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  1. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Hisano

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc. affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  2. High Quality Topic Extraction from Business News Explains Abnormal Financial Market Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their “thematic” features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be “abnormally large,” can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no “excess trading,” when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information. PMID:23762258

  3. Solvation thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with a subject that has been studied since the beginning of physical chemistry. Despite the thousands of articles and scores of books devoted to solvation thermodynamics, I feel that some fundamen­ tal and well-established concepts underlying the traditional approach to this subject are not satisfactory and need revision. The main reason for this need is that solvation thermodynamics has traditionally been treated in the context of classical (macroscopic) ther­ modynamics alone. However, solvation is inherently a molecular pro­ cess, dependent upon local rather than macroscopic properties of the system. Therefore, the starting point should be based on statistical mechanical methods. For many years it has been believed that certain thermodynamic quantities, such as the standard free energy (or enthalpy or entropy) of solution, may be used as measures of the corresponding functions of solvation of a given solute in a given solvent. I first challenged this notion in a paper published in 1978 b...

  4. Where do ions solvate?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a simple model of ionic solvation inside a water cluster. The cluster is modeled as a spherical dielectric continuum. It is found that unpolarizable ions always prefer the bulk solvation. On the other hand, for polarizable ions, there exists a critical value of polarization above which surface solvation becomes ...

  5. Variation in family physicians' recording of auscultation abnormalities in patients with acute cough is not explained by case mix. A study from 12 European networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nick A; Melbye, Hasse; Kelly, Mark J; Cals, Jochen W L; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Coenen, Samuel; Butler, Christopher C

    2013-06-01

    Conflicting data on the diagnostic and prognostic value of auscultation abnormalities may be partly explained by inconsistent use of terminology. To describe general practitioners use of chest auscultation abnormality terms for patients presenting with acute cough across Europe, and to explore the influence of geographic location and case mix on use of these terms. Clinicians recorded whether 'diminished vesicular breathing', 'wheezes', 'crackles' and 'rhonchi' were present in an observational study of adults with acute cough in 13 networks in 12 European countries. We describe the use of these terms overall and by network, and used multilevel logistic regression to explore variation by network, controlling for patients' gender, age, comorbidities, smoking status and symptoms. 2345 patients were included. Wheeze was the auscultation abnormality most frequently recorded (20.6% overall) with wide variation by network (range: 8.3-30.8%). There was similar variation for other auscultation abnormalities. After controlling for patient characteristics, network was a significant predictor of auscultation abnormalities with odds ratios for location effects ranging from 0.37 to 4.46 for any recorded auscultation abnormality, and from 0.25 to 3.14 for rhonchi. There is important variation in recording chest auscultation abnormalities by general practitioners across Europe, which cannot be explained by differences in patient characteristics. There is a need and opportunity for standardization in the detection and classification of lung sounds.

  6. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  7. [Experimental and computation studies of polar solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report from the Pennsylvania State University contains seven sections: (1) radiative rate effects in solvatlvatochromic probes; (2) intramolecular charge transfer reactions; (3) Solvation dynamics in low temperature alcohols; (4) Ionic solvation dynamics; (5) solvation and proton-transfer dynamics in 7-azaindole; (6) computer simulations of solvation dynamics; (7) solvation in supercritical fluids. 20 refs., 11 figs

  8. Solvation of hydrocarbons in aqueous-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, I.A.; Magsumov, T.I.; Solomonov, B.N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic functions of solvation in mixtures of water with acetone and acetonitrile are measured at T = 298.15 K. • Solvation of n-octane and toluene in aqueous-organic mixtures is studied. • When increasing water content, Gibbs free energies grow up steadily, while enthalpies have a maximum. • Hydrocarbons are preferentially solvated with organic cosolvent even in mixtures with rather high water content. • Acetonitrile suppresses the hydrophobic effect less than acetone. - Abstract: We study the solvation of two hydrocarbons, n-octane and toluene, in binary mixtures of water with organic cosolvents. Two polar aprotic cosolvents that are miscible with water in any proportions, acetonitrile and acetone, were considered. We determine the magnitudes of thermodynamic functions of dissolution and solvation at T = 298.15 K in the mixtures with various compositions. Solution calorimetry was used to measure the enthalpies of solution, and GC headspace analysis was applied to obtain limiting activity coefficients of solutes in the studied systems. For the first time, the enthalpies of solution of alkane in the mixtures with high water content were measured directly. We observed well-pronounced maxima of the dependencies of enthalpies of solvation from the composition of solvent and no maxima for the Gibbs free energies of solvation. Two factors are concluded to be important to explain the observed tendencies: high energy cost of reorganization of binary solvent upon insertion of solute molecules and preferential surrounding of hydrocarbons with the molecules of organic cosolvent. Enthalpy-entropy compensation leads to a steady growth of the Gibbs free energies with increasing water content. On the other hand, consideration of the plots of the Gibbs free energy against enthalpy of solvation clearly shows that the solvation properties are changed dramatically after addition of a rather small amount of organic cosolvents. It is shown that they

  9. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air–water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute–solvent) and indirect (solvent–solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air–water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. (paper)

  10. Rotation and solvation of ammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, C.L.; Gipe, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    From nitrogen-15 spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser enhancements, the rotational correlations time tau/sub c/ for 15 NH 4 + was determined in s series of solvents. Values of tau/sub c/ range from 0.46 to 20 picoseconds. The solvent dependent of tau/sub c/ cannot be explained in terms of solvent polarity, molecular dipole moment, solvent basicity, solvent dielectric relaxation, or solvent viscosity. The rapid rotation and the variation with solvent can be accounted for by a model that involves hydrogen bonding of an NH proton to more than one solvent molecule in a disordered solvation environment. 25 references, 1 table

  11. Solvation in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T.; Karaborni, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the solvation structure in supercritical water composed with that in ambient water and in simple supercritical solvents. Molecular dynamics studies have been undertaken of systems that model ionic sodium and chloride, atomic argon, and molecular methanol in supercritical aqueous solutions using the simple point charge model of Berendsen for water. Because of the strong interactions between water and ions, ionic solutes are strongly attractive in supercritical water, forming large clusters of water molecules around each ion. Methanol is found to be a weakly-attractive solute in supercritical water. The cluster of excess water molecules surrounding a dissolved ion or polar molecule in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to the solvent clusters surrounding attractive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. Likewise, the deficit of water molecules surrounding a dissolved argon atom in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to that surrounding repulsive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in supercritical water was found to be about one third the number in ambient water. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule surrounding a central particle in supercritical water was only mildly affected by the identify of the central particle--atom, molecule, or ion. These results should be helpful in developing a qualitative understanding of important processes that occur in supercritical water. 29 refs., 6 figs

  12. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus, E-mail: gusgw@gusgw.net [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  13. Theories of the solvated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors address only the final state of the electron, that is, the solvated state, which, if no chemical reaction would occur, is a stable entity with well-defined characteristics. Except for some metal-ammonia solutions, and possible a few other cases, such stable species, in reality, exist but a short time (often as short as microseconds). Nevertheless, this chapter only deals with this final time-independent,'' completely solvated,'' equilibrium species. The last statement is added to indicate that the solvent around the electron has also come to thermal equilibrium with the field of the charge

  14. Unusual solvation through both p-orbital lobes of a carbene carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadad, C. Z., E-mail: cacier.hadad@udea.edu.co [Grupo de Química-Física Teórica, Instituto de Química, Universidad de Antioquia, A. A. 1226 Medellín (Colombia); Jenkins, Samantha [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Flórez, Elizabeth [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad de Medellín, Carrera 87 N° 30-65, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-03-07

    As a result of a configurational space search done to explain the experimental evidence of transient specific solvation of singlet fluorocarbene amide with tetrahydrofuran, we found that the most stable structures consist in a group in which each oxygen of two tetrahydrofuran molecules act as electron donor to its respective empty p-orbital lobe of the carbene carbon atom, located at each side of the carbene molecular plane. This kind of species, which to our knowledge has not been reported before, explains very well the particular experimental characteristics observed for the transient solvation of this system. We postulate that the simultaneous interaction to both p-orbital lobes seems to confer a special stability to the solvation complexes, because this situation moves away the systems from the proximity of the corresponding transition states for the ylide products. Additionally, we present an analysis of other solvation complexes and a study of the nature of the involved interactions.

  15. Unique geometry of sister kinetochores in human oocytes during meiosis I may explain maternal age-associated increases in chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Patel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The first meiotic division in human oocytes is highly error-prone and contributes to the uniquely high incidence of aneuploidy observed in human pregnancies. A successful meiosis I (MI division entails separation of homologous chromosome pairs and co-segregation of sister chromatids. For this to happen, sister kinetochores must form attachments to spindle kinetochore-fibres emanating from the same pole. In mouse and budding yeast, sister kinetochores remain closely associated with each other during MI, enabling them to act as a single unified structure. However, whether this arrangement also applies in human meiosis I oocytes was unclear. In this study, we perform high-resolution imaging of over 1900 kinetochores in human oocytes, to examine the geometry and architecture of the human meiotic kinetochore. We reveal that sister kinetochores in MI are not physically fused, and instead individual kinetochores within a pair are capable of forming independent attachments to spindle k-fibres. Notably, with increasing female age, the separation between kinetochores increases, suggesting a degradation of centromeric cohesion and/or changes in kinetochore architecture. Our data suggest that the differential arrangement of sister kinetochores and dual k-fibre attachments may explain the high proportion of unstable attachments that form in MI and thus indicate why human oocytes are prone to aneuploidy, particularly with increasing maternal age.

  16. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air−n-hexadecane and n-octanol−water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  17. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air-n-hexadecane and n-octanol-water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  18. Solvates of silico-12-molybdic acid with alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punchuk, I.N.; Chuvaev, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of investigating interaction processes of solid heteropolyacids and organic compounds, solvates are prepared. Solvates are products of adding gaseous methanol, ethanol and isopropanol to silico-12-molybdic acid. The compounds are studied by IR and PMR spectroscopy methods. Possible models for solvate structure are considered, as well as their connection with solvate properties and thermal decomposition

  19. 1 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Nonpolar Solvation Dynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IITP

    . S. NP. ( t. ) ( )t. SNeqm. NP. (a). (b). Figure S2. (a) Nonequilibrium solvation response functions calculated after averaging over different number of nonequilibrium trajectories. The response function converges after averaging over more than ...

  20. Solvated electron structure in glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, L.

    1981-01-01

    Current knowledge of the detailed geometrical structure of solvated electrons in aqueous and organic media is summarized. The geometry of solvated electrons in glassy methanol, ethanol, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran is discussed. Advanced electron magnetic resonance methods and development of new methods of analysis of electron spin echo modulation patterns, second moment line shapes, and forbidden photon spin-flip transitions for paramagnetic species in these disordered systems are discussed. 66 references are cited

  1. Preferential solvation and solvation shell composition of free base and protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin in aqueous organic mixed solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajtabar, Ali; Jaberi, Fatemeh; Gharib, Farrokh

    2011-12-01

    The solvatochromic properties of the free base and the protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) were studied in pure water, methanol, ethanol (protic solvents), dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (non-protic solvent), and their corresponding aqueous-organic binary mixed solvents. The correlation of the empirical solvent polarity scale ( ET) values of TPPS with composition of the solvents was analyzed by the solvent exchange model of Bosch and Roses to clarify the preferential solvation of the probe dyes in the binary mixed solvents. The solvation shell composition and the synergistic effects in preferential solvation of the solute dyes were investigated in terms of both solvent-solvent and solute-solvent interactions and also, the local mole fraction of each solvent composition was calculated in cybotactic region of the probe. The effective mole fraction variation may provide significant physico-chemical insights in the microscopic and molecular level of interactions between TPPS species and the solvent components and therefore, can be used to interpret the solvent effect on kinetics and thermodynamics of TPPS. The obtained results from the preferential solvation and solvent-solvent interactions have been successfully applied to explain the variation of equilibrium behavior of protonation of TPPS occurring in aqueous organic mixed solvents of methanol, ethanol and DMSO.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G; Schnieders, Michael J; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A

    2012-11-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view toward describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g. solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and non-polar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models.

  4. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  5. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein-DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein-DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein-DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein-DNA complexes.

  6. Solvated protein–DNA docking using HADDOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein–DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein–DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein–DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein–DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein–DNA complexes.

  7. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marc; Visscher, Koen M; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the

  8. Partial solvation parameters and LSER molecular descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The one-to-one correspondence of LSER molecular descriptors and partial solvation parameters (PSPs) for propionic acid. Highlights: ► Quantum-mechanics based development of a new QSPR predictive method. ► One-to-one correspondence of partial solvation parameters and LSER molecular descriptors. ► Development of alternative routes for the determination of partial solvation parameters and solubility parameters. ► Expansion and enhancement of solubility parameter approach. - Abstract: The partial solvation parameters (PSP) have been defined recently, on the basis of the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, in an effort to overcome some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition of solubility parameter and expand its range of applications. The present work continues along these lines and introduces two new solvation parameters, the van der Waals and the polarity/refractivity ones, which may replace both of the former dispersion and polar PSPs. Thus, one may use either the former scheme of PSPs (dispersion, polar, acidic, and basic) or, equivalently, the new scheme (van der Waals, polarity/refractivity, acidic, basic). The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner and, thus, the strength and appeal of the widely accepted concept of solubility parameter is preserved. The inter-relations of the various PSPs are critically discussed and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. The advantage of the new scheme of PSPs is the bridge that makes with the corresponding Abraham’s LSER descriptors. With this bridge, one may exchange information between PSPs, LSER experimental scales, and quantum mechanics calculations such as via the COSMO-RS theory. The proposed scheme is a predictive one and it is applicable to, both, homo-solvated and hetero-solvated compounds. The new scheme is tested for the calculation of activity coefficients at infinite dilution, for octanol

  9. Silver atom solvation and desolvation in ice matrices: study of solvation shell geometry by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L; Narayana, P A

    1978-01-01

    Results of studies of the solvation shell structure of silver atoms in ice matrix at 4/sup 0/K by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo spectrometry are reported. Drastic change in the hyperfine coupling constant of the silver atom was noted when the silver atom initially produced at 4/sup 0/K was warmed to 77/sup 0/K and reexamined by ESR at 4/sup 0/K. This suggested a very drastic rearrangement of the water molecules surrounding the silver atom. The geometric arrangement of water molecules around the silver atom produced at 4/sup 0/K was what would be expected for a solvated silver ion, indicating that no rearrangement had occurred after the silver atom formed. The addition of a little thermal excitation (heating to 77/sup 0/K) results in the geometry changes than can be explained by assuming either that a water molecule rotates around one of its OH bands or by the development of a hydrogen bond between the silver atom and one of the first solvation shell water molecules. Optical excitation in the absorption band of the silver atom in the ice matrix at 400nm resulted in desolvation of the silver ion or a reversion to the structure originally obtained by reaction of solver salts in ic matrix with radiation produced electrons. This was best explained by a charge transfer mechanism. (BLM)

  10. Advanced dielectric continuum model of preferential solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, Mikhail; Odinokov, Alexey; Nikitina, Ekaterina; Grigoriev, Fedor; Petrov, Nikolai; Alfimov, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    A continuum model for solvation effects in binary solvent mixtures is formulated in terms of the density functional theory. The presence of two variables, namely, the dimensionless solvent composition y and the dimensionless total solvent density z, is an essential feature of binary systems. Their coupling, hidden in the structure of the local dielectric permittivity function, is postulated at the phenomenological level. Local equilibrium conditions are derived by a variation in the free energy functional expressed in terms of the composition and density variables. They appear as a pair of coupled equations defining y and z as spatial distributions. We consider the simplest spherically symmetric case of the Born-type ion immersed in the benzene/dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solvent mixture. The profiles of y(R ) and z(R ) along the radius R, which measures the distance from the ion center, are found in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is shown that for a given solute ion z(R ) does not depend significantly on the composition variable y. A simplified solution is then obtained by inserting z(R ), found in the MD simulation for the pure DMSO, in the single equation which defines y(R ). In this way composition dependences of the main solvation effects are investigated. The local density augmentation appears as a peak of z(R ) at the ion boundary. It is responsible for the fine solvation effects missing when the ordinary solvation theories, in which z =1, are applied. These phenomena, studied for negative ions, reproduce consistently the simulation results. For positive ions the simulation shows that z ≫1 (z =5-6 at the maximum of the z peak), which means that an extremely dense solvation shell is formed. In such a situation the continuum description fails to be valid within a consistent parametrization.

  11. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  12. Generalized Born Models of Macromolecular Solvation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, Donald; Case, David A.

    2000-10-01

    It would often be useful in computer simulations to use a simple description of solvation effects, instead of explicitly representing the individual solvent molecules. Continuum dielectric models often work well in describing the thermodynamic aspects of aqueous solvation, and approximations to such models that avoid the need to solve the Poisson equation are attractive because of their computational efficiency. Here we give an overview of one such approximation, the generalized Born model, which is simple and fast enough to be used for molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and nucleic acids. We discuss its strengths and weaknesses, both for its fidelity to the underlying continuum model and for its ability to replace explicit consideration of solvent molecules in macromolecular simulations. We focus particularly on versions of the generalized Born model that have a pair-wise analytical form, and therefore fit most naturally into conventional molecular mechanics calculations.

  13. Evidence for Reduced Hydrogen-Bond Cooperativity in Ionic Solvation Shells from Isotope-Dependent Dielectric Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Roberto; Ottosson, Niklas; Bakker, Huib J.; Woutersen, Sander

    2018-05-01

    We find that the reduction in dielectric response (depolarization) of water caused by solvated ions is different for H2O and D2O . This isotope dependence allows us to reliably determine the kinetic contribution to the depolarization, which is found to be significantly smaller than predicted by existing theory. The discrepancy can be explained from a reduced hydrogen-bond cooperativity in the solvation shell: we obtain quantitative agreement between theory and experiment by reducing the Kirkwood correlation factor of the solvating water from 2.7 (the bulk value) to ˜1.6 for NaCl and ˜1 (corresponding to completely uncorrelated motion of water molecules) for CsCl.

  14. SPSS explained

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Perry R; Brownlow, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    SPSS Explained provides the student with all that they need to undertake statistical analysis using SPSS. It combines a step-by-step approach to each procedure with easy to follow screenshots at each stage of the process. A number of other helpful features are provided: regular advice boxes with tips specific to each test explanations divided into 'essential' and 'advanced' sections to suit readers at different levels frequently asked questions at the end of each chapter. The first edition of this popular book has been fully updated for IBM SPSS version 21 and also includes: chapters that expl

  15. Theory of optical spectra of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years better theoretical models of solvated electron have been developed. These models allow one to calculate a priori the observable properties of the trapped electron. One of the most important and most widely determined properties is the optical spectrum. In this paper we consider the predictions of the theories not only as to the band maximum but line shape and width. In addition we will review how the theories predict these will depend on the solvent, pressure, temperature, and solvent density. In all cases extensive comparisons will be made with experimental work. In addition four new areas will be explored and recent results will be presented. These concern electrons in dense polar gases, the time development of the solvated electron spectrum, solvated electrons in mixed solvents, and photoelectron emission spectra (PEE) as it relates to higher excited states. This paper will review all recent theoretical calculations and present a critical review of the present status and future developments which are anticipated. The best theories are quite successful in predicting trends, and qualitative agreement concerning band maximum. The theory is still weak in predicting line shape and line width

  16. Preferential solvation: dividing surface vs excess numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2014-04-10

    How do osmolytes affect the conformation and configuration of supramolecular assembly, such as ion channel opening and actin polymerization? The key to the answer lies in the excess solvation numbers of water and osmolyte molecules; these numbers are determinable solely from experimental data, as guaranteed by the phase rule, as we show through the exact solution theory of Kirkwood and Buff (KB). The osmotic stress technique (OST), in contrast, purposes to yield alternative hydration numbers through the use of the dividing surface borrowed from the adsorption theory. However, we show (i) OST is equivalent, when it becomes exact, to the crowding effect in which the osmolyte exclusion dominates over hydration; (ii) crowding is not the universal driving force of the osmolyte effect (e.g., actin polymerization); (iii) the dividing surface for solvation is useful only for crowding, unlike in the adsorption theory which necessitates its use due to the phase rule. KB thus clarifies the true meaning and limitations of the older perspectives on preferential solvation (such as solvent binding models, crowding, and OST), and enables excess number determination without any further assumptions.

  17. Preferential Solvation of an Asymmetric Redox Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kee Sung; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Vijayakumar, M.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jian Z.; Persson, Kristin A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2016-12-15

    The fundamental correlations between inter-molecular interactions, solvation structure and functionality of electrolytes are in many cases unknown, particularly for multi-component liquid systems. In this work, we explore such correlations by investigating the complex interplay between solubility and solvation structure for the electrolyte system comprising N-(ferrocenylmethyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonimide (Fc1N112-TFSI) dissolved in a ternary carbonate solvent mixture using combined NMR relaxation and computational analyses. Probing the evolution of the solvent-solvent, ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions with an increase in solute concentration provides a molecular level understanding of the solubility limit of the Fc1N112-TFSI system. An increase in solute con-centration leads to pronounced Fc1N112-TFSI contact-ion pair formation by diminishing solvent-solvent and ion-solvent type interactions. At the solubility limit, the precipitation of solute is initiated through agglomeration of contact-ion pairs due to overlapping solvation shells.

  18. Astronomy Explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Gerald

    Every year large numbers of people take up the study of astronomy, mostly at amateur level. There are plenty of elementary books on the market, full of colourful photographs, but lacking in proper explanations of how and why things are as they are. Many people eventually wish to go beyond the 'coffee-table book' stage and study this fascinating subject in greater depth. This book is written for them. In addition, many people sit for public examinations in this subject each year and this book is also intended to be of use to them. All the topics from the GCSE syllabus are covered here, with sample questions at the end of each chapter. Astronomy Explained provides a comprehensive treatment of the subject in more depth than is usually found in elementary works, and will be of interest to both amateur astronomers and students of astronomy.

  19. Conductometric determination of solvation numbers of alkali metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Yu.Ya.; Gorbachev, V.Yu.; Chumak, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Theories describing the interrelation of ion mobility with their effective radii in solutions are considered. Possibility of using these theories for determination the solvation numbers n s of some ions is estimated. According to conductometric data values of n s are calculated for alkali metal ions in propylene carbonate. The data obtained are compared with solvation numbers determined with the use of entropies of ions solvation. Change of n s values within temperature range 273.15-323.15 K is considered. Using literature data the effect of crystallographic radii of cations and medium permittivity on the the values of solvation numbers of cations are analyzed. (author)

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  1. WAP explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.J.; Pulsipher, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    The Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is a federal block grant program administered by all 50 states and the District of Columbia through community action agencies, state energy offices, local government, and other nonprofit organizations to provide weatherization services to eligible households. The WAP was established in 1976 to increase the energy efficiency, reduce the energy expenditures, and improve the health and safety of low-income households, especially those households that are particularly vulnerable such as families with children, persons with disabilities, and the elderly. The manner in which WAP funds have been allocated to states, however, has been a contentious issue since the inception of the program. Southern states have argued that too much of the federal funding goes to cold-climate and rural states. Northern states disagree. In 1990, Congress amended the Energy Conservation and Production Act and required the Department of Energy to develop a new funding formula. The Department of Energy currently uses a three-factor formula developed in 1995 in conjunction with a two-factor formula developed in 1977 and a hold-harmless provision to allocate WAP funding. The purpose of this paper is to explain the WAP allocation mechanism and the assumptions associated with the 1977 and the 1995 funding formula. The factors that compose each funding formula are critically assessed and various implementation issues are reviewed, including the selection of the trigger point and program capacity levels. It is not possible to define the need for weatherization assistance objectively and in a unique manner, and this ambiguity is the main reason why the WAP allocation mechanism is expected to remain a lively topic of debate and contention

  2. Nonpolar solvation dynamics for a nonpolar solute in room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandipa Indra

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Keywords. Solvation dynamics; nonpolar solvation; ionic liquid; molecular dynamics; linear response theory. 1. ... J. Chem. Sci. (2018) 130:3 spectrum of the excited probe molecule for imida- .... Therefore, the solute and the RTIL ions interact only ... interval of 30 ps from a long equilibrium trajectory of dura-.

  3. Abacavir methanol 2.5-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong-Truc T. Pham

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The structure of abacavir (systematic name: {(1S,4R-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino-9H-purin-9-yl]cyclopent-2-en-1-yl}methanol, C14H18N6O·2.5CH3OH, consists of hydrogen-bonded ribbons which are further held together by additional hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl group and two N atoms on an adjacent purine. The asymmetric unit also contains 2.5 molecules of methanol solvate which were grossly disordered and were excluded using SQUEEZE subroutine in PLATON [Spek, (2009. Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155].

  4. An APC:WNT counter-current-like mechanism regulates cell division along the colonic crypt axis: a mechanism that explains how APC mutations induce proliferative abnormalities that drive colon cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M Boman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside. WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g. survivin are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric. APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly-proliferating cells during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes.

  5. An APC:WNT Counter-Current-Like Mechanism Regulates Cell Division Along the Human Colonic Crypt Axis: A Mechanism That Explains How APC Mutations Induce Proliferative Abnormalities That Drive Colon Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Bruce M.; Fields, Jeremy Z.

    2013-01-01

    APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT) that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs) at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside). WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside) and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g., survivin) are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric). APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly proliferating cells) during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes. PMID:24224156

  6. Solvation of lithium ion in dimethoxyethane and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Solvation of the lithium ion (Li+) in dimethoxyethane (DME) and propylene carbonate (PC) is of scientific significance and urgency in the context of lithium-ion batteries. I report PM7-MD simulations on the composition of Li+ solvation shells (SH) in a few DME/PC mixtures. The equimolar mixture features preferential solvation by PC, in agreement with classical MD studies. However, one DME molecule is always present in the first SH, supplementing the cage formed by five PC molecules. As PC molecules get removed, DME gradually substitutes vacant places. In the PC-poor mixtures, an entire SH is populated by five DME molecules.

  7. Watching the Solvation of Atoms in Liquids One Solvent Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Arthur E.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2010-06-01

    We use mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast transient hole-burning spectroscopy to build a molecular-level picture of the motions of solvent molecules around Na atoms in liquid tetrahydrofuran. We find that even at room temperature, the solvation of Na atoms occurs in discrete steps, with the number of solvent molecules nearest the atom changing one at a time. This explains why the rate of solvent relaxation differs for different initial nonequilibrium states, and reveals how the solvent helps determine the identity of atomic species in liquids.

  8. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  9. Ultrafast transient-absorption of the solvated electron in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Y.; Alfano, J.C.; Walhout, P.K.; Barbara, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafast near infrared (NIR)-pump/variable wavelength probe transient-absorption spectroscopy has been performed on the aqueous solvated electron. The photodynamics of the solvated electron excited to its p-state are qualitatively similar to previous measurements of the dynamics of photoinjected electrons at high energy. This result confirms the previous interpretation of photoinjected electron dynamics as having a rate-limiting bottleneck at low energies presumably involving the p-state

  10. Estimation of abraham solvation equation coefficients for hydrogen bond formation from abraham solvation parameters for solute activity and basicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abraham solvation equations find widespread use in environmental chemistry and pharmaco-chemistry. The coefficients in these equations, which are solvent (system) descriptors, are usually determined by fitting experimental data. To simplify the determination of these coefficients in Abraham

  11. A shell-resolved analysis of preferential solvation of coffee ingredients in aqueous mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Berger, Magdalena; Steinhauser, Othmar; Schröder, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids increase the solubility of various coffee ingredients in aqueous solution but little is known about the underlying mechanism. Kirkwood-Buff integrals as well as the potential of mean force indicate that the imidazolium cations are accumulated at the surface of the solutes, removing water molecules from the solute surface. Although hydrogen bonding of the anions to hydroxy groups of the solutes can be detected, their concentration at the surface is less enhanced compared to the cations. The decomposition into solvation shells by Voronoi tessellation reveals that structural features are only observed in the first solvation shell. Nevertheless, the depletion of water and the excess concentration of the ions and, in particular, of the cations are visible in the next solvation shells as well. Therefore, classical arguments of hydrotropic theory fail to explain this behavior.

  12. Water-enhanced solvation of organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jane H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Water-enhanced solvation (WES) was explored for Lewis acid solutes in Lewis base organic solvents, to develop cheap extract regeneration processes. WES for solid solutes was determined from ratios of solubilities of solutes in water-sat. and low-water solvent; both were determined from solid-liquid equilibrium. Vapor-headspace analysis was used to determine solute activity coefficients as function of organic phase water concentration. WES magnitudes of volatile solutes were normalized, set equal to slope of log γs vs xw/xs curve. From graph shape Δ(log γs) represents relative change in solute activity coefficient. Solutes investigated by vapor-headspace analysis were acetic acid, propionic acid, ethanol, 1,2-propylene glycol, 2,3-butylene glycol. Monocarboxylic acids had largest decrease in activity coefficient with water addition followed by glycols and alcohols. Propionic acid in cyclohexanone showed greatest water-enhancement Δ(log γacid)/Δ(xw/xacid) = -0.25. In methylcyclohexanone, the decrease of the activity coefficient of propionic acid was -0.19. Activity coefficient of propionic acid in methylcyclohexanone stopped decreasing once the water reached a 2:1 water to acid mole ratio, implying a stoichiometric relation between water, ketone, and acid. Except for 2,3-butanediol, activity coefficients of the solutes studied decreased monotonically with water content. Activity coefficient curves of ethanol, 1,2-propanediol and 2,3-butanediol did not level off at large water/solute mole ratio. Solutes investigated by solid-liquid equilibrium were citric acid, gallic acid, phenol, xylenols, 2-naphthol. Saturation concentration of citric acid in anhydrous butyl acetate increased from 0.0009 to 0.087 mol/L after 1.3 % (g/g) water co-dissolved into organic phase. Effect of water-enhanced solvation for citric acid is very large but very small for phenol and its derivatives.

  13. Cluster expansion of the solvation free energy difference: Systematic improvements in the solvation of single ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliego, Josefredo R.

    2017-07-01

    The cluster expansion method has been used in the imperfect gas theory for several decades. This paper proposes a cluster expansion of the solvation free energy difference. This difference, which results from a change in the solute-solvent potential energy, can be written as the logarithm of a finite series. Similar to the Mayer function, the terms in the series are related to configurational integrals, which makes the integrand relevant only for configurations of the solvent molecules close to the solute. In addition, the terms involve interaction of solute with one, two, and so on solvent molecules. The approach could be used for hybrid quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics methods or mixed cluster-continuum approximation. A simple form of the theory was applied for prediction of pKa in methanol; the results indicated that three explicit methanol molecules and the dielectric continuum lead to a root of mean squared error (RMSE) of only 1.3 pKa units, whereas the pure continuum solvation model based on density method leads to a RMSE of 6.6 pKa units.

  14. Standard electrode potential, Tafel equation, and the solvation thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2009-06-21

    Equilibrium in the electronic subsystem across the solution-metal interface is considered to connect the standard electrode potential to the statistics of localized electronic states in solution. We argue that a correct derivation of the Nernst equation for the electrode potential requires a careful separation of the relevant time scales. An equation for the standard metal potential is derived linking it to the thermodynamics of solvation. The Anderson-Newns model for electronic delocalization between the solution and the electrode is combined with a bilinear model of solute-solvent coupling introducing nonlinear solvation into the theory of heterogeneous electron transfer. We therefore are capable of addressing the question of how nonlinear solvation affects electrochemical observables. The transfer coefficient of electrode kinetics is shown to be equal to the derivative of the free energy, or generalized force, required to shift the unoccupied electronic level in the bulk. The transfer coefficient thus directly quantifies the extent of nonlinear solvation of the redox couple. The current model allows the transfer coefficient to deviate from the value of 0.5 of the linear solvation models at zero electrode overpotential. The electrode current curves become asymmetric in respect to the change in the sign of the electrode overpotential.

  15. Solvation structures of lithium halides in methanol–water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Atanu; Dixit, Mayank Kumar; Tembe, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Potentials of mean force for Li + -halides are calculated in methanol–water mixtures. • Stable CIP for x methanol = 1.0 becomes unstable at and below x methanol = 0.75. • The Li + ion is preferentially solvated by methanol molecules. • The halide ions are preferentially solvated by water molecules. - Abstract: The potentials of mean force (PMFs) for the ion pairs, Li + −Cl − , Li + −Br − and Li + −I − have been calculated in five methanol–water compositions. The results obtained are verified by trailing the trajectories and calculating the ion pair distance residence times. Local structures around the ions are studied using the radial distribution functions, density profiles, orientational correlation functions, running coordination numbers and excess coordination numbers. The major change in PMF is observed as the methanol mole fraction (x methanol ) is changed from 1.0 to 0.75. The stable contact ion pair occurring for x methanol = 1.0 becomes unstable at and below x methanol = 0.75. The preferential solvation data show that the halide ions are always preferentially solvated by water molecules. Although the lithium ion is preferentially solvated by methanol molecules, there is significant affinity towards water molecules as well

  16. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  17. Difference rule-a new thermodynamic principle: prediction of standard thermodynamic data for inorganic solvates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, H Donald Brooke; Glasser, Leslie

    2004-12-08

    We present a quite general thermodynamic "difference" rule, derived from thermochemical first principles, quantifying the difference between the standard thermodynamic properties, P, of a solid n-solvate (or n-hydrate), n-S, containing n molecules of solvate, S (water or other) and the corresponding solid parent (unsolvated) salt: [P[n-solvate] - P[parent

  18. Water Evaporation and Conformational Changes from Partially Solvated Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Prakash Thirumuruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  19. Dipole moments of molecules solvated in helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, Paul L.; Nauta, Klaas; Miller, Roger E.

    2003-01-01

    Stark spectra are reported for hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene solvated in helium nanodroplets. The goal of this study is to understand the influence of the helium solvent on measurements of the permanent electric dipole moment of a molecule. We find that the dipole moments of the helium solvated molecules, calculated assuming the electric field is the same as in vacuum, are slightly smaller than the well-known gas-phase dipole moments of HCN and HCCCN. A simple elliptical cavity model quantitatively accounts for this difference, which arises from the dipole-induced polarization of the helium

  20. A conductivity study of preferential solvation of lithium ion in acetonitrile-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhzhukhina, Nataliia; Longinotti, M. Paula; Corti, Horacio R.; Calvo, Ernesto J.

    2015-01-01

    The electrical mobility of LiPF 6 in acetonitrile–dimethyl sulfoxide (ACN–DMSO) mixtures, a potential electrolyte in oxygen cathodes of lithium-air batteries, has been studied using a very precise conductance technique, which allowed the determination of the infinite dilution molar conductivity and association constant of the salt in the whole composition range. In the search for preferential Li + ion solvation, we also measured the electrical conductivity of tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate (TBAPF 6 ), a salt formed by a bulky cation, over the same composition range. The results show a qualitative change in the curvature of the LiPF 6 molar conductivity composition dependence for ACN molar fraction (x ACN ) ∼ 0.95, which was not observed for TBAPF 6 . The dependence of the measured Li/Li + couple potential with solvent composition also showed a pronounced change around the same composition. We suggest that these observations can be explained by Li + ion preferential solvation by DMSO in ACN–DMSO mixtures with very low molar fractions of DMSO

  1. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  2. Solubility and preferential solvation of some n-alkyl-parabens in methanol + water mixtures at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cárdenas, Zaira J.; Jiménez, Daniel M.; Delgado, Daniel R.; Almanza, Ovidio A.; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Martínez, Fleming; Acree, William E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Parabens equilibrium solubility was determined in methanol + water binary mixtures at 298.15 K. • Solubility values were correlated with the Jouyban-Acree model. • Preferential solvation parameters were derived by using the IKBI method. • δx 1,3 values are negative in water-rich mixtures but positive in the other mixtures. - Abstract: Methyl, ethyl and propyl parabens equilibrium solubility was determined in (methanol + water) binary mixtures at 298.15 K. The mole fraction solubility of these compounds increased in 503 (from 2.40 × 10 −4 to 0.121), 1377 (from 9.86 × 10 −5 to 0.136) and 4597 (from 3.73 × 10 −5 to 0.171) times when passing from neat water to neat methanol, for methyl, ethyl and propyl parabens, respectively. All these solubility values were correlated with the Jouyban-Acree model. Preferential solvation parameters by methanol (δx 1,3 ) of these parabens were derived from their thermodynamic solution properties using the inverse Kirkwood-Buff integrals (IKBI) method. For all compounds δx 1,3 values are negative in water-rich mixtures but positive in mixtures with methanol mole fraction greater than 0.32. It is conjecturable that in the former case the hydrophobic hydration around non-polar groups of parabens plays a relevant role in the solvation. Besides, the preferential solvation of these solutes by methanol in mixtures of similar co-solvent compositions and in methanol-rich mixtures could be explained in terms of the higher basic behaviour of methanol.

  3. Thermodynamics of solvation and solvophobic effect in formamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, I.A.; Stolov, M.A.; Solomonov, B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution of apolar organic compounds in formamide were measured. • Gibbs free energies of solution were experimentally determined. • Influence of the solvophobic effect on solvation thermodynamics was studied. • Thermodynamic features of solutions in formamide resemble those of aqueous solutions. -- Abstract: Using semi-adiabatic calorimetry, we measured the enthalpies of solution for various low-polar compounds including alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and their halogenated derivatives in formamide at temperature of 298 K. For the same compounds, the values of limiting activity coefficients in formamide were determined using GC headspace analysis at 298 K, and Gibbs free energies of solution and solvation were calculated. Based on these data and the available literature values of the Gibbs free energy of solvation in formamide for a number of other low-polar solutes, a study of the solvophobic effect in this solvent is performed, and its resemblance to the hydrophobic effect in aqueous solutions is demonstrated. It is shown that the contribution of the solvophobic effect into the solvation Gibbs free energy in formamide is much higher than that in aliphatic alcohols, but lower than that in water. Like in water, the magnitude of this contribution for different solutes linearly increases with the solute molecular volume. Solvophobic effect also significantly affects the enthalpies of dissolution in formamide, causing them to be more negative in the case of alkanes and more positive in the case of arenes

  4. Isotope effect in enthalpy of solvation of the lithium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestov, G.A.; Egorov, G.I.; Korolev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    At 298.15 K, the authors determined the standard enthalpies of solution for 6 LiCl and 7 LiCl in water, heavy water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and aqueous solutions of DMSO. The authors have established that solvation of 6 Li + is differentiated in water and DMSO to a greater degree than for 7 Li +

  5. The solvation of carbohydrates in dimethylsulfoxide and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Diaz, M.D.; Horwat, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    The solvation of sucrose and other carbohydrates in DMSO and water is probed by intermolecular NOE measurements. The NOE effects are interpreted in terms of specific binding of the solvent to certain sites of the molecules. It is shown that DMSO attaches to specific sites of the sucrose molecule, whereas for water such a clear differentiation cannot be proven. (author)

  6. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  7. On the coupling between molecular diffusion and solvation shell exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Rey, Rossend; Masia, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The connection between diffusion and solvent exchanges between first and second solvation shells is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and analytic calculations, with detailed illustrations for water exchange for the Li+ and Na+ ions, and for liquid argon. First, two methods...

  8. Comparison between implicit and hybrid solvation methods for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Both implicit solvation method (dielectric polarizable continuum model, DPCM) and hybrid ... the free energy change (ΔGsol) as per the PCM ... Here the gas phase change is written as ΔGg = ΔEelec + ..... bution to the field of electrochemistry.

