lines in a sample of 21 new morphologically determined polar-ring galaxies (of which nine are kinematically confirmed), obtained from a wide search in the Galaxy Zoo project by Moiseev and collaborators. Polar-ring galaxies (PRGs) are a unique class of objects, tracing special episodes in the galaxy mass assembly: they can be formed through galaxy interaction and merging, but also through accretion from cosmic filaments. Furthermore, they enable the study of dark matter haloes in three dimensions. The polar ring itself is a sub-system rich in gas, where molecular gas is expected, and new stars are formed. Among the sample of 21 PRGs, we have detected five CO-rich systems, that can now be followed up with higher spatial resolution. Their average molecular mass is 9.4 × 109M⊙, and their average gas fraction is 27% of their baryonic mass, with a range from 15 to 43%, implying that they have just accreted a large amount of gas. The position of the detected objects in the velocity-magnitude diagram is offset from the Tully-Fisher relation of normal spirals, as was already found for PRGs. This work is part of our multi-wavelength project to determine the detailed morphology and dynamics of PRGs, test through numerical models their formation scenario, and deduce their dark matter content and 3D-shape. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Spectra of detections are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5">130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/554/A11

  5. Cybersex: regulating sexually explicit expression on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, F H

    1996-01-01

    While the First Amendment restricts the power of the government to control access by adults to sexually explicit expression that is not obscene, the government may restrict access by children, provided that those restrictions do not limit adults to reading only "what is fit for children." Controlling access by children presents special problems in the context of broadcasting, because broadcast programming is accessible to children too young to read and because of the impossibility of segregating adults and children in the audience. The Supreme Court therefore permits the government to require "channeling" of sexually explicit programming to times when fewer unsupervised children are in the audience, to facilitate parental control over children's access to sexually explicit material. Although Internet content includes less than one percent of sexually explicit expression, that material has been the subject of intensive media and government attention. Much of that attention ignores (1) the high level of constitutional protection applicable to non-obscene, sexually explicit expression; (2) features of the Internet which facilitate controlling access by children to sexually explicit expression far more effectively than in broadcasting or print media; and (3) the First Amendment values served by permitting expression of all forms on the Internet.

  6. Trends in explicit portrayal of suicidal behavior in popular U.S. movies, 1950-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Patrick Edwin; Romer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Trends in suicidal behavior portrayal in movies may reflect greater societal acceptance of suicide with potential adverse effects on adolescents. To assess the potential for such adverse effects, explicit portrayals of suicidal behavior and the ratings of films were coded in top-grossing U.S. movies from 1950-2006 (N = 855). Suicidal behavior portrayal in films increased linearly from 1950 to 2006. From 1968-1984, movies rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America had 5 times more highly explicit suicide behavior portrayals than did G/PG films. After the adoption of the PG-13 category in 1985, PG-13 and R films were indistinguishable on this measure. The results indicate the need for further study of the effects of suicidal behavior portrayals on adolescent movie audiences.

  7. Information sampling behavior with explicit sampling costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, Mordechai Z.; Gureckis, Todd M.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2015-01-01

    The decision to gather information should take into account both the value of information and its accrual costs in time, energy and money. Here we explore how people balance the monetary costs and benefits of gathering additional information in a perceptual-motor estimation task. Participants were rewarded for touching a hidden circular target on a touch-screen display. The target’s center coincided with the mean of a circular Gaussian distribution from which participants could sample repeatedly. Each “cue” — sampled one at a time — was plotted as a dot on the display. Participants had to repeatedly decide, after sampling each cue, whether to stop sampling and attempt to touch the hidden target or continue sampling. Each additional cue increased the participants’ probability of successfully touching the hidden target but reduced their potential reward. Two experimental conditions differed in the initial reward associated with touching the hidden target and the fixed cost per cue. For each condition we computed the optimal number of cues that participants should sample, before taking action, to maximize expected gain. Contrary to recent claims that people gather less information than they objectively should before taking action, we found that participants over-sampled in one experimental condition, and did not significantly under- or over-sample in the other. Additionally, while the ideal observer model ignores the current sample dispersion, we found that participants used it to decide whether to stop sampling and take action or continue sampling, a possible consequence of imperfect learning of the underlying population dispersion across trials. PMID:27429991

  8. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (US)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a one-meter-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV. (orig.)

  9. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  11. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  12. Age and time effects on implicit and explicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verneau, Marion; van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; de Looze, Michiel P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: It has been proposed that effects of aging are more pronounced for explicit than for implicit motor learning. The authors evaluated this claim by comparing the efficacy of explicit and implicit learning of a movement sequence in young and older adults, and by testing the resilience against fatigue and secondary tasking after learning. It was also examined whether explicit learning in older adults can be promoted by alleviating time constraints during learning. The alternating serial reaction time task (ASRTT) was used. Experiment 1 compared the benefits of receiving full instructions about the stimulus sequence relative to receiving no instructions in young (20-25 years) and older (50-65 years) adults during retention and during transfer to fatigue and secondary task conditions. Experiment 2 alleviated time constraints during the initial bouts of practice with full instructions. Experiment 1 indicated that the older adults learned on the ASRTT and achieved similar performance as young adults when no instructions were given. In contrast to the young adults, learning was not superior in older adults who received full instructions compared with those who did not. Experiment 2 indicated that alleviating time constraints allowed some of the older adults to gain from instruction but only under relatively low time constraints, but there was no retention with rigorous time constraints. Explicit learning, but not implicit learning, declines in older adults. This is partly due to older adults difficulties to apply explicit knowledge. Less rigorous time constraints can help to ameliorate some of these difficulties and may induce levels of explicit learning in older adults that will result in superior performance compared with implicit learning. Implicit learning did occur under time constraints that prevented explicit learning.

  13. Understanding Residential Polarization in a Globalizing City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Rotimi Aliu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the spatial polarization that characterizes the dwellings in the African leading megacity of Lagos. Data were collected through an extensive housing survey carried out on 1,485 household residences in 56 wards within 12 administrative units in Lagos megacity. The spatial dimension of residential density in the city generates three unique residential patterns which are low residential density (LRD, medium residential density (MRD, and high residential density (HRD areas. Descriptive and multivariate inferential statistics were used to render explanations for the spatial variations in the residential quality variables in the study area. Findings indicated that a clear difference exists in the residential quality within the three residential density areas of Lagos. High correlations exist among the residential quality indicators and housing type. The principal component analysis shows that residential polarizations that occur in the LRD, MRD, and HRD are based on the location, dwelling facility, interior and exterior quality, neighborhood integrity, social bond, barrier to entry, and security. The practical implications of residential polarizations along the residential density areas are explicitly expressed.

  14. On Spatially Explicit Models of Cholera Epidemics: Hydrologic controls, environmental drivers, human-mediated transmissions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, A.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Gatto, M.; Casagrandi, R.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2010-12-01

    A recently proposed model for cholera epidemics is examined. The model accounts for local communities of susceptibles and infectives in a spatially explicit arrangement of nodes linked by networks having different topologies. The vehicle of infection (Vibrio cholerae) is transported through the network links which are thought of as hydrological connections among susceptible communities. The mathematical tools used are borrowed from general schemes of reactive transport on river networks acting as the environmental matrix for the circulation and mixing of water-borne pathogens. The results of a large-scale application to the Kwa Zulu (Natal) epidemics of 2001-2002 will be discussed. Useful theoretical results derived in the spatially-explicit context will also be reviewed (like e.g. the exact derivation of the speed of propagation for traveling fronts of epidemics on regular lattices endowed with uniform population density). Network effects will be discussed. The analysis of the limit case of uniformly distributed population density proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. To that extent, it is shown that the ratio between spreading and disease outbreak timescales proves the crucial parameter. The relevance of our results lies in the major differences potentially arising between the predictions of spatially explicit models and traditional compartmental models of the SIR-like type. Our results suggest that in many cases of real-life epidemiological interest timescales of disease dynamics may trigger outbreaks that significantly depart from the predictions of compartmental models. Finally, a view on further developments includes: hydrologically improved aquatic reservoir models for pathogens; human mobility patterns affecting disease propagation; double-peak emergence and seasonality in the spatially explicit epidemic context.

  15. The physics of laser polarized muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, G. D.

    This past research period we carried out a successful experiment at LAMPF in collaboration with Syracuse University in which we used lasers to produce polarized muonic He-3. Samples of nuclear polarized He-3 were produced by spin-exchange with optically pumped rubidium vapor. Unpolarized muons were stopped in the gas, and became polarized due to their hyperfine interaction with the He-3 nucleus. We determined that a muon polarization of approximately 8 percent results with a He-3 target polarization of 100 percent. The high statistical accuracy of our result gives us a firm handle on a theoretical question of great importance to future work involving muons and polarized He-3. Currently, we are working toward a new experiment at LAMPF, for which we have just submitted a proposal requesting running time this coming summer. The experiment utilizes a new technique for producing polarized muonic He-3, a technique we believe has the potential for producing practical polarizations that in principle could be as high as 75 percent, and in practice may exceed 25 to 50 percent. We call this new technique direct spin-exchange (DSE) because it is based on spin-exchange collisions between neutral muonic helium and an optically pumped vapor of Rb. It is direct because, in contrast to the technique we used last summer, the He-3 nucleus is not involved in the spin-exchange process. We have proposed the use of DSE to study the induced pseudoscalar form factor of He-3. Finally, we describe an experiment to measure the spin dependent structure function of the neutron at SLAC. Princeton played an important role in the design and proposal of this experiment, including hosting a meeting to explore the technical feasibility of the polarized He-3 target.

  16. Thalamic volume deficit contributes to procedural and explicit memory impairment in HIV infection with primary alcoholism comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fama, Rosemary; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rohlfing, Torsten; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2014-12-01

    Component cognitive and motor processes contributing to diminished visuomotor procedural learning in HIV infection with comorbid chronic alcoholism (HIV+ALC) include problems with attention and explicit memory processes. The neural correlates associated with this constellation of cognitive and motor processes in HIV infection and alcoholism have yet to be delineated. Frontostriatal regions are affected in HIV infection, frontothalamocerebellar regions are affected in chronic alcoholism, and frontolimbic regions are likely affected in both; all three of these systems have the potential of contributing to both visuomotor procedural learning and explicit memory processes. Here, we examined the neural correlates of implicit memory, explicit memory, attention, and motor tests in 26 HIV+ALC (5 with comorbidity for nonalcohol drug abuse/dependence) and 19 age-range matched healthy control men. Parcellated brain volumes, including cortical, subcortical, and allocortical regions, as well as cortical sulci and ventricles, were derived using the SRI24 brain atlas. Results indicated that smaller thalamic volumes were associated with poorer performance on tests of explicit (immediate and delayed) and implicit (visuomotor procedural) memory in HIV+ALC. By contrast, smaller hippocampal volumes were associated with lower scores on explicit, but not implicit memory. Multiple regression analyses revealed that volumes of both the thalamus and the hippocampus were each unique independent predictors of explicit memory scores. This study provides evidence of a dissociation between implicit and explicit memory tasks in HIV+ALC, with selective relationships observed between hippocampal volume and explicit but not implicit memory, and highlights the relevance of the thalamus to mnemonic processes.

  17. Lexical Ways of Expressing Explicit Politeness in German Linguoculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Рафаэль Аркадьевич Газизов

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with lexical ways of expressing explicit politeness forms in the German linguocultural community. Speech acts of greeting, saying good-bye, apologizing, thanking, requesting, giving advice, offering help and making invitations are used to analyze most frequent means of realization of explicit politeness, the latter acting in verbal communication as a graded phenomenon. The use of modal and introductory verbs, modal particles, adjectives, adverbs, distant and contact communication forms, specific politeness modificators are demonstrated to be most common lexical means of expressing the type of politeness under consideration. Frequency of use of different parts of speech in the structure of etiquette formulas in German allows us to situate politeness at one or another level (high - medium - low i. e. etiquette units implement the category of explicit politeness with various degrees of intensity. The use of the forms expliciting varoius levels of politeness is connected with communicants' specific intentions, such as paying attention, showing interest, mitigating imposition, and implying further incentive to act. The German linguocultural community is characterized by frequent use of neutral forms of expressive speech acts and stylistically elevated forms of incentive statements representing undogmatic and nonurgent forms. To conclude, specific national peculiarities of explicit politeness in German liguoculture are formulated.

  18. Gender differences in implicit and explicit memory for affective passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Leslie A; Rabin, Laura; Vardy, Susan Bernstein; Frohlich, Jonathan; Wyatt, Gwinne; Dimitri, Diana; Constante, Shimon; Guterman, Elan

    2004-04-01

    Thirty-two participants were administered 4 verbal tasks, an Implicit Affective Task, an Implicit Neutral Task, an Explicit Affective Task, and an Explicit Neutral Task. For the Implicit Tasks, participants were timed while reading passages aloud as quickly as possible, but not so quickly that they did not understand. A target verbal passage was repeated three times, and alternated with other previously unread passages. The Implicit Affective and Neutral passages had strong affective or neutral content, respectively. The Explicit Tasks were administered at the end of testing, and consisted of multiple choice questions regarding the passages. Priming effects in terms of more rapid reading speed for the target compared to non-target passages were seen for both the Implicit Affective Task and the Implicit Neutral Task. Overall reading speed was faster for the passages with neutral compared to affective content, consistent with studies of the emotional Stroop effect. For the Explicit memory tasks, overall performance was better on the items from the repeated passage, and on the Affective compared to Neutral Task. The male subjects showed greater priming for affective material than female subjects, and a greater gain than female subjects in explicit memory for affective compared to neutral material.

  19. Coordenadas polares: curvas maravillosas

    OpenAIRE

    Norberto Jaime Chau Pérez; Roy Wil Sánchez Gutiérrez

    2010-01-01

    Se presenta una actividad colaborativa en la que se trabaja el tema coordenadas polares. Se presentan los objetivos de aprendizaje, el desarrollo de la actividad, los conocimientos previos necesarios y recomendaciones para una aplicación posterior.

  20. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  1. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and

  2. Polarization dynamics in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Nils C.; Höpfner, Henning; Lindemann, Markus; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2014-08-01

    Spin-polarized lasers and especially spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (spin-VCSELs) are at- tractive novel spintronic devices providing functionalities and characteristics superior to their conventional purely charge-based counterparts. This applies in particular to ultrafast dynamics, modulation capability and chirp control of directly modulated lasers. Here we demonstrate that ultrafast oscillations of the circular polarization degree can be generated in VCSELs by pulsed spin injection which have the potential to reach frequencies beyond 100 GHz. These oscillations are due to the coupling of the carrier-spin-photon system via the optical birefringence for the linearly polarized laser modes in the micro-cavity and are principally decoupled from conventional relaxation oscillations of the carrier-photon system. Utilizing these polarization oscillations is a very promising path to ultrafast directly modulated spin-VCSELs in the near future as long as an effective concept can be developed to modulate or switch these polarization oscillations. After briefly reviewing the state of research in the emerging field of spin-VCSELs, we present a novel concept for controlled switching of polarization oscillations by use of multiple optical spin injection pulses. Depending on the amplitude and phase conditions of the excitation pulses, constructive or destructive interference of polarization oscillations leads to an excitation, stabilization or switch-off of these oscillations. Furthermore even short single polarization bursts can be generated with pulse widths only limited by the resonance frequency of the polarization oscillation. Consequently, this concept is an important building block for using spin controlled polarization oscillations for future communication applications.

  3. Polarization Versus Agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Martinho, Vítor João Pereira Domingues

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the processes of polarization and agglomeration, to explain the mechanisms and causes of these phenomena in order to identify similarities and differences. As the main implication of this study should be noted that both process pretend to explain the concentration of economic activity and population in certain places, through cumulative phenomena, but with different perspectives, in other words, the polarization with a view of economic development and agglo...

  4. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    associated with the rotation of the extreme density may in itself lead to a stronger growth of ionospheric irregularities . These irregularities may...continue to grow all the way across the polar cap. The result is more efficient creation of ionospheric irregularities . Title 4: Motion of polar...the cusp ionosphere over Svalbard to investigate the production of decameter scale irregularities in the electron plasma associated with HF radar

  5. Regulation of osteoclast polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoyuki; Ejiri, Sadakazu; Yanagisawa, Shigeru; Ozawa, Hidehiro

    2007-07-01

    Osteoclast function consists of several processes: recognition of mineralized tissues, development of ruffled borders and sealing zones, secretion of acids and proteolytic enzymes into the space beneath the ruffled border, and incorporation and secretion of bone degradation products using the transcytosis system. One of the most important questions concerning osteoclast function is how osteoclasts recognize bone and polarize. During the past decade, new approaches have been taken to investigate the regulation of osteoclast polarization. Attachment of osteoclasts to some proteins containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence motif through vitronectin receptors is the first step in inducing the polarization of osteoclasts. Physical properties of bone such as hardness or roughness are also required to induce osteoclast polarity. Osteoclasts cultured even on plastic dishes secrete protons toward the dish surface, suggesting that osteoclasts recognize plastic as a mineralized matrix and secrete protons. This notion was supported by the recent findings that bisphosphonates and reveromycin A were specifically incorporated into polarized osteoclasts cultured even on plastic dishes. On the other hand, a sealing zone, defined as a thick band of actin, is induced in osteoclasts adherent only on an apatite-containing mineralized matrix. These results suggest that osteoclasts recognize physical properties of the mineralized tissue to secrete protons, and also sense apatite itself or components of apatite to form the sealing zone. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of osteoclast polarization. We also discuss how osteoclasts recognize mineralized tissues to form the sealing zone.

  6. Polarizations on abelian varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, A.; Zarhin, Yu. G.

    2002-09-01

    Every isogeny class over an algebraically closed field contains a principally polarized abelian variety ([10, corollary 1 to theorem 4 in section 23]). Howe ([3]; see also [4]) gave examples of isogeny classes of abelian varieties over finite fields with no principal polarizations (but not with the degrees of all the polarizations divisible by a given non-zero integer, as in Theorem 1·1 below). In [17] we obtained, for all odd primes [script l], isogeny classes of abelian varieties in positive characteristic, all of whose polarizations have degree divisible by [script l]2. We gave results in the more general context of invertible sheaves; see also Theorems 6·1 and 5·2 below. Our results gave the first examples for which all the polarizations of the abelian varieties in an isogeny class have degree divisible by a given prime. Inspired by our results in [17], Howe [5] recently obtained, for all odd primes [script l], examples of isogeny classes of abelian varieties over fields of arbitrary characteristic different from [script l] (including number fields), all of whose polarizations have degree divisible by [script l]2.

  7. New explicit methods for the numerical solution of diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David J.

    In this survey paper, Part 1 is concerned with new explicit methods for the finite difference solution of a parabolic partial differential equation in 1 space dimension. The new methods use stable asymmetric approximations to the partial differential equation which when coupled in groups of 2 adjacent points on the grid result in implicit equations which can be easily converted to explicit form which in turn offer many advantages. By judicious use of alternating this strategy on the grid points of the domain results in an algorithm which possesses unconditional stability. Part II briefly surveys existing methods and then an explicit finite difference approximation procedure which is unconditionally stable for the solution of the two-dimensional nonhomogeneous diffusion equation is presented. This method possesses the advantages of the implicit methods, i.e., no severe limitation on the size of the time increment.

