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Sample records for expert exploration tool

  1. Risk Reduction with a Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, William W.; Broadhead, Ron; Mundorf, William R.

    2003-03-06

    A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, was developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs.

  2. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William W. Weiss

    2000-12-31

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries, including medical diagnostics, have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized data base and computer maps generated by neural networks, is proposed for development through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This tool will be beneficial in many regions of the US, enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting and decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the US as reserves are depleted. The proposed expert exploration tool will benefit a diverse group in the US, leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds and lower product prices for consumers. This third of ten semi-annual reports contains an account of the progress, problems encountered, plans for the next quarter, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress.

  3. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Balch

    2003-04-15

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The pool of experts is much reduced today. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This fourth of five annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the April 2002 through March 2003 period was directed toward Silurian-Devonian geology, development of rules for the fuzzy system, and on-line software.

  4. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William W. Weiss

    2001-09-30

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. As a result, today's pool of experts is much reduced. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds and lower product prices for consumers. This fifth of ten semi-annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the May 2001 through September 2001 was directed toward development of rules for the fuzzy system.

  5. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Balch

    2004-04-08

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This fifth annual (and tenth of 12 semi-annual reports) contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the March 2003 through March 2004 period was directed toward completion of the Brushy Canyon FEE Tool and to Silurian-Devonian geology, and development of rules for the Devonian fuzzy system, and on-line software.

  6. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Balch; Ron Broadhead

    2005-03-01

    Incomplete or sparse data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduce a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results when working with sparse data. State-of-the-art expert exploration tools, relying on a database, and computer maps generated by neural networks and user inputs, have been developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk has been reduced with the use of these properly verified and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tools.'' Through the course of this project, FEE Tools and supporting software were developed for two producing formations in southeast New Mexico. Tools of this type can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In today's oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lack the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, volatile oil prices, and scarcity of domestic exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tools benefit a diverse group in the U.S., allowing a more efficient use of scarce funds, and potentially reducing dependence on foreign oil and providing lower product prices for consumers.

  7. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Balch

    2003-10-15

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This ninth of ten semi-annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the March 2003 through September 2003 period was directed toward Silurian-Devonian geology, development of rules for the fuzzy system, and on-line software.

  8. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William W. Weiss

    2001-05-17

    Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds and lower product prices for consumers. This second annual report contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next quarter, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. During the second year of the project, data acquisition of the Brushy Canyon Formation was completed with the compiling and analyzing of well logs, geophysical data, and production information needed to characterize production potential in the Delaware Basin. A majority of this data now resides in several online databases on our servers and is in proper form to be accessed by external

  9. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William W. Weiss

    2000-06-30

    Incomplete or sparse information on geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. Expert systems have been developed and used in several disciplines and industries, including medical diagnostics, with favorable results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized data base and computer maps generated by neural networks, is proposed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. This project will develop an Artificial Intelligence system that will draw upon a wide variety of information to provide realistic estimates of risk. ''Fuzzy logic,'' a system of integrating large amounts of inexact, incomplete information with modern computational methods to derive usable conclusions, has been demonstrated as a cost-effective computational technology in many industrial applications. During project year 1, 90% of geologic, geophysical, production and price data were assimilated for installation into the database. Logs provided geologic data consisting of formation tops of the Brushy Canyon, Lower Brushy Canyon, and Bone Springs zones of 700 wells used to construct regional cross sections. Regional structure and isopach maps were constructed using kriging to interpolate between the measured points. One of the structure derivative maps (azimuth of curvature) visually correlates with Brushy Canyon fields on the maximum change contours. Derivatives of the regional geophysical data also visually correlate with the location of the fields. The azimuth of maximum dip approximately locates fields on the maximum change contours. In a similar manner the second derivative in the x-direction of the gravity map visually correlates with the alignment of the known fields. The visual correlations strongly suggest that neural network architectures will be

  10. Risk Reduction with a Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, William W.; Broadhead, Ron

    2002-06-27

    In the first three years of the Fee Tool Project, an immense amount of data on the Delaware Basin has been accumulated. Data on geology, structure, production, regional information such as gravity as well as local data, such as well logs. This data, organized and cataloged into several online databases, is available for the Expert System and users as needed and as appropriate in analyzing production potential.

  11. Benchmarking expert system tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary

    1988-01-01

    As part of its evaluation of new technologies, the Artificial Intelligence Section of the Mission Planning and Analysis Div. at NASA-Johnson has made timing tests of several expert system building tools. Among the production systems tested were Automated Reasoning Tool, several versions of OPS5, and CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System), an expert system builder developed by the AI section. Also included in the test were a Zetalisp version of the benchmark along with four versions of the benchmark written in Knowledge Engineering Environment, an object oriented, frame based expert system tool. The benchmarks used for testing are studied.

  12. Experts' Opinion: A Powerful Evaluation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, David

    Experts' opinion is proposed as a valuable evaluation tool. Advantages of this method include the relative cost effectiveness when compared with other data collection methods. It is a time-saving method important in formative evaluation when a decision must be made concerning implementation of a course of action. When experts are carefully…

  13. GEST = The Generic Expert System Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John F.; Ho, David; Howard, Chuck

    1986-03-01

    The development cycle of an expert system can be decreased if an effective expert system tool (EST) is used. This paper describes the Generic Expert System Tool (GEST) developed by the Artificial Intelligence Branch of the Georgia Tech Research Institute. GEST was developed to be as general purpose as possible while incorporating all of the basic features required of an EST used for real world applications. This paper outlines GEST's basic software architecture and highlights a variety of it's processing elements. A discussion of future enhancement currently being implemented to increase GEST's application domains is also provided.

  14. Commercial Expert-System-Building Software Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Report evaluates commercially-available expert-system-building tools in terms of structures, representations of knowledge, inference mechanisms, interfaces with developers and end users, and capabilities of performing such functions as diagnosis and design. Software tools commercialized derivatives of artificial-intelligence systems developed by researchers at universities and research organizations. Reducing time to develop expert system by order of magnitude compared to that required with such traditional artificial development languages as LISP. Table lists 20 such tools, rating attributes as strong, fair, programmable by user, or having no capability in various criteria.

  15. Expert system terms and building tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of an Expert System Building Tool (ESBT) capable of inference and hypothetical reasoning are discussed. The inference capabilities of ESBTs allow such functions as classification, design-synthesis, forecasting, decision-aiding, scheduling and planning, real-time monitoring, situation assessment, the discovery of novel relations, and debugging. ESBTs are noted to have made possible order-of-magnitude improvements in expert system construction. Higher-end ESBTs are moving from LISP machines to less expensive workstations, and lower-end ones are appearing on PCs.

  16. Knowledge-Acquisition Tool For Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbrow, James D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Regenie, Victoria A.

    1988-01-01

    Digital flight-control systems monitored by computer program that evaluates and recommends. Flight-systems engineers for advanced, high-performance aircraft use knowlege-acquisition tool for expert-system flight-status monitor suppling interpretative data. Interpretative function especially important in time-critical, high-stress situations because it facilitates problem identification and corrective strategy. Conditions evaluated and recommendations made by ground-based engineers having essential knowledge for analysis and monitoring of performances of advanced aircraft systems.

  17. Developing Expert Tools for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Banjac, Jelena; Timkó, Helga

    2017-10-12

    This Thesis describes software tools developed for automated, precision setting-up of low-power level radio frequency (LLRF) loops, which will help expert users to have better control and faster setting-up of the radio-frequency (RF) system in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. The aim was to completely redesign the software architecture, to add new features, to improve certain algorithms, and to increase the automation.

  18. EXPERT SYSTEMS - DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL INSURANCE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAN Anca-Petruţa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the fact that specialty agricultural assistance is not always available when the farmers need it, we identified expert systems as a strong instrument with an extended potential in agriculture. This started to grow in scale recently, including all socially-economic activity fields, having the role of collecting data regarding different aspects from human experts with the purpose of assisting the user in the necessary steps for solving problems, at the performance level of the expert, making his acquired knowledge and experience available. We opted for a general presentation of the expert systems as well as their necessity, because, the solution to develop the agricultural system can come from artificial intelligence by implementing the expert systems in the field of agricultural insurance, promoting existing insurance products, farmers finding options in depending on their necessities and possibilities. The objective of this article consists of collecting data about different aspects about specific areas of interest of agricultural insurance, preparing the database, a conceptual presentation of a pilot version which will become constantly richer depending on the answers received from agricultural producers, with the clearest exposure of knowledgebase possible. We can justify picking this theme with the fact that even while agricultural insurance plays a very important role in agricultural development, the registered result got from them are modest, reason why solutions need to be found in the scope of developing the agricultural sector. The importance of this consists in the proposal of an immediate viable solution to correspond with the current necessities of agricultural producers and in the proposal of an innovative solution, namely the implementation of expert system in agricultural insurance as a way of promoting insurance products. Our research, even though it treats the subject at an conceptual level, it wants to undertake an

  19. Expert Systems--A Competent Tool for Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoul, Jean; Smith, P. J.

    Expert systems, rule-based knowledge systems, have been widely heralded as an important tool in management and accounting. Expert system shells have become available for personal computers, and accountants are investing in systems which are supposed to be capable of intelligent decisions. The limitations of rule-based knowledge systems are…

  20. Topics in expert system design methodologies and tools

    CERN Document Server

    Tasso, C

    1989-01-01

    Expert Systems are so far the most promising achievement of artificial intelligence research. Decision making, planning, design, control, supervision and diagnosis are areas where they are showing great potential. However, the establishment of expert system technology and its actual industrial impact are still limited by the lack of a sound, general and reliable design and construction methodology.This book has a dual purpose: to offer concrete guidelines and tools to the designers of expert systems, and to promote basic and applied research on methodologies and tools. It is a coordinated coll

  1. The nature and evaluation of commercial expert system building tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1987-01-01

    This memorandum reviews the factors that constitute an Expert System Building Tool (ESBT) and evaluates current tools in terms of these factors. Evaluation of these tools is based on their structure and their alternative forms of knowledge representation, inference mechanisms and developer/end-user interfaces. Next, functional capabilities, such as diagnosis and design, are related to alternative forms of mechanization. The characteristics and capabilities of existing commercial tools are then reviewed in terms of these criteria.

  2. Adaptive Research Supervision: Exploring Expert Thesis Supervisors' Practical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as "adaptivity." In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing expert thesis supervisors about…

  3. Development of the Expert System Domain Advisor and Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    systems. 3. Educational background a. General b. Expert Systems 98 Description of ’ome expert systems worked on. For eacn of the Expert Systems discussed...of an ES to evaluate the suitability of a project for using ES tecnology is not recxzmrxded because the wide variation in projects wold reqdir

  4. Digital exploration via Skype: connecting your classroom with the experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    This presentation describes experiences of using Skype in the classroom to connect learners with scientists and explorers all over the world in order to deepen learners' knowledge and understanding of course material, develop their enquiry skills, and broaden their perspectives on life beyond the classroom walls. In a session organised by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society (RSGS) in partnership with Digital Explorer, twenty-five Perth High School students who were studying coral reefs took part in an exciting live Skype chat with researchers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Students spoke to a marine biologist and a geographer who were on-board their research vessel some 15,000km away. They learned about the Catlin Survey's cutting-edge research, which was set up to study conditions on the reef, take 50,000 images, and create a baseline for future comparisons. In addition, the scientists aimed to develop an underwater equivalent of Google Streetview, called Seaview, which will allow people everywhere to engage with this incredible ecosystem. We heard about the divers' encounter with Tiger sharks earlier that same day, and had a tour of the research vessel, as well as asking the experts questions about their research findings and career paths. Feedback from the students was extremely positive, and it was clear that the experience had greatly enhanced their studies. For myself and the other teachers involved, it was an exciting (and surreal!) experience, and helped to update our knowledge of our subjects. Between July and December 2013 I volunteered as Community Manager for Digital Explorer in their partnership with Skype in the classroom. Digital Explorer is an educational social enterprise dedicated to engaging young people in global issues, and preparing them to tackle environmental and technological changes in the 21st century. We offered seventeen lessons as part of Skype in the classroom's Exploring Oceans event in October and November, which aimed to

  5. Robotic Tool Changer for Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future planetary exploration missions will require compact, lightweight robotic manipulators for handling a variety of tools & instruments without increasing the...

  6. MRXT: The Multi-Robot Exploration Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Gil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the multi-robot eXploration tool (MRXT [Freely available at http://arvc.umh.es/mrxt], a new mobile robotics simulation tool whose aim is to experiment and understand some well-known multi-robot exploration algorithms. The application is designed to test and compare different multi-robot exploration algorithms as well as SLAM techniques. The application includes a wide range of exploration algorithms that differ in their level of coordination and integration with the SLAM algorithm. The tool is focused on describing the exploration problem in a simple manner so that it is useful for educational or research purposes. In comparison with other simulation tools, MRXT is the first application completely focused on the exploration problem, so it can be easily employed to understand interactively many of the issues regarding this general problem in mobile robotics. Furthermore, the paper describes some examples using the tool.

  7. The BRIEFER project: using expert systems as theory construction tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, W J; de Shazer, S

    1991-06-01

    This article describes the development of BRIEFER I and BRIEFER II, expert systems that advise the therapist on selecting, designing, and developing an intervention at the end of the first therapy session. The process of developing expert systems has aided us in describing what brief therapists do, in modeling the intervention design process, and in training brief therapists.

  8. Web-based tool for expert elicitation of the variogram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, N.P.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Gosling, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The variogram is the keystone of geostatistics. Estimation of the variogram is deficient and difficult when there are no or too few observations available due to budget constraints or physical and temporal obstacles. In such cases, expert knowledge can be an important source of information. Expert

  9. Tools for Exploring the Proteomosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Andrej; Valcu, Cristina-Maria; Junqueira, Magno

    2009-01-01

    Homology-driven proteomics aims at exploring the proteomes of organisms with unsequenced genomes that, despite rapid genomic sequencing progress, still represent the overwhelming majority of species in the biosphere. Methodologies have been developed to enable automated LC-MS/MS identifications of unknown proteins, which rely on the sequence similarity between the fragmented peptides and reference database sequences from phylogenetically related species. However, because full sequences of matched proteins are not available and matching specificity is reduced, estimating protein abundances should become the obligatory element of homology-driven proteomics pipelines to circumvent the interpretation bias towards proteins from evolutionary conserved families. PMID:19167528

  10. New Tools to Explore Troy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    During the Golden Age of Greece the poet Homer wrote of the epic battles between Agamemnon and Priam-the fabled Trojan War. Although the city of Troy was a tourist attraction in Greek and Roman times, by the 1800s its location was lost, and many believed the story was only a myth. Frank Calvert and Heinrich Schliemann thought otherwise, and in the 1870s began excavating an earthen mound in western Turkey, near the Dardanelles. The site did indeed turn out to be the legendary city of Troy, and much more. Different layers-each corresponding to a different city-revealed evidence of a sequence (progression) of human habitation stretching back almost 5000 years. Although the ruins of Troy have been explored for 130 years, archaeologists have only excavated 10 percent of the site. To help them, NASA scientists are exploring new ways of using remote sensing data. The image above shows Troy and the surrounding image in true color. Taken by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the EO-1 satellite, the full-size image has a resolution of 10 meters. The city of Troy is circled, and the body of water to the north is the Dardanelles. These and other sensors may help find the boundaries of a harbor near Trojan-war era Troy that has since filled with sediment, trace the route of a Roman aqueduct that carried water to the city 2000 years ago, locate an ancient cemetary, and map the outer walls. A high-resolution image of Troy from the Ikonos satellite, posted previously on the Earth Observatory, reveals more details of the city. Image courtesy Konstantinos Stefanidis, EO-1 team

  11. Comparing Novices & Experts in Their Exploration of Data in Line Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Bruce H.; Lindgaard, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    This research compared undergraduate Novices and PhD Experts in psychology and business in their exploration of psychology and business domain graphs. An overall expertise effect in graph explanation was found. Results indicated that Novices paused longer than Experts before beginning their explanations. Qualitative analyses showed that Experts…

  12. A web-based tool for eliciting probability distributions from experts

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, David E.; Oakley, Jeremy E.; Crowe, John A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a web-based probability distribution elicitation tool: The MATCH Uncertainty Elicitation Tool. The Tool is designed to help elicit probability distributions about uncertain model parameters from experts, in situations where suitable data is either unavailable or sparse. The Tool is free to use, and offers five different techniques for eliciting univariate probability distributions. A key feature of the Tool is that users can log in from different sites and view and interact with th...

  13. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  14. Development of a knowledge acquisition tool for an expert system flight status monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbrow, J. D.; Duke, E. L.; Regenie, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    Two of the main issues in artificial intelligence today are knowledge acquisition and knowledge representation. The Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA's Ames Research Center is presently involved in the design and implementation of an expert system flight status monitor that will provide expertise and knowledge to aid the flight systems engineer in monitoring today's advanced high-performance aircraft. The flight status monitor can be divided into two sections: the expert system itself and the knowledge acquisition tool. This paper discusses the knowledge acquisition tool, the means it uses to extract knowledge from the domain expert, and how that knowledge is represented for computer use. An actual aircraft system has been codified by this tool with great success. Future real-time use of the expert system has been facilitated by using the knowledge acquisition tool to easily generate a logically consistent and complete knowledge base.

  15. Risk Reduction with a Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, William W.; Broadhead, Ron; Sung, Andrew

    2000-10-24

    This project developed an Artificial Intelligence system that drew up on a wide variety of information in providing realistic estimates of risk. ''Fuzzy logic,'' a system of integrating large amounts of inexact, incomplete information with modern computational methods derived usable conclusions, were demonstrated as a cost-effective computational technology in many industrial applications.

  16. The nature and evaluation of commercial expert system building tools, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1987-01-01

    This memorandum reviews the factors that constitute an Expert System Building Tool (ESBT) and evaluates current tools in terms of these factors. Evaluation of these tools is based on their structure and their alternative forms of knowledge representation, inference mechanisms and developer end-user interfaces. Next, functional capabilities, such as diagnosis and design, are related to alternative forms of mechanization. The characteristics and capabilities of existing commercial tools are then reviewed in terms of these criteria.

  17. Exploration Medical System Trade Study Tools Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, J.; Myers, J.; Latorella, K.; Cerro, J.; Hanson, A.; Hailey, M.; Middour, C.

    2018-01-01

    ExMC is creating an ecosystem of tools to enable well-informed medical system trade studies. The suite of tools address important system implementation aspects of the space medical capabilities trade space and are being built using knowledge from the medical community regarding the unique aspects of space flight. Two integrating models, a systems engineering model and a medical risk analysis model, tie the tools together to produce an integrated assessment of the medical system and its ability to achieve medical system target requirements. This presentation will provide an overview of the various tools that are a part of the tool ecosystem. Initially, the presentation's focus will address the tools that supply the foundational information to the ecosystem. Specifically, the talk will describe how information that describes how medicine will be practiced is captured and categorized for efficient utilization in the tool suite. For example, the talk will include capturing what conditions will be planned for in-mission treatment, planned medical activities (e.g., periodic physical exam), required medical capabilities (e.g., provide imaging), and options to implement the capabilities (e.g., an ultrasound device). Database storage and configuration management will also be discussed. The presentation will include an overview of how these information tools will be tied to parameters in a Systems Modeling Language (SysML) model, allowing traceability to system behavioral, structural, and requirements content. The discussion will also describe an HRP-led enhanced risk assessment model developed to provide quantitative insight into each capability's contribution to mission success. Key outputs from these various tools, to be shared with the space medical and exploration mission development communities, will be assessments of medical system implementation option satisfaction of requirements and per-capability contributions toward achieving requirements.

  18. A Tool for Automatic Verification of Real-Time Expert Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, B.; Schwuttke, U.; Quan, A.

    1994-01-01

    The creation of an automated, user-driven tool for expert system development, validation, and verification is curretly onoging at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In the new age of faster, better, cheaper missions, there is an increased willingness to utilize embedded expert systems for encapsulating and preserving mission expertise in systems which combine conventional algorithmic processing and artifical intelligence. The once-questioned role of automation in spacecraft monitoring is now becoming one of increasing importance.

  19. The Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (GenSAA): A tool for automating spacecraft monitoring with expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M.; Luczak, Edward C.