  9. Polarizability and Aqueous Solvation of the Sulfate Dianion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Pavel; Curtis, J. E.; Tobias, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 367, - (2003), s. 704-710 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : polarizability * aqueous solvation * dianion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.438, year: 2003

  10. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  11. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  12. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  13. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  14. Explaining Away Intuitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Ichikawa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available What is it to explain away an intuition? Philosophers regularly attempt to explain intuitions away, but it is often unclear what the success conditions for their project consist in. I attempt to articulate some of these conditions, taking philosophical case studies as guides, and arguing that many attempts to explain away intuitions underestimate the challenge the project of explaining away involves. I will conclude, therefore, that explaining away intuitions is a more difficult task than has sometimes been appreciated; I also suggest, however, that the importance of explaining away intuitions has often been exaggerated.

  15. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  16. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WISHART, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  17. A solvated electron lithium electrode for secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammells, A. F.; Semkow, K. W.

    1986-09-01

    Attention is given to a novel method for the achievement of high electro-chemical reversibility in Li-based nonaqueous cells, using a liquid negative electrode that consists of Li dissolved in liquid ammonia as a solvated electron Li electrode. The containment of this liquid negative active material from direct contact to a liquid nonaqueous electrolyte in the positive electrode compartment was realized through the use of a Li-intercalated, electronically conducting ceramic membrane.

  18. Tris[2-(deuteriomethylsulfanylphenyl]phosphine deuteriochloroform 0.125-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seik Weng Ng

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title deuterated tripodal phosphine, C21H12D9PS3·0.125CDCl3, crystallizes as two independent molecules, one of which lies on a general position and the other about a threefold rotation axis, and as a deuteriochloroform solvate. The solvent molecule is disordered about a site of symmetry 3, so that the ratio of phosphine to solvent is 8:1. The P atom adopts a pyramidal coordination geometry.

  19. Solvation dynamics of lithium salts in wet nitrobenzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moakes, G.; Gelbaum, L. T.; Leisen, J.; Janata, J.; Mareček, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 111-118 ISSN 0022-0728 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0822 Grant - others:Georgia Research Alliance(US) GRA.CG06.D Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : solvation * NMR * FTIR * nitrobenzene/water * solvatomers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.339, year: 2006

  20. Benzonitrile: Electron affinity, excited states, and anion solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew R.; Khuseynov, Dmitry; Sanov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We report a negative-ion photoelectron imaging study of benzonitrile and several of its hydrated, oxygenated, and homo-molecularly solvated cluster anions. The photodetachment from the unsolvated benzonitrile anion to the X ˜ 1 A 1 state of the neutral peaks at 58 ± 5 meV. This value is assigned as the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the valence anion and the upper bound of adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of benzonitrile. The EA of the lowest excited electronic state of benzonitrile, a ˜ 3 A 1 , is determined as 3.41 ± 0.01 eV, corresponding to a 3.35 eV lower bound for the singlet-triplet splitting. The next excited state, the open-shell singlet A ˜ 1 A 1 , is found about an electron-volt above the triplet, with a VDE of 4.45 ± 0.01 eV. These results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations for neutral benzonitrile and its valence anion but do not preclude the existence of a dipole-bound state of similar energy and geometry. The step-wise and cumulative solvation energies of benzonitrile anions by several types of species were determined, including homo-molecular solvation by benzonitrile, hydration by 1-3 waters, oxygenation by 1-3 oxygen molecules, and mixed solvation by various combinations of O2, H2O, and benzonitrile. The plausible structures of the dimer anion of benzonitrile were examined using density functional theory and compared to the experimental observations. It is predicted that the dimer anion favors a stacked geometry capitalizing on the π-π interactions between the two partially charged benzonitrile moieties.

  1. Comparison of solvation dynamics of electrons in four polyols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampre, I.; Pernot, P.; Bonin, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France); Mostafavi, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France)], E-mail: mehran.mostafavi@lcp.u-psud.fr

    2008-10-15

    Using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, we studied the solvation dynamics of the electron in liquid polyalcohols: ethane-1,2-diol, propane-1,2-diol, propane-1,3-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol. Time-resolved absorption spectra ranging from 440 to 720 nm were measured. Our study shows that the excess electron in the diols presents an intense and wide absorption band in the visible and near-IR spectral domain at early time after two-photon ionization of the neat solvent. Then, for the first tens of picoseconds, the electron spectrum shifts toward the blue domain and its bandwidth decreases as the red part of the initial spectrum rapidly drops, while the blue part hardly evolves. In contrast, in the triol, the absorption spectrum of the electron is early situated in the visible range after the pump pulse and then solely evolves in the red part. The Bayesian data analysis of the observed picosecond solvation dynamics with different models is in favor of a heterogeneous continuous relaxation. That is corroborated by the analogy between the change in the absorption band with increasing time or decreasing temperature. That tends to indicate a similar organization disorder of the solvent. Moreover, the electron solvation dynamics is very fast in propane-1,2,3-triol despite its high viscosity and highlight the role of the OH-group in that process.

  2. Improvements to the APBS biomolecular solvation software suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurrus, Elizabeth; Engel, Dave; Star, Keith; Monson, Kyle; Brandi, Juan; Felberg, Lisa E; Brookes, David H; Wilson, Leighton; Chen, Jiahui; Liles, Karina; Chun, Minju; Li, Peter; Gohara, David W; Dolinsky, Todd; Konecny, Robert; Koes, David R; Nielsen, Jens Erik; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Geng, Weihua; Krasny, Robert; Wei, Guo-Wei; Holst, Michael J; McCammon, J Andrew; Baker, Nathan A

    2018-01-01

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) software was developed to solve the equations of continuum electrostatics for large biomolecular assemblages that have provided impact in the study of a broad range of chemical, biological, and biomedical applications. APBS addresses the three key technology challenges for understanding solvation and electrostatics in biomedical applications: accurate and efficient models for biomolecular solvation and electrostatics, robust and scalable software for applying those theories to biomolecular systems, and mechanisms for sharing and analyzing biomolecular electrostatics data in the scientific community. To address new research applications and advancing computational capabilities, we have continually updated APBS and its suite of accompanying software since its release in 2001. In this article, we discuss the models and capabilities that have recently been implemented within the APBS software package including a Poisson-Boltzmann analytical and a semi-analytical solver, an optimized boundary element solver, a geometry-based geometric flow solvation model, a graph theory-based algorithm for determining pK a values, and an improved web-based visualization tool for viewing electrostatics. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Enthalpy-entropy compensation: the role of solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoliy I; Read, Christopher M; Crane-Robinson, Colyn

    2017-05-01

    Structural modifications to interacting systems frequently lead to changes in both the enthalpy (heat) and entropy of the process that compensate each other, so that the Gibbs free energy is little changed: a major barrier to the development of lead compounds in drug discovery. The conventional explanation for such enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) is that tighter contacts lead to a more negative enthalpy but increased molecular constraints, i.e., a compensating conformational entropy reduction. Changes in solvation can also contribute to EEC but this contribution is infrequently discussed. We review long-established and recent cases of EEC and conclude that the large fluctuations in enthalpy and entropy observed are too great to be a result of only conformational changes and must result, to a considerable degree, from variations in the amounts of water immobilized or released on forming complexes. Two systems exhibiting EEC show a correlation between calorimetric entropies and local mobilities, interpreted to mean conformational control of the binding entropy/free energy. However, a substantial contribution from solvation gives the same effect, as a consequence of a structural link between the amount of bound water and the protein flexibility. Only by assuming substantial changes in solvation-an intrinsically compensatory process-can a more complete understanding of EEC be obtained. Faced with such large, and compensating, changes in the enthalpies and entropies of binding, the best approach to engineering elevated affinities must be through the addition of ionic links, as they generate increased entropy without affecting the enthalpy.

  4. Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation in normal alcohols of aliphatic series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeeva, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation of alkali, alkaline earth metals and halogenides in 9 alcohols are calculated using the earlier suggested method. It is shown that summary values are in good accord with experimental ones, the deviations do not surpass 0-5%, solvation energies of one and the same electrolyte in the series of n-alcohols do not change, enthalpy and entropy of solvation increase from lower alcohols to higher ones

  5. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  6. Plant abnormality inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plant abnormality inspection device for conducting remote or automatic patrolling inspection in a plant and, more particularly, relates to such a device as capable of detecting abnormal odors. That is, the device comprises a moving device for moving to a predetermined position in the plant, a plurality of gas sensors for different kind of gases to be inspected mounted thereon, a comparator for comparing the concentration of a gas detected by the gas sensor with the normal gas concentration at the predetermined position and a judging means for judging the absence or presence of abnormality depending on the combination of the result of the comparison and deliverying a signal if the state is abnormal. As a result, a slight amount of gas responsible to odors released upon abnormality of the plant can be detected by a plurality of gas sensors for different kinds gases to rapidly and easily find abnormal portions in the plant. (I.S.)

  7. Structural and dynamical properties of solvated electrons; a study of kinetic spectroscopy using pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, C. van

    1977-01-01

    In this thesis the pulse radiolysis experiments of hexamethyl-phosphortriamide (HMPA), propanol-1, 3-methylpentane and mixtures of propanol-1 and 3-methylpentane are reported. In the pulse radiolysis of HMPA, carried out at room temperature, the high yield of esub(s) - (G=2) and the very high wavelength of the maximum absorption (max= 2200 nm) in the esub(s) - absorption spectrum are explained by considering the aprotic nature and the molecular structure of this compound. In the experiment with propanol-1 (temperature range 93deg-123degK) a temporal shift to lower wavelengths in the time range of 10 s-10 ms is observed. In further experiments biphenyl was used as electron scavenger. It was concluded that after the electron pulse the following sequence of events takes place: 1) electron redistribution in times shorter than 1 s; 2) dipole reorientation during 10 s-10 ms; 3) recombination of a part of the solvated electrons; 4) a reaction of the solvated electrons with the neighbouring propanol-1 molecules. In the experiments with 3-methylpentane at 103deg-113degK an esub(s) - absorption band with third order decay kinetics was observed. This is attributed to geminate recombination. The activation energy of the recombination process was 0.4 eV. The experiments with mixtures of propanol-1 and 3-methylpentane were carried out at 103degK. At low propanol-1 concentrations the build-up at 500 nm obeys first order kinetics, whereas at high concentrations this build-up can be split up into three first order components, as was measured in pure propanol-1. The half-lives of the three components were in the ratio of 1:10:100. In the last chapter theoretical models for the electron redistribution and the matric relaxation are discussed and compared with the experiments

  8. Ionic liquids: radiation chemistry, solvation dynamics and reactivity patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.; Funston, A.M.; Szreder, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of energy production, chemical industry and environmental applications. Pulse radiolysis of [R 4 N][NTf 2 ] [R 4 N][N(CN) 2 ], and [R 4 P][N(CN) 2 ] ionic liquids produces solvated electrons that absorb over a broad range in the near infrared and persisting for hundreds of nanoseconds. Systematic cation variation shows that solvated electron's spectroscopic properties depend strongly on the lattice structure of the ionic liquid. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that

  9. Plagiarism explainer for students

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A.

    2016-01-01

    A slide deck to serve as an explainer of plagiarism in academic settings, with a personal viewpoint. For my students.Also on SpeakerDeck:https://speakerdeck.com/labarba/plagiarism-explainer-for-students(The slide viewer on SpeakerDeck is much nicer.)

  10. Ab initio joint density-functional theory of solvated electrodes, with model and explicit solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Tomas

    2015-03-01

    the electrochemical context and how it is needed for realistic description of solvated electrode systems [], and how simple ``implicit'' polarized continuum methods fail radically in this context. Finally, we shall present a series of results relevant to battery, supercapacitor, and solar-fuel systems, one of which has led to a recent invention disclosure for improving battery cycle lifetimes. Supported as a part of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by DOE/BES (award de-sc0001086) and by the New York State Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR, award 60923).

  11. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  12. Solvation quantities from a COSMO-RS equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotou, C.; Tsivintzelis, I.; Aslanidou, D.; Hatzimanikatis, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Extension of the successful COSMO-RS model to an equation-of-state model. • Two scaling constants, obtained from atom-specific contributions. • Overall estimation of the solvation quantities and contributions. - Abstract: This work focuses on the extension of the successful COSMO-RS model of mixtures into an equation-of-state model of fluids and its application for the estimation of solvation/hydration quantities of a variety of chemical substances. These quantities include free-energies, enthalpies and entropies of hydration as well as the separate contributions to each of them. Emphasis is given on the estimation of contributions from the conformational changes of solutes upon solvation and the associated restructuring of solvent in its immediate neighborhood. COSMO-RS is a quantum-mechanics based group/segment contribution model in which the Quasi-Chemical (QC) approach is used for the description of the non-random distribution of interacting segments in the system. Thus, the equation-of-state development is done through such a QC framework. The new model will not need any adjustable parameters for the strong specific interactions, such as hydrogen bonds, since they will be provided by the quantum-mechanics based cosmo-files – a key feature of COSMO-RS model. It will need, however, one volumetric and one energy parameter per fluid, which are scaling constants or molecular descriptors of the fluid and are obtained from rather easily available data such as densities, boiling points, vapor pressures, heats of vaporization or second virial coefficients. The performance and the potential of the new equation-of-state model to become a fully predictive model are critically discussed

  13. Solvation of the electron in alcohols studied using the Argonne picosecond pulse radiolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Kenney-Wallace, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    With a stroboscopic pulse radiolysis system, it is possible to measure the reactions of solvated electrons and dry electrons and the solvation time of electrons in alcohols from 20 psec to 350 psec. The solvation in alcohol and alcohol-alkane solutions is a complex process which depends on the microscopic structure of the fluid, so that the studies of solvation in alcohols as a function of temperature or as a function of the concentration of the alcohols must take into account the structure of the fluid being studied. The relaxation processes may not be dominant at low temperature. However, in room temperature alcohols, pre-existing traps are the dominant means of electron trapping. The extrapolation to water may be reasonable since water and alcohols both give similar final species. To obtain such idea of the solvation process in alcohols, the change of the absorption of electrons at 500 nm was measured. At very low concentration of alcohols in alkanes, electrons form a complex with a cluster of alcohol molecules, and the most probable size of this cluster is two alcohols (C 4 , C 10 ). The species formed is not solvated electrons, since the characteristic spectrum of solvated electrons is absent, and the conductivity of the species is far above that of solvated electrons. (Yamashita, S.)

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are

  15. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization ...

  16. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of the solvation of amphiphilic molecules by water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezus, Y.L.A.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We use polarization-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy to study the aqueous solvation of proline and N-methylacetamide. These molecules serve as models to study the solvation of proteins. We monitor the orientational dynamics of partly deuterated water molecules (HDO) that are present at

  17. Competitive solvation of (bis)(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion by acetonitrile and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Competitive solvation of an ion by two or more solvents is one of the key phenomena determining the identity of our world. Solvation in polar solvents frequently originates from non-additive non-covalent interactions. Pre-parametrized potentials poorly capture these interactions, unless the force...

  18. Time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2005-01-01

    We have derived a new relation between the time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function (STCF) for non-polar fluids. The friction values calculated using this relation and simulation results on STCF for a Lennard-Jones fluid are shown to have excellent agreement with the same obtained through mode-coupling theory. Also derived is a relation between the time-dependent dielectric friction and STCF for polar fluids. Routes are thus provided to obtain the time-dependent friction (non-polar as well as dielectric) from an experimentally measured quantity like STCF, even if the interparticle interaction potential is not known

  19. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation and solute electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Hynes, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    When a molecular solute is immersed in a polar and polarizable solvent, the electronic wave function of the solute system is altered compared to its vacuum value; the solute electronic structure is thus solvent-dependent. Further, the wave function will be altered depending upon whether the polarization of the solvent is or is not in equilibrium with the solute charge distribution. More precisely, while the solvent electronic polarization should be in equilibrium with the solute electronic wave function, the much more sluggish solvent orientational polarization need not be. We call this last situation non-equilibrium solvation. We outline a nonlinear Schroedinger equation approach to these issues

  20. Role of trapped and solvated electrons in Ps formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.V.; Byakov, V.M.; Mikhin, K.V.; He, C.; Hirade, T.

    2005-01-01

    Role of trapped and solvated electrons in Ps formation is discussed. Combination of thermalized positron with such electrons is possible from the view point of the energy balance and may results in Ps formation. This process proceeds during all e = lifetime matter. Fitting of raw experimental e + -e - annihilation spectra has to be based on an adequate physical input, which often leads to necessity of nonexponential deconvolution of the spectra. We have interpreted the Ps formation data in polyethylene, ethylene-methylmethacrylate and polymethylmethacrylate in dark and in light vs. tome of the measurement and temperature. parameters characterized accumulation of trapped electrons and their recombination with counter ions and positrons are obtained. (author)

  1. Electrochemical redox reactions in solvated silica sol-gel glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opallo, M.

    2002-01-01

    The studies of electrochemical redox reactions in solvated silica sol-gel glass were reviewed. The methodology of the experiments with emphasis on the direct preparation of the solid electrolyte and the application ultra microelectrodes was described. Generally, the level of the electrochemical signal is not much below that observed in liquid electrolyte. The current depends on time elapsed after gelation, namely the longer time, the smaller current. The differences between electrochemical behaviour of the redox couples in monoliths and thin layers were described. (author)

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  3. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  4. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  5. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality ...

  6. Computer jargon explained

    CERN Document Server

    Enticknap, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Computer Jargon Explained is a feature in Computer Weekly publications that discusses 68 of the most commonly used technical computing terms. The book explains what the terms mean and why the terms are important to computer professionals. The text also discusses how the terms relate to the trends and developments that are driving the information technology industry. Computer jargon irritates non-computer people and in turn causes problems for computer people. The technology and the industry are changing so rapidly; it is very hard even for professionals to keep updated. Computer people do not

  7. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  8. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. The wireless internet explained

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoton, John

    2001-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Explained covers the full spectrum of wireless technologies from a wide range of vendors, including initiatives by Microsoft and Compaq. The Wireless Internet Explained takes a practical look at wireless technology. Rhoton explains the concepts behind the physics, and provides an overview that clarifies the convoluted set of standards heaped together under the umbrella of wireless. It then expands on these technical foundations to give a panorama of the increasingly crowded landscape of wireless product offerings. When it comes to actual implementation the book gives abundant down-to-earth advice on topics ranging from the selection and deployment of mobile devices to the extremely sensitive subject of security.Written by an expert on Internet messaging, the author of Digital Press''s successful Programmer''s Guide to Internet Mail and X.400 and SMTP: Battle of the E-mail Protocols, The Wireless Internet Explained describes and evaluates the current state of the fast-growing and crucial...

  10. Self-explaining roads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, A.R.A. van der; Kaptein, N.

    1999-01-01

    As a means to a sustainable safe traffic environment the concept of Self-Explaining Roads (SER) has been developed. The SER concept advocates a traffic environment that elicits safe driving behaviour simply by its design. In order to support safe driving behaviour and appropriate speed choice,

  11. Solvation Effect on Complexation of Alkali Metal Cations by a Calix[4]arene Ketone Derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Požar, Josip; Nikšić-Franjić, Ivana; Cvetnić, Marija; Leko, Katarina; Cindro, Nikola; Pičuljan, Katarina; Borilović, Ivana; Frkanec, Leo; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2017-09-14

    The medium effect on the complexation of alkali metal cations with a calix[4]arene ketone derivative (L) was systematically examined in methanol, ethanol, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile. In all solvents the binding of Na + cation by L was rather efficient, whereas the complexation of other alkali metal cations was observed only in methanol and acetonitrile. Complexation reactions were enthalpically controlled, while ligand dissolution was endothermic in all cases. A notable influence of the solvent on NaL + complex stability could be mainly attributed to the differences in complexation entropies. The higher NaL + stability in comparison to complexes with other alkali metal cations in acetonitrile was predominantly due to a more favorable complexation enthalpy. The 1 H NMR investigations revealed a relatively low affinity of the calixarene sodium complex for inclusion of the solvent molecule in the calixarene hydrophobic cavity, with the exception of acetonitrile. Differences in complex stabilities in the explored solvents, apart from N,N-dimethylformamide and acetonitrile, could be mostly explained by taking into account solely the cation and complex solvation. A considerable solvent effect on the complexation equilibria was proven to be due to an interesting interplay between the transfer enthalpies and entropies of the reactants and the complexes formed.

  12. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution by alkyl phosphorus esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Wan, R.Y.; Mooiman, M.B.; Sibrell, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Research efforts have shown that solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution is possible by alkyl phosphorus esters. Both tributyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP) appear to be effective extractants for gold and exhibit high loading capacities exceeding 30 gpl. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution can be achieved with selectivity factors relative to other cyanoanions as high as 1000 under certain circumstances. Variables influencing the selectivity such as ionic strength, temperature, and extractant structure, are discussed in terms of the extraction chemistry, which seems to involve the solvation of a M dot, dot, dot Au(CN)2 ion pair.

  13. Solvation of ions in the gas-phase: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Lisy, James M.

    1996-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the collision between a cesium ion and a cluster of twenty methanol molecules. This process, generating a solvated ion, was studied over a range (1 to 25 eV) of eight collision energies. Preliminary analysis of this gas phase solvation has included the distribution of final ion cluster sizes, fragmentation patterns, solvation timescales and energetics. Two distinct patterns have emerged: a ballistic penetration of the neutral cluster at the higher collision energies and an evaporative evolution of the cluster ion at lower collision energies.

  14. Solvation of graphite oxide in water-methanol binary polar solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Shujie; Yu, Junchun; Sundqvist, Bertil; Talyzin, Alexandr V. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    The phase transition between two solvated phases was studied by DSC for graphite oxide (GO) powders immersed in water-methanol mixtures of various compositions. GO forms solid solvates with two different compositions when immersed in methanol. Reversible phase transition between two solvate states due to insertion/desertion of methanol monolayer occurs upon temperature variations. The temperature point and the enthalpy ({Delta}H) of the phase transition are maximal for pure methanol and decrease linearly with increase of water fraction up to 30%. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Selective nonspecific solvation under dielectric saturation and fluorescence spectra of dye solutions in binary solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshiev, N G; Kiselev, M B

    1991-09-01

    The influence of selective nonspecific solvation on the fluorescence spectra of three substitutedN-methylphthalimides in a binary solvent system consisting of a nonpolar (n-heptane) and a polar (pyridine) component has been studied under conditions close to dielectric saturation. The substantially nonlinearity of the effect is confirmation that the spectral shifts of fluorescence bands depend on the number of polar solvent molecules involved in solvating the dye molecule. The measured fluorescence spectral shifts determined by substituting one nonpolar solvent molecula with a polar one in the proximity of the dye molecule agree quantitatively with the forecasts of the previously proposed semiempirical theory which describes this nonlinear solvation phenomenon.

  16. Explaining the Microtubule Energy Balance: Contributions Due to Dipole Moments, Charges, van der Waals and Solvation Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Taha Ayoub

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are the main components of mitotic spindles, and are the pillars of the cellular cytoskeleton. They perform most of their cellular functions by virtue of their unique dynamic instability processes which alternate between polymerization and depolymerization phases. This in turn is driven by a precise balance between attraction and repulsion forces between the constituents of microtubules (MTs—tubulin dimers. Therefore, it is critically important to know what contributions result in a balance of the interaction energy among tubulin dimers that make up microtubules and what interactions may tip this balance toward or away from a stable polymerized state of tubulin. In this paper, we calculate the dipole–dipole interaction energy between tubulin dimers in a microtubule as part of the various contributions to the energy balance. We also compare the remaining contributions to the interaction energies between tubulin dimers and establish a balance between stabilizing and destabilizing components, including the van der Waals, electrostatic, and solvent-accessible surface area energies. The energy balance shows that the GTP-capped tip of the seam at the plus end of microtubules is stabilized only by − 9 kcal/mol, which can be completely reversed by the hydrolysis of a single GTP molecule, which releases + 14 kcal/mol and destabilizes the seam by an excess of + 5 kcal/mol. This triggers the breakdown of microtubules and initiates a disassembly phase which is aptly called a catastrophe.

  17. Trimesic acid dimethyl sulfoxide solvate: space group revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Bernès

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title solvate, C9H6O6·C2H6OS, was determined 30 years ago [Herbstein, Kapon & Wasserman (1978. Acta Cryst. B34, 1613–1617], with data collected at room temperature, and refined in the space group P21. The present redetermination, based on high-resolution diffraction data, shows that the actual space group is more likely to be P21/m. The crystal structure contains layers of trimesic acid molecules lying on mirror planes. A mirror plane also passes through the S and O atoms of the solvent molecule. The molecules in each layer are interconnected through strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional supramolecular network within each layer. The donor groups are the hydroxyls of the trimesic acid molecules, while the acceptors are the carbonyl or the sulfoxide O atoms.

  18. Solvation thermodynamics of phenylalcohols in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyniak, A.; Scheuermann, R.; Dilger, H.; Tucker, I.M.; Burkert, T.; Hashmi, A.S.K.; Vujosevic', D.; Roduner, E.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and the stability of five phenylalcohols in a lamellar phase composed of simple bilayers separated by water at 298 and 348K is explored using avoided-level-crossing muon-spin resonance (ALC-μSR). The dependence of the alignment of the bilayer chains on temperature appears to be a crucial factor determining the phenylalcohol partitioning: increasing order of the surfactant tails leads to expulsion of the solute. Moreover, we observed a systematic trend, the longer the chain the deeper the phenyl group dips into the lipid bilayer. Recent studies have shown that the hydrophobic effect is adequate to describe membrane partitioning of small amphiphilic molecules. The solvation thermodynamic properties ΔG sol , ΔH sol , and ΔS sol which determine the solute transfer from the double layer into water prove that the distribution also strongly depends on shape, chemical nature and different structure of phenylalcohols

  19. Solvation thermodynamics of phenylalcohols in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniak, A. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Dilger, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Tucker, I.M. [Unilever Research and Development, Port Sunlight, Wirral CH63 3JW (United Kingdom); Burkert, T. [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hashmi, A.S.K. [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Vujosevic' , D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Roduner, E. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: e.roduner@ipc.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-03-31

    The distribution and the stability of five phenylalcohols in a lamellar phase composed of simple bilayers separated by water at 298 and 348K is explored using avoided-level-crossing muon-spin resonance (ALC-{mu}SR). The dependence of the alignment of the bilayer chains on temperature appears to be a crucial factor determining the phenylalcohol partitioning: increasing order of the surfactant tails leads to expulsion of the solute. Moreover, we observed a systematic trend, the longer the chain the deeper the phenyl group dips into the lipid bilayer. Recent studies have shown that the hydrophobic effect is adequate to describe membrane partitioning of small amphiphilic molecules. The solvation thermodynamic properties {delta}G{sub sol}, {delta}H{sub sol}, and {delta}S{sub sol} which determine the solute transfer from the double layer into water prove that the distribution also strongly depends on shape, chemical nature and different structure of phenylalcohols.

  20. MTS-MD of Biomolecules Steered with 3D-RISM-KH Mean Solvation Forces Accelerated with Generalized Solvation Force Extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-14

    We developed a generalized solvation force extrapolation (GSFE) approach to speed up multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of biomolecules steered with mean solvation forces obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure). GSFE is based on a set of techniques including the non-Eckart-like transformation of coordinate space separately for each solute atom, extension of the force-coordinate pair basis set followed by selection of the best subset, balancing the normal equations by modified least-squares minimization of deviations, and incremental increase of outer time step in motion integration. Mean solvation forces acting on the biomolecule atoms in conformations at successive inner time steps are extrapolated using a relatively small number of best (closest) solute atomic coordinates and corresponding mean solvation forces obtained at previous outer time steps by converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations. The MTS-MD evolution steered with GSFE of 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces is efficiently stabilized with our optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) thermostat. We validated the hybrid MTS-MD/OIN/GSFE/3D-RISM-KH integrator on solvated organic and biomolecules of different stiffness and complexity: asphaltene dimer in toluene solvent, hydrated alanine dipeptide, miniprotein 1L2Y, and protein G. The GSFE accuracy and the OIN efficiency allowed us to enlarge outer time steps up to huge values of 1-4 ps while accurately reproducing conformational properties. Quasidynamics steered with 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces achieves time scale compression of conformational changes coupled with solvent exchange, resulting in further significant acceleration of protein conformational sampling with respect to real time dynamics. Overall, this provided a 50- to 1000-fold effective speedup of conformational sampling for these systems, compared to conventional MD

  1. MAGMADIM: Young Explainers Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paltiel, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Physics teachers and educators constantly face the problem of inspiring their students to major in physics. On the other hand, science museums are designed to provide a pleasant environment which will stimulate and encourage a science associated experience to the general public. Typically, there is no intention to teach science as such in science museums. One may, however, use the science museum to teach and inspire certain groups of students in a much deeper sense. In fact they may actually enthusiastically learn much of the school physics curriculum at the museum. This report discusses the Magmadim program through which 10th graders are trained to be young explainers at the Weizmann Institutes Clore Garden of Science. To this end they study the physics underlying its exhibits in an after-school course. The ultimate goal is for the 'magmadim' to become the best possible explainers and be able to face all sorts of museum visitors. Along with learning how to instruct visitors, they must learn the physics behind the exhibits to give a full explanation of the exhibit and be able to answer any question that may arise. Our 5 year experience with the program shows that its self-selected participants not only study a lot of science, but also like it and learn how to explain the content to other people. This program, along with similar programs at the Bloomfield Science Museum and the Madatzim (young physics tutors) program of Ort, help in promoting the interest in science in general and physics in particular among school students. Various ways to expand the programs will also be discussed

  2. Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained

    CERN Document Server

    Vujičić, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject suitable for adoption as a self-contained text for courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The clear and comprehensive presentation of the basic theory is illustrated throughout with an abundance of worked examples. The book is written for teachers and students of linear algebra at all levels and across mathematics and the applied sciences, particularly physics and engineering. It will also be an invaluable addition to research libraries as a comprehensive resource book for the subject.

  3. Theory of competitive solvation of polymers by two solvents and entropy-enthalpy compensation in the solvation free energy upon dilution with the second solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-06-07

    We develop a statistical mechanical lattice theory for polymer solvation by a pair of relatively low molar mass solvents that compete for binding to the polymer backbone. A theory for the equilibrium mixture of solvated polymer clusters {AiBCj} and free unassociated molecules A, B, and C is formulated in the spirit of Flory-Huggins mean-field approximation. This theoretical framework enables us to derive expressions for the boundaries for phase stability (spinodals) and other basic properties of these polymer solutions: the internal energy U, entropy S, specific heat CV, extent of solvation Φsolv, average degree of solvation 〈Nsolv〉, and second osmotic virial coefficient B2 as functions of temperature and the composition of the mixture. Our theory predicts many new phenomena, but the current paper applies the theory to describe the entropy-enthalpy compensation in the free energy of polymer solvation, a phenomenon observed for many years without theoretical explanation and with significant relevance to liquid chromatography and other polymer separation methods.

  4. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  5. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.).

  6. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  7. Electrical resistivities and solvation enthalpies for solutions of salts in liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubberstey, P.; Dadd, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    An empirical correlation is shown to exist between the resistivity coefficients drho/dc for solutes in liquid alkali metals and the corresponding solvation enthalpies Usub(solvn) of the neutral gaseous solute species. Qualitative arguments based on an electrostatic solvation model in which the negative solute atom is surrounded by a solvation sphere of positive solvent ion cores are used to show that both parameters are dependent on the charge density of the solute atom and hence on the extent of charge transfer from solvent to solute. Thus as the charge density of the solute increases, the solvation enthalpy increases regularly and the resistivity coefficients pass through a maximum to give the observed approximately parabolic drho/dc versus Usub(solvn) relationship. (Auth.)

  8. Entropic solvation force between surfaces modified by grafted chains: a density functional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pizio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of a hard sphere fluid in slit-like pores with walls modified by grafted chain molecules composed of hard sphere segments is studied using density functional theory. The chains are grafted to opposite walls via terminating segments forming pillars. The effects of confinement and of "chemical" modification of pore walls on the entropic solvation force are investigated in detail. We observe that in the absence of adsorbed fluid the solvation force is strongly repulsive for narrow pores and attractive for wide pores. In the presence of adsorbed fluid both parts of the curve of the solvation force may develop oscillatory behavior dependent on the density of pillars, the number of segments and adsorption conditions. Also, the size ratio between adsorbed fluid species and chain segments is of importance for the development of oscillations. The choice of these parameters is crucial for efficient manipulation of the solvation force as desired for pores of different width.

  9. Matlab for engineers explained

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    This book is written for students at bachelor and master programs and has four different purposes, which split the book into four parts: 1. To teach first or early year undergraduate engineering students basic knowledge in technical computations and programming using MATLAB. The first part starts from first principles and is therefore well suited both for readers with prior exposure to MATLAB but lacking a solid foundational knowledge of the capabilities of the system and readers not having any previous experience with MATLAB. The foundational knowledge gained from these interactive guided tours of the system will hopefully be sufficient for an effective utilization of MATLAB in the engineering profession, in education and in research. 2. To explain the foundations of more advanced use of MATLAB using the facilities added the last couple of years, such as extended data structures, object orientation and advanced graphics. 3. To give an introduction to the use of MATLAB in typical undergraduate courses in elec...

  10. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  11. Role of Dispersive Fluorous Interaction in the Solvation Dynamics of the Perfluoro Group Containing Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Chaterjee, Soumit; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-08-17

    Perfluoro group containing molecules possess an important self-aggregation property through the fluorous (F···F) interaction which makes them useful for diverse applications such as medicinal chemistry, separation techniques, polymer technology, and biology. In this article, we have investigated the solvation dynamics of coumarin-153 (C153) and coumarin-6H (C6H) in ethanol (ETH), 2-fluoroethanol (MFE), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) using the femtosecond upconversion technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to understand the role of fluorous interaction between the solute and solvent molecules in the solvation dynamics of perfluoro group containing molecules. The femtosecond upconversion data show that the time scales of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH, MFE, and TFE are approximately the same whereas the solvation dynamics of C153 in TFE is slow as compared to that of ETH and MFE. It has also been observed that the time scale of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH and MFE is higher than that of C153 in the same solvents. MD simulation results show a qualitative agreement with the experimental data in terms of the time scale of the slow components of the solvation for all the systems. The experimental and simulation studies combined lead to the conclusion that the solvation dynamics of C6H in all solvents as well as C153 in ETH and MFE is mostly governed by the charge distribution of ester moieties (C═O and O) of dye molecules whereas the solvation of C153 in TFE is predominantly due to the dispersive fluorous interaction (F···F) between the perfluoro groups of the C153 and solvent molecules.

  12. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  13. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  14. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  15. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  16. Internal energy effects on the solvation and reactivity of multiply charged biomolecules for electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. [Bovine ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light-Wahl, K.J.; Winger, B.E.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Mild (capillary) interface conditions which do not completely desolvate the ions of proteins in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) may be required to probe the higher order structures and weak associations. For the small protein bovine ubiquitin, two ion distributions (unsolvated ions and unresolved solvated ions) were observed. The resolvable solvation for leucine-enkephalin with methanol and water shows that the use of countercurrent N{sub 2} flow at the capillary affects the solvation observed. 2 figs. (DLC)

  17. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  19. Nonequilibrium quantum solvation with a time-dependent Onsager cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, H.; Nalbach, P.; Thorwart, M.

    2018-04-01

    We formulate a theory of nonequilibrium quantum solvation in which parameters of the solvent are explicitly depending on time. We assume in a simplest approach a spherical molecular Onsager cavity with a time-dependent radius. We analyze the relaxation properties of a test molecular point dipole in a dielectric solvent and consider two cases: (i) a shrinking Onsager sphere and (ii) a breathing Onsager sphere. Due to the time-dependent solvent, the frequency-dependent response function of the dipole becomes time-dependent. For a shrinking Onsager sphere, the dipole relaxation is in general enhanced. This is reflected in a temporally increasing linewidth of the absorptive part of the response. Furthermore, the effective frequency-dependent response function shows two peaks in the absorptive part which are symmetrically shifted around the eigenfrequency. By contrast, a breathing sphere reduces damping as compared to the static sphere. Interestingly, we find a non-monotonous dependence of the relaxation rate on the breathing rate and a resonant suppression of damping when both rates are comparable. Moreover, the linewidth of the absorptive part of the response function is strongly reduced for times when the breathing sphere reaches its maximal extension.

  20. Cluster Formation of Polyphilic Molecules Solvated in a DPPC Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yang Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the initial stages of cluster formation of polyphilic additive molecules which are solvated in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC lipid bilayer. Our polyphilic molecules comprise an aromatic (trans-bilayer core domain with (out-of-bilayer glycerol terminations, complemented with a fluorophilic and an alkyl side chain, both of which are confined within the aliphatic segment of the bilayer. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (1 μ s total duration of a set of six of such polyphilic additives reveal the initial steps towards supramolecular aggregation induced by the specific philicity properties of the molecules. For our intermediate system size of six polyphiles, the transient but recurrent formation of a trimer is observed on a characteristic timescale of about 100 ns. The alkane/perfluoroalkane side chains show a very distinct conformational distribution inside the bilayer thanks to their different philicity, despite their identical anchoring in the trans-bilayer segment of the polyphile. The diffusive mobility of the polyphilic additives is about the same as that of the surrounding lipids, although it crosses both bilayer leaflets and tends to self-associate.

  1. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  2. Molecular hydrogen solvated in water – A computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous hydrogen molecule is studied with molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature and pressure conditions, using a newly developed flexible and polarizable H 2 molecule model. The design and implementation of this model, compatible with an existing flexible and polarizable force field for water, is presented in detail. The structure of the hydration layer suggests that first-shell water molecules accommodate the H 2 molecule without major structural distortions and two-dimensional, radial-angular distribution functions indicate that as opposed to strictly tangential, the orientation of these water molecules is such that the solute is solvated with one of the free electron pairs of H 2 O. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient of H 2 (aq) agrees very well with experimental results and the time dependence of mean square displacement suggests the presence of caging on a time scale corresponding to hydrogen bond network vibrations in liquid water. Orientational correlation function of H 2 experiences an extremely short-scale decay, making the H 2 –H 2 O interaction potential essentially isotropic by virtue of rotational averaging. The inclusion of explicit polarizability in the model allows for the calculation of Raman spectra that agree very well with available experimental data on H 2 (aq) under differing pressure conditions, including accurate reproduction of the experimentally noted trends with solute pressure or concentration

  3. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other

  4. Normal and abnormal growth plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Madewell, J.E.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal growth is a dynamic process. A knowledge of the structure and function of the normal growth plate is essential in order to understand the pathophysiology of abnormal skeletal growth in various diseases. In this well-illustrated article, the authors provide a radiographic classification of abnormal growth plates and discuss mechanisms that lead to growth plate abnormalities

  5. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The dynamics of Ca2+ ions within the solvation shell of calbindin D9k.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Project

    Full Text Available The encounter of a Ca(2+ ion with a protein and its subsequent binding to specific binding sites is an intricate process that cannot be fully elucidated from experimental observations. We have applied Molecular Dynamics to study this process with atomistic details, using Calbindin D9k (CaB as a model protein. The simulations show that in most of the time the Ca(2+ ion spends within the Debye radius of CaB, it is being detained at the 1st and 2nd solvation shells. While being detained near the protein, the diffusion coefficient of the ion is significantly reduced. However, due to the relatively long period of detainment, the ion can scan an appreciable surface of the protein. The enhanced propagation of the ion on the surface has a functional role: significantly increasing the ability of the ion to scan the protein's surface before being dispersed to the bulk. The contribution of this mechanism to Ca(2+ binding becomes significant at low ion concentrations, where the intervals between successive encounters with the protein are getting longer. The efficiency of the surface diffusion is affected by the distribution of charges on the protein's surface. Comparison of the Ca(2+ binding dynamics in CaB and its E60D mutant reveals that in the wild type (WT protein the carboxylate of E60 function as a preferred landing-site for the Ca(2+ arriving from the bulk, followed by delivering it to the final binding site. Replacement of the glutamate by aspartate significantly reduced the ability to transfer Ca(2+ ions from D60 to the final binding site, explaining the observed decrement in the affinity of the mutated protein to Ca(2+.