  8. Implicit-explicit (IMEX) evolution of single black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Stephen R; Pfeiffer, Harald P

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of binary black holes---an important predictive tool for the detection of gravitational waves---are computationally expensive, especially for binaries with high mass ratios or with rapidly spinning constituent holes. Existing codes for evolving binary black holes rely on explicit timestepping methods for which the timestep size is limited by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. In explicit evolutions of binary black holes, the timestep size is typically orders of magnitude smaller than the relevant physical timescales. Implicit timestepping methods allow for larger timesteps and often reduce the total computational cost. However, fully implicit methods can be difficult to implement for nonlinear evolution systems like the Einstein equations. Therefore, in this paper we explore implicit-explicit (IMEX) methods and use them for the first time to evolve black-hole spacetimes. Specifically, as a first step toward IMEX evolution of a full binary-black-hole spacetime, we develop an IMEX algo...

  9. Explicit Dynamic DDA Method considering Dynamic Contact Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an explicit dynamic DDA method considering dynamic contact force, which aims at solving the problems of low efficiency of dynamic contact detection and the simulation of dynamic contact force in the conventional DDA method. The mutual contact between blocks can be regarded as the application of point loading on a single block, and the corresponding contact submatrix can be calculated and the simultaneous equations of the block system can be integrated. The central difference method is adopted to deduce the explicit expression of block displacement containing dynamic contact force. With the relationship between displacement and dynamic contact force, contact constraint equations of a block system are obtained to calculate the dynamic contact force and the corresponding block displacement. The accuracy of the explicit dynamic DDA method is verified using two numerical cases. The calculation results show that the new DDA method can be applied in large-scale geotechnical engineering.

  10. Explicit Solutions for One-Dimensional Mean-Field Games

    KAUST Repository

    Prazeres, Mariana

    2017-04-05

    In this thesis, we consider stationary one-dimensional mean-field games (MFGs) with or without congestion. Our aim is to understand the qualitative features of these games through the analysis of explicit solutions. We are particularly interested in MFGs with a nonmonotonic behavior, which corresponds to situations where agents tend to aggregate. First, we derive the MFG equations from control theory. Then, we compute explicit solutions using the current formulation and examine their behavior. Finally, we represent the solutions and analyze the results. This thesis main contributions are the following: First, we develop the current method to solve MFG explicitly. Second, we analyze in detail non-monotonic MFGs and discover new phenomena: non-uniqueness, discontinuous solutions, empty regions and unhappiness traps. Finally, we address several regularization procedures and examine the stability of MFGs.

  11. Hybrid fur rendering: combining volumetric fur with explicit hair strands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Grønbeck; Falster, Viggo; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2016-01-01

    Hair is typically modeled and rendered using either explicitly defined hair strand geometry or a volume texture of hair densities. Taken each on their own, these two hair representations have difficulties in the case of animal fur as it consists of very dense and thin undercoat hairs in combination...... with coarse guard hairs. Explicit hair strand geometry is not well-suited for the undercoat hairs, while volume textures are not well-suited for the guard hairs. To efficiently model and render both guard hairs and undercoat hairs, we present a hybrid technique that combines rasterization of explicitly...... defined guard hairs with ray marching of a prismatic shell volume with dynamic resolution. The latter is the key to practical combination of the two techniques, and it also enables a high degree of detail in the undercoat. We demonstrate that our hybrid technique creates a more detailed and soft fur...

  12. Making context explicit for explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brezillon, P. [Univ. Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Intelligent systems may be improved by making context explicit in problem solving. This is a lesson drawn from a study of the reasons why a number of knowledge-based systems (KBSs) failed. We discuss the interest to make context explicit in explanation generation and incremental knowledge acquisition, two important aspects of intelligent systems that aim to cooperate with users. We show how context can be used to better explain and incrementally acquire knowledge. The advantages of using context in explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition are discussed through SEPIT, an expert system for supporting diagnosis and explanation through simulation of power plants. We point out how the limitations of such systems may be overcome by making context explicit.

  13. Control processes in voluntary and explicitly cued task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Michael E J; Carruthers, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Explicitly cued task switching slows performance relative to performing the same task on consecutive trials. This effect appears to be due partly to more efficient encoding of the task cue when the same cue is used on consecutive trials and partly to an additional task-switching process. These components were examined by comparing explicitly cued and voluntary task switching groups, with external cues presented to both groups. Cue-switch effects varied in predictable ways to dissociate explicitly cued and voluntary task switching, whereas task-switch effects had similar characteristics for both instructional groups. The data were well fitted by a mathematical model of task switching that included a cue-encoding mechanism (whereby cue repetition improves performance) and an additional process that was invoked on task-switch trials. Analyses of response-time distributions suggest that this additional process involves task-set reconfiguration that may or may not be engaged before the target stimulus is presented.

  14. Explicit solution of Calderon preconditioned time domain integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2013-07-01

    An explicit marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme for solving Calderon-preconditioned time domain integral equations is proposed. The scheme uses Rao-Wilton-Glisson and Buffa-Christiansen functions to discretize the domain and range of the integral operators and a PE(CE)m type linear multistep to march on in time. Unlike its implicit counterpart, the proposed explicit solver requires the solution of an MOT system with a Gram matrix that is sparse and well-conditioned independent of the time step size. Numerical results demonstrate that the explicit solver maintains its accuracy and stability even when the time step size is chosen as large as that typically used by an implicit solver. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. The time course of explicit and implicit categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Herberger, Eric R; Boomer, Joseph; Roeder, Jessica L; Ashby, F Gregory; Church, Barbara A

    2015-10-01

    Contemporary theory in cognitive neuroscience distinguishes, among the processes and utilities that serve categorization, explicit and implicit systems of category learning that learn, respectively, category rules by active hypothesis testing or adaptive behaviors by association and reinforcement. Little is known about the time course of categorization within these systems. Accordingly, the present experiments contrasted tasks that fostered explicit categorization (because they had a one-dimensional, rule-based solution) or implicit categorization (because they had a two-dimensional, information-integration solution). In Experiment 1, participants learned categories under unspeeded or speeded conditions. In Experiment 2, they applied previously trained category knowledge under unspeeded or speeded conditions. Speeded conditions selectively impaired implicit category learning and implicit mature categorization. These results illuminate the processing dynamics of explicit/implicit categorization.

  16. Parallel PWTD-Accelerated Explicit Solution of the Time Domain Electric Field Volume Integral Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2016-03-25

    A parallel plane-wave time-domain (PWTD)-accelerated explicit marching-on-in-time (MOT) scheme for solving the time domain electric field volume integral equation (TD-EFVIE) is presented. The proposed scheme leverages pulse functions and Lagrange polynomials to spatially and temporally discretize the electric flux density induced throughout the scatterers, and a finite difference scheme to compute the electric fields from the Hertz electric vector potentials radiated by the flux density. The flux density is explicitly updated during time marching by a predictor-corrector (PC) scheme and the vector potentials are efficiently computed by a scalar PWTD scheme. The memory requirement and computational complexity of the resulting explicit PWTD-PC-EFVIE solver scale as ( log ) s s O N N and ( ) s t O N N , respectively. Here, s N is the number of spatial basis functions and t N is the number of time steps. A scalable parallelization of the proposed MOT scheme on distributed- memory CPU clusters is described. The efficiency, accuracy, and applicability of the resulting (parallelized) PWTD-PC-EFVIE solver are demonstrated via its application to the analysis of transient electromagnetic wave interactions on canonical and real-life scatterers represented with up to 25 million spatial discretization elements.

  17. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  18. Accurate thermochemistry from explicitly correlated distinguishable cluster approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Daniel; Kreplin, David; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Manby, Frederick R

    2015-02-14

    An explicitly correlated version of the distinguishable-cluster approximation is presented and extensively benchmarked. It is shown that the usual F12-type explicitly correlated approaches are applicable to distinguishable-cluster theory with single and double excitations, and the results show a significant improvement compared to coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles for closed and open-shell systems. The resulting method can be applied in a black-box manner to systems with single- and multireference character. Most noticeably, optimized geometries are of coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples quality or even better.

  19. Memory Efficient Data Structures for Explicit Verification of Timed Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taankvist, Jakob Haahr; Srba, Jiri; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    Timed analysis of real-time systems can be performed using continuous (symbolic) or discrete (explicit) techniques. The explicit state-space exploration can be considerably faster for models with moderately small constants, however, at the expense of high memory consumption. In the setting of timed......-arc Petri nets, we explore new data structures for lowering the used memory: PTries for efficient storing of configurations and time darts for semi-symbolic description of the state-space. Both methods are implemented as a part of the tool TAPAAL and the experiments document at least one order of magnitude...... of memory savings while preserving comparable verification times....

  20. Labelled Lambda-calculi with Explicit Copy and Erase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Fernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present two rewriting systems that define labelled explicit substitution lambda-calculi. Our work is motivated by the close correspondence between Levy's labelled lambda-calculus and paths in proof-nets, which played an important role in the understanding of the Geometry of Interaction. The structure of the labels in Levy's labelled lambda-calculus relates to the multiplicative information of paths; the novelty of our work is that we design labelled explicit substitution calculi that also keep track of exponential information present in call-by-value and call-by-name translations of the lambda-calculus into linear logic proof-nets.

  1. Stimulated electromagnetic emission polarization under different polarizations of pump waves

    OpenAIRE

    E. D. Tereshchenko; R. Y. Yurik; Baddeley, L.

    2015-01-01

    The results of investigations into the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) polarization under different modes of the pump wave polarization are presented. The present results were obtained in November 2012 during a heating campaign utilizing the SPEAR (Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar) heating facility, transmitting in both O- and X-mode polarization, and a PGI (Polar Geophysical Institute) radio interferometer capable of recording the polarization of the recei...

  2. Circular polarization analyzer with polarization tunable focusing of surface plasmon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Sen; Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yzhang@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Metamaterials and Devices, and Key Laboratory of Terahertz Optoelectronics, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Wang, Xinke [Beijing Key Laboratory for Metamaterials and Devices, and Key Laboratory of Terahertz Optoelectronics, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Kan, Qiang [State Key Laboratory for Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Qu, Shiliang [Optoelectronics Department, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A practical circular polarization analyzer (CPA) that can selectively focus surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at two separate locations, according to the helicity of the circularly polarized light, is designed and experimentally verified in the terahertz frequency range. The CPA consists of fishbone-slit units and is designed using the simulated annealing algorithm. By differentially detecting the intensities of the two SPPs focuses, the helicity of the incident circularly polarized light can be obtained and the CPA is less vulnerable to the noise of incident light. The proposed device may also have wide potential applications in chiral SPPs photonics and the analysis of chiral molecules in biology.

  3. Polarization: A Must for Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidal M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent realistic simulations confirm that the polarization of the fuel would improve significantly the DT fusion efficiency. We have proposed an experiment to test the persistence of the polarization in a fusion process, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the neutrons and the change in the corresponding total cross section are related to the polarization persistence. The experimental polarization of DT fuel is a technological challenge. Possible paths for Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF and for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF are reviewed. For MCF, polarized gas can be used. For ICF, cryogenic targets are required. We consider both, the polarization of gas and the polarization of solid DT, emphasizing the Dynamic Nuclear polarization (DNP of HD and DT molecules.

  4. SYMPOSIUM ON REMOTE SENSING IN THE POLAR REGIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arctic Institute of North America long has been interested in encouraging full and specific attention to applications of remote sensing to polar...research problems. The major purpose of the symposium was to acquaint scientists and technicians concerned with remote sensing with some of the...special problems of the polar areas and, in turn, to acquaint polar scientists with the potential of the use of remote sensing . The Symposium therefore was

  5. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  6. Photon polarization in np fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, G; Kumar, S P

    2003-01-01

    A model-independent irreducible tensor formalism is developed to discuss photon polarization in np fusion. It is shown that photon polarization arising out of the interference of the dominant isovector M1 amplitude at thermal neutron energies with the small isoscalar M1 and E2 amplitudes can be studied with advantage in suitably designed polarized beam and polarized target experiments, where the neutron and proton polarizations are either opposite to each other or orthogonal to each other. (letter to the editor)

  7. A Framework for Explicit Vocabulary Instruction with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.; Tindall, Evie R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic vocabulary development is critical to the success of all learners--particularly English language learners (ELLs). This article presents a framework for integrating explicit academic vocabulary instruction for ELLs into middle school classrooms. The framework embodies five research-based principles and serves as a vehicle for structuring…

  8. Continuous Flattening of a Regular Tetrahedron with Explicit Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ichi Itoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We proved in [10] that each Platonic polyhedron P can be folded into a flat multilayered face of P by a continuous folding process of polyhedra. In this paper, we give explicit formulas of continuous functions for such a continuous flattening process in R³ for a regular tetrahedron.The article is published in the author’s wording.

  9. Efficient explicit formulation for practical fuzzy structural analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents a practical approach based on High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) for analysing the response of structures with fuzzy parameters. The proposed methodology involves integrated finite element modelling, HDMR based response surface generation, and explicit fuzzy analysis procedures.

  10. Effect of explicit dimension instruction on speech category learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Yi, Han-Gyol; Smayda, Kirsten E.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Learning non-native speech categories is often considered a challenging task in adulthood. This difficulty is driven by cross-language differences in weighting critical auditory dimensions that differentiate speech categories. For example, previous studies have shown that differentiating Mandarin tonal categories requires attending to dimensions related to pitch height and direction. Relative to native speakers of Mandarin, the pitch direction dimension is under-weighted by native English speakers. In the current study, we examined the effect of explicit instructions (dimension instruction) on native English speakers' Mandarin tone category learning within the framework of a dual-learning systems (DLS) model. This model predicts that successful speech category learning is initially mediated by an explicit, reflective learning system that frequently utilizes unidimensional rules, with an eventual switch to a more implicit, reflexive learning system that utilizes multidimensional rules. Participants were explicitly instructed to focus and/or ignore the pitch height dimension, the pitch direction dimension, or were given no explicit prime. Our results show that instruction instructing participants to focus on pitch direction, and instruction diverting attention away from pitch height resulted in enhanced tone categorization. Computational modeling of participant responses suggested that instruction related to pitch direction led to faster and more frequent use of multidimensional reflexive strategies, and enhanced perceptual selectivity along the previously underweighted pitch direction dimension. PMID:26542400

  11. The Role of Prosody and Explicit Instruction in Processing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nick; Jackson, Carrie N.; Dimidio, Jack

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the role of prosodic cues and explicit information (EI) in the acquisition of German accusative case markers. We compared 4 groups of 3rd-semester learners (low intermediate level) who completed 1 of 4 Processing Instruction (PI) treatments that manipulated the presence or absence of EI and focused prosody. The results…

  12. Evaluating spatially explicit burn probabilities for strategic fire management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Miller; M.-A. Parisien; A. A. Ager; M. A. Finney

    2008-01-01

    Spatially explicit information on the probability of burning is necessary for virtually all strategic fire and fuels management planning activities, including conducting wildland fire risk assessments, optimizing fuel treatments, and prevention planning. Predictive models providing a reliable estimate of the annual likelihood of fire at each point on the landscape have...

  13. Explicit- and Implicit Bullying Attitudes in Relation to Bullying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goethem, Anne A. J.; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly developed measures of implicit bullying attitudes (a…

  14. Explicit versus Implicit Social Cognition Testing in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents…

  15. Explicit derivation of a new hyper-Kaehler metric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedra, M.B. [Univ. Ibn Tofail, Kenitra (Morocco). Dept. de Phys.]|[Universite Mohammed V, Faculte des Sciences, Departement de Physique, UFR Physique des Hautes Energies, B.P. 1400, Rabat (Morocco)

    1998-03-09

    Using the harmonic superspace techniques in D=2 N=4, we present an explicit derivation of a new hyper-Kaehler metric associated to the Toda-like self-interaction H{sup 4+}({omega},u)=({xi}{sup ++}/{lambda}){sup 2} exp(2{lambda}{omega}). Some important features are also discussed. (orig.). 12 refs.

  16. Dissociating explicit and implicit effects of cross-media advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandeberg, L.; Murre, J.M.J.; Voorveld, H.A.M.; Smit, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of cross-media advertising effects is mainly based on explicit psychological measures, such as self-reports. To fully understand the mechanisms responsible for the success of cross-media advertising, it is important to also use implicit measures. We used both types of measures to assess

  17. Some explicit expressions for the probability distribution of force ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Recently, empirical investigations have suggested that the components of contact forces follow the exponential distribution. However, explicit expressions for the probability distribution of the corresponding force magnitude have not been known and only approximations have been used in the literature. In this note ...

  18. Some explicit expressions for the probability distribution of force ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, empirical investigations have suggested that the components of contact forces follow the exponential distribution. However, explicit expressions for the probability distribution of the corresponding force magnitude have not been known and only approximations have been used in the literature. In this note, for the ...

  19. Explicit and implicit attitude toward an emerging food technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Gerben A.; Fischer, Arnout R.H.; Tobi, Hilde; Trijp, van Hans C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cultured meat is an unfamiliar emerging food technology that could provide a near endless supply of high quality protein with a relatively small ecological footprint. To understand consumer acceptance of cultured meat, this study investigated the influence of information provision on the explicit

  20. Implicit and Explicit Learning in Individuals with Agrammatic Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchard, Julia; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Implicit learning is a process of acquiring knowledge that occurs without conscious awareness of learning, whereas explicit learning involves the use of overt strategies. To date, research related to implicit learning following stroke has been largely restricted to the motor domain and has rarely addressed implications for language. The present…

  1. Enhancing "Reading Mastery" Programs Using Explicit "Reading to Learn" Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.; McGlocklin, Linda M.; Miller, Darcey E.; Martella, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    Vocabulary and text comprehension strategies are acknowledged as critical components of any comprehensive reading program. This article highlights the scientifically-based research on effective reading instruction related to vocabulary and comprehension development. Specifically, the article provides explicit formats integrating these important…

  2. Usefulness of spatially explicit population models in land management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arthaud, G.J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Engstrom, R.T. [Tall Timbers Research, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hejl, S.J. [US Forest Service, Missoula, MT (United States); Liu, Jianguo [Harvard Institute for International Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Loeb, S. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); McKelvey, K. [US Forest Service, Arcata, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Land managers need new tools, such as spatial models, to aid them in their decision-making processes because managing for biodiversity, water quality, or natural disturbance is challenging, and landscapes are complex and dynamic. Spatially explicit population models are helpful to managers because these models consider both species - habitat relationships and the arrangement of habitats in space and time. The visualizations that typically accompany spatially explicit models also permit managers to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the effects of alternative management strategies on populations of interest. However, the expense entailed in developing the data bases required for spatially explicit models may limit widespread implementation. In addition, many of the models are developed for one or a few species, and dealing with multiple species in a landscape remains a significant challenge. To be most useful to land managers, spatially explicit population models should be user friendly, easily portable, operate on spatial and temporal scales appropriate to management decisions, and use input and output variables that can be measured affordably. 20 refs.