    1991-01-01

    Flight Operations Analysts (FOAs) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) are responsible for monitoring a satellite's health and safety. As satellites become more complex and data rates increase, FOAs are quickly approaching a level of information saturation. The FOAs in the spacecraft control center for the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite are currently using a fault isolation expert system named the Communications Link Expert Assistance Resource (CLEAR), to assist in isolating and correcting communications link faults. Due to the success of CLEAR and several other systems in the control center domain, many other monitoring and fault isolation expert systems will likely be developed to support control center operations during the early 1990s. To facilitate the development of these systems, a project was initiated to develop a domain specific tool, named the Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (GenSAA). GenSAA will enable spacecraft analysts to easily build simple real-time expert systems that perform spacecraft monitoring and fault isolation functions. Lessons learned during the development of several expert systems at Goddard, thereby establishing the foundation of GenSAA's objectives and offering insights in how problems may be avoided in future project, are described. This is followed by a description of the capabilities, architecture, and usage of GenSAA along with a discussion of its application to future NASA missions.

  20. Planetary Exploration Education: As Seen From the Point of View of Subject Matter Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Anderson, R. B.; Gaither, T. A.; Vaughan, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary Learning that Advances the Nexus of Engineering, Technology, and Science (PLANETS) was selected as one of 27 new projects to support the NASA Science Mission Directorate's Science Education Cooperative Agreement Notice. Our goal is to develop and disseminate out-of-school time (OST) curricular and related educator professional development modules that integrate planetary science, technology, and engineering. We are a partnership between planetary science Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), curriculum developers, science and engineering teacher professional development experts and OST teacher networks. The PLANETS team includes the Center for Science Teaching and Learning (CSTL) at Northern Arizona University (NAU); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Astrogeology Science Center (Astrogeology), and the Boston Museum of Science (MOS). Here, we present the work and approach by the SMEs at Astrogeology. As part of this overarching project, we will create a model for improved integration of SMEs, curriculum developers, professional development experts, and educators. For the 2016 and 2017 Fiscal Years, our focus is on creating science material for two OST modules designed for middle school students. We will begin development of a third module for elementary school students in the latter part of FY2017. The first module focuses on water conservation and treatment as applied on Earth, the International Space Station, and at a fictional Mars base. This unit involves the science and engineering of finding accessible water, evaluating it for quality, treating it for impurities (i.e., dissolved and suspended), initial use, a cycle of greywater treatment and re-use, and final treatment of blackwater. The second module involves the science and engineering of remote sensing as it is related to Earth and planetary exploration. This includes discussion and activities related to the electromagnetic spectrum, spectroscopy and various remote sensing systems and techniques. In

  1. The Griffiths Question Map: A Forensic Tool For Expert Witnesses' Assessments of Witnesses and Victims' Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodier, Olivier; Denault, Vincent

    2017-02-27

    Expert witnesses are sometimes asked to assess the reliability of young witnesses and victims' statements because of their high susceptibility to memory biases. This technical note aims to highlight the relevance of the Griffiths Question Map (GQM) as a professional forensic tool to improve expert witnesses' assessments of young witnesses and victims' testimonies. To do so, this innovative question type assessment grid was used to proceed to an in-depth analysis of the interview of an alleged 13-year-old victim of a sexual assault and two rapes. Overall, the GQM stressed how the interview was mainly conducted in an inappropriate manner. The results are examined with regard to scientific knowledge on young witnesses and victims' memory. Finally, it is argued that expert witnesses in inquisitorial systems might use the GQM while encountering difficulties to fulfill the legal standards for expert evidence in adversarial systems because of the lack of studies regarding its reliability. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. The Virtual UNICOS Process Expert: integration of Artificial Intelligence tools in Control Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Vilches Calvo, I; Barillere, R

    2009-01-01

    UNICOS is a CERN framework to produce control applications. It provides operators with ways to interact with all process items from the most simple (e.g. I/O channels) to the most abstract objects (e.g. a part of the plant). This possibility of fine grain operation is particularly useful to recover from abnormal situations if operators have the required knowledge. The Virtual UNICOS Process Expert project aims at providing operators with means to handle difficult operation cases for which the intervention of process experts is usually requested. The main idea of project is to use the openness of the UNICOS-based applications to integrate tools (e.g. Artificial Intelligence tools) which will act as Process Experts to analyze complex situations, to propose and to execute smooth recovery procedures.

  3. The Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (gensaa): a Tool for Developing Graphical Expert Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    During numerous contacts with a satellite each day, spacecraft analysts must closely monitor real-time data. The analysts must watch for combinations of telemetry parameter values, trends, and other indications that may signify a problem or failure. As the satellites become more complex and the number of data items increases, this task is becoming increasingly difficult for humans to perform at acceptable performance levels. At NASA GSFC, fault-isolation expert systems are in operation supporting this data monitoring task. Based on the lessons learned during these initial efforts in expert system automation, a new domain-specific expert system development tool named the Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (GenSAA) is being developed to facilitate the rapid development and reuse of real-time expert systems to serve as fault-isolation assistants for spacecraft analysts. Although initially domain-specific in nature, this powerful tool will readily support the development of highly graphical expert systems for data monitoring purposes throughout the space and commercial industry.

  4. An exploration of partnership through interactions between young 'expert' patients with cystic fibrosis and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kath; Irvine, Lindesay; Smith, Margaret Coulter

    2015-12-01

    To explore how young 'expert patients' living with Cystic Fibrosis and the healthcare professionals with whom they interact perceive partnership and negotiate care. Modern healthcare policy encourages partnership, engagement and self-management of long-term conditions. This philosophy is congruent with the model adopted in the care of those with Cystic Fibrosis, where self-management, trust and mutual respect are perceived to be integral to the development of the ongoing patient/professional relationship. Self-management is associated with the term; 'expert patient'; an individual with a long-term condition whose knowledge and skills are valued and used in partnership with healthcare professionals. However, the term 'expert patient' is debated in the literature as are the motivation for its use and the assumptions implicit in the term. A qualitative exploratory design informed by Interpretivism and Symbolic Interactionism was conducted. Thirty-four consultations were observed and 23 semi-structured interviews conducted between 10 patients, 2 carers and 12 healthcare professionals. Data were analysed thematically using the five stages of 'Framework' a matrix-based qualitative data analysis approach and were subject to peer review and respondent validation. The study received full ethical approval. Three main themes emerged; experiences of partnership, attributes of the expert patient and constructions of illness. Sub-themes of the 'ceremonial order of the clinic', negotiation and trust in relationships and perceptions of the expert patient are presented. The model of consultation may be a barrier to person-centred care. Healthcare professionals show leniency in negotiations, but do not always trust patients' accounts. The term 'expert patient' is unpopular and remains contested. Gaining insight into structures and processes that enable or inhibit partnership can lead to a collaborative approach to service redesign and a revision of the consultation model. © 2015

  5. Exploring experts' views and perspectives on the enhancement of Strategic Environmental Assessment in European small islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polido, Alexandra, E-mail: a.polido@campus.fct.unl.pt [CENSE, Center for Environmental and Sustainability Research, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); João, Elsa, E-mail: elsa.joao@strath.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Level 5, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ramos, Tomás B., E-mail: tabr@fct.unl.pt [CENSE, Center for Environmental and Sustainability Research, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-04-15

    stakeholders, such as territorial experts, to learn and promote the use and improvement of environmental and sustainability tools such as SEA. - Highlights: • Explored the views and perspectives of European small island experts • Showed the need for cooperation networks while developing SEA in these territories • Encouraged the development of specific guidelines as opposed to more legal frameworks • Highlighted SEA capability for the enhancement of small island sustainability.

  6. Building the Next Generation of Scientific Explorers through Active Engagement with STEM Experts and International Space Station Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Higgins, M.; Stefanov, W. L.; Rampe, E.

    2015-01-01

    Connecting students and teachers in classrooms with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts provides an invaluable opportunity for all. These experts can share the benefits and utilization of resources from the International Space Station (ISS) while sharing and "translating" exciting science being conducted by professional scientists. Active engagement with these STEM experts involves students in the journey of science and exploration in an enthralling and understandable manner. This active engagement, connecting classrooms with scientific experts, helps inspire and build the next generation of scientific explorers in academia, private industry, and government.

  7. IBZM tool: a fully automated expert system for the evaluation of IBZM SPECT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Martin, Brigitte; Borczyskowski, Daniel von; Mester, Janos; Brenner, Winfried; Clausen, Malte [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Berding, Georg [University School of Medicine Hannover, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Visual reading of [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPECT scans depends on the experience of the interpreter. Therefore, semi-quantification of striatal IBZM uptake is commonly considered mandatory. However, semi-quantification is time consuming and prone to error, particularly if the volumes of interest (VOIs) are positioned manually. Therefore, the present paper proposes a new software tool (''IBZM tool'') for fully automated and standardised processing, evaluation and documentation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPECT scans. The IBZM tool is an easy-to-use SPM toolbox. It includes automated procedures for realignment and summation of multiple frames (motion correction), stereotactic normalisation, scaling, VOI analysis of striatum-to-reference ratio R, classification of R and standardised display. In order to evaluate the tool, which was developed at the University of Hamburg, the tool was transferred to the University of Hannover. There it was applied to 27 well-documented subjects: eight patients with multi-system atrophy (MSA), 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and seven controls. The IBZM tool was compared with manual VOI analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of the IBZM tool for the differentiation of the MSA subjects from the controls were 100% and 86%, respectively. The IBZM tool provided improved statistical power compared with manual VOI analysis. The IBZM tool is an expert system for the detection of reduced striatal D{sub 2} availability on [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPECT scans. The standardised documentation supports visual and semi-quantitative evaluation, and it is useful for presenting the findings to the referring physician. The IBZM tool has the potential for widespread use, since it appears to be fairly independent of the performance characteristics of the particular SPECT system used. The tool is available free of charge. (orig.)

  8. MRXT: The Multi-Robot eXploration Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Gil; Miguel Juliá; Óscar Reinoso

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the multi-robot eXploration tool (MRXT) [Freely available at http://arvc.umh.es/mrxt], a new mobile robotics simulation tool whose aim is to experiment and understand some well-known multi-robot exploration algorithms. The application is designed to test and compare different multi-robot exploration algorithms as well as SLAM techniques. The application includes a wide range of exploration algorithms that differ in their level of coordination and integration with the SLAM ...

  9. An online planetary exploration tool: ;Country Movers;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gede, Mátyás; Hargitai, Henrik

    2017-08-01

    Results in astrogeologic investigations are rarely communicated towards the general public by maps despite the new advances in planetary spatial informatics and new spatial datasets in high resolution and more complete coverage. Planetary maps are typically produced by astrogeologists for other professionals, and not by cartographers for the general public. We report on an application designed for students, which uses cartography as framework to aid the virtual exploration of other planets and moons, using the concepts of size comparison and travel time calculation. We also describe educational activities that build on geographic knowledge and expand it to planetary surfaces.

  10. OntoBrowser: a collaborative tool for curation of ontologies by subject matter experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravagli, Carlo; Pognan, Francois; Marc, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The lack of controlled terminology and ontology usage leads to incomplete search results and poor interoperability between databases. One of the major underlying challenges of data integration is curating data to adhere to controlled terminologies and/or ontologies. Finding subject matter experts with the time and skills required to perform data curation is often problematic. In addition, existing tools are not designed for continuous data integration and collaborative curation. This results in time-consuming curation workflows that often become unsustainable. The primary objective of OntoBrowser is to provide an easy-to-use online collaborative solution for subject matter experts to map reported terms to preferred ontology (or code list) terms and facilitate ontology evolution. Additional features include web service access to data, visualization of ontologies in hierarchical/graph format and a peer review/approval workflow with alerting. The source code is freely available under the Apache v2.0 license. Source code and installation instructions are available at http://opensource.nibr.com This software is designed to run on a Java EE application server and store data in a relational database. philippe.marc@novartis.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Multimodal Neurodiagnostic Tool for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Linea Research Corporation has developed a neurodiagnostic tool that detects behavioral stress markers for astronauts on long-duration space missions. Lightweight and compact, the device is unobtrusive and requires minimal time and effort for the crew to use. The system provides a real-time functional imaging of cortical activity during normal activities. In Phase I of the project, Linea Research successfully monitored cortical activity using multiparameter sensor modules. Using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals, the company obtained photoplethysmography and electrooculography signals to compute the heart rate and frequency of eye movement. The company also demonstrated the functionality of an algorithm that automatically classifies the varying degrees of cognitive loading based on physiological parameters. In Phase II, Linea Research developed the flight-capable neurodiagnostic device. Worn unobtrusively on the head, the device detects and classifies neurophysiological markers associated with decrements in behavior state and cognition. An automated algorithm identifies key decrements and provides meaningful and actionable feedback to the crew and ground-based medical staff.

  12. Supporting GUI Exploration through USS Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in usability and design techniques (e.g. user-centered design try to facilitate the use of interactive systems. However, users still have to adapt to interactive systems, i.e. they have to learn the steps required to accomplish a task either by trial and error or by obtaining help. While advanced users are usually able to adapt without much effort this is far from being the case with beginners. Some interactive systems offer different interaction styles in an attempt to meet the needs of all types of user but this is not the case with all interactive systems. In this sense, we present an approach to support the use of any interactive system making use of enriched models and picture-driven computing to achieve tasks automation. The USS tool (User Support System is the basis to the adaptation of interactive systems accordingly to the users' needs. The approach provides the foundation for the addition of help (based on demonstration to any graphical user interfaces (GUI facilitating learning and use. The work is illustrated by a case study and completed with a preliminary user evaluation which provides insights about the validity of the approach.

  13. Multi-Modal Neurodiagnostic Tool for Exploration Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a critical requirement for a neurodiagnostic tool that can be used to monitor the behavioral health of the crew during long duration exploration missions....

  14. NEEMO 21: Tools, Techniques, Technologies & Training for Science Exploration EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The 21st mission of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated operational test and evaluation of tools, techniques, technologies, and training for science driven exploration during Extravehicular Activity (EVA).The 16-day mission was conducted from the Aquarius habitat, an underwater laboratory, off the coast of Key Largo, FL. The unique facility, authentic science objectives, and diverse skill-sets of the crew/team facilitate the planning and design for future space exploration.

  15. Perceived key injury risk factors in World Cup alpine ski racing--an explorative qualitative study with expert stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Amesberger, Günter; Blake, Ollie M; Müller, Erich

    2012-12-01

    There is limited knowledge about key injury risk factors in alpine ski racing, particularly for World Cup (WC) athletes. This study was undertaken to compile and explore perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. Qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with 61 expert stakeholders of the WC ski racing community. Experts' statements were collected, paraphrased and loaded into a database with inductively derived risk factor categories (Risk Factor Analysis). At the end of the interviews, experts were asked to name those risk factors they believed to have a high potential impact on injury risk and to rank them according to their priority of impact (Risk Factor Rating). In total, 32 perceived risk factors categories were derived from the interviews within the basic categories Athlete, Course, Equipment and Snow. Regarding their perceived impact on injury risk, the experts' top five categories were: system ski, binding, plate and boot; changing snow conditions; physical aspects of the athletes; speed and course setting aspects and speed in general. Severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing can have various causes. This study compiled a list of perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors and explored those factors with the highest believed impact on injury risk. Hence, by using more detailed hypotheses derived from this explorative study, further studies should verify the plausibility of these factors as true risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing.

  16. MaGnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Joanna L; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2013-09-15

    The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (MaGnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive 'exploration-style' visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. MaGnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein-protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Exploring tool innovation: a comparison of Western and Bushman children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mark; Tomaselli, Keyan; Mushin, Ilana; Whiten, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    A capacity for constructing new tools, or using old tools in new ways, to solve novel problems is a core feature of what it means to be human. Yet current evidence suggests that young children are surprisingly poor at innovating tools. However, all studies of tool innovation to date have been conducted with children from comparatively privileged Western backgrounds. This raises questions as to whether or not previously documented tool innovation failure is culturally and economically specific. In the current study, thus, we explored the innovation capacities of children from Westernized urban backgrounds and from remote communities of South African Bushmen. Consistent with past research, we found tool innovation to occur at extremely low rates and that cultural background had no bearing on this. The current study is the first to empirically test tool innovation in children from non-Western backgrounds, with our data being consistent with the view that despite its key role in human evolution, a capacity for innovation in tool making remains remarkably undeveloped during early childhood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the brains of Baduk (Go experts: gray matter morphometry, resting-state functional connectivity, and graph theoretical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wi Hoon eJung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One major characteristic of experts is intuitive judgment, which is an automatic process whereby patterns stored in memory through long-term training are recognized. Indeed, long-term training may influence brain structure and function. A recent study revealed that chess experts at rest showed differences in structure and functional connectivity (FC in the head of caudate, which is associated with rapid best next-move generation. However, less is known about the structure and function of the brains of Baduk experts compared with those of experts in other strategy games. Therefore, we performed voxel-based morphometry and FC analyses in Baduk experts to investigate structural brain differences and to clarify the influence of these differences on functional interactions. We also conducted graph theoretical analysis to explore the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Compared to novices, Baduk experts exhibited decreased and increased gray matter volume in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, respectively. We also found increased FC between the amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex and decreased FC between the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex. Further graph theoretical analysis revealed differences in measures of the integration of the network and in the regional nodal characteristics of various brain regions activated during Baduk. This study provides evidence for structural and functional differences as well as altered topological organization of the whole-brain functional networks in Baduk experts. Our findings also offer novel suggestions about the cognitive mechanisms behind Baduk expertise, which involves intuitive decision-making mediated by somatic marker circuitry and visuospatial processing.

  19. Expert Insight into the Assessment of Competence in Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy: A Qualitative Exploration of Experts' Experiences, Opinions and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Kate; McManus, Freda

    2016-05-01

    To offer insight into how cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) competence is defined, measured and evaluated and to highlight ways in which the assessment of CBT competence could be further improved, the current study utilizes a qualitative methodology to examine CBT experts' (N = 19) experiences of conceptualizing and assessing the competence of CBT therapists. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore participants' experiences of assessing the competence of CBT therapists. Interview transcripts were then analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis in order to identify commonalities and differences in the way CBT competence is evaluated. Four superordinate themes were identified: (i) what to assess, the complex and fuzzy concept of CBT competence; (ii) how to assess CBT competence, selecting from the toolbox of assessment methods; (iii) who is best placed to assess CBT competence, expertise and independence; and (iv) pitfalls, identifying and overcoming assessment biases. Priorities for future research and ways in which the assessment of CBT competence could be further improved are discussed in light of these findings. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. A qualitative exploration of experts' experiences, opinions and recommendations for assessing the competence of CBT therapists. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Themes identified shed light on (i) what to assess; (ii) how to assess; (iii) who is best placed to assess; and (iv) common pitfalls. Priorities for future research and ways in which the assessment of CBT competence could be further improved are discussed in light of these findings. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Refining a Tool for the Selection of Experts in Educational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cruz Ramírez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report a research study geared toward refining an empirical instrument for the selection of experts for educational research, according to its reliability and internal consistency. To this end we used a three-round Delphi technique and subjected the results to a factor analysis. Latent variables were determined that explain the nature of the sources of argumentation necessary for ensuring an adequate level of competence on the part of the experts.

  1. Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES)-a useful tool to practice and learn medical acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chi Fai David; Leung, Kwong Sak; Heng, Pheng Ann; Lim, Chi Eung Danforn; Wong, Felix Wu Shun

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) that will assist the learning and practice of medical acupuncture. This was the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System which incorporated eight functional modules. These modules were 1) Add Patient Record subsystem; 2) Diagnosis subsystem ; 3) Acupuncture Prescription subsystem ; 4) Needle Insertion Position Animation subsystem ; 5) Acupuncture Points Usage Statistic subsystem ; 6) History Query subsystem; 7) Acupuncture Points Query subsystem and 8) Diagnosis Remarks and Diagnosis Record Save subsystem. Two databases were built-Patient Record database and Diagnosis (Acupuncture) Knowledge database. All the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) knowledge and acupuncture treatment prescriptions were extracted from officially used TCM textbooks and received guidance and expert advice from two acupuncturists working in this project. A Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) was built, which after the input from users of any Chinese disease symptoms and signs, it can provide a list of related TCM syndrome diagnoses based on the patients' disease symptoms and signs, and at the same time it can offer advice of the appropriate Chinese acupuncture treatment to the users. CAES also provided text descriptions and acupuncture animations showing the acupoint locations and the direction and depth of the needle insertion technique. Therefore users can easily learn acupuncture and practice it. This new acupuncture expert system will hopefully provide an easy way for users to learn and practice Chinese Acupuncture and establish its usefulness after it was fully evaluated.

  2. An interactive testbed for development of expert tools for pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    The initial implementation of an interactive testbed for development of expert system applications in image processing, i.e., a toolbox of procedures designed to facilitate the capture of expert knowledge for region grouping and analysis is described. The user can elect to interactively enter commands (via a command interpreter) for region manipulation to, in effect, simulate the actions of a hypothetical expert system. The user can then incorporate any rules and procedures as derived from interactive experimentation into customized region processing procedures using the library of utility functions. An iterative technique based on image pyramids is used to compute the initial region segmentation without the use of process parameters. These regions can then be interactively examined and manipulated using the command interpreter.