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts ... relatively low and the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stage, often before symptoms occur or before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine ... nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can do to prepare. First, you may be asked ...

  9. Roentgenologic abnormalities in Down's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takehiko; Russell, W J; Komatsuda, Michio; Neriishi, Shotaro

    1968-07-25

    Roentgenograms of 28 patients with Down's syndrome were reviewed with emphasis on all previously reported abnormalities and any possible additional ones. Most of the abnormalities occurred with the same frequency as previously reported, but some less frequently reported findings were also seen. One abnormal vertebral measurement found in this series may be an additional stigma of Down's syndrome. All of the 27 cases studied cytogenetically had chromosomal abnormalities consistent with this disease. This study emphasizes the need for roentgenologic norms for the Japanese, and the desirability of combining chromosome studies with roentgenological abnormalities and clinical observations in diagnosing Down's syndrome. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Breaking the polar-nonpolar division in solvation free energy prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wang, Chengzhang; Wu, Kedi; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-02-05

    Implicit solvent models divide solvation free energies into polar and nonpolar additive contributions, whereas polar and nonpolar interactions are inseparable and nonadditive. We present a feature functional theory (FFT) framework to break this ad hoc division. The essential ideas of FFT are as follows: (i) representability assumption: there exists a microscopic feature vector that can uniquely characterize and distinguish one molecule from another; (ii) feature-function relationship assumption: the macroscopic features, including solvation free energy, of a molecule is a functional of microscopic feature vectors; and (iii) similarity assumption: molecules with similar microscopic features have similar macroscopic properties, such as solvation free energies. Based on these assumptions, solvation free energy prediction is carried out in the following protocol. First, we construct a molecular microscopic feature vector that is efficient in characterizing the solvation process using quantum mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Microscopic feature vectors are combined with macroscopic features, that is, physical observable, to form extended feature vectors. Additionally, we partition a solvation dataset into queries according to molecular compositions. Moreover, for each target molecule, we adopt a machine learning algorithm for its nearest neighbor search, based on the selected microscopic feature vectors. Finally, from the extended feature vectors of obtained nearest neighbors, we construct a functional of solvation free energy, which is employed to predict the solvation free energy of the target molecule. The proposed FFT model has been extensively validated via a large dataset of 668 molecules. The leave-one-out test gives an optimal root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.05 kcal/mol. FFT predictions of SAMPL0, SAMPL1, SAMPL2, SAMPL3, and SAMPL4 challenge sets deliver the RMSEs of 0.61, 1.86, 1.64, 0.86, and 1.14 kcal/mol, respectively. Using a test set of 94

  11. Hydrophilic Solvation Dominates the Terahertz Fingerprint of Amino Acids in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Alexander; Forbert, Harald; Sebastiani, Federico; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina; Marx, Dominik

    2018-02-01

    Spectroscopy in the terahertz frequency regime is a sensitive tool to probe solvation-induced effects in aqueous solutions. Yet, a systematic understanding of spectral lineshapes as a result of distinct solvation contributions remains terra incognita. We demonstrate that modularization of amino acids in terms of functional groups allows us to compute their distinct contributions to the total terahertz response. Introducing the molecular cross-correlation analysis method provides unique access to these site-specific contributions. Equivalent groups in different amino acids lead to look-alike spectral contributions, whereas side chains cause characteristic but additive complexities. Specifically, hydrophilic solvation of the zwitterionic groups in valine and glycine leads to similar terahertz responses which are fully decoupled from the side chain. The terahertz response due to H-bonding within the large hydrophobic solvation shell of valine turns out to be nearly indistinguishable from that in bulk water in direct comparison to the changes imposed by the charged functional groups that form strong H-bonds with their hydration shells. Thus, the hydrophilic groups and their solvation shells dominate the terahertz absorption difference, while on the same intensity scale, the influence of hydrophobic water can be neglected.

  12. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Timothy T.; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Chistopher J.

    2017-10-01

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to unphysical values for the single ion solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation.

  13. Solvation pressure as real pressure: I. Ethanol and starch under negative pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Uden, N W A V; Faux, D A; Tanczos, A C; Howlin, B; Dunstan, D J

    2003-01-01

    The reality of the solvation pressure generated by the cohesive energy density of liquids is demonstrated by three methods. Firstly, the Raman spectrum of ethanol as a function of cohesive energy density (solvation pressure) in ethanol-water and ethanol-chloroform mixtures is compared with the Raman spectrum of pure ethanol under external hydrostatic pressure and the solvation pressure and hydrostatic pressure are found to be equivalent for some transitions. Secondly, the bond lengths of ethanol are calculated by molecular dynamics modelling for liquid ethanol under pressure and for ethanol vapour. The difference in bond lengths between vapour and liquid are found to be equivalent to the solvation pressure for the C-H sub 3 , C-H sub 2 and O-H bond lengths, with discrepancies for the C-C and C-O bond lengths. Thirdly, the pressure-induced gelation of potato starch is measured in pure water and in mixtures of water and ethanol. The phase transition pressure varies in accordance with the change in solvation pre...

  14. Improving accuracy of electrochemical capacitance and solvation energetics in first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Letchworth-Weaver, Kendra; Schwarz, Kathleen A.

    2018-04-01

    Reliable first-principles calculations of electrochemical processes require accurate prediction of the interfacial capacitance, a challenge for current computationally efficient continuum solvation methodologies. We develop a model for the double layer of a metallic electrode that reproduces the features of the experimental capacitance of Ag(100) in a non-adsorbing, aqueous electrolyte, including a broad hump in the capacitance near the potential of zero charge and a dip in the capacitance under conditions of low ionic strength. Using this model, we identify the necessary characteristics of a solvation model suitable for first-principles electrochemistry of metal surfaces in non-adsorbing, aqueous electrolytes: dielectric and ionic nonlinearity, and a dielectric-only region at the interface. The dielectric nonlinearity, caused by the saturation of dipole rotational response in water, creates the capacitance hump, while ionic nonlinearity, caused by the compactness of the diffuse layer, generates the capacitance dip seen at low ionic strength. We show that none of the previously developed solvation models simultaneously meet all these criteria. We design the nonlinear electrochemical soft-sphere solvation model which both captures the capacitance features observed experimentally and serves as a general-purpose continuum solvation model.

  15. Understanding Lithium Solvation and Diffusion through Topological Analysis of First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Harsh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gyulassy, Attila [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ong, Mitchell [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Draeger, Erik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pask, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bremer, Peer -Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-27

    The performance of lithium-ion batteries is strongly influenced by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, which depends on the speed at which Li ions migrate across the cell and relates to their solvation structure. The choice of solvent can greatly impact, both, the solvation and diffusivity of Li ions. In this work, we present our application of the topological techniques to extract and predict such behavior in the data generated by the first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of Li ions in an important organic solvent -ethylene carbonate. More specifically, we use the scalar topology of the electron charge density field to analyze the evolution of the solvation structures. This allows us to derive a parameter-free bond definition for lithium-oxygen bonds, to provide a quantitative measure for bond strength, and to understand the regions of influence of each atom in the simulation. This has provided new insights into how and under what conditions certain bonds may form and break. As a result, we can identify and, more importantly, predict, unstable configurations in solvation structures. This can be very useful in understanding when small changes to the atoms' movements can cause significantly different bond structures to evolve. Ultimately, this promises to allow scientists to explore lithium ion solvation and diffusion more systematically, with the aim of new insights and potentially accelerating the calculations themselves.

  16. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  17. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  18. Abnormal biodistribution of radiogallium in persons treated with phenytoin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.; Starreveld, Elout; Catz, Zolly; Penney, Heather; Turner, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    After incidentally observing a patient in whom abnormal uptake of gallium-67 citrate appeared to be explained by treatment with phenytoin, we have conducted a prospective study. Of sixteen persons with a seizure disorder treated with phenytoin, five (31 percent) had abnormal uptake of radiogallium either in the mediastinum, pulmonary hilum or both. Of nineteen historical control patients only one had such abnormal uptake. Phenytoin may thus cause the false-positive uptake of radiogallium in lymph nodes; this finding may also prove to have nosological importance in identifying patients at particular risk of the side-effects of this drug

  19. Recent results on solvation dynamics of electron and spur reactions of solvated electron in polar solvents studied by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report several studies done recently at ELYSE laboratory on the solvation dynamics of electron and on the kinetics of solvated electron in the spur reactions, performed by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis, respectively. Solvated electrons have been produced in polyol (1,2-Etanediol, 1,2-Propanediol and 1,3-Propanediol) by two-photon ionization of the solvent with 263 nm femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature. The two-photon absorption coefficient of these solvents at 263 nm has been determined. The dynamics of electron solvation in polyols has been studied by pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy. So, time resolved absorption spectra ranging from 430 to 720 nm have been measured (Figure 1). A blue shift of the spectra is observed for the first tens of picoseconds. Using Bayesian data analysis method, the observed solvation dynamics are reconstructed with different models: stepwise mechanisms, continuous relaxation models or combinations of stepwise and continuous relaxation. That analysis clearly indicates that it is not obvious to select a unique model to describe the solvation dynamics of electron in diols. We showed that several models are able to reproduce correctly the data: a two-step model, a heterogeneous or bi-exponential continuous relaxation model and even a hybrid model with a stepwise transition and homogeneous continuous relaxation. Nevertheless, the best fits are given by the continuous spectral relaxation models. The fact that the time-evolution of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron in diols can be accurately described by the temperature dependent absorption spectrum of the ground state solvated electron suggests that the spectral blue shift is mostly caused by the continuous relaxation of the electron trapped in a large distribution of solvent cages. Similar trends on electron solvation dynamics are observed in the cases of 1,2-ethanediol, 1,3-propanediol and 1,2 propanediol

  20. Solvation of the fluorine containing anions and their lithium salts in propylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Electrolyte solutions based on the propylene carbonate (PC)-dimethoxyethane (DME) mixtures are of significant importance and urgency due to emergence of lithium-ion batteries. Solvation and coordination of the lithium cation in these systems have been recently attended in detail. However, analogous information concerning anions (tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate) is still missed. This work reports PM7-MD simulations (electronic-structure level of description) to include finite-temperature effects on the anion solvation regularities in the PC-DME mixture. The reported result evidences that the anions appear weakly solvated. This observation is linked to the absence of suitable coordination sites in the solvent molecules. In the concentrated electrolyte solutions, both BF4(-) and PF6(-) prefer to exist as neutral ion pairs (LiBF4, LiPF6).

  1. Competitive solvation of (bis)(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion by acetonitrile and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-10-01

    Competitive solvation of an ion by two or more solvents is one of the key phenomena determining the identity of our world. Solvation in polar solvents frequently originates from non-additive non-covalent interactions. Pre-parametrized potentials poorly capture these interactions, unless the force field derivation is repeated for every new system. Development cost increases drastically as new chemical species are supplied. This work represents an alternative simulation approach, PM7-MD, by coupling the latest semiempirical parametrization, PM7, with equation-of-motion propagation scheme and temperature coupling. Using a competitive solvation of (bis)(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion in acetonitrile and water, the work demonstrates efficiency and robustness of PM7-MD.

  2. Solvation of decane and benzene in mixtures of 1-octanol and N, N-dimethylformamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, A. V.; Smirnova, N. L.

    2016-09-01

    The heats of dissolution of decane and benzene in a model system of octanol-1 (OctOH) and N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at 308 K are measured using a variable temperature calorimeter equipped with an isothermal shell. Standard enthalpies are determined and standard heat capacities of dissolution in the temperature range of 298-318 K are calculated using data obtained in [1, 2]. The state of hydrocarbon molecules in a binary mixture is studied in terms of the enhanced coordination model (ECM). Benzene is shown to be preferentially solvated by DMF over the range of physiological temperatures. The solvation shell of decane is found to be strongly enriched with 1-octanol. It is obvious that although both hydrocarbons are nonpolar, the presence of the aromatic π-system in benzene leads to drastic differences in their solvation in a lipid-protein medium.

  3. Corrosion Thermodynamics of Magnesium and Alloys from First Principles as a Function of Solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Krista; Williams, Kristen; Andzelm, Jan

    Thermodynamics of corrosion processes occurring on magnesium surfaces, such as hydrogen evolution and water dissociation, have been examined with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate the effect of impurities and dilute alloying additions. The modeling of corrosion thermodynamics requires examination of species in a variety of chemical and electronic states in order to accurately represent the complex electrochemical corrosion process. In this study, DFT calculations for magnesium corrosion thermodynamics were performed with two DFT codes (VASP and DMol3), with multiple exchange-correlation functionals for chemical accuracy, as well as with various levels of implicit and explicit solvation for surfaces and solvated ions. The accuracy of the first principles calculations has been validated against Pourbaix diagrams constructed from solid, gas and solvated charged ion calculations. For aqueous corrosion, it is shown that a well parameterized implicit solvent is capable of accurately representing all but the first coordinating layer of explicit water for charged ions.

  4. Analysis of biomolecular solvation sites by 3D-RISM theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhikara, Daniel J; Hirata, Fumio

    2013-06-06

    We derive, implement, and apply equilibrium solvation site analysis for biomolecules. Our method utilizes 3D-RISM calculations to quickly obtain equilibrium solvent distributions without either necessity of simulation or limits of solvent sampling. Our analysis of these distributions extracts highest likelihood poses of solvent as well as localized entropies, enthalpies, and solvation free energies. We demonstrate our method on a structure of HIV-1 protease where excellent structural and thermodynamic data are available for comparison. Our results, obtained within minutes, show systematic agreement with available experimental data. Further, our results are in good agreement with established simulation-based solvent analysis methods. This method can be used not only for visual analysis of active site solvation but also for virtual screening methods and experimental refinement.

  5. Solvation of monovalent anions in formamide and methanol: Parameterization of the IEF-PCM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boees, Elvis S.; Bernardi, Edson; Stassen, Hubert; Goncalves, Paulo F.B.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamics of solvation for a series of monovalent anions in formamide and methanol has been studied using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The parameterization of this continuum model was guided by molecular dynamics simulations. The parameterized PCM model predicts the Gibbs free energies of solvation for 13 anions in formamide and 16 anions in methanol in very good agreement with experimental data. Two sets of atomic radii were tested in the definition of the solute cavities in the PCM and their performances are evaluated and discussed. Mean absolute deviations of the calculated free energies of solvation from the experimental values are in the range of 1.3-2.1 kcal/mol

  6. Quantitative measurement of solvation shells using frequency modulated atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, T.; Higgins, M.; Nakayama, Y.; Sader, J. E.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2005-03-01

    The nanoscale specificity of interaction measurements and additional imaging capability of the atomic force microscope make it an ideal technique for measuring solvation shells in a variety of liquids next to a range of materials. Unfortunately, the widespread use of atomic force microscopy for the measurement of solvation shells has been limited by uncertainties over the dimensions, composition and durability of the tip during the measurements, and problems associated with quantitative force calibration of the most sensitive dynamic measurement techniques. We address both these issues by the combined use of carbon nanotube high aspect ratio probes and quantifying the highly sensitive frequency modulation (FM) detection technique using a recently developed analytical method. Due to the excellent reproducibility of the measurement technique, additional information regarding solvation shell size as a function of proximity to the surface has been obtained for two very different liquids. Further, it has been possible to identify differences between chemical and geometrical effects in the chosen systems.

  7. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  8. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  9. Solvation phenomena in association theories with applications to oil & gas and chemical industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Folas, Georgios; Muro Sunè, Nuria

    2008-01-01

    Association theories e.g. those belonging to the SAFT family account explicitly for self- and cross-association (solvation) phenomena. Such phenomena are of great practical importance as they affect, often dramatically, the phase behaviour of many mixtures of industrial relevance. From the scient......Association theories e.g. those belonging to the SAFT family account explicitly for self- and cross-association (solvation) phenomena. Such phenomena are of great practical importance as they affect, often dramatically, the phase behaviour of many mixtures of industrial relevance. From...

  10. Phase Equilibria and Ionic Solvation in the Lithium Tetrafluoroborate-Dimethylsulfoxide System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, M. M.; Kirillov, S. A.; Gorobets, M. I.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Ataev, M. B.; Tretyakov, D. O.; Aydemirov, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    The phase diagram and electrical conductivity isotherms for the lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) system and Raman spectra of DMSO and the LiBF4-DMSO solution were studied. Spectroscopic signatures of a H-bond between DMSO and BF4 - ions were found. The bonds of Li+ ions to the solvent were stronger than the bonds in DMSO dimers because formation of the solvate destroyed dimeric DMSO molecules. The τω values for DMSO molecules in the Li+-ion solvate shell of the LiBF4-DMSO system were similar to those for associated solvent molecules.

  11. Modelos contínuos do solvente: fundamentos Continuum solvation models: fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefredo R. Pliego Jr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuum solvation models are nowadays widely used in the modeling of solvent effects and the range of applications goes from the calculation of partition coefficients to chemical reactions in solution. The present work presents a detailed explanation of the physical foundations of continuum models. We discuss the polarization of a dielectric and its representation through the volume and surface polarization charges. The Poisson equation for a dielectric was obtained and we have also derived and discuss the apparent surface charge method and its application for free energy of solvation calculations.

  12. Spectral luminescence studies of eosin solvation in water-alcohol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketsle, G.A.; Levshin, L.V.; Mel' nikov, G.V.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1987-11-01

    The authors investigate the effects of solvation of eosin molecules in binary water-propanol mixtures with the goal of assessing eosin as a candidate dye laser material. The fluorescence was measured with a Hitachi spectrofluorimeter and the absorption spectra were taken on a Specord spectrophotometer. Absorption and fluorescence were measured for different amounts of propanol in the solvent. Data are also given on excitation and de-excitation kinetics between ground and excited states. Values for quantum yields of fluorescence and phosphorescence, average excited state lifetime, and molecular volume of the dye with the solvated shell are tabulated.

  13. Preferential Solvation of Silver (I) Bromate in Methanol-Dimethylsulfoxide Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, S.; Kalidas, C.

    1984-06-01

    The solubiltiy of silver bromate, the Gibbs transfer energy of Ag+ and BrO3- and the solvent transport number in methanol-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures are reported. The solubility of silver bromate increases with addition of DMSO. The Gibbs energy of transfer of the silver ion (based on the ferrocene reference method) decreases, while that of the bromate ion becomes slightly negative with the addition of DMSO. The solvent transport number A passes through a maximum (⊿ = 1.0 at XDMSO = 0.65. From these results, it is concluded that the silver ion is preferentially solvated by DMSO whereas the bromate ion shows no preferential solvation.

  14. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  15. Explaining Physics – What Skills does a good Explainer Need?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Bartels, Hauke

    2018-01-01

    Explaining physics in a way that it is both scientifically correct and comprehensible is a highly demanding practice. But are explanations an effective way to teach physics? Under which circumstances should a physics teacher explain – and is there such a thing as a guideline for effective instructional explanations? Of course, explaining is more than just presenting content knowledge in clear language – but what more? In our talk, we want to discuss empirical studies on instructional explanations from science education and psychology to address these questions. Among other things, we will refer to results from a large study aiming to research whether teacher education contributes to the development of explaining skills. Besides, we will give insights into a project that seeks to measure explaining skills with an interactive online test instrument.

  16. Are mixed explicit/implicit solvation models reliable for studying phosphate hydrolysis? A comparative study of continuum, explicit and mixed solvation models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-05-01

    Phosphate hydrolysis is ubiquitous in biology. However, despite intensive research on this class of reactions, the precise nature of the reaction mechanism remains controversial. In this work, we have examined the hydrolysis of three homologous phosphate diesters. The solvation free energy was simulated by means of either an implicit solvation model (COSMO), hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) or a mixed solvation model in which N water molecules were explicitly included in the ab initio description of the reacting system (where N=1-3), with the remainder of the solvent being implicitly modelled as a continuum. Here, both COSMO and QM/MM-FEP reproduce Delta Gobs within an error of about 2kcal/mol. However, we demonstrate that in order to obtain any form of reliable results from a mixed model, it is essential to carefully select the explicit water molecules from short QM/MM runs that act as a model for the true infinite system. Additionally, the mixed models tend to be increasingly inaccurate the more explicit water molecules are placed into the system. Thus, our analysis indicates that this approach provides an unreliable way for modelling phosphate hydrolysis in solution.

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of ...

  18. Abnormality diagnostic technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, it is feared that the failure of the installations containing radioactive substances may inflict serious damage on public and workers. Therefore in nuclear power plants, the ensuring of safety is planned by supposing hypothetical accidents which are not likely to occur from engineering viewpoint, and multiple protection measures are taken in the plant constitution. In addition to the safety measures from such hardware aspect, recently in order to prevent the occurrence of accidents by using various safety-confirming means, and to detect early when any accident occurred, the development and putting in practical use of many monitoring equipments have been promoted. In such background, the development of nuclear power generation supporting system was carried out for five years since fiscal year 1980, subsidized by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and in this report, the technology of equipment abnormality diagnosis developed as a part of that project and the diagnostic techniques for actual plants are described. The technology of diagnosing nuclear reactor abnormality includes the diagnosis of loose metal pieces and the abnormal vibration of in-core structures. The detection and diagnosis of valve leak and the diagnosis of the deterioration of detectors are also explained. (Kako, I.)

  19. Preferential solvation, ion pairing, and dynamics of concentrated aqueous solutions of divalent metal nitrate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sushma; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-12-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of preferential solvation of ions, structure of solvation shells, ion pairing, and dynamics of aqueous solutions of divalent alkaline-earth metal nitrate salts at varying concentration by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Hydration shell structures and the extent of preferential solvation of the metal and nitrate ions in the solutions are investigated through calculations of radial distribution functions, tetrahedral ordering, and also spatial distribution functions. The Mg2+ ions are found to form solvent separated ion-pairs while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ ions form contact ion pairs with the nitrate ions. These findings are further corroborated by excess coordination numbers calculated through Kirkwood-Buff G factors for different ion-ion and ion-water pairs. The ion-pairing propensity is found to be in the order of Mg(NO3) 2 lead to the presence of substantial dynamical heterogeneity in these solutions of strongly interacting ions. The current study helps us to understand the molecular details of hydration structure, ion pairing, and dynamics of water in the solvation shells and also of ion diffusion in aqueous solutions of divalent metal nitrate salts.

  20. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bardhan, J. P.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, L.

    Roč. 137, č. 12 ( 2012 ), 124101/1-124101/6 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ion solvation * continuum models * linear response Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.164, year: 2012

  1. Mutagenicity of Tween 80-solvated mild gasification products in the Ames salmonella microsomal assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-13

    The results of the Tween 80-solvated Ames testing of six mild gasification samples indicate significant mutagenic activity only in the composite materials (MG-119 and MG-120), previously suspected from the DMSO-solvated assays, which had shown some variable but ultimately insignificant mutagenic responses. The activity of these samples from the Tween 80-solvated assays was quite low when compared to either the positive controls or the SRC-II HD coal-liquefaction reference material. The class of mutagenic activity expressed by these samples solvated in Tween 80 was that of an indirect-acting, frameshift mutagen(s) since significant activity was found only on tester strain TA98 in the presence of the metabolic activation fraction (S9). Because DMSO and other solvents have been shown to affect the mutagenic activity of certain pure chemicals, the possibility of solvent/mutagen interactions in complex mixtures such as coal-derived liquids exists. Thus, the testing of the genotoxic activity of undefined, chemically complex compounds may require the use of at least two solvent systems to reduce the possibility of artifactual findings. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Ni(salen): a system that forms many solvates with interacting Ni atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegler, M.A.M.; Lutz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Recrystallization of [N,N’-Ethylene-bis(salicylideneiminato)]-nickel(II) [Ni(salen)] has been carried out from a large selection of solvents. Crystals can be either solvent free or solvates. This study is based on X-ray crystal structure determinations, which include the redetermination of Ni(salen)

  3. Conformational Behavior of Polymer Chains of Different Architectures in Strongly Endothermic Solvent Mixtures: Specific Solvation Effects.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchá, L.; Limpouchová, Z.; Procházka, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 8 (2017), s. 1391-1403 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : cononsolvency * preferential solvation * star polymer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.723, year: 2016

  4. Influence of temperature and molecular structure on ionic liquid solvation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Deborah; Hayes, Robert; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2009-04-30

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force profiling is used to investigate the structure of adsorbed and solvation layers formed on a mica surface by various room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), ethylammonium formate (EAF), propylammonium formate (PAF), ethylmethylammonium formate (EMAF), and dimethylethylammonium formate (DMEAF). At least seven layers are observed for EAN at 14 degrees C (melting point 13 degrees C), decreasing as the temperature is increased to 30 degrees C due to thermal energy disrupting solvophobic forces that lead to segregation of cation alkyl tails from the charged ammonium and nitrate moieties. The number and properties of the solvation layers can also be controlled by introducing an alcohol moiety to the cation's alkyl tail (EtAN), or by replacing the nitrate anion with formate (EAF and PAF), even leading to the detection of distinct cation and anion sublayers. Substitution of primary by secondary or tertiary ammonium cations reduces the number of solvation layers formed, and also weakens the cation layer adsorbed onto mica. The observed solvation and adsorbed layer structures are discussed in terms of the intermolecular cohesive forces within the ILs.

  5. Strong Stretching of Poly(ethylene glycol) Brushes Mediated by Ionic Liquid Solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengwei; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2017-09-07

    We have measured forces between mica surfaces coated with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush solvated by a vacuum-dry ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, with a surface forces apparatus. At high grafting density, the solvation mediated by the ionic liquid causes the brush to stretch twice as much as in water. Modeling of the steric repulsion indicates that PEG behaves as a polyelectrolyte; the hydrogen bonding between ethylene glycol and the imidazolium cation seems to effectively charge the polymer brush, which justifies the strong stretching. Importantly, under strong polymer compression, solvation layers are squeezed out at a higher rate than for the neat ionic liquid. We propose that the thermal fluctuations of the PEG chains, larger in the brush than in the mushroom configuration, maintain the fluidity of the ionic liquid under strong compression, in contrast to the solid-like squeezing-out behavior of the neat ionic liquid. This is the first experimental study of the behavior of a polymer brush solvated by an ionic liquid under nanoconfinement.

  6. Fluorescent probe studies of polarity and solvation within room temperature ionic liquids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shubha; Baker, Sheila N; Pandey, Siddharth; Baker, Gary A

    2012-09-01

    Ionic liquids display an array of useful and sometimes unconventional, solvent features and have attracted considerable interest in the field of green chemistry for the potential they hold to significantly reduce environmental emissions. Some of these points have a bearing on the chemical reactivity of these systems and have also generated interest in the physical and theoretical aspects of solvation in ionic liquids. This review presents an introduction to the field of ionic liquids, followed by discussion of investigations into the solvation properties of neat ionic liquids or mixed systems including ionic liquids as a major or minor component. The ionic liquid based multicomponent systems discussed are composed of other solvents, other ionic liquids, carbon dioxide, surfactants or surfactant solutions. Although we clearly focus on fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to illuminate ionic liquid systems, the issues discussed herein are of general relevance to discussions of polarity and solvent effects in ionic liquids. Transient solvation measurements carried out by means of time-resolved fluorescence measurements are particularly powerful for their ability to parameterize the kinetics of the solvation process in ionic liquids and are discussed as well.

  7. Highly Stable Lithium Metal Batteries Enabled by Regulating the Solvation of Lithium Ions in Nonaqueous Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Xiang; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Li, Bo-Quan; Shen, Xin; Yan, Chong; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang

    2018-05-04

    Safe and rechargeable lithium metal batteries have been difficult to achieve because of the formation of lithium dendrites. Herein an emerging electrolyte based on a simple solvation strategy is proposed for highly stable lithium metal anodes in both coin and pouch cells. Fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) and lithium nitrate (LiNO 3 ) were concurrently introduced into an electrolyte, thus altering the solvation sheath of lithium ions, and forming a uniform solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), with an abundance of LiF and LiN x O y on a working lithium metal anode with dendrite-free lithium deposition. Ultrahigh Coulombic efficiency (99.96 %) and long lifespans (1000 cycles) were achieved when the FEC/LiNO 3 electrolyte was applied in working batteries. The solvation chemistry of electrolyte was further explored by molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles calculations. This work provides insight into understanding the critical role of the solvation of lithium ions in forming the SEI and delivering an effective route to optimize electrolytes for safe lithium metal batteries. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Applications of the solvation parameter model in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F; Lenca, Nicole

    2017-02-24

    The solvation parameter model is widely used to provide insight into the retention mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, for column characterization, and in the development of surrogate chromatographic models for biopartitioning processes. The properties of the separation system are described by five system constants representing all possible intermolecular interactions for neutral molecules. The general model can be extended to include ions and enantiomers by adding new descriptors to encode the specific properties of these compounds. System maps provide a comprehensive overview of the separation system as a function of mobile phase composition and/or temperature for method development. The solvation parameter model has been applied to gradient elution separations but here theory and practice suggest a cautious approach since the interpretation of system and compound properties derived from its use are approximate. A growing application of the solvation parameter model in reversed-phase liquid chromatography is the screening of surrogate chromatographic systems for estimating biopartitioning properties. Throughout the discussion of the above topics success as well as known and likely deficiencies of the solvation parameter model are described with an emphasis on the role of the heterogeneous properties of the interphase region on the interpretation and understanding of the general retention mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography for porous chemically bonded sorbents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Solvated protein-protein docking using Kyte-Doolittle-based water preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastritis, P.; Visscher, K.M.; van Dijk, A.D.J.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    HADDOCK is one of the few docking programs that can explicitly account for water molecules in the docking process. Its solvated docking protocol starts from hydrated molecules and a fraction of the resulting interfacial waters is subsequently removed in a biased Monte Carlo procedure based on

  10. Solvated protein-protein docking using Kyte-Doolittle-based water preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Visscher, Koen M.; van Dijk, Aalt D.J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.

    HADDOCK is one of the few docking programs that can explicitly account for water molecules in the docking process. Its solvated docking protocol starts from hydrated molecules and a fraction of the resulting interfacial waters is subsequently removed in a biased Monte Carlo procedure based on

  11. Systematic solvate screening of trospium chloride: discovering hydrates of a long-established pharmaceutical

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládková, V.; Skalická, T.; Skořepová, E.; Čejka, J.; Eigner, Václav; Kratochvíl, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 25 (2015), s. 4712-4721 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : trospium chloride * solvate screening * x-ray crystallography * Jana2006 Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2015

  12. Solvation in atomic liquids: connection between Gaussian field theory and density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergiievskyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of molecular solvation, formulated as a liquid submitted to the external potential field created by a molecular solute of arbitrary shape dissolved in that solvent, we draw a connection between the Gaussian field theory derived by David Chandler [Phys. Rev. E, 1993, 48, 2898] and classical density functional theory. We show that Chandler's results concerning the solvation of a hard core of arbitrary shape can be recovered by either minimising a linearised HNC functional using an auxiliary Lagrange multiplier field to impose a vanishing density inside the core, or by minimising this functional directly outside the core — indeed a simpler procedure. Those equivalent approaches are compared to two other variants of DFT, either in the HNC, or partially linearised HNC approximation, for the solvation of a Lennard-Jones solute of increasing size in a Lennard-Jones solvent. Compared to Monte-Carlo simulations, all those theories give acceptable results for the inhomogeneous solvent structure, but are completely out-of-range for the solvation free-energies. This can be fixed in DFT by adding a hard-sphere bridge correction to the HNC functional.

  13. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  14. Solvated Positron Chemistry. Competitive Positron Reactions with Halide Ions in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Palle; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen; Andersen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown by means of the angular correlation technique that the binding of positrons to halides is strongly influenced by solvation effects. For aqueous solutions we find increasing values for the binding energies between the halide and the positron with increasing mass of the halide...

  15. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this “CANDLE” model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile.

  16. Febuxostat-Minoxidil Salt Solvates: Crystal Structures, Characterization, Interconversion and Solubility Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yang Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Three febuxostat-minoxidil salt solvates with acetone (ACE, tetrahydrofuran (THF and isopropanol (IPA are synthesized by solvent-assisted grinding and characterized by infrared (IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. These febuxostat-minoxidil salt solvates feature isostructural with the same stoichiometries (1:1:1 molecule ratio. The proton transfers from the carboxylic group of febuxostat (FEB to imino N atom of minoxidil (MIN, which forms the motif with combined R 2 2 (9 R 4 2 (8 R 2 2 (9 graph set in the three solvates. The solvents occupy the different positions related to the motif, which results in the apparent differences in PXRD patterns before/after desolvation although they are isostructures. The FEB-MIN·THF was more thermostable than FEB-MIN·ACE and FEB-MIN·IPA relative to solvent removal from DSC patterns, which is different from the results from the solvent-exchange experiments in chemical kinetics. All three salt solvates exhibit increased equilibrium solubility compared to FEB in aqueous medium.

  17. Solvation analysis of some Solvatochromic probes in binary mixtures of reline, ethaline, and glyceline with DMSO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harifi-Mood, A.R.; Ghobadi, R.; Matić, S.; Minofar, Babak; Řeha, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, OCT 2016 (2016), s. 845-853 ISSN 0167-7322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-21053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Deep eutectic solvents * Solvatochromic parameters * Preferential solvation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.648, year: 2016

  18. 6,6'-Dimethoxygossypol: molecular structure, crystal polymorphism, and solvate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    6,6´-Dimethoxygossypol (DMG) is a naturally produced derivative of gossypol that is found in relatively high concentration in some Gossypium barbadense cotton varieties. Like gossypol, DMG forms an equimolar solvate with acetic acid, but it was not clear if, like gossypol, the compound would form c...

  19. Solvent density inhomogeneities and solvation free energies in supercritical diatomic fluids: a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husowitz, B; Talanquer, V

    2007-02-07

    Density functional theory is used to explore the solvation properties of a spherical solute immersed in a supercritical diatomic fluid. The solute is modeled as a hard core Yukawa particle surrounded by a diatomic Lennard-Jones fluid represented by two fused tangent spheres using an interaction site approximation. The authors' approach is particularly suitable for thoroughly exploring the effect of different interaction parameters, such as solute-solvent interaction strength and range, solvent-solvent long-range interactions, and particle size, on the local solvent structure and the solvation free energy under supercritical conditions. Their results indicate that the behavior of the local coordination number in homonuclear diatomic fluids follows trends similar to those reported in previous studies for monatomic fluids. The local density augmentation is particularly sensitive to changes in solute size and is affected to a lesser degree by variations in the solute-solvent interaction strength and range. The associated solvation free energies exhibit a nonmonotonous behavior as a function of density for systems with weak solute-solvent interactions. The authors' results suggest that solute-solvent interaction anisotropies have a major influence on the nature and extent of local solvent density inhomogeneities and on the value of the solvation free energies in supercritical solutions of heteronuclear molecules.

  20. Effect of Preferential Solvation of Polymer Chains on Vapor-Pressure Osmometry Results. Computer Simulation Study.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Limpouchová, Z.; Procházka, Karel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 3 (2018), s. 244-251 ISSN 1023-666X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : vapor-pressure osmometry * simulation * solvatation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  1. Comparative assessment of computational methods for the determination of solvation free energies in alcohol-based molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Silvia A; Sousa, Sergio F

    2013-06-05

    The determination of differences in solvation free energies between related drug molecules remains an important challenge in computational drug optimization, when fast and accurate calculation of differences in binding free energy are required. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of five commonly used polarized continuum model (PCM) methodologies in the determination of solvation free energies for 53 typical alcohol and alkane small molecules. In addition, the performance of these PCM methods, of a thermodynamic integration (TI) protocol and of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) and generalized Born (GB) methods, were tested in the determination of solvation free energies changes for 28 common alkane-alcohol transformations, by the substitution of an hydrogen atom for a hydroxyl substituent. The results show that the solvation model D (SMD) performs better among the PCM-based approaches in estimating solvation free energies for alcohol molecules, and solvation free energy changes for alkane-alcohol transformations, with an average error below 1 kcal/mol for both quantities. However, for the determination of solvation free energy changes on alkane-alcohol transformation, PB and TI yielded better results. TI was particularly accurate in the treatment of hydroxyl groups additions to aromatic rings (0.53 kcal/mol), a common transformation when optimizing drug-binding in computer-aided drug design. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale in methanol determined by the lithium cluster-continuum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliego, Josefredo R; Miguel, Elizabeth L M

    2013-05-02

    Absolute solvation free energy of the lithium cation in methanol was calculated by the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory of solvation. Clusters with up to five methanol molecules were investigated using X3LYP, MP2, and MP4 methods with DZVP, 6-311+G(2df,2p), TZVPP+diff, and QZVPP+diff basis sets and including the cluster solvation through the PCM and SMD continuum models. Our calculations have determined a value of -118.1 kcal mol(-1) for the solvation free energy of the lithium, in close agreement with a value of -116.6 kcal mol(-1) consistent with the TATB assumption. Using data of solvation and transfer free energy of a pair of ions, electrode potentials and pKa, we have obtained the solvation free energy of 25 ions in methanol. Our analysis leads to a value of -253.6 kcal mol(-1) for the solvation free energy of the proton, which can be compared with the value of -263.5 kcal mol(-1) obtained by Kelly et al. using the cluster pair approximation. Considering that this difference is due to the methanol surface potential, we have estimated that it corresponds to -0.429 V.

  3. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation with methadone and benzodiazepines.

  4. A sensitive fluorescent probe for the polar solvation dynamics at protein-surfactant interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yongwoong; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Jhimli; Das, Ranjan; Ahn, Kyo-Han; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-17

    Relaxation dynamics at the surface of biologically important macromolecules is important taking into account their functionality in molecular recognition. Over the years it has been shown that the solvation dynamics of a fluorescent probe at biomolecular surfaces and interfaces account for the relaxation dynamics of polar residues and associated water molecules. However, the sensitivity of the dynamics depends largely on the localization and exposure of the probe. For noncovalent fluorescent probes, localization at the region of interest in addition to surface exposure is an added challenge compared to the covalently attached probes at the biological interfaces. Here we have used a synthesized donor-acceptor type dipolar fluorophore, 6-acetyl-(2-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalene) (ACYMAN), for the investigation of the solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. A significant structural rearrangement of a model histone protein (H1) upon interaction with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as revealed from the circular dichroism (CD) studies is nicely corroborated in the solvation dynamics of the probe at the interface. The polarization gated fluorescence anisotropy of the probe compared to that at the SDS micellar surface clearly reveals the localization of the probe at the protein-surfactant interface. We have also compared the sensitivity of ACYMAN with other solvation probes including coumarin 500 (C500) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). In comparison to ACYMAN, both C500 and DCM fail to probe the interfacial solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. While C500 is found to be delocalized from the protein-surfactant interface, DCM becomes destabilized upon the formation of the interface (protein-surfactant complex). The timescales obtained from this novel probe have also been compared with other femtosecond resolved studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Alegret, X.; Sanchis, E.; Rivas, A.