  3. The Order of Explicit Information in Processing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty Diaz, Erin

    2017-01-01

    The two main components of Processing Instruction (PI) are Explicit Information (EI) and Structured Input (SI). Most researchers have concluded that the SI is more responsible for learner gains than the EI (Benati, 2004a, 2004b; VanPatten & Oikennon, 1996; Wong, 2004). However, some researchers have found that EI does significantly impact…

  4. The Role of Explicit Need Strength for Emotions during Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flunger, Barbara; Pretsch, Johanna; Schmitt, Manfred; Ludwig, Peter

    2013-01-01

    According to self-determination theory, the satisfaction of the basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness influences achievement emotions and situational interest. The present study investigated whether domain-specific explicit need strength moderated the impact of need satisfaction/dissatisfaction on the outcomes achievement emotions…

  5. Differential developmental profiles of adolescents using sexually explicit internet material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornwaard, S.M.; van den Eijnden, R.J.J.M.; Overbeek, G.; ter Bogt, T.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a person-centered approach to examine whether different developmental trajectories of boys’ and girls’ use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) exist, which factors predict these trajectories, and whether sexual behavior develops differently for adolescents in these

  6. Differential Developmental Profiles of Adolescents Using Sexually Explicit Internet Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornwaard, Suzan M.; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M; Overbeek, Geertjan; ter Bogt, Tom F M

    2015-01-01

    This study used a person-centered approach to examine whether different developmental trajectories of boys' and girls' use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) exist, which factors predict these trajectories, and whether sexual behavior develops differently for adolescents in these

  7. Urban and regional design : Making the design process explicit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dooren, E.J.G.C.; Willekens, L.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Urban and regional design are fundamental skills in the field of urban studies. Designing is a complex, personal, creative and open-ended skill. Performing a well-developed skill is mainly an implicit activity. In teaching, however, it is essential to make explicit what to do. Learning a complex

  8. Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-08-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 carefully matched typically developing controls completed the Dewey Story Test. 'Explicit' (multiple-choice answering format) and 'implicit' (free interview) measures of social cognition were obtained. Autism spectrum disorder participants did not differ from controls regarding explicit social cognition performance. However, the autism spectrum disorder group performed more poorly than controls on implicit social cognition performance in terms of spontaneous perspective taking and social awareness. Findings suggest that social cognition alterations in autism spectrum disorder are primarily implicit in nature and that an apparent absence of social cognition difficulties on certain tests using rather explicit testing formats does not necessarily mean social cognition typicality in autism spectrum disorder. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Arabic Handwritten Word Recognition Using HMMs with Explicit State Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sellami

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe an offline unconstrained Arabic handwritten word recognition system based on segmentation-free approach and discrete hidden Markov models (HMMs with explicit state duration. Character durations play a significant part in the recognition of cursive handwriting. The duration information is still mostly disregarded in HMM-based automatic cursive handwriting recognizers due to the fact that HMMs are deficient in modeling character durations properly. We will show experimentally that explicit state duration modeling in the HMM framework can significantly improve the discriminating capacity of the HMMs to deal with very difficult pattern recognition tasks such as unconstrained Arabic handwriting recognition. In order to carry out the letter and word model training and recognition more efficiently, we propose a new version of the Viterbi algorithm taking into account explicit state duration modeling. Three distributions (Gamma, Gauss, and Poisson for the explicit state duration modeling have been used, and a comparison between them has been reported. To perform word recognition, the described system uses an original sliding window approach based on vertical projection histogram analysis of the word and extracts a new pertinent set of statistical and structural features from the word image. Several experiments have been performed using the IFN/ENIT benchmark database and the best recognition performances achieved by our system outperform those reported recently on the same database.

  10. Explicit expression for effective moment of inertia of RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Patel

    Full Text Available AbstractDeflection is an important design parameter for structures subjected to service load. This paper provides an explicit expression for effective moment of inertia considering cracking, for uniformly distributed loaded reinforced concrete (RC beams. The proposed explicit expression can be used for rapid prediction of short-term deflection at service load. The explicit expression has been obtained from the trained neural network considering concrete cracking, tension stiffening and entire practical range of reinforcement. Three significant structural parameters have been identified that govern the change in effective moment of inertia and therefore deflection. These three parameters are chosen as inputs to train neural network. The training data sets for neural network are generated using finite element software ABAQUS. The explicit expression has been validated for a number of simply supported and continuous beams and it is shown that the predicted deflections have reasonable accuracy for practical purpose. A sensitivity analysis has been performed, which indicates substantial dependence of effective moment of inertia on the selected input parameters.

  11. "See Translation": Explicit and Implicit Language Policies on Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendus, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The currently tested "See Translation" button can be considered an expression of Facebook's explicit language policy. It offers the users fast and easy translations of others' status updates and can therefore be seen as diminishing language barriers and reducing the need for a lingua franca in polylingual networks, thus enhancing…

  12. Euphemism vs explicitness: A corpus-based analysis of translated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Euphemism vs explicitness: A corpus-based analysis of translated taboo words from English to Zimbabwean Ndebele. ... This finding endorses the argument that selected strategies have the capacity to influence the linguistic and cultural acceptability and/or non-acceptability of translated texts. Most Ndebele translators ...

  13. The Impact of Explicit Deposit Insurance on Market Discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ioannidou, V.; de Dreu, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the impact of explicit deposit insurance on market discipline in a framework that resembles a natural experiment.We improve upon previous studies by exploiting a unique combination of country-specific circumstances, design features, and data availability that allows us to

  14. Explicit Solutions and Conservation Laws of a Coupled Burgers' Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Li, Fang; Li, Yihao; Sun, Mingming

    2017-08-01

    Based on the gauge transformation between the corresponding 3×3 matrix spectral problems, N-fold Darboux transformation for a coupled Burgers' equation is constructed. Considering the N=1 case of the derived Darboux transformation, explicit solutions for the coupled Burgers' equation are given and their figures are plotted. Moreover, conservation laws of this integrable equation are deduced.

  15. Explicit predictability and dispersion scaling exponents in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Francois G. [CNRS, UMR 8013 ELICO, Wimereux Marine Station, University of Lille 1, 28 av. Foch, 62930 Wimereux (France)]. E-mail: francois.schmitt@univ-lille1.fr

    2005-07-25

    We apply a simple method to provide explicit expressions for different scaling exponents in intermittent fully developed turbulence, that before were only given through a Legendre transform. This includes predictability exponents for infinitesimal and noninfinitesimal perturbations, Lagrangian velocity exponents, and dispersion exponents. We obtain also new results concerning inverse statistics corresponding to exit-time moments.

  16. Explicit Instruction, Bilingualism, and the Older Adult Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jessica G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about older adult language learners and effects of aging on L2 learning. This study investigated learning in older age through interactions of learner-internal and -external variables; specifically, late-learned L2 (bilingualism) and provision of grammar explanation (explicit instruction, EI). Forty-three older adults (age 60+) who…

  17. accurate, explicit pipe sizing formula for turbulent flows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    This paper develops an explicit formula for computing the diameter of pipes, which is applicable to all turbulent ... cifically tailored to water distribution pipes, in .... this study. Substituting Eqns. 4 and 5 in Eqn. 9a and rearranging, yields o f. fRD.

  18. Explicit- and implicit bullying attitudes in relation to bullying behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, A.A.J.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Wiers, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly

  19. Explicit- and Implicit Bullying Attitudes in Relation to Bullying Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goethem, A.A.J. van; Scholte, R.H.J.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly

  20. Technical Note: Accurate, Explicit Pipe Sizing Formula For Turbulent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper develops an explicit formula for computing the diameter of pipes, which is applicable to all turbulent flows. The formula not only avoids iteration but still estimates pipe diameters over the entire range of turbulent flows with an error of less than 4% in the worst cases. This is superior to (without requiring a higher ...

  1. Explicit design for real estate education : The management game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, P.; Van Dooren, E.J.G.C.; Den Heijer, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    In positioning the design school versus the business school, the management game as an educational module in the last semester of the architectural bachelor in Delft is illustrative for the possible synthesis between real estate and architecture. The explicit approach of design, as applied in Delft

  2. Implicit and explicit self-esteem in remitted depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeijers, D.; Vrijsen, J.N.; Oostrom, I.I. van; Isaac, L.; Speckens, A.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives: Low self-esteem is a symptom of depression and depression vulnerability. Prior research on self-esteem has largely focused on implicit (ISE) and explicit self-esteem (ESE) as two separate constructs, missing their interaction. Therefore, the current study investigated the

  3. Challenging Stereotypes about Academic Writing: Complexity, Elaboration, Explicitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Douglas; Gray, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    The stereotypical view of professional academic writing is that it is grammatically complex, with elaborated structures, and with meaning relations expressed explicitly. In contrast, spoken registers, especially conversation, are believed to have the opposite characteristics. Our goal in the present paper is to challenge these stereotypes, based…

  4. Explicit grammar teaching in EAL classrooms: Suggestions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of the subject English Additional Language (EAL) to serve as a strong support subject in explicitly teaching learners the grammar of English is suggested as an interim solution to the effects of the non-implementation of the 1997 South African Language in Education Policy. To identify specific grammatical ...

  5. General Equilibrium in a Nutshell: An Explicit Function Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a general equilibrium model that fills the gap between the general function models described in price-theory textbooks and the numerical practice of general equilibrium analysis used in contemporary policy assessment. This model uses explicit mathematical forms but general parameter values. Includes graphs and statistical tables. (MJP)

  6. An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm for aerodynamic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann-Tuitman, B.E.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    1997-01-01

    An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm with applications to aerodynamic flows is presented. In the algorithm, in different parts of the computational domain different time steps are taken, and the flow is synchronized at the so-called synchronization levels. The algorithm is validated for

  7. Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Sex and Romance in Asexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, Maria; Izuma, Keise

    2017-03-31

    Despite the recent surge of interest in sexuality, asexuality has remained relatively underresearched. Distinct from abstinence or chastity, asexuality refers to a lack of sexual attraction toward others. Past research suggests asexuals have negative attitudes toward sex, though no research has examined implicit attitudes. While preliminary evidence suggests that many asexuals are interested in engaging in romantic relationships, these attitudes have yet to be examined thoroughly, implicitly, or compared with a control group. This study investigated explicit and implicit attitudes toward sex and romance in a group of asexuals (N = 18, age M = 21.11) and a group of controls (N = 27, age M = 21.81), using the Asexuality Identification Scale (AIS), the Triangular Love Scale (TLS), semantic differentials, an Implicit Association Task (IAT), and two Single Category IATs. It was found that asexuals exhibited more negative explicit and implicit attitudes toward sex, as well as more negative explicit attitudes toward romance, relative to controls. There was no significant difference between groups on implicit romantic attitudes. Moreover, aromantic asexuals demonstrated significantly more negative explicit attitudes toward romance than romantic asexuals, though there was no significant difference between groups on implicit measures. Explanations and implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. accurate, explicit pipe sizing formula for turbulent flows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    ABSTRACT. This paper develops an explicit formula for computing the diameter of pipes, which is applicable to all turbulent flows. The formula not only avoids iteration but still estimates pipe diameters over the entire range of turbulent flows with an error of less than 4% in the worst cases. This is superior to (without ...

  9. Explicit presentation of the Colebrook's friction factor equation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two explicit and very accurate equations for calculating the friction factor of pipes over the entire range of relative roughness and Reynold's Number covered by the Colebrook's Equation have been developed. A rectangular array of relative Roughness and Reynold's Number was used to test the accuracy of the new ...

  10. Physics of polarized targets

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  11. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...... polarization response when compared to traditional integral chargeability inversion. The quality of the inversion results has been assessed by a complete uncertainty analysis of the model parameters; furthermore, borehole information confirm the outcomes of the field interpretations. With this new accurate...

  12. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  13. Ionization in elliptically polarized pulses: Multielectron polarization effects and asymmetry of photoelectron momentum distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvetsov-Shilovskiy, Nikolay; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    in close to circularly polarized light, and it is validated by comparison with ab initio results and experiments. The momentum distributions are shown to be highly sensitive to the tunneling exit point, the Coulomb force, and the dipole potential from the induced dipole in the atomic core......In the tunneling regime we present a semiclassical model of above-threshold ionization with inclusion of the Stark shift of the initial state, the Coulomb potential, and a polarization induced dipole potential. The model is used for the investigation of the photoelectron momentum distributions...

  14. The Role of Explicit and Impelicit Memory in Stutteres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golavizh Karimi-Javan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stuttering is one of the most common speech disorders. However, its etiology is poorly understood, and is likely to be heterogeneous. Impairment of cognitive functions such as emotional memory and attention is one of the important factors. The aim of this research is to compare explicit and implicit memory between stutterers and normal individuals and also comparison of anxiety and depression between 2 groups. Materials & Methods: This is a case-control and analytical research.The participated individuals in this research were 30 male and female stutterers and the same number as the matched control group. The control group was matched for gender, age, education and bilingualism. The cue recall task performed to investigate explicit memory and the word stem completing task for implicit memory. The anxiety and depression of the individuals were measured by using general Hygiene Questionnaire (GHQ28 in this study. The performance of the individuals was measured based on positive and negative words in explicit and implicit memory and was compared with anxiety and depression score they obtained. Data was analyzed by using independent T-test, paired T-test, U-Man Witney and Willkaxon test. Results: The data indicated that stutterers recognized less emotionally positive words in explicit memory as compared with nonstutterers. Also, stutterers recognized more emotionally negative words as compared with emotionally positive words in explicit and implicit memory tasks (P<0/05. Additionally, stutterers showed more anxiety and depression as compared to nonstutterers. This difference was significant except for depression (P0.05. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the role of cognitive functions including emotional memory in motor speech programming and the difference in the function of positive versus negative emotional memories between stutterers and nonstutterers in this research, the role of emotional memory can be considered as an important

  15. The role of electrostatic interactions and solvent polarity on the 15N NMR shielding of azines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Gester, Rodrigo M.; Manzoni, Vinícius

    2017-10-01

    The nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (15N NMR) shielding of azines is very sensitive to the chemical environment. Theoretically, specific interactions are important on the calculation of their spectroscopic properties. However, the choice of the solvent model for the description of NMR shielding constants is still a subject of discussion. In this context, we analyse the role of electrostatic interactions on 15N NMR shielding as function of solvent polarity using the sequential-Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics approach methodology. Excellent agreement with experimental data of the NMR shielding was obtained without the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules either for polar or non polar solvents.

  16. A constructive model potential method for atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1974-01-01

    A model potential method is presented that can be applied to many electron single centre and two centre systems. The development leads to a Hamiltonian with terms arising from core polarization that depend parametrically upon the positions of the valence electrons. Some of the terms have been introduced empirically in previous studies. Their significance is clarified by an analysis of a similar model in classical electrostatics. The explicit forms of the expectation values of operators at large separations of two atoms given by the model potential method are shown to be equivalent to the exact forms when the assumption is made that the energy level differences of one atom are negligible compared to those of the other.

  17. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  18. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  19. Polarization division multiple access with polarization modulation for LOS wireless communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Bin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we discuss a potential multiple access and modulation scheme based on polarized states (PS of electromagnetic (EM waves for line-of-sight (LOS communications. The proposed scheme is theoretic different from the existing polar modulation for EDGE and WCDMA systems. We propose the detailed bit representation (modulation and multiple access scheme using PS. Because of the inflexibility of polarization information in the time and frequency domains, as well as independence of frequency and space, the polarization information can be used independently for wireless communications, i.e., another independent resource domain that can be utilized. Due to the independence between the PS and the specific features of signals (such as waveform, bandwidth and data rate, the discussed polarization division multiple access (PDMA and polarization modulation (PM are expected to improve the spectrum utilization effectively. It is proved that the polarization filtering technique can be adopted in the PDMA-PM wireless communications to separate the multiuser signals and demodulate the bit information representing by PS for desired user. Some theoretical analysis is done to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme, and the simulation results are made to evaluate the performance of the suggested system.

  20. Spatially explicit multimedia fate models for pollutants in Europe: state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistocchi, A; Sarigiannis, D A; Vizcaino, P

    2010-08-15

    A review by Hollander et al. (in preparation), discusses the relative potentials, advantages and shortcomings of spatial and non spatial models of chemical fate, highlighting that spatially explicit models may be needed for specific purposes. The present paper reviews the state of the art in spatially explicit chemical fate and transport modeling in Europe. We summarize the three main approaches currently adopted in spatially explicit modeling, namely (1) multiple box models, (2) numerical solutions of simultaneous advection-dispersion equations (ADE) in air, soil and water, and (3) the development of meta-models. As all three approaches experience limitations, we describe in further detail geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling as an alternative approach allowing a simple, yet spatially explicit description of chemical fate. We review the input data needed, and the options available for their retrieval at the European scale. We also discuss the importance of, and limitations in model evaluation. We observe that the high uncertainty in chemical emissions and physico-chemical behavior in the environment make realistic simulations difficult to obtain. Therefore we envisage a shift in model use from process simulation to hypothesis testing, in which explaining the discrepancies between observed and computed chemical concentrations in the environment takes importance over prediction per se. This shift may take advantage of using simple models in GIS with residual uses of complex models for detailed studies. It also calls for tighter joint interpretation of models and spatially distributed monitoring datasets, and more refined spatial representation of environmental drivers such as landscape and climate variables, and better emission estimates. In summary, we conclude that the problem is not "how to compute" (i.e. emphasis on numerical methods, spatial/temporal discretization, quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis...) but "what to compute" (i

  1. Core polarization and non local response of metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Pederiva, F. [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1992-12-31

    The random phase approximation is generalized to include the effects of core polarization and non local potentials. Core polarization can explain the blue shift of the dipole mode recently observed in silver clusters. Non local effects introduce in the dipole frequency a dependence on the crystalline mass which is crucial to explain the data in lithium. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs.

  2. Topological px+ipy superfluid phase of fermionic polar molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsen, J.; Cooper, N.R.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the topological px+ipy superfluid phase in a 2D gas of single-component fermionic polar molecules dressed by a circularly polarized microwave field. This phase emerges because the molecules may interact with each other via a potential Vo(r) that has an attractive dipole-dipole 1/r^3 tail,

  3. Moral opinion polarization and the erosion of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    generalized trust, we focus on opinion polarization as another potential impact factor on trust. In more detail, we investigate the extent to which polarization over morally charged issues such as homsexuality, abortion and euthanasia affects individuals' likelihood to trust others. We hypothesize that moral...

  4. Moderating Effects of Mathematics Anxiety on the Effectiveness of Explicit Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grays, Sharnita D.; Rhymer, Katrina N.; Swartzmiller, Melissa D.

    2017-01-01

    Explicit timing is an empirically validated intervention to increase problem completion rates by exposing individuals to a stopwatch and explicitly telling them of the time limit for the assignment. Though explicit timing has proven to be effective for groups of students, some students may not respond well to explicit timing based on factors such…

  5. South Polar Region of Mars: Topography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The polar layered deposits of Mars represent potentially important volatile reservoirs and tracers for the planet's geologically recent climate history. Unlike the north polar cap, the uppermost surface of the bright residual south polar deposit is probably composed of carbon dioxide ice. It is unknown whether this ice extends through the entire thickness of the deposit. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL), launched in January 1999, is due to arrive in December 1999 to search for water and carbon dioxide on layered deposits near the south pole (SP) of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Acquiring negative polarity items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) are words or expressions that exhibit a restricted distribution to certain negative contexts only. For example, yet is an NPI and must appear in the scope of a negation: Mary has *(not) finished yet. The existence of NPIs such as yet gives rise to a learnability

  7. Polarized structure functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, P.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the spin structure of quarks in hadrons, in particular the transverse spin polarization or transversity. The most direct way to probe transversity appears to be via azimuthal spin asymmetries. This brings in the role of intrinsic transverse momenta of quarks in hadrons and the study of

  8. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  9. Acquisition of Oocyte Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Mara; Marlow, Florence L

    2017-01-01

    Acquisition of oocyte polarity involves complex translocation and aggregation of intracellular organelles, RNAs, and proteins, along with strict posttranscriptional regulation. While much is still unknown regarding the formation of the animal-vegetal axis, an early marker of polarity, animal models have contributed to our understanding of these early processes controlling normal oogenesis and embryo development. In recent years, it has become clear that proteins with self-assembling properties are involved in assembling discrete subcellular compartments or domains underlying subcellular asymmetries in the early mitotic and meiotic cells of the female germline. These include asymmetries in duplication of the centrioles and formation of centrosomes and assembly of the organelle and RNA-rich Balbiani body, which plays a critical role in oocyte polarity. Notably, at specific stages of germline development, these transient structures in oocytes are temporally coincident and align with asymmetries in the position and arrangement of nuclear components, such as the nuclear pore and the chromosomal bouquet and the centrioles and cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm. Formation of these critical, transient structures and arrangements involves microtubule pathways, intrinsically disordered proteins (proteins with domains that tend to be fluid or lack a rigid ordered three-dimensional structure ranging from random coils, globular domains, to completely unstructured proteins), and translational repressors and activators. This review aims to examine recent literature and key players in oocyte polarity.