  3. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  4. Walkability Explorer. An Evaluation and Design Support Tool for Walkability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Blečić

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Walkability Explorer is a software tool for the evaluation of urban walkability which, we argue, is an important aspect of the quality of life in cities. Many conventional approaches to the assessment of quality of life measure the distribution, density and distances of different opportunities in space. But distance is not all there is. To reason in terms of urban capabilities of people we should also take into account the quality of pedestrian accessibility and of urban opportunities offered by the city. The software tool we present in this paper is an user-friendly implementation of such an evaluation approach to walkability. It includes several GIS and analysis features, and is interoperable with other standard GIS and data-analysis tools.

  5. Action to achieve smoke-free homes- an exploration of experts' views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham-Burley Sarah

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking in the home is the major cause of exposure to second-hand smoke in children in the UK, particularly those living in low income households which have fewer restrictions on smoking in the home. Reducing children's exposure to second-hand smoke is an important public health and inequalities issue. Drawing on findings from a qualitative Scottish study, this paper identifies key issues and challenges that need to be considered when developing action to promote smoke-free homes at the national and local level. Methods Two panels of tobacco control experts (local and national from Scotland considered the implications of the findings from a qualitative study of smokers and non-smokers (who were interviewed about smoking in the home, for future action on reducing smoking in the home. Results Several key themes emerged through the expert panel discussions. These related to: improving knowledge about SHS among carers and professionals; the goal and approach of future interventions (incremental/harm reduction or total restrictions; the complexity of the interventions; and issues around protecting children. Conclusion The expert panels were very aware of the sensitivities around the boundary between the 'private' home and public health interventions; but also the lack of evidence on the relative effectiveness of specific individual and community approaches on increasing restrictions on smoking in the home. Future action on smoke-free homes needs to consider and address these complexities. In particular health professionals and other key stakeholders need appropriate training on the issues around smoking in the home and how to address these, as well as for more research to evaluate interventions and develop a more robust evidence base to inform effective action on this issue.

  6. SeDeM expert system a new innovator tool to develop pharmaceutical forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Díaz, Johnny Edward; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, José María; Miñarro, Montserrat; Ticó, José Ramón

    2014-02-01

    The SeDeM expert system is based on the experimental study and quantitative determination of the characterization parameters of powdered substances, the aim being to determine whether a substance is suitable for producing tablets by means of direct compression (DC) technology, thereby reducing the lead time for pre-formulation studies. Additionally, this expert system also provides formulations with a minimum number of excipients. We used this system to analyze suitable formulas for the production of orodispersible ibuprofen tablets. Twenty-one disintegrants and ibuprophen were characterized using SeDeM methodology. The results indicated that production of ibuprofen tablets by DC would require improvements in the dimension and compressibility factors of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. The expert system analysis provided the specific percentage of disintegrant needed to blend with ibuprofen and a standardized formula of lubricants in order to obtain a powder mix that would successfully produce tablets by DC. The eight formulas proposed by SeDeM were produced and tested in the laboratory. All eight formulas successfully produced tablets by DC, but only four of them could be considered suitable for use as an orodispersible tablet and accomplishes all the pharmaceutical quality parameters. So, in fact, the use of the SeDeM system reduced the time of medicine's development and therefore the cost of the activity.

  7. Designing tools for oil exploration using nuclear modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauborgne, Marie-Laure; Allioli, Françoise; Manclossi, Mauro; Nicoletti, Luisa; Stoller, Chris; Evans, Mike

    2017-09-01

    When designing nuclear tools for oil exploration, one of the first steps is typically nuclear modeling for concept evaluation and initial characterization. Having an accurate model, including the availability of accurate cross sections, is essential to reduce or avoid time consuming and costly design iterations. During tool response characterization, modeling is benchmarked with experimental data and then used to complement and to expand the database to make it more detailed and inclusive of more measurement environments which are difficult or impossible to reproduce in the laboratory. We present comparisons of our modeling results obtained using the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII cross section data bases, focusing on the response to a few elements found in the tool, borehole and subsurface formation. For neutron-induced inelastic and capture gamma ray spectroscopy, major obstacles may be caused by missing or inaccurate cross sections for essential materials. We show examples of the benchmarking of modeling results against experimental data obtained during tool characterization and discuss observed discrepancies.

  8. Designing tools for oil exploration using nuclear modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauborgne Marie-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing nuclear tools for oil exploration, one of the first steps is typically nuclear modeling for concept evaluation and initial characterization. Having an accurate model, including the availability of accurate cross sections, is essential to reduce or avoid time consuming and costly design iterations. During tool response characterization, modeling is benchmarked with experimental data and then used to complement and to expand the database to make it more detailed and inclusive of more measurement environments which are difficult or impossible to reproduce in the laboratory. We present comparisons of our modeling results obtained using the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII cross section data bases, focusing on the response to a few elements found in the tool, borehole and subsurface formation. For neutron-induced inelastic and capture gamma ray spectroscopy, major obstacles may be caused by missing or inaccurate cross sections for essential materials. We show examples of the benchmarking of modeling results against experimental data obtained during tool characterization and discuss observed discrepancies.

  9. Identity as an Analytical Tool to Explore Students’ Mathematical Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    Learning to communicate in, with and about mathematics is a key part of learning mathematics (Niss & Højgaard, 2011). Therefore, understanding how students’ mathematical writing is shaped is important to mathematics education research. In this paper the notion of ‘writer identity’ (Ivanič, 1998; ......; Burgess & Ivanič, 2010) is introduced and operationalised in relation to students’ mathematical writing and through a case study it is illustrated how this analytic tool can facilitate valuable insights when exploring students’ mathematical writing....

  10. Perceived key injury risk factors in World Cup alpine ski racing—an explorative qualitative study with expert stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Amesberger, Günter; Blake, Ollie M; Müller, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about key injury risk factors in alpine ski racing, particularly for World Cup (WC) athletes. Objective This study was undertaken to compile and explore perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. Methods Qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with 61 expert stakeholders of the WC ski racing community. Experts’ statements were collected, paraphrased and loaded into a database with inductively derived risk factor categories (Risk Factor Analysis). At the end of the interviews, experts were asked to name those risk factors they believed to have a high potential impact on injury risk and to rank them according to their priority of impact (Risk Factor Rating). Results In total, 32 perceived risk factors categories were derived from the interviews within the basic categories Athlete, Course, Equipment and Snow. Regarding their perceived impact on injury risk, the experts’ top five categories were: system ski, binding, plate and boot; changing snow conditions; physical aspects of the athletes; speed and course setting aspects and speed in general. Conclusions Severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing can have various causes. This study compiled a list of perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors and explored those factors with the highest believed impact on injury risk. Hence, by using more detailed hypotheses derived from this explorative study, further studies should verify the plausibility of these factors as true risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. PMID:22872684

  11. EINSTEIN - Expert system for an Intelligent Supply of Thermal Energy in Industry. Audit methodology and software tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweiger, Hans; Danov, Stoyan (energyXperts.NET (Spain)); Vannoni, Claudia; Facci, Enrico (Sapienza Univ. of Rome, Dept. of Mechanics and Aeronautics, Rome (Italy)); Brunner, Christoph; Slawitsch, Bettina (Joanneum Research, Inst. of Sustainable Techniques and Systems - JOINTS, Graz (Austria))

    2009-07-01

    For optimising thermal energy supply in industry, a holistic integral approach is required that includes possibilities of demand reduction by heat recovery and process integration, and by an intelligent combination of efficient heat and cold supply technologies. EINSTEIN is a tool-kit for fast and high quality thermal energy audits in industry, composed by an audit guide describing the methodology and by a software tool that guides the auditor through all the audit steps. The main features of EINSTEIN are: (1) a basic questionnaire helps for systematic collection of the necessary information with the possibility to acquire data by distance; (2) special tools allow for fast consistency checking and estimation of missing data, so that already with very few data some first predictions can be made; (3) the data processing is based on standardised models for industrial processes and industrial heat supply systems; (4) semi-automatization: the software tool gives support to decision making for the generation of alternative heat and cold supply proposals, carries out automatically all the necessary calculations, including dynamic simulation of the heat supply system, and creates a standard audit report. The software tool includes modules for benchmarking, automatic design of heat exchanger networks, and design assistants for the heat and cold supply system. The core of the expert system software tool is available for free, as an open source software project. This type of software development has shown to be very efficient for dissemination of knowledge and for the continuous maintenance and improvement thanks to user contributions.

  12. Design and Application of the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromgren, Chel; Terry, Michelle; Crillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce; Maxwell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conducting human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will present unique challenges in the areas of supportability and maintainability. The durations of proposed missions can be relatively long and re-supply of logistics, including maintenance and repair items, will be limited or non-existent. In addition, mass and volume constraints in the transportation system will limit the total amount of logistics that can be flown along with the crew. These constraints will require that new strategies be developed with regards to how spacecraft systems are designed and maintained. NASA is currently developing Design Reference Missions (DRMs) as an initial step in defining future human missions. These DRMs establish destinations and concepts of operation for future missions, and begin to define technology and capability requirements. Because of the unique supportability challenges, historical supportability data and models are not directly applicable for establishing requirements for beyond LEO missions. However, supportability requirements could have a major impact on the development of the DRMs. The mass, volume, and crew resources required to support the mission could all be first order drivers in the design of missions, elements, and operations. Therefore, there is a need for enhanced analysis capabilities to more accurately establish mass, volume, and time requirements for supporting beyond LEO missions. Additionally, as new technologies and operations are proposed to reduce these requirements, it is necessary to have accurate tools to evaluate the efficacy of those approaches. In order to improve the analysis of supportability requirements for beyond LEO missions, the Space Missions Analysis Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool (EMAT). This tool is a probabilistic simulator that evaluates the need for repair and maintenance activities during space missions and the logistics and crew

  13. NEEMO 21: Tools, Techniques, Technologies and Training for Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T.; Young, K.; Coan, D.; Merselis, D.; Bellantuono, A.; Dougan, K.; Rodriguez-Lanetty, M.; Nedimyer, K.; Chappell, S.; Beaton, K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The 21st mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated operational field test and evaluation of tools, techniques, technologies, and training for science driven exploration during extravehicular activity (EVA). The mission was conducted in July 2016 from the Aquarius habitat, an underwater laboratory, off the coast of Key Largo in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. An international crew of eight (comprised of NASA and ESA astronauts, engineers, medical personnel, and habitat technicians) lived and worked in and around Aquarius and its surrounding reef environment for 16 days. The integrated testing (both interior and exterior objectives) conducted from this unique facility continues to support current and future human space exploration endeavors. Expanding on the scientific and operational evaluations conducted during NEEMO 20, the 21st NEEMO mission further incorporated a diverse Science Team comprised of planetary geoscientists from the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES/XI) Division from the Johnson Space Center, marine scientists from the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University (FIU) Integrative Marine Genomics and Symbiosis (IMaGeS) Lab, and conservationists from the Coral Restoration Foundation. The Science Team worked in close coordination with the long-standing EVA operations, planning, engineering, and research components of NEEMO in all aspects of mission planning, development, and execution.

  14. Including values in evidence-based policy making for breast screening: An empirically grounded tool to assist expert decision makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa

    2017-07-01

    Values are an important part of evidence-based decision making for health policy: they guide the type of evidence that is collected, how it is interpreted, and how important the conclusions are considered to be. Experts in breast screening (including clinicians, researchers, consumer advocates and senior administrators) hold differing values in relation to what is important in breast screening policy and practice, and committees may find it difficult to incorporate the complexity and variety of values into policy decisions. The decision making tool provided here is intended to assist with this process. The tool is modified from more general frameworks that are intended to assist with ethical decision making in public health, and informed by data drawn from previous empirical studies on values amongst Australian breast screening experts. It provides a structured format for breast screening committees to consider and discuss the values of themselves and others, suggests relevant topics for further inquiry and highlights areas of need for future research into the values of the public. It enables committees to publicly explain and justify their decisions with reference to values, improving transparency and accountability. It is intended to act alongside practices that seek to accommodate the values of individual women in the informed decision making process for personal decision making about participation in breast screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring the musical taste of expert listeners: musicology students reveal tendency toward omnivorous taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvers, Paul; Omigie, Diana; Fuhrmann, Wolfgang; Fischinger, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Musicology students are engaged with music on an academic level and usually have an extensive musical background. They have a considerable knowledge of music history and theory and listening to music may be regarded as one of their primary occupations. Taken together, these factors qualify them as ≫expert listeners≪, who may be expected to exhibit a specific profile of musical taste: interest in a broad range of musical styles combined with a greater appreciation of ≫sophisticated≪ styles. The current study examined the musical taste of musicology students as compared to a control student group. Participants (n = 1003) completed an online survey regarding the frequency with which they listened to 22 musical styles. A factor analysis revealed six underlying dimensions of musical taste. A hierarchical cluster analysis then grouped all participants, regardless of their status, according to their similarity on these dimensions. The employed exploratory approach was expected to reveal potential differences between musicology students and controls. A three-cluster solution was obtained. Comparisons of the clusters in terms of musical taste revealed differences in the listening frequency and variety of appreciated music styles: the first cluster (51% musicology students/27% controls) showed the greatest musical engagement across all dimensions although with a tendency toward ≫sophisticated≪ musical styles. The second cluster (36% musicology students/46% controls) exhibited an interest in ≫conventional≪ music, while the third cluster (13% musicology students/27% controls) showed a strong liking of rock music. The results provide some support for the notion of specific tendencies in the musical taste of musicology students and the contribution of familiarity and knowledge toward musical omnivorousness. Further differences between the clusters in terms of social, personality, and sociodemographic factors are discussed.

  16. Lyapunov exponents a tool to explore complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pikovsky, Arkady

    2016-01-01

    Lyapunov exponents lie at the heart of chaos theory, and are widely used in studies of complex dynamics. Utilising a pragmatic, physical approach, this self-contained book provides a comprehensive description of the concept. Beginning with the basic properties and numerical methods, it then guides readers through to the most recent advances in applications to complex systems. Practical algorithms are thoroughly reviewed and their performance is discussed, while a broad set of examples illustrate the wide range of potential applications. The description of various numerical and analytical techniques for the computation of Lyapunov exponents offers an extensive array of tools for the characterization of phenomena such as synchronization, weak and global chaos in low and high-dimensional set-ups, and localization. This text equips readers with all the investigative expertise needed to fully explore the dynamical properties of complex systems, making it ideal for both graduate students and experienced researchers...

  17. Seismic Canvas: Evolution as a Data Exploration and Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    SeismicCanvas, originally developed as a prototype interactive waveform display and printing application for educational use has evolved to include significant data exploration and analysis functionality. The most recent version supports data import from a variety of standard file formats including SAC and mini-SEED, as well as search and download capabilities via IRIS/FDSN Web Services. Data processing tools now include removal of means and trends, interactive windowing, filtering, smoothing, tapering, resampling. Waveforms can be displayed in a free-form canvas or as a record section based on angular or great circle distance, azimuth or back azimuth. Integrated tau-p code allows the calculation and display of theoretical phase arrivals from a variety of radial Earth models. Waveforms can be aligned by absolute time, event time, picked or theoretical arrival times and can be stacked after alignment. Interactive measurements include means, amplitudes, time delays, ray parameters and apparent velocities. Interactive picking of an arbitrary list of seismic phases is supported. Bode plots of amplitude and phase spectra and spectrograms can be created from multiple seismograms or selected windows of seismograms. Direct printing is implemented on all supported platforms along with output of high-resolution pdf files. With these added capabilities, the application is now being used as a data exploration tool for research. Coded in C++ and using the cross-platform Qt framework, the most recent version is available as a 64-bit application for Windows 7-10, Mac OS X 10.6-10.11, and most distributions of Linux, and a 32-bit version for Windows XP and 7. With the latest improvements and refactoring of trace display classes, the 64-bit versions have been tested with over 250 million samples and remain responsive in interactive operations. The source code is available under a LPGLv3 license and both source and executables are available through the IRIS SeisCode repository.

  18. The Genome Reverse Compiler: an explorative annotation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As sequencing costs have decreased, whole genome sequencing has become a viable and integral part of biological laboratory research. However, the tools with which genes can be found and functionally characterized have not been readily adapted to be part of the everyday biological sciences toolkit. Most annotation pipelines remain as a service provided by large institutions or come as an unwieldy conglomerate of independent components, each requiring their own setup and maintenance. Results To address this issue we have created the Genome Reverse Compiler, an easy-to-use, open-source, automated annotation tool. The GRC is independent of third party software installs and only requires a Linux operating system. This stands in contrast to most annotation packages, which typically require installation of relational databases, sequence similarity software, and a number of other programming language modules. We provide details on the methodology used by GRC and evaluate its performance on several groups of prokaryotes using GRC's built in comparison module. Conclusion Traditionally, to perform whole genome annotation a user would either set up a pipeline or take advantage of an online service. With GRC the user need only provide the genome he or she wants to annotate and the function resource files to use. The result is high usability and a very minimal learning curve for the intended audience of life science researchers and bioinformaticians. We believe that the GRC fills a valuable niche in allowing users to perform explorative, whole-genome annotation.

  19. FilooT: a visualization tool for exploring genomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinaly, Mahshid; Soltangheis, Mina; Shaw, Chris D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to enhance analysis of synthetic health data of the IEEE VAST Challenge 2010, we introduce an interactive Visual Analytics tool called FilooT designed as a part of the Interactive Multi-genomic Analysis System (IMAS) project. In this paper, we describe different interactive views of FilooT: the Tabular View for exploring and comparing genetic sequences, the Matrix View for sorting sequences according to the values of different characteristics, the P-value View for finding the most important mutations across a family of sequences, the Graph View for finding related sequences and the Group View to group them for further investigation. We followed the Nested Process Model framework throughout the design process and the evaluation. To understand the tool's design capabilities for target domain analysts, we conducted a User Experience scenario-based study followed by an informal interview. The findings indicated how analysts employ each of the visualization and interaction designs in their Bioinformatics task-analysis process. The critical analysis of the results inspired design informing suggestions.

  20. A tool for exploring space-time patterns : an animation user research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogao Patrick J

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ever since Dr. John Snow (1813–1854 used a case map to identify water well as the source of a cholera outbreak in London in the 1800s, the use of spatio-temporal maps have become vital tools in a wide range of disease mapping and control initiatives. The increasing use of spatio-temporal maps in these life-threatening sectors warrants that they are accurate, and easy to interpret to enable prompt decision making by health experts. Similar spatio-temporal maps are observed in urban growth and census mapping – all critical aspects a of a country's socio-economic development. In this paper, a user test research was carried out to determine the effectiveness of spatio-temporal maps (animation in exploring geospatial structures encompassing disease, urban and census mapping. Results Three types of animation were used, namely; passive, interactive and inference-based animation, with the key differences between them being on the level of interactivity and complementary domain knowledge that each offers to the user. Passive animation maintains the view only status. The user has no control over its contents and dynamic variables. Interactive animation provides users with the basic media player controls, navigation and orientation tools. Inference-based animation incorporates these interactive capabilities together with a complementary automated intelligent view that alerts users to interesting patterns, trends or anomalies that may be inherent in the data sets. The test focussed on the role of animation passive and interactive capabilities in exploring space-time patterns by engaging test-subjects in thinking aloud evaluation protocol. The test subjects were selected from a geoinformatics (map reading, interpretation and analysis abilities background. Every test-subject used each of the three types of animation and their performances for each session assessed. The results show that interactivity in animation is a preferred

  1. Dual processing theory and experts' reasoning: exploring thinking on national multiple-choice questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Dong, Ting; Artino, Anthony R; van der Vleuten, Cees; Holmboe, Eric; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-08-01

    An ongoing debate exists in the medical education literature regarding the potential benefits of pattern recognition (non-analytic reasoning), actively comparing and contrasting diagnostic options (analytic reasoning) or using a combination approach. Studies have not, however, explicitly explored faculty's thought processes while tackling clinical problems through the lens of dual process theory to inform this debate. Further, these thought processes have not been studied in relation to the difficulty of the task or other potential mediating influences such as personal factors and fatigue, which could also be influenced by personal factors such as sleep deprivation. We therefore sought to determine which reasoning process(es) were used with answering clinically oriented multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and if these processes differed based on the dual process theory characteristics: accuracy, reading time and answering time as well as psychometrically determined item difficulty and sleep deprivation. We performed a think-aloud procedure to explore faculty's thought processes while taking these MCQs, coding think-aloud data based on reasoning process (analytic, nonanalytic, guessing or combination of processes) as well as word count, number of stated concepts, reading time, answering time, and accuracy. We also included questions regarding amount of work in the recent past. We then conducted statistical analyses to examine the associations between these measures such as correlations between frequencies of reasoning processes and item accuracy and difficulty. We also observed the total frequencies of different reasoning processes in the situations of getting answers correctly and incorrectly. Regardless of whether the questions were classified as 'hard' or 'easy', non-analytical reasoning led to the correct answer more often than to an incorrect answer. Significant correlations were found between self-reported recent number of hours worked with think-aloud word count

  2. SOSPEX, an interactive tool to explore SOFIA spectral cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Dario; Chambers, Edward T.