    1997-01-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  10. Explaining variation in nascent entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Stel (André); A.R.M. Wennekers (Sander); P. Reynolds (Paul); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis paper aims at explaining cross-country variation in nascent entrepreneurship. Regression analysis is applied using various explanatory variables derived from three different approaches. We make use of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor database, including nascent entrepreneurship

  11. Explaining nascent entrepreneurship across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Thurik (Roy); A.J. van Stel (André); A.R.M. Wennekers (Sander); P. Reynolds (Paul)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper aims at explaining cross-country variation in nascent entrepreneurship. Regression analysis is applied using various explanatory variables derived from three different approaches. We make use of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor database, including nascent entrepreneurship

  12. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  13. Incorporation of Hydrogen Bond Angle Dependency into the Generalized Solvation Free Energy Density Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songling; Hwang, Sungbo; Lee, Sehan; Acree, William E; No, Kyoung Tai

    2018-04-23

    To describe the physically realistic solvation free energy surface of a molecule in a solvent, a generalized version of the solvation free energy density (G-SFED) calculation method has been developed. In the G-SFED model, the contribution from the hydrogen bond (HB) between a solute and a solvent to the solvation free energy was calculated as the product of the acidity of the donor and the basicity of the acceptor of an HB pair. The acidity and basicity parameters of a solute were derived using the summation of acidities and basicities of the respective acidic and basic functional groups of the solute, and that of the solvent was experimentally determined. Although the contribution of HBs to the solvation free energy could be evenly distributed to grid points on the surface of a molecule, the G-SFED model was still inadequate to describe the angle dependency of the HB of a solute with a polarizable continuum solvent. To overcome this shortcoming of the G-SFED model, the contribution of HBs was formulated using the geometric parameters of the grid points described in the HB coordinate system of the solute. We propose an HB angle dependency incorporated into the G-SFED model, i.e., the G-SFED-HB model, where the angular-dependent acidity and basicity densities are defined and parametrized with experimental data. The G-SFED-HB model was then applied to calculate the solvation free energies of organic molecules in water, various alcohols and ethers, and the log P values of diverse organic molecules, including peptides and a protein. Both the G-SFED model and the G-SFED-HB model reproduced the experimental solvation free energies with similar accuracy, whereas the distributions of the SFED on the molecular surface calculated by the G-SFED and G-SFED-HB models were quite different, especially for molecules having HB donors or acceptors. Since the angle dependency of HBs was included in the G-SFED-HB model, the SFED distribution of the G-SFED-HB model is well described

  14. A molecular dynamics study for the isomerization of Ar solvated (benzene){sub 2}-K{sup +} heteroclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, M. [CERQT, Departament de Quimica Fisica Parc Cientific, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pacifici, L. [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Perugia, via Vanvitelli, 1 06123 Perugia (Italy); Lagana, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: lag@dyn.unipg.it; Aguilar, A. [CERQT, Departament de Quimica Fisica Parc Cientific, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-08-21

    A dynamical study of the (benzene){sub 2}-K{sup +} heteroclusters solvated by Ar atoms has been performed using an analytical force field of the atom (ion)-bond type. An analysis of the relevant calculated structural and energetic properties of these systems is made to understand involved molecular processes. The key effect found in the calculations is the tieing up of the two rings to sandwich K{sup +} and the weaking of this effect by solvation.

  15. Pulse radiolysis study in ethanol and N-propanol of the solvated electron formation and reactivity at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bono Merino, M.R.

    1978-01-01

    The electron solvation process in polar media has been studied in liquid ethanol and n-propanol at temperatures near their melting points. The results show that using the change of absorption at a given wavelength to determine the solvation time leads to a value which varies with the wavelength considered. Furthermore, for n-propanol it appears that the process occurs without a definite order. Studies of the spectral shifts show that the passage from the initial to the final spectrum (solvated electron spectrum) involves intermediate transient spectra which probably correspond to partly solvated states of the electron. The interpretation of these various results points out the ambiguity of the kinetic measurements: the simultaneous existence of several partly solvated states of the electron is not consistent with the hypothesis previously admitted that the molar extinction coefficient at a given wavelength is unique and does not vary with time. The reaction of the solvated electron with acetone has been studied in ethanol in the temperature range from +25 to -105 0 C: this reaction is diffusion controlled [fr

  16. Journalism and Explaining News Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albæk, E.; Skovsgaard, M.; de Vreese, C.H.; Nussbaum, J.F.

    Three models are presented to explain variation in news content. In the first model the explanation is based on the individual journalist, in the second model on the professional journalist, and in the third model on the organized journalist. The individual journalist model focuses on how the

  17. Can Marxism Explain America's Racism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhelm, Sidney M.

    1980-01-01

    The Marxist interpretation of the Black experience in America has always had difficulty explaining various noneconomic aspects of racism. A perspective is needed that can blend racism as a variable in relationship with economic variables. To reach this perspective, the labor process within capitalism must be more fully understood. (Author/GC)

  18. Does market competition explain fairness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descioli, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The target article by Baumard et al. uses their previous model of bargaining with outside options to explain fairness and other features of human sociality. This theory implies that fairness judgments are determined by supply and demand but humans often perceive prices (divisions of surplus) in competitive markets to be unfair.

  19. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  20. Thermodynamics of sublimation and solvation for bicyclo-derivatives of 1,3-thiazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol’khovich, Marina V.; Blokhina, Svetlana V.; Sharapova, Angelica V.; Perlovich, German L.; Proshin, Alexey N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure of new bicyclo-derivatives were obtained. • Thermodynamic functions of sublimation and solvation were calculated. • The correlations between thermodynamic functions and molecular descriptors are discussed. - Abstract: Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure of novel bicyclo-derivatives of 1,3-thiazine with methoxy- and carbonyl-substituents have been obtained by method of transference by means of an inert gas carrier. Thermodynamic functions of sublimation have been calculated. Correlations between thermodynamic functions of sublimation and thermophysical properties of the substances and molecular descriptors have been established. The enthalpies of solvation of compounds were calculated using the measured values of enthalpies of sublimation and of standard enthalpies of solution in hexane and buffer

  1. Wave–particle interactions in a resonant system of photons and ion-solvated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Eiji, E-mail: konishi.eiji.27c@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2017-02-26

    Highlights: • We consider a QED model of rotating water molecules with ion solvation effects. • The equations of motion are cast in terms of a conventional free electron laser. • We offer a new quantum coherence mechanism induced by collective instability. - Abstract: We investigate a laser model for a resonant system of photons and ion cluster-solvated rotating water molecules in which ions in the cluster are identical and have very low, non-relativistic velocities and direction of motion parallel to a static electric field induced in a single direction. This model combines Dicke superradiation with wave–particle interaction. As the result, we find that the equations of motion of the system are expressed in terms of a conventional free electron laser system. This result leads to a mechanism for dynamical coherence, induced by collective instability in the wave–particle interaction.

  2. Continuous registration of optical absorption spectra of periodically produced solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, P.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of unstable intermediates, such as solvated electrons, were usually taken point by point, recording the time-dependent light absorption after their production by a flash. The experimental arrangement for continuous recording of the spectra consists of a conventional one beam spectral photometer with a stabilized white light source, a monochromator, and a light detector. By periodic production of light absorbing intermediates such as solvated electrons, e.g., by ac uv light, a small ac signal is modulated on the light detector output which after amplification can be continuously recorded as a function of wavelength. This method allows the detection of absorption spectra when disturbances from the outside provide a signal-to-noise ratio smaller than 1

  3. Variation of the solvation number of Eu(III) in mixed system of methanol and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganuma, H.; Arisaka, M.; Omori, T.; Satoh, I.; Choppin, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants (β 1 ) of the monofluoride complex of Eu(III) have been determined in mixed solvents of methanol and water at a 0.10 M ionic strength using a solvent extraction technique. The values of ln β 1 increase as the mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent system increases. The variation in the stability constants can be correlated with both the large effect due to the solvation of F and the small effect due to both (1) the solvation of cations in connection with complexation and (2) the electrostatic attraction between Eu 3+ and F - . Based on the variation in the sum of (1) and (2) in water and the mixed solvent solutions, it was determined that the coordination number (CN) of Eu(III) varied from a mixture of CN = 9 and 8 to CN = 8 at about a 0.03 mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of solvated electrons in hydrogen cyanide clusters: (HCN)n- (n=3, 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the solvated electrons (HCN)n- (n =3, 4) reveal a variety of electron trapping possibilities in the (HCN)n (n =3, 4) clusters. Two isomers for (HCN)3- and four isomers for (HCN)4- are obtained at the MP2/aug -cc-pVDZ+dBF (diffusive bond functions) level of theory. In view of vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) at the CCSD(T) level, the excess electron always "prefers" locating in the center of the system, i.e., the isomer with higher coordination number shows larger VDE value. However, the most stable isomers of the solvated electron state (HCN)3- and (HCN)4- are found to be the linear C∞ν and D∞h structures, respectively, but not the fullyl symmetric structures which have the largest VDE values.

  5. Solvation of excess electrons trapped in charge pockets on molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.

    This work considers the ability of hydrogen fluoride (HF) to solvate excess electrons located on cyclic hydrocarbon surfaces. The principle applied involves the formation of systems in which excess electrons can be stabilized not only on concentrated molecular surface charge pockets but also by HF. Recent studies have shown that OH groups can form stable hydrogen-bonded networks on one side of a hydrocarbon surface (i.e. cyclohexane sheets), at the same time, the hydrogen atoms on the opposite side of this surface form a pocket of positive charge can attract the excess electron. This density can be further stabilized by the addition of an HF molecule that can form an 'anion with an internally solvated electron' (AISE) state. These systems are shown to be stable with respect to vertical electron detachment (VDE).

  6. Quantitative prediction of solvation free energy in octanol of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eduardo J; Jaña, Gonzalo A

    2009-03-01

    The free energy of solvation, DeltaGS0, in octanol of organic compounds is quantitatively predicted from the molecular structure. The model, involving only three molecular descriptors, is obtained by multiple linear regression analysis from a data set of 147 compounds containing diverse organic functions, namely, halogenated and non-halogenated alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, ethers and esters; covering a DeltaGS0 range from about -50 to 0 kJ.mol(-1). The model predicts the free energy of solvation with a squared correlation coefficient of 0.93 and a standard deviation, 2.4 kJ.mol(-1), just marginally larger than the generally accepted value of experimental uncertainty. The involved molecular descriptors have definite physical meaning corresponding to the different intermolecular interactions occurring in the bulk liquid phase. The model is validated with an external set of 36 compounds not included in the training set.

  7. Quantitative Prediction of Solvation Free Energy in Octanol of Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J. Delgado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The free energy of solvation, ΔGS0 , in octanol of organic compunds is quantitatively predicted from the molecular structure. The model, involving only three molecular descriptors, is obtained by multiple linear regression analysis from a data set of 147 compounds containing diverse organic functions, namely, halogenated and non-halogenated alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, ethers and esters; covering a ΔGS0 range from about –50 to 0 kJ·mol-1. The model predicts the free energy of solvation with a squared correlation coefficient of 0.93 and a standard deviation, 2.4 kJ·mol-1, just marginally larger than the generally accepted value of experimental uncertainty. The involved molecular descriptors have definite physical meaning corresponding to the different intermolecular interactions occurring in the bulk liquid phase. The model is validated with an external set of 36 compounds not included in the training set.

  8. Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Shao, Yuyan; Gallagher, Kevin

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systems that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. This perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.

  9. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynami...... of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis....

  10. Hybrid Perovskite Thin-Film Photovoltaics: In Situ Diagnostics and Importance of the Precursor Solvate Phases

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, Rahim

    2016-11-07

    Solution-processed hybrid perovskite semiconductors attract a great deal of attention, but little is known about their formation process. The one-step spin-coating process of perovskites is investigated in situ, revealing that thin-film formation is mediated by solid-state precursor solvates and their nature. The stability of these intermediate phases directly impacts the quality and reproducibility of thermally converted perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance.

  11. Solvation-based vapour pressure model for (solvent + salt) systems in conjunction with the Antoine equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senol, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Vapour pressures of (solvent + salt) systems have been estimated through a solvation-based model. • Two structural forms of the generalized solvation model using the Antoine equation have been performed. • A simplified concentration-dependent vapour pressure model has been also processed. • The model reliability analysis has been performed in terms of a log-ratio objective function. • The reliability of the models has been interpreted in terms of the statistical design factors. -- Abstract: This study deals with modelling the vapour pressure of a (solvent + salt) system on the basis of the principles of LSER. The solvation model framework clarifies the simultaneous impact of several physical variables such as the vapour pressure of a pure solvent estimated by the Antoine equation, the solubility and solvatochromic parameters of the solvent and the physical properties of the ionic salt. It has been analyzed independently the performance of two structural forms of the generalized model, i.e., a relation depending on an integration of the properties of the solvent and the ionic salt and a relation on a reduced property-basis. A simplified concentration-dependent vapour pressure model has been also explored and implemented on the relevant systems. The vapour pressure data of sixteen (solvent + salt) systems have been processed to analyze statistically the reliability of existing models in terms of a log–ratio objective function. The proposed vapour pressure models match relatively well the observed performance, yielding the overall design factors of 1.066 and 1.073 for the solvation-based models with the integrated and reduced properties, and 1.008 for the concentration-based model, respectively

  12. Solvation behavior of carbonate-based electrolytes in sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresce, Arthur V; Russell, Selena M; Borodin, Oleg; Allen, Joshua A; Schroeder, Marshall A; Dai, Michael; Peng, Jing; Gobet, Mallory P; Greenbaum, Steven G; Rogers, Reginald E; Xu, Kang

    2016-12-21

    Sodium ion batteries are on the cusp of being a commercially available technology. Compared to lithium ion batteries, sodium ion batteries can potentially offer an attractive dollar-per-kilowatt-hour value, though at the penalty of reduced energy density. As a materials system, sodium ion batteries present a unique opportunity to apply lessons learned in the study of electrolytes for lithium ion batteries; specifically, the behavior of the sodium ion in an organic carbonate solution and the relationship of ion solvation with electrode surface passivation. In this work the Li + and Na + -based solvates were characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, 17 O, 23 Na and pulse field gradient double-stimulated-echo pulse sequence nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and conductivity measurements. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrate that the Li + and Na + cations share a number of similar ion-solvent interaction trends, such as a preference in the gas and liquid phase for a solvation shell rich in cyclic carbonates over linear carbonates and fluorinated carbonates. However, quite different IR spectra due to the PF 6 - anion interactions with the Na + and Li + cations were observed and were rationalized with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that were also used to examine the relative free energies of solvates using cluster - continuum models. Ion-solvent distances for Na + were longer than Li + , and Na + had a greater tendency towards forming contact pairs compared to Li + in linear carbonate solvents. In tests of hard carbon Na-ion batteries, performance was not well correlated to Na + solvent preference, leading to the possibility that Na + solvent preference may play a reduced role in the passivation of anode surfaces and overall Na-ion battery performance.

  13. Hybrid Perovskite Thin-Film Photovoltaics: In Situ Diagnostics and Importance of the Precursor Solvate Phases

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, Rahim; Sheikh, Arif D.; Abdelsamie, Maged; Hu, Hanlin; Yu, Liyang; Zhao, Kui; Kim, Taesoo; El Tall, Omar; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef M.; Amassian, Aram

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed hybrid perovskite semiconductors attract a great deal of attention, but little is known about their formation process. The one-step spin-coating process of perovskites is investigated in situ, revealing that thin-film formation is mediated by solid-state precursor solvates and their nature. The stability of these intermediate phases directly impacts the quality and reproducibility of thermally converted perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance.

  14. Solution thermodynamics and preferential solvation of sulfamethazine in (methanol + water) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Daniel R.; Almanza, Ovidio A.; Martínez, Fleming; Peña, María A.; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Acree, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of sulfamethazine (SMT) was measured in (methanol + water) mixtures. • SMT solubility was correlated with Jouyban–Acree model. • Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of dissolution of SMT were calculated. • Non-linear enthalpy–entropy relationship was observed for SMT. • Preferential solvation of SMT by methanol was analyzed by using the IKBI method. - Abstract: The solubility of sulfamethazine (SMT) in {methanol (1) + water (2)} co-solvent mixtures was determined at five different temperatures from (293.15 to 313.15) K. The sulfonamide exhibited its highest mole fraction solubility in pure methanol (δ 1 = 29.6 MPa 1/2 ) and its lowest mole fraction solubility in water (δ 2 = 47.8 MPa 1/2 ) at each of the five temperatures studied. The Jouyban–Acree model was used to correlate/predict the solubility values. The respective apparent thermodynamic functions Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of solution were obtained from the solubility data through the van’t Hoff and Gibbs equations. Apparent thermodynamic quantities of mixing were also calculated for this drug using values of the ideal solubility reported in the literature. A non-linear enthalpy–entropy relationship was noted for SMT in plots of both the enthalpy vs. Gibbs energy of mixing and the enthalpy vs. entropy of mixing. These plots suggest two different trends according to the slopes obtained when the composition of the mixtures changes. Accordingly, the mechanism for SMT transfer processes in water-rich mixtures from water to the mixture with 0.70 in mass fraction of methanol is entropy driven. Conversely, the mechanism is enthalpy driven in mixtures whenever the methanol composition exceeds 0.70 mol fraction. An inverse Kirkwood–Buff integral analysis of the preferential solvation of SMT indicated that the drug is preferentially solvated by water in water-rich mixtures but is preferentially solvated by methanol in methanol-rich mixtures.

  15. The role of solvation in the binding selectivity of the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Dezső; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2013-08-07

    We present grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation results for a reduced model of the L-type calcium channel. While charged residues of the protein amino acids in the selectivity filter are treated explicitly, most of the degrees of freedom (including the rest of the protein and the solvent) are represented by their dielectric response, i.e., dielectric continua. The new aspect of this paper is that the dielectric coefficient in the channel is different from that in the baths. The ions entering the channel, thus, cross a dielectric boundary at the entrance of the channel. Simulating this case has been made possible by our recent methodological development [D. Boda, D. Henderson, B. Eisenberg, and D. Gillespie, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064105 (2011)]. Our main focus is on the effect of solvation energy (represented by the Born energy) on monovalent vs. divalent ion selectivity in the channel. We find no significant change in selectivity by changing the dielectric coefficient in the channel because the larger solvation penalty is counterbalanced by the enhanced Coulomb attraction inside the channel as soon as we use the Born radii (fitted to experimental hydration energies) to compute the solvation penalty from the Born equation.

  16. Modifying Poisson equation for near-solute dielectric polarization and solvation free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pei-Kun, E-mail: peikun@isu.edu.tw

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • We modify the Poisson equation. • The dielectric polarization was calculated from the modified Poisson equation. • The solvation free energies of the solutes were calculated from the dielectric polarization. • The calculated solvation free energies were similar to those obtained from MD simulations. - Abstract: The dielectric polarization P is important for calculating the stability of protein conformation and the binding affinity of protein–protein/ligand interactions and for exploring the nonthermal effect of an external electric field on biomolecules. P was decomposed into the product of the electric dipole moment per molecule p; bulk solvent density N{sub bulk}; and relative solvent molecular density g. For a molecular solute, 4πr{sup 2}p(r) oscillates with the distance r to the solute, and g(r) has a large peak in the near-solute region, as observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Herein, the Poisson equation was modified for computing p based on the modified Gauss’s law of Maxwell’s equations, and the potential of the mean force was used for computing g. For one or two charged atoms in a water cluster, the solvation free energies of the solutes obtained by these equations were similar to those obtained from MD simulations.

  17. Ultrafast dynamics of solvation and charge transfer in a DNA-based biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Batabyal, Subrata; Mondol, Tanumoy; Sao, Dilip; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules is a key factor for DNA-based devices in optoelectronics and biotechnology. The association of a significant amount of water molecules in DNA-based materials for the intactness of the DNA structure and their dynamic role in the charge-transfer (CT) dynamics is less documented in contemporary literature. In the present study, we have used a genomic DNA-cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA) complex, a technological important biomaterial, and Hoechest 33258 (H258), a well-known DNA minor groove binder, as fluorogenic probe for the dynamic solvation studies. The CT dynamics of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs; 5.2 nm) embedded in the as-prepared and swollen biomaterial have also been studied and correlated with that of the timescale of solvation. We have extended our studies on the temperature-dependent CT dynamics of QDs in a nanoenvironment of an anionic, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelle (AOT RMs), whereby the number of water molecules and their dynamics can be tuned in a controlled manner. A direct correlation of the dynamics of solvation and that of the CT in the nanoenvironments clearly suggests that the hydration barrier within the Arrhenius framework essentially dictates the charge-transfer dynamics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer and solvation in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Oli T; Griffin, Graham B; Young, Ryan M; Neumark, Daniel M

    2009-04-02

    We have used ultrafast time-resolved photoelectron imaging to measure charge transfer dynamics in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters I(-)(CH(3)CN)(n) with n = 5-10. Strong modulations of vertical detachment energies were observed following charge transfer from the halide, allowing interpretation of the ongoing dynamics. We observe a sharp drop in the vertical detachment energy (VDE) within 300-400 fs, followed by a biexponential increase that is complete by approximately 10 ps. Comparison to theory suggests that the iodide is internally solvated and that photodetachment results in formation of a diffuse electron cloud in a confined cavity. We interpret the initial drop in VDE as a combination of expansion of the cavity and localization of the excess electron on one or two solvent molecules. The subsequent increase in VDE is attributed to a combination of the I atom leaving the cavity and rearrangement of the acetonitrile molecules to solvate the electron. The n = 5-8 clusters then show a drop in VDE of around 50 meV on a much longer time scale. The long-time VDEs are consistent with those of (CH(3)CN)(n)(-) clusters with internally solvated electrons. Although the excited-state created by the pump pulse decays by emission of a slow electron, no such decay is seen by 200 ps.

  19. Solvated electrons at elevated temperatures in different alcohols: Temperature and molecular structure effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lin, Mingzhang [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fu, Haiying; Muroya, Yusa [Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The absorption spectra of solvated electrons in pentanol, hexanol and octanol are measured from 22 to 200, 22 to 175 and 50 to150 {sup o}C, respectively, at a fixed pressure of 15 MPa, using nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique. The results show that the peak positions of the absorption spectra have a red-shift (shift to longer wavelengths) as temperature increases, similar to water and other alcohols. Including the above mentioned data, a compilation of currently available experimental data on the energy of absorption maximum (E{sub max}) of solvated electrons changed with temperature in monohydric alcohols, diols and triol is presented. E{sub max} of solvated electron is larger in those alcohols that have more OH groups at all the temperatures. The molecular structure effect, including OH numbers, OH position and carbon chain length, is investigated. For the primary alcohols with same OH group number and position, the temperature coefficient increases with increase in chain length. For the alcohols with same chain length and OH numbers, temperature coefficient is larger for the symmetric alcohols than the asymmetric ones.

  20. Ejection of solvated ions from electrosprayed methanol/water nanodroplets studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Elias; Konermann, Lars

    2011-06-22

    The ejection of solvated small ions from nanometer-sized droplets plays a central role during electrospray ionization (ESI). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can provide insights into the nanodroplet behavior. Earlier MD studies have largely focused on aqueous systems, whereas most practical ESI applications involve the use of organic cosolvents. We conduct simulations on mixed water/methanol droplets that carry excess NH(4)(+) ions. Methanol is found to compromise the H-bonding network, resulting in greatly increased rates of ion ejection and solvent evaporation. Considerable differences in the water and methanol escape rates cause time-dependent changes in droplet composition. Segregation occurs at low methanol concentration, such that layered droplets with a methanol-enriched periphery are formed. This phenomenon will enhance the partitioning of analyte molecules, with possible implications for their ESI efficiencies. Solvated ions are ejected from the tip of surface protrusions. Solvent bridging prior to ion secession is more extensive for methanol/water droplets than for purely aqueous systems. The ejection of solvated NH(4)(+) is visualized as diffusion-mediated escape from a metastable basin. The process involves thermally activated crossing of a ~30 kJ mol(-1) free energy barrier, in close agreement with the predictions of the classical ion evaporation model.

  1. Improvements to the APBS biomolecular solvation software suite: Improvements to the APBS Software Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurrus, Elizabeth [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Star, Keith [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Monson, Kyle [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Brandi, Juan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Felberg, Lisa E. [University of California, Berkeley California; Brookes, David H. [University of California, Berkeley California; Wilson, Leighton [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan; Chen, Jiahui [Southern Methodist University, Dallas Texas; Liles, Karina [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Chun, Minju [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Li, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Gohara, David W. [St. Louis University, St. Louis Missouri; Dolinsky, Todd [FoodLogiQ, Durham North Carolina; Konecny, Robert [University of California San Diego, San Diego California; Koes, David R. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania; Nielsen, Jens Erik [Protein Engineering, Novozymes A/S, Copenhagen Denmark; Head-Gordon, Teresa [University of California, Berkeley California; Geng, Weihua [Southern Methodist University, Dallas Texas; Krasny, Robert [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan; Wei, Guo-Wei [Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Holst, Michael J. [University of California San Diego, San Diego California; McCammon, J. Andrew [University of California San Diego, San Diego California; Baker, Nathan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Brown University, Providence Rhode Island

    2017-10-24

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) software was developed to solve the equations of continuum electrostatics for large biomolecular assemblages that has provided impact in the study of a broad range of chemical, biological, and biomedical applications. APBS addresses three key technology challenges for understanding solvation and electrostatics in biomedical applications: accurate and efficient models for biomolecular solvation and electrostatics, robust and scalable software for applying those theories to biomolecular systems, and mechanisms for sharing and analyzing biomolecular electrostatics data in the scientific community. To address new research applications and advancing computational capabilities, we have continually updated APBS and its suite of accompanying software since its release in 2001. In this manuscript, we discuss the models and capabilities that have recently been implemented within the APBS software package including: a Poisson-Boltzmann analytical and a semi-analytical solver, an optimized boundary element solver, a geometry-based geometric flow solvation model, a graph theory based algorithm for determining pKa values, and an improved web-based visualization tool for viewing electrostatics.

  2. High-dimensional neural network potentials for solvation: The case of protonated water clusters in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schran, Christoph; Uhl, Felix; Behler, Jörg; Marx, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    The design of accurate helium-solute interaction potentials for the simulation of chemically complex molecules solvated in superfluid helium has long been a cumbersome task due to the rather weak but strongly anisotropic nature of the interactions. We show that this challenge can be met by using a combination of an effective pair potential for the He-He interactions and a flexible high-dimensional neural network potential (NNP) for describing the complex interaction between helium and the solute in a pairwise additive manner. This approach yields an excellent agreement with a mean absolute deviation as small as 0.04 kJ mol-1 for the interaction energy between helium and both hydronium and Zundel cations compared with coupled cluster reference calculations with an energetically converged basis set. The construction and improvement of the potential can be performed in a highly automated way, which opens the door for applications to a variety of reactive molecules to study the effect of solvation on the solute as well as the solute-induced structuring of the solvent. Furthermore, we show that this NNP approach yields very convincing agreement with the coupled cluster reference for properties like many-body spatial and radial distribution functions. This holds for the microsolvation of the protonated water monomer and dimer by a few helium atoms up to their solvation in bulk helium as obtained from path integral simulations at about 1 K.

  3. Effect of solvation on reactions of aluminium, gallium, indium, zinc and cadmium with azo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvin, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Colour reactions have been examined between Al, Ga, In, Zn, Cd and reagents of a group of chromotropic acid 2.7-bisazo derivatives (Picramin B, Picramin M, Methanyl B, sulphonitrophenol M, sulphonitrophenol B) in organo-aqueous solutions containing acetone, propanol, DMFA, DMSO and acetic acid. Sensitive colour reactions occur in all the cases in aceton- or propanol-containing solutions: more sensitive than in water for Al, Ga, In; new reactions for Zn and Cd which are specific for organo-aqueous media and not observed in aqueous solutions. Sensitive reactions are observed only for Al and Ga in DMSO or DMFA solutions. Zn, Cd and In do not give colour reactions in such solutions. Differences in colour reactions for the elements in DMFA- and DMSO-containing media are connected with different solvation effects of the solvents on certain cations. Preferable solvation of some cations has been confirmed by infrared studies and is in agreement with the data reported on selective solvation

  4. Significance of solvated electrons (e(aq)-) as promoters of life on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Based on the present state of knowledge a new hypothesis concerning the origin of life on Earth is presented, and emphasizes the particular significance of solvated electrons (e(aq)(-)). Solvated electrons are produced in seawater, mainly by (40)K radiation and in atmospheric moisture by VUV light, electrical discharges and cosmic ray. Solvated electrons are involved in primary chemical processes and in biological processes. The conversion of aqueous CO2 and CO into simple organic substances, the generation of ammonia from N2 and water, the formation of amines, amino acids and simple proteins under the action of e(aq)(-) has been experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is supposed that the generation of the primitive cell and equilibria of primitive enzymes are also realized due to the strong reducing property of e(aq)(-). The presented hypothesis is mainly founded on recently obtained experimental results. The involvement of e(aq)(-) in such mechanisms, as well as their action as an initiator of life is also briefly discussed.

  5. Elucidating the Solvation Structure and Dynamics of Lithium Polysulfides Resulting from Competitive Salt and Solvent Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Shin, Yongwoo; Han, Kee Sung; Lau, Kah Chun; Chen, Junzheng; Liu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry A.; Mueller, Karl T.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2017-04-10

    Fundamental molecular level understanding of functional properties of liquid solutions provides an important basis for designing optimized electrolytes for numerous applica-tions. In particular, exhaustive knowledge of solvation structure, stability and transport properties is critical for developing stable electrolytes for fast charging and high energy density next-generation energy storage systems. Here we report the correlation between solubility, solvation structure and translational dynamics of a lithium salt (Li-TFSI) and polysulfides species using well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It is observed that the polysulfide chain length has a significant effect on the ion-ion and ion-solvent interaction as well as on the diffusion coefficient of the ionic species in solution. In particular, extensive cluster formation is observed in lower order poly-sulfides (Sx2-; x≤4), whereas the longer polysulfides (Sx2-; x>4) show high solubility and slow dynamics in the solu-tion. It is observed that optimal solvent/salt ratio is essen-tial to control the solubility and conductivity as the addi-tion of Li salt increases the solubility but decreases the mo-bility of the ionic species. This work provides a coupled theoretical and experimental study of bulk solvation struc-ture and transport properties of multi-component electro-lyte systems, yielding design metrics for developing optimal electrolytes with improved stability and solubility.

  6. Explaining Disparities in Unemployment Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Karanassou, Marika; Snower, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain disparities among the unemployment experiences of different OECD countries in terms of the `fragility' of the short-run unemployment equilibrium (the impact of labour market shocks on the short-run unemployment rate) and the lag structure of the employment determination, wage setting, and labour force participation decisions. The effects of this lag structure on unemployment dynamics are captured through two general measures of `unemployment persistence' (occurr...

  7. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. A gender wealth gap remains between married men and women after controlling for the full model that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects. PMID:23264038

  8. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  9. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Snoussi, Hichem

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm. PMID:25811227

  10. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  11. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  12. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  13. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  14. SAMPL4, a blind challenge for computational solvation free energies: the compounds considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, J. Peter

    2014-03-01

    For the fifth time I have provided a set of solvation energies (1 M gas to 1 M aqueous) for a SAMPL challenge. In this set there are 23 blind compounds and 30 supplementary compounds of related structure to one of the blind sets, but for which the solvation energy is readily available. The best current values of each compound are presented along with complete documentation of the experimental origins of the solvation energies. The calculations needed to go from reported data to solvation energies are presented, with particular attention to aspects which are new to this set. For some compounds the vapor pressures (VP) were reported for the liquid compound, which is solid at room temperature. To correct from VPsubcooled liquid to VPsublimation requires ΔSfusion, which is only known for mannitol. Estimated values were used for the others, all but one of which were benzene derivatives and expected to have very similar values. The final compound for which ΔSfusion was estimated was menthol, which melts at 42 °C so that modest errors in ΔSfusion will have little effect. It was also necessary to look into the effects of including estimated values of ΔCp on this correction. The approximate sizes of the effects of inclusion of ΔCp in the correction from VPsubcooled liquid to VPsublimation were estimated and it was noted that inclusion of ΔCp invariably makes ΔGS more positive. To extend the set of compounds for which the solvation energy could be calculated we explored the use of boiling point (b.p.) data from Reaxys/Beilstein as a substitute for studies of the VP as a function of temperature. B.p. data are not always reliable so it was necessary to develop a criterion for rejecting outliers. For two compounds (chlorinated guaiacols) it became clear that inclusion represented overreach; for each there were only two independent pressure, temperature points, which is too little for a trustworthy extrapolation. For a number of compounds the extrapolation from lowest

  15. Pulse radiolysis study on solvated electrons in ionic liquid with controlling water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Nagaishi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids, which are nonvolatile and nonflammable, have been proposed as 'green solvents' for new applications in chemical synthesis, separation chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. In the separation chemistry, the hydrophobic ionic liquids have been practically expected to be alternative to traditional organic solvents for solvent extraction of 4f and 5f elements from the viewpoints of the immiscibility in water, especially in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. However, the chemical reaction or kinetics studies are important to apply the ionic liquids for various processes. To understand the effects of ionic liquids on chemical reactions, pulse radiolysis studies of ionic liquid have been carried out on nanosecond scale by using a 27 MeV electron beam and an analyzing light source of xenon lamp. In the experiment, a hydrophobic ionic liquid of diethylmethyl(2-methoxy)ammonium-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (DEMMA-TFSI) salt was used. The ionic liquid of DEMMA-TFSI was prepared by reacting equimolar amounts of diethylmethyl(2-methoxy)ammonium chloride (C 10 H 20 F 6 N 2 O 5 S 2 Cl, >98%, Nisshinbo) with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiN(SO 2 CF 3 ) 2 , SynQuest Labs., Inc.) in aqueous solutions at room temperature. The ionic liquid was separated from the aqueous phase, purified by repeated extractions with water to LiCl and excess reagent, and finally dried at 110 degree C under vacuum. The transient absorptions of the ionic liquid were measured at wavelengths from 350 to 1400 nm, in which two photodiodes of silicon ( 1000 nm) were used. The spectrum of solvated electrons in the ionic liquid of DEMMA-TFSI was obtained with an absorption peak of 1060 nm and a wide bandwidth of about 600 nm (FWHM). The decay constant of the solvated electrons in the ionic liquid was 1.54 x 10 7 s -1 , which is independent on the wavelength. The absorption peak of the spectrum was blue-shifted from 1060 to 780 nm with increasing water

  16. Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Shabbott, Britne; Cortés, Juan Camilo

    2012-01-01

    The primary manifestations of Parkinson’s disease are abnormalities of movement, including movement slowness, difficulties with gait and balance, and tremor. We know a considerable amount about the abnormalities of neuronal and muscle activity that correlate with these symptoms. Motor symptoms can also be described in terms of motor control, a level of description that explains how movement variables, such as a limb’s position and speed, are controlled and coordinated. Understanding motor symptoms as motor control abnormalities means to identify how the disease disrupts normal control processes. In the case of Parkinson’s disease, movement slowness, for example, would be explained by a disruption of the control processes that determine normal movement speed. Two long-term benefits of understanding the motor control basis of motor symptoms include the future design of neural prostheses to replace the function of damaged basal ganglia circuits, and the rational design of rehabilitation strategies. This type of understanding, however, remains limited, partly because of limitations in our knowledge of normal motor control. In this article, we review the concept of motor control and describe a few motor symptoms that illustrate the challenges in understanding such symptoms as motor control abnormalities. PMID:22675667

  17. Explaining the Evolution of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach for analyzing the evolution of poverty using Mozambique as a case study. Bringing together data from disparate sources, we develop a novel “back-casting” framework that links a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to a micro-simulation poverty module....... This framework provides a new approach to explaining and decomposing the evolution of poverty, as well as to examining rigorously the coherence between poverty, economic growth, and inequality outcomes. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely-applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty...

  18. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodulfo Garcia, Maikel; Tornes Perez, Victor Manuel; Castellanos Tardo, Juan Ramon

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  19. Octanol-Water Partition Coefficient from 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation with Partial Molar Volume Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, WenJuan; Blinov, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-30

    The octanol-water partition coefficient is an important physical-chemical characteristic widely used to describe hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of chemical compounds. The partition coefficient is related to the transfer free energy of a compound from water to octanol. Here, we introduce a new protocol for prediction of the partition coefficient based on the statistical-mechanical, 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation. It was shown recently that with the compound-solvent correlation functions obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, the free energy functional supplemented with the correction linearly related to the partial molar volume obtained from the Kirkwood-Buff/3D-RISM theory, also called the "universal correction" (UC), provides accurate prediction of the hydration free energy of small compounds, compared to explicit solvent molecular dynamics [ Palmer , D. S. ; J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2010 , 22 , 492101 ]. Here we report that with the UC reparametrized accordingly this theory also provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data for the solvation free energy in nonpolar solvent (1-octanol) and so accurately predicts the octanol-water partition coefficient. The performance of the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) and Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functionals of the solvation free energy, with and without UC, is tested on a large library of small compounds with diverse functional groups. The best agreement with the experimental data for octanol-water partition coefficients is obtained with the KH-UC solvation free energy functional.

  20. Additive scheme for calculation of solvation enthalpies of heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Sublimation/vaporization enthalpy at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomonov, Boris N.; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Additivity scheme for solvation enthalpies estimation of heteroaromatic compounds was proposed. • Method for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at 298.15 K was developed. • Solution enthalpies of 25 heteroaromatic compounds were measured. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 44 heteroaromatic compounds were determined. • Obtained values are in good agreement with the results of conventional methods. - Abstract: Hereby we propose a method for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing aromatic compounds at 298.15 K. According to this method vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K are determined based on enthalpies of solvation and solution. Solvation enthalpies of heteroatomatic and carbonyl-containing compounds are calculated using an additive scheme from the solvation enthalpy of closest aromatic hydrocarbon and contributions related to the exchange of CH-groups of hydrocarbon with corresponding substituent atoms or groups. Measured solution enthalpies together with calculated solvation enthalpies allowed to calculate corresponding vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K for a large number of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing compounds. We have also found that in a number of cases instead of solution enthalpy in benzene at 298.15 K fusion enthalpy at the melting temperature can be used. Comparison between literature data and calculated vaporization and sublimation enthalpies demonstrates satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  1. Additive scheme for calculation of solvation enthalpies of heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Sublimation/vaporization enthalpy at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@kpfu.ru; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Additivity scheme for solvation enthalpies estimation of heteroaromatic compounds was proposed. • Method for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at 298.15 K was developed. • Solution enthalpies of 25 heteroaromatic compounds were measured. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 44 heteroaromatic compounds were determined. • Obtained values are in good agreement with the results of conventional methods. - Abstract: Hereby we propose a method for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing aromatic compounds at 298.15 K. According to this method vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K are determined based on enthalpies of solvation and solution. Solvation enthalpies of heteroatomatic and carbonyl-containing compounds are calculated using an additive scheme from the solvation enthalpy of closest aromatic hydrocarbon and contributions related to the exchange of CH-groups of hydrocarbon with corresponding substituent atoms or groups. Measured solution enthalpies together with calculated solvation enthalpies allowed to calculate corresponding vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K for a large number of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing compounds. We have also found that in a number of cases instead of solution enthalpy in benzene at 298.15 K fusion enthalpy at the melting temperature can be used. Comparison between literature data and calculated vaporization and sublimation enthalpies demonstrates satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  2. Goldenhar syndrome and urogenital abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Marulaiah

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Goldenhar syndrome (oculo-auriculo-vertebral syn-drome or 1st and 2nd branchial arch syndrome is a com-plex of craniofacial anomalies. It has been associated with anomalies in other systems and with abnormalities of the urogenital system. We present a case of Goldenhar syn-drome with multiple renal anomalies and a urogenital si-nus, which has not been reported before.

  3. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  4. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  5. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis. (orig.)