  10. No More Polarization, Please!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...

  11. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-03-17

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

  12. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-07

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  13. 45∘ Relative Orientations of Planes of Polarizations States of Gravitational Waves and the Graviton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves calls for, not just in words or by plausible arguments, of an explicit derivation of polarization aspects of gravitational waves with emphasis, especially, on the non-trivial aspect of the relative 45∘ orientations of the planes of polarization states of gravitation in the same way as has been done over the years for the far simpler case involving electromagnetic wave propagation with the well known relative 90∘ between its polarization states. The purpose of this communication is to carry out in a covariant description as well as by giving special attention to the underlying gauge problem these polarization aspects via a direct consideration of the graviton propagator in a quantum field theory setting from which fundamental properties of polarizations are readily extracted.

  14. Phase Equilibrium Calculations for Multi-Component Polar Fluid Mixtures with tPC-PSAFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakatsani, Eirini; Economou, Ioannis

    2007-01-01

    to most other SAFT versions, tPC-PSAFT accounts explicitly for polar forces. Three pure-component parameters are required for non-polar and non-associating compounds, two additional parameters characterize the association contribution and one parameter is needed to account for polar interactions......The truncated Perturbed-Chain Polar Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (tPC-PSAFT) is applied to a number of different mixtures, including binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of components that differ substantially in terms of intermolecular interactions and molecular size. In contrast....... The experimental dipole and/or quadrupole moment and/or polarizability of the component are used to calculate polar interactions. Using a temperature-independent interaction parameter kij for each binary system, tPC-PSAFT provides accurate prediction of multi-component phase behavior over a wide range...

  15. Partial spin polarization of a conductance in a bi-layer In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As heterostructure based nanowire for the rectangular and the smooth lateral confinement potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-03-01

    We simulate the electron transport in a vertical bi-layer nanowire in order to study an influence of the lateral confinement's shape on a spin polarization of wire's conductance. The active part of considered quantum wire constitutes a double inverted heterojunction In0.52 Al0.48 As /In0.53 Ga0.47 As which nanostructure can be fabricated in molecular beam epitaxy process while the lateral confinement potential can be finally formed by means of cleaved overgrowth or surface oxidization methods giving the desired rectangular and smooth lateral confinement. In calculations we take into account interaction between charge carriers using DFT within local spin density approximation. We show that if the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wire axis, the pseudogaps are opened in energy dispersion relation E (k) what in conjunction with spin Zeeman shift of spin-up and spin-down subbands may enhance the spin polarization of conductance with reference to a single layer wire. For nanowire with rectangular lateral confinement potential we found that the electron density has two maximums localized at wire edges in each layers. This modificates strongly all magnetosubbands giving up to four energy minimums in lowest subband and considerably diminishes widths of pseudogaps what translates into low maximal spin polarization of conductance, not exceeding 40%. This drawback is absent in wire with smooth lateral confinement. However, in order to gain a large spin polarization simultaneous tuning of magnetic field as well as the Fermi energies in both layers of nanowire are required.

  16. Discrepancies between implicit and explicit motivation and unhealthy eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Oertig, Daniela; Brandstätter, Veronika; Allemand, Mathias

    2010-08-01

    Many people change their eating behavior as a consequence of stress. One source of stress is intrapersonal psychological conflict as caused by discrepancies between implicit and explicit motives. In the present research, we examined whether eating behavior is related to this form of stress. Study 1 (N=53), a quasi-experimental study in the lab, showed that the interaction between the implicit achievement motive disposition and explicit commitment toward an achievement task significantly predicts the number of snacks consumed in a consecutive taste test. In cross-sectional Study 2 (N=100), with a sample of middle-aged women, overall motive discrepancy was significantly related to diverse indices of unsettled eating. Regression analyses revealed interaction effects specifically for power and achievement motivation and not for affiliation. Emotional distress further partially mediated the relationship between the overall motive discrepancy and eating behavior.

  17. Parallel alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Łoś, Marcin

    2015-04-27

    In this paper we present a parallel implementation of the alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics. The Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm, belongs to the category of matrix-splitting iterative methods, was proposed almost six decades ago for solving parabolic and elliptic partial differential equations, see [1–4]. The new version of this algorithm has been recently developed for isogeometric simulations of two dimensional explicit dynamics [5] and steady-state diffusion equations with orthotropic heterogenous coefficients [6]. In this paper we present a parallel version of the alternating direction implicit algorithm for three dimensional simulations. The algorithm has been incorporated as a part of PETIGA an isogeometric framework [7] build on top of PETSc [8]. We show the scalability of the parallel algorithm on STAMPEDE linux cluster up to 10,000 processors, as well as the convergence rate of the PCG solver with ADI algorithm as preconditioner.

  18. An Explicit Numerical Method for the Fractional Cable Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Quintana-Murillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit numerical method to solve a fractional cable equation which involves two temporal Riemann-Liouville derivatives is studied. The numerical difference scheme is obtained by approximating the first-order derivative by a forward difference formula, the Riemann-Liouville derivatives by the Grünwald-Letnikov formula, and the spatial derivative by a three-point centered formula. The accuracy, stability, and convergence of the method are considered. The stability analysis is carried out by means of a kind of von Neumann method adapted to fractional equations. The convergence analysis is accomplished with a similar procedure. The von-Neumann stability analysis predicted very accurately the conditions under which the present explicit method is stable. This was thoroughly checked by means of extensive numerical integrations.

  19. Explicit estimating equations for semiparametric generalized linear latent variable models

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2010-07-05

    We study generalized linear latent variable models without requiring a distributional assumption of the latent variables. Using a geometric approach, we derive consistent semiparametric estimators. We demonstrate that these models have a property which is similar to that of a sufficient complete statistic, which enables us to simplify the estimating procedure and explicitly to formulate the semiparametric estimating equations. We further show that the explicit estimators have the usual root n consistency and asymptotic normality. We explain the computational implementation of our method and illustrate the numerical performance of the estimators in finite sample situations via extensive simulation studies. The advantage of our estimators over the existing likelihood approach is also shown via numerical comparison. We employ the method to analyse a real data example from economics. © 2010 Royal Statistical Society.

  20. TACIT, EXPLICIT, AND CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE IN DEMAND PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉ EDUARDO MIRANDA DOS SANTOS

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Demand planning consists in a set of steps which evolves two main types of knowledge: tacit and explicit. It is under these types of knowledge that the present article was developed. It aimed at relating the concept of demand planning with knowledge management, but delimited to its tacit, explicit, and cultural knowledge components. An exploratory research was done with five companies. Therefore, the study was characterized as multicases and evolded enterviews, observations, and documents analysis. The analysis was made by content analysis. The results evidenced the presence of a set of components related to the three types of knowledge in demand planning like: information technology tools, professional experience, collective interation, social relations, and a corporative view, which leads the company´ business.

  1. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Gaalswyk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different.

  2. Enhanced polarization by the coherent heterophase interface between polar and non-polar phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Yeop; Sung, Kil-Dong; Rhyim, Youngmok; Yoon, Seog-Young; Kim, Min-Soo; Jeong, Soon-Jong; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ryu, Jungho; Kim, Sung-Dae; Choi, Si-Young

    2016-04-14

    A piezoelectric composite containing the ferroelectric polar (Bi(Na0.8K0.2)0.5TiO3: f-BNKT) and the non-polar (0.94Bi(Na0.75K0.25)0.5TiO3-0.06BiAlO3: BNKT-BA) phases exhibits synergetic properties which combine the beneficial aspects of each phase, i.e., the high saturated polarization (Ps) of the polar phase and the low coercive field (Ec) of the non-polar phase. To understand the origin of such a fruitful outcome from this type of polar/non-polar heterophase structure, comprehensive studies are conducted, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finite element method (FEM) analyses. The TEM results show that the polar/non-polar composite has a core/shell structure in which the polar phase (core) is surrounded by a non-polar phase (shell). In situ electrical biasing TEM experiments visualize that the ferroelectric domains in the polar core are aligned even under an electric field of ∼1 kV mm(-1), which is much lower than its intrinsic coercive field (∼3 kV mm(-1)). From the FEM analyses, we can find that the enhanced polarization of the polar phase is promoted by an additional internal field at the phase boundary which originates from the preferential polarization of the relaxor-like non-polar phase. From the present study, we conclude that the coherent interface between polar and non-polar phases is a key factor for understanding the enhanced piezoelectric properties of the composite.

  3. Explicit proton transfer in classical molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Maarten G.; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We present Hydrogen Dynamics (HYDYN), a method that allows explicit proton transfer in classical force field molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. HYDYN reproduces the characteristic properties of the excess proton in water, from the special pair dance, to the continuous fluctuation between the limiting Eigen and Zundel complexes, and the water reorientation beyond the first solvation layer. Advantages of HYDYN with respect to existing methods are computational efficien...

  4. Explicit formulas for reaction probability in reaction-diffusion experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Feres, Renato; Wallace, Matthew; Stern, Ari; Yablonsky, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    A computational procedure is developed for determining the conversion probability for reaction-diffusion systems in which a first-order catalytic reaction is performed over active particles. We apply this general method to systems on metric graphs, which may be viewed as 1-dimensional approximations of 3-dimensional systems, and obtain explicit formulas for conversion. We then study numerically a class of 3-dimensional systems and test how accurately they are described by model formulas obtai...

  5. Analysis of LYSA-calculus with explicit confidentiality annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Han; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased research interest in applying process calculi in the verification of cryptographic protocols due to their ability to formally model protocols. This work presents LYSA with explicit confidentiality annotations for indicating the expected behavior of target...... malicious activities performed by attackers as specified by the confidentiality annotations. The proposed analysis approach is fully automatic without the need of human intervention and has been applied successfully to a number of protocols....

  6. An explicit method for modeling lossy and dispersive transmission lines

    OpenAIRE

    Palà Schönwälder, Pere; Miró Sans, Joan Maria

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an explicit -non iterative- method for modeling lossy and dispersive transmission lines, allowing the inclusion of skin-effect parameters is described. This method, based on multipoint Padé approximation, allows direct implementation to obtain models for existing simulation program -such as SPICE-without the need of making use of optimization algorithms at any stage. Examples are given to show that the described procedure yields the same accuracy as other existing techniques th...

  7. Explicit solutions of Fisher's equation with three zeros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. K. Abur-Robb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Explicit traveling wave solutions of Fisher's equation with three simple zeros ut=uxx+u(1−u(u−a, a∈(0,1, are obtained for the wave speeds C=±2(12−a suggested by pure analytic considerations. Two types of solutions are obtained: one type is of a permanent wave form whereas the other is not.

  8. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  9. Explicit symmetry breaking in electrodynamic systems and electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the concept of symmetries in electromagnetism and explicit symmetry breaking. It begins with a brief background on the origin of the concept of symmetry and its meaning in fields such as architecture, mathematics and physics. Despite the extensive developments of symmetry in these fields, it has yet to be applied to the context of classical electromagnetism and related engineering applications. This book unravels the beauty and excitement of this area to scientists and engineers.

  10. Arabic Handwritten Word Recognition Using HMMs with Explicit State Duration

    OpenAIRE

    Sellami, M.; Ennaji, A.; A. Benouareth

    2008-01-01

    We describe an offline unconstrained Arabic handwritten word recognition system based on segmentation-free approach and discrete hidden Markov models (HMMs) with explicit state duration. Character durations play a significant part in the recognition of cursive handwriting. The duration information is still mostly disregarded in HMM-based automatic cursive handwriting recognizers due to the fact that HMMs are deficient in modeling character durations properly. We will show experimentally that ...

  11. Explicit solutions of the Rand Equation | Huber | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the meaning of a nonlinear partial differential equation (nPDE) of the third-order is shown to the first time. The equation is known as the 'Rand Equation' and belongs to a class of less studied nPDEs. Both the explicit physical meaning as well as the behaviour is not known until now. Therefore we believe it is ...

  12. Perfect pitch and the implicit/explicit distinction

    OpenAIRE

    Macpherson, F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the representationalist view of experiences in the light of the phenomena of perfect and relative pitch. Two main kinds of representationalism are identified - environment-based and cognitive role-based. It is argued that to explain the relationship between the two theories a distinction should be drawn between various types of implicit and explicit content. When investigated, this distinction sheds some light on the difference between the phenomenology of perfect and rela...

  13. Computing approximate (symmetric block) rational Krylov subspaces without explicit inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Mach, Thomas; Pranić, Miroslav S.; Vandebril, Raf

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown, see TW623, that approximate extended Krylov subspaces can be computed —under certain assumptions— without any explicit inversion or system solves. Instead the necessary products A-1v are obtained in an implicit way retrieved from an enlarged Krylov subspace. In this paper this approach is generalized to rational Krylov subspaces, which contain besides poles at infinite and zero also finite non-zero poles. Also an adaption of the algorithm to the block and the symmetric ...

  14. Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 carefully matched typically developing controls completed the Dewey Story Test. ‘Explicit’ (multiple-choice ans...

  15. Explicit Precedence Constraints in Safety-Critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Noulard, Eric; Pagetti, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Safety-critical Java (SCJ) aims at making the amenities of Java available for the development of safety-critical applications. The multi-rate synchronous language Prelude facilitates the specification of the communication and timing requirements of complex real-time systems. This paper combines...... to provide explicit support for precedence constraints. We present the considerations behind the design of this extension and discuss our experiences with a first prototype implementation based on the SCJ implementation of the Java Optimized Processor....

  16. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  17. Mass Loss Rates of Fasting Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilfold, Nicholas W; Hedman, Daryll; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Lunn, Nicholas J; Richardson, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have adapted to an annual cyclic regime of feeding and fasting, which is extreme in seasonal sea ice regions of the Arctic. As a consequence of climate change, sea ice breakup has become earlier and the duration of the open-water period through which polar bears must rely on fat reserves has increased. To date, there is limited empirical data with which to evaluate the potential energetic capacity of polar bears to withstand longer fasts. We measured the incoming and outgoing mass of inactive polar bears (n = 142) that were temporarily detained by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship during the open-water period near the town of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, in 2009-2014. Polar bears were given access to water but not food and held for a median length of 17 d. Median mass loss rates were 1.0 kg/d, while median mass-specific loss rates were 0.5%/d, similar to other species with high adiposity and prolonged fasting capacities. Mass loss by unfed captive adult males was identical to that lost by free-ranging individuals, suggesting that terrestrial feeding contributes little to offset mass loss. The inferred metabolic rate was comparable to a basal mammalian rate, suggesting that while on land, polar bears can maintain a depressed metabolic rate to conserve energy. Finally, we estimated time to starvation for subadults and adult males for the on-land period. Results suggest that at 180 d of fasting, 56%-63% of subadults and 18%-24% of adult males in this study would die of starvation. Results corroborate previous assessments on the limits of polar bear capacity to withstand lengthening ice-free seasons and emphasize the greater sensitivity of subadults to changes in sea ice phenology.

  18. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by 2-4 orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 μT, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5-5.7 mT fields using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as large as -95 for protons and as large as -200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by low-temperature dissolution DNP.

  19. Broadband TM-mode-pass polarizer and polarization beam splitter using asymmetrical directional couplers based on silicon subwavelength grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Yang, Junbo; Liang, Linmei; Wu, Wenjun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, an on-chip polarizer passing the transverse-magnetic mode and a polarization beam splitter are proposed. The polarizer achieves an extinction ratio exceeding 20 dB within a spectral range from 1500 nm to 1610 nm, and has a value of 24dB at 1550 nm with a coupling efficiency of 84%. By employing a specific wavelength of 1570 nm, the polarizer behaves as the polarization beam splitter with extinction ratio for the transverse-electric mode and the transverse-magnetic mode of 29dB and 24 dB, respectively. In addition, the coupling efficiency of 95.98% and 78.18% for above two polarizations, demonstrate that our approach has a potential to efficiently control coupling splitting ratio via silicon subwavelength grating.

  20. Observations that polar climate modelers use and want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, J. E.; de Boer, G.; Hunke, E. C.; Bailey, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Observations are essential for motivating and establishing improvement in the representation of polar processes within climate models. We believe that explicitly documenting the current methods used to develop and evaluate climate models with observations will help inform and improve collaborations between the observational and climate modeling communities. As such, we will present the current strategy of the Polar Climate Working Group (PCWG) to evaluate polar processes within Community Earth System Model (CESM) using observations. Our presentation will focus primarily on PCWG evaluation of atmospheric, sea ice, and surface oceanic processes. In the future, we hope to expand to include land surface, deep ocean, and biogeochemical observations. We hope our presentation, and a related working document developed by the PCWG (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zt0xParsFeMYhlihfxVJhS3D5nEcKb8A41JH0G1Ic-E/edit) inspires new and useful interactions that lead to improved climate model representation of polar processes relevant to polar climate.

  1. Implicit and explicit attitudes towards lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Melanie C

    2005-01-01

    Attitudes towards lesbians and gay men, as assessed with questionnaires, have become more and more positive in the last decades. An open question is, however, whether that trend reflects true change or rather a growing reluctance to admit negative attitudes (to others and self). New procedures measuring implicit attitudes may help find an answer. In three studies with 208 students at a German university, attitudes towards lesbians and gay men were measured with explicit scales and with an Implicit Association Test (Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) adapted for that purpose. Explicit attitudes were very positive. However, implicit attitudes were relatively negative instead, except for female participants' implicit attitudes towards lesbians which were repeatedly as positive as were their attitudes towards heterosexuals. The internal consistencies of the implicit tests were exemplary. Correlations with sexual orientation as well as with explicit homosexuality-related and gender-related attitudes attested to their validity. However, context effects were found for different implicit attitudes measured in close succession, and correlations of implicit homosexuality-related and gender-related attitudes could not be detected.

  2. Explicit Determination of Piezoelectric Eshelby Tensors for a Spheroidal Inclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yozo Mikata

    2001-06-21

    In this paper, by systematically treating the integrals involved in the piezoelectric inclusion problem, explicit results were obtained for the piezoelectric Eshelby tensors for a spheroidal inclusion aligned along the axis of the anisotropy in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric material. This problem was first treated by Dunn and Wienecke (1996) using a Green's function approach, which closely follows Withers' approach (1989) for an ellipsoidal inclusion problem in a transversely isotropic elastic medium. The same problem was recently treated by Michelitsch and Levin (2000) also using a Green's function approach. In this paper, a different method was used to obtain the explicit results for the piezoelectric Eshelby tensors for a spheroidal inclusion. The method is a direct extension of a more unified approach, which has been recently developed by Mikata (2000), which is based on Deeg's results (1980) on a piezoelectric inclusion problem. The main advantage of this method is that it is more straightforward and simpler than Dunn and Wienecke (1996), or Michelitsch and Levin (2000), and the results are a little bit more explicit than their solutions. The key step of this paper is an analytical closed form evaluation of several integrals, which was made possible after a careful treatment of a certain bi-cubic equation.