    2018-01-01

    We present SOSPEX (SOFIA SPectral EXplorer), an interactive tool to visualize and analyze spectral cubes obtained with the FIFI-LS and GREAT instruments onboard the SOFIA Infrared Observatory. This software package is written in Python 3 and it is available either through Github or Anaconda.Through this GUI it is possible to explore directly the spectral cubes produced by the SOFIA pipeline and archived in the SOFIA Science Archive. Spectral cubes are visualized showing their spatial and spectral dimensions in two different windows. By selecting a part of the spectrum, the flux from the corresponding slice of the cube is visualized in the spatial window. On the other hand, it is possible to define apertures on the spatial window to show the corresponding spectral energy distribution in the spectral window.Flux isocontours can be overlapped to external images in the spatial window while line names, atmospheric transmission, or external spectra can be overplotted on the spectral window. Atmospheric models with specific parameters can be retrieved, compared to the spectra and applied to the uncorrected FIFI-LS cubes in the cases where the standard values give unsatisfactory results. Subcubes can be selected and saved as FITS files by cropping or cutting the original cubes. Lines and continuum can be fitted in the spectral window saving the results in Jyson files which can be reloaded later. Finally, in the case of spatially extended observations, it is possible to compute spectral momenta as a function of the position to obtain velocity dispersion maps or velocity diagrams.

  3. Exploring TechQuests Through Open Source and Tools That Inspire Digital Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, K.; Ouyang, Y.; Kilb, D.; Taylor, N.; Krey, B.

    2008-12-01

    Quests, to support classroom instruction previously outlined through a textbook. Project classrooms have participated in videoconferences over high-speed networks and through satellite connections with experts in the field investigating scientific data found in the CA State Park of Anza Borrego. Other engaging tools include: An Interactive Epicenter Locator Tool developed through the project in collaboration with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography to engage students in the use of data to determine earthquake epicenters during hands on investigations, and a TechQuest activity where GoogleEarth allows students to explore geographic locations and scientific data.

  4. Exploring Self-Regulation of More or Less Expert College-Age Video Game Players: A Sequential Explanatory Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem YILMAZ SOYLU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined differences in self-regulation among college-age expert, moderately expert, and non-expert video game players in playing video games for fun. Winne’s model of self-regulation (Winne, 2001 guided the study. Main assumption of this study was that expert video game players used more processes of self-regulation than the less-expert players. We surveyed 143 college students about their game playing frequency, habits, and use of self-regulation. Data analysis indicated that while playing recreational video games, expert gamers self-regulated more than moderately expert and non-expert players and moderately expert players used more processes of self-regulation than non-experts. Semi-structured interviews also were conducted with selected participants at each of the expertise levels. Qualitative follow-up analyses revealed five themes: 1 characteristics of expert video gamers, 2 conditions for playing a video game, 3 figuring out a game, 4 how gamers act and, 5 game context. Overall, findings indicated that playing a video game is a highly self-regulated activity and that becoming an expert video game player mobilizes multiple sets of self-regulation related skills and processes. These findings are seen as promising for educators desiring to encourage student self-regulation, because they indicate the possibility of supporting students via recreational video games by recognizing that their play includes processes of self-regulation.

  5. Exploring Self-regulation of More or Less Expert College-Age Video Game Players: A Sequential Explanatory Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Soylu, Meryem; Bruning, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    This study examined differences in self-regulation among college-age expert, moderately expert, and non-expert video game players in playing video games for fun. Winne's model of self-regulation (Winne, 2001) guided the study. The main assumption of this study was that expert video game players used more processes of self-regulation than the less-expert players. We surveyed 143 college students about their game playing frequency, habits, and use of self-regulation. Data analysis indicated that while playing recreational video games, expert gamers self-regulated more than moderately expert and non-expert players and moderately expert players used more processes of self-regulation than non-experts. Semi-structured interviews also were conducted with selected participants at each of the expertise levels. Qualitative follow-up analyses revealed five themes: (1) characteristics of expert video gamers, (2) conditions for playing a video game, (3) figuring out a game, (4) how gamers act and, (5) game context. Overall, findings indicated that playing a video game is a highly self-regulated activity and that becoming an expert video game player mobilizes multiple sets of self-regulation related skills and processes. These findings are seen as promising for educators desiring to encourage student self-regulation, because they indicate the possibility of supporting students via recreational video games by recognizing that their play includes processes of self-regulation.

  6. Learning Design Rashomon II: Exploring One Lesson through Multiple Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Luis P.; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Craft, Brock; Derntl, Michael; Emin, Valerie; Katsamani, Mary; Laurillard, Diana; Masterman, Elizabeth; Retalis, Symeon; Villasclaras, Eloy

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of tools are available to support the learning design process at different levels and from different perspectives. However, this variety can make it difficult for researchers and teachers to assess the tool that is best suited to their objectives and contexts as learning designers. Several of the tools are presented elsewhere…

  7. Abstractocyte: A Visual Tool for Exploring Nanoscale Astroglial Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Haneen

    2017-08-28

    This paper presents Abstractocyte, a system for the visual analysis of astrocytes and their relation to neurons, in nanoscale volumes of brain tissue. Astrocytes are glial cells, i.e., non-neuronal cells that support neurons and the nervous system. The study of astrocytes has immense potential for understanding brain function. However, their complex and widely-branching structure requires high-resolution electron microscopy imaging and makes visualization and analysis challenging. Furthermore, the structure and function of astrocytes is very different from neurons, and therefore requires the development of new visualization and analysis tools. With Abstractocyte, biologists can explore the morphology of astrocytes using various visual abstraction levels, while simultaneously analyzing neighboring neurons and their connectivity. We define a novel, conceptual 2D abstraction space for jointly visualizing astrocytes and neurons. Neuroscientists can choose a specific joint visualization as a point in this space. Interactively moving this point allows them to smoothly transition between different abstraction levels in an intuitive manner. In contrast to simply switching between different visualizations, this preserves the visual context and correlations throughout the transition. Users can smoothly navigate from concrete, highly-detailed 3D views to simplified and abstracted 2D views. In addition to investigating astrocytes, neurons, and their relationships, we enable the interactive analysis of the distribution of glycogen, which is of high importance to neuroscientists. We describe the design of Abstractocyte, and present three case studies in which neuroscientists have successfully used our system to assess astrocytic coverage of synapses, glycogen distribution in relation to synapses, and astrocytic-mitochondria coverage.

  8. Applied, theoretical modeling of space-based assembly, using expert system architecture for computer-aided engineering tool development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Steven Douglas

    1992-01-01

    The challenges associated with constructing interplanetary spacecraft and space platforms in low earth orbit are such that it is imperative that comprehensive, preliminary process planning analyses be completed before committing funds for Phase B design (detail design, development). Phase A and 'pre-Phase A' design activities will commonly address engineering questions such as mission-design structural integrity, attitude control, thermal control, etc. But the questions of constructability, maintainability and reliability during the assembly phase usually go unaddressed until the more mature stages of design (or very often production) are reached. This is an unacceptable strategy for future space missions whether they be government or commercial ventures. After interviews with expert Aerospace and Construction industry planners a new methodology was formulated and a Blackboard Metaphor Knowledge-based Expert System synthesis model has been successfully developed which can decompose interplanetary vehicles into deliverable orbital subassemblies. Constraint propagation, including launch vehicle payload shroud envelope, is accomplished with heuristic and numerical algorithms including a unique adaptation of a reasoning technique used by Stanford researchers in terrestrial automated process planning. The model is a hybrid combination of rule and frame-based representations, designed to integrate into a Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) environment. Emphasis is placed on the actual joining, rendezvous, and refueling of the orbiting, dynamic spacecraft. Significant results of this new methodology upon a large Mars interplanetary spacecraft (736,000 kg) designed by Boeing, show high correlation to manual decomposition and planning analysis studies, but at a fraction of the time, and with little user interaction. Such Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) tools would greatly leverage the designers ability to assess constructability.

  9. Short Paper: Design Tools, Hybridization Exploring Intuitive Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, Robert E.; Kuhlen, Torsten; Coquillart, Sabine; Interrante, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Design and Design Engineering is about making abstract representations often based on fuzzy notions, ideas or prerequisite requirements with the use of various design tools. This paper introduces an interactive hybrid design tool to assist and support singular design activity or multiple

  10. Corruption and oil exploration: expert agreement about the prevention of HIV/AIDS in the Niger Delta of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Isidore A; Stammen, Ronald M; Mantell, Joanne E

    2008-08-01

    The Niger Delta, according to the Nigerian Ministry of Health, has a disproportionately high HIV infection rate, which is double the national average. The United Nations Development Program attributes the spiraling HIV infection rate in the region to poverty, migration and gender inequality. This paper examines two complementary suppositions: Is the high prevalence of HIV in the Niger Delta related to incompetent leadership and corruption? Is it related to the negative effects of oil exploration in the region? Currently, there is a dearth of research on the effectiveness of government programs or the role of the oil industry on the impact of AIDS in Nigeria. To address this gap, we conducted a survey with 27 internationally renowned experts from diverse disciplines using a three-round modified Delphi to formulate consensus about the impact of weak governance and oil corruption on AIDS in the Niger Delta. Results from the Delphi suggest that these factors and others have exacerbated the transmission of HIV in the region. To mitigate the impact of AIDS in the region, efforts to engage oil companies in implementing HIV prevention programs as part of their corporate environmental responsibility to the community are urgently needed.

  11. Corruption and oil exploration: expert agreement about the prevention of HIV/AIDS in the Niger Delta of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Isidore A.; Stammen, Ronald M.; Mantell, Joanne E.

    2008-01-01

    The Niger Delta, according to the Nigerian Ministry of Health, has a disproportionately high HIV infection rate, which is double the national average. The United Nations Development Program attributes the spiraling HIV infection rate in the region to poverty, migration and gender inequality. This paper examines two complementary suppositions: Is the high prevalence of HIV in the Niger Delta related to incompetent leadership and corruption? Is it related to the negative effects of oil exploration in the region? Currently, there is a dearth of research on the effectiveness of government programs or the role of the oil industry on the impact of AIDS in Nigeria. To address this gap, we conducted a survey with 27 internationally renowned experts from diverse disciplines using a three-round modified Delphi to formulate consensus about the impact of weak governance and oil corruption on AIDS in the Niger Delta. Results from the Delphi suggest that these factors and others have exacerbated the transmission of HIV in the region. To mitigate the impact of AIDS in the region, efforts to engage oil companies in implementing HIV prevention programs as part of their corporate environmental responsibility to the community are urgently needed. PMID:17906312

  12. Exploring Arduino tools and techniques for engineering wizardry

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Learn to easily build gadgets, gizmos, robots, and more using Arduino Written by Arduino expert Jeremy Blum, this unique book uses the popular Arduino microcontroller platform as an instrument to teach you about topics in electrical engineering, programming, and human-computer interaction. Whether you're a budding hobbyist or an engineer, you'll benefit from the perfectly paced lessons that walk you through useful, artistic, and educational exercises that gradually get more advanced. In addition to specific projects, the book shares best practices in programming and design that

  13. Exploring the factors associated with expert systems success Explorando os fatores associados com o êxito de sistemas especialistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Guimaraes

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available As the widespread use and company dependency on Expert Systems increase, so does the need to assess their value and to ensure implementation success. This study identified and empirically tested eight major variables proposed in the literature as determinants of ES success, in this case measured in terms of user satisfaction. IBM's Corporate Manufacturing Expert Systems Project Center collected information from 69 project managers to support the study. The results clearly support the hypothesized relationships and suggest the need for ES project managers to pay special attention to these determinants of ES implementation success. ES success is directly related to the quality of developers and of the ES shells used, end-user characteristics and degree of user involvement in ES development, as each has been defined in this study. For exploratory purposes, the component items for each of these major variables were correlated with the components of user satisfaction. Based on the results, several recommendations are proposed for ES project managers to enhance the likelihood of project success, including: adding problem difficulty as a criterion for ES application selection; increasing ES developer training to improve their people skills, ability to model and to use a systems approach in solving business problems; shaping end-user attitudes and expectations regarding ES; improving the selection of domain experts; more thoroughly understanding the ES impact on end-user jobs; restricting the acquisition of ES shells based on a proposed set of criteria; and ensuring a proper match of ES development techniques and tools to the business problem at hand.Com o crescimento das aplicações de Sistemas Especialistas (SE, surge a necessidade de avaliar seu valor e assegurar o sucesso da implantação. Este estudo identificou e testou empiricamente oito variáveis principais apresentadas na literatura como determinantes do êxito de um SE, neste caso medido em

  14. Mirone: A multi-purpose tool for exploring grid data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Mirone is a Windows MATLAB-based framework tool developed by the author that allows the display and manipulation of a large number of grid formats through its interface with the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). Its main purpose is to provide users with an easy-to-use graphical interface to the more popular programs of the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) package. In addition it offers a range of tools dedicated to topics in the earth sciences, including tools for multibeam mission planning, elastic deformation studies, tsunami propagation modeling, earth magnetic field computations and magnetic Parker inversions, Euler rotations and poles computations, plate tectonic reconstructions, and seismicity and focal mechanism plotting. The high-quality mapping and cartographic capabilities for which GMT is renowned is guaranteed through Mirone's ability to automatically generate GMT cshell scripts and dos batch files. User-specific requirements that lie outside the current capabilities of Mirone can be met by simple programming to provide the required functionality.

  15. Constraints on the exploitation of the functional properties of objects in expert tool-using chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Daniel J; Frey, Scott H

    2016-09-01

    Many species exploit immediately apparent dimensions of objects during tool use and manufacture and operate over internal perceptual representations of objects (they move and reorient objects in space, have rules of operation to deform or modify objects, etc). Humans, however, actively test for functionally relevant object properties before such operations begin, even when no previous percepts of a particular object's qualities in the domain have been established. We hypothesize that such prospective diagnostic interventions are a human specialization of cognitive function that has been entirely overlooked in the neuropsychological literature. We presented chimpanzees with visually identical rakes: one was functional for retrieving a food reward; the other was non-functional (its base was spring-loaded). Initially, they learned that only the functional tool could retrieve a distant reward. In test 1, we explored if they would manually test for the rakes' rigidity during tool selection, but before using it. We found no evidence of such behavior. In test 2, we obliged the apes to deform the non-functional tool's base before using it, in order to evaluate whether this would cause them to switch rakes. It did not. Tests 3-6 attempted to focus the apes' attention on the functionally relevant property (rigidity). Although one ape eventually learned to abandon the non-functional rake before using it, she still did not attempt to test the rakes for rigidity prior to use. While these results underscore the ability of chimpanzees to use novel tools, at the same time they point toward a fundamental (and heretofore unexplored) difference in causal reasoning between humans and apes. We propose that this behavioral difference reflects a human specialization in how object properties are represented, which could have contributed significantly to the evolution of our technological culture. We discuss developing a new line of evolutionarily motivated neuropsychological research on

  16. Combining the Strengths of Physically Based Models with Statistical Modelling Tools Using a Hierarchical Mixture of Experts Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, L. A.; Sharma, A.; Nott, D.

    2005-12-01

    Rigidity in a modelling framework has been known to result in considerable bias in cases where the system behaviour is closely linked to the catchment antecedent conditions. An alternative to accommodate such variations in the system makeup is to enable the model to be flexible enough to evolve as antecedent conditions change. We present a framework that incorporates such flexibility by expressing the model through the combination of a number of different model structures. Each structure is adopted at a given time with a probability that depends on the current hydrologic state of the catchment. This framework is known as a Hierarchical Mixture of Experts (HME). When applied in a hydrological context, the HME approach has two major functions. It can act as a powerful predictive tool where simulation is extended beyond the calibration period. It also offers a basis for model development and building based on interpretation of the final model architecture in calibration. The probabilistic nature of HME means that it is ideally specified using Bayesian inference. The Bayesian approach also formalises the incorporation of uncertainty in the model specification. The interpretability of the overall HME framework is largely influenced by the individual model structures. One model which can be applied in the HME context is the popular Topmodel. Topmodel is a modelling tool that allows the simulation of distributed catchment response to rainfall. Many different versions of the basic model structure exist as the underlying concepts are challenged by different catchment studies. One modification often made is to the description of the baseflow recession. This study will investigate the predictive capability of Topmodel when the model is specified using both a Bayesian and HME approach. The specification of the distribution of model errors is investigated by definition of several different probability distributions. The HME approach is applied in a framework that compares two

  17. Use of a computer-based simulated consultation tool to assess whether doctors explore sociocultural factors during patient evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Noëlle Junod; Perneger, Thomas; Kolly, Véronique; Dao, Melissa Dominicé; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    The delivery of patient-centred care to diverse populations requires that doctors identify sociocultural factors that may affect care. We adapted a computer-based simulated consultation tool and tested its utility for assessing whether doctors explore sociocultural factors during a patient evaluation, and whether they include such information in their case conclusions and follow-up recommendations. We developed two detailed patient 'stories' that involved sociocultural issues that doctors needed to identify and consider for adequate clinical management. They were incorporated into an existing 'Virtual Internet Patient Simulation' (VIPS) program designed to test clinical reasoning skills. Doctors and medical students (n = 618) were invited to access the program via Internet. For each consultation, participants were assigned a sociocultural score, corresponding to the number of sociocultural domains explored. Scores were then compared with subjective ratings of participants' performance by expert doctors. 118 respondents completed at least one virtual consultation (19%), 92 conducted both. The mean number of sociocultural dimensions explored by doctors (i.e. sociocultural score) was 3.9 (standard deviation 2.6) for case 1, and 5.2 (standard deviation 2.3) for case 2. The two sociocultural scores were moderately correlated (Spearman r = 0.65, P < 0.001). Sociocultural scores correlated positively with experts' subjective ratings of participants' performance (Spearman r = 0.84 for case 1 and 0.78 for case 2, both P < 0.001). The adapted computer-based simulated consultation tool provided a feasible means to assess doctors' exploration of sociocultural issues during a clinical evaluation. Further validation of this method should be conducted by comparing VIPS results with other skills assessment methods such as objective structured clinical examination or direct observation of clinical performance.

  18. Exploring Preservice Teacher Perspectives on Video Games as Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Beverly B.; Powell, Angiline; Jacobsen, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Despite their popularity with learners, many K-12 teachers are reluctant to use video games as learning tools. Addressing issues surrounding this reluctance is important since the educational use of video games is supported by learning theory and an emerging research base. Specifically, this study adopts exploratory research as a means to examine…

  19. The New O*NET Assessment Tools for Career Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Janet

    The Department of Labor, through a grant with the National Center for O*NET Development, has provided three instruments for use by career development practitioners. These include an interest inventory, a work values inventory, and an ability assessment. The tools are designed to provide results that can assist persons interested in learning about…

  20. Language, Space, Time: Anthropological Tools and Scientific Exploration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Roxana

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the importance of social science disciplines in the scientific exploration of Mars. The importance of language, workspace, and time differences are reviewed. It would appear that the social scientist perspective in developing a completely new workspace, keeping track of new vocabulary and the different time zones (i.e., terrestrial and Martian) was useful.

  1. A Tool For Exploring Spectral Energy Distributions in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Darryl; Seebode, S.; Drumheller, D.; Howell, S. B.; Hoard, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of spectral type, temperature, radius and distance is often the first step in the study of stars and stellar systems. Spectral energy distributions or SEDs are of paramount importance in the determination of these quantities. We have created an innovative tool that enables high school and college physics and astronomy instructors and their students, to evaluate these parameters. This tool includes templates of main sequence stars with spectral types from O5 to M5 and associated lesson plans. Instructors can use it in a classroom setting and design lab exercises around it. Students can use it for research, determining stellar radii, distances, as well as cluster membership of stellar samples. More complex, multi-component SEDs can be used to investigate stellar systems, with dust disks, as well as, the dusty nuclei of starburst galaxies. The tool is in google documents format, easily downloadable and modifiable by interested parties, and will be accessible on the College of San Mateo astronomy website (http://gocsm.net/astronomy/), Teachers and students can add template data for other spectral types and luminosity classes, for their own projects. This study is part of the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP).