  6. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  7. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  8. Hemostatic abnormalities in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artoni, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo; Passamonti, Serena M; Lecchi, Anna; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Cerutti, Marta; Cianci, Paola; Gianniello, Francesca; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-05-01

    A bleeding diathesis is a common feature of Noonan syndrome, and various coagulation abnormalities have been reported. Platelet function has never been carefully investigated. The degree of bleeding diathesis in a cohort of patients with Noonan syndrome was evaluated by a validated bleeding score and investigated with coagulation and platelet function tests. If ratios of prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, the activity of clotting factors was measured. Individuals with no history of bleeding formed the control group. The study population included 39 patients and 28 controls. Bleeding score was ≥2 (ie, suggestive of a moderate bleeding diathesis) in 15 patients (38.5%) and ≥4 (ie, suggestive of a severe bleeding diathesis) in 7 (17.9%). Abnormal coagulation and/or platelet function tests were found in 14 patients with bleeding score ≥2 (93.3%) but also in 21 (87.5%) of those with bleeding score Noonan syndrome had a bleeding diathesis and >90% of them had platelet function and/or coagulation abnormalities. Results of these tests should be taken into account in the management of bleeding or invasive procedures in these patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Explaining the harmonic sequence paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Zimper, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    According to the harmonic sequence paradox, an expected utility decision maker's willingness to pay for a gamble whose expected payoffs evolve according to the harmonic series is finite if and only if his marginal utility of additional income becomes zero for rather low payoff levels. Since the assumption of zero marginal utility is implausible for finite payoff levels, expected utility theory - as well as its standard generalizations such as cumulative prospect theory - are apparently unable to explain a finite willingness to pay. This paper presents first an experimental study of the harmonic sequence paradox. Additionally, it demonstrates that the theoretical argument of the harmonic sequence paradox only applies to time-patient decision makers, whereas the paradox is easily avoided if time-impatience is introduced. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  11. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, N.

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots

  12. Special report on abnormal climate in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    This reports on abnormal climate in 2010 with impact on the each field. It is comprised of four chapters, which deal with Introduction with purpose of publish and background, current situation and cause of abnormal climate in 2010 on abnormal climate around the world and Korea, Action and impact against abnormal climate in 2010 to agriculture, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, forest, fishery products, environment and health, Evaluation and policy proposal. It also has an appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world in 2010 and media reports on abnormal climate in Korea in 2010.

  13. Photo-illuminated diamond as a solid-state source of solvated electrons in water for nitrogen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Di; Zhang, Linghong; Ruther, Rose E; Hamers, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The photocatalytic reduction of N₂ to NH₃ is typically hampered by poor binding of N₂ to catalytic materials and by the very high energy of the intermediates involved in this reaction. Solvated electrons directly introduced into the reactant solution can provide an alternative pathway to overcome such limitations. Here we demonstrate that illuminated hydrogen-terminated diamond yields facile electron emission into water, thus inducing reduction of N₂ to NH₃ at ambient temperature and pressure. Transient absorption measurements at 632 nm reveal the presence of solvated electrons adjacent to the diamond after photoexcitation. Experiments using inexpensive synthetic diamond samples and diamond powder show that photocatalytic activity is strongly dependent on the surface termination and correlates with the production of solvated electrons. The use of diamond to eject electrons into a reactant liquid represents a new paradigm for photocatalytic reduction, bringing electrons directly to reactants without requiring molecular adsorption to the surface.

  14. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of solvated electron cluster anions, (H2O)n- and (NH3)n-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.H.; Arnold, S.T.; Eaton, J.G; Sarkas, H.W.; Bowen, K.H.; Ludewigt, C.; Haberland, H.

    1991-01-01

    The photodetachment spectra of (H 2 O) - n=2-69 and (NH 3 ) - n=41-1100 have been recorded, and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) were obtained from the spectra. For both systems, the cluster anion VDEs increase smoothly with increasing sizes and most species plot linearly with n -1/3 , extrapolating to a VDE (n = ∞) value which is very close to the photoelectric threshold energy for the corresponding condensed phase solvated electron system. The linear extrapolation of this data to the analogous condensed phase property suggests that these cluster anions are gas phase counterparts to solvated electrons, i.e. they are embryonic forms of hydrated and ammoniated electrons which mature with increasing cluster size toward condensed phase solvated electrons. (orig.)

  15. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of solvated electron cluster anions, (H2O){/n -} and (NH3){/n -}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. H.; Arnold, S. T.; Eaton, J. G.; Sarkas, H. W.; Bowen, K. H.; Ludewigt, C.; Haberland, H.

    1991-03-01

    The photodetachment spectra of (H2O){/n =2-69/-} and (NH3){/n =41-1100/-} have been recorded, and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) were obtained from the spectra. For both systems, the cluster anion VDEs increase smoothly with increasing sizes and most species plot linearly with n -1/3, extrapolating to a VDE ( n=∞) value which is very close to the photoelectric threshold energy for the corresponding condensed phase solvated electron system. The linear extrapolation of this data to the analogous condensed phase property suggests that these cluster anions are gas phase counterparts to solvated electrons, i.e. they are embryonic forms of hydrated and ammoniated electrons which mature with increasing cluster size toward condensed phase solvated electrons.

  16. Solvation of o-hydroxybenzoic acid in pure and modified supercritical carbon dioxide, according to numerical modeling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.; Petrenko, V. E.

    2015-08-01

    The dissolution of an elementary fragment of crystal structure (an o-hydroxybenzoic acid ( o-HBA) dimer) in both pure and modified supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide by adding methanol (molar fraction, 0.035) at T = 318 K, ρ = 0.7 g/cm3 is simulated. Features of the solvation mechanism in each solvent are revealed. The solvation of o-HBA in pure SC CO2 is shown to occur via electron donor-acceptor interactions. o-HBA forms a solvate complex in modified SC CO2 through hydrogen bonds between the carboxyl group and methanol. The hydroxyl group of o-HBA participates in the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond, and not in interactions with the solvent. It is concluded that the o-HBA-methanol complex is a stable molecular structure, and its lifetime is one order of magnitude higher than those of other hydrogen bonds in fluids.

  17. Towards a stable ion-solvating polymer electrolyte for advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Wright, Andrew G.; Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær

    2017-01-01

    Advanced alkaline water electrolysis using ion-solvating polymer membranes as electrolytes represents a new direction in the field of electrochemical hydrogen production. Polybenzimidazole membranes equilibrated in aqueous KOH combine the mechanical robustness and gas-tightness of a polymer...... stability in alkaline environments. The novel electrolytes are extensively characterized with respect to physicochemical and electrochemical properties and the chemical stability is assessed in 0-50 wt% aqueous KOH for more than 6 months at 88 degrees C. In water electrolysis tests using porous 3...

  18. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibya, Pooja Arora [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work

  19. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  20. Effective interactions between nanoparticles: Creating temperature-independent solvation environments for self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Hari O. S., E-mail: cyz108802@chemistry.iitd.ac.in, E-mail: hariyadav.iitd@gmail.com; Shrivastav, Gourav; Agarwal, Manish; Chakravarty, Charusita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-06-28

    The extent to which solvent-mediated effective interactions between nanoparticles can be predicted based on structure and associated thermodynamic estimators for bulk solvents and for solvation of single and pairs of nanoparticles is studied here. As a test of the approach, we analyse the strategy for creating temperature-independent solvent environments using a series of homologous chain fluids as solvents, as suggested by an experimental paper [M. I. Bodnarchuk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 11967 (2010)]. Our conclusions are based on molecular dynamics simulations of Au{sub 140}(SC{sub 10}H{sub 21}){sub 62} nanoparticles in n-alkane solvents, specifically hexane, octane, decane and dodecane, using the TraPPE-UA potential to model the alkanes and alkylthiols. The 140-atom gold core of the nanocrystal is held rigid in a truncated octahedral geometry and the gold-thiolate interaction is modeled using a Morse potential. The experimental observation was that the structural and rheological properties of n-alkane solvents are constant over a temperature range determined by equivalent solvent vapour pressures. We show that this is a consequence of the fact that long chain alkane liquids behave to a good approximation as simple liquids formed by packing of monomeric methyl/methylene units. Over the corresponding temperature range (233–361 K), the solvation environment is approximately constant at the single and pair nanoparticle levels under good solvent conditions. However, quantitative variations of the order of 10%–20% do exist in various quantities, such as molar volume of solute at infinite dilution, entropy of solvation, and onset distance for soft repulsions. In the opposite limit of a poor solvent, represented by vacuum in this study, the effective interactions between nanoparticles are no longer temperature-independent with attractive interactions increasing by up to 50% on decreasing the temperature from 361 K to 290 K, accompanied by an increase in

  1. Protonic charge defect structures in floating water bridges observed as Zundel and Eigen solvation arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; de Castro, Jose Roberto; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz; Soares, David Mendez

    2017-10-01

    Protonic arrangements were detected in water bridge structures using confocal Raman microscopy, and the spectra show two formed structures. The measured Raman spectra were modified using the voltage applied to the bridge structure, which changed the proportion of these two species. Initially, for a 6.3 kV applied voltage, there was a measurable increase in the bridge current above the Ohmic contribution and the observed Raman spectrum of this new injected specie corresponded to the computed spectrum for the Zundel protonic arrangement. As the voltage further increases a contribution from the Eigen proton solvation specie is added to the measured spectrum.

  2. New chiral zwitterionic phosphorus heterocycles: synthesis, structure, properties and application as chiral solvating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshenev, Andrey E; Boltukhina, Ekaterina V; Grishina, Anastasiya A; Cisařova, Ivana; Lyapkalo, Ilya M; Hii, King Kuok Mimi

    2013-06-17

    A family of new chiral zwitterionic phosphorus-containing heterocycles (zPHC) have been derived from methylene-bridged bis(imidazolines). These structures were unambiguously determined, including single-crystal XRD analysis for two compounds. The stability, acid/base and electronic properties of these dipolar phosphorus heterocycles were subsequently investigated. zPHCs can be successfully employed as a new class of chiral solvating agents for the enantiodifferentiation of chiral carboxylic and sulfonic acids by NMR spectroscopy. The stoichiometry and binding constants for the donor-acceptor complexes formed were established by NMR titration methods. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Ligand Conformational and Solvation/Desolvation Free Energy in Protein-Ligand Complex Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2011), s. 4718-4724 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GAP208/11/0295 Grant - others:Korea Science and Engineering Foundation(KR) R32-2008-000-10180-0; European Science Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : solvation free energy * SMD * HIV protease inhibitors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  4. Organic solvation of intercalated cations in V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemordant, D.; Bouhaouss, A.; Aldbert, P.; Baffier, N.

    1986-01-01

    V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ xerogels (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, 1.6H/sub 2/O) undergo a topotactic reversible exchange reaction at room temperature in organic solvents containing monovalent alkali or divalent (Mn/sup 2+/) cations. Basal spacing are dependent on solvent type and charge-to-radius ratio of guest cations. From the interlayer distances, two solvation stages have been inferred, depending on the nature of the solvent and of the cation, except with Cs/sup +/ for which no intracrystalline swelling by organic solvents is observed

  5. The effect of solvation on the radiation damage rate constants for adenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    in calculations of Gibbs free energies and reaction rates for the reaction between the OH radical and the DNA nucleobase adenine using Density Functional Theory at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with the Eckart tunneling correction. The solvent, water, has been included through either the implicit...... polarizable continuum model (PCM) or through explicit modelling of micro-solvation by a single water molecule at the site of reaction as well as the combination of both. Scrutiny of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the individual sub-reactions suggests that the qualitative differences introduced...

  6. An analysis of 3D solvation structure in biomolecules: application to coiled coil serine and bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kenji; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2010-06-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) solvation structure around coiled coil serine (Coil-Ser) and inner 3D hydration structure in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were studied using a recently developed method named multicenter molecular Ornstein-Zernike equation (MC-MOZ) theory. In addition, a procedure for analyzing the 3D solvent distribution was proposed. The method enables us to calculate the coordination number of solvent water as well as the strength of hydrogen bonding between the water molecule and the protein. The results for Coil-Ser and bR showed very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Lieb-Liniger-like model of quantum solvation in CO-4HeN clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, D.; Iñarrea, M.; Lanchares, V.; Salas, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Small 4He clusters doped with various molecules allow for the study of "quantum solvation" as a function of cluster size. A peculiarity of quantum solvation is that, as the number of 4He atoms is increased from N = 1, the solvent appears to decouple from the molecule which, in turn, appears to undergo free rotation. This is generally taken to signify the onset of "microscopic superfluidity." Currently, little is known about the quantum mechanics of the decoupling mechanism, mainly because the system is a quantum (N + 1)-body problem in three dimensions which makes computations difficult. Here, a one-dimensional model is studied in which the 4He atoms are confined to revolve on a ring and encircle a rotating CO molecule. The Lanczos algorithm is used to investigate the eigenvalue spectrum as the number of 4He atoms is varied. Substantial solvent decoupling is observed for as few as N = 5 4He atoms. Examination of the Hamiltonian matrix, which has an almost block diagonal structure, reveals increasingly weak inter-block (solvent-molecule) coupling as the number of 4He atoms is increased. In the absence of a dopant molecule the system is similar to a Lieb-Liniger (LL) gas and we find a relatively rapid transition to the LL limit as N is increased. In essence, the molecule initially—for very small N—provides a central, if relatively weak, attraction to organize the cluster; as more 4He atoms are added, the repulsive interactions between the identical bosons start to dominate as the solvation ring (shell) becomes more crowded which causes the molecule to start to decouple. For low N, the molecule pins the atoms in place relative to itself; as N increases the atom-atom repulsion starts to dominate the Hamiltonian and the molecule decouples. We conclude that, while the notion of superfluidity is a useful and correct description of the decoupling process, a molecular viewpoint provides complementary insights into the quantum mechanism of the transition from a molecular

  8. First crystal structures of pharmaceutical ibrutinib: systematic solvate screening and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvoníček, V.; Skořepová, E.; Dušek, Michal; Babor, M.; Zvatora, P.; Šoós, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3116-3127 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603; GA ČR GA17-23196S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Ibrutinib solvates * anticancer drug * Raman spectroscopy * powder X-ray diffraction * crystal structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  9. Grid inhomogeneous solvation theory: hydration structure and thermodynamics of the miniature receptor cucurbit[7]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Young, Tom Kurtzman; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-07-28

    The displacement of perturbed water upon binding is believed to play a critical role in the thermodynamics of biomolecular recognition, but it is nontrivial to unambiguously define and answer questions about this process. We address this issue by introducing grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST), which discretizes the equations of inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) onto a three-dimensional grid situated in the region of interest around a solute molecule or complex. Snapshots from explicit solvent simulations are used to estimate localized solvation entropies, energies, and free energies associated with the grid boxes, or voxels, and properly summing these thermodynamic quantities over voxels yields information about hydration thermodynamics. GIST thus provides a smoothly varying representation of water properties as a function of position, rather than focusing on hydration sites where solvent is present at high density. It therefore accounts for full or partial displacement of water from sites that are highly occupied by water, as well as for partly occupied and water-depleted regions around the solute. GIST can also provide a well-defined estimate of the solvation free energy and therefore enables a rigorous end-states analysis of binding. For example, one may not only use a first GIST calculation to project the thermodynamic consequences of displacing water from the surface of a receptor by a ligand, but also account, in a second GIST calculation, for the thermodynamics of subsequent solvent reorganization around the bound complex. In the present study, a first GIST analysis of the molecular host cucurbit[7]uril is found to yield a rich picture of hydration structure and thermodynamics in and around this miniature receptor. One of the most striking results is the observation of a toroidal region of high water density at the center of the host's nonpolar cavity. Despite its high density, the water in this toroidal region is disfavored energetically and

  10. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ...

  11. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Kadri, Farid

    2016-01-01

    of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA

  12. Interface of the polarizable continuum model of solvation with semi-empirical methods in the GAMESS program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Blædel, Kristoffer L.; Christensen, Anders Steen

    2013-01-01

    An interface between semi-empirical methods and the polarized continuum model (PCM) of solvation successfully implemented into GAMESS following the approach by Chudinov et al (Chem. Phys. 1992, 160, 41). The interface includes energy gradients and is parallelized. For large molecules such as ubiq......An interface between semi-empirical methods and the polarized continuum model (PCM) of solvation successfully implemented into GAMESS following the approach by Chudinov et al (Chem. Phys. 1992, 160, 41). The interface includes energy gradients and is parallelized. For large molecules...

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of model electrochemical interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum: some implications for ionic and chemisorbate solvation at electrode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Ignacio; Kizhakevariam, Naushad; Weaver, Michael J.

    1995-07-01

    The utility of infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) for examining structure and bonding for model electrochemical interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) is illustrated, focusing specifically on the solvation of cations and chemisorbed carbon monoxide on Pt(111). These systems were chosen partly in view of the availability of IRAS data (albeit limited to chemisorbate vibrations) for the corresponding in-situ metal-solution interfaces, enabling direct spectral comparisons to be made with the "UHV electrochemical model" systems. Kelvin probe measurements of the metal-UHV surface potential changes (ΔΦ) attending alterations in the interfacial composition are also described: these provide the required link to the in-situ electrode potentials as well as yielding additional insight into surface solvation. Variations in the negative electronic charge density and, correspondingly, in the cation surface concentration (thereby mimicking charge-induced alterations in the electrode potential below the potential of zero charge) are achieved by potassium atom dosage onto Pt(111). Of the solvents selected for discussion here — deuterated water, methanol, and acetonitrile — the first two exhibit readily detectable vibrational bands which provide information on the ionic solvation structure. Progressively dosing these solvents onto Pt(111) in the presence of low potassium coverages yields marked alterations in the solvent vibrational bands which can be understood in terms of sequential cation solvation. Comparison between these spectra for methanol with analogous data for sequential methanol solvation of gas-phase alkali cations enables the influence of the interfacial environment to be assessed. The effects of solvating chemisorbed CO are illustrated for acetonitrile; the markedly larger shifts in CO frequencies and binding sites for dilute CO adlayers can be accounted for in terms of short-range coadsorbate interactions in addition to longer-range Stark effects

  14. Solvation thermodynamics of L-cystine, L-tyrosine, and L-leucine in aqueous-electrolyte media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjay; Guin, Partha Sarathi; Mahali, Kalachand; Dolui, Bijoy Krishna

    2017-12-01

    Solubilities of L-cystine, L-tyrosine, and L-leucine in aqueous NaCl media at 298.15 K have been studied. Indispensable and related solvent parameters such as molar mass, molar volume, etc., were also determined. The results are used to evaluate the standard transfer Gibbs free energy, cavity forming enthalpy of transfer, cavity forming transfer Gibbs free energy and dipole-dipole interaction effects during the course of solvation. Various weak interactions involving solute-solvent or solvent-solvent molecules were characterized in order to find their role on the solvation of these amino acids.

  15. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Sanchez, R.; Murray, W.T.; Silbiger, M.L.; Ogden, J.; Cochran, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  16. Operator training for the abnormal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzec, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Training of nuclear power plant control room operators, on actions to be taken for an abnormal event, has classically been limited to discussion, on-shift and/or during requalification training classes, of symptoms, logical thought processes, systems analysis, and operator experience. The prerequisites for these discussions are a common technical vocabulary, and a minimum basic comprehension of nuclear power plant fundamentals, plant component theory of operation, system configuration, system control philosophy and operating procedures. Nuclear power plant control room operators are not the only personnel who are or should be involved in these discussions. The shift supervisors, operations management, and auxiliary equipment operators require continuing training in abnormal operations, as well. More in-depth training is necessary for shift supervisors and control room operators. The availability of vendor simulators has improved the effectiveness of training efforts for these individuals to some extent by displaying typical situations and plant performance characteristics and by providing a degree of ''hands on'' experience. The evolution of in-depth training with these simulators is reviewed

  17. Computational 17O-NMR spectroscopy of organic acids and peracids: comparison of solvation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggioli, Alberto; Castiglione, Franca; Raos, Guido; Crescenzi, Orlando; Field, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine several computational strategies for the prediction of the 17 O-NMR shielding constants for a selection of organic acids and peracids in aqueous solution. In particular, we consider water (the solvent and reference for the chemical shifts), hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, lactic acid and peracetic acid. First of all, we demonstrate that the PBE0 density functional in combination with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set provides an excellent compromise between computational cost and accuracy in the calculation of the shielding constants. Next, we move on to the problem of the solvent representation. Our results confirm the shortcomings of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) in the description of systems susceptible to strong hydrogen bonding interactions, while at the same time they demonstrate its usefulness within a molecular-continuum approach, whereby PCM is applied to describe the solvation of the solute surrounded by some explicit solvent molecules. We examine different models of the solvation shells, sampling their configurations using both energy minimizations of finite clusters and molecular dynamics simulations of bulk systems. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulations, in which the solute is described at the PM6 semiempirical level and the solvent by the TIP3P model, prove to be a promising sampling method for medium-to-large sized systems. The roles of solvent shell size and structure are also briefly discussed. (authors)

  18. Effects of solvation shells and cluster size on the reaction of aluminum clusters with water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Mou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of aluminum clusters, Aln (n = 16, 17 and 18, with liquid water is investigated using quantum molecular dynamics simulations, which show rapid production of hydrogen molecules assisted by proton transfer along a chain of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds between water molecules, i.e. Grotthuss mechanism. The simulation results provide answers to two unsolved questions: (1 What is the role of a solvation shell formed by non-reacting H-bonds surrounding the H-bond chain; and (2 whether the high size-selectivity observed in gas-phase Aln-water reaction persists in liquid phase? First, the solvation shell is found to play a crucial role in facilitating proton transfer and hence H2 production. Namely, it greatly modifies the energy barrier, generally to much lower values (< 0.1 eV. Second, we find that H2 production by Aln in liquid water does not depend strongly on the cluster size, in contrast to the existence of magic numbers in gas-phase reaction. This paper elucidates atomistic mechanisms underlying these observations.

  19. Phospholipid bilayer affinities and solvation characteristics by electrokinetic chromatography with a nanodisc pseudostationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, William M; Steele, Harmen B; Ross, J B Alexander; Palmer, Christopher P

    2017-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and synthetic maleic acid-styrene copolymer belts have been introduced as a pseudostationary phase (PSP) in electrokinetic chromatography and demonstrated good performance. The nanodiscs provide a suitable migration range and high theoretical plate counts. Using this nanodisc pseudostationary phase, the affinity of the bilayer structure for probe solutes was determined and characterized. Good correlation is observed between retention factors and octanol water partition coefficients for particular categories of solutes, but the general correlation is weak primarily because the nanodiscs show stronger affinity than octanol for hydrogen bond donors. This suggests that a more appropriate application of this technology is to measure and characterize interactions between solutes and lipid bilayers directly. Linear solvation energy relationship analysis of the nanodisc-solute interactions in this study demonstrates that the nanodiscs provide a solvation environment with low cohesivity and weak hydrogen bond donating ability, and provide relatively strong hydrogen bond acceptor strength. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Alain [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, Calle 30 # 502, 11300 La Habana (Cuba); Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2015-10-14

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the OCTOPUS code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water.

  1. Solvation of actinide salts in water using a polarizable continuum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M

    2015-01-29

    In order to determine how actinide atoms are dressed when solvated in water, density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the equilibrium structure of uranium plutonium and thorium salts (UO2(2+), PuO2(2+), Pu(4+), and Th(4+)) both in vacuum as well as in solution represented by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. This information is of paramount importance for the development of sensitive nanosensors. Both UO2(2+) and PuO2(2+) ions show coordination number of 4-5 with counterions replacing one or two water molecules from the first coordination shell. On the other hand, Pu(4+), has a coordination number of 8 both when completely solvated and also in the presence of chloride and nitrate ions with counterions replacing water molecules in the first shell. Nitrates were found to bind more strongly to Pu(IV) than chloride anions. In the case of the Th(IV) ion, the coordination number was found to be 9 or 10 in the presence of chlorides. Moreover, the Pu(IV) ion shows greater affinity for chlorides than the Th(IV) ion. Adding dispersion and ZPE corrections to the binding energy does not alter the trends in relative stability of several conformers because of error cancelations. All structures and energetics of these complexes are reported.

  2. Electron detachment energies in high-symmetry alkali halide solvated-electron anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusiewicz, Iwona; Berdys, Joanna; Simons, Jack; Skurski, Piotr

    2003-07-01

    We decompose the vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) in solvated-electron clusters of alkali halides in terms of (i) an electrostatic contribution that correlates with the dipole moment (μ) of the individual alkali halide molecule and (ii) a relaxation component that is related to the polarizability (α) of the alkali halide molecule. Detailed numerical ab initio results for twelve species (MX)n- (M=Li,Na; X=F,Cl,Br; n=2,3) are used to construct an interpolation model that relates the clusters' VDEs to their μ and α values as well as a cluster size parameter r that we show is closely related to the alkali cation's ionic radius. The interpolation formula is then tested by applying it to predict the VDEs of four systems [i.e., (KF)2-, (KF)3-, (KCl)2-, and (KCl)3-] that were not used in determining the parameters of the model. The average difference between the model's predicted VDEs and the ab initio calculated electron binding energies is less than 4% (for the twelve species studied). It is concluded that one can easily estimate the VDE of a given high-symmetry solvated electron system by employing the model put forth here if the α, μ and cation ionic radii are known. Alternatively, if VDEs are measured for an alkali halide cluster and the α and μ values are known, one can estimate the r parameter, which, in turn, determines the "size" of the cluster anion.

  3. Preferential solvation of fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone in binary solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozefowicz, Marek; Heldt, Janina R.

    2003-01-01

    Preferential solvation of fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone in binary solvent mixtures has been studied using steady-state spectroscopic measurements. This study concerns the solvent-induced shift of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of both molecules in two solvent mixtures, i.e., cyclohexane-tetrahydrofuran and cyclohexane-ethanol. The first system contains polar solute molecules, fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone, in a mixture of polar aprotic (tetrahydrofuran) and non-polar (cyclohexane) solvents. In the second solvents mixture, hydrogen bonding with solute molecules (ethanol) may occur. The results of spectroscopic measurements are analysed using theoretical models of Bakshiev, Mazurenko and Suppan which describe preferential solvation phenomena. In the case of cyclohexane-tetrahydrofuran mixtures, the deviation from linearity in the absorption and fluorescence solvatochromic shifts vs. the solution polarity is due to non-specific dipolar solvent-solute interactions. For cyclohexane-ethanol binary mixtures, both non-specific and specific (hydrogen bond and proton-relay tautomerization) interactions contribute to the observed solvatochromism

  4. Intensity of f-f bands of neodymium chloride alcohol solvates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukietynska, K.; Jezowski-Trzebiatowska, B.; Keller, B.

    1981-01-01

    Recent results revealed that in alcohol solutions of lanthanide chlorides, at least in the case of Eu 3+ and Yb 3+ ions, there exist mixed solvates, i.e. both chloride ions and solvent molecules are present in the Ln 3+ ion first coordination sphere. This conclusion was drawn from an analysis of the charge transfer transitions in the spectra of Eu 3+ and Yb 3+ chlorides in alcohols (methyl, ethyl, n-propyl), where two separate C.T.bands were observed and identified as C.T. transitions from the alcohol molecule and chloride ion to the Ln 3+ ion. In our previous paper we have reported that the energy of the first f-d transition in the Pr 3+ chloride alcohol solvates varied for different alcohols. These data also confirmed our suggestion that alcohol molecules are present in the first coordination sphere of the lanthanide ion. In the work reported here, we have tried to apply the intensity analysis method to the solution spectra of neodymium chloride dissolved in simple aliphatic alcohols like methanol, ethanol and n-propanol. Experimental details are given. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  5. The initial stages of NaCl dissolution: Ion or ion pair solvation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, Jiri; Michaelides, Angelos

    2009-03-01

    The interaction of water with rock salt (NaCl) is important in a wide variety of natural processes and human activities. A lot is known about NaCl dissolution at the macroscopic level but we do not yet have a detailed atomic scale picture of how salt crystals dissolve. Here we report an extensive series of density functional theory, forcefield and molecular dynamics studies of water clusters at flat and defective NaCl surfaces and NaCl clusters. The focus is on answering seemingly elementary questions such as how many water molecules are needed before it becomes favorable to extract an ion or a pair of ions from the crystal or the cluster. It turns out, however, that the answers to these questions are not so straightforward: below a certain number of water molecules (˜ 12) solvation of individual ions is less costly and above this number solvation of ion pairs is favored. These results reveal a hitherto unknown complexity in the NaCl dissolution process born out of a subtle interplay between water-water and water-ion interactions.

  6. Ionic association and solvation in solutions of magnesium and nickel perchlorates in acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalugin, O. N.; Agieienko, V. N.; Otroshko, N. A.; Moroz, V. V.

    2009-02-01

    The paper presents the conductometric data on solutions of Mg(ClO4)2 and Ni(ClO4)2 in acetonitrile over the temperature ranges 5-55°C for Mg(ClO4)2 and 25-75°C for Ni(ClO4)2. The extended Lee-Wheaton equation for unsymmetrical electrolytes was used to determine the limiting equivalent conductivities of the Mg2+, Ni2+, and ClO{4/-} ions and first-step ionic association constants with the formation of [KtClO4]+ ion pairs. Lower ionic association constants for Ni(ClO4)2 compared with Mg(ClO4)2 were a consequence of stronger non-Coulomb repulsion in the formation of [KtClO4]+ ion pairs because of the formation of a firmer solvation shell by the nickel compared with magnesium cation. The structure-dynamic parameter of ionic solvation was estimated. It was found that spatial-time correlations in the nearest environment of ions increased in the series ClO{4/-} > Mg2+ > Ni2+.

  7. A linear solvation energy relationship model of organic chemical partitioning to dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipka, Undine; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2011-09-01

    Predicting the association of contaminants with both particulate and dissolved organic matter is critical in determining the fate and bioavailability of chemicals in environmental risk assessment. To date, the association of a contaminant to particulate organic matter is considered in many multimedia transport models, but the effect of dissolved organic matter is typically ignored due to a lack of either reliable models or experimental data. The partition coefficient to dissolved organic carbon (K(DOC)) may be used to estimate the fraction of a contaminant that is associated with dissolved organic matter. Models relating K(DOC) to the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW)) have not been successful for many types of dissolved organic carbon in the environment. Instead, linear solvation energy relationships are proposed to model the association of chemicals with dissolved organic matter. However, more chemically diverse K(DOC) data are needed to produce a more robust model. For humic acid dissolved organic carbon, the linear solvation energy relationship predicts log K(DOC) with a root mean square error of 0.43. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  8. Abnormality diagnosis device for nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Shinmi; Sakaba, Hideo

    1989-02-21

    According to the present invention, abnormality such as abnormal increase of temperature in a nuclear reactor is detected to send a signal to control rod drives, etc. thereby stopping the operation of the nuclear reactor. Receiving/transmission device transmits a signal for conducting normal operation of an abnormality information section, as well as receives an echo signal from the abnormality information section to transmit an abnormal signal to a reactor protection system. The abnormality information section is disposed to fuel assemblies, receives a signal from the receiving/transmission device for conducting the normal operation to transmit a normal echo signal, as well as changes the echo signal when detecting the nuclear reactor abnormality. By the foregoing method, since the abnormality information section is disposed to the fuel assemblies, various effects can be attained such as: (1) there is no response delay from the occurrence of abnormality to emergency counter measure after detection, (2) high burnup degree for fuels can thus be possible to improve the economical property, (3) the abnormality information section can be taken out from the reactor container together with fuel assemablies by an existent take-out mechanism and (4) since wireless transmission and reception are established between the receiving/transmission device and the abnormality information section, cables are not required in the container. (K.M.).

  9. The influence of brain abnormalities on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number and type of brain abnormalities and their influence on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers. We analyzed psychiatric court reports of 166 sexual murderers and compared a group with notable signs of brain abnormalities (N = 50) with those without any signs (N = 116). Sexual murderers with brain abnormalities suffered more from early behavior problems. They were less likely to cohabitate with the victim at the time of the homicide and had more victims at the age of six years or younger. Psychiatric diagnoses revealed a higher total number of paraphilias: Transvestic fetishism and paraphilias not otherwise specified were more frequent in offenders with brain abnormalities. A binary logistic regression identified five predictors that accounted for 46.8% of the variance explaining the presence of brain abnormalities. Our results suggest the importance of a comprehensive neurological and psychological examination of this special offender group.

  10. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital ... of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’re scheduled for an MRA scan, ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ... examine blood vessels in key areas of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’ ...

  13. Solvation free energies and partition coefficients with the coarse-grained and hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained MARTINI models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel

    2017-10-01

    We present the estimation of solvation free energies of small solutes in water, n-octanol and hexane using molecular dynamics simulations with two MARTINI models at different resolutions, viz. the coarse-grained (CG) and the hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) models. From these estimates, we also calculate the water/hexane and water/octanol partition coefficients. More than 150 small, organic molecules were selected from the Minnesota solvation database and parameterized in a semi-automatic fashion. Using either the CG or hybrid AA/CG models, we find considerable deviations between the estimated and experimental solvation free energies in all solvents with mean absolute deviations larger than 10 kJ/mol, although the correlation coefficient is between 0.55 and 0.75 and significant. There is also no difference between the results when using the non-polarizable and polarizable water model, although we identify some improvements when using the polarizable model with the AA/CG solutes. In contrast to the estimated solvation energies, the estimated partition coefficients are generally excellent with both the CG and hybrid AA/CG models, giving mean absolute deviations between 0.67 and 0.90 log units and correlation coefficients larger than 0.85. We analyze the error distribution further and suggest avenues for improvements.

  14. Estimate of electrostatic solvation free energy of electron in various polar solvents by using modified born equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kazuo; Kitamura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Hideo

    1976-01-01

    The modified Born equation was tentatively applied to estimate the electrostatic free energies of solvation of the electron in various polar solvents. The related data of halide ions and a datum of the hydration free energy of the electron obtained by radiation chemical studies were used for the numerical calculations. (auth.)

  15. Electron spin resonance of the solvation of radiation-produced silver atoms in alcohol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.S.W.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    Frozen solutions of silver salts exposed to 60 Co γ-irradiation form silver atoms by reaction of radiation-produced electrons with the silver ion. At 4 K the silver atoms are initially produced in a nonequilibrium or presolvated state and upon brief thermal excitation to 77 K the first solvation shell geometry changes towards an equilibrium or solvated silver atom. This is most pronounced in water but also occurs in methanol, ethanol and n-propanol matrices. The changes in the electron spin resonance magnetic parameters upon silver atom solvation have been determined. In alcohol-water mixtures Ag 0 is preferentially solvated by polycrystalline water at low alcohol concentration. Above a particular alcohol mole percent Ag 0 suddenly changes its environment to a glassy alcohol one. This sudden change occurs at 17, 13 and 6 mol % methanol, ethanol and n-propanol, respectively. These mole percents correlate with the minimum of the excess enthalpy of mixing and with the hydrogen atom trapping ability of these alcohol-water mixtures. The results also suggest that the local environmental disorder around Ag 0 increases with alcohol chain length in alcohol-water frozen solutions. (author)

  16. Ion solvation in polymer blends and block copolymer melts: effects of chain length and connectivity on the reorganization of dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Issei

    2014-05-29

    We studied the thermodynamic properties of ion solvation in polymer blends and block copolymer melts and developed a dipolar self-consistent field theory for polymer mixtures. Our theory accounts for the chain connectivity of polymerized monomers, the compressibility of the liquid mixtures under electrostriction, the permanent and induced dipole moments of monomers, and the resultant dielectric contrast among species. In our coarse-grained model, dipoles are attached to the monomers and allowed to rotate freely in response to electrostatic fields. We demonstrate that a strong electrostatic field near an ion reorganizes dipolar monomers, resulting in nonmonotonic changes in the volume fraction profile and the dielectric function of the polymers with respect to those of simple liquid mixtures. For the parameter sets used, the spatial variations near an ion can be in the range of 1 nm or larger, producing significant differences in the solvation energy among simple liquid mixtures, polymer blends, and block copolymers. The solvation energy of an ion depends substantially on the chain length in block copolymers; thus, our theory predicts the preferential solvation of ions arising from differences in chain length.

  17. Modelling the Preferential Solvation of Ferulic Acid in {2-Propanol (1 + Water (2} Mixtures at 298.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Jouyban 1,2, Fleming Martínez 3 *

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently Haq et al. reported the equilibrium solubility in {2-propanol (1 + water (2} mixtures at several temperatures with some numerical correlation analysis. Nevertheless, no attempt was made to evaluate the preferential solvation of this compound by the solvents. Methods: Preferential solvation of ferulic acid in the saturated mixtures at 298.15 K was analyzed based on the inverse Kirkwood-Buff integrals as described in the literature. Results: Ferulic acid is preferentially solvated by water in water-rich mixtures (0.00 < x1 < 0.19 but preferentially solvated by 2-propanol in mixtures with composition 0.19 < x1 < 1.00. Conclusion: These results could be interpreted as a consequence of hydrophobic hydration around the non-polar groups of the solute in the former case (0.00 < x1 < 0.19. Moreover, in the last case (0.19 < x1 < 1.00, the observed trend could be a consequence of the acid behavior of ferulic acid in front to 2-propanol molecules because this cosolvent is more basic than water as described by the respective solvatochromic parameters.

  18. Solvation free energies and partition coefficients with the coarse-grained and hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained MARTINI models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel

    2017-10-01

    We present the estimation of solvation free energies of small solutes in water, n-octanol and hexane using molecular dynamics simulations with two MARTINI models at different resolutions, viz. the coarse-grained (CG) and the hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) models. From these estimates, we also calculate the water/hexane and water/octanol partition coefficients. More than 150 small, organic molecules were selected from the Minnesota solvation database and parameterized in a semi-automatic fashion. Using either the CG or hybrid AA/CG models, we find considerable deviations between the estimated and experimental solvation free energies in all solvents with mean absolute deviations larger than 10 kJ/mol, although the correlation coefficient is between 0.55 and 0.75 and significant. There is also no difference between the results when using the non-polarizable and polarizable water model, although we identify some improvements when using the polarizable model with the AA/CG solutes. In contrast to the estimated solvation energies, the estimated partition coefficients are generally excellent with both the CG and hybrid AA/CG models, giving mean absolute deviations between 0.67 and 0.90 log units and correlation coefficients larger than 0.85. We analyze the error distribution further and suggest avenues for improvements.

  19. Computational Study of Geometry, Solvation Free Energy, Dipole Moment, Polarizability, Hyperpolarizability and Molecular Properties of 2-Methylimidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Firoz Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio calculations were carried out to study the geometry, solvation free energy, dipole moment, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP, Mulliken and Natural charge distribution, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO energetic and different molecular properties like global reactivity descriptors (chemical hardness, softness, chemical potential, electronegativity, electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole. B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory was used to optimize the structure both in the gas phase and in solution. The solvation free energy, dipole moment and molecular properties were calculated by applying the Solvation Model on Density (SMD in four solvent systems, namely water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, n-octanol and chloroform. The computed bond distances, bond angles and dihedral angles of 2-methylimidazole agreed reasonably well with the experimental data except for C(2-N(1, C(4-C(5 and N(1-H(7 bond lengths and N(1-C(5-C(4 bond angle. The solvation free energy, dipole moment, polarizability, first order hyperpolarizability, chemical potential, electronegativity and electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole increased on going from non-polar to polar solvents. Chemical hardness also increased with increasing polarity of the solvent and the opposite relation was found in the case of softness. These results provide better understanding of the stability and reactivity of 2-methylimidazole in different solvent systems.