  3. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wheeler

    Full Text Available Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  4. Implementing Explicit and Finding Implicit Sharing in Embedded DSLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kiselyov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aliasing, or sharing, is prominent in many domains, denoting that two differently-named objects are in fact identical: a change in one object (memory cell, circuit terminal, disk block is instantly reflected in the other. Languages for modelling such domains should let the programmer explicitly define the sharing among objects or expressions. A DSL compiler may find other identical expressions and share them, implicitly. Such common subexpression elimination is crucial to the efficient implementation of DSLs. Sharing is tricky in embedded DSL, since host aliasing may correspond to copying of the underlying objects rather than their sharing. This tutorial summarizes discussions of implementing sharing in Haskell DSLs for automotive embedded systems and hardware description languages. The technique has since been used in a Haskell SAT solver and the DSL for music synthesis. We demonstrate the embedding in pure Haskell of a simple DSL with a language form for explicit sharing. The DSL also has implicit sharing, implemented via hash-consing. Explicit sharing greatly speeds up hash-consing. The seemingly imperative nature of hash-consing is hidden beneath a simple combinator language. The overall implementation remains pure functional and easy to reason about.

  5. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Rebecca; Allan, Kevin; Tsivilis, Dimitris; Martin, Douglas; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe) systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  6. Implicit and explicit memory bias in anxiety: a conceptual replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C; McLaughlin, K

    1995-01-01

    Williams, Watts, MacLeod and Mathews' (1988) [Cognitive psychology and the emotional disorders. Chichester, Wiley] model of anxiety and cognition leads to the prediction that anxious subjects will show an implicit, but not an explicit, memory advantage for threat-related information. Mathews, Mogg, May and Eysenck (1989) [Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 98, 401-407] obtained marginally significant support for this prediction in an experiment that tested memory using word stem completion tasks following a self-referent encoding procedure. However, neither the reliability nor generality of these findings have been established. The current experiment was designed to provide a conceptual replication of Mathews et al.'s study, using different tests of implicit memory (i.e. tachistoscopic identification) and explicit memory (i.e. recognition) and an alternative type of encoding task (i.e. colour naming stimulus words). 16 generalised anxiety disorder patients, and 16 non-anxious control subjects were tested. As predicted, the anxiety patients showed a relative implicit memory advantage for threat-related stimulus words, while the two subject groups did not differ in their pattern of explicit memory performance. These results support the predictions generated by Williams et al.'s model of anxiety and cognition.

  7. Explicit Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spotti, Cristiano; Sun, Song

    2017-01-01

    We exhibit the first non-trivial concrete examples of Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds in all complex dimensions bigger than two (Fano K-moduli spaces). We also discuss potential applications to explicit study of moduli spaces of K-stable Fano...... manifolds with large anti-canonical volume. Our arguments are based on recent progress about the geometry of metric tangent cones and on related ideas about the algebro-geometric study of singularities of K-stable Fano varieties....

  8. An Explicit Approach Toward Modeling Thermo-Coupled Deformation Behaviors of SMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new elastoplastic J 2 -flow models with thermal effects is proposed toward simulating thermo-coupled finite deformation behaviors of shape memory polymers. In this new model, an elastic potential evolving with development of plastic flow is incorporated to characterize the stress-softening effect at unloading and, moreover, thermo-induced plastic flow is introduced to represent the strain recovery effect at heating. It is shown that any given test data for both effects may be accurately simulated by means of direct and explicit procedures. Numerical examples for model predictions compare well with test data in literature.

  9. Explicit Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spotti, Cristiano; Sun, Song

    We exhibit the first non-trivial concrete examples of Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds in all complex dimensions bigger than two (Fano K-moduli spaces). We also discuss potential applications to explicit study of moduli spaces of K-stable Fano...... manifolds with large anti-canonical volume. Our arguments are based on recent progress about the geometry of metric tangent cones and on related ideas about the algebro-geometric study of singularities of K-stable Fano varieties....

  10. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  11. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  12. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  13. Metasurfaces for Terahertz Waves Polarization Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    metamaterials-based THz components have been proposed and show good potential for applications [1,2]. Especially fruitful appears to be two-dimensional metamaterials or metasurfaces due to fabrication simplifications and practically the same as bulk metamaterials functionalities. In the talk we will focus...... on employment of THz metasurfaces as polarizers and polarization converters, absorbers and conducting layers with enhanced transmittance, dichroic and chiral reconfigurable systems, waveplates and broadband filters. As the unified approach we employ the transmission line theory providing a needed level...... to several cm2) 2μm-thick Ni film. Depending on arrangement of both slits and their sizes different optical properties of such metasurface can be acquired. We demonstrate linear polarization filtering with the parallel slits dimmers, and more complex chiral behaviour of dimers, when non-equal slits are non...

  14. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  15. Comparison of Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models for the Calculation of Solvation Free Energy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Haiyang; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qi; van der Spoel, David

    2017-03-14

    Quantitative prediction of physical properties of liquids is important for many applications. Computational methods based on either explicit or implicit solvent models can be used to approximate thermodynamics properties of liquids. Here, we evaluate the predictive power of implicit solvent models for solvation free energy of organic molecules in organic solvents. We compared the results calculated with four generalized Born (GB) models (GBStill, GBHCT, GBOBCI, and GBOBCII), the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model, and the density-based solvent model SMD with previous solvation free energy calculations (Zhang et al. J. Chem. Inf. 2015, 55, 1192-1201) and experimental data. The comparison indicates that both PB and GB give poor agreement with explicit solvent calculations and even worse agreement with experiments (root-mean-square deviation ≈ 15 kJ/mol). The main problem seems to be the prediction of the apolar contribution, which should include the solvent entropy. The quantum mechanical-based SMD model gives significantly better agreement with experimental data than do PB or GB, but it is not as good as explicit solvent calculation results. The dielectric constant ε of the solvent is found to be a powerful predictor for the polar contribution to the free energy in implicit models; however, the Onsager relation may not hold for realistic solvent, as suggested by explicit solvent and SMD calculations. From the comparison, we also find that with an optimization of the apolar contribution, the PB model gives slightly better agreement with experiments than the SMD model, whereas the correlation between the optimized GB models and experiments remains poor. Further optimization of the apolar contribution is needed for GB models to be able to treat solvents other than water.

  16. Established liked versus disliked brands: Brain activity, implicit associations and explicit responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon S. Bosshard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumers’ attitudes towards established brands were tested using implicit and explicit measures. In particular, late positive potential (LPP effects were assessed as an implicit neurophysiological measure of motivational significance. The Implicit Association Test (IAT was used as an implicit behavioural measure of valence-related aspects (affective content of brand attitude. We constructed individualised stimulus lists of liked and disliked brand types from participants’ subjective pre-assessment. Participants then re-rated these visually presented brands whilst brain potential changes were recorded via electroencephalography (EEG. First, self-report measures during the test confirmed pre-assessed attitudes underlining consistent explicit rating performance. Second, liked brands elicited significantly more positive going waveforms (LPPs than disliked brands over right parietal cortical areas starting at about 800 ms post stimulus onset (reaching statistical significance at around 1,000 ms and lasting until the end of the recording epoch (2,000 ms. In accordance to the literature, this finding is interpreted as reflecting positive affect-related motivational aspects of liked brands. Finally, the IAT revealed that both liked and disliked brands indeed are associated with affect-related valence. The increased levels of motivation associated with liked brands is interpreted as potentially reflecting increased purchasing intention, but this is of course only speculation at this stage.

  17. Neural correlates of decision making with explicit information about probabilities and incentives in elderly healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudda, Kirsten; Woermann, Friedrich G; Mertens, Markus; Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Markowitsch, Hans J; Brand, Matthias

    2008-06-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging and lesion studies demonstrate the involvement of the orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal cortex as a key structure in decision making processes. This region seems to be particularly crucial when contingencies between options and consequences are unknown but have to be learned by the use of feedback following previous decisions (decision making under ambiguity). However, little is known about the neural correlates of decision making under risk conditions in which information about probabilities and potential outcomes is given. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in 12 subjects during a decision making task. This task provided explicit information about probabilities and associated potential incentives. The responses were compared to BOLD signals in a control condition without information about incentives. In contrast to previous decision making studies, we completely removed the outcome phase following a decision to exclude the potential influence of feedback previously received on current decisions. The results indicate that the integration of information about probabilities and incentives leads to activations within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior parietal lobe, the anterior cingulate and the right lingual gyrus. We assume that this pattern of activation is due to the involvement of executive functions, conflict detection mechanisms and arithmetic operations during the deliberation phase of decisional processes that are based on explicit information.

  18. Polarization of a Helium-Neon Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves measuring the intensity of laser light passed by a linear polarizer. Discusses polarization effects, orthogonal polarizations, instrumentation, and further experiments. (JRH)

  19. Optically pumped polarized ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenski, A.N.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization transfer collisions between protons, atomic hydrogen, or deuterium and optically pumped alkali-metal vapour are implemented in the high current optically pumped polarized ion source (OPPIS) and the laser driven source (LDS) of nuclear polarized atoms for target applications. The OPPIS technique overcomes the limitations on intensity of the conventional atomic beam source technique and meets the requirements of the new generation of polarization experiments at multi-GeV accelerators and colliders. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Elite Polarization and Public Opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua; Mullinix, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Elite polarization has reshaped American politics and is an increasingly salient aspect of news coverage within the United States. As a consequence, a burgeoning body of research attempts to unravel the effects of elite polarization on the mass public. However, we know very little about how polar...... of the consequences of elite polarization—and how polarization is communicated—for public opinion and political behavior in democratic politics....

  1. Molecular model of self diffusion in polar organic liquids: implications for conductivity and fluidity in polar organic liquids and electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frech, Roger; Petrowsky, Matt

    2014-03-06

    Decades of studying isothermal and temperature-dependent mass and charge transport in polar organic liquids and electrolytes have resulted in two mutually incompatible models and the failure to develop a general molecular level picture. The hydrodynamic model describes conductivity, diffusion, and dielectric relaxation in terms of viscosity, while the inadequacy of the thermal activation model leads to empirical descriptions and fitting procedures whose adjustable parameters have little or no physical significance. We recently demonstrated that transport data can be characterized with a high degree of accuracy and self-consistency using the compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF), where the transport property of interest assumes an Arrhenius-like form that also includes a dielectric constant dependence in the exponential prefactor. Here, we provide the molecular-level basis for the CAF by first modifying transition state theory, emphasizing the coupling of the diffusing molecule's motion with the dynamical motion of the surrounding matrix. We then explicitly include the polarization energy contribution from the dipolar medium. The polarization energy is related to molecular and system properties through the dipole moment and dipole density, respectively. The energy barrier for transport is coupled to the polarization energy, and we show that accounting for the role of the polarization energy leads naturally to the dielectric constant dependence in the exponential prefactor.

  2. Polarized and non-polarized leaf reflectances of Coleus blumei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lois; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1987-01-01

    A polarization photometer has been used to measure the reflectance of three variegated portions of Coleus blumei, Benth. in five wavelength bands of the visible and near-infrared spectrum. The polarized component of the reflectance factor was found to be independent of wavelength, indicating that the polarized reflectance arises from the leaf surface. It is suggested that differences in the polarized component result from variations in surface features. The nonpolarized component of the reflectance factor is shown to be related to the internal leaf structure. The variation of the degree of polarization with wavelength was found to be greatest in the regions of the spectrum where absorption occurs.

  3. Alexithymia Components Are Differentially Related to Explicit Negative Affect But Not Associated with Explicit Positive Affect or Implicit Affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, Thomas; Donges, Uta-Susan

    2017-01-01

    Alexithymia represents a multifaceted personality construct defined by difficulties in recognizing and verbalizing emotions and externally oriented thinking. According to clinical observations, experience of negative affects is exacerbated and experience of positive affects is decreased in alexithymia. Findings from research based on self-report indicate that all alexithymia facets are negatively associated with the experience of positive affects, whereas difficulties identifying and describing feelings are related to heightened negative affect. Implicit affectivity, which can be measured using indirect assessment methods, relates to processes of the impulsive system. The aim of the present study was to examine, for the first time, the relations between alexithymia components and implicit and explicit positive and negative affectivity in healthy adults. The 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) were administered to two hundred and forty-one healthy individuals along with measures of depression and trait anxiety. Difficulties identifying feelings were correlated with explicit negative trait affect, depressive mood and trait anxiety. Difficulties describing feelings showed smaller but also significant correlations with depressive mood and trait anxiety but were not correlated with explicit state or trait affect as assessed by the PANAS. Externally oriented thinking was not significantly correlated with any of the implicit and explicit affect measures. According to our findings, an externally oriented, concrete way of thinking appears to be generally unrelated to dispositions to develop positive or negative affects. Difficulties identifying feelings seem to be associated with increased conscious negative affects but not with a heightened disposition to develop negative affects at an automatic response level.

  4. Alexithymia Components Are Differentially Related to Explicit Negative Affect But Not Associated with Explicit Positive Affect or Implicit Affectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Suslow

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexithymia represents a multifaceted personality construct defined by difficulties in recognizing and verbalizing emotions and externally oriented thinking. According to clinical observations, experience of negative affects is exacerbated and experience of positive affects is decreased in alexithymia. Findings from research based on self-report indicate that all alexithymia facets are negatively associated with the experience of positive affects, whereas difficulties identifying and describing feelings are related to heightened negative affect. Implicit affectivity, which can be measured using indirect assessment methods, relates to processes of the impulsive system. The aim of the present study was to examine, for the first time, the relations between alexithymia components and implicit and explicit positive and negative affectivity in healthy adults. The 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS were administered to two hundred and forty-one healthy individuals along with measures of depression and trait anxiety. Difficulties identifying feelings were correlated with explicit negative trait affect, depressive mood and trait anxiety. Difficulties describing feelings showed smaller but also significant correlations with depressive mood and trait anxiety but were not correlated with explicit state or trait affect as assessed by the PANAS. Externally oriented thinking was not significantly correlated with any of the implicit and explicit affect measures. According to our findings, an externally oriented, concrete way of thinking appears to be generally unrelated to dispositions to develop positive or negative affects. Difficulties identifying feelings seem to be associated with increased conscious negative affects but not with a heightened disposition to develop negative affects at an automatic response level.

  5. Polarization Perception Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsell L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  6. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  7. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  8. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  9. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging...produce at high densities. We revealed broad Feshbach resonances that we hope will allow production of higher-density 85Rb clouds. We are now...attempting to achieve the next step, formation of 85RbCs molecules. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, ultracold polar molecules, Feshbach resonance 16. SECURITY

  10. Explicit and implicit modeling of nanobubbles in hydrophobic confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Dzubiella

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Water at normal conditions is a fluid thermodynamically close to the liquid-vapor phase coexistence and features a large surface tension. This combination can lead to interesting capillary phenomena on microscopic scales. Explicit water molecular dynamics (MD computer simulations of hydrophobic solutes, for instance, give evidence of capillary evaporation on nanometer scales, i.e., the formation of nanometer-sized vapor bubbles (nanobubbles between confining hydrophobic surfaces. This phenomenon has been exemplified for solutes with varying complexity, e.g., paraffin plates, coarse-grained homopolymers, biological and solid-state channels, and atomistically resolved proteins. It has been argued that nanobubbles strongly impact interactions in nanofluidic devices, translocation processes, and even in protein stability, function, and folding. As large-scale MD simulations are computationally expensive, the efficient multiscale modeling of nanobubbles and the prediction of their stability poses a formidable task to the'nanophysical' community. Recently, we have presented a conceptually novel and versatile implicit solvent model, namely, the variational implicit solvent model (VISM, which is based on a geometric energy functional. As reviewed here, first solvation studies of simple hydrophobic solutes using VISM coupled with the numerical level-set scheme show promising results, and, in particular, capture nanobubble formation and its subtle competition to local energetic potentials in hydrophobic confinement.Água em condições normais consiste de um fluido termodinamicamente próximo à fase líquida-vapor exibindo alta tensão superficial. Esta combinação conduz a fenômenos capilares interessantes na escala microscópica. Simulações computacionais baseadas em técnicas de Dinâmica Molecular em solutos hidrofóbicos por exemplo fornecem evidências do fenômeno de evaporação capilar em escalas nanométricas dando origem à formação de

  11. Explicit review of risperidone long-acting injection prescribing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A; Vanderpyl, J; Carswell, C; Stojkovic, M; Robinson, E

    2011-12-01

    antipsychotic co-prescribing at three cross-sectional time-points and ongoing at 12 months (12.3%). Patients prescribed higher RLAI starting doses were more likely to be prescribed higher doses 12 months later. To our knowledge this is the largest multi-site explicit review of RLAI use in real world clinical practice. The review found that clinicians were using RLAI in clinical practice predominantly in accordance with best practice recommendations. However, high rates of antipsychotic co-prescribing with RLAI were identified which differ from practice reported in other small reviews of RLAI use and local studies of antipsychotic prescribing. We have demonstrated that clinical audit of practice is a powerful tool to identify areas of potentially poor practice, such as ongoing high rates of antipsychotic co-prescription cross-sectionally and 12 months after RLAI initiation and that this is an area of practice requiring further evaluation. Feedback to clinicians and stakeholders followed by re-audit of practice is needed in order to complete the audit cycle. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Polarization of Prompt Muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterbach, Michael J. [Yale U.

    1977-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of the polarization of muons produced very near the point of proton - nucleon interaction" The experiment utilized a 400 GeV proton beam available in the Proton Central area of Fermilab. Muons were produced by the interaction of these protons with a variable density copper target" Extrapolation to infinite target density allowed elilp.ination of contributions due to muons from meson decay" Measurements were made upon muons produced in the forward direction with energies near 185 GeV and upon muons produced with transverse momenta near 1. 9 Ge V / c and an energy of 54 Ge V" In the first case only the longitudinal polarization was measured: P = - 0.01 ± 0.14. Under the second set of kinematic conditions both the longitudinal and transverse polarization were measured: $P_L$ = - 0.06 ± 0.16, $P_T$ = - 0.01 ± O.11 These null measurements suggest that an electromagnetic process is the dominant mechanism for prompt muon production" The measurements also indicate an upper limit of $B_{\\mu} ( D^0) \\sigma_{D^0} + B_{\\mu} ( D^+) \\sigma_{D^+} < 6.7 x 10^{-8}$ barns may be placed upon the production cross section for D particles

  13. Polarization-based non-staining cell detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Ihida-Stansbury, K; Van der Spiegel, J; Engheta, N

    2012-11-05

    Polarization is an important characteristic of electromagnetic waves, which can not be detected by either the human visual system or traditional image sensors. Motivated by various animal species with polarization vision as well as by the prospect of improving the image quality of the imaging systems, we are exploring the potential of polarization for microscope imaging. The most powerful techniques for molecule monitoring requires complex preprocessing for labeling the sample with different dyes. In this paper, we propose a cell detection method using polarization imaging without any need for staining target cell samples with any chemical dye. The motivation for this work is to develop an optical imaging technique that is simple and that can be used on live cells. The polarization sensitivity of cell samples is studied in this paper. A definition for the quantity called "polarization deviation" is proposed in order to identify clearer the difference between target cells and the background. Based on the polarization deviation detection method, a three-parameter polarization imaging method is employed to further simplify the image capture procedure for the proposed label-free cell detection. A color imaging methodology based on the well-known color space is utilized in order to represent the captured polarization information using computer graphics.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of the Solvation of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor in Explicit Water: A Comparative Study of the Effects of Solvent and Protein Polarizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungchan; Young, Tom; Harder, Edward; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    To isolate the effects of the inclusion of polarizability in the force field model on the structure and dynamics of the solvating water in differing electrostatic environments of proteins, we present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in water with force fields that explicitly include polarization for both the protein and the water. We use three model potentials for water and two model potentials for the protein. Two of the water models and one of the protein models are polarizable. A total of six systems were simulated representing all combinations of these polarizable and nonpolarizable protein and water force fields. We find that all six systems behave in a similar manner in regions of the protein that are weakly electrostatic (either hydrophobic or weakly hydrophilic). However, in the vicinity of regions of the protein with relatively strong electrostatic fields (near positively or negatively charged residues), we observe that the water structure and dynamics are dependent on both the model of the protein and the model of the water. We find that a large part of the dynamical dependence can be described by small changes in the local environments of each region that limit the local density of non-hydrogen-bonded waters, precisely the water molecules that facilitate the dynamical relaxation of the water–water hydrogen bonds. We introduce a simple method for rescaling for this effect. When this is done, we are able to effectively isolate the influence of polarizability on the dynamics. We find that the solvating water’s relaxation is most affected when both the protein and the water models are polarizable. However, when only one model (or neither) is polarizable, the relaxation is similar regardless of the models used. PMID:16853101

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T; Bajaj, Vikram S; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2008-02-07

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (microw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (gamma(e)gamma(l)), being approximately 660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (> or =5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms-the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in microw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments.