  2. The botanical explorer's legacy: a promising bioprospecting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstädter, Axel

    2017-05-01

    Records about the traditional uses of medicinal plants can be considered useful in bioprospecting (i.e., the search for new active agents or lead structures in nature). Several sources like Egyptian papyri, early modern herbals and pharmacopoeias have been studied in this respect. It is proposed to use recordings of botanically interested explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries as well. Some of them give detailed information about traditionally used medicinal plants and analysis shows that a considerable number of these have never been scientifically investigated. Existing studies, however, are confirming the traditional uses described to a great extent. Thus, the explorer's writings should not be neglected while looking for starting points for plant screening; success seems more likely than with screening at random. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast simulation and optimization tool to explore selective neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélissa Dali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In functional electrical stimulation, selective stimulation of axons is desirable to activate a specific target, in particular muscular function. This implies to simulate a fascicule without activating neighboring ones i.e. to be spatially selective. Spatial selectivity is achieved by the use of multicontact cuff electrodes over which the stimulation current is distributed. Because of the large number of parameters involved, numerical simulations provide a way to find and optimize electrode configuration. The present work offers a computation effective scheme and associated tool chain capable of simulating electrode-nerve interface and find the best spread of current to achieve spatial selectivity.

  4. A Quantitative ADME-base Tool for Exploring Human ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to a wide range of chemicals through our daily habits and routines is ubiquitous and largely unavoidable within modern society. The potential for human exposure, however, has not been quantified for the vast majority of chemicals with wide commercial use. Creative advances in exposure science are needed to support efficient and effective evaluation and management of chemical risks, particularly for chemicals in consumer products. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development is developing, or collaborating in the development of, scientifically-defensible methods for making quantitative or semi-quantitative exposure predictions. The Exposure Prioritization (Ex Priori) model is a simplified, quantitative visual dashboard that provides a rank-ordered internalized dose metric to simultaneously explore exposures across chemical space (not chemical by chemical). Diverse data streams are integrated within the interface such that different exposure scenarios for “individual,” “population,” or “professional” time-use profiles can be interchanged to tailor exposure and quantitatively explore multi-chemical signatures of exposure, internalized dose (uptake), body burden, and elimination. Ex Priori has been designed as an adaptable systems framework that synthesizes knowledge from various domains and is amenable to new knowledge/information. As such, it algorithmically captures the totality of exposure across pathways. It

  5. Heart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eChouchou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: 1 non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS, characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and 2 rapid eye movement sleep (REMS, characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: 1 the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, 2 differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and 3 the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders.

  6. Designing Tools for Ocean Exploration. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Overview: Ocean Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity teaches about the complexity of ocean exploration, the technological applications and capabilities required for ocean exploration, the importance of teamwork in scientific research projects, and developing abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed materials, key…

  7. Interactive Java Tools for Exploring High-dimensional Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Bradley

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Wide Web (WWW is a new mechanism for providing information. At this point, the majority of the information on the WWW is static, which means it is incapable of responding to user input. Text, images, and video are examples of static information that can easily be included in a WWW page. With the advent of the Java programming language, it is now possible to embed dynamic information in the form of interactive programs called applets. Therefore, it is not only possible to transfer raw data over the WWW, but we can also now provide interactive graphics for displaying and exploring data in the context of a WWW page. In this paper, we will describe the use of Java applets that have been developed for the interactive display of high dimensional data on the WWW.

  8. Exploring the Knowledge Management Index as a Performance Diagnostic Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakov Crnkovic

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge management index (KMI has been proposed as a parsimonious and useful tool to help organizations gauge their knowledge management (KM capabilities. This may be the first step in understanding the difference between what an organization is currently doing and what it needs to do in order to maintain and improve its performance level. At the macro level, the index enables organizations to compare themselves with each other. At the micro level, it calls attention to areas needing improvement in current and future KM initiatives. In either case, the KMI provides a robust indicator and basis for business decision-making and organizational support and development. This paper presents a holistic approach to KM that relates key knowledge management processes (KMP and critical success factors (CSF needed to successfully implement it. By juxtaposing these processes and success factors, we create Belardo's matrix that will enable us to characterize an organization and estimate the KMI. At the macro level, we used realized KMI values and OP estimates to confirm the positive correlation between the KMI and OP. Additional findings include comparing the current and expected role of KM in organizations and discussion for marginal values of rows (CSF and columns (KM Processes of the proposed matrix.

  9. On the Development of Metapragmatic Awareness Abroad: Two Case Studies Exploring the Role of Expert-Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henery, Ashlie

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the resulting qualitative transformation of two students' metapragmatic awareness following a semester abroad in southern France--one of whom had access to a concept-based pragmatics instruction programme (expert-mediation), while the other followed a standard semester programme. The larger study from which these cases are…

  10. An Exploration of the Examination Script Features that Most Influence Expert Judgements in Three Methods of Evaluating Script Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Irenka; Novakovic, Nadezda

    2012-01-01

    Some methods of determining grade boundaries within examinations, such as awarding, paired comparisons, and rank ordering, entail expert judgements of script quality. We aimed to identify the features of examinees' scripts that most influence judgements in the three methods. For contrasting examinations in biology and English, a Latin square…

  11. Abstractocyte: A Visual Tool for Exploring Nanoscale Astroglial Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Haneen

    2017-06-12

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of Abstractocyte, a system for the visual analysis of astrocytes, and their relation to neurons, in nanoscale volumes of brain tissue. Astrocytes are glial cells, i.e., non-neuronal cells that support neurons and the nervous system. Even though glial cells make up around 50 percent of all cells in the mammalian brain, so far they have been far less studied than neurons. Nevertheless, the study of astrocytes has immense potential for understanding brain function. However, the complex and widely-branching structure of astrocytes requires high-resolution electron microscopy imaging and makes visualization and analysis challenging. Using Abstractocyte, biologists can explore the morphology of astrocytes at various visual abstraction levels, while simultaneously analyzing neighboring neurons and their connectivity. We define a novel, conceptual 2D abstraction space for jointly visualizing astrocytes and neurons. Neuroscientists can choose a joint visualization as a specific point in that 2D abstraction space. Dragging this point allows them to smoothly transition between different abstraction levels in an intuitive manner. We describe the design of Abstractocyte, and present three case studies in which neuroscientists have successfully used our system to assess astrocytic coverage of synapses, glycogen distribution in relation to synapses, and astrocytic-mitochondria coverage.

  12. GEE: An Informatics Tool for Gene Expression Data Explore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Park, Chan Hee; Yoon, Jun Hee; Yun, Sunmin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Major public high-throughput functional genomic data repositories, including the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and ArrayExpress have rapidly expanded. As a result, a large number of diverse high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval systems have been developed. However, high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval remains challenging. Methods We developed Gene Expression data Explore (GEE), the first powerful, flexible web and mobile search application for searching whole-genome epigenetic data and microarray data in public databases, such as GEO and ArrayExpress. Results GEE provides an elaborate, convenient interface of query generation competences not available via various high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval systems, including GEO, ArrayExpress, and Atlas. In particular, GEE provides a suitable query generator using eVOC, the Experimental Factor Ontology (EFO), which is well represented with a variety of high-throughput functional genomic data experimental conditions. In addition, GEE provides an experimental design query constructor (EDQC), which provides elaborate retrieval filter conditions when the user designs real experiments. Conclusions The web version of GEE is available at http://www.snubi.org/software/gee, and its app version is available from the Apple App Store. PMID:27200217

  13. GEE: An Informatics Tool for Gene Expression Data Explore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Park, Chan Hee; Yoon, Jun Hee; Yun, Sunmin; Kim, Ju Han

    2016-04-01

    Major public high-throughput functional genomic data repositories, including the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and ArrayExpress have rapidly expanded. As a result, a large number of diverse high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval systems have been developed. However, high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval remains challenging. We developed Gene Expression data Explore (GEE), the first powerful, flexible web and mobile search application for searching whole-genome epigenetic data and microarray data in public databases, such as GEO and ArrayExpress. GEE provides an elaborate, convenient interface of query generation competences not available via various high-throughput functional genomic data retrieval systems, including GEO, ArrayExpress, and Atlas. In particular, GEE provides a suitable query generator using eVOC, the Experimental Factor Ontology (EFO), which is well represented with a variety of high-throughput functional genomic data experimental conditions. In addition, GEE provides an experimental design query constructor (EDQC), which provides elaborate retrieval filter conditions when the user designs real experiments. The web version of GEE is available at http://www.snubi.org/software/gee, and its app version is available from the Apple App Store.

  14. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron.

  15. Teachers' Use of Computational Tools to Construct and Explore Dynamic Mathematical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    To what extent does the use of computational tools offer teachers the possibility of constructing dynamic models to identify and explore diverse mathematical relations? What ways of reasoning or thinking about the problems emerge during the model construction process that involves the use of the tools? These research questions guided the…

  16. Exploring the Interaction between Learners and Tools in E-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meri, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    The present research explores the interaction between learners and tools in e-learning environments. In order to explore that issue, this study analyzed and interpreted the findings obtained through observation and interview with 10 international students who wished to improve their learning of English by using the English for Academic Purposes…

  17. Meteorology and Meteorologists in the Debate of ‘Wrong Forecast’: Exploring the Conception Gap between Non-scientists and Scientific Experts in the Media Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Chiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted a qualitative approach to explore how non-scientists and scientific experts consider meteorology and the role of meteorological scientists by investigating newspaper articles regarding the ‘wrong forecast’ in the 2009 Typhoon Morakot. The results showed that the news reports demarcate actors in the debate as non-scientists and scientific experts, with the policy-makers in the former group, and the meteorologists and professors in the latter. This research also found that the way media represents pinpoints the shortcomings in weather forecast on the one hand, and constructs the understanding of meteorology, meteorologists as well as non-scientists for the readers on the other. These findings led us to rethink the role media plays in weather forecast, and readers’ (including the aforementioned non-scientists’ and scientific experts’ expectations to media.

  18. Development and application of explorative tools in the field of architectural geometry: L-systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruševski Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of L-Systems was created as base for axiomatic theory of biologic growth. L-systems are applied in computer graphics for fractal generation, as well as in models of biological structures and simulations of their growth. Within generic architecture, by applying L-systems, the natural growth mechanisms are used as generators of architectural geometry. After mathematical and logical explanations of the chosen generic concept of L-systems, this study examines its generic potential, which is the base for development of specific explorative tools in the field of architectural geometry. Within a wider research activity titled 'Generic Explorations', the original software parametric tools have been developed, allowing generation of a complex architectural geometry based on the concept of L-systems. Variation of parametric values facilitates creation and further exploration of generated spatial forms. The paper presents possibilities of developed explorative tools, their particularities, as well as an overview of their initial application results.

  19. 'To be treated as a human': Using co-production to explore experts by experience involvement in mental health nursing education - The COMMUNE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Aine; Manning, Fionnuala; Bocking, Julia; Happell, Brenda; Lahti, Mari; Doody, Rory; Griffin, Martha; Bradley, Stephen K; Russell, Siobhan; Bjornsson, Einar; O'Donovan, Moira; MacGabhann, Liam; Savage, Eileen; Pulli, Jarmo; Goodwin, John; van der Vaart, Kornelis Jan; O'Sullivan, Hazel; Dorrity, Claire; Ellila, Heikki; Allon, Jerry; Hals, Elisabeth; Sitvast, Jan; Granerud, Arild; Biering, Pall

    2018-01-29

    Increasingly, experts as deemed by personal experience or mental health service use, are involved in the education of nurses; however, accompanying research is limited and focuses primarily on opinions of nurse educators and students. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the potential contribution to mental health nursing education by those with experience of mental health service use. The research was part of the international COMMUNE (Co-production of Mental Health Nursing Education) project, established to develop and evaluate co-produced mental health content for undergraduate nursing students. A qualitative descriptive design was adopted with data collected through focus group interviews in seven sites across Europe and Australia. Experts by experience (people with experience of distress, service use, and recovery) co-produced the project in partnership with nursing academics. Co-production enriched the process of data collection and facilitated the analysis of data from multiple perspectives. Two themes are presented in this paper. The first focuses on how experts by experience can enhance students' understanding of recovery by seeing the strengths inherent in the 'human' behind the diagnostic label. The second highlights the importance of communication and self-reflection on personal values, where students can explore their own thoughts and feelings about mental distress alongside those with lived experience. Interacting with experts by experience in the classroom can assist in challenging stigmatizing attitudes prior to nursing placements. These findings can be used to inform international nursing curricula by increasing the focus on nursing skills valued by those who use the services. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Validation of the tool assessment of clinical education (AssCE): A study using Delphi method and clinical experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, Anna; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the validity of the tool Assessment of Clinical Education (AssCE). The tool is widely used in Sweden and some Nordic countries for assessing nursing students' performance in clinical education. It is important that the tools in use be subjected to regular audit and critical reviews. The validation process, performed in two stages, was concluded with a high level of congruence. In the first stage, Delphi technique was used to elaborate the AssCE tool using a group of 35 clinical nurse lecturers. After three rounds, we reached consensus. In the second stage, a group of 46 clinical nurse lecturers representing 12 universities in Sweden and Norway audited the revised version of the AssCE in relation to learning outcomes from the last clinical course at their respective institutions. Validation of the revised AssCE was established with high congruence between the factors in the AssCE and examined learning outcomes. The revised AssCE tool seems to meet its objective to be a validated assessment tool for use in clinical nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Visualizing Anomalies in Electronic Health Record Data: The Variability Explorer Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Estiri, Hossein; Chan, Ya-Fen; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Jung, Hyunggu; Cole, Allison; Stephens, Kari A.

    2015-01-01

    As Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are becoming more prevalent in the U.S. health care domain, the utility of EHR data in translational research and clinical decision-making gains prominence. Leveraging primay? care-based. multi-clinic EHR data, this paper introduces a web-based visualization tool, the Variability Explorer Tool (VET), to assist researchers with profiling variability among diagnosis codes. VET applies a simple statistical method to approximate probability distribution f...

  2. Entropic algorithms and the lid method as exploration tools for complex landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, Daniele; Sibani, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    to a single valley, are key to understand the dynamical properties of such systems. In this paper we combine the lid algorithm, a tool for landscape exploration previously applied to a range of models, with the Wang-Swendsen algorithm. To test this improved exploration tool, we consider a paradigmatic complex...... system, the Edwards-Andersom model in two and three spatial dimension. We find a striking difference between the energy dependence of the local density of states in the two cases: nearly flat in the first case, and nearly exponential in the second. The lid dependence of the data is analyzed to estimate...

  3. Introduction to expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.

    1986-01-01

    Expert systems have become one of the most exciting applications within the domain of artificial intelligence. Further interest has been provoked by Japan's Fifth Generation Project, which identifies expert or knowledge-based systems as a key element in the computer systems of the future. This book presents an introduction to expert systems at a level suited to the undergraduate student and the interested layman. It surveys the three main techniques for knowledge representation - rules, frames and logic. and describes in detail the expert systems which employ them. Contents: Expert systems and artificial intelligence; Formalisms for knowledge representation; MYCIN; Medical diagnosis using rules. MYCIN derivatives; TEIRESIAS, EMYCIN, and GUIDON; RI: recognition as a problem-solving strategy; CENTAUR: a combination of frames metalevel inference and commonsense reasoning in MECHO; Tools for building expert systems; Summary and conclusions; Exercises.

  4. Monitoring Building Energy Systems at NASA Centers Using NASA Earth Science data, CMIP5 climate data products and RETScreen Expert Clean Energy Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Ganoe, R. E.; Westberg, D. J.; Leng, G. J.; Teets, E.; Hughes, J. M.; De Young, R.; Carroll, M.; Liou, L. C.; Iraci, L. T.; Podolske, J. R.; Stefanov, W. L.; Chandler, W.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Climate Adaptation Science Investigator team is devoted to building linkages between NASA Earth Science and those within NASA responsible for infrastructure assessment, upgrades and planning. One of the focus areas is assessing NASA center infrastructure for energy efficiency, planning to meet new energy portfolio standards, and assessing future energy needs. These topics intersect at the provision of current and predicted future weather and climate data. This presentation provides an overview of the multi-center effort to access current building energy usage using Earth science observations, including those from in situ measurements, satellite measurement analysis, and global model data products as inputs to the RETScreen Expert, a clean energy decision support tool. RETScreen® Expert, sponsored by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), is a tool dedicated to developing and providing clean energy project analysis software for the feasibility design and assessment of a wide range of building projects that incorporate renewable energy technologies. RETScreen Expert requires daily average meteorological and solar parameters that are available within less than a month of real-time. A special temporal collection of meteorological parameters was compiled from near-by surface in situ measurements. These together with NASA data from the NASA CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiance Energy System)/FLASHFlux (Fast Longwave and SHortwave radiative Fluxes) provides solar fluxes and the NASA GMAO (Global Modeling and Assimilation Office) GEOS (Goddard Earth Observing System) operational meteorological analysis are directly used for meteorological input parameters. Examples of energy analysis for a few select buildings at various NASA centers are presented in terms of the energy usage relationship that these buildings have with changes in their meteorological environment. The energy requirements of potential future climates are then surveyed for a range of changes using the most

  5. Exploring Cystic Fibrosis Using Bioinformatics Tools: A Module Designed for the Freshman Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2011-01-01

    We incorporated a bioinformatics component into the freshman biology course that allows students to explore cystic fibrosis (CF), a common genetic disorder, using bioinformatics tools and skills. Students learn about CF through searching genetic databases, analyzing genetic sequences, and observing the three-dimensional structures of proteins…

  6. Family Myths, Beliefs, and Customs as a Research/Educational Tool to Explore Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, William E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a qualitative research tool designed to explore personal identity formation as described by Erik Erikson and offers self-reflective and anonymous evaluative comments made by college students after completing this task. Subjects compiled a list of 200 myths, customs, fables, rituals, and beliefs from their family of origin and…

  7. Development of an objective assessment tool for total laparoscopic hysterectomy: A Delphi method among experts and evaluation on a virtual reality simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Sophie; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Agostini, Aubert; Loundou, Anderson; Berdah, Stéphane; Crochet, Patrice

    2018-01-01

    Total Laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) requires an advanced level of operative skills and training. The aim of this study was to develop an objective scale specific for the assessment of technical skills for LH (H-OSATS) and to demonstrate feasibility of use and validity in a virtual reality setting. The scale was developed using a hierarchical task analysis and a panel of international experts. A Delphi method obtained consensus among experts on relevant steps that should be included into the H-OSATS scale for assessment of operative performances. Feasibility of use and validity of the scale were evaluated by reviewing video recordings of LH performed on a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator. Three groups of operators of different levels of experience were assessed in a Marseille teaching hospital (10 novices, 8 intermediates and 8 experienced surgeons). Correlations with scores obtained using a recognised generic global rating tool (OSATS) were calculated. A total of 76 discrete steps were identified by the hierarchical task analysis. 14 experts completed the two rounds of the Delphi questionnaire. 64 steps reached consensus and were integrated in the scale. During the validation process, median time to rate each video recording was 25 minutes. There was a significant difference between the novice, intermediate and experienced group for total H-OSATS scores (133, 155.9 and 178.25 respectively; p = 0.002). H-OSATS scale demonstrated high inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.930; preality simulator. The implementation of this scale is expected to facilitate deliberate practice. Next steps should focus on evaluating the validity of the scale in the operating room.

  8. Patient Involvement as Experts in the Development and Assessment of a Smartphone App as a Patient Education Tool for the Management of Thalassemia and Iron Overload Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard; Taha, Karim M

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to develop and assess the feasibility of an education tool to improve health outcomes of patients with thalassemia. Thirty-five patients attending a Canadian thalassemia clinic were enrolled. Acting in an expert role, they participated in a Delphi method to reach consensus as to what tools and information should be incorporated in the development of a self management Smartphone app. One- and 6-month usability and health impact feedback surveys were built-in. Sixty percent of responders were 18-34 years old, over 50.0% had a college degree. The Delphi method successfully generated a comprehensive list of features important to patients. The app has been downloaded 147 times globally. Between March 2015 and January 2016, 19 responses for the 1-month survey were collected and the trends described. Responders reported improved medication adherence. The personal adherence pledge feature supports gamification of health apps to individualize goals of therapy. The impact of tracking iron levels was highly favorable. The Delphi method was an effective way to introduce a patient education and empowerment tool to the thalassemia population. The long-term impact requires data maturation. Use of validated methodology is essential to ensure ehealth interventions are positively contributing to patient education and disease outcomes.