  20. Origin of parameter degeneracy and molecular shape relationships in geometric-flow calculations of solvation free energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Michael D. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Wei, Guowei [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Baker, Nathan A. [Computational and Statistical Analytics Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    Implicit solvent models are important tools for calculating solvation free energies for chemical and biophysical studies since they require fewer computational resources but can achieve accuracy comparable to that of explicit-solvent models. In past papers, geometric flow-based solvation models have been established for solvation analysis of small and large compounds. In the present work, the use of realistic experiment-based parameter choices for the geometric flow models is studied. We find that the experimental parameters of solvent internal pressure p = 172 MPa and surface tension γ = 72 mN/m produce solvation free energies within 1 RT of the global minimum root-mean-squared deviation from experimental data over the expanded set. Our results demonstrate that experimental values can be used for geometric flow solvent model parameters, thus eliminating the need for additional parameterization. We also examine the correlations between optimal values of p and γ which are strongly anti-correlated. Geometric analysis of the small molecule test set shows that these results are inter-connected with an approximately linear relationship between area and volume in the range of molecular sizes spanned by the data set. In spite of this considerable degeneracy between the surface tension and pressure terms in the model, both terms are important for the broader applicability of the model.

  1. Synthesis and IR spectroscopic investigation of solvated complexes of dioxomolybdenum (6) with salicylal-S-methyl isothiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, V.L.; Sergienko, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    The complex of MoO 2 L (H 2 L-S-methylizothiosemicarbazone of salicyl aldehyde) and its seven solvated derivatives MoO 2 LxSolv, have been synthesized, their IR spectroscopic study being conducted. The conclusions on the structure of the complexes studied are confirmed by ata of x-ray diffraction analysis. Refs. 4, tabs. 1

  2. Spectroscopic and computational studies of ionic clusters as models of solvation and atmospheric reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Keith T.

    Ionic clusters are useful as model systems for the study of fundamental processes in solution and in the atmosphere. Their structure and reactivity can be studied in detail using vibrational predissociation spectroscopy, in conjunction with high level ab initio calculations. This thesis presents the applications of infrared spectroscopy and computation to a variety of gas-phase cluster systems. A crucial component of the process of stratospheric ozone depletion is the action of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) to convert the reservoir species HCl and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) to photochemically labile compounds. Quantum chemistry was used to explore one possible mechanism by which this activation is effected: Cl- + ClONO2 /to Cl2 + NO3- eqno(1)Correlated ab initio calculations predicted that the direct reaction of chloride ion with ClONO2 is facile, which was confirmed in an experimental kinetics study. In the reaction a weakly bound intermediate Cl2-NO3- is formed, with ~70% of the charge localized on the nitrate moiety. This enables the Cl2-NO3- cluster to be well solvated even in bulk solution, allowing (1) to be facile on PSCs. Quantum chemistry was also applied to the hydration of nitrosonium ion (NO+), an important process in the ionosphere. The calculations, in conjunction with an infrared spectroscopy experiment, revealed the structure of the gas-phase clusters NO+(H2O)n. The large degree of covalent interaction between NO+ and the lone pairs of the H2O ligands is contrasted with the weak electrostatic bonding between iodide ion and H2O. Finally, the competition between ion solvation and solvent self-association is explored for the gas-phase clusters Cl/-(H2O)n and Cl-(NH3)n. For the case of water, vibrational predissociation spectroscopy reveals less hydrogen bonding among H2O ligands than predicted by ab initio calculations. Nevertheless, for n /ge 5, cluster structure is dominated by water-water interactions, with Cl- only partially solvated by the

  3. Solvation effect on decomposition rate of 10-methyl-10-phenylphenoxarsonium iodide in some alcohols and ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, V.I.; Gumerov, N.S.; Rakhmatullin, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    By the method of conductometry decomposition kinetics of 10-methyl-10phenylphenoxarsonium iodide in methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and methyl ethyl ketone at initial concentration of the salt 0.00024-0.003 mol/l, is studied. It is shown that at the temperatures up to 80-95 deg C practically no decomposition of arsonium salt in methanol and ethanol is observed. With an increase in the length of alcohol alkyl radical the decomposition rate increases. The values of activation enrgy both for alcohols and ketone are approximately the same. At the same time, decomposition rate in alcohol proved much slower than in ketone, which is related to iodide-ion solvation in protic solvents

  4. Solvation effect on decomposition rate of 10-methyl-10-phenylphenoxarsonium iodide in some alcohols and ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, V I; Gumerov, N S; Rakhmatullin, R R [Kazanskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst., Kazan (USSR)

    1989-03-01

    By the method of conductometry decomposition kinetics of 10-methyl-10phenylphenoxarsonium iodide in methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and methyl ethyl ketone at initial concentration of the salt 0.00024-0.003 mol/l, is studied. It is shown that at the temperatures up to 80-95 deg C practically no decomposition of arsonium salt in methanol and ethanol is observed. With an increase in the length of alcohol alkyl radical the decomposition rate increases. The values of activation enrgy both for alcohols and ketone are approximately the same. At the same time, decomposition rate in alcohol proved much slower than in ketone, which is related to iodide-ion solvation in protic solvents.

  5. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.; Denisov, Gleb S.; Borissova, Alexandra O.; Goloveshkin, Alexander S.; Greindl, Julian; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Shenderovich, Ilya G.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer's size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  6. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-24

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer\\'s size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  7. Band resolution of optical spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, F.-Y.; Freeman, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran are empirically resolved into two Gaussian bands and a continuum tail. The first Gaussian band covers most of the low energy side of the spectrum. The second Gaussian band lies at an energy slightly above that of the absorption maximum of the total spectrum. With the exception of tert-butyl alcohol, in water and alcohols the following were observed: (a) the first Gaussian bands have the same half-width, but the oscillator strength in water is about double that in an alcohol; (b) the second Gaussian bands have similar half-widths and oscillator strengths; (c) the continuum tails have similar half-widths, yet that in water possesses only about one third as much oscillator strength as the one in alcohol. In tert-butyl alcohol and tetrahydrofuran the first Gaussian band and the continuum tail each carry nearly half of the total oscillator strength. (author)

  8. Pharmaceutical solvates, hydrates and amorphous forms: A special emphasis on cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Anne Marie; Worku, Zelalem Ayenew; Kumar, Dinesh; Madi, Atif M

    2017-08-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may exist in various solid forms, which can lead to differences in the intermolecular interactions, affecting the internal energy and enthalpy, and the degree of disorder, affecting the entropy. Differences in solid forms often lead to differences in thermodynamic parameters and physicochemical properties for example solubility, dissolution rate, stability and mechanical properties of APIs and excipients. Hence, solid forms of APIs play a vital role in drug discovery and development in the context of optimization of bioavailability, filing intellectual property rights and developing suitable manufacturing methods. In this review, the fundamental characteristics and trends observed for pharmaceutical hydrates, solvates and amorphous forms are presented, with special emphasis, due to their relative abundance, on pharmaceutical hydrates with single and two-component (i.e. cocrystal) host molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Computing Relative Free Energies of Solvation using Single Reference Thermodynamic Integration Augmented with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V; Wallqvist, Anders

    2010-11-09

    This paper introduces an efficient single-topology variant of Thermodynamic Integration (TI) for computing relative transformation free energies in a series of molecules with respect to a single reference state. The presented TI variant that we refer to as Single-Reference TI (SR-TI) combines well-established molecular simulation methodologies into a practical computational tool. Augmented with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange (HREX), the SR-TI variant can deliver enhanced sampling in select degrees of freedom. The utility of the SR-TI variant is demonstrated in calculations of relative solvation free energies for a series of benzene derivatives with increasing complexity. Noteworthy, the SR-TI variant with the HREX option provides converged results in a challenging case of an amide molecule with a high (13-15 kcal/mol) barrier for internal cis/trans interconversion using simulation times of only 1 to 4 ns.

  10. Synthesis of Tertiary and Quaternary Amine Derivatives from Wood Resin as Chiral NMR Solvating Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Laaksonen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chiral tertiary and quaternary amine solvating agents for NMR spectroscopy were synthesized from the wood resin derivative (+-dehydroabietylamine (2. The resolution of enantiomers of model compounds [Mosher’s acid (3 and its n-Bu4N salt (4] (guests by (+-dehydroabietyl-N,N-dimethylmethanamine (5 and its ten different ammonium salts (hosts was studied. The best results with 3 were obtained using 5 while with 4 the best enantiomeric resolution was obtained using (+-dehydroabietyl-N,N-dimethylmethanaminium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonimide (6. The compounds 5 and 6 showed a 1:1 complexation behaviour between the host and guest. The capability of 5 and 6 to recognize the enantiomers of various α-substituted carboxylic acids and their n-Bu4N salts in enantiomeric excess (ee determinations was demonstrated. A modification of the RES-TOCSY NMR pulse sequence is described, allowing the enhancement of enantiomeric discrimination when the resolution of multiplets is insufficient.

  11. Anisotropy enhanced X-ray scattering from solvated transition metal complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biasin, Elisa; van Driel, Tim B.; Levi, Gianluca

    2018-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray scattering patterns from photoexcited molecules in solution are in many cases anisotropic at the ultrafast time scales accessible at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). This anisotropy arises from the interaction of a linearly polarized UV-Vis pump laser pulse with the sample......, which induces anisotropic structural changes that can be captured by femtosecond X-ray pulses. In this work, a method for quantitative analysis of the anisotropic scattering signal arising from an ensemble of molecules is described, and it is demonstrated how its use can enhance the structural...... sensitivity of the time-resolved X-ray scattering experiment. This method is applied on time-resolved X-ray scattering patterns measured upon photoexcitation of a solvated di-platinum complex at an XFEL, and the key parameters involved are explored. It is shown that a combined analysis of the anisotropic...

  12. Hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water because its solvated structure inhibits correlated proton transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Zheng, Lixin; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Klein, Michael L.; Car, Roberto; Wu, Xifan

    2018-03-01

    Proton transfer via hydronium and hydroxide ions in water is ubiquitous. It underlies acid-base chemistry, certain enzyme reactions, and even infection by the flu. Despite two centuries of investigation, the mechanism underlying why hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water is still not well understood. Herein, we employ state-of-the-art density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics—with corrections for non-local van der Waals interactions, and self-interaction in the electronic ground state—to model water and hydrated water ions. At this level of theory, we show that structural diffusion of hydronium preserves the previously recognized concerted behaviour. However, by contrast, proton transfer via hydroxide is less temporally correlated, due to a stabilized hypercoordination solvation structure that discourages proton transfer. Specifically, the latter exhibits non-planar geometry, which agrees with neutron-scattering results. Asymmetry in the temporal correlation of proton transfer leads to hydroxide diffusing slower than hydronium.

  13. Effects of solvation on partition and dimerization of benzoic acid in mixed solvent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Yajima, K; Wada, H; Nakagawa, G

    1995-06-01

    The partition of benzoic acid between 0.1M perchloric acid solution and two kinds of mixed solvents has been carried out at 25 degrees C. The partition and dimerization constants of benzoic acid have been determined in the 1-octanol-benzene and 2-octanone-benzene systems. In both the mixed solvent systems, with increasing content of 1-octanol and 2-octanone in each mixed solvent, the partition constant of benzoic acid has been found to increase, and the dimerization constant of benzoic acid in each organic phase to decrease. These phenomena are attributable to solvation of monomeric benzoic acid by 1-octanol and 2-octanone molecules in each mixed solvent.

  14. Linear solvation energy relationships: "rule of thumb" for estimation of variable values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James P.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1991-01-01

    For the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER), values are listed for each of the variables (Vi/100, π*, &betam, αm) for fundamental organic structures and functional groups. We give the guidelines to estimate LSER variable values quickly for a vast array of possible organic compounds such as those found in the environment. The difficulty in generating these variables has greatly discouraged the application of this quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. This paper present the first compilation of molecular functional group values together with a utilitarian set of the LSER variable estimation rules. The availability of these variable values and rules should facilitate widespread application of LSER for hazard evaluation of environmental contaminants.

  15. Resonant Pump-dump Quantum Control of Solvated Dye Molecules with Phase Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    Quantum coherent control of two photon and multiphoton excitation processes in atomic and condensed phase systems employing phase jumps has been well studied and understood. Here we demonstrate coherent quantum control of a two photon resonant pump-dump process in a complex solvated dye molecule. Phase jump in the frequency domain via a pulse shaper is employed to coherently enhance the stimulated emission by an order of magnitude when compared to transform limited pulses. Red shifted stimulated emission from successive low energy Stokes shifted excited states leading to narrowband emission are observed upon scanning the pi step across the excitation spectrum. A binary search space routine was also employed to investigate the effects of other types of phase jumps on stimulated emission and to determine the optimum phase that maximizes the emission. Understanding the underlying mechanism of this kind of enhancement will guide us in designing pulse shapes for enhancing stimulated emission, which can be further applied in the field of imaging.

  16. Theoretical-experimental study of the solvation enthalpy of acetone in dilute aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, S. Tolosa; Martin, J.A. Sanson; Garcia, A. Hidalgo

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions at infinite dilution with acetone as solute. Lennard-Jones with electrostatic term (12-6-1 potentials) were employed to describe the solute-solvent interactions. The Morokuma decomposition scheme of ab initio interaction energies at the SCF level and the ESIE charges on the solute atoms were used to reproduce the exchange and Coulomb electrostatic contributions of the solute-water interaction potential. Some extensions, such as including the dispersion component evaluated at MP2 level, were added to the traditional calculation procedures in order to improve the results of the solvation enthalpy. The results obtained with the EX-DIS-ES model were compared with the experimental calorimetry values, the observed agreement being acceptable

  17. Solubility and solvation of alkali metal perchlorates, tetramethyl and tetraethylammonium in aqua-ketone solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.A.; Pak, T.G.; Bezuglyj, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    The KClO 4 , RbClO 4 , CsClO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NClO 4 , (C 2 H 5 ) 4 NClO 4 solubility in water and water-acetone, water-methylethylketone mixtures is determined through the method of isothermal saturation at 298.15 K. Dissociation constants of alkali metals perchlorates in acetone and its 90% mixtures (by volume) are determined conductometrically. Solubility products and standard energies of the Gibbs transfer of the studied electrolytes from water into water-acetone and water-methylethylketone solvents. It is established that the Gibbs standard energies of Na + , K + , Rb + and Cs + cations transfer from water to water-ketone solvents are close to each other. It is shown that the effect of acetone and methylethylketone on solvation of the studied electrolytes is practically similar

  18. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangerow, J. von; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.

    2015-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb * ) desorb off the He droplets, Rb + photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb + solvation to full Rb * desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ∼ 600 fs for Rb * in the 6pΣ-state and τ ∼ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb + He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb * He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb + He-states in a photoassociative ionization process

  19. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vangerow, J.; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.

    2015-07-01

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb*) desorb off the He droplets, Rb+ photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb+ solvation to full Rb* desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ˜ 600 fs for Rb* in the 6pΣ-state and τ ˜ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb+He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb*He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb+He-states in a photoassociative ionization process.

  20. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangerow, J. von; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M., E-mail: mudrich@physik.uni-freiburg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-07-21

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb{sup *}) desorb off the He droplets, Rb{sup +} photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb{sup +} solvation to full Rb{sup *} desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ∼ 600 fs for Rb{sup *} in the 6pΣ-state and τ ∼ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb{sup +}He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb{sup *}He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb{sup +}He-states in a photoassociative ionization process.

  1. Crystal structure and packing analysis of nitrofurantoin N,N-dimethylformamide solvate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovski, A., E-mail: aleksandar.cvetkovski@ugd.edu.mk [University Goce Delcev, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Krste Misirkov bb (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ferretti, V. [University of Ferrara, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    The N, N′-dimethylformamide solvated crystal of the drug nitrofurantoin has been prepared and analysed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The two co-crystallized molecules, in the 1 : 1 stoichiometric ratio, are linked by a medium/strong N–H···O hydrogen bond (N···O is 2.759 (3) Å) and a weaker C–H···O interaction to form isolated supramolecular adducts, that in turn are packed into the lattice framework mainly through C–H···O hydrogen bonds. Two-dimensional fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surfaces are used to visualize, analyze and compare intermolecular interactions found in the title compound and in similar structures.

  2. Solvated electron: criticism of a suggested correlation of chemical potential with optical absorption energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhataziz, M.

    1984-01-01

    A recent theoretical treatment of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron, e - sub(s), maintains that rigorously μ 0 >= -0.75 Esub(av), which gives empirical relationship, μ 0 >= -(0.93 +- 0.02)Esub(max). For e - sub(s) in a particular solvent at a temperature and pressure, μ 0 , Esub(av) and Esub(max) are standard chemical potential, average energy of the absorption spectrum and the energy at the absorption maximum respectively. The temperature and pressure effects on the absorption spectrum of e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia do not support the equality sign in the above cited relationships. The implications of inequality expressed above are discussed for e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia. (author)

  3. On the relation between Marcus theory and ultrafast spectroscopy of solvation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Santanu; Galib, Mirza; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    The phenomena of solvent exchange control the process of solvating ions, protons, and charged molecules. Building upon our extension of Marcus' philosophy of electron transfer, we provide a new perspective of ultrafast solvent exchange mechanism around ions measurable by two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. In this theory, solvent rearrangement drives an ion-bound water to an activated state of higher coordination number, triggering ion-water separation that leads to the solvent-bound state of the water molecule. This ion-bound to solvent-bound transition rate for a BF4--water system is computed using ab initio molecular dynamics and Marcus theory, and is found to be in excellent agreement with the 2DIR measurement.

  4. The solvation reaction field for a hydrogen atom in a dielectric continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A reaction field exists even for a nonpolar solute embedded in a spherical cavity within a surrounding homogeneous dielectric continuum. This arises from the tail of the electronic wave function that penetrates beyond the cavity boundary into the dielectric region. This effect, which is neglected or treated only in cursory fashion in most reaction field implementations, is examined in detail for the simple case of a ground state hydrogen atom, where very accurate solutions of the relevant equations can be obtained. Properties considered include the penetration of the electron outside the cavity, the electronic density at the nucleus, the electron binding energy, the electrostatic free energy of solvation, the polarizability, and the vertical 1s→2p excitation energy. Also, the effect of the common approximation of neglecting the volume polarization and treating only the surface polarization contribution to the reaction field is critically evaluated. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  6. [Cognitive abnormalities and cannabis use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowij, Nadia; Pesa, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Evidence that cannabis use impairs cognitive function in humans has been accumulating in recent decades. The purpose of this overview is to update knowledge in this area with new findings from the most recent literature. Literature searches were conducted using the Web of Science database up to February 2010. The terms searched were: "cannabi*" or "marijuana", and "cogniti*" or "memory" or "attention" or "executive function", and human studies were reviewed preferentially over the animal literature. Cannabis use impairs memory, attention, inhibitory control, executive functions and decision making, both during the period of acute intoxication and beyond, persisting for hours, days, weeks or more after the last use of cannabis. Pharmacological challenge studies in humans are elucidating the nature and neural substrates of cognitive changes associated with various cannabinoids. Long-term or heavy cannabis use appears to result in longer-lasting cognitive abnormalities and possibly structural brain alterations. Greater adverse cognitive effects are associated with cannabis use commencing in early adolescence. The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulatory neural mechanisms that modulate processes underlying a range of cognitive functions that are impaired by cannabis. Deficits in human users most likely therefore reflect neuroadaptations and altered functioning of the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  7. Report on abnormal climate in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports of impact on abnormal climate in 2011. It has Introduction with purpose and background of publish and summary of this report. The cause and current state on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011, Measurement and impact against abnormal climate in 2011 to agriculture, land and maritime, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, environment and health, assessment and advice on the policy. It lists the appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011 and media report data.

  8. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common Trombophilic Mutations in Cases with Recurrent Miscarriage. Ahmet Karatas, Recep Eroz, Mustafa Albayrak, Tulay Ozlu, Bulent Cakmak, Fatih Keskin ...

  9. The reactivity of allyl and propargyl alcohols with solvated electrons: temperature and solvent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanassiev, A.M.; Okazaki, K.; Freeman, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The rate constants K 1 for the reaction of solvated electrons with allyl alcohol in a number of hydroxylic solvents differ by up to two orders of magnitude and decrease in the order tert-butyl alcohol > 2-propanol > l-propanol approximately ethanol > methanol approximately ethylene glycol > water. In methanol and ethylene glycol the rate constants (7 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 at 298 K) and activation energies (16 kJ/mol) are equal, in spite of a 32-fold difference in solvent viscosity (0.54 and 17.3 cP, respectively) and 3-fold difference in its activation energy (11 and 32 kJ/mol, respectively). The reaction in tert-butyl alcohol is nearly diffusion controlled and has a high activation energy that is characteristic of transport in that liquid (E 1 = 31 kJ/mol, E sub(eta) = 39 kJ/mol). The activation energies in the other alcohols are all 16 kJ/mol, and it is 14 kJ/mol in water. They do not correlate with transport properties. The solvent effect is connected primarily with the entropy of activation. The rate constants correlate with the solvated electron trap depth. When the electron affinity of the scavenger is small, a favorable configuration of solvent molecules about the electron/scavenger encounter pair is required for the electron jump to take place. The behavior of the rate parameters for propargyl alcohol is similar to that for allyl alcohol, but k 1 , A 1 , and E 1 are larger for the former. The ratio k(propargyl)/k(allyl) at 298 K equals 10.5 in water and decreases through the series, reaching 1.3 in tert-butyl alcohol. Rate parameters for several other scavengers are also reported. (author)

  10. Solvation of a Small Metal-Binding Peptide in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Youngseon; Jung, Younjoon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Structural properties of a small hexapeptide molecule modeled after metal-binding siderochrome immersed in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. We consider two different RTILs, each of which is made up of the same cationic species, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI{sup +}), but different anions, hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}). We investigate how anionic properties such as hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity or hydrogen bonding capability affect the stabilization of the peptide in RTILs. To examine the effect of peptide-RTIL electrostatic interactions on solvation, we also consider a hypothetical solvent BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0}, a non-ionic counter-part of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}. For reference, we investigate solvation structures in common polar solvents, water and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -} and BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0} shows that electrostatic interactions of the peptide and RTIL play a significant role in the conformational fluctuation of the peptide. For example, strong electrostatic interactions between the two favor an extended conformation of the peptide by reducing its structural fluctuations. The hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of RTIL anions also exerts a notable influence; specifically, structural fluctuations of the peptide become reduced in more hydrophilic BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}, compared with those in more hydrophobic BMI{sup +}PF{sub 6}{sup -}. This is ascribed to the good hydrogen-bond accepting power of chloride anions, which enables them to bind strongly to hydroxyl groups of the peptide and to stabilize its structure. Transport properties of the peptide are examined briefly. Translations of the peptide significantly slow down in highly viscous RTILs.

  11. Solvation Dynamics in Different Phases of the Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bibhisan; Satpathi, Sagar; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Hazra, Partha

    2015-09-03

    Reverse hexagonal (HII) liquid crystalline material based on glycerol monooleate (GMO) is considered as a potential carrier for drugs and other important biomolecules due to its thermotropic phase change and excellent morphology. In this work, the dynamics of encapsulated water, which plays important role in stabilization and formation of reverse hexagonal mesophase, has been investigated by time dependent Stokes shift method using Coumarin-343 as a solvation probe. The formation of the reverse hexagonal mesophase (HII) and transformation to the L2 phase have been monitored using small-angle X-ray scattering and polarized light microscopy experiments. REES studies suggest the existence of different polar regions in both HII and L2 systems. The solvation dynamics study inside the reverse hexagonal (HII) phase reveals the existence of two different types of water molecules exhibiting dynamics on a 120-900 ps time scale. The estimated diffusion coefficients of both types of water molecules obtained from the observed dynamics are in good agreement with the measured diffusion coefficient collected from the NMR study. The calculated activation energy is found to be 2.05 kcal/mol, which is associated with coupled rotational-translational water relaxation dynamics upon the transition from "bound" to "quasi-free" state. The observed ∼2 ns faster dynamics of the L2 phase compared to the HII phase may be associated with both the phase transformation as well as thermotropic effect on the relaxation process. Microviscosities calculated from time-resolved anisotropy studies infer that the interface is almost ∼22 times higher viscous than the central part of the cylinder. Overall, our results reveal the unique dynamical features of water inside the cylinder of reverse hexagonal and inverse micellar phases.

  12. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a “first-principles” DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  13. Solvation numbers and hydration constant for thorium(IV) in ethanol-water medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedaira, H.; Idriss, K.A.; Hashem, E.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The solvation number and hydration constant of Th 4+ in ethanol-water medium were determined at 25 degrees C using UV-spectral and electrochemical measurements. A solvate formation equilibrium is demonstrated and characterized. Three molecules of ethanol (S) can bond to the metal cation with strengths comparable to that for H 2 O to form ThS 3 (H 2 O) 3 4+ . Formation of thorium monochelate with lawsone (2-hydroxy-1.4-naphthoquinone) eliminates bonding with alcohol molecules. The dissociation constant of the chelating agent s K a and the formation contant of the monochelated metal ion s K f * that are essentially independent of the solution composition are evaluated. Hydration titrations involving thorium-lawsone monochlate are performed and the data obtained from the changes of pH with solvent composition are analyzed. The solution independent constant, s K f * for thorium-lawsone complex formation in mixed aqueous ethanol is given by log x K f * =vpK a + log s K h - log [LH] - vpH + 3 log v where vpK a is the dissociation constant of the chelating agent LH in the solvent system of v volume fraction of water and s K h is the solution-independent hydration constant of thorium (IV) in the solvent system. Log-values for the constants s K h , s K f * and s K z * are found to be 7.8 ±0.02, 11.38±0.04 and -0.753, respectively

  14. Pressure effect on the amide I frequency of the solvated α-helical structure in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takekiyo, T; Yoshimura, Y; Shimizu, A; Koizumi, T; Kato, M; Taniguchi, Y

    2007-01-01

    As a model system of the pressure dependence of the amide I mode of the solvated α-helical structure in a helical peptide, we have calculated the frequency shifts of the amide I modes as a function of the distance between trans-N-methylacetamide (t-NMA) dimer and a water molecule (d C=O···H-O ) by the density-functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-31G++(d,p) level. Two amide I frequencies at 1652 and 1700 cm -1 were observed under this calculation. The former is ascribed to the amide I mode forming the intermolecular hydrogen bond (H-bond) between t-NMA and H 2 O in addition to the intermolecular H-bond in the t-NMA dimer. The latter is due to the amide I mode forming only the intermolecular H-bond in the t-NMA dimer. We have found that the amide I frequency at 1652 cm -1 shifts to a lower frequency with decreasing d C=O···H-O ) (i.e., increasing pressure), whereas that at 1700 cm -1 shifts to a higher frequency. The amide I frequency shift of 1652 cm -1 is larger than that of 1700 cm -1 by the intermolecular H-bond. Thus, our results clearly indicate that the pressure-induced amide I frequency shift of the solvated α-helical structure correlates with the change in d C=O···H-O )

  15. Electrochemical behaviours of Eu(III/E(II and Ce(IV/Ce(III in H3PO4-H2O media : solvation and complexation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belqat B.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of rare earth elements (REE such as europium and cerium have been make them essential elements in many high-tech components. The electrochemical studies can be presented as an interesting indication for europium and cerium extraction from phosphoric solutions, including solvation and complexation reactions. The normal redox potentials of Eu3+/Eu2+ and Ce4+/Ce3+ systems have been determined in H3PO4-H2O media with various phosphoric acid concentration. The solvation of these elements in phosphoric media is characterized by their transfer activity coefficients "f" calculated from the corresponding normal redox potentials. The corresponding solvation increases with increasing the H3PO4 concentration. For each REE, the electrochemical properties depend on its number of charges and on its basic properties. Results suggest that solvation and complexation of REE phosphates are important in controlling REE concentration.

  16. Solvation dynamics in triton-X-100 and triton-X-165 micelles: Effect of micellar size and hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Pal, Haridas

    2004-09-01

    Dynamic Stokes' shift measurements using coumarin 153 as the fluorescence probe have been carried out to study solvation dynamics in two nonionic micelles, viz., triton-X-100 (TX-100) and triton-X-165 (TX-165). In both the micelles, the solvent relaxation dynamics is biexponential in nature. While the fast solvation time τs1 is seen to be almost similar for both the micelles, the slow solvation time τs2 is found to be appreciably smaller in TX-165 than in TX-100 micelle. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicate that the TX-165 micelles are substantially smaller in size than that of TX-100. Assuming similar core size for both the micelles, as expected from the similar chemical structures of the nonpolar ends for both the surfactants, the Palisade layer is also indicated to be substantially thinner for TX-165 micelles than that of TX-100. The aggregation number of TX-165 micelles is also found to be substantially smaller than that of TX-100 micelles. Fluorescence spectral studies of C153 dye in the two micelles indicate that the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is more polar than that of TX-100 micelles. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicate that the microviscosity in the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is also lower than that of TX-100 micelles. Based on these results it is inferred that the structure of the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is quite loose and have higher degree hydration in comparison to that of TX-100 micelles. Due to these structural differences in the Palisade layers of TX-165 and TX-100 micelles the solvation dynamics is faster in the former micelles than in the latter. It has been further inferred that in the present systems the collective response of the water molecules at somewhat away from the probes is responsible for the faster component of the solvation time, which does not reflect much of the structural changes of the micellar Palisade layer. On the contrary, the slower solvation time component, which is mainly due to

  17. Effects of theophylline administration and intracranial abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine effects of theophylline therapy for recurrent apnoea of prematurity and abnormal early (within the first 24 hours) cranial ultrasound abnormalities on protective neck turning response in preterm infants. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: The Neonatal Unit of Hammersmith Hospital, ...

  18. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  19. Prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39,7%), raised serum ...

  20. Contrast sensitivity abnormalities in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khorrami-Nejad

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Hearing impaired boys are at a greater risk for contrast sensitivity abnormalities than boys with normal hearing. The larger frequency of contrast sensitivity abnormalities in high spatial frequencies than in other frequencies may demonstrate greater defects in the central visual system compared with the periphery in individuals with hearing loss.

  1. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of relevant risk factors is a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a family history of diabetes could be a risk factor for lipid abnormalities in healthy individuals. This study is a ...

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January through March 1993. There is one abnormal occurrence at a nuclear power plant disposed in this report that involved a steam generator tube rupture at Palo Verde Unit 2, and none for fuel cycle facilities. Three abnormal occurrences involving medical misadminstrations (two therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities are also discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  3. Examination of hydrogen-bonding interactions between dissolved solutes and alkylbenzene solvents based on Abraham model correlations derived from measured enthalpies of solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T. [Chemical Institute, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Acree, William E., E-mail: acree@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Brumfield, Michela [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Abraham, Michael H. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution measured for 48 solutes dissolved in mesitylene. • Enthalpies of solution measured for 81 solutes dissolved in p-xylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in mesitylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in p-xylene. • Hydrogen-bonding enthalpies reported for interactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with hydrogen-bond acidic solutes. - Abstract: Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of 48 organic solutes in mesitylene and 81 organic solutes in p-xylene were measured using isothermal solution calorimeter. Enthalpies of solvation for 92 organic vapors and gaseous solutes in mesitylene and for 130 gaseous compounds in p-xylene were determined from the experimental and literature data. Abraham model correlations are determined from the experimental enthalpy of solvation data. The derived correlations describe the experimental gas-to-mesitylene and gas-to-p-xylene solvation enthalpies to within average standard deviations of 1.87 kJ mol{sup −1} and 2.08 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Enthalpies of X-H⋯π (X-O, N, and C) hydrogen bond formation of proton donor solutes (alcohols, amines, chlorinated hydrocarbons etc.) with mesitylene and p-xylene were calculated based on the Abraham solvation equation. Obtained values are in good agreement with the results determined using conventional methods.

  4. A Case-Study Assignment to Teach Theoretical Perspectives in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David V.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an assignment that requires students to organize, prepare, and revise a case study in abnormal behavior. Explains that students employ a single theoretical perspective in preparing a report on a figure from history, literature, the arts, or current events. Discusses the value of the assignment for students. (SG)

  5. Written Assignments for Abnormal Psychology at Howard Community College, Fall 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James

    Designed for students enrolled in an Abnormal Psychology course at Howard Community College (Maryland), this booklet explains the requirements for the course's writing assignments, which are designed to teach the skills of comparison and contrast, analysis, critical thinking, and synthesis. Following an overview of class assignments and…

  6. Expanding the structural landscape of niclosamide: a high Z ' polymorph, two new solvates and monohydrate HA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sovago, Ioana; Bond, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    to be twinned by twofold rotation around that axis. The acetonitrile molecules occupy channels in the structure. A complete structure is provided for niclosamide monohydrate, C13H8Cl2N2O4·H2O, polymorph HA, obtained by Rietveld refinement against laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data. It has been suggested...... that this compound is related to the methanol solvate of niclosamide [Harriss, Wilson & Radosevljevic Evans (2014). Acta Cryst. C70, 758-763], but it is found that the two are not fully isostructural: they contain isostructural two-dimensional layers, but the layers are arranged differently in the two structures....... This suggests that HA may have the potential for polytypism, and features in the Rietveld difference curve indicate that a polytype fully isostructural with the methanol solvate might be present....

  7. Computational solvation analysis of biomolecules in aqueous ionic liquid mixtures : From large flexible proteins to small rigid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Schröder, Christian

    2018-06-01

    Based on their tunable properties, ionic liquids attracted significant interest to replace conventional, organic solvents in biomolecular applications. Following a Gartner cycle, the expectations on this new class of solvents dropped after the initial hype due to the high viscosity, hydrolysis, and toxicity problems as well as their high cost. Since not all possible combinations of cations and anions can be tested experimentally, fundamental knowledge on the interaction of the ionic liquid ions with water and with biomolecules is mandatory to optimize the solvation behavior, the biodegradability, and the costs of the ionic liquid. Here, we report on current computational approaches to characterize the impact of the ionic liquid ions on the structure and dynamics of the biomolecule and its solvation layer to explore the full potential of ionic liquids.

  8. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  9. A hybrid neutron diffraction and computer simulation study on the solvation of N-methylformamide in dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, João M. M.; Soper, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation of N-methylformamide (NMF) by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in a 20% NMF/DMSO liquid mixture is investigated using a combination of neutron diffraction augmented with isotopic substitution and Monte Carlo simulations. The aim is to investigate the solute-solvent interactions and the structure of the solution. The results point to the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) between the H bonded to the N of the amine group of NMF and the O of DMSO particularly strong when compared with other H-bonded liquids. Moreover, a second cooperative H-bond is identified with the S atom of DMSO. As a consequence of these H-bonds, molecules of NMF and DMSO are rather rigidly connected, establishing very stable dimmers in the mixture and very well organized first and second solvation shells.

  10. Interface of the polarizable continuum model of solvation with semi-empirical methods in the GAMESS program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Blædel, Kristoffer; Christensen, Anders S

    2013-01-01

    An interface between semi-empirical methods and the polarized continuum model (PCM) of solvation successfully implemented into GAMESS following the approach by Chudinov et al (Chem. Phys. 1992, 160, 41). The interface includes energy gradients and is parallelized. For large molecules such as ubiq......An interface between semi-empirical methods and the polarized continuum model (PCM) of solvation successfully implemented into GAMESS following the approach by Chudinov et al (Chem. Phys. 1992, 160, 41). The interface includes energy gradients and is parallelized. For large molecules...... such as ubiquitin a reasonable speedup (up to a factor of six) is observed for up to 16 cores. The SCF convergence is greatly improved by PCM for proteins compared to the gas phase....

  11. Establishing linear solvation energy relationships between VOCs and monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters using quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Lin; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2009-08-15

    Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) have been recognized as a useful model for investigating the chemical forces behind the partition coefficients between vapor molecules and absorbents. This study is the first to determine the solvation properties of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs) with different surface ligands. The ratio of partition coefficients/MPC density (K/rho) of 18 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for four different MPCs obtained through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) experiments were used for the LSER model calculations. LSER modeling results indicate that all MPC surfaces showed a statistically significant (pattraction, 4-methoxythiophenol-capped MPCs can also interact with polar organics (s=1.04). Showing a unique preference for the hydrogen bond basicity of vapors (b=1.11), 2-benzothiazolethiol-capped MPCs provide evidence of an intra-molecular, proton-shift mechanism on surface of nano-gold.

  12. Thermodynamics of coproportionation reactions of homogeneous samarium (3) and yttrium (3) nitrates solvates with neutral organic phosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    Reaction heats of homogeneous samarium (3) and yttrium (3) nitrate solvates coproportionation with neutral organophosphoric compounds (tri-n.-butylphosphate, diisooctylmethylphosphonate, diisoamylmethylphosphonate) at T=298.15 K in hexane have been measured by thermochemical method. It has been ascertained that enthalpies of coproportionation reactions practically do not depend on the nature, concentration of rare earth metal (3) nitrate solvates in hexane, nature of neutral organophosphoric compound and constitute 1.1±-.2 kJ/mol. The Gibbs free energy of coproportionation reactions is -5.43 kJ/mol, while entropy of the reactions in 14.5±0.7 J/mol·K. 8 refs., 1 tab

  13. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism

  14. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-06-01

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  15. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  16. Enthalpies of fusion and enthalpies of solvation of aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives: Estimation of sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@kpfu.ru; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Buzyurov, Aleksey V.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.

    2016-03-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives (ArHD) were measured at 298.15 K. • Solution enthalpies of ArHD in benzene at 298.15 K are equal to their fusion enthalpy at melting point. • Sublimation enthalpies of 80 ArHD were calculated as a sum of fusion and solvation enthalpies. • Obtained sublimation enthalpies are in good agreement with the recommended literature data. - Abstract: Enthalpy of sublimation of solid compound can be found using the values of solution enthalpy and solvation enthalpy in any solvent. In this work enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of a number of aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives in benzene were measured at 298.15 K. Comparison between experimental and literature solution enthalpies in benzene at 298.15 K and fusion enthalpies at melting temperature of aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives showed, that these values are approximately equal. Thereby, fusion enthalpies at melting temperature can be used instead of their solution enthalpies in benzene at 298.15 K for calculation of sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K. Solvation enthalpies in benzene at 298.15 K required for this procedure were calculated using group additivity scheme. The sublimation enthalpies of 80 aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives at 298.15 K were evaluated as a difference between fusion enthalpies at melting temperature and solvation enthalpies in benzene at 298.15 K. Obtained in this work values of sublimation enthalpy at 298.15 K for studied compounds were in a good agreement with available literature data.

  17. Interface of the polarizable continuum model of solvation with semi-empirical methods in the GAMESS program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Steinmann

    Full Text Available An interface between semi-empirical methods and the polarized continuum model (PCM of solvation successfully implemented into GAMESS following the approach by Chudinov et al (Chem. Phys. 1992, 160, 41. The interface includes energy gradients and is parallelized. For large molecules such as ubiquitin a reasonable speedup (up to a factor of six is observed for up to 16 cores. The SCF convergence is greatly improved by PCM for proteins compared to the gas phase.