  16. Neglect impairs explicit processing of the mental number line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Marco; Bonato, Mario; Treccani, Barbara; Scalambrin, Giovanni; Marenzi, Roberto; Priftis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that visuospatial attention plays a pivotal role in numerical processing, especially when the task involves the manipulation of numerical magnitudes. Visuospatial neglect impairs contralesional attentional orienting not only in perceptual but also in numerical space. Indeed, patients with left neglect show a bias toward larger numbers when mentally bisecting a numerical interval, as if they were neglecting its leftmost part. In contrast, their performance in parity judgments is unbiased, suggesting a dissociation between explicit and implicit processing of numerical magnitude. Here we further investigate the consequences of these visuospatial attention impairments on numerical processing and their interaction with task demands. Patients with right hemisphere damage, with and without left neglect, were administered both a number comparison and a parity judgment task that had identical stimuli and response requirements. Neglect patients' performance was normal in the parity task, when processing of numerical magnitude was implicit, whereas they showed characteristic biases in the number comparison task, when access to numerical magnitude was explicit. Compared to patients without neglect, they showed an asymmetric distance effect, with slowing of the number immediately smaller than (i.e., to the left of) the reference and a stronger SNARC effect, particularly for large numbers. The latter might index an exaggerated effect of number-space compatibility after ipsilesional (i.e., rightward) orienting in number space. Thus, the effect of neglect on the explicit processing of numerical magnitude can be understood in terms of both a failure to orient to smaller (i.e., contralesional) magnitudes and a difficulty to disengage from larger (i.e., ipsilesional) magnitudes on the number line, which resembles the disrupted pattern of attention orienting in visual space.

  17. Neglect impairs explicit processing of the mental number line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eZorzi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence suggests that visuospatial attention plays a pivotal role in numerical processing, especially when the task involves the manipulation of numerical magnitudes. Visuospatial neglect impairs contralesional attentional orienting not only in perceptual but also in numerical space. Indeed, patients with left neglect show a bias towards larger numbers when mentally bisecting a numerical interval, as if they were neglecting its leftmost part. In contrast, their performance in parity judgements is unbiased, suggesting a dissociation between explicit and implicit processing of numerical magnitude. Here we further investigate the consequences of these visuospatial attention impairments on numerical processing and their interaction with task demands. Patients with right hemisphere damage, with and without left neglect, were administered both a number comparison and a parity judgement task that had identical stimuli and response requirements. Neglect patients’ performance was normal in the parity task, when processing of numerical magnitude was implicit, whereas they showed characteristic biases in the number comparison task, when access to numerical magnitude was explicit. Compared to patients without neglect, they showed an asymmetric distance effect, with slowing of the number immediately smaller than (i.e., to the left of the reference and a stronger SNARC effect, particularly for large numbers. The latter might index an exaggerated effect of number-space compatibility after ipsilesional (i.e., rightward orienting in number space. Thus, the effect of neglect on the explicit processing of numerical magnitude can be understood in terms of both a failure to orient to smaller (i.e., contralesional magnitudes and a difficulty to disengage from larger (i.e., ipsilesional magnitudes on the number line, which resembles the disrupted pattern of attention orienting in visual space.

  18. Integrating remote sensing and spatially explicit epidemiological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Flavio; Knox, Allyn; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Bompangue, Didier; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Spatially explicit epidemiological models are a crucial tool for the prediction of epidemiological patterns in time and space as well as for the allocation of health care resources. In addition they can provide valuable information about epidemiological processes and allow for the identification of environmental drivers of the disease spread. Most epidemiological models rely on environmental data as inputs. They can either be measured in the field by the means of conventional instruments or using remote sensing techniques to measure suitable proxies of the variables of interest. The later benefit from several advantages over conventional methods, including data availability, which can be an issue especially in developing, and spatial as well as temporal resolution of the data, which is particularly crucial for spatially explicit models. Here we present the case study of a spatially explicit, semi-mechanistic model applied to recurring cholera outbreaks in the Lake Kivu area (Democratic Republic of the Congo). The model describes the cholera incidence in eight health zones on the shore of the lake. Remotely sensed datasets of chlorophyll a concentration in the lake, precipitation and indices of global climate anomalies are used as environmental drivers. Human mobility and its effect on the disease spread is also taken into account. Several model configurations are tested on a data set of reported cases. The best models, accounting for different environmental drivers, and selected using the Akaike information criterion, are formally compared via cross validation. The best performing model accounts for seasonality, El Niño Southern Oscillation, precipitation and human mobility.

  19. Implicit versus explicit associative learning and experimentally induced placebo hypoalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Martin-Pichora

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea L Martin-Pichora1,2, Tsipora D. Mankovsky-Arnold3, Joel Katz11Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Centre for Student Development and Counseling, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: The present study examined whether 1 placebo hypoalgesia can be generated through implicit associative learning (ie, conditioning in the absence of conscious awareness and 2 the magnitude of placebo hypoalgesia changes when expectations about pain are made explicit. The temperature of heat pain stimuli was surreptitiously lowered during conditioning trials for the placebo cream and the magnitude of the placebo effect was assessed during a subsequent set of trials when the temperature was the same for both placebo and control conditions. To assess whether placebo hypoalgesia could be generated from an implicit tactile stimulus, a 2 × 2 design was used with direction of cream application as one factor and verbal information about which cream was being applied as the second factor. A significant placebo effect was observed when participants received verbal information about which cream was being applied but not following implicit conditioning alone. However, 87.5% of those who showed a placebo response as the result of implicit conditioning were able to accurately guess the order of cream application during the final trial, despite a lack of awareness about the sensory manipulation and low confidence in their ratings, suggesting implicit learning in some participants. In summary, implicit associative learning was evident in some participants but it was not sufficient to produce a placebo effect suggesting some level of explicit expectation or cognitive mediation may be necessary. Notably, the placebo response was abolished when expectations were made explicit, suggesting a delicate interplay between attention and expectation.Keywords: placebo hypoalgesia

  20. Explicit Oral Narrative Intervention for Students with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Diez-Itza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Narrative skills play a crucial role in organizing experience, facilitating social interaction and building academic discourse and literacy. They are at the interface of cognitive, social, and linguistic abilities related to school engagement. Despite their relative strengths in social and grammatical skills, students with Williams syndrome (WS do not show parallel cognitive and pragmatic performance in narrative generation tasks. The aim of the present study was to assess retelling of a TV cartoon tale and the effect of an individualized explicit instruction of the narrative structure. Participants included eight students with WS who attended different special education levels. Narratives were elicited in two sessions (pre and post intervention, and were transcribed, coded and analyzed using the tools of the CHILDES Project. Narratives were coded for productivity and complexity at the microstructure and macrostructure levels. Microstructure productivity (i.e., length of narratives included number of utterances, clauses, and tokens. Microstructure complexity included mean length of utterances, lexical diversity and use of discourse markers as cohesive devices. Narrative macrostructure was assessed for textual coherence through the Pragmatic Evaluation Protocol for Speech Corpora (PREP-CORP. Macrostructure productivity and complexity included, respectively, the recall and sequential order of scenarios, episodes, events and characters. A total of four intervention sessions, lasting approximately 20 min, were delivered individually once a week. This brief intervention addressed explicit instruction about the narrative structure and the use of specific discourse markers to improve cohesion of story retellings. Intervention strategies included verbal scaffolding and modeling, conversational context for retelling the story and visual support with pictures printed from the cartoon. Results showed significant changes in WS students’ retelling of the

  1. Explicit K-symplectic algorithms for charged particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou, Zhaoqi [LSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun, Yajuan, E-mail: sunyj@lsec.cc.ac.cn [LSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Jian [Department of Modern Physics and School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Qin, Hong [Department of Modern Physics and School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    We study the Lorentz force equation of charged particle dynamics by considering its K-symplectic structure. As the Hamiltonian of the system can be decomposed as four parts, we are able to construct the numerical methods that preserve the K-symplectic structure based on Hamiltonian splitting technique. The newly derived numerical methods are explicit, and are shown in numerical experiments to be stable over long-term simulation. The error convergency as well as the long term energy conservation of the numerical solutions is also analyzed by means of the Darboux transformation.

  2. Gravity discharge vessel revisited: An explicit Lambert W function solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2017-07-01

    Based on the generalized Poiseuille equation modified by a kinetic energy correction, an explicit solution for the time evolution of a liquid column draining under gravity through an exit capillary tube is derived in terms of the Lambert W function. In contrast to the conventional exponential behavior, as implied by the Poiseuille law, a new analytical solution gives a full account for the volumetric flow rate of a fluid through a capillary of any length and improves the precision of viscosity determination. The theoretical consideration may be of interest to students as an example of how implicit equations in the field of physics can be solved analytically using the Lambert function.

  3. Explicit Oral Narrative Intervention for Students with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Itza, Eliseo; Martínez, Verónica; Pérez, Vanesa; Fernández-Urquiza, Maite

    2018-01-01

    Narrative skills play a crucial role in organizing experience, facilitating social interaction and building academic discourse and literacy. They are at the interface of cognitive, social, and linguistic abilities related to school engagement. Despite their relative strengths in social and grammatical skills, students with Williams syndrome (WS) do not show parallel cognitive and pragmatic performance in narrative generation tasks. The aim of the present study was to assess retelling of a TV cartoon tale and the effect of an individualized explicit instruction of the narrative structure. Participants included eight students with WS who attended different special education levels. Narratives were elicited in two sessions (pre and post intervention), and were transcribed, coded and analyzed using the tools of the CHILDES Project. Narratives were coded for productivity and complexity at the microstructure and macrostructure levels. Microstructure productivity (i.e., length of narratives) included number of utterances, clauses, and tokens. Microstructure complexity included mean length of utterances, lexical diversity and use of discourse markers as cohesive devices. Narrative macrostructure was assessed for textual coherence through the Pragmatic Evaluation Protocol for Speech Corpora (PREP-CORP). Macrostructure productivity and complexity included, respectively, the recall and sequential order of scenarios, episodes, events and characters. A total of four intervention sessions, lasting approximately 20 min, were delivered individually once a week. This brief intervention addressed explicit instruction about the narrative structure and the use of specific discourse markers to improve cohesion of story retellings. Intervention strategies included verbal scaffolding and modeling, conversational context for retelling the story and visual support with pictures printed from the cartoon. Results showed significant changes in WS students’ retelling of the story, both at

  4. Assessment of an Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model in the in the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, ISAAC (Integrated Solution Algorithm for Arbitrary Con gurations). Additionally, it compares solutions for two select configurations between ISAAC and the RANS solver PAB3D. This study compares with either direct numerical simulation data, experimental data, or empirical models for several different geometries with compressible, separated, and high Reynolds number flows. In general, the turbulence model matched data or followed experimental trends well, and for the selected configurations, the computational results of ISAAC closely matched those of PAB3D using the same turbulence model.

  5. Quantum Trajectories for Squeezed Input Processes: Explicit Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Anita; Gough, John

    2016-03-01

    We consider the quantum (trajectories) filtering equation for the case when the system is driven by Bose field inputs prepared in an arbitrary non-zero mean Gaussian state. The a posteriori evolution of the system is conditioned by the results of a single or double homodyne measurements. The system interacting with the Bose field is a single cavity mode taken initially in a Gaussian state. We show explicit solutions using the method of characteristic functions to the filtering equations exploiting the linear Gaussian nature of the problem.

  6. Evaluation of extraction protocols for simultaneous polar and non-polar yeast metabolite analysis using multivariate projection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambellini, Nicolas P; Zaremberg, Vanina; Turner, Raymond J; Weljie, Aalim M

    2013-07-23

    Metabolomic and lipidomic approaches aim to measure metabolites or lipids in the cell. Metabolite extraction is a key step in obtaining useful and reliable data for successful metabolite studies. Significant efforts have been made to identify the optimal extraction protocol for various platforms and biological systems, for both polar and non-polar metabolites. Here we report an approach utilizing chemoinformatics for systematic comparison of protocols to extract both from a single sample of the model yeast organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three chloroform/methanol/water partitioning based extraction protocols found in literature were evaluated for their effectiveness at reproducibly extracting both polar and non-polar metabolites. Fatty acid methyl esters and methoxyamine/trimethylsilyl derivatized aqueous compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to evaluate non-polar or polar metabolite analysis. The comparative breadth and amount of recovered metabolites was evaluated using multivariate projection methods. This approach identified an optimal protocol consisting of 64 identified polar metabolites from 105 ion hits and 12 fatty acids recovered, and will potentially attenuate the error and variation associated with combining metabolite profiles from different samples for untargeted analysis with both polar and non-polar analytes. It also confirmed the value of using multivariate projection methods to compare established extraction protocols.

  7. Evaluation of Extraction Protocols for Simultaneous Polar and Non-Polar Yeast Metabolite Analysis Using Multivariate Projection Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas P. Tambellini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic and lipidomic approaches aim to measure metabolites or lipids in the cell. Metabolite extraction is a key step in obtaining useful and reliable data for successful metabolite studies. Significant efforts have been made to identify the optimal extraction protocol for various platforms and biological systems, for both polar and non-polar metabolites. Here we report an approach utilizing chemoinformatics for systematic comparison of protocols to extract both from a single sample of the model yeast organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three chloroform/methanol/water partitioning based extraction protocols found in literature were evaluated for their effectiveness at reproducibly extracting both polar and non-polar metabolites. Fatty acid methyl esters and methoxyamine/trimethylsilyl derivatized aqueous compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to evaluate non-polar or polar metabolite analysis. The comparative breadth and amount of recovered metabolites was evaluated using multivariate projection methods. This approach identified an optimal protocol consisting of 64 identified polar metabolites from 105 ion hits and 12 fatty acids recovered, and will potentially attenuate the error and variation associated with combining metabolite profiles from different samples for untargeted analysis with both polar and non-polar analytes. It also confirmed the value of using multivariate projection methods to compare established extraction protocols.

  8. Bringing Polar Science to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoli, A.; Madsen, J. M.; Porter, M.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF sponsored IceCube (OPP-0236449) and Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) projects have developed a model for engaging K-12 teachers in a variety of scientific disciplines using polar science as a unifying theme. An intensive workshop, Science in the Ice, provided teachers with background content knowledge and seed ideas for activities aligned with national teaching standards. These activities were used to support the introduction of authentic science investigations related to current polar research in the classroom. The pilot workshop, sponsored by the NSF supported Math-Science Partnership SCALE (0227016), demonstrated the viability of this approach for involving a continuum of teachers from novice to master in a meaningful professional development model that can lead to sustainable classroom changes. This model for teacher professional development is based on the premise that the most robust educational outreach efforts involve teachers that are prepared, supported, and connected to a network of researchers and educators. This network can also serve to both stimulate interest in polar research and as a vehicle for delivering classroom materials related to the International Polar Year. An overview of Science in the Ice will be provided to show how the natural fascination with extreme environments can be used to introduce on-going research to the classroom from multiple disciplines---glaciology, geology, and astrophysics---with a common thread of polar science. The case for involving teachers now to fully capitalize on the potential of the International Polar Year, by providing professional development opportunities including field experiences with researchers, will be made.

  9. Circularly polarized antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Steven; Zhu, Fuguo

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive insight into the design techniques for different types of CP antenna elements and arrays In this book, the authors address a broad range of topics on circularly polarized (CP) antennas. Firstly, it introduces to the reader basic principles, design techniques and characteristics of various types of CP antennas, such as CP patch antennas, CP helix antennas, quadrifilar helix antennas (QHA), printed quadrifilar helix antennas (PQHA), spiral antenna, CP slot antennas, CP dielectric resonator antennas, loop antennas, crossed dipoles, monopoles and CP horns. Adva

  10. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... several electrical behaviours similar to those measured for biological membranes and considered to be distinctive features of protein channels, like outward rectification and gating currents. Finally, our proposed equivalent model is suggested by the structure and physical properties of the system...

  11. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  12. Polarization mode dispersion effects on phase and polarization diversity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Thomas G.; Ingram, Mary Ann

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the combined effects of weak phase noise and polarization mode dispersion (PMD) on a coherent receiver employing phase and polarization diversity reception. The receiver is assumed to be subjected to the following: transmitter and receiver polarization misalignment relative to the principal states of the optical fiber, phase noise, polarization mode dispersion, and shot noise. The receiver outputs are investigated for ASK demodulation using square-law and envelope detection. The results show that for the assumed receiver configuration, square law detection provides an output which is independent of PMD, phase noise, and polarization misalignment. Envelope detection results in a receiver output which is dependent on all of these parameters. Furthermore, when phase noise and PMD are simultaneously present, the resulting probability of bit error is no greater than the probability of bit error under worst-case operating conditions when polarization mode dispersion and phase noise are absent.

  13. Coronal Polarization of Pseudostreamers and the Solar Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Guennou, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Gibson, S. E.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP polarization data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere, the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015. We present here the evolution of the structure and describe its identification in the Fe XII 1074nm coronal emission line, sensitive to the Hanle effect in the corona.

  14. Explicit simulation of a midlatitude Mesoscale Convective System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G.D.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have explicitly simulated the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 23-24 June 1985 during PRE-STORM, the Preliminary Regional Experiment for the Stormscale Operational and Research and Meterology Program. Stensrud and Maddox (1988), Johnson and Bartels (1992), and Bernstein and Johnson (1994) are among the researchers who have investigated various aspects of this MCS event. We have performed this MCS simulation (and a similar one of a tropical MCS; Alexander and Cotton 1994) in the spirit of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), in which cloud-resolving models are used to assist in the formulation and testing of cloud parameterization schemes for larger-scale models. In this paper, we describe (1) the nature of our 23-24 June MCS dimulation and (2) our efforts to date in using our explicit MCS simulations to assist in the development of a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches. The paper is organized as follows. First, we discuss the synoptic situation surrounding the 23-24 June PRE-STORM MCS followed by a discussion of the model setup and results of our simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulations in developing a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches and summarize our results.