  9. Exploring Parliamentary Debate as a Pedagogical Tool to Develop English Communication Skills in EFL/ESL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice M. Aclan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To survive in the 21st century workplace, communication skills are extremely important. However, a mismatch between the industry requirement and the university graduates’ competencies in terms of effective communication skills exists. Rote learning and lack of opportunities to practice English communication skills inside and outside the classroom are common issues in EFL/ESL contexts. Thus, this qualitative study was conducted to explore how debate as a pedagogical tool with three stages - pre-debate, actual debate and post-debate - can develop communication skills. The data were gathered through semi-structured one-on-one interview with five debate experts across from ASEAN countries and focus group interview with six ASEAN debate students. The participants of this study  described  the use of the pre-debate stage for the research and brainstorming tasks  that engage the team members with each other, the actual debate for the arguments, POI and rebuttals that actively engage debaters with their opponents, and the post-debate stage that engage all the debaters with the adjudicators, their team-mates and their opponents. This pedagogical aspect focusing on the three stages of debate which has implications for SLA and language teaching was not substantially dealt with in previous studies on debate.

  10. Evaluation and Development of E-Learning Tools and Methods in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts from Academia and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülch, E.; Al-Ghorani, N.; Quedenfeldt, B.; Braun, J.

    2012-07-01

    There does already exist a wide variety of tutorials and on-line courses on Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing very often used in academia. Many of them are still rather static and tedious or target high-knowledge learners. E-learning is, however, increasingly applied by many organizations and companies for life-long learning (like e.g. the EduServ courses of EuroSDR), but also for training of resellers and in order to save the expenses and time of travelling. A new issue of this project when taking into account the ethnic mentality in some countries like Saudi Arabia where it is impossible to mix the females and males at any institution type or for instance to teach ladies by a male teacher face to face, many academic workshops have been done separately twice by foreign organizations to adapt this situation. This paper will focus on these issues and present experiences gathered from a Master Thesis on "E-learning in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts using Moodle" at HFT Stuttgart in co-operation with a software vendor and a reseller and experiences from a current European Tempus IV project GIDEC (Geographic information technology for sustainable development in Eastern neighouring countries). The aim of this research is to provide an overview on available methods and tools and classify and judge their feasibility for the above mentioned scenarios. A more detailed description is given on the development of e-learning applications for Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing using the open source package Moodle as platform. A first item covers the experiences from setting up and handling of Moodle for non-experts. The major emphasis is then on developing and analyzing some few case studies for lectures, exercises, and software training in the fields of Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Feedback from students and company staff will be evaluated and incorporated in an improved design and sample implementation. A further focus is on free

  11. EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF E-LEARNING TOOLS AND METHODS IN DIGITAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING FOR NON EXPERTS FROM ACADEMIA AND INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gülch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There does already exist a wide variety of tutorials and on-line courses on Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing very often used in academia. Many of them are still rather static and tedious or target high-knowledge learners. E-learning is, however, increasingly applied by many organizations and companies for life-long learning (like e.g. the EduServ courses of EuroSDR, but also for training of resellers and in order to save the expenses and time of travelling. A new issue of this project when taking into account the ethnic mentality in some countries like Saudi Arabia where it is impossible to mix the females and males at any institution type or for instance to teach ladies by a male teacher face to face, many academic workshops have been done separately twice by foreign organizations to adapt this situation. This paper will focus on these issues and present experiences gathered from a Master Thesis on "E-learning in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts using Moodle" at HFT Stuttgart in co-operation with a software vendor and a reseller and experiences from a current European Tempus IV project GIDEC (Geographic information technology for sustainable development in Eastern neighouring countries. The aim of this research is to provide an overview on available methods and tools and classify and judge their feasibility for the above mentioned scenarios. A more detailed description is given on the development of e-learning applications for Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing using the open source package Moodle as platform. A first item covers the experiences from setting up and handling of Moodle for non-experts. The major emphasis is then on developing and analyzing some few case studies for lectures, exercises, and software training in the fields of Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Feedback from students and company staff will be evaluated and incorporated in an improved design and sample implementation. A

  12. Expert Witness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    discipline that permits them to testify to an opinion that will aid a judge or jury in resolving a question that is beyond the understanding or competence of laypersons. An expert witness is an expert who makes his or her knowledge available to a court (a tribunal or any other forum where formal rules of evidence apply) to help ...

  13. Remote Sensing Image Analysis Without Expert Knowledge - A Web-Based Classification Tool On Top of Taverna Workflow Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsam, Peter; Schwartze, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Providing software solutions via internet has been known for quite some time and is now an increasing trend marketed as "software as a service". A lot of business units accept the new methods and streamlined IT strategies by offering web-based infrastructures for external software usage - but geospatial applications featuring very specialized services or functionalities on demand are still rare. Originally applied in desktop environments, the ILMSimage tool for remote sensing image analysis and classification was modified in its communicating structures and enabled for running on a high-power server and benefiting from Tavema software. On top, a GIS-like and web-based user interface guides the user through the different steps in ILMSimage. ILMSimage combines object oriented image segmentation with pattern recognition features. Basic image elements form a construction set to model for large image objects with diverse and complex appearance. There is no need for the user to set up detailed object definitions. Training is done by delineating one or more typical examples (templates) of the desired object using a simple vector polygon. The template can be large and does not need to be homogeneous. The template is completely independent from the segmentation. The object definition is done completely by the software.

  14. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge...... base of expert systems is often given in terms of an ontology, extracted and built from various data sources by employing natural language-processing and statistics. To emphasize such capabilities, the term “expert” is now often replaced by “cognitive,” “knowledge,” “knowledge-based,” or “intelligent......” system. With very few exceptions, general-purpose expert systems have failed to emerge so far. However, expert systems are applied in specialized domains, particularly in healthcare. The increasing availability of large quantities of data to organizations today provides a valuable opportunity...

  15. Exploring Textiles in Architecture through Tangible Three-Dimensional Sketching Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen; Lenau, Torben Anker; O'Mahony, Marie

    This paper argues that tangible three dimensional sketching with textiles makes it more likely that these materials will be used when creating architectural spaces. Our research contributes to the more general idea that innovation in architecture and design can be stimulated by the exploration...... of new materials. With tangible three dimensional sketching, we mean an iterative process of physical model making. In two experiments with architectural students, all textile novices, spaces were modelled using a three dimensional sketching tool consisting of textiles, cardboard support and tools...... for giving form to and joining these materials. The chosen architectural task was how textiles could be used to regulate daylight by applying them to an exterior building skin or to interior spaces. Findings were that three different strategies were used: the tool was used to materialize, illustrate...

  16. Exploring the MACH Model's Potential as a Metacognitive Tool to Help Undergraduate Students Monitor Their Explanations of Biological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    When undergraduate biology students learn to explain biological mechanisms, they face many challenges and may overestimate their understanding of living systems. Previously, we developed the MACH model of four components used by expert biologists to explain mechanisms: Methods, Analogies, Context, and How. This study explores the implementation of…

  17. MATISSE: A novel tool to access, visualize and analyse data from planetary exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Palomba, E.; Giommi, P.; Antonelli, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number and complexity of planetary exploration space missions require new tools to access, visualize and analyse data to improve their scientific return. ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) addresses this request with the web-tool MATISSE (Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for the Instruments of the Solar System Exploration), allowing the visualization of single observation or real-time computed high-order products, directly projected on the three-dimensional model of the selected target body. Using MATISSE it will be no longer needed to download huge quantity of data or to write down a specific code for every instrument analysed, greatly encouraging studies based on joint analysis of different datasets. In addition the extremely high-resolution output, to be used offline with a Python-based free software, together with the files to be read with specific GIS software, makes it a valuable tool to further process the data at the best spatial accuracy available. MATISSE modular structure permits addition of new missions or tasks and, thanks to dedicated future developments, it would be possible to make it compliant to the Planetary Virtual Observatory standards currently under definition. In this context the recent development of an interface to the NASA ODE REST API by which it is possible to access to public repositories is set.

  18. Understanding the Role of Medical Experts during a Public Health Crisis Digital Tools and Library Resources for Research on the 1918 Spanish Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, E Thomas; Gad, Samah; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Reznick, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    Humanities scholars, particularly historians of health and disease, can benefit from digitized library collections and tools such as topic modeling. Using a case study from the 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic, this paper explores the application of a big humanities approach to understanding the impact of a public health official on the course of the disease and the response of the public, as documented through digitized newspapers and medical periodicals.

  19. Feature Usage Explorer: Usage Monitoring and Visualization Tool in HTML5 Based Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarunas Marciuska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Feature Usage Explorer is a JavaScript library, which automatically detects features in HTML5 based applications and monitors their usage. The collected information can be visualized in a Feature Usage Diagram, which is automatically generated from an input json file. Currently, the users of Feature Usage Explorer have to design their own tool in order to generate the json file from collected usage information. This option remains viable when using the library in order not to constraint the user’s choice of preferred data storage. Feature Usage Explorer can be reused in any HTML5 based applications where an understanding of how users interact with the system is required (i.e. user experience and usability studies, human computer interaction field, or requirement prioritization area.

  20. The Effects of Webopac Self Training Tool with Guided Exploration on Information Literacy Skills among First Year Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Nasir; Mamat, Nurfaezah; Jamaludin, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of WebOPAC Self Training Tool with Guided Exploration (WSTTG), WebOPAC Self Training Tool with non-guided exploration (WSTT) and Traditional (T) groups as the learning strategies on information literacy (IL) skills standards among first year degree students in Malaysian public university. The…

  1. Exploring mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools in their practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Schueller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of Internet sites and mobile applications are being developed intended for use in clinical practice. However, during the development process (e.g., creating features and determining use cases, the needs and interests of providers are often overlooked. We explored providers' interests using a mixed-methods approach incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research methods. A first study used an interview approach to identify the challenges providers faced, tools they used, and any use of computers and apps specifically. Fifteen providers from both the United States and Canada completed the interview and recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Four primary themes were identified including challenges, potential tools, access and usability. A second study used a brief survey completed by 132 providers at a large healthcare system to explore current use of and potential interest in Internet and mobile technologies. Although many providers (80.9% reported recommending some form of technology to patients, these were mostly Internet websites that were predominantly informational/psychoeducational in nature. Overall, these studies combine to suggest a strong interest in websites and apps for use in clinical settings while highlighting potential areas (ease of use, patient security and privacy that should be considered in the design and deployment of these tools.

  2. Exploring Mental Health Providers’ Interest in Using Web and Mobile-Based Tools in their Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Stephen M.; Washburn, Jason J.; Price, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of Internet sites and mobile applications are being developed intended for use in clinical practice. However, during the development process (e.g., creating features and determining use cases), the needs and interests of providers are often overlooked. We explored providers’ interests using a mixed-methods approach incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research methods. A first study used an interview approach to identify the challenges providers faced, tools they used, and any use of computers and apps specifically. Fifteen providers from both the United States and Canada completed the interview and recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Four primary themes were identified including challenges, potential tools, access and usability. A second study used a brief survey completed by 132 providers at a large healthcare system to explore current use of and potential interest in Internet and mobile technologies. Although many providers (80.9%) reported recommending some form of technology to patients, this was mostly Internet websites that were predominantly informational/psychoeducational in nature. Overall, these studies combine to suggest a strong interest in websites and apps for use in clinical settings while highlighting potential areas (ease of use, patient security and privacy) that should be considered in the design and deployment of these tools. PMID:28090438

  3. Exploring the oxygen supply and demand framework as a learning tool in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Mary; Shackell, Eileen

    2017-11-01

    In nursing education, physiological concepts are typically presented within a body 'systems' framework yet learners are often challenged to apply this knowledge in the holistic and functional manner needed for effective clinical decision-making and safe patient care. A nursing faculty addressed this learning challenge by developing an advanced organizer as a conceptual and integrative learning tool to support learners in diverse learning environments and practice settings. A mixed methods research study was conducted that explored the effectiveness of the Oxygen Supply and Demand Framework as a learning tool in undergraduate nursing education. A pretest/post-test assessment and reflective journal were used to gather data. Findings indicated the Oxygen Supply and Demand Framework guided the development of pattern recognition and thinking processes and supported knowledge development, knowledge application and clinical decision-making. The Oxygen Supply and Demand Framework supports undergraduate students learning to provide safe and effective nursing care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peripleo: a Tool for Exploring Heterogeneous Data through the Dimensions of Space and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces Peripleo, a prototype spatiotemporal search and visualization tool. Peripleo enables users to explore the geographic, temporal and thematic composition of distributed digital collections in their entirety, and then to progressively filter and drill down to explore individual records. We provide an overview of Peripleo's features, and present the underlying technical architecture. Furthermore, we discuss how datasets that differ vastly in terms of size, content type and theme can be made uniformly accessible through a set of lightweight metadata conventions we term "connectivity through common references". Our current demo installation links approximately half a million records from 25 datasets. These datasets originate from a spectrum of sources, ranging from the small personal photo collection with 35 records, to the large institutional database with 134.000 objects. The product of research in the Andrew W. Mellon-funded Pelagios 3 project, Peripleo is Open Source software.

  5. Final OptiMIR Scientific and Expert Meeting: From milk analysis to advisory tools (Palais des Congrès, Namur, Belgium, 16-17 April 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrichs, P.

    2015-01-01

    phenotypic data of the cows and the MIR spectra from the European MR, which enables the detection of relevant phenotypic traits and their reflection in the MIR spectra. Additionally, a standardization has been installed among all instruments of the milk analyzing laboratories involved in the OptiMIR project to ensure a stable prediction over time and a correction of deviations. Due to the monthly standardization process the developed prediction equations can be used in routine on all instruments taking part in the standardization. Different models for the prediction of the pregnancy status, energy balance, the methane emission as well as the detection of ketosis and acidosis have been developed within OptiMIR. It is worth mentioning, that those models predict the status of the animal with different accuracies and that progress on development and implementation differs between the models. Some of the tools developed within OptiMIR are already used in the field and provide dairy farmers with useful information e.g. about the health status or methane emission of a certain cow. The OptiMIR project also resulted in a collaborative planning on an economic interest group formation of the participating MROs. The final OptiMIR scientific and expert meeting disseminates the results obtained through OptiMIR more detailed and also provides an overview of recent advances in the development of management tools for the dairy sector. Initial application of the MIR-based tools has shown their potential for providing dairy farmers with information to improve their herd management in a cost-effective way. However, further research and development is required to finish a greater extend of MIR-based tools so that north-western European stakeholders can acquire competitive advantage in the dairy sector.

  6. User Driven Development of Software Tools for Open Data Discovery and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlobinski, Sascha; Keppel, Frank; Dihe, Pascal; Boot, Gerben; Falkenroth, Esa

    2016-04-01

    The use of open data in research faces challenges not restricted to inherent properties such as data quality, resolution of open data sets. Often Open data is catalogued insufficiently or fragmented. Software tools that support the effective discovery including the assessment of the data's appropriateness for research have shortcomings such as the lack of essential functionalities like support for data provenance. We believe that one of the reasons is the neglect of real end users requirements in the development process of aforementioned software tools. In the context of the FP7 Switch-On project we have pro-actively engaged the relevant user user community to collaboratively develop a means to publish, find and bind open data relevant for hydrologic research. Implementing key concepts of data discovery and exploration we have used state of the art web technologies to provide an interactive software tool that is easy to use yet powerful enough to satisfy the data discovery and access requirements of the hydrological research community.

  7. An exploration of experts' perceptions on the use of interprofessional education to support collaborative practice in the care of community-living older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Fisher, Anita; Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Chambers, Tracey; Kennedy, Laurie; Morsy, Mona; Dufour, Sinéad

    2017-09-01

    Globally, as older adults are living longer and with more chronic conditions, there is a need to support their ability to age optimally in their homes and communities. Community-based interprofessional teams working closely with these older adults, their families, and informal caregivers will be instrumental in achieving this goal. Interprofessional education (IPE) is the means through which these teams can develop expertise in collaboratively working together with older adults. However, most IPE occurs in academic settings, and acute and long-term care sectors and little is known about IPE in the context of home and community care of older adults. The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of academic and practice experts related to the current state of IPE in home and community care of older adults and the changes that are necessary to meet the future needs of practitioners and older adults. Using a qualitative descriptive design, interviews were conducted with 32 national and international key informants representing practitioners, educators, researchers, and health system decision-makers in the field of IPE. Thematic analysis of the data identified six themes: (a) client and family-centred care at the core of IPE, (b) the community as a unique learning setting across the learning continuum; (c) an aging-relevant IPE curriculum; (d) faculty commitment and resources for IPE; (e) technological innovation to support IPE; and (f) comprehensive IPE programme evaluation and research. These findings are explored through the lens of an interprofessional learning continuum model. The article concludes with a discussion of the study implications for IPE practice and research specifically in the care of community-living older adults.

  8. Expert Oracle application express

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, John Edward

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle Application Express brings you groundbreaking insights into developing with Oracle's enterprise-level, rapid-development tool from some of the best practitioners in the field today. Oracle Application Express (APEX) is an entirely web-based development framework that is built into every edition of Oracle Database. The framework rests upon Oracle's powerful PL/SQL language, enabling power users and developers to rapidly develop applications that easily scale to hundreds, even thousands of concurrent users. The 13 authors of Expert Oracle Application Express build their careers aro

  9. Djinn Lite: a tool for customised gene transcript modelling, annotation-data enrichment and exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teber, Erdahl T; Crawford, Edward; Bolton, Kent B; Van Dyk, Derek; Schofield, Peter R; Kapoor, Vimal; Church, W Bret

    2006-01-01

    Background There is an ever increasing rate of data made available on genetic variation, transcriptomes and proteomes. Similarly, a growing variety of bioinformatic programs are becoming available from many diverse sources, designed to identify a myriad of sequence patterns considered to have potential biological importance within inter-genic regions, genes, transcripts, and proteins. However, biologists require easy to use, uncomplicated tools to integrate this information, visualise and print gene annotations. Integrating this information usually requires considerable informatics skills, and comprehensive knowledge of the data format to make full use of this information. Tools are needed to explore gene model variants by allowing users the ability to create alternative transcript models using novel combinations of exons not necessarily represented in current database deposits of mRNA/cDNA sequences. Results Djinn Lite is designed to be an intuitive program for storing and visually exploring of custom annotations relating to a eukaryotic gene sequence and its modelled gene products. In particular, it is helpful in developing hypothesis regarding alternate splicing of transcripts by allowing the construction of model transcripts and inspection of their resulting translations. It facilitates the ability to view a gene and its gene products in one synchronised graphical view, allowing one to drill down into sequence related data. Colour highlighting of selected sequences and added annotations further supports exploration, visualisation of sequence regions and motifs known or predicted to be biologically significant. Conclusion Gene annotating remains an ongoing and challengingtask that will continue as gene structures, gene transcription repertoires, disease loci, protein products and their interactions become moreprecisely defined. Djinn Lite offers an accessible interface to help accumulate, enrich, and individualise sequence annotations relating to a gene, its

  10. Djinn Lite: a tool for customised gene transcript modelling, annotation-data enrichment and exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyk Derek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ever increasing rate of data made available on genetic variation, transcriptomes and proteomes. Similarly, a growing variety of bioinformatic programs are becoming available from many diverse sources, designed to identify a myriad of sequence patterns considered to have potential biological importance within inter-genic regions, genes, transcripts, and proteins. However, biologists require easy to use, uncomplicated tools to integrate this information, visualise and print gene annotations. Integrating this information usually requires considerable informatics skills, and comprehensive knowledge of the data format to make full use of this information. Tools are needed to explore gene model variants by allowing users the ability to create alternative transcript models using novel combinations of exons not necessarily represented in current database deposits of mRNA/cDNA sequences. Results Djinn Lite is designed to be an intuitive program for storing and visually exploring of custom annotations relating to a eukaryotic gene sequence and its modelled gene products. In particular, it is helpful in developing hypothesis regarding alternate splicing of transcripts by allowing the construction of model transcripts and inspection of their resulting translations. It facilitates the ability to view a gene and its gene products in one synchronised graphical view, allowing one to drill down into sequence related data. Colour highlighting of selected sequences and added annotations further supports exploration, visualisation of sequence regions and motifs known or predicted to be biologically significant. Conclusion Gene annotating remains an ongoing and challengingtask that will continue as gene structures, gene transcription repertoires, disease loci, protein products and their interactions become moreprecisely defined. Djinn Lite offers an accessible interface to help accumulate, enrich, and individualise sequence

  11. ExpertFOAF recommends experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iofcu, Tereza; Diederich, Joerg; Dolog, Peter

    2007-01-01

    the GrowBag approach [1]. The main assumption is that such user profiles can provide good hints about users' expertise. Such extended FOAF files (called ExpertFOAF) can be published on a user's home page, on web pages of institutions or conferences to characterize them. They can be crawled by distributed...