  18. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson–Boltzmann electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Wen, Jiayi; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric boundary based implicit-solvent models provide efficient descriptions of coarse-grained effects, particularly the electrostatic effect, of aqueous solvent. Recent years have seen the initial success of a new such model, variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) [Dzubiella, Swanson, and McCammon Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 087802 (2006) and J. Chem. Phys. 124, 084905 (2006)], in capturing multiple dry and wet hydration states, describing the subtle electrostatic effect in hydrophobic interactions, and providing qualitatively good estimates of solvation free energies. Here, we develop a phase-field VISM to the solvation of charged molecules in aqueous solvent to include more flexibility. In this approach, a stable equilibrium molecular system is described by a phase field that takes one constant value in the solute region and a different constant value in the solvent region, and smoothly changes its value on a thin transition layer representing a smeared solute-solvent interface or dielectric boundary. Such a phase field minimizes an effective solvation free-energy functional that consists of the solute-solvent interfacial energy, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson–Boltzmann theory. We apply our model and methods to the solvation of single ions, two parallel plates, and protein complexes BphC and p53/MDM2 to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of our approach at different levels. With a diffuse dielectric boundary, our new approach can describe the dielectric asymmetry in the solute-solvent interfacial region. Our theory is developed based on rigorous mathematical studies and is also connected to the Lum–Chandler–Weeks theory (1999). We discuss these connections and possible extensions of our theory and methods. PMID:26723595

  19. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Wen, Jiayi; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-12-28

    Dielectric boundary based implicit-solvent models provide efficient descriptions of coarse-grained effects, particularly the electrostatic effect, of aqueous solvent. Recent years have seen the initial success of a new such model, variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) [Dzubiella, Swanson, and McCammon Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 087802 (2006) and J. Chem. Phys. 124, 084905 (2006)], in capturing multiple dry and wet hydration states, describing the subtle electrostatic effect in hydrophobic interactions, and providing qualitatively good estimates of solvation free energies. Here, we develop a phase-field VISM to the solvation of charged molecules in aqueous solvent to include more flexibility. In this approach, a stable equilibrium molecular system is described by a phase field that takes one constant value in the solute region and a different constant value in the solvent region, and smoothly changes its value on a thin transition layer representing a smeared solute-solvent interface or dielectric boundary. Such a phase field minimizes an effective solvation free-energy functional that consists of the solute-solvent interfacial energy, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. We apply our model and methods to the solvation of single ions, two parallel plates, and protein complexes BphC and p53/MDM2 to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of our approach at different levels. With a diffuse dielectric boundary, our new approach can describe the dielectric asymmetry in the solute-solvent interfacial region. Our theory is developed based on rigorous mathematical studies and is also connected to the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory (1999). We discuss these connections and possible extensions of our theory and methods.

  20. A chiral aluminum solvating agent (CASA) for 1H NMR chiral analysis of alcohols at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min-Seob; Jang, Sumin; Kim, Hyunwoo

    2018-03-16

    A chiral aluminum solvating agent (CASA) was demonstrated to be a general and efficient reagent for 1H NMR chiral analysis of alcohols. The sodium salt of the CASA (CASA-Na) showed a complete baseline peak separation of the hydroxyl group for various chiral alcohols including primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols with alkyl and aryl substituents in CD3CN. Due to the weak intermolecular interaction, 1H NMR measurement at low temperature (-40 to 10 °C) was required.

  1. Mode coupling theory analysis of electrolyte solutions: Time dependent diffusion, intermediate scattering function, and ion solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-03-28

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) intermediate scattering function of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding intermediate scattering function evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of intermediate scattering function, F(k, t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behavior allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times-the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. The solvation time correlation and ion-ion intermediate scattering function indeed exhibit highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behavior at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  2. Formation of clusters (ions solvated with products of radiolysis) during irradiation of certain chloralkanes in the condensed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhov, F.F.; Karatun, A.A.; Slovokhotova, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    Using the infrared spectroscopy method, the radiolysis of the 2-chloropropane and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane was investigated in various phase states and in argon matrix at 15 and 77 K. A conclusion is drawn that the reaction of the radiation dehydrochlorination in the chloralkanes investigated occurs under certain conditions in the vicinity of ions, mostly; as this takes place, unique clusters composed of radiolysis products, i.e. ions solvated with complexes of alkane and hydrogen chloride are being formed. (author)

  3. Generalized linear solvation energy model applied to solute partition coefficients in ionic liquid-supercritical carbon dioxide systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Planeta, Josef; Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Šťavíková, Lenka; Roth, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1250, SI (2012), s. 54-62 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/11/0138; GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522; GA ČR(CZ) GPP503/11/P523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : ionic liquid * supercritical carbon dioxide * solvation energy model Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 4.612, year: 2012

  4. Continuum model of non-equilibrium solvation and solvent effect on ultra-fast processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangyuan; Fu Kexiang; Zhu Quan

    2006-01-01

    In the past 50 years, non-equilibrium solvation theory for ultra-fast processes such as electron transfer and light absorption/emission has attracted particular interest. A great deal of research efforts was made in this area and various models which give reasonable qualitative descriptions for such as solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer and spectral shift in solution, were developed within the framework of continuous medium theory. In a series of publications by the authors, we clarified that the expression of the non-equilibrium electrostatic free energy that is at the dominant position of non-equilibrium solvation and serves as the basis of various models, however, was incorrectly formulated. In this work, the authors argue that reversible charging work integration was inappropriately applied in the past to an irreversible path linking the equilibrium or the non-equilibrium state. Because the step from the equilibrium state to the nonequilibrium state is factually thermodynamically irreversible, the conventional expression for non-equilibrium free energy that was deduced in different ways is unreasonable. Here the authors derive the non-equilibrium free energy to a quite different form according to Jackson integral formula. Such a difference throws doubts to the models including the famous Marcus two-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer and the Lippert-Mataga equation for spectral shift. By introducing the concept of 'spring energy' arising from medium polarizations, the energy constitution of the non-equilibrium state is highlighted. For a solute-solvent system, the authors separate the total electrostatic energy into different components: the self-energies of solute charge and polarized charge, the interaction energy between them and the 'spring energy' of the solvent polarization. With detailed reasoning and derivation, our formula for non-equilibrium free energy can be reached through different ways. Based on the

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of solubility, solvation and partitioning processes of some sulfonamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlovich, German L., E-mail: glp@isc-ras.r [Department of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, Institute of Physiologically Active Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Ryzhakov, Alex M. [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Strakhova, Nadezda N.; Kazachenko, Vladimir P. [Department of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, Institute of Physiologically Active Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Schaper, Klaus-Juergen [Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, D-23845 Borstel (Germany); Raevsky, Oleg A. [Department of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, Institute of Physiologically Active Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The thermodynamic aspects of sublimation processes of some sulfonamides were studied by investigating the temperature dependence of vapor pressure using the transpiration method. {yields} Solubility processes of the compounds in water, phosphate buffer with pH 7.4 and n-octanol were investigated and corresponding thermodynamic functions were calculated as well. {yields} Thermodynamic characteristics of the sulfonamides solvation were evaluated. - Abstract: The thermodynamic aspects of sublimation processes of three sulfonamides with the general structures C{sub 6}H{sub 5}-SO{sub 2}NH-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-R (R = 4-NO{sub 2}) and 4-NH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-SO{sub 2}NH-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-R (R = 4-NO{sub 2}; 4-CN) were studied by investigating the temperature dependence of vapor pressure using the transpiration method. These data together with those obtained earlier for C{sub 6}H{sub 5}-SO{sub 2}NH-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-R (R = 4-Cl) and 4-NH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-SO{sub 2}NH-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-R (R = 4-Cl; 4-OMe; 4-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}) were analyzed and compared. A correlation was derived between sublimation Gibbs free energies and the sum of H-bond acceptor factors of the molecules. Solubility processes of the compounds in water, phosphate buffer with pH 7.4 and n-octanol (as phases modeling various drug delivery pathways) were investigated and corresponding thermodynamic functions were calculated as well. Thermodynamic characteristics of the sulfonamides solvation were evaluated. Also in this case a correlation between solubility/solvation Gibbs free energy values and the sum of H-bond acceptor factors was observed. For the sulfonamides with various substituents at para-position the processes of transfer from one solvent (water or buffer) to n-octanol were studied by a diagram method combined with analysis of enthalpic and entropic terms. Distinguishing between enthalpy and entropy, as is possible through the present approach, leads to the insight

  6. Comparison of the Marcus and Pekar partitions in the context of non-equilibrium, polarizable-continuum solvation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Herbert, John M.; Mewes, Jan-Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Marcus and Pekar partitions are common, alternative models to describe the non-equilibrium dielectric polarization response that accompanies instantaneous perturbation of a solute embedded in a dielectric continuum. Examples of such a perturbation include vertical electronic excitation and vertical ionization of a solution-phase molecule. Here, we provide a general derivation of the accompanying polarization response, for a quantum-mechanical solute described within the framework of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) of electrostatic solvation. Although the non-equilibrium free energy is formally equivalent within the two partitions, albeit partitioned differently into “fast” versus “slow” polarization contributions, discretization of the PCM integral equations fails to preserve certain symmetries contained in these equations (except in the case of the conductor-like models or when the solute cavity is spherical), leading to alternative, non-equivalent matrix equations. Unlike the total equilibrium solvation energy, however, which can differ dramatically between different formulations, we demonstrate that the equivalence of the Marcus and Pekar partitions for the non-equilibrium solvation correction is preserved to high accuracy. Differences in vertical excitation and ionization energies are <0.2 eV (and often <0.01 eV), even for systems specifically selected to afford a large polarization response. Numerical results therefore support the interchangeability of the Marcus and Pekar partitions, but also caution against relying too much on the fast PCM charges for interpretive value, as these charges differ greatly between the two partitions, especially in polar solvents

  7. Comparison of the Marcus and Pekar partitions in the context of non-equilibrium, polarizable-continuum solvation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Herbert, John M., E-mail: herbert@chemistry.ohio-state.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mewes, Jan-Michael; Dreuw, Andreas [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Ruprechts-Karls University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-28

    The Marcus and Pekar partitions are common, alternative models to describe the non-equilibrium dielectric polarization response that accompanies instantaneous perturbation of a solute embedded in a dielectric continuum. Examples of such a perturbation include vertical electronic excitation and vertical ionization of a solution-phase molecule. Here, we provide a general derivation of the accompanying polarization response, for a quantum-mechanical solute described within the framework of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) of electrostatic solvation. Although the non-equilibrium free energy is formally equivalent within the two partitions, albeit partitioned differently into “fast” versus “slow” polarization contributions, discretization of the PCM integral equations fails to preserve certain symmetries contained in these equations (except in the case of the conductor-like models or when the solute cavity is spherical), leading to alternative, non-equivalent matrix equations. Unlike the total equilibrium solvation energy, however, which can differ dramatically between different formulations, we demonstrate that the equivalence of the Marcus and Pekar partitions for the non-equilibrium solvation correction is preserved to high accuracy. Differences in vertical excitation and ionization energies are <0.2 eV (and often <0.01 eV), even for systems specifically selected to afford a large polarization response. Numerical results therefore support the interchangeability of the Marcus and Pekar partitions, but also caution against relying too much on the fast PCM charges for interpretive value, as these charges differ greatly between the two partitions, especially in polar solvents.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of thermodynamic stability and dynamics of [Li(glyme)]+ complex in lithium-glyme solvate ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Wataru; Hatanaka, Yuta; Hirakawa, Masashi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Ueno, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2018-05-01

    Equimolar mixtures of glymes and organic lithium salts are known to produce solvate ionic liquids, in which the stability of the [Li(glyme)]+ complex plays an important role in determining the ionic dynamics. Since these mixtures have attractive physicochemical properties for application as electrolytes, it is important to understand the dependence of the stability of the [Li(glyme)]+ complex on the ion dynamics. A series of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations has been conducted to investigate the dynamic properties of these solvate ionic liquids. Successful solvate ionic liquids with high stability of the [Li(glyme)]+ complex have been shown to have enhanced ion dynamics. Li-glyme pair exchange rarely occurs: its characteristic time is longer than that of ion diffusion by one or two orders of magnitude. Li-glyme pair exchange most likely occurs through cluster formation involving multiple [Li(glyme)]+ pairs. In this process, multiple exchanges likely take place in a concerted manner without the production of energetically unfavorable free glyme or free Li+ ions.

  9. 17O NMR Studies of the Solvation State of cis/trans Isomers of Amides and Model Protected Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Vakka, Constantina; Troganis, Anastasios

    1996-06-01

    17O shielding constants have been utilized to investigate solvation differences of the cis/trans isomers ofN-methylformamide (NMF),N-ethylformamide (NEF), andtert-butylformamide (TBF) in a variety of solvents with particular emphasis on aqueous solution. Comparisons are also made with protected peptides of the formulas CH3CO-YOH, CH3CO-Y-NHR (Y = Pro, Sar), and CH3CO-Y-Z-NHR (Y = Pro; Z =D-Ala) selectively enriched in17O at the acetyl oxygen atom. Hydration at the amide oxygen induces large and specific modifications of the17O shielding constants, which are practically the same for the cis and trans isomers of NMF, NEF, and the protected peptides. Fortert-butylformamide, the strong deshielding of the trans isomer compared to that of the cis isomer may be attributed to an out-of-plane (torsion-angle) deformation of the amide bond and/or a significant reduction of solvation of the trans isomer due to steric inhibition of the bulkytert-butyl group. Good linear correlation between δ(17O) of amides and δ(17O) of acetone was found for different solvents which have varying dielectric constants and solvation abilities. Sum-over-states calculations, within the solvaton model, underestimate effects of the dielectric constant of the medium on17O shielding, while finite-perturbation-theory calculations give good agreement with the experiment.

  10. 17O NMR Studies of the Solvation State of cissolidustrans Isomers of Amides and Model Protected Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerothanassis; Vakka; Troganis

    1996-06-01

    17O shielding constants have been utilized to investigate solvation differences of the cissolidustrans isomers of N-methylformamide (NMF), N-ethylformamide (NEF), and tert-butylformamide (TBF) in a variety of solvents with particular emphasis on aqueous solution. Comparisons are also made with protected peptides of the formulas CH3CO-YOH, CH3CO-Y-NHR (Y = Pro, Sar), and CH3CO-Y-Z-NHR (Y = Pro; Z = D-Ala) selectively enriched in 17O at the acetyl oxygen atom. Hydration at the amide oxygen induces large and specific modifications of the 17O shielding constants, which are practically the same for the cis and trans isomers of NMF, NEF, and the protected peptides. For tert-butylformamide, the strong deshielding of the trans isomer compared to that of the cis isomer may be attributed to an out-of-plane (torsion-angle) deformation of the amide bond andsolidusor a significant reduction of solvation of the trans isomer due to steric inhibition of the bulky tert-butyl group. Good linear correlation between delta(17O) of amides and delta(17O) of acetone was found for different solvents which have varying dielectric constants and solvation abilities. Sum-over-states calculations, within the solvaton model, underestimate effects of the dielectric constant of the medium on 17O shielding, while finite-perturbation-theory calculations give good agreement with the experiment.

  11. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Mingzhang; Mostafavi, M.; Lampre, I.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol -1 ·m 2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures. (authors)

  12. Differential solvation of intrinsically disordered linkers drives the formation of spatially organized droplets in ternary systems of linear multivalent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Tyler S.; Holehouse, Alex S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2018-04-01

    Intracellular biomolecular condensates are membraneless organelles that encompass large numbers of multivalent protein and nucleic acid molecules. The bodies assemble via a combination of liquid–liquid phase separation and gelation. A majority of condensates included multiple components and show multilayered organization as opposed to being well-mixed unitary liquids. Here, we put forward a simple thermodynamic framework to describe the emergence of spatially organized droplets in multicomponent systems comprising of linear multivalent polymers also known as associative polymers. These polymers, which mimic proteins and/or RNA have the architecture of domains or motifs known as stickers that are interspersed by flexible spacers known as linkers. Using a minimalist numerical model for a four-component system, we have identified features of linear multivalent molecules that are necessary and sufficient for generating spatially organized droplets. We show that differences in sequence-specific effective solvation volumes of disordered linkers between interaction domains enable the formation of spatially organized droplets. Molecules with linkers that are preferentially solvated are driven to the interface with the bulk solvent, whereas molecules that have linkers with negligible effective solvation volumes form cores in the core–shell architectures that emerge in the minimalist four-component systems. Our modeling has relevance for understanding the physical determinants of spatially organized membraneless organelles.

  13. Prediction of heart abnormality using MLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Januar, Yulni; Mat, Muhammad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Awang, Mat Kamil

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality does not choose gender, age and races when it strikes. With no warning signs or symptoms, it can result to a sudden death of the patient. Generally, heart's irregular electrical activity is defined as heart abnormality. Via implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network, this paper tries to develop a program that allows the detection of heart abnormality activity. Utilizing several training algorithms with Purelin activation function, an amount of heartbeat signals received through the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be employed to condition the MLP network.

  14. Hysterosalpingography: analysis of 473 abnormal examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petta, C.A.; Costa-Paiva, L.H.S. da; Pinto-Neto, A.M.; Martins, R.; Souza, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors reviewed the reports of 4/3 abnormal hysterosalpingographies from 1,200 medical records of patients at the sterility and infertility out-patient clinic of the School of Medical Sciences of the State University of Campinas (Unicamp), from July, 1974 to December, 1981. The objective was to evaluate the incidence and main alterations diagnosed by hysterosalpingography. The most frequent findings were tuboperitoneal factors in 91% of the examinations, uterine cavity abnormalities in 17.4% and cervical factor in 6.3% of the cases. The examinations showed a great incident of tuboperitoneal abnormalities as cause of sterility from lower social classes. (author) [pt

  15. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Brain and bone abnormalities of thanatophoric dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elka; Blaser, Susan; Shannon, Patrick; Widjaja, Elysa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the imaging findings of skeletal and brain abnormalities in thanatophoric dwarfism, a lethal form of dysplastic dwarfism. The bony abnormalities associated with thanatophoric dwarfism include marked shortening of the tubular bones and ribs. Abnormal temporal lobe development is a common associated feature and can be visualized as early as the second trimester. It is important to assess the brains of fetuses with suspected thanatophoric dwarfism because the presence of associated brain malformations can assist in the antenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dwarfism.

  17. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality measurem...... is found that satisfies: the distance between its local space and the normal space is large. We evaluate our method on two public benchmark datasets: UCSD and Subway Entrance datasets. The comparison to the state-of-the-art methods validate our method's effectiveness....

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Clinical Genetics Department, Human Genetics & Genome Research Division, ... neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the ... level and by developmental changes2. .... for IQ as a confounding factor.30.

  19. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1990. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none involving a nuclear power plant. There were five abnormal occurrences at NRC licensees: (1) deficiencies in brachytherapy program; (2) a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; (3) a medical diagnostic misadministration; (4) administration of iodine-131 to a lactating female with subsequent uptake by her infant; and (5) a medical therapy misadministration. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported an abnormal occurrence involving a medical diagnostic misadministration. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported occurrence

  20. Evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities and common trombophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Infections, genetic, endocrine, anatomic and immunologic problems have been suggested as causes for RM. ... Metaphase chromosome preparations from the .... The rate of karyotypically abnormal abortion specimens.

  1. On two abnormal sharks from Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.

    The description of the two abnormal sharks, Carchariaswalbeehmi and Eulamia dussumieri collected from Gujarat, India, is given Of these C walbeehmi was double-headed The other shark E dussumieri had thumb snouted albino...

  2. Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Delivery Introduction to Complications of Labor and Delivery Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus Amniotic Fluid Embolism Excessive Uterine Bleeding at Delivery Fetal Distress Inverted Uterus Labor That ...

  3. Morphological Abnormalities of Thalamic Subnuclei in Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magon, Stefano; May, Arne; Stankewitz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The thalamus contains third-order relay neurons of the trigeminal system, and animal models as well as preliminary imaging studies in small cohorts of migraine patients have suggested a role of the thalamus in headache pathophysiology. However, larger studies using advanced imaging te...... is a disorder of the CNS in which not only is brain function abnormal, but also brain structure is undergoing significant remodeling....... a fully automated multiatlas approach. Deformation-based shape analysis was performed to localize surface abnormalities. Differences between patients with migraine and healthy subjects were assessed using an ANCOVA model. After correction for multiple comparisons, performed using the false discovery rate.......9) was observed in patients. This large-scale study indicates structural thalamic abnormalities in patients with migraine. The thalamic nuclei with abnormal volumes are densely connected to the limbic system. The data hence lend support to the view that higher-order integration systems are altered in migraine...

  4. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Medicine. Vol. ... Medicine, Harvard University, U.S.A. ... abnormalities such as corneal opacities (0.5%) and allergic conjunctivitis (3.4%) while others had posterior .... were administered to those with treatable eye disease.

  5. Errata :Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent Abortions in Lagos, Nigeria. Akinde OR, Daramola A O, Taiwo I A, Afolayan M O and Akinsola Af. Sonographic Mammary Gland Density Pattern in Women in Selected ommunities of Southern Nigeria.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, ...

  7. Normal and Abnormal Behavior in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, Miriam R.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation of normal and abnormal behavior in the period to three years of age involves many variables. Parental attitudes, determined by many factors such as previous childrearing experience, the bonding process, parental psychological status and parental temperament, often influence the labeling of behavior as normal or abnormal. This article describes the forms of crying, sleep and wakefulness, and affective responses from infancy to three years of age.

  8. Syringomyelia and Craniocervical Junction Abnormalities in Chihuahuas

    OpenAIRE

    Kiviranta, A.‐M.; Rusbridge, C.; Laitinen‐Vapaavuori, O.; Hielm‐Björkman, A.; Lappalainen, A.K.; Knowler, S.P.; Jokinen, T.S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chiari-like malformation (CM) and syringomyelia (SM) are widely reported in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Griffon Bruxellois dogs. Increasing evidence indicates that CM and SM also occur in other small and toy breed dogs, such as Chihuahuas. Objectives: To describe the presence of SM and craniocervical junction (CCJ) abnormalities in Chihuahuas and to evaluate the possible association of CCJ abnormalities with SM. To describe CM/SM-related clinical signs and neuro...

  9. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  10. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl; Murphy, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  11. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  12. Abnormal ''Contamination' Levels On Garden Appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, U.; Levinson, S.; Elmelech, V.; Pelled, O.; Tshuva, A.; Laichter, Y.

    1999-01-01

    During routine contamination checks we encountered an abnormal high level of Alpha and Beta emitting radioisotopes on working gloves of employees of the gardening department. It came out that the source was due to ''contamination'' levels on steering wheels of some gardening machines. In order to ensure that no real contamination of these workers was involved , a series of checks was started to identity the source of the abnormal levels found during monitoring

  13. Visual field abnormalities in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, V H; Heron, J R

    1980-01-01

    Visual fields were examined with a tangent screen in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or optic neuritis (ON). Visual fields were abnormal in all patients with definite MS, 94% with probable MS and 81% with possible MS. Three-quarters of the MS patients with no history of visual symptoms had abnormal fields. The commonest defect found was an arcuate scotoma. As a diagnostic test of visual pathway involvement in MS, tangent screen examination compares favourably with more sophisticated ...

  14. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  16. Explorers Presentation: Explaining the Tides to Children

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the tides to children Presentation includes information about: Orbits of the Earth, Moon and Sun; Moon phases and the lunar cycle; Gravity; Gravity and the tide; Types of tides; The tides and me!; Tide tables; Extra insight

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  18. A model to explain human voice production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Bôas, C. S. N.; Gobara, S. T.

    2018-05-01

    This article presents a device constructed with low-cost material to demonstrate and explain voice production. It also provides a contextualized, interdisciplinary approach to introduce the study of sound waves.

  19. Using Expectancy Theory to Explain Performance Appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... appraisal conducting style, the relation between the performance appraisal system and task ... the article first explains the theory model which is based expectancy theory. II. ... which in return lead to rewards. According to [12],.

  20. Explaining body size beliefs in anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive neuropsychiatry has had much success in providing theoretical models for the causal origins of many delusional beliefs. Recently, it has been suggested that some anorexia nervosa patients' beliefs about their own body size should be considered delusions. As such, it seems high time the methods of cognitive neuropsychiatry were turned to modelling the false body size beliefs of anorexics. In this paper, I adopt an empiricist approach to modelling the causal origins of false body size beliefs in anorexia. Within the background of cognitive neuropsychiatry, empiricist models claim that abnormal beliefs are grounded by abnormal experiences bearing similar content. I discuss the kinds of abnormal experiences of body size anorexics suffer from which could ground their false beliefs about body size. These oversized experiences come in three varieties: false self-other body comparisons, spontaneous mental imagery of a fat body and distorted perception of affordances. Further theoretical and empirical research into the oversized experiences which anorexics suffer from presents a promising avenue for understanding and treating the disorder.

  1. Abnormal sympathetic nerve activity in women exposed to cigarette smoke: a potential mechanism to explain increased cardiac risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Park, Jeanie; Agrawal, Harsh; Gornbein, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-15

    In women, cardiac deaths attributable to tobacco exposure have reached the same high levels as men. Normally, sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) fluctuates according to the menstrual phase, but in habitual smokers, SNA levels remain constant. Our purpose is to extend these observations to other groups of women exposed to tobacco smoke and to explore potential mechanisms. We hypothesize that women exposed to secondhand smoke, but not former smokers, have nonfluctuating SNA compared with never smokers, and that impaired baroreflex suppression of SNA, and/or heightened central SNA responses, underlie this nonfluctuating SNA. We also hypothesize that female smokers have impaired nocturnal blood pressure dipping, normally mediated by modulation of SNA. In 49 females (19 never, 12 current, 9 former, 9 passive smokers), SNA was recorded (microneurography) during high- and low-hormone ovarian phases at rest, during pharmacological baroreflex testing, and during the cold pressor test (CPT). Twenty-four hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring was performed. Current and passive smokers, but not former smokers, had a nonfluctuating pattern of SNA, unlike never smokers in whom SNA varied with the menstrual phase. Baroreflex control of SNA was significantly blunted in current smokers, independent of menstrual phase. In passive smokers, SNA response to CPT was markedly increased. Nondipping was unexpectedly high in all groups. SNA does not vary during the menstrual cycle in active and passive smokers, unlike never and former smokers. Baroreflex control of SNA is blunted in current smokers, whereas SNA response to CPT is heightened in passive smokers. Smoking cessation is associated with return of the altered SNA pattern to normal.

  2. White matter abnormalities in tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Academic Dept. of Radiology; Bolton, P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Section of Developmental Psychiatry; Verity, C. [Addenbrooke`s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the range of white matter abnormalities in children with tuberous sclerosis complex by means of MR imaging. Material and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on the basis of MR imaging findings in 20 cases of tuberous sclerosis complex in children aged 17 years or younger. Results: White matter abnormalities were present in 19/20 (95%) cases of tuberous sclerosis complex. These were most frequently (19/20 cases) found in relation to cortical tubers in the supratentorial compartment. White matter abnormalities related to tubers were found in the cerebellum in 3/20 (15%) cases. White matter abnormalities described as radial migration lines were found in relation to 5 tubers in 3 (15%) children. In 4/20 (20%) cases, white matter abnormalities were found that were not related to cortical tubers. These areas had the appearance of white matter cysts in 3 cases and infarction in the fourth. In the latter case there was a definable event in the clinical history, supporting the diagnosis of stroke. Conclusion: A range of white matter abnormalities were found by MR imaging in tuberous sclerosis complex, the commonest being gliosis and hypomyelination related to cortical tubers. Radial migration lines were seen infrequently in relation to cortical tubers and these are thought to represent heterotopic glia and neurons along the expected path of cortical migration. (orig.)

  3. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  4. Crystal structures of two solvates of (18-crown-6potassium acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Liebing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystal and molecular strutures of two solvated forms of [K(18c6]OAc (18c6 = 18-crown-6 = 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane and OAc = acetate were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, namely (acetato-κ2O,O′(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane-κ6Opotassium dihydrate, [K(CH3COO(C12H24O6]·2H2O (1 and (acetato-κ2O,O′aqua(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane-κ6Opotassium acetic acid monosolvate [K(CH3COO(C12H24O6(H2O]·CH3COOH (2. In both compounds, the acetate anion is bonded to the potassium ion in a chelating fashion and the metal atom is consequently slightly displaced from the O6 plane of the crown ether. In the crystals, O—H...O hydrogen bonds lead to a polymeric ladder structure in the dihydrate 1, while the acetic acid hydrate 2 features inversion dimers.

  5. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids.

  6. Solvation of positive ions in water: the dominant role of water-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krekeler, Christian; Site, Luigi Delle

    2007-01-01

    Local polarization effects, induced by monovalent and divalent positive ions in water, influence (and in turn are influenced by) the large-scale structural properties of the solvent. Experiments can only distinguish this process of interplay in a generic qualitative way. Instead, first-principles calculations can address the question at both the electronic and atomistic scale, accounting for electronic polarization as well as geometrical conformations. For this reason we study the extension of the scales' interconnection by means of first-principle Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics applied to systems of different size. In this way we identify the general aspects dominating the physics of the first solvation shell and their connection to the effects related to the formation of the outer shells and eventually the bulk. We show that while the influence of the ions is extended to the first shell only, the water-water interaction is instead playing a dominant role even within the first shell independently of the size or the charge of the ion. (fast track communication)

  7. Thermodynamics of DL-alanine solvation in water-dimethylsulfoxide mixtures at 298.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Mahali, K.; Mondal, S.; Dolui, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    In this study we mainly discuss the transfer Gibbs free energy Δ G {/t 0}( i) and Δ S {/t 0}( i)entropy of DL-alanine at 298.15 K and consequently the involved chemical transfer free energy (Δ G {/t,ch 0}( i)) and entropy ( TΔ S {/t,ch 0}( i)) in aqueous mixtures of dimethylsulfoxide are discussed to clarify the solvation chemistry of DL-alanine. For the evaluation of these energy terms, solubility of this amino acid has been measured by formol titrimetry at five equidistant temperatures i.e., from 288.15 to 308.15 K in different composition of this mixed solvent system. The various solvent parameters as well as thermodynamic parameters like molar volume, density, dipole moment and solvent diameter of this solvent system have also been reported here. The chemical effects of the transfer Gibbs energies (Δ G {/t,ch 0}( i)) and entropies of transfer ( TΔ S {/t,ch 0}( i)) have been obtained after elimination of cavity effect and dipole-dipole interaction effects from the total transfer energies. Here the chemical contribution of transfer energetics of DL-alanine is mainly guided by the composite effects of increased dispersion interaction, basicity effect and decreased acidity, hydrogen bonding effects, hydrophilic hydration and hydrophobic hydration of aqueous DMSO mixtures as compared to that of reference solvent, water.

  8. The cavity electromagnetic field within the polarizable continuum model of solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipolo, Silvio, E-mail: silvio.pipolo@nano.cnr.it [Center S3, CNR Institute of Nanoscience, Modena (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy); Corni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.corni@nano.cnr.it [Center S3, CNR Institute of Nanoscience, Modena (Italy); Cammi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.cammi@unipr.it [Department of Chemistry, Università degli studi di Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-28

    Cavity field effects can be defined as the consequences of the solvent polarization induced by the probing electromagnetic field upon spectroscopies of molecules in solution, and enter in the definitions of solute response properties. The polarizable continuum model of solvation (PCM) has been extended in the past years to address the cavity-field issue through the definition of an effective dipole moment that couples to the external electromagnetic field. We present here a rigorous derivation of such cavity-field treatment within the PCM starting from the general radiation-matter Hamiltonian within inhomogeneous dielectrics and recasting the interaction term to a dipolar form within the long wavelength approximation. To this aim we generalize the Göppert-Mayer and Power-Zienau-Woolley gauge transformations, usually applied in vacuo, to the case of a cavity vector potential. Our derivation also allows extending the cavity-field correction in the long-wavelength limit to the velocity gauge through the definition of an effective linear momentum operator. Furthermore, this work sets the basis for the general PCM treatment of the electromagnetic cavity field, capable to describe the radiation-matter interaction in dielectric media beyond the long-wavelength limit, providing also a tool to investigate spectroscopic properties of more complex systems such as molecules close to large nanoparticles.

  9. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, Lee

    2012-09-28

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to drive asymmetric solvent response to a solute charge: a static potential contribution similar to the liquid-vapor potential, and a steric contribution associated with a water molecule's structure and charge distribution. In this work, we use free-energy perturbation molecular-dynamics calculations in explicit water to show that these mechanisms act in complementary regimes; the large static potential (∼44 kJ/mol/e) dominates asymmetric response for deeply buried charges, and the steric contribution dominates for charges near the solute-solvent interface. Therefore, both mechanisms must be included in order to fully account for asymmetric solvation in general. Our calculations suggest that the steric contribution leads to a remarkable deviation from the popular "linear response" model in which the reaction potential changes linearly as a function of charge. In fact, the potential varies in a piecewise-linear fashion, i.e., with different proportionality constants depending on the sign of the charge. This discrepancy is significant even when the charge is completely buried, and holds for solutes larger than single atoms. Together, these mechanisms suggest that implicit-solvent models can be improved using a combination of affine response (an offset due to the static potential) and piecewise-linear response (due to the steric contribution).

  10. An experimental point of view on hydration/solvation in halophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talon, Romain; Coquelle, Nicolas; Madern, Dominique; Girard, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Protein-solvent interactions govern the behaviors of proteins isolated from extreme halophiles. In this work, we compared the solvent envelopes of two orthologous tetrameric malate dehydrogenases (MalDHs) from halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria. The crystal structure of the MalDH from the non-halophilic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus (Ca MalDH) solved, de novo, at 1.7 Å resolution exhibits numerous water molecules in its solvation shell. We observed that a large number of these water molecules are arranged in pentagonal polygons in the first hydration shell of Ca MalDH. Some of them are clustered in large networks, which cover non-polar amino acid surface. The crystal structure of MalDH from the extreme halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber (Sr) solved at 1.55 Å resolution shows that its surface is strongly enriched in acidic amino acids. The structural comparison of these two models is the first direct observation of the relative impact of acidic surface enrichment on the water structure organization between a halophilic protein and its non-adapted counterpart. The data show that surface acidic amino acids disrupt pentagonal water networks in the hydration shell. These crystallographic observations are discussed with respect to halophilic protein behaviors in solution.

  11. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores.

  12. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to drive asymmetric solvent response to a solute charge: a static potential contribution similar to the liquid-vapor potential, and a steric contribution associated with a water molecule's structure and charge distribution. In this work, we use free-energy perturbation molecular-dynamics calculations in explicit water to show that these mechanisms act in complementary regimes; the large static potential (∼44 kJ/mol/e) dominates asymmetric response for deeply buried charges, and the steric contribution dominates for charges near the solute-solvent interface. Therefore, both mechanisms must be included in order to fully account for asymmetric solvation in general. Our calculations suggest that the steric contribution leads to a remarkable deviation from the popular “linear response” model in which the reaction potential changes linearly as a function of charge. In fact, the potential varies in a piecewise-linear fashion, i.e., with different proportionality constants depending on the sign of the charge. This discrepancy is significant even when the charge is completely buried, and holds for solutes larger than single atoms. Together, these mechanisms suggest that implicit-solvent models can be improved using a combination of affine response (an offset due to the static potential) and piecewise-linear response (due to the steric contribution). PMID:23020318

  13. Solvation consequences of polymer PVP with biological buffers MES, MOPS, and MOPSO in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Bhupender S.; Chen, Bo-Ren; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Densities and viscosities data for aqueous solutions with PVP and/or buffer. • The studied buffers include MES, MOPS, and MOPSO. • DFT was used to estimate the binding energies of the (PVP + buffer) complexes. • The viscosity data were correlated with the Jones–Dole equation. • The investigated buffers behave as Kosmotropies. - Abstract: Densities and viscosities were measured for the aqueous buffer (MES, MOPS, or MOPSO) solutions containing different concentrations of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (5, 10, 15, 20 and 30) mass% at temperatures from (298.15 to 318.15) K under atmospheric pressure. The DFT calculations were also performed and the binding energies of the possible (PVP + buffer) complexes were obtained. The experimental and computational results reveal the interactions of the PVP with the constituent compounds in the aqueous buffer solutions. Additionally we have explored the solvation behavior of the buffers by measuring the densities and the viscosities data of the aqueous buffer solutions from (0.0 to 1.0) mol · kg"−"1 at temperatures from (298.15 to 318.15) K. The viscosity results were correlated with the Jones–Dole equation. The correlated results confirmed that all the investigated buffers behave as Kosmotropes (structure makers).

  14. CL 14: Solvation structure and dynamics of room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Polyansky, Dmitriy; Crowell, Robert A.; Thomas, Marie; Wishart, James F.; Takahashi, Kenji; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2010-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have emerged as a new class of solvents that, due to their unique properties (e.g., low volatility, large electrochemical window, high conductivity, etc.), have several potential applications. Among these are their possible use in nuclear fuel reprocessing, dye sensitized solar cells, and CO 2 sequestration. The properties of a given class of RTILs depend strongly on the choice of the counter anion. In this contribution we present new results using both static and time-resolved EXAFS (ca. 1 ns resolution) and time resolved optical absorption spectroscopy on a series of bromide containing imidazolium salts. The static results provide detailed information of the solvation shell of the bromide ion while the time-resolved data shed light on the nature and chemical behavior of the lowest lying charge transfer band, the physical motion of the bromine atom and its conversion to di-bromide. The photochemistry of the charge transfer (CT) band of the room temperature ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide is investigated using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) in the near-IR and steady state UV absorption. Irradiation of the CT band at 266 nm results in the steady state production of di-bromide which absorbs strongly at 266 nm. It is shown that this photoproduct, which is apparently very stable, adversely affects ultrafast transient absorption measurements. Flowing and simultaneously translating the sample mitigates this effect and reveals new transient species and dynamics within the detection window of 850 nm to 1250 nm. (authors)

  15. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne, E-mail: egarand@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  16. How abnormal is the behaviour of captive, zoo-living chimpanzees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy P Birkett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes show a variety of serious behavioural abnormalities, some of which have been considered as possible signs of compromised mental health. The provision of environmental enrichments aimed at reducing the performance of abnormal behaviours is increasing the norm, with the housing of individuals in (semi-natural social groups thought to be the most successful of these. Only a few quantitative studies of abnormal behaviour have been conducted, however, particularly for the captive population held in zoological collections. Consequently, a clear picture of the level of abnormal behaviour in zoo-living chimpanzees is lacking. METHODS: We present preliminary findings from a detailed observational study of the behaviour of 40 socially-housed zoo-living chimpanzees from six collections in the United States of America and the United Kingdom. We determined the prevalence, diversity, frequency, and duration of abnormal behaviour from 1200 hours of continuous behavioural data collected by focal animal sampling. RESULTS, CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our overall finding was that abnormal behaviour was present in all sampled individuals across six independent groups of zoo-living chimpanzees, despite the differences between these groups in size, composition, housing, etc. We found substantial variation between individuals in the frequency and duration of abnormal behaviour, but all individuals engaged in at least some abnormal behaviour and variation across individuals could not be explained by sex, age, rearing history or background (defined as prior housing conditions. Our data support a conclusion that, while most behaviour of zoo-living chimpanzees is 'normal' in that it is typical of their wild counterparts, abnormal behaviour is endemic in this population despite enrichment efforts. We suggest there is an urgent need to understand how the chimpanzee mind copes with captivity, an issue with both

  17. Abnormal grain growth in Eurofer-97 steel in the ferrite phase field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, V.B. [Lorena School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Lorena, SP, 12602-810 (Brazil); Sandim, H.R.Z., E-mail: hsandim@demar.eel.usp.br [Lorena School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Lorena, SP, 12602-810 (Brazil); Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf, D-40237 (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) Eurofer-97 steel is a candidate material for structural applications in future fusion reactors. Depending on the amount of prior cold rolling strain and annealing temperature, important solid-state softening reactions such as recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth occur. Eurofer-97 steel was cold rolled up to 70, 80 and 90% reductions in thickness and annealed in the ferrite phase field (below ≈ 800 °C). Changes in microstructure, micro-, and mesotexture were followed by orientation mappings provided by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Eurofer-97 steel undergoes abnormal grain growth above 650 °C and this solid-state reaction seems to be closely related to the high mobility of a few special grain boundaries that overcome pinning effects caused by fine particles. This solid-state reaction promotes important changes in the microstructure and microtexture of this steel. Abnormal grain growth kinetics for each condition was determined by means of quantitative metallography. - Highlights: • Abnormal grain growth (AGG) occurs in Eurofer-97 steel deformed to several strains. • Kinetics of abnormal grain growth has been determined at 750 and 800 °C. • Significant changes in crystallographic texture take place during AGG. • Grain boundaries with misorientations above 45° may explain abnormal grain growth. • Local microstructural instabilities (coarsening of M23C6 carbides) also explain AGG.