  15. Conceptualising energy security and making explicit its polysemic nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, Lynne [The John Curtin Institute of Public Policy, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Twenty-first century access to energy sources depends on a complex system of global markets, vast cross-border infrastructure networks, a small group of primary energy suppliers, and interdependencies with financial markets and technology. This is the context in which energy security has risen high on the policy agenda of governments around the world and the term 'energy security' has quietly slipped into the energy lexicon. The limited discourse about the nature of the term or its underlying assumptions has been totally eclipsed by an almost overwhelming focus on securing supplies of primary energy sources and geopolitics. An examination of explicit and inferred definitions finds that the concept of energy security is inherently slippery because it is polysemic in nature, capable of holding multiple dimensions and taking on different specificities depending on the country (or continent), timeframe or energy source to which it is applied. This 'slipperiness' poses analytical, prediction and policy difficulties but if explicitly recognised through definitional clarity, new levels of understanding will enrich the policy debate to deal with obstacles impacting on the constantly evolving nature of energy security. (author)

  16. Implicit and explicit self-esteem in remitted depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeijers, Danique; Vrijsen, Janna N; van Oostrom, Iris; Isaac, Linda; Speckens, Anne; Becker, Eni S; Rinck, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Low self-esteem is a symptom of depression and depression vulnerability. Prior research on self-esteem has largely focused on implicit (ISE) and explicit self-esteem (ESE) as two separate constructs, missing their interaction. Therefore, the current study investigated the interaction between ISE and ESE in a depression-vulnerable group (remitted depressed patients; RDs), compared to never-depressed controls (ND). Seventy-five RDs and 75 NDs participated in the study. To measure ESE, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was used. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and the Name Letter Preference Task (NLPT) were used to assess ISE. RDs reported lower ESE than NDs. However, the two groups did not differ on ISE. RDs exhibited a damaged self-esteem or a low-congruent self-esteem, similar to what has been found in currently depressed patients. Moreover, damaged self-esteem was associated with residual depressive symptoms. The results need to be interpreted with care because the IAT and NLPT did not reveal the same associations with the clinical measures. Implicit and explicit self-esteem may be different constructs in depression and studying the combination is important. The present study provides evidence indicating that damaged self-esteem may be more detrimental than low congruent self-esteem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Explicit Deconvolution of Well Test Data Dominated by Wellbore Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Razminia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses some methods for interpretation of oil and gas well test data distorted by wellbore storage effects. Using these techniques, we can deconvolve pressure and rate data from drawdown and buildup tests dominated by wellbore storage. Some of these methods have the advantage of deconvolving the pressure data without rate measurement. The two important methods that are applied in this study are an explicit deconvolution method and a modification of material balance deconvolution method. In cases with no rate measurements, we use a blind deconvolution method to restore the pressure response free of wellbore storage effects. Our techniques detect the afterflow/unloading rate function with explicit deconvolution of the observed pressure data. The presented techniques can unveil the early time behavior of a reservoir system masked by wellbore storage effects and thus provide powerful tools to improve pressure transient test interpretation. Each method has been validated using both synthetic data and field cases and each method should be considered valid for practical applications.

  18. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  19. Capturing the H 2 –Metal Interaction in Mg-MOF-74 Using Classical Polarization

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony

    2014-10-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of H2 sorption were performed in Mg-MOF-74, a metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays very high H2 sorption affinity. Experimental H2 sorption isotherms and isosteric heats of adsorption (Qst) values were reproduced using a general purpose materials sorption potential that includes many-body polarization interactions. In contrast, using two models that include only charge-quadrupole interactions failed to reproduce such experimental measurements even though they are the type normally employed in such classical force field calculations. Utilizing the present explicit polarizable model in GCMC simulation resulted in a Mg2+-H2 distance of 2.60 Å, which is close to a previously reported value that was obtained using electronic structure methods and comparable to similar experimental measurements. The induced dipole distribution obtained from simulation assisted in the characterization of two previously identified sorption sites in the MOF: the Mg2+ ions and the oxido group of the linkers. The calculated two-dimensional quantum rotational levels for a H2 molecule sorbed onto the Mg2+ ion were in good agreement with experimental inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data. Although the H2-metal interaction in MOFs may be thought of as a quantum mechanical effect, this study demonstrates how the interaction between the sorbate molecules and the open-metal sites in a particular highly sorbing MOF can be captured using classical simulation techniques that involve a polarizable potential.

  20. Spatially explicit multi-criteria decision analysis for managing vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Valerie; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Bélanger, Denise; Michel, Pascal

    2011-12-29

    The complex epidemiology of vector-borne diseases creates significant challenges in the design and delivery of prevention and control strategies, especially in light of rapid social and environmental changes. Spatial models for predicting disease risk based on environmental factors such as climate and landscape have been developed for a number of important vector-borne diseases. The resulting risk maps have proven value for highlighting areas for targeting public health programs. However, these methods generally only offer technical information on the spatial distribution of disease risk itself, which may be incomplete for making decisions in a complex situation. In prioritizing surveillance and intervention strategies, decision-makers often also need to consider spatially explicit information on other important dimensions, such as the regional specificity of public acceptance, population vulnerability, resource availability, intervention effectiveness, and land use. There is a need for a unified strategy for supporting public health decision making that integrates available data for assessing spatially explicit disease risk, with other criteria, to implement effective prevention and control strategies. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a decision support tool that allows for the consideration of diverse quantitative and qualitative criteria using both data-driven and qualitative indicators for evaluating alternative strategies with transparency and stakeholder participation. Here we propose a MCDA-based approach to the development of geospatial models and spatially explicit decision support tools for the management of vector-borne diseases. We describe the conceptual framework that MCDA offers as well as technical considerations, approaches to implementation and expected outcomes. We conclude that MCDA is a powerful tool that offers tremendous potential for use in public health decision-making in general and vector-borne disease management in particular.

  1. Explicit all-atom modeling of realistically sized ligand-capped nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of an explicit all-atom representation of nanocrystals of experimentally relevant sizes (up to 6 nm), capped with alkyl chain ligands, in vacuum. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulation methods in concert with a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (molecular mechanics 3), for the studies presented here. These studies include determining the preferred conformation of an isolated single nanocrystal (NC), pairs of isolated NCs, and (presaging studies of superlattice arrays) unit cells of NC superlattices. We observe that very small NCs (3 nm) behave differently in a superlattice as compared to larger NCs (6 nm and above) due to the conformations adopted by the capping ligands on the NC surface. Short ligands adopt a uniform distribution of orientational preferences, including some that lie against the face of the nanocrystal. In contrast, longer ligands prefer to interdigitate. We also study the effect of changing ligand length and ligand coverage on the NCs on the preferred ligand configurations. Since explicit all-atom modeling constrains the maximum system size that can be studied, we discuss issues related to coarse-graining the representation of the ligands, including a comparison of two commonly used coarse-grained models. We find that care has to be exercised in the choice of coarse-grained model. The data provided by these realistically sized ligand-capped NCs, determined using explicit all-atom models, should serve as a reference standard for future models of coarse-graining ligands using united atom models, especially for self-assembly processes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Spatially explicit multi-criteria decision analysis for managing vector-borne diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongoh Valerie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complex epidemiology of vector-borne diseases creates significant challenges in the design and delivery of prevention and control strategies, especially in light of rapid social and environmental changes. Spatial models for predicting disease risk based on environmental factors such as climate and landscape have been developed for a number of important vector-borne diseases. The resulting risk maps have proven value for highlighting areas for targeting public health programs. However, these methods generally only offer technical information on the spatial distribution of disease risk itself, which may be incomplete for making decisions in a complex situation. In prioritizing surveillance and intervention strategies, decision-makers often also need to consider spatially explicit information on other important dimensions, such as the regional specificity of public acceptance, population vulnerability, resource availability, intervention effectiveness, and land use. There is a need for a unified strategy for supporting public health decision making that integrates available data for assessing spatially explicit disease risk, with other criteria, to implement effective prevention and control strategies. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA is a decision support tool that allows for the consideration of diverse quantitative and qualitative criteria using both data-driven and qualitative indicators for evaluating alternative strategies with transparency and stakeholder participation. Here we propose a MCDA-based approach to the development of geospatial models and spatially explicit decision support tools for the management of vector-borne diseases. We describe the conceptual framework that MCDA offers as well as technical considerations, approaches to implementation and expected outcomes. We conclude that MCDA is a powerful tool that offers tremendous potential for use in public health decision-making in general and vector

  3. Constant pH molecular dynamics of proteins in explicit solvent with proton tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Garrett B; Hulbert, Benjamin S; Zhou, Huiqing; Brooks, Charles L

    2014-07-01

    pH is a ubiquitous regulator of biological activity, including protein-folding, protein-protein interactions, and enzymatic activity. Existing constant pH molecular dynamics (CPHMD) models that were developed to address questions related to the pH-dependent properties of proteins are largely based on implicit solvent models. However, implicit solvent models are known to underestimate the desolvation energy of buried charged residues, increasing the error associated with predictions that involve internal ionizable residue that are important in processes like hydrogen transport and electron transfer. Furthermore, discrete water and ions cannot be modeled in implicit solvent, which are important in systems like membrane proteins and ion channels. We report on an explicit solvent constant pH molecular dynamics framework based on multi-site λ-dynamics (CPHMD(MSλD)). In the CPHMD(MSλD) framework, we performed seamless alchemical transitions between protonation and tautomeric states using multi-site λ-dynamics, and designed novel biasing potentials to ensure that the physical end-states are predominantly sampled. We show that explicit solvent CPHMD(MSλD) simulations model realistic pH-dependent properties of proteins such as the Hen-Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL), binding domain of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (BBL) and N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9 (NTL9), and the pKa predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental values, with a RMSE ranging from 0.72 to 0.84 pKa units. With the recent development of the explicit solvent CPHMD(MSλD) framework for nucleic acids, accurate modeling of pH-dependent properties of both major class of biomolecules-proteins and nucleic acids is now possible. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An atomic charge model for graphene oxide for exploring its bioadhesive properties in explicit water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, D.; Dragneva, N.; Floriano, W. B.; Rubel, O. [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, 290 Munro St, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 7T1 (Canada); Mawhinney, R. C. [Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 7T1 (Canada); Fanchini, G. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); French, S. [University of Calgary, South Health Campus, 4448 Front St. SE, Calgary, Alberta T3M 1M4 (Canada)

    2014-07-28

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been shown to exhibit properties that are useful in applications such as biomedical imaging, biological sensors, and drug delivery. The binding properties of biomolecules at the surface of GO can provide insight into the potential biocompatibility of GO. Here we assess the intrinsic affinity of amino acids to GO by simulating their adsorption onto a GO surface. The simulation is done using Amber03 force-field molecular dynamics in explicit water. The emphasis is placed on developing an atomic charge model for GO. The adsorption energies are computed using atomic charges obtained from an ab initio electrostatic potential based method. The charges reported here are suitable for simulating peptide adsorption to GO.

  5. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  6. Cheesecake and Beefcake: No Matter How You Slice It, Sexual Explicitness in Advertising Continues to Increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Tom; Lambiase, Jacqueline; Morgan, Susan; Carstarphen, Meta; Zavoina, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on sexual content and gender portrayals in advertising by assessing images of women and men in magazine ads in 1983 and 1993. Finds both genders were portrayed more explicitly and through more sexually intimate contact in 1993; images of men were more explicit in the 1990s; and portrayals were most explicit in women's…

  7. Virtually Shaping the Future of Polar Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeseman, J. L.; Koldunov, N. V.; Jochum, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) is an international and interdisciplinary organization for undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the wider cryosphere that started as a result of the International Polar Year (IPY). APECS is leading the way for virtual communication of polar research through several activities: an online Polar Literature Discussion Forum, a Virtual Poster Session, and Communication beyond the conference setting. APECS has created an extensive online discussion forum where researchers share both classic and cutting-edge literature articles and critique techniques that were used by authors, helping to improve methods as well as discover new ways to approach polar research questions. Many researchers present their results as posters at conferences. APECS has taken this process to a new level by creating a format to display previously presented posters online instead of these files simply sitting on a researcher’s hard-drive. Not only are the posters online, a monthly conference call open to hundreds of participants allows researchers to share their work with a new audience - fellow researchers, community members, potential colleagues, policy makers and educators. These calls are recorded and archived online so the next time someone visits the poster, they can hear the researcher describe their work and communicate with the researcher questions they may have, potential ways to collaborate or share different methodologies to improve future endeavors. Peer-reviewed literature articles are the currency of science and APECS has capitalized on this by creating a way for researchers to increase the exposure of their publications beyond the table of contents published by journals. The Polar Literature Discussion Forum is a new way for researchers to share their papers, as well as discuss classic articles. This has become a popular

  8. Algorithms for calculating the leading quantum electrodynamics P(1/r 3) correction with all-electron molecular explicitly correlated Gaussians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Jurkowski, Jacek; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2017-03-01

    Algorithms for calculating the quantum electrodynamics Araki-Sucher correction for n-electron explicitly correlated molecular Gaussian functions with shifted centers are derived and implemented. The algorithms are tested in calculations concerning the H2 molecule and applied in ground-state calculations of LiH and {{{H}}}3+ molecules. The implementation will significantly increase the accuracy of the calculations of potential energy surfaces of small diatomic and triatomic molecules and their rovibrational spectra.

  9. Yb-doped polarizing fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillooly, A.; Webb, A. S.; Favero, F. C.; Bouchan, T.; Cooper, L. J.; Read, D.; Hill, M.

    2017-02-01

    An ytterbium (Yb) doped polarizing fiber is demonstrated. The fiber offers the opportunity to build all-fiber lasers with single polarization output and without the need for free-space polarizing components. Traditional single polarization fiber lasers utilize polarization-maintaining (PM) gain fiber with a single polarization stimulation signal. Whilst this results in an approximation to a single polarization laser, the spontaneous emission from the unstimulated polarization state limits the polarization extinction ratio (PER). The PER is further limited as the stimulated signal is prone to crosstalk. Furthermore, controlling amplitude modulation of the stimulated signal is critical for maximizing the peak power of an optical pulse, particularly for high energy lasers. If light is allowed to leak in to the unstimulated axis it will travel at a different velocity to the stimulated axis and can cross-couple back into the signal axis, creating an interference effect which leads to amplitude modulation on the signal pulse. Single-polarization Yb-doped fiber ensures that light on the fast axis is constantly attenuated; ensuring that light on the unstimulated axis cannot propagate and thus cannot degrade the PER or create amplitude modulation. In this paper we report on, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of a single polarization Yb-doped bowtie optical fiber manufactured using a combination of Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition (MCVD) and rare-earth solution doping technology. The fiber has a single-polarization window of 80nm at the operating wavelength of 1060nm and a PER of >18dB. The fabrication and characterization of the fiber is reported.

  10. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  11. Evolution of costly explicit memory and cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamaru, Mayuko

    2016-06-21

    Humans can acquire new information and modify it (cumulative culture) based on their learning and memory abilities, especially explicit memory, through the processes of encoding, consolidation, storage, and retrieval. Explicit memory is categorized into semantic and episodic memories. Animals have semantic memory, while episodic memory is unique to humans and essential for innovation and the evolution of culture. As both episodic and semantic memory are needed for innovation, the evolution of explicit memory influences the evolution of culture. However, previous theoretical studies have shown that environmental fluctuations influence the evolution of imitation (social learning) and innovation (individual learning) and assume that memory is not an evolutionary trait. If individuals can store and retrieve acquired information properly, they can modify it and innovate new information. Therefore, being able to store and retrieve information is essential from the perspective of cultural evolution. However, if both storage and retrieval were too costly, forgetting and relearning would have an advantage over storing and retrieving acquired information. In this study, using mathematical analysis and individual-based simulations, we investigate whether cumulative culture can promote the coevolution of costly memory and social and individual learning, assuming that cumulative culture improves the fitness of each individual. The conclusions are: (1) without cumulative culture, a social learning cost is essential for the evolution of storage-retrieval. Costly storage-retrieval can evolve with individual learning but costly social learning does not evolve. When low-cost social learning evolves, the repetition of forgetting and learning is favored more than the evolution of costly storage-retrieval, even though a cultural trait improves the fitness. (2) When cumulative culture exists and improves fitness, storage-retrieval can evolve with social and/or individual learning, which

  12. Convergence of environment polarization effects in multiscale modeling of excitation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    of polarization interactions for chromophores in different chemical environments. We find that the rate of convergence of excitation energies with respect to polarization cut-off is much slower for chromophores in an ordered environment such as a protein than for chromophores in a homogeneous medium......We present a systematic investigation of the influence of polarization effects from a surrounding medium on the excitation energies of a chromophore. We use a combined molecular dynamics and polarizable embedding time-dependent density functional theory (PE-TD-DFT) approach for chromophores....... By varying the subset of sites in the environment for which atomic polarizabilities are included, we investigate to what distance from the quantum region explicit polarization effects need to be taken into account in order to provide converged excitation energies. Our study gives new insight into the range...

  13. Improving carbon monitoring and reporting in forests using spatially-explicit information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Boisvenue

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding and quantifying carbon (C exchanges between the biosphere and the atmosphere—specifically the process of C removal from the atmosphere, and how this process is changing—is the basis for developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies for climate change. Monitoring forest systems and reporting on greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and removals are now required components of international efforts aimed at mitigating rising atmospheric GHG. Spatially-explicit information about forests can improve the estimates of GHG emissions and removals. However, at present, remotely-sensed information on forest change is not commonly integrated into GHG reporting systems. New, detailed (30-m spatial resolution forest change products derived from satellite time series informing on location, magnitude, and type of change, at an annual time step, have recently become available. Here we estimate the forest GHG balance using these new Landsat-based change data, a spatial forest inventory, and develop yield curves as inputs to the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3 to estimate GHG emissions and removals at a 30 m resolution for a 13 Mha pilot area in Saskatchewan, Canada. Results Our results depict the forests as cumulative C sink (17.98 Tg C or 0.64 Tg C year−1 between 1984 and 2012 with an average C density of 206.5 (±0.6 Mg C ha−1. Comparisons between our estimates and estimates from Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System (NFCMARS were possible only on a subset of our study area. In our simulations the area was a C sink, while the official reporting simulations, it was a C source. Forest area and overall C stock estimates also differ between the two simulated estimates. Conclusions Both estimates have similar uncertainties, but the spatially-explicit results we present here better quantify the potential improvement brought on by spatially-explicit

  14. Optical characterization and polarization calibration for rigid endoscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Missael; Gruev, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    Polarization measurements give orthogonal information to spectral images making them a great tool in the characterization of environmental parameters in nature. Thus, polarization imagery has proven to be remarkably useful in a vast range of biomedical applications. One such application is the early diagnosis of flat cancerous lesions in murine colorectal tumor models, where polarization data complements NIR fluorescence analysis. Advances in nanotechnology have led to compact and precise bio-inspired imaging sensors capable of accurately co-registering multidimensional spectral and polarization information. As more applications emerge for these imagers, the optics used in these instruments get very complex and can potentially compromise the original polarization state of the incident light. Here we present a complete optical and polarization characterization of three rigid endoscopes of size 1.9mm x 10cm (Karl Storz, Germany), 5mm x 30cm, and 10mm x 33cm (Olympus, Germany), used in colonoscopy for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. Characterization results show that the telescope optics act as retarders and effectively depolarize the linear component. These incorrect readings can cause false-positives or false-negatives leading to an improper diagnosis. In this paper, we offer a polarization calibration scheme for these endoscopes based on Mueller calculus. By modeling the optical properties from training data as real-valued Mueller matrices, we are able to successfully reconstruct the initial polarization state acquired by the imaging system.