  12. Exploring science with sound: sonification and the use of sonograms as data analysis tool

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Williams, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Resonances, periodicity, patterns and spectra are well-known notions that play crucial roles in particle physics, and that have always been at the junction between sound/music analysis and scientific exploration. Detecting the shape of a particular energy spectrum, studying the stability of a particle beam in a synchrotron, and separating signals from a noisy background are just a few examples where the connection with sound can be very strong, all sharing the same concepts of oscillations, cycles and frequency. This seminar will focus on analysing data and their relations by translating measurements into audible signals and using the natural capability of the ear to distinguish, characterise and analyse waveform shapes, amplitudes and relations. This process is called data sonification, and one of the main tools to investigate the structure of the sound is the sonogram (sometimes also called a spectrogram). A sonogram is a visual representation of how the spectrum of a certain sound signal changes with time...

  13. Exploring Variability of Gaseous Composition of the Troposphere Using Giovanni Online Visualization and Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptoukh, G.

    2006-05-01

    We present remote sensing observations of various gases in the atmospheric measured by several instruments aboard EOS NASA satellites. The emphasis is on providing options for quick exploration of these data using Giovanni, the NASA GES DISC developed online visualization and analysis tool. We describe the Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (http://acdisc.gsfc.nasa.gov), a one-stop shopping center for atmospheric composition. We provide a comprehensive list of geophysical parameters measured by TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MODIS, MLS, and other instruments, including description of data preparation for utilization in Giovanni. We describe various Giovanni functionalities, including time-series, area maps, vertical profiles, vertical cross- sections, zonal averages, etc., that allow Atmospheric Composition researches quickly and conveniently assess variability and intercompare behavior of various gases without even downloading data - everything is done online. We also discuss potential inclusion of ground station measurements of pollution into Giovanni, and utilization of this system in air-quality studies.

  14. Development of an expert analysis tool based on an interactive subsidence hazard map for urban land use in the city of Celaya, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, A.; Gonzalez Dominguez, F.; Nila Fonseca, A. L.; Ruangsirikulchai, A.; Gentle, J. N., Jr.; Cabral, E.; Pierce, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Land Subsidence as a result of groundwater extraction in central Mexico's larger urban centers initiated in the 80's as a result of population and economic growth. The city of Celaya has undergone subsidence for a few decades and a consequence is the development of an active normal fault system that affects its urban infrastructure and residential areas. To facilitate its analysis and a land use decision-making process we created an online interactive map enabling users to easily obtain information associated with land subsidence. Geological and socioeconomic data of the city was collected, including fault location, population data, and other important infrastructure and structural data has been obtained from fieldwork as part of a study abroad interchange undergraduate course. The subsidence and associated faulting hazard map was created using an InSAR derived subsidence velocity map and population data from INEGI to identify hazard zones using a subsidence gradient spatial analysis approach based on a subsidence gradient and population risk matrix. This interactive map provides a simple perspective of different vulnerable urban elements. As an accessible visualization tool, it will enhance communication between scientific and socio-economic disciplines. Our project also lays the groundwork for a future expert analysis system with an open source and easily accessible Python coded, SQLite database driven website which archives fault and subsidence data along with visual damage documentation to civil structures. This database takes field notes and provides an entry form for uniform datasets, which are used to generate a JSON. Such a database is useful because it allows geoscientists to have a centralized repository and access to their observations over time. Because of the widespread presence of the subsidence phenomena throughout cities in central Mexico, the spatial analysis has been automated using the open source software R. Raster, rgeos, shapefiles, and rgdal

  15. Visualizing Anomalies in Electronic Health Record Data: The Variability Explorer Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estiri, Hossein; Chan, Ya-Fen; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Jung, Hyunggu; Cole, Allison; Stephens, Kari A

    2015-01-01

    As Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are becoming more prevalent in the U.S. health care domain, the utility of EHR data in translational research and clinical decision-making gains prominence. Leveraging primay· care-based. multi-clinic EHR data, this paper introduces a web-based visualization tool, the Variability Explorer Tool (VET), to assist researchers with profiling variability among diagnosis codes. VET applies a simple statistical method to approximate probability distribution functions for the prevalence of any given diagnosis codes to visualize between-clinic and across-year variability. In a depression diagnoses use case, VET outputs demonstrated substantial variability in code use. Even though data quality research often characterizes variability as an indicator for data quality, variability can also reflect real characteristics of data, such as practice-level, and patient-level issues. Researchers benefit from recognizing variability in early stages of research to improve their research design and ensure validity and generalizability of research findings.

  16. iRaster: a novel information visualization tool to explore spatiotemporal patterns in multiple spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, J; Stuart, L; Sernagor, E; Borisyuk, R

    2010-12-15

    Over the last few years, simultaneous recordings of multiple spike trains have become widely used by neuroscientists. Therefore, it is important to develop new tools for analysing multiple spike trains in order to gain new insight into the function of neural systems. This paper describes how techniques from the field of visual analytics can be used to reveal specific patterns of neural activity. An interactive raster plot called iRaster has been developed. This software incorporates a selection of statistical procedures for visualization and flexible manipulations with multiple spike trains. For example, there are several procedures for the re-ordering of spike trains which can be used to unmask activity propagation, spiking synchronization, and many other important features of multiple spike train activity. Additionally, iRaster includes a rate representation of neural activity, a combined representation of rate and spikes, spike train removal and time interval removal. Furthermore, it provides multiple coordinated views, time and spike train zooming windows, a fisheye lens distortion, and dissemination facilities. iRaster is a user friendly, interactive, flexible tool which supports a broad range of visual representations. This tool has been successfully used to analyse both synthetic and experimentally recorded datasets. In this paper, the main features of iRaster are described and its performance and effectiveness are demonstrated using various types of data including experimental multi-electrode array recordings from the ganglion cell layer in mouse retina. iRaster is part of an ongoing research project called VISA (Visualization of Inter-Spike Associations) at the Visualization Lab in the University of Plymouth. The overall aim of the VISA project is to provide neuroscientists with the ability to freely explore and analyse their data. The software is freely available from the Visualization Lab website (see www.plymouth.ac.uk/infovis). Copyright © 2010

  17. A new tool for exploring climate change induced range shifts of conifer species in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Kou

    Full Text Available It is inevitable that tree species will undergo considerable range shifts in response to anthropogenic induced climate change, even in the near future. Species Distribution Models (SDMs are valuable tools in exploring general temporal trends and spatial patterns of potential range shifts. Understanding projections to future climate for tree species will facilitate policy making in forestry. Comparative studies for a large number of tree species require the availability of suitable and standardized indices. A crucial limitation when deriving such indices is the threshold problem in defining ranges, which has made interspecies comparison problematic until now. Here we propose a set of threshold-free indices, which measure range explosion (I, overlapping (O, and range center movement in three dimensions (Dx, Dy, Dz, based on fuzzy set theory (Fuzzy Set based Potential Range Shift Index, F-PRS Index. A graphical tool (PRS_Chart was developed to visualize these indices. This technique was then applied to 46 Pinaceae species that are widely distributed and partly common in China. The spatial patterns of the modeling results were then statistically tested for significance. Results showed that range overlap was generally low; no trends in range size changes and longitudinal movements could be found, but northward and poleward movement trends were highly significant. Although range shifts seemed to exhibit huge interspecies variation, they were very consistent for certain climate change scenarios. Comparing the IPCC scenarios, we found that scenario A1B would lead to a larger extent of range shifts (less overlapping and more latitudinal movement than the A2 and the B1 scenarios. It is expected that the newly developed standardized indices and the respective graphical tool will facilitate studies on PRS's for other tree species groups that are important in forestry as well, and thus support climate adaptive forest management.

  18. Soft Expert Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawkat Alkhazaleh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft set theory as a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. Many researchers have studied this theory, and they created some models to solve problems in decision making and medical diagnosis, but most of these models deal only with one expert. This causes a problem with the user, especially with those who use questionnaires in their work and studies. In our model, the user can know the opinion of all experts in one model. So, in this paper, we introduce the concept of a soft expert set, which will more effective and useful. We also define its basic operations, namely, complement, union intersection AND, and OR. Finally, we show an application of this concept in decision-making problem.

  19. Using multifractal modeling as a standard tool in geochemical exploration for predicting mineralized areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Mario A.

    2015-04-01

    It has been 20 years since the pioneering work of Cheng et al (1994) first proposed a quantitative relationship for the areas enclosing concentration values of an element above given thresholds and their distribution in the field, known as concentration-area (CA) method, which is based in multifractal theory. The method allows the definition of geochemical anomalies in wide set of geological backgrounds but it took nearly 15 years before it became a widely used methodology for mineral exploration. The method was also extended to 1D and 3D data sets. It is worth noting the variety of methods that spanned from the theory of fractals. Building on previous models, including multiplicative cascades and size-grade relationships, increasing evidence points to the powerful tools of fractal theory to describe and model ore deposit distribution and formation. However, while much of these approaches become complex and not easy to use, the CA method is remarkable for its utter simplicity and disarming results obtained when confronted with the geological reality in the field. This is most valued by companies and professionals undertaking geochemical exploration surveys for the characterization or refining of potential ore targets or known mineralized areas. Several approaches have combined the CA method with geostatistic modeling and simulation and other established statistical techniques in order to enhance anomalous threshold identification. Examples are not restricted to geochemical exploration alone, other applications being studies on environmental change. Some of these examples will be addressed as they have been applied to different regions in the world, but particular emphasis will be put on geochemical exploration surveys in different geotectonic units of the Variscan basement in the Iberian Peninsula. These include quartz-vein gold mineralization in Northern Portugal and several surveys for base metals over two wide areas, which served to re-evaluate much of the

  20. Enhanced STEM Learning with the GeoMapApp Data Exploration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), is a free, map-based data discovery and visualisation tool developed with NSF funding at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. GeoMapApp provides casual and specialist users alike with access to hundreds of built-in geoscience data sets covering geology, geophysics, geochemistry, oceanography, climatology, cryospherics, and the environment. Users can also import their own data tables, spreadsheets, shapefiles, grids and images. Simple manipulation and analysis tools combined with layering capabilities and engaging visualisations provide a powerful platform with which to explore and interrogate geoscience data in its proper geospatial context thus helping users to more easily gain insight into the meaning of the data. A global elevation base map covering the oceans as well as continents forms the backbone of GeoMapApp. The multi-resolution base map is updated regularly and includes data sources ranging from Space Shuttle elevation data for land areas to ultra-high-resolution surveys of coral reefs and seafloor hydrothermal vent fields. Examples of built-in data sets that can be layered over the elevation model include interactive earthquake and volcano data, plate tectonic velocities, hurricane tracks, land and ocean temperature, water column properties, age of the ocean floor, and deep submersible bottom photos. A versatile profiling tool provides instant access to data cross-sections. Contouring and 3-D views are also offered - the attached image shows a 3-D view of East Africa's Ngorongoro Crater as an example. Tabular data - both imported and built-in - can be displayed in a variety of ways and a lasso tool enables users to quickly select data points directly from the map. A range of STEM-based education material based upon GeoMapApp is already available, including a number of self-contained modules for school- and college-level students (http://www.geomapapp.org/education/contributed_material.html). More learning modules are

  1. Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  2. Validation of a motivation survey tool for pharmacy students: Exploring a link to professional identity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylrea, Martina F; Sen Gupta, Tarun; Glass, Beverley D

    2017-09-01

    Self-determination theory (SDT), which describes a continuum of motivation regulators, is proposed as an appropriate framework to study pharmacy student motivation. The aim was to develop a Pharmacy Motivation Scale (Pharm-S) to determine motivation regulators in undergraduate students and explore a possible link to professional identity development. The Pharm-S was adapted from the SDT-based, Sports Motivation Scale (SMS-II), and administered to undergraduate students in an Australian pharmacy course. Convergent validity was assessed by conducting a correlation analysis between the Pharm-S and MacLeod Clark Professional Identity Scale (MCPIS-9). Face, content and construct validity were established for the Pharm-S through the analysis of 327 survey responses. Factor analysis extracted four of the six theoretical subscales as proposed by SDT (variance explained: 65.7%). Support for the SDT structure was confirmed by high factor loadings in each of the subscales and acceptable reliability coefficients. Subscale correlations revealed a simplex pattern, supporting the presence of a motivation continuum, as described by SDT. A moderate positive correlation (0.64) between Pharm-S responses and the validated professional identity instrument, MCPIS-9, indicated a possible link between levels of motivation and professional identity. and conclusions: Content and structural validity and internal consistency of the Pharm-S confirmed the reliability of the Pharm-S as a valid tool to assess motivational regulators. Pharm-S and the MCPIS-9 were positively correlated, lending support to a link between motivation and professional identity. This suggests a potential role for the Pharm-S as a valid tool to measure pharmacy student professional identity development. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Topological data analysis: A promising big data exploration tool in biology, analytical chemistry and physical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offroy, Marc; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2016-03-03

    An important feature of experimental science is that data of various kinds is being produced at an unprecedented rate. This is mainly due to the development of new instrumental concepts and experimental methodologies. It is also clear that the nature of acquired data is significantly different. Indeed in every areas of science, data take the form of always bigger tables, where all but a few of the columns (i.e. variables) turn out to be irrelevant to the questions of interest, and further that we do not necessary know which coordinates are the interesting ones. Big data in our lab of biology, analytical chemistry or physical chemistry is a future that might be closer than any of us suppose. It is in this sense that new tools have to be developed in order to explore and valorize such data sets. Topological data analysis (TDA) is one of these. It was developed recently by topologists who discovered that topological concept could be useful for data analysis. The main objective of this paper is to answer the question why topology is well suited for the analysis of big data set in many areas and even more efficient than conventional data analysis methods. Raman analysis of single bacteria should be providing a good opportunity to demonstrate the potential of TDA for the exploration of various spectroscopic data sets considering different experimental conditions (with high noise level, with/without spectral preprocessing, with wavelength shift, with different spectral resolution, with missing data). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Linked Scatter Plots, A Powerful Exploration Tool For Very Large Sets of Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Duane Francis; Henze, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    We present a new tool, based on linked scatter plots, that is designed to efficiently explore very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, APOGEE, LAMOST, GAIA, and RAVE data sets.The tool works in two stages: the first uses batch processing and the second runs interactively. In the batch stage, spectra are processed through our data pipeline which computes the depths relative to the local continuum at preselected feature wavelengths. These depths, and any additional available variables such as local S/N level, magnitudes, colors, positions, and radial velocities, are the basic measured quantities used in the interactive stage.The interactive stage employs the NASA hyperwall, a configuration of 128 workstation displays (8x16 array) controlled by a parallelized software suite running on NASA's Pleiades supercomputer. Each hyperwall panel is used to display a fully linked 2-D scatter plot showing the depth of feature A vs the depth of feature B for all of the spectra. A and B change from panel to panel. The relationships between the various (A,B) strengths and any distinctive clustering, as well as unique outlier groupings, are visually apparent when examining and inter-comparing the different panels on the hyperwall. In addition, the data links between the scatter plots allow the user to apply a logical algebra to the measurements. By graphically selecting the objects in any interesting region of any 2-D plot on the hyperwall, the tool immediately and clearly shows how the selected objects are distributed in all the other 2-D plots. The selection process may be repeated multiple times and, at each step, the selections can represent a sequence of logical constraints on the measurements, revealing those objects which satisfy all the constraints thus far. The spectra of the selected objects may be examined at any time on a connected workstation display.Using over 945,000,000 depth measurements from 569,738 SDSS DR10 stellar spectra, we illustrate how to quickly

  5. Les trajectoires archivées des experts de la modernisation rurale alpine (XIXe-XXe siècles Exploring the archives on the trajectories of 19th and 20th century experts in rural Alpine modernization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Brunier

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article propose une résolution historienne de la question des parcours individuels dans leurs contextes, inscrite dans l'historiographie des études prosopographiques visant à saisir les caractéristiques sociales d’un groupe par le biais d’une comparaison des itinéraires biographiques qui le constitue. Opérant un détour méthodologique et épistémologique, elle se retourne vers l’opération historiographique telle qu’a pu la définir Paul Ricoeur, et le processus d’enquête tel qu’en rend compte Jean-Claude Passeron. Il s’agit de présenter un usage possible des bases de données relationnelles en histoire qui ne se limite pas à faciliter la décomposition des sources en évènements biographiques. Conservant la lieutenance des informations extraites envers le document historique, l’outil peut être mobilisé dans la perspective d’une reconstitution des rapports individuels qui président à la formation et la conservation de chaque type d’archive. L'étude prend alors pour objet les trajectoires d'individus amenés à se reconnaître et/ou à être reconnus comme les experts de la modernisation agricole des Alpes. La politique de Restauration des Terrains de Montagne de la fin du XIXe siècle dans les Alpes occidentales françaises et la politique de Reconstitution agricole après la Seconde Guerre mondiale sur le Plateau du Vercors, s’effectuent toutes les deux sur la base d’enquêtes menées par des experts, produisant ainsi les archives à partir desquelles se dessinent les trajectoires des individus.The purpose of this contribution is to suggest a historian’s way of dealing with individual careers and social context in the past. The main historical background is rooted in prosopographic studies that arrived from the United-States in the mid-1970s. We focus on social groups, using the comparative method to grasp their social characteristics. After a theoretical detour through Paul Ric

  6. Surface and downhole prospecting tools for planetary exploration: tests of neutron and gamma ray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R C; Chu, P; Hahn, S; James, M R; Lawrence, D J; Prettyman, T H; Johnson, J B; Podgorney, R K

    2008-06-01

    The ability to locate and characterize icy deposits and other hydrogenous materials on the Moon and Mars will help us understand the distribution of water and, therefore, possible habitats at Mars, and may help us locate primitive prebiotic compounds at the Moon's poles. We have developed a rover-borne neutron probe that localizes a near-surface icy deposit and provides information about its burial depth and abundance. We have also developed a borehole neutron probe to determine the stratigraphy of hydrogenous subsurface layers while operating within a drill string segment. In our field tests, we have used a neutron source to "illuminate" surrounding materials and gauge the instruments' efficacy, and we can simulate accurately the observed instrument responses using a Monte Carlo nuclear transport code (MCNPX). An active neutron source would not be needed for lunar or martian near-surface exploration: cosmic-ray interactions provide sufficient neutron flux to depths of several meters and yield better depth and abundance sensitivity than an active source. However, for deep drilling (>or=10 m depth), a source is required. We also present initial tests of a borehole gamma ray lithodensity tool and demonstrate its utility in determining soil or rock densities and composition.

  7. Social media and medical education: Exploring the potential of Twitter as a learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Alireza; Sherbino, Jonathan; Frank, Jason; Sutherland, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    This study set out to explore the ways in which social media can facilitate learning in medical education. In particular we were interested in determining whether the use of Twitter during an academic conference can promote learning for participants. The Twitter transcript from the annual International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) 2013 was qualitatively analysed for evidence of the three overarching cognitive themes: (1) preconceptions, (2) frameworks, and (3) metacognition/refl ection in regard to the National Research Council ’ s (NRC) How People Learn framework . Content analysis of the Twitter transcript revealed evidence of the three cognitive themes as related to how people learn. Twitter appears to be most effective at stimulating individuals ’ preconceptions, thereby engaging them with the new material acquired during a medical education conference. The study of social media data, such as the Twitter data used in this study, is in its infancy. Having established that Twitter does hold signifi cant potential as a learning tool during an academic conference, we are now in a better position to more closely examine the spread, depth, and sustainability of such learning during medical education meetings.

  8. Exploration of verbal repetition in people with dementia using an online symptom-tracking tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Emily; Molin, Pierre; Hui, Amaris; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2017-06-01

    Online tools can be used by people with dementia and their caregivers to self-identify and track troubling symptoms, such as verbal repetition. We aimed to explore verbal repetition behaviors in people with dementia. Participants were recruited via an online resource for people with dementia and their caregivers. Respondents were instructed to complete information about symptoms that are most important to them for tracking over time. In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed data pertaining to individuals with dementia who had at least three symptoms selected for tracking. Of the 3,573 participants who began a user profile, 1,707 fulfilled criteria for analysis. Verbal repetition was identified as a treatment target in 807 respondents (47.3%). Verbal repetition was more frequent in individuals with mild dementia compared to those with moderate and severe dementia (57.2% vs. 36.0% and 39.9%, p gadgets/appliances (OR 3.65, 95%CI: 2.82-4.72), lack of interest and/or initiative (3.52: 2.84-4.36), misplacing or losing objects (3.25: 2.64-4.01), and lack of attention and/or concentration (2.62: 2.12-3.26). Verbal repetition is a common symptom in people at all stages of dementia but is most commonly targeted for monitoring and treatment effects in its mild stage. Much research is required to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms and the effect of different treatment strategies.