  18. Predictors of abnormal heart rate response to dipyridamole in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza Leao Lima, R.; Machado, L.; Azevedo, A.B.; De Lorenzo, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify predictors of abnormal HR response to dipyridamole (DIP) in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). Patients with a reduced heart rate (HR) response to DIP have higher cardiac mortality, but the mechanism is unknown. We studied 432 patients who underwent dual-isotope gated MPS. DIP (0.56 mg/kg) was infused over 4 min, and Tc-99m tetrofosmin was injected 3 min after the end of the infusion. MPS was semiquantitatively interpreted. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes were automatically calculated. The population was categorized into quartiles according to HR ratio, and characteristics in each quartile were compared. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of abnormal HR response, using the lowest quartile as the independent variable. Patients with abnormal HR response were more frequently without chest pain, with a history of chronic renal failure and taking digoxin. Baseline HR was higher and had fewer symptoms during stress. The stress and rest perfusion defects were greater, but reversibility was not; in addition, LVEF was lower. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of abnormal HR response were baseline HR and low LVEF. LV dysfunction is an independent predictor of abnormal HR response to DIP, and the association between low LVEF and low HR ratio may explain the link between abnormal HR ratio and increased mortality. (author)

  19. Ametropia, retinal anatomy, and OCT abnormality patterns in glaucoma. 2. Impacts of optic nerve head parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Neda; Wang, Mengyu; Wang, Hui; Jin, Qingying; Elze, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    Clinicians use retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an adjunct to glaucoma diagnosis. Ametropia is accompanied by changes to the optic nerve head (ONH), which may affect how OCT machines mark RNFLT measurements as abnormal. These changes in abnormality patterns may bias glaucoma diagnosis. Here, we investigate the relationship between OCT abnormality patterns and the following ONH-related and ametropia-associated parameters on 421 eyes of glaucoma patients: optic disc tilt and torsion, central retinal vessel trunk location (CRVTL), and nasal and temporal retinal curvature adjacent to ONH, quantified as nasal/temporal slopes of the inner limiting membrane. We applied multivariate logistic regression with abnormality marks as regressands to 40,401 locations of the peripapillary region and generated spatial maps of locations of false positive/negative abnormality marks independent of glaucoma severity. Effects of torsion and temporal slope were negligible. The effect of tilt could be explained by covariation with ametropia. For CRVTL/nasal slope, abnormality pattern shifts at 7.2%/23.5% of the peripapillary region were detected, respectively, independent of glaucoma severity and ametropia. Therefore, CRVTL and nasal curvature should be included in OCT RNFLT norms. Our spatial location maps may aid clinicians to improve diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Preferential solvation of ions in mixed solvents. 6: Univalent anions in aqueous organic solvents according to the inverse Kirkwood-Buff integral (IKBI) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2007-01-01

    The inverse Kirkwood-Buff integral (IKBI) approach is applied to the preferential solvation of F - , Cl - , Br - , I - , and ClO 4 - in aqueous mixtures of the co-solvents (S) methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH), t-butanol (t-BuOH), 1,2-ethanediol (EG), glycerol (Gly), acetone (Me 2 CO), acetonitrile (MeCN), formamide (FA), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexamethyl phosphoric triamide (HMPT), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), as far as the relevant data exist in the literature. Fluoride anions are selectively solvated by the water up to large mole fractions (x S ≥ 0.4) of S = EtOH, t-BuOH, Me 2 CO, MeCN, and DMF, and up to lower contents (x S ∼ 0.1) of MeOH, EG, FA, and DMSO. The other anions are preferentially solvated by water to diminishing extent as their sizes become larger, and the largest ones show some preference for S in water-rich mixtures of MeOH and FA, whereas in aqueous Gly even chloride is preferentially solvated by the Gly. The competition between the co-solvent and the anion for the hydrogen bonds that water molecules donate is the main cause for the observed preferential solvation behaviour

  1. Preferential solvation of ions in mixed solvents. 6: Univalent anions in aqueous organic solvents according to the inverse Kirkwood-Buff integral (IKBI) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Yizhak [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: ymarcus@vms.huji.ac.il

    2007-10-15

    The inverse Kirkwood-Buff integral (IKBI) approach is applied to the preferential solvation of F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}, and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in aqueous mixtures of the co-solvents (S) methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH), t-butanol (t-BuOH), 1,2-ethanediol (EG), glycerol (Gly), acetone (Me{sub 2}CO), acetonitrile (MeCN), formamide (FA), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexamethyl phosphoric triamide (HMPT), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), as far as the relevant data exist in the literature. Fluoride anions are selectively solvated by the water up to large mole fractions (x{sub S} {>=} 0.4) of S = EtOH, t-BuOH, Me{sub 2}CO, MeCN, and DMF, and up to lower contents (x{sub S} {approx} 0.1) of MeOH, EG, FA, and DMSO. The other anions are preferentially solvated by water to diminishing extent as their sizes become larger, and the largest ones show some preference for S in water-rich mixtures of MeOH and FA, whereas in aqueous Gly even chloride is preferentially solvated by the Gly. The competition between the co-solvent and the anion for the hydrogen bonds that water molecules donate is the main cause for the observed preferential solvation behaviour.

  2. Solvatochromism and preferential solvation of 1,4-dihydroxy-2,3-dimethyl-9,10-anthraquinone by UV-vis absorption and laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasirekha, V.; Vanelle, P.; Terme, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2008-12-01

    Solvation characteristics of 1,4-dihydroxy-2,3-dimethyl-9,10-anthraquinone ( 1) in pure and binary solvent mixtures have been studied by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The binary solvent mixtures used as CCl 4 (tetrachloromethane)-DMF ( N, N-dimethylformamide), AN (acetonitrile)-DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide), CHCl 3 (chloroform)-DMSO, CHCl 3-MeOH (methanol), and MeOH-DMSO. The longest wavelength band of 1 has been studied in pure solvents as well as in binary solvent mixtures as a function of the bulk mole fraction. The Vis absorption band maxima show an unusual blue shift with increasing solvent polarity. The emission maxima of 1 show changes with varying the pure solvents and the composition in the case of binary solvent mixtures. Non-ideal solvation characteristics are observed in all binary solvent mixtures. It has been observed that the quantity [ ν-(Xν+Xν)] serves as a measure of the extent of preferential solvation, where ν˜ and X are the position of band maximum in wavenumbers (cm -1) and the bulk mole fraction values, respectively. The preferential solvation parameters local mole fraction ( X2L), solvation index ( δs2), and exchange constant ( k12) are evaluated.

  3. Performance of the SMD and SM8 models for predicting solvation free energy of neutral solutes in methanol, dimethyl sulfoxide and acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanith, Caroline C.; Pliego, Josefredo R.

    2015-03-01

    The continuum solvation models SMD and SM8 were developed using 2,346 solvation free energy values for 318 neutral molecules in 91 solvents as reference. However, no solvation data of neutral solutes in methanol was used in the parametrization, while only few solvation free energy values of solutes in dimethyl sulfoxide and acetonitrile were used. In this report, we have tested the performance of the models for these important solvents. Taking data from literature, we have generated solvation free energy, enthalpy and entropy values for 37 solutes in methanol, 21 solutes in dimethyl sulfoxide and 19 solutes in acetonitrile. Both SMD and SM8 models have presented a good performance in methanol and acetonitrile, with mean unsigned error equal or less than 0.66 and 0.55 kcal mol-1 in methanol and acetonitrile, respectively. However, the correlation is worse in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the SMD and SM8 methods present mean unsigned error of 1.02 and 0.95 kcal mol-1, respectively. Our results point out the SMx family of models need be improved for dimethyl sulfoxide solvent.

  4. Chromosomal abnormality in patients with secondary amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safai, Akbar; Vasei, Mohammad; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Azad, Fariborz; Tabibi, Narjes

    2012-04-01

    Secondary amenorrhea is a condition in which there is cessation of menses after at least one menstruation. It is a symptom of different diseases, such as hormonal disturbances which range from pituitary to ovarian origin, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. Knowledge of the distinct cause of secondary amenorrhea is of tremendous benefit for the management and monitoring of patients. In this study, we determine the chromosomal abnormalities in patients with secondary amenorrhea in Southwest Iran. We selected 94 patients with secondary amenorrhea who referred to our Cytogenetic Ward from 2004 until 2009. For karyotyping, peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures were set up by conventional technique. In this study, 5.3% (n=5) of patients with secondary amenorrhea presented with chromosomal abnormalities, of which all contained an X element. The chromosomal abnormalities were: i) 45, X (n=1); ii) 47, XXX (n=1); iii) 45, X [13]/ 45, Xi(X)q[17] (n=1);  iv) 45, X[12]/46,X,+mar[12] (n=1); and v) 46,X,del(Xq)(q23q28) (n=1). Our study revealed that some causes of secondary amenorrhea could be due to chromosomal abnormalities. Therefore, cytogenetic studies should be important tests in the evaluation of patients with secondary amenorrhea.

  5. Abnormal Default System Functioning in Depression: Implications for Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Francesca; Cusinato, Maria; Calvo, Vincenzo; Sambin, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Depression is widely seen as the result of difficulties in regulating emotions. Based on neuroimaging studies on voluntary emotion regulation, neurobiological models have focused on the concept of cognitive control, considering emotion regulation as a shift toward involving controlled processes associated with activation of the prefrontal and parietal executive areas, instead of responding automatically to emotional stimuli. According to such models, the weaker executive area activation observed in depressed patients is attributable to a lack of cognitive control over negative emotions. Going beyond the concept of cognitive control, psychodynamic models describe the development of individuals' capacity to regulate their emotional states in mother-infant interactions during childhood, through the construction of the representation of the self, others, and relationships. In this mini-review, we link these psychodynamic models with recent findings regarding the abnormal functioning of the default system in depression. Consistently with psychodynamic models, psychological functions associated with the default system include self-related processing, semantic processes, and implicit forms of emotion regulation. The abnormal activation of the default system observed in depression may explain the dysfunctional aspects of emotion regulation typical of the condition, such as an exaggerated negative self-focus and rumination on self-esteem issues. We also discuss the clinical implications of these findings with reference to the therapeutic relationship as a key tool for revisiting impaired or distorted representations of the self and relational objects.

  6. Preferential solvation of single ions in mixed solvents: Part 1. New experimental approach and solvation of monovalent ions in methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixture. Part 2. Theoretical computation and comparison with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, Aarti C.; Venkataramani, B.; Gupta, A.R.

    1999-06-01

    Preferential solvation of single ion solutions has been studied with Li + , Na + , K + and Ag +- forms of Dowex 50W resins of different cross-linkings in methanol-water and acetonitrile (AN)- water mixtures. The solvent uptake by this alkali metal ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins was studied in an isopiestic set-up using 2,4,6 and 8 m LiCl solutions in 11.0, 20.8, 44.3 and 70.2 % (w/w) methanol-water mixtures and that of Na +- and Ag +- forms using 14.6 to 94.3 % (w/w) AN - water mixtures. The solvent sorbed in the resin phase was extracted by Rayleigh-type distillation and analysed gas chromatographically. The data were analysed by the N s (mole fraction of the organic solvent in the resin phase) vs n t au (total solvent content in the resin phase) plots and separation factor, alpha(ratio of mole fraction of the solvents in the resin and solution phases) or N s vs m (molality in the resin phase) plots. The limiting values of these plots gave the composition of the solvent in the primary solvation shell around the single ion. The compositions of the primary solvation shell around Li + , Na + , and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + and Ag + in acetonitrile (AN) - water mixtures have been computed using Franks equation and the approach of Marcus and compared with the experimental results obtained with the above mentioned ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins in different mixed solvents. The experimental results for Li + showed good agreement with the values computed using Franks equation for all methanol-water composition. However, in the case of Na + and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + in AN-water mixtures, there was agreement only at lower organic solvent content and the Franks equation predicted higher values for the organic solvent in the primary solvation shell around the cation at higher organic solvent content as compared to experimental results

  7. Solvation of fluoroform and fluoroform-dimethylether dimer in liquid krypton: a theoretical cryospectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Emilija; Mishev, Anastas; Pejov, Ljupčo

    2013-08-07

    A hybrid, sequential statistical physics-quantum mechanical electronic-quantum mechanical nuclei approach has been applied to study the C-H stretching frequencies of bare fluoroform dissolved in liquid krypton under cryogenic conditions (at ~130 K), as well as upon blue shifting hydrogen bonding interactions with dimethylether in the same solvent. The structure of the liquid at 130 K was generated by Monte Carlo simulations of cryogenic Kr solutions containing either fluoroform or fluoroform and dimethylether molecules. Statistically uncorrelated configurations were appropriately chosen from the equilibrated MC runs and supermolecular clusters containing solute and solvent molecules (either standalone or embedded in the "bulk" part of the solvent treated as a polarizable continuum) were subjected to quantum mechanical electronic (QMel) and subsequent quantum mechanical nuclei (QMnuc) calculations. QMel calculations were implemented to generate the in-liquid 1D intramolecular C-H stretching vibrational potential of the fluoroform moiety and subsequently in the QMnuc phase the corresponding anharmonic C-H stretching frequency was computed by diagonalization techniques. Finally, the constructed vibrational density of states histograms were compared to the experimental Raman bands. The calculated anharmonic vibrational frequency shifts of the fluoroform C-H stretching mode upon interaction with dimethylether in liquid Kr are in very good agreement with the experimental data (20.3 at MP2 level vs. 16.6 cm(-1) experimentally). Most of this relatively large frequency blue shift is governed by configurations characterized by a direct C-H···O contact between monomers. The second population detected during MC simulations, characterized by reversed orientation of the monomers, has a minor contribution to the spectral appearance. The experimentally observed trend in the corresponding bandwidths is also correctly reproduced by our theoretical approach. Solvation of the

  8. Cardiac abnormality prediction using HMLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Ahmad, K. A.; Mat, Muhamad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Ahmad, Shahril

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races but depends on the lifestyle. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and usually detected once it already critical which lead to a sudden death to the patient. Basically, cardiac abnormality is the irregular electrical signal that generate by the pacemaker of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect cardiac abnormality activity through implementation of Hybrid Multilayer Perceptron (HMLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP and HMLP network by using Modified Recursive Prediction Error (MRPE) algorithm and to test the network performance.

  9. Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, B; Westerman, R

    2001-09-01

    Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.

  10. Report on Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Section 208 of the energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1991. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Five of the events occurred at NRC-licensed facilities: one involved a significant degradation of plant safety at a nuclear fuel cycle facility, one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration, and three involved medical therapy misadministrations. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported one abnormal occurrence that involved medical therapy misadministrations

  11. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a statistical technique for detecting signs of abnormal situation generated by the influx of patients at emergency department (ED). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA was used as the modelling framework of the ARMA-based GLR anomaly-detection methodology. The GLR test was applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the ARMA model to detect anomalies when the data did not fit the reference ARMA model. The ARMA-based GLR hypothesis testing scheme was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France. © 2015 IEEE.

  12. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  13. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnell, R.M.; Richardson, M.L.; Vincent, J.M.; Godwin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  14. Device for diagnoising abnormalities of equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroshi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the collision energy easily and at high accuracy by applying impact shocks at known collision energy from a simulated acoustic wave generator and using the generated acoustic signal as reference data. Constitution: A plurality of acoustic detectors are attached to the surface of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. These acoustic detectors are connected respectively to an abnormality diagnosis device for equipments. Then, when metal obstacles collide against the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel, acoustic signals generated upon collision are detected by the acoustic detectors and acoustic information thus obtained from the acoustic detectors determines the colliding position of the metal obstacles by means of the abnormality diagnosis device and then the collision energy is measured. In this case, by applying impact shocks at known collision energy near the colliding position of metal obstacles determined by the abnormality diagnosis device, collision energy can be determined at a higher accuracy. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  16. Pyranose dehydrogenase ligand promiscuity: a generalized approach to simulate monosaccharide solvation, binding, and product formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M H Graf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The flavoenzyme pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH from the litter decomposing fungus Agaricus meleagris oxidizes many different carbohydrates occurring during lignin degradation. This promiscuous substrate specificity makes PDH a promising catalyst for bioelectrochemical applications. A generalized approach to simulate all 32 possible aldohexopyranoses in the course of one or a few molecular dynamics (MD simulations is reported. Free energy calculations according to the one-step perturbation (OSP method revealed the solvation free energies (ΔGsolv of all 32 aldohexopyranoses in water, which have not yet been reported in the literature. The free energy difference between β- and α-anomers (ΔGβ-α of all d-stereoisomers in water were compared to experimental values with a good agreement. Moreover, the free-energy differences (ΔG of the 32 stereoisomers bound to PDH in two different poses were calculated from MD simulations. The relative binding free energies (ΔΔGbind were calculated and, where available, compared to experimental values, approximated from Km values. The agreement was very good for one of the poses, in which the sugars are positioned in the active site for oxidation at C1 or C2. Distance analysis between hydrogens of the monosaccharide and the reactive N5-atom of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD revealed that oxidation is possible at HC1 or HC2 for pose A, and at HC3 or HC4 for pose B. Experimentally detected oxidation products could be rationalized for the majority of monosaccharides by combining ΔΔGbind and a reweighted distance analysis. Furthermore, several oxidation products were predicted for sugars that have not yet been tested experimentally, directing further analyses. This study rationalizes the relationship between binding free energies and substrate promiscuity in PDH, providing novel insights for its applicability in bioelectrochemistry. The results suggest that a similar approach could be applied to study

  17. 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidine solvated lanthanide aryloxides: pre-catalysts for intramolecular hydroalkoxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janini, Thomas E; Rakosi, Robert; Durr, Christopher B; Bertke, Jeffrey A; Bunge, Scott D

    2009-12-21

    The synthesis and structural characterization of six 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine (H-TMG) solvated lanthanide aryloxide complexes are reported. Ln[N{Si(CH3)3}2]3 (Ln = Nd, La) was reacted with two equivalents of both H-TMG and HOAr {HOAr = HOC6H2(CMe3)2-2,6 (H-DBP) or HOC6H2(CMe3)2-2,6-CH3-4 (H-4MeDBP)} and one equivelent of ethanol (HOEt) to yield the corresponding [Nd(H-TMG)2(4MeDBP)2(OEt)] (1) and [La(H-TMG)2(DBP)2(OEt)] (2). Compounds 1 and 2 were further reacted with 4-pentyn-1-ol {HO(CH2)3C[triple bond]CH} to isolate [Nd(H-TMG)2(4MeDBP)2{O(CH2)3C[triple bond]CH}] (3) and [La(H-TMG)2(DBP)2{O(CH2)3C[triple bond]CH}] (4), respectively. Three equivalents of HOAr and one equivalent of H-TMG were additionally reacted with Ln[N{Si(CH3)3}2]3 to generate [Nd(4MeDBP)3(H-TMG)] (5) and [La(DBP)3(H-TMG)] (6). In order to examine the formation of 1-6, the interaction of H-TMG and HOAr was further examined in solution and the hydrogen bonded complexes (H-TMG:HOAr), 7 and 8, were isolated. Upon successful isolation of 1-6, the utility of 1, 2, 4 and 5 as pre-catalysts for the intramolecular hydroalkoxylation of 4-pentyn-1-ol was investigated. The bulk powders for all complexes were found to be in agreement with the crystal structures based on elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, and 1H and 13C NMR investigations.

  18. Ionic Solution: What Goes Right and Wrong with Continuum Solvation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhao; Ren, Pengyu; Luo, Ray

    2017-12-14

    Solvent-mediated electrostatic interactions were well recognized to be important in the structure and function of molecular systems. Ionic interaction is an important component in electrostatic interactions, especially in highly charged molecules, such as nucleic acids. Here, we focus on the quality of the widely used Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (PBSA) continuum models in modeling ionic interactions by comparing with both explicit solvent simulations and the experiment. In this work, the molality-dependent chemical potentials for sodium chloride (NaCl) electrolyte were first simulated in the SPC/E explicit solvent. Our high-quality simulation agrees well with both the previous study and the experiment. Given the free-energy simulations in SPC/E as the benchmark, we used the same sets of snapshots collected in the SPC/E solvent model for PBSA free-energy calculations in the hope to achieve the maximum consistency between the two solvent models. Our comparative analysis shows that the molality-dependent chemical potentials of NaCl were reproduced well with both linear PB and nonlinear PB methods, although nonlinear PB agrees better with SPC/E and the experiment. Our free-energy simulations also show that the presence of salt increases the hydrophobic effect in a nonlinear fashion, in qualitative agreement with previous theoretical studies of Onsager and Samaras. However, the lack of molality-dependency in the nonelectrostatics continuum models dramatically reduces the overall quality of PBSA methods in modeling salt-dependent energetics. These analyses point to further improvements needed for more robust modeling of solvent-mediated interactions by the continuum solvation frameworks.

  19. Boundary layer friction of solvate ionic liquids as a function of potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Rutland, Mark W; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Atkin, Rob

    2017-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the potential dependent boundary layer friction at solvate ionic liquid (SIL)-highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and SIL-Au(111) interfaces. Friction trace and retrace loops of lithium tetraglyme bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (Li(G4) TFSI) at HOPG present clearer stick-slip events at negative potentials than at positive potentials, indicating that a Li + cation layer adsorbed to the HOPG lattice at negative potentials which enhances stick-slip events. The boundary layer friction data for Li(G4) TFSI shows that at HOPG, friction forces at all potentials are low. The TFSI - anion rich boundary layer at positive potentials is more lubricating than the Li + cation rich boundary layer at negative potentials. These results suggest that boundary layers at all potentials are smooth and energy is predominantly dissipated via stick-slip events. In contrast, friction at Au(111) for Li(G4) TFSI is significantly higher at positive potentials than at negative potentials, which is comparable to that at HOPG at the same potential. The similarity of boundary layer friction at negatively charged HOPG and Au(111) surfaces indicates that the boundary layer compositions are similar and rich in Li + cations for both surfaces at negative potentials. However, at Au(111), the TFSI - rich boundary layer is less lubricating than the Li + rich boundary layer, which implies that anion reorientations rather than stick-slip events are the predominant energy dissipation pathways. This is confirmed by the boundary friction of Li(G4) NO 3 at Au(111), which shows similar friction to Li(G4) TFSI at negative potentials due to the same cation rich boundary layer composition, but even higher friction at positive potentials, due to higher energy dissipation in the NO 3 - rich boundary layer.

  20. Do changes in connectivity explain desertification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desertification, broad-scale land degradation in drylands, is a major environmental hazard facing inhabitants of the world’s deserts as well as an important component of global change. There is no unifying framework that simply and effectively explains different forms of desertification. Here we arg...

  1. Can the inherence heuristic explain vitalistic reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock

    2014-10-01

    Inherence is an important component of psychological essentialism. By drawing on vitalism as a way in which to explain this link, however, the authors appear to conflate causal explanations based on fixed features with those based on general causal forces. The disjuncture between these two types of explanatory principles highlights potential new avenues for the inherence heuristic.

  2. Explaining probalistic risk assessment in common language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic human health risk assessment is explained in ordinary language using a hypothetical example and the ingestion equation from EPA's Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund. A section on understanding probabilities and probability distributions used in a Monte Carlo simulation is included as well as an appendix showing the computer run and the technical assumptions behind it

  3. Explaining Violence in Sierra Leone's Civil War

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Explaining the violence of civil war is never a simple task for the scholar. In the case of the Sierra Leone, paradoxically, the task has in some ways been rendered more difficult by the sheer variety of compelling scholarship on the question. This paper seeks to identify the most useful of the explanations offered thus far, and ...

  4. Measuring and explaining house price developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses ways of measuring and explaining the development of house prices. The goal of the research underpinning this dissertation was to develop a methodological framework for studying these developments. This framework relates, first, to correcting for changes in the composition of

  5. Adaptive hatching hypotheses do not explain asynchronous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the core of the suite of adaptive hatching hypotheses advanced to explain asynchronous hatching in birds is the assumption that if food is not limited then all the hatchlings will develop normally to adulthood. In this study Brown-headed Parrot Poicephalus cryptoxanthus chicks were hand fed and weighed on a daily basis.

  6. Explaining convergence of oecd welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, C.; Starke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of conditional convergence helps to both better describe and explain the phenomenon. By applying error correction models, we examine conditional convergence of various types of social expenditure in 21 OECD countries between 1980 and 2005. Our empirical findings go beyond the existing literature in two respects...

  7. Explaining the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Linda; Beddie, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    This document explains the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework, created as part of a project that explored how the vocational education and training (VET) sector could broaden its engagement in Australia's research and development (R&D) and innovation systems. Achieving this engagement will rely significantly on building the…

  8. Explaining Teachers' Use of Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In educational systems without comprehensive systems for regulating textbooks, teachers can exert considerable influence on the use of textbooks. However, existing research has not yet identified the mechanisms of this use. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to examine and explain teachers' strategic use of textbooks. I administered a…

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  10. High prevalence of abnormal motor repertoire at 3 months corrected age in extremely preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjørtoft, Toril; Evensen, Kari Anne I; Øberg, Gunn Kristin; Songstad, Nils Thomas; Labori, Cathrine; Silberg, Inger Elisabeth; Loennecken, Marianne; Møinichen, Unn Inger; Vågen, Randi; Støen, Ragnhild; Adde, Lars

    2016-03-01

    To compare early motor repertoire between extremely preterm and term-born infants. An association between the motor repertoire and gestational age and birth weight was explored in extremely preterm infants without severe ultrasound abnormalities. In a multicentre study, the early motor repertoire of 82 infants born extremely preterm (ELGAN:<28 weeks) and/or with extremely low birth weight (ELBW:<1000 g) and 87 term-born infants were assessed by the "Assessment of Motor Repertoire - 2 to 5 Months" (AMR) which is part of Prechtl's "General Movement Assessment", at 12 weeks post-term age. Fidgety movements were classified as normal if present and abnormal if absent, sporadic or exaggerated. Concurrent motor repertoire was classified as normal if smooth and fluent and abnormal if monotonous, stiff, jerky and/or predominantly fast or slow. Eight-teen ELBW/ELGAN infants had abnormal fidgety movements (8 absent, 7 sporadic and 3 exaggerated fidgety movements) compared with 2 control infants (OR:12.0; 95%CI:2.7-53.4) and 46 ELBW/ELGAN infants had abnormal concurrent motor repertoire compared with 17 control infants (OR:5.3; 95%CI:2.6-10.5). Almost all detailed aspects of the AMR differed between the groups. Results were the same when three infants with severe ultrasound abnormalities were excluded. In the remaining ELBW/ELGAN infants, there was no association between motor repertoire and gestational age or birth weight. ELBW/ELGAN infants had poorer quality of early motor repertoire than term-born infants.The findings were not explained by severe abnormalities on neonatal ultrasound scans and were not correlated to the degree of prematurity. The consequences of these abnormal movement patterns remain to be seen in future follow-up studies. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  12. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances...... in neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association...

  13. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  14. Intestinal Rotation Abnormalities and Midgut Volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Jacob C

    2017-02-01

    Rotation abnormalities may be asymptomatic or may be associated with obstruction caused by bands, midgut volvulus, or associated atresia or web. The most important goal of clinicians is to determine whether the patient has midgut volvulus with intestinal ischemia, in which case an emergency laparotomy should be done. If the patient is not acutely ill, the next goal is to determine whether the patient has a narrow-based small bowel mesentery. In general, the outcomes for children with a rotation abnormality are excellent, unless there has been midgut volvulus with significant intestinal ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  16. Extending the Solvation-Layer Interface Condition Continum Electrostatic Model to a Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molavi Tabrizi, Amirhossein; Goossens, Spencer; Mehdizadeh Rahimi, Ali; Cooper, Christopher D; Knepley, Matthew G; Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2017-06-13

    We extend the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (LPB) continuum electrostatic model for molecular solvation to address charge-hydration asymmetry. Our new solvation-layer interface condition (SLIC)/LPB corrects for first-shell response by perturbing the traditional continuum-theory interface conditions at the protein-solvent and the Stern-layer interfaces. We also present a GPU-accelerated treecode implementation capable of simulating large proteins, and our results demonstrate that the new model exhibits significant accuracy improvements over traditional LPB models, while reducing the number of fitting parameters from dozens (atomic radii) to just five parameters, which have physical meanings related to first-shell water behavior at an uncharged interface. In particular, atom radii in the SLIC model are not optimized but uniformly scaled from their Lennard-Jones radii. Compared to explicit-solvent free-energy calculations of individual atoms in small molecules, SLIC/LPB is significantly more accurate than standard parametrizations (RMS error 0.55 kcal/mol for SLIC, compared to RMS error of 3.05 kcal/mol for standard LPB). On parametrizing the electrostatic model with a simple nonpolar component for total molecular solvation free energies, our model predicts octanol/water transfer free energies with an RMS error 1.07 kcal/mol. A more detailed assessment illustrates that standard continuum electrostatic models reproduce total charging free energies via a compensation of significant errors in atomic self-energies; this finding offers a window into improving the accuracy of Generalized-Born theories and other coarse-grained models. Most remarkably, the SLIC model also reproduces positive charging free energies for atoms in hydrophobic groups, whereas standard PB models are unable to generate positive charging free energies regardless of the parametrized radii. The GPU-accelerated solver is freely available online, as is a MATLAB implementation.

  17. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye [Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Information Technology (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  18. Effect of the composition of a solution on the enthalpies of solvation of piperidine in methanol-acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide-acetonitrile mixed solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'mina, I. A.; Volkova, M. A.; Sitnikova, K. A.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Heat effects of dissolution of piperidine (ppd) are measured by calorimetry at 298.15 K over the range of composition of acetonitrile-methanol (AN-MeOH) mixed solvents. Based on the Δsol H ○(ppd)AN-MeOH values obtained using the literature data on Δsol H ○ (ppd) in acetonitrile-dimethylsulfoxide (AN-DMSO) mixed solvents and the vaporization enthalpy of ppd, the enthalpies of solvation of amine in AN-MeOH and AN-DMSO binary mixtures are calculated. A rise in the exothermicity of solvation of piperidine is observed upon the transition from AN to DMSO and MeOH, due mainly to the enhanced solvation of the amino group of ppd as a result of changes in the acid-base properties of the mixed solvent.

  19. Effects of functional group substitution on electron spectra and solvation dynamics in a family of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, James F.; Lall-Ramnarine, Sharon I.; Raju, Ravinder; Scumpia, Alexander; Bellevue, Sherly; Ragbir, Revans; Engel, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Ionic liquids containing ether-, alcohol- and alkyl-functionalized quaternary ammonium dications were studied by pulse radiolysis. Spectra on nanosecond timescales revealed that solvation of the excess electron is particularly slow in the case of the alcohol-derivatized ionic liquids. The blue shift of the electron spectrum to the customary 650 nm peak takes 25-40 ns at 21 deg. C. Comparison with the relaxation dynamics observed in viscous 1,2,6-trihydroxyhexane reveals the hindering effect of the ionic liquid lattice on hydroxypropyl side chain reorientation

  20. Calculation of relative free energies for ligand-protein binding, solvation, and conformational transitions using the GROMOS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Christ, Clara D; Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H; Oostenbrink, Chris; Steiner, Denise; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-11-24

    The calculation of the relative free energies of ligand-protein binding, of solvation for different compounds, and of different conformational states of a polypeptide is of considerable interest in the design or selection of potential enzyme inhibitors. Since such processes in aqueous solution generally comprise energetic and entropic contributions from many molecular configurations, adequate sampling of the relevant parts of configurational space is required and can be achieved through molecular dynamics simulations. Various techniques to obtain converged ensemble averages and their implementation in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation are discussed, and examples of their application to biomolecules in aqueous solution are given. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (V): Development of rigid-body type harmonic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Moto; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-05-01

    This letter proposes an approximate treatment of the harmonic solvation model (HSM) assuming the solute to be a rigid body (RB-HSM). The HSM method can appropriately estimate the Gibbs free energy for condensed phases even where an ideal gas model used by standard quantum chemical programs fails. The RB-HSM method eliminates calculations for intra-molecular vibrations in order to reduce the computational costs. Numerical assessments indicated that the RB-HSM method can evaluate entropies and internal energies with the same accuracy as the HSM method but with lower calculation costs.

  2. The mechanism for enhanced oxidation degradation of dioxin-like PCBs (PCB-77) in the atmosphere by the solvation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Mei-Ling; Yang, Jia-Wen; Li, Yu

    2017-07-11

    The reaction pathways of PCB-77 in the atmosphere with ·OH, O 2 , NO x , and 1 O 2 were inferred based on density functional theory calculations with the 6-31G* basis set. The structures the reactants, transition states, intermediates, and products were optimized. The energy barriers and reaction heats were obtained to determine the energetically favorable reaction pathways. To study the solvation effect, the energy barriers and reaction rates for PCB-77 with different polar and nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, and water) were calculated. The results showed that ·OH preferentially added to the C5 atom of PCB-77, which has no Cl atom substituent, to generate the intermediate IM5. This intermediate subsequently reacted with O 2 via pathway A to generate IM5a, with an energy barrier of 7.27 kcal/mol and total reaction rate of 8.45 × 10 -8  cm 3 /molecule s. Pathway B involved direct dehydrogenation of IM5 to produce the OH-PCBs intermediate IM5b, with an energy barrier of 28.49 kcal/mol and total reaction rate of 1.15 × 10 -5  cm 3 /molecule s. The most likely degradation pathway of PCB-77 in the atmosphere is pathway A to produce IM5a. The solvation effect results showed that cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, and benzene could reduce the reaction energy barrier of pathway A. Among these solvents, the solvation effect of benzene was the largest, and could reduce the total reaction energy barrier by 25%. Cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethanol could increase the total reaction rate of pathway A. The increase in the reaction rate of pathway A with benzene was 8%. The effect of solvents on oxidative degradation of PCB-77 in the atmosphere is important. Graphical abstract The reaction pathways of PCB-77 in the atmosphere with •OH, O2, NOx, and 1O2 were inferred based on density functional theory

  3. Abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation pattern in hyperquenched metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Lina; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Our recent work observed a quite different relaxation pattern, i.e., the abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg relaxation in CuZrAl GRs[1]. However, the generality and the origin of this remarkable thermodynamic anomaly remain enigmatic. By hyperquenching strategy, the present work investigated the depe......Our recent work observed a quite different relaxation pattern, i.e., the abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg relaxation in CuZrAl GRs[1]. However, the generality and the origin of this remarkable thermodynamic anomaly remain enigmatic. By hyperquenching strategy, the present work investigated...... in La55Al25Ni20 GRs. However, the correlation between Tf and the activation energy for initiating the energy releasing during thermal scanning is three-steplike for La55Al25Ni20, revealing the similar phenomenon with the abnormal ERP of Cu46Zr46Al8. These unexpected phenomena have been well explained...

  4. Next generation sequencing identifies abnormal Y chromosome and candidate causal variants in premature ovarian failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujung; Kim, Changshin; Park, YoungJoon; Pyun, Jung-A; Kwack, KyuBum

    2016-12-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is characterized by heterogeneous genetic causes such as chromosomal abnormalities and variants in causal genes. Recently, development of techniques made next generation sequencing (NGS) possible to detect genome wide variants including chromosomal abnormalities. Among 37 Korean POF patients, XY karyotype with distal part deletions of Y chromosome, Yp11.32-31 and Yp12 end part, was observed in two patients through NGS. Six deleterious variants in POF genes were also detected which might explain the pathogenesis of POF with abnormalities in the sex chromosomes. Additionally, the two POF patients had no mutation in SRY but three non-synonymous variants were detected in genes regarding sex reversal. These findings suggest candidate causes of POF and sex reversal and show the propriety of NGS to approach the heterogeneous pathogenesis of POF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Y [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells were recognized in 6 cases which consisted of one case of chronic myelogenous leukemia, two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, one case of sideroblastic anemia, and two cases of myelodysplasis. Frequency of stable type chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells was investigated in 45 atomic bomb survivors without hematologic disorders and 15 controls. It was 1.4% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 1 km from the hypocenter, which was significantly higher as compared with 0.1% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb over 2.5 km from the hypocenter and 0.2% in normal controls. Examination of chromosome was also made on 2 of 3 cases which were the seconds born of female with high chromosome abnormality, who was exposed to within 1 km from the hypocenter, and healthy male exposed 3 km from the hypocenter. These two cases showed chromosome of normal male type, and balanced translocation was not recognized. There was not a significant difference in chromosome abnormalities between the seconds of atomic bomb survivors and controls.

  7. Common echocardiographic abnormalities in Nigerians of different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-17

    Sep 17, 2012 ... artery disease, cardiac murmurs, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and transient ischaemic attack.[4,5] In some circumstances, the examination is an appropriate screening test even in the absence of cardiovascular symptoms, especially. Common echocardiographic abnormalities in. Nigerians of different age groups.

  8. Learning from anticipated and abnormal plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, B.

    1983-01-01

    A report is given of the American Nuclear Society topical meeting on Anticipated and Abnormal Transients in Light Water Reactors held in Jackson, Wyoming in September 1983. Industry involvement in the evaluation of operating experience, human error contributions, transient management, thermal hydraulic modelling, the role of probabilistic risk assessment and the cost of transient incidents are discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The present report presents the findings of SIMRAC project GAP 045 entitled ‘Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments’. It is intended as a reference to develop guidelines which, in turn would assist mine management in establishing safe...

  10. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; De Jesus, Danilo R; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders.

  11. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  12. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  13. immunological arthritis Prevalence of biochemical and abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... the serum creatinine valuell and abnormalities of calcium and cholesterol have .... 16 high. Creatinine (JLmolJl). 75 - 115. 81,3 ± 20,9. 6,6 high. 7 high. 43,4 low ... acid levels without any obvious secondary cause. A raised.

  14. Fetal chromosome abnormalities and congenital malformations: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results also showed that Multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) represented among 42.2%, congenital malformation of CNS represents 26.6%, congenital malformation of the skeletal system 20%, congenital polycystic kidney 8.8% and pyloric stenosis in 2.2%. Among the 21 women with abnormal karyotype of amniotic ...

  15. Neurobehavioural Correlates of Abnormal Repetitive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ford

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions in which echolalia and echopraxia occur are reviewed, followed by an attempt to elicit possible mechanisms of these phenomena. A brief description of stereotypical and perseverative behaviour and obsessional phenomena is given. It is suggested that abnormal repetitive behaviour may occur partly as a result of central dopaminergic dysfunction.

  16. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... syndrome (0.6%) and Ushers syndrome (0.6%). Refractive error was the most common (7.9%). Conclusion: Since these deaf students use their sight to compensate for the deafness, routine ophthalmologic examination should be carried out on them so that ophthalmologic abnormalities are detected early and treatment ...

  17. The prevalence of electroencephalographic abnormalities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... South African studies. There is little South African data examining either prevalence or usefulness of EEG abnormalities among adult psychiatric patients. Some work has been done in adolescents. Szabo1 reviewed all admissions to the adolescent inpatient unit at Tara. Hospital between 1990 and 1995.

  18. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... This study is a cross-sectional case control study. 179 men and women were ... can lead to lipid parameters abnormalities and CVD risk factor via aggregation of ... insulin kit is the brand of DRG German Company. The insulin.

  19. Abnormal Events for Emergency Trip in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Guk Hun; Choi, M. J.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. H.; Kwon, I. C

    2006-12-15

    This report gathers abnormal events related to emergency trip of HANARO that happened during its operation over 10 years since the first criticality on February 1995. The collected examples will be utilized to the HANARO's operators as a useful guide.

  20. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.