  15. Polarization-preserving holey fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2001-01-01

    In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization......In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization...

  16. Polarization preservation in the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The successful operation of a high energy polarized beam at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) with the concommitant development of depolarizing resonance correction techniques has led to the present project of commissioning such a beam at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A description of the project was presented at the 1981 National Accelerator Conference. I would like to now present a more detailed description of how we plan to preserve the polarization during acceleration, and to present our game plan for tuning through some 50 resonances and reaching our goal of a 26 GeV polarized proton beam with greater than 60% polarization.

  17. Magnet polarities in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    McAteer, M; Maclean, E; Persson, T; Steinhagen, R; Tomas, R

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of extensive tests to verify the polarities of Landau damping octupoles (MOF, MOD) and octupole spool correctors (MCO), arc trim skew sextupoles (MSS), and triplet sextupole correctors (MCSX and MCSSX). All octupole circuits that were measured were found to have the expected polarity. All arc skew sextupoles MSS and triplet sextupole correctors MCSX and MCSSX that were measured were found to have reversed polarity with respect to MADX. It is also noted that the triplet quadrupole trims ktqx2, as well as MQS and MQSX, have reversed polarity with respect to MADX.

  18. Novel application of explicit dynamics occupancy models to ongoing aquatic invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam J.

    2018-01-01

    Identification of suitable habitats, where invasive species can establish, is an important step towards controlling their spread. Accurate identification is difficult for new or slow invaders because unoccupied habitats may be suitable, given enough time for dispersal, while occupied habitats may prove to be unsuitable for establishment.To identify the suitable habitat of a recent invader, I used an explicit dynamics occupancy modelling framework to evaluate habitat covariates related to successful and failed establishments of American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) within the Yellowstone River floodplain of Montana, USA from 2012-2016.During this five-year period, bullfrogs failed to establish at most sites they colonized. Bullfrog establishment was most likely to occur and least likely to fail at sites closest to human-modified ponds and lakes and those with emergent vegetation. These habitat covariates were generally associated with the presence of permanent water.Suitable habitat for bullfrog establishment is abundant in the Yellowstone River floodplain, though many sites with suitable habitat remain uncolonized. Thus, the maximum distribution of bullfrogs is much greater than their current distribution.Synthesis and applications. Focused control efforts on habitats with or proximate to permanent waters are most likely to reduce the potential for invasive bullfrog establishment and spread in the Yellowstone River. The novel application of explicit dynamics occupancy models is a useful and widely applicable tool for guiding management efforts towards those habitats where new or slow invaders are most likely to establish and persist.

  19. Instructional Experiences of Graduate Assistants Implementing Explicit and Reflective Introductory Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag Bautista, Nazan; Schussler, Elisabeth E.; Rybczynski, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    Science education reform documents identify nature of science (NOS) as a critical component of scientific literacy and call for universities, colleges, and K-12 schools to explicitly integrate NOS learning into science curricula. In response to these calls, this study investigated the classroom practices of nine graduate assistants (GAs) who taught expository and inquiry laboratories that implemented an explicit and reflective (ER) pedagogy to teach NOS. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the experiences that enabled or inhibited GA implementation of an ER strategy in a college setting. The findings revealed that achieving quality implementation in this setting was very difficult. Factors such as GAs' ability to foster meaningful classroom discussions, laboratory logistics (e.g. lack of time and supplies), and the value undergraduates and GAs saw in learning about NOS were identified by GAs and observed by the researchers as barriers to the technique maximizing its potential. Thus, for meaningful infusion of NOS into science curricula, pedagogical support for GAs to manage meaningful classroom discussions in support of NOS or other complex topics is recommended for an ER approach to NOS learning to be successful in college settings.

  20. Spatially explicit bioaccumulation modeling in aquatic environments: Results from 2 demonstration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stackelberg, Katherine; Williams, Marc A; Clough, Jonathan; Johnson, Mark S

    2017-11-01

    Bioaccumulation models quantify the relationship between sediment and water exposure concentrations and resulting tissue levels of chemicals in aquatic organisms and represent a key link in the suite of tools used to support decision making at contaminated sediment sites. Predicted concentrations in the aquatic food web provide exposure estimates for human health and ecological risk assessments, which, in turn, provide risk-based frameworks for evaluating potential remedial activities and other management alternatives based on the fish consumption pathway. Despite the widespread use of bioaccumulation models to support remedial decision making, concerns remain about the predictive power of these models. A review of the available literature finds the increased mathematical complexity of typical bioaccumulation model applications is not matched by the deterministic exposure concentrations used to drive the models. We tested a spatially explicit exposure model (FishRand) at 2 nominally contaminated sites and compared results to estimates of bioaccumulation based on conventional, nonspatial techniques, and monitoring data. Differences in predicted fish tissue concentrations across applications were evident, although these demonstration sites were only mildly contaminated and would not warrant management actions on the basis of fish consumption. Nonetheless, predicted tissue concentrations based on the spatially explicit exposure characterization consistently outperformed conventional, nonspatial techniques across a variety of model performance metrics. These results demonstrate the improved predictive power as well as greater flexibility in evaluating the impacts of food web exposure and fish foraging behavior in a heterogeneous exposure environment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:1023-1037. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. An explicit example of Hopf bifurcation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloeden, P.; Wells, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is observed that a complete and explicit example of Hopf bifurcation appears not to be known in fluid mechanics. Such an example is presented for the rotating Benard problem with free boundary conditions on the upper and lower faces, and horizontally periodic solutions. Normal modes are found for the linearization, and the Veronis computation of the wave numbers is modified to take into account the imposed horizontal periodicity. An invariant subspace of the phase space is found in which the hypotheses of the Joseph-Sattinger theorem are verified, thus demonstrating the Hopf bifurcation. The criticality calculations are carried through to demonstrate rigorously, that the bifurcation is subcritical for certain cases, and to demonstrate numerically that it is subcritical for all the cases in the paper.

  2. A General Symbolic PDE Solver Generator: Beyond Explicit Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sheshadri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extension of our Mathematica- and MathCode-based symbolic-numeric framework for solving a variety of partial differential equation (PDE problems. The main features of our earlier work, which implemented explicit finite-difference schemes, include the ability to handle (1 arbitrary number of dependent variables, (2 arbitrary dimensionality, and (3 arbitrary geometry, as well as (4 developing finite-difference schemes to any desired order of approximation. In the present paper, extensions of this framework to implicit schemes and the method of lines are discussed. While C++ code is generated, using the MathCode system for the implicit method, Modelica code is generated for the method of lines. The latter provides a preliminary PDE support for the Modelica language. Examples illustrating the various aspects of the solver generator are presented.

  3. Enhanced sampling and applications in protein folding in explicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Jianpeng

    2010-01-01

    We report a single-copy tempering method for simulating large complex systems. In a generalized ensemble, the method uses runtime estimate of the thermal average energy computed from a novel integral identity to guide a continuous temperature-space random walk. We first validated the method in a two-dimensional Ising model and a Lennard-Jones liquid system. It was then applied to folding of three small proteins, trpzip2, trp-cage, and villin headpiece in explicit solvent. Within 0.5∼1 microsecond, all three systems were reversibly folded into atomic accuracy: the alpha carbon root mean square deviations of the best folded conformations from the native states were 0.2, 0.4, and 0.4 Å, for trpzip2, trp-cage, and villin headpiece, respectively. PMID:20590175

  4. Explicit free parametrization of the modified tetrahedron equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gehlen, G V; Sergeev, S

    2003-01-01

    The modified tetrahedron equation (MTE) with affine Weyl quantum variables at the Nth root of unity is solved by a rational mapping operator which is obtained from the solution of a linear problem. We show that the solutions can be parametrized in terms of eight free parameters and 16 discrete phase choices, thus providing a broad starting point for the construction of three-dimensional integrable lattice models. The Fermat-curve points parametrizing the representation of the mapping operator in terms of cyclic functions are expressed in terms of the independent parameters. An explicit formula for the density factor of the MTE is derived. For the example N=2 we write the MTE in full detail.

  5. ALADYN - a spatially explicit, allelic model for simulating adaptive dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Katja H; Travis, Justin Mj

    2014-12-01

    ALADYN is a freely available cross-platform C++ modeling framework for stochastic simulation of joint allelic and demographic dynamics of spatially-structured populations. Juvenile survival is linked to the degree of match between an individual's phenotype and the local phenotypic optimum. There is considerable flexibility provided for the demography of the considered species and the genetic architecture of the traits under selection. ALADYN facilitates the investigation of adaptive processes to spatially and/or temporally changing conditions and the resulting niche and range dynamics. To our knowledge ALADYN is so far the only model that allows a continuous resolution of individuals' locations in a spatially explicit landscape together with the associated patterns of selection.

  6. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nathan P; Branson, Mark; Burt, Melissa A; Abbot, Dorian S; Kuang, Zhiming; Randall, David A; Tziperman, Eli

    2014-07-29

    The effect of clouds on climate remains the largest uncertainty in climate change predictions, due to the inability of global climate models (GCMs) to resolve essential small-scale cloud and convection processes. We compare preindustrial and quadrupled CO2 simulations between a conventional GCM in which convection is parameterized and a "superparameterized" model in which convection is explicitly simulated with a cloud-permitting model in each grid cell. We find that the global responses of the two models to increased CO2 are broadly similar: both simulate ice-free Arctic summers, wintertime Arctic convection, and enhanced Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) activity. Superparameterization produces significant differences at both CO2 levels, including greater Arctic cloud cover, further reduced sea ice area at high CO2, and a stronger increase with CO2 of the MJO.

  7. Philosophical Reflections made explicit as a Tool for Mathematical Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sune; Andresen, Mette

    2009-01-01

        A new construct, ‘multidiciplinarity', is prescribed in the curricula of Danish Upper Secondary Schools by governmental regulations since 2006. Multidisciplinarity offers a good chance to introduce philosophical tools or methods in mathematics with the aim to improve the students' learning...... of both subjects, and to study the students' reactions and signs of progressive mathematizing. Based on realistic mathematics education (RME) which is rooted in Hans Freudenthal's idea of mathematics as a human activity, we decided to centre our work on the concept of reflection and to build a model...... for making students reflections in the mathematics class explicit to themselves. In our paper, we present a combination of two stratifications of reflections which were developed recently in works by other authors. The paper outlines our model and exemplifies its use on the teaching of mathematical models...

  8. Approximating Explicitly the Mean-Reverting CEV Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Halidias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in the numerical solution of mean-reverting CEV processes that appear in financial mathematics models and are described as nonnegative solutions of certain stochastic differential equations with sublinear diffusion coefficients of the form (xtq, where 1/2explicit numerical schemes that preserve positivity. We prove convergence of the proposed SD scheme with rate depending on the parameter q. Furthermore, we verify our findings through numerical experiments and compare with other positivity preserving schemes. Finally, we show how to treat the two-dimensional stochastic volatility model with instantaneous variance process given by the above mean-reverting CEV process.

  9. Explicit and implicit emotion regulation: a multi-level framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Laura Martin; Gross, James J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ability to adaptively regulate emotion is essential for mental and physical well-being. How should we organize the myriad ways people attempt to regulate their emotions? We explore the utility of a framework that distinguishes among four fundamental classes of emotion regulation strategies. The framework describes each strategy class in terms their behavioral characteristics, underlying psychological processes and supporting neural systems. A key feature of this multi-level framework is its conceptualization of the psychological processes in terms of two orthogonal dimensions that describe (i) the nature of the emotion regulation goal (ranging from to implicit to explicit) and (ii) the nature of the emotion change process (ranging from more automatic to more controlled). After describing the core elements of the framework, we use it to review human and animal research on the neural bases of emotion regulation and to suggest key directions for future research on emotion regulation. PMID:28981910

  10. Virtual prototyping of drop test using explicit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Georgi; Kamberov, Konstantin

    2017-12-01

    Increased requirements for reliability and safety, included in contemporary standards and norms, has high impact over new product development. New numerical techniques based on virtual prototyping technology, facilitates imrpoving product development cycle, resutling in reduced time/money spent for this stage as well as increased knowledge about certain failure mechanism. So called "drop test" became nearly a "must" step in development of any human operated product. This study aims to demonstrate dynamic behaviour assessment of a structure under impact loads, based on virtual prototyping using a typical nonlinear analysis - explicit dynamics. An example is presneted, based on a plastic container that is used as cartridge for a dispenser machine exposed to various work conditions. Different drop orientations were analyzed and critical load cases and design weaknesses have been found. Several design modifications have been proposed, based on detailed analyses results review.

  11. Explicit equilibria in a kinetic model of gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, F.; Toscani, G.

    2010-06-01

    We introduce and discuss a nonlinear kinetic equation of Boltzmann type which describes the evolution of wealth in a pure gambling process, where the entire sum of wealths of two agents is up for gambling, and randomly shared between the agents. For this equation the analytical form of the steady states is found for various realizations of the random fraction of the sum which is shared to the agents. Among others, the exponential distribution appears as steady state in case of a uniformly distributed random fraction, while Gamma distribution appears for a random fraction which is Beta distributed. The case in which the gambling game is only conservative-in-the-mean is shown to lead to an explicit heavy tailed distribution.

  12. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation (GLE), which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection (LP) technique. Within this framework a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here we discuss that this task is most naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importa...

  13. SEARCH: Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Benjamin P; McCann, Nicholas P; Zollner, Patrick A; Cummings, Robert; Gilbert, Jonathan H; Gustafson, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Complex decisions dramatically affect animal dispersal and space use. Dispersing individuals respond to a combination of fine-scale environmental stimuli and internal attributes. Individual-based modeling offers a valuable approach for the investigation of such interactions because it combines the heterogeneity of animal behaviors with spatial detail. Most individual-based models (IBMs), however, vastly oversimplify animal behavior and such behavioral minimalism diminishes the value of these models. We present program SEARCH (Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat), a spatially explicit, individual-based, population model of animal dispersal through realistic landscapes. SEARCH uses values in Geographic Information System (GIS) maps to apply rules that animals follow during dispersal, thus allowing virtual animals to respond to fine-scale features of the landscape and maintain a detailed memory of areas sensed during movement. SEARCH also incorporates temporally dynamic landscapes so that the environment to which virtual animals respond can change during the course of a simulation. Animals in SEARCH are behaviorally dynamic and able to respond to stimuli based upon their individual experiences. Therefore, SEARCH is able to model behavioral traits of dispersing animals at fine scales and with many dynamic aspects. Such added complexity allows investigation of unique ecological questions. To illustrate SEARCH's capabilities, we simulated case studies using three mammals. We examined the impact of seasonally variable food resources on the weight distribution of dispersing raccoons (Procyon lotor), the effect of temporally dynamic mortality pressure in combination with various levels of behavioral responsiveness in eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), and the impact of behavioral plasticity and home range selection on disperser mortality and weight change in virtual American martens (Martes americana). These simulations highlight the relevance of

  14. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software package PySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is described

  15. SEARCH: Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Pauli

    Full Text Available Complex decisions dramatically affect animal dispersal and space use. Dispersing individuals respond to a combination of fine-scale environmental stimuli and internal attributes. Individual-based modeling offers a valuable approach for the investigation of such interactions because it combines the heterogeneity of animal behaviors with spatial detail. Most individual-based models (IBMs, however, vastly oversimplify animal behavior and such behavioral minimalism diminishes the value of these models. We present program SEARCH (Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat, a spatially explicit, individual-based, population model of animal dispersal through realistic landscapes. SEARCH uses values in Geographic Information System (GIS maps to apply rules that animals follow during dispersal, thus allowing virtual animals to respond to fine-scale features of the landscape and maintain a detailed memory of areas sensed during movement. SEARCH also incorporates temporally dynamic landscapes so that the environment to which virtual animals respond can change during the course of a simulation. Animals in SEARCH are behaviorally dynamic and able to respond to stimuli based upon their individual experiences. Therefore, SEARCH is able to model behavioral traits of dispersing animals at fine scales and with many dynamic aspects. Such added complexity allows investigation of unique ecological questions. To illustrate SEARCH's capabilities, we simulated case studies using three mammals. We examined the impact of seasonally variable food resources on the weight distribution of dispersing raccoons (Procyon lotor, the effect of temporally dynamic mortality pressure in combination with various levels of behavioral responsiveness in eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus, and the impact of behavioral plasticity and home range selection on disperser mortality and weight change in virtual American martens (Martes americana. These simulations highlight the

  16. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software packagePySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is

  17. Intrinsically polarized elastic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Osama; Suesstrunk, Roman; Huber, Sebastian; Daraio, Chiara

    Mechanical metamaterials, with periodically repeating basic building blocks in space, expand the envelope of possible properties of matter. Metamaterials harness their effective properties through structure rather than chemical composition. Successful implementations of such materials enabled the realization of ultrastiff-utralight materials, negative Poisson ratio materials, and fluid-like solids. In this work, we theoretically analyze and experimentally implement a new design principle for mechanical metamaterials. By combining states of self-stress, topological invariants and additive manufacturing techniques, we realize a new class of three-dimensional mechanical metamaterials with polar elasticity. The fabricated specimens show, at two of its opposing faces along the same axis, an asymmetric elastic response (i.e., soft on one face and harder on the other). We design our lattice to retain angular dependency to a perpendicular load, providing a direct experimental observation of nodal Weyl lines.

  18. North Polar Erg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form. This VIS image was taken at 81 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. This region of the north polar erg is dominated by a different form of dunes than yesterday's image. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 81.4, Longitude 121.9 East (238.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Polarization sensitivity as a contrast enhancer in pelagic predators: lessons from in situ polarization imaging of transparent zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Sönke; Marshall, N Justin; Widder, Edith A

    2011-03-12

    Because light in the pelagic environment is partially polarized, it has been suggested that the polarization sensitivity found in certain pelagic species may serve to enhance the contrast of their transparent zooplankton prey. We examined its potential during cruises in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean and at a field station on the Great Barrier Reef. First, we collected various species of transparent zooplankton and micronekton and photographed them between crossed polarizers. Many groups, particularly the cephalopods, pelagic snails, salps and ctenophores, were found to have ciliary, muscular or connective tissues with striking birefringence. In situ polarization imagery of the same species showed that, while the degree of underwater polarization was fairly high (approx. 30% in horizontal lines of sight), tissue birefringence played little to no role in increasing visibility. This is most likely due to the low radiance of the horizontal background light when compared with the downwelling irradiance. In fact, the dominant radiance and polarization contrasts are due to unpolarized downwelling light that has been scattered from the animal viewed against the darker and polarized horizontal background light. We show that relatively simple algorithms can use this negative polarization contrast to increase visibility substantially.

  20. In-plane polarization of GaN-based heterostructures with arbitrary crystal orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Q.Y.; Li, T.; Wu, Z.H.; Ponce, F.A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The total polarization fields of pseudomorphic In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN heterostructures with 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.4 have been calculated as a function of the crystal orientation. Especial attention is placed on the direction and magnitude of in-plane piezoelectric polarization, which is not negligible for the non-polar and semi-polar growth. For an arbitrary crystal orientation, the piezoelectric polarization prevails in the InGaN/GaN system while the spontaneous polarization prevails in the AlGaN/GaN system. The in-plane potential due to polarization fields in non-polar epilayers is found to depend on the degree of planarity of the heterojunctions, and on the respective lateral dimensions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)