  9. Exploring the use of tablet technology as a teaching tool at Kolej Matrikulasi Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Amirnudin, Mohamad Tahar; Sulaiman, Hajar

    2013-04-01

    The use of technology in teaching and learning (T&L) of mathematics is gaining popularity these days. There are various technologies that are designed to facilitate the process of learning, such as graphic calculators, three-dimensional projectors and multimedia softwares. Tablet is a portable technology used as a tool for communication and information search. In addition, it can also be used as a teaching aid. Galaxy Tab (tab) is a tablet produced by the giant company SAMSUNG which uses Android operating system. For this study, the researcher had to download and install the two softwares, SynSpace and Google + into the tab. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of tabs in the T&L of mathematics and get the students' perceptions. This study is divided into five phases. In Phase One, the researcher prepared the lesson plan. In the Second Phase, a workshop was conducted to introduce the students to the basic use of tab which contained two modules: Module 1 was on Syncspace Applications and Module 2 was on Google+. Third phase involves teaching and learning mathematics using tab. In Phase Four, questionnaires were distributed and then collected to obtain the data for analysis. In Phase Five, the collected data was analyzed using simple statistics involving frequency tables and bar charts. The findings showed that the use of tab in teaching and learning mathematics was accepted very by the students at Kolej Matrikulasi Perak.

  10. Curbing Kidnapping in Nigeria: An Exploration of Strategic Peace Building Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelechi Johnmary Ani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing growth of kidnapping inNigeria has become a strong threat tonational peace and security. It has affected the national image of the state and has eaten deep into every region and segmentof the nation. This work unveils howidentity fanaticism and political violence led to emergence of economy of violence referred as "kidnapping” in Nigeria. Upon this circumstance, the paper argues that peace building is a potent strategic tool that can eliminates kidnapping and other terror related crime from Nigeria by ensuring that violent actors and their sponsors embrace peace while exploring other non-violent mechanisms for resolving such differences that trigger kidnapping in the Nigerian state. It adds that adequate public information process, a behavioural change messages and actions that return the mindsets of of kidnapping into the life of rule of law and peaceful coexistence, eliminates the network of organized crime used by kidnappers to carry out its nefarious activities. Essentially eradication of kidnapping restores security climate for establishment of democratic culture, promotion of national development, and foreign direct investment.

  11. MODexplorer: an integrated tool for exploring protein sequence, structure and function relationships.

    KAUST Repository

    Kosinski, Jan

    2013-02-08

    SUMMARY: MODexplorer is an integrated tool aimed at exploring the sequence, structural and functional diversity in protein families useful in homology modeling and in analyzing protein families in general. It takes as input either the sequence or the structure of a protein and provides alignments with its homologs along with a variety of structural and functional annotations through an interactive interface. The annotations include sequence conservation, similarity scores, ligand-, DNA- and RNA-binding sites, secondary structure, disorder, crystallographic structure resolution and quality scores of models implied by the alignments to the homologs of known structure. MODexplorer can be used to analyze sequence and structural conservation among the structures of similar proteins, to find structures of homologs solved in different conformational state or with different ligands and to transfer functional annotations. Furthermore, if the structure of the query is not known, MODexplorer can be used to select the modeling templates taking all this information into account and to build a comparative model. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Freely available on the web at http://modorama.biocomputing.it/modexplorer. Website implemented in HTML and JavaScript with all major browsers supported. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Exploring the use of tools for urban sustainability in European cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Elle, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the main findings from case studies analysed within the Practical Evaluation Tools for Urban Sustainability (PETUS) project, about the practical use of tools for sustainable urban development in European cities. The paper looks across 60 case studies and identifies the main...... drivers for using tools, the benefits gained by using them and discusses why, in genera, there is limited use of available tools. The main question raised by the PETUS project was, ' why are so few tools for urban sustainability being used, when so many are available?' Recent years have shown a growing...... number of theoretical tools to assess and evaluate urban sustainability. However, experience also shows that only a few of such tools are being used in practice. The paper outlines the motivations for actors to use tools, the benefits achieved and the barriers for using tools. From this, different...

  13. Alaska Geochemical Database - Mineral Exploration Tool for the 21st Century - PDF of presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has created a geochemical database of geologic material samples collected in Alaska. This database is readily accessible to anyone with access to the Internet. Designed as a tool for mineral or environmental assessment, land management, or mineral exploration, the initial version of the Alaska Geochemical Database - U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637 - contains geochemical, geologic, and geospatial data for 264,158 samples collected from 1962-2009: 108,909 rock samples; 92,701 sediment samples; 48,209 heavy-mineral-concentrate samples; 6,869 soil samples; and 7,470 mineral samples. In addition, the Alaska Geochemical Database contains mineralogic data for 18,138 nonmagnetic-fraction heavy mineral concentrates, making it the first U.S. Geological Survey database of this scope that contains both geochemical and mineralogic data. Examples from the Alaska Range will illustrate potential uses of the Alaska Geochemical Database in mineral exploration. Data from the Alaska Geochemical Database have been extensively checked for accuracy of sample media description, sample site location, and analytical method using U.S. Geological Survey sample-submittal archives and U.S. Geological Survey publications (plus field notebooks and sample site compilation base maps from the Alaska Technical Data Unit in Anchorage, Alaska). The database is also the repository for nearly all previously released U.S. Geological Survey Alaska geochemical datasets. Although the Alaska Geochemical Database is a fully relational database in Microsoft® Access 2003 and 2010 formats, these same data are also provided as a series of spreadsheet files in Microsoft® Excel 2003 and 2010 formats, and as ASCII text files. A DVD version of the Alaska Geochemical Database was released in October 2011, as U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637, and data downloads are available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/. Also, all Alaska Geochemical Database data have been incorporated into

  14. "I CAMMINI DELLA REGINA" - Open Source based tools for preserving and culturally exploring historical traffic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Massimiliano; Colombo, Massimo; Antonovic, Milan; Cardoso, Mirko; Delucchi, Andrea; Gianocca, Giancarlo; Brovelli, Maria Antonia

    2015-04-01

    "I CAMMINI DELLA REGINA" (The Via Regina Paths) is an Interreg project funded within the transnational cooperation program between Italy and Switzerland 2007-2013. The aim of this project is the preservation and valorization of the cultural heritage linked to the walking historically paths crossing, connecting and serving the local territories. With the approach of leveraging the already existing tools, which generally consist of technical descriptions of the paths, the project uses the open source geospatial technologies to deploy innovative solutions which can fill some of the gaps in historical-cultural tourism offers. The Swiss part, and particularly the IST-SUPSI team, has been focusing its activities in the realization of two innovative solutions: a mobile application for the survey of historical paths and a storytelling system for immersive cultural exploration of the historical paths. The former, based on Android, allows to apply in a revised manner a consolidated and already successfully used methodology of survey focused on the conservation of the historical paths (Inventory of historical traffic routes in Switzerland). Up to now operators could rely only on hand work based on a combination of notes, pictures and GPS devices synthesized in manually drawn maps; this procedure is error prone and shows many problems both in data updating and extracting for elaborations. Thus it has been created an easy to use interface which allows to map, according to a newly developed spatially enabled data model, paths, morphological elements, and multimedia notes. When connected to the internet the application can send the data to a web service which, after applying linear referencing and further elaborating the data, makes them available using open standards. The storytelling system has been designed to provide users with cultural insights embedded in a multimedial and immersive geospatial portal. Whether the tourist is exploring physically or virtually the desired

  15. MARs Tools for Interactive ANalysis (MARTIAN): Google Maps Tools for Visual Exploration of Geophysical Modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Haines, M.; Holt, W. E.; Schultz, R. A.; Richard, G.; Haines, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive maps of surface-breaking faults and stress models on Mars provide important tools to engage undergraduate students, educators, and scientists with current geological and geophysical research. We have developed a map based on the Google Maps API -- an Internet based tool combining DHTML and AJAX, -- which allows very large maps to be viewed over the World Wide Web. Typically, small portions of the maps are downloaded as needed, rather than the entire image at once. This set-up enables relatively fast access for users with low bandwidth. Furthermore, Google Maps provides an extensible interactive interface making it ideal for visualizing multiple data sets at the user's choice. The Google Maps API works primarily with data referenced to latitudes and longitudes, which is then mapped in Mercator projection only. We have developed utilities for general cylindrical coordinate systems by converting these coordinates into equivalent Mercator projection before including them on the map. The MARTIAN project is available at http://rock.geo.sunysb.edu/~holt/Mars/MARTIAN/. We begin with an introduction to the Martian surface using a topography model. Faults from several datasets are classified by type (extension vs. compression) and by time epoch. Deviatoric stresses due to gravitational potential energy differences, calculated from the topography and crustal thickness, can be overlain. Several quantitative measures for the fit of the stress field to the faults are also included. We provide introductory text and exercises spanning a range of topics: how are faults identified, what stress is and how it relates to faults, what gravitational potential energy is and how variations in it produce stress, how the models are created, and how these models can be evaluated and interpreted. The MARTIAN tool is used at Stony Brook University in GEO 310: Introduction to Geophysics, a class geared towards junior and senior geosciences majors. Although this project is in its

  16. Thermal Modelling of Amagmatic Heat Sources as an Exploration Tool for Hot Rock Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescinsky, D. T.; Budd, A. R.; Champion, D. C.; Gerner, E. J.; Kirkby, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal resources in Australia are amagmatic, "Hot Rock" systems, and unrelated to active volcanism or plate margin collision. Instead, these resources are typically associated with heat from radioactive decay in high-heat-producing (HHP) granites (granites containing high concentrations of U, Th and K), coupled with thermal insulation from a thick sediment cover. A greater understanding of the ideal geological components of the Hot Rock system is needed to assist geothermal exploration and reduce risk. Existing geothermal data for Australia (borehole temperatures and heat flow determinations) are limited and collection of additional data is both time consuming and restricted to accessing wells drilled for other purposes. To aid in targeting and prioritizing areas for further study (i.e., evaluations of permeabilities and flow rates), GA has undertaken synthetic thermal modelling, constrained by available geological and geophysical datasets. 150,000 discrete numerical simulations were performed using the SHEMAT computer code. The models were designed to explore the range of geological conditions present in Australia and include variations in intrusive geometry and heat production, sediment thickness and thermal conductivity, basement heat production and basal heat flow. In order to facilitate computation and analysis, plutons were modelled as radially symmetrical cylinders and advective heat transfer was considered to be negligible. The results of the synthetic modelling indicate that significant heat can be generated by granites and trapped in geologically realistic conditions. Temperatures >160°C can be produced with heat production values as low as 2.0 μW/m3, but these scenarios require either unusually large pluton diameters (>50 km), low sediment thermal conductivity (0.05 W/m2). The most geologically reasonable conditions that result in temperatures >160°C, are: pluton diameters 30-40 km; heat production of 4.0-5.0 μW/m3; a basal heat flow of 0.04 W/m2

  17. Exploring students’ perceived and actual ability in solving statistical problems based on Rasch measurement tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azila Che Musa, Nor; Mahmud, Zamalia; Baharun, Norhayati

    2017-09-01

    One of the important skills that is required from any student who are learning statistics is knowing how to solve statistical problems correctly using appropriate statistical methods. This will enable them to arrive at a conclusion and make a significant contribution and decision for the society. In this study, a group of 22 students majoring in statistics at UiTM Shah Alam were given problems relating to topics on testing of hypothesis which require them to solve the problems using confidence interval, traditional and p-value approach. Hypothesis testing is one of the techniques used in solving real problems and it is listed as one of the difficult concepts for students to grasp. The objectives of this study is to explore students’ perceived and actual ability in solving statistical problems and to determine which item in statistical problem solving that students find difficult to grasp. Students’ perceived and actual ability were measured based on the instruments developed from the respective topics. Rasch measurement tools such as Wright map and item measures for fit statistics were used to accomplish the objectives. Data were collected and analysed using Winsteps 3.90 software which is developed based on the Rasch measurement model. The results showed that students’ perceived themselves as moderately competent in solving the statistical problems using confidence interval and p-value approach even though their actual performance showed otherwise. Item measures for fit statistics also showed that the maximum estimated measures were found on two problems. These measures indicate that none of the students have attempted these problems correctly due to reasons which include their lack of understanding in confidence interval and probability values.

  18. Lessons Learnt from Experts in Design Rationale Knowledge Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Mark; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo; Ravindranath, Ranjitun

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the use of argumentation models and software tools to support knowledge capture in the design of long-life engineering products. The results of semi-structured interviews with a number of experts in the field are presented, exploring their collective experience...... of knowledge capture and eliciting guidelines for successful implementation of such models and tools. The results of this research may be used as the basis for the design of future tools and techniques for knowledge capture....

  19. Asking Questions in the Classroom: An Exploration of Tools and Techniques Used in the Library Instruction Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitver, Sara Maurice; Lo, Leo S.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the tools and techniques used within the library instruction classroom to facilitate a conversation about teaching practices. Researchers focused on the questioning methods employed by librarians, specifically the number of questions asked by librarians and students. This study was comprised of classroom observations of a team…

  20. A Web Portal-Based Time-Aware KML Animation Tool for Exploring Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Hydrological Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Cai, X.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding spatiotemporal dynamics of hydrological events such as storms and droughts is highly valuable for decision making on disaster mitigation and recovery. Virtual Globe-based technologies such as Google Earth and Open Geospatial Consortium KML standards show great promises for collaborative exploration of such events using visual analytical approaches. However, currently there are two barriers for wider usage of such approaches. First, there lacks an easy way to use open source tools to convert legacy or existing data formats such as shapefiles, geotiff, or web services-based data sources to KML and to produce time-aware KML files. Second, an integrated web portal-based time-aware animation tool is currently not available. Thus users usually share their files in the portal but have no means to visually explore them without leaving the portal environment which the users are familiar with. We develop a web portal-based time-aware KML animation tool for viewing extreme hydrologic events. The tool is based on Google Earth JavaScript API and Java Portlet standard 2.0 JSR-286, and it is currently deployable in one of the most popular open source portal frameworks, namely Liferay. We have also developed an open source toolkit kml-soc-ncsa (http://code.google.com/p/kml-soc-ncsa/) to facilitate the conversion of multiple formats into KML and the creation of time-aware KML files. We illustrate our tool using some example cases, in which drought and storm events with both time and space dimension can be explored in this web-based KML animation portlet. The tool provides an easy-to-use web browser-based portal environment for multiple users to collaboratively share and explore their time-aware KML files as well as improving the understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the hydrological events.

  1. Visual exploration and analysis of ionospheric scintillation monitoring data: The ISMR Query Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, Bruno César; Shimabukuro, Milton Hirokazu; Galera Monico, João Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Ionospheric Scintillations are rapid variations on the phase and/or amplitude of a radio signal as it passes through ionospheric plasma irregularities. The ionosphere is a specific layer of the Earth's atmosphere located approximately between 50 km and 1000 km above the Earth's surface. As Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) - such as GPS, Galileo, BDS and GLONASS - use radio signals, these variations degrade their positioning service quality. Due to its location, Brazil is one of the places most affected by scintillation in the world. For that reason, ionosphere monitoring stations have been deployed over Brazilian territory since 2011 through cooperative projects between several institutions in Europe and Brazil. Such monitoring stations compose a network that generates a large amount of monitoring data everyday. GNSS receivers deployed at these stations - named Ionospheric Scintillation Monitor Receivers (ISMR) - provide scintillation indices and related signal metrics for available satellites dedicated to satellite-based navigation and positioning services. With this monitoring infrastructure, more than ten million observation values are generated and stored every day. Extracting the relevant information from this huge amount of data was a hard process and required the expertise of computer and geoscience scientists. This paper describes the concepts, design and aspects related to the implementation of the software that has been supporting research on ISMR data - the so-called ISMR Query Tool. Usability and other aspects are also presented via examples of application. This web based software has been designed and developed aiming to ensure insights over the huge amount of ISMR data that is fetched every day on an integrated platform. The software applies and adapts time series mining and information visualization techniques to extend the possibilities of exploring and analyzing ISMR data. The software is available to the scientific community through the

  2. VisIVO: A Library and Integrated Tools for Large Astrophysical Dataset Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciani, U.; Costa, A.; Ersotelos, N.; Krokos, M.; Massimino, P.; Petta, C.; Vitello, F.

    2012-09-01

    VisIVO provides an integrated suite of tools and services that can be used in many scientific fields. VisIVO development starts in the Virtual Observatory framework. VisIVO allows users to visualize meaningfully highly-complex, large-scale datasets and create movies of these visualizations based on distributed infrastructures. VisIVO supports high-performance, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale astrophysical datasets. Users can rapidly obtain meaningful visualizations while preserving full and intuitive control of the relevant parameters. VisIVO consists of VisIVO Desktop - a stand-alone application for interactive visualization on standard PCs, VisIVO Server - a platform for high performance visualization, VisIVO Web - a custom designed web portal, VisIVOSmartphone - an application to exploit the VisIVO Server functionality and the latest VisIVO features: VisIVO Library allows a job running on a computational system (grid, HPC, etc.) to produce movies directly with the code internal data arrays without the need to produce intermediate files. This is particularly important when running on large computational facilities, where the user wants to have a look at the results during the data production phase. For example, in grid computing facilities, images can be produced directly in the grid catalogue while the user code is running in a system that cannot be directly accessed by the user (a worker node). The deployment of VisIVO on the DG and gLite is carried out with the support of EDGI and EGI-Inspire projects. Depending on the structure and size of datasets under consideration, the data exploration process could take several hours of CPU for creating customized views and the production of movies could potentially last several days. For this reason an MPI parallel version of VisIVO could play a fundamental role in increasing performance, e.g. it could be automatically deployed on nodes that are MPI aware. A central concept in our development is thus to

  3. Legal Knowledge as a Tool for Social Change: La Mesa por la Vida y la Salud de las Mujeres as an Expert on Colombian Abortion Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Vélez, Ana Cristina; Jaramillo, Isabel Cristina

    2017-06-01

    In May 2006, Colombia's Constitutional Court liberalized abortion, introducing three circumstances under which the procedure would not be considered a crime: (1) rape or incest; (2) a risk to the woman's health or life; and (3) fetal malformations incompatible with life. Immediately following the court's ruling, known as Sentence C-355, members of La Mesa por la Vida y Salud de las Mujeres (hereinafter La Mesa) began to mobilize to ensure the decision's implementation, bearing in mind the limited impact that the legal framework endorsed by the court has had in other countries in the region. We argue that La Mesa's strategy is an innovative one in the field of legal mobilization insofar as it presumes that law can be shaped not just by public officials and universities but also by social actors engaged in the creation and diffusion of legal knowledge. In this regard, La Mesa has become a legal expert on abortion by accumulating knowledge about the multiple legal rules affecting the practice of abortion and about the situations in which these rules are to be applied. In addition, by becoming a legal expert, La Mesa has been able to persuade health providers that they will not risk criminal prosecution or being fired if they perform abortions. We call this effect of legal mobilization a "pedagogical effect" insofar as it involves the production of expertise and appropriation of knowledge by health professionals. We conclude by discussing La Mesa's choice to become a legal expert on abortion as opposed to recruiting academics to do this work or encouraging women to produce and disseminate this knowledge.

  4. A Tropical Marine Microbial Natural Products Geobibliography as an Example of Desktop Exploration of Current Research Using Web Visualisation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Evans-Illidge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind ™, ArcGIS Explorer ™ and Google Earth ™. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth ™ and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

  5. Teachers' Initial and Sustained Use of an Instructional Assistive Technology Tool: Exploring the Mitigating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Flanagan, Sara; Heutsche, Anne; Okolo, Cynthia M.; Englert, Carol Sue

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative research project explored factors that mitigated teachers implementing an instructional assistive technology and factors that mitigated its sustained use. Specifically, it explored these issues in relation to a social studies based instructional assistive technology (Virtual History Museum [VHM]), which was originally implemented…

  6. Utilizing expert systems for satellite monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft analysts in the spacecraft control center for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite are currently utilizing a fault-isolation expert system developed to assist in the isolation and correction of faults in the communications link. This system, the communication link expert assistance resource (CLEAR), monitors real time spacecraft and ground systems performance parameters in search of configuration discrepancies and communications link problems. If such a discrepancy or problem is isolated, CLEAR alerts the analyst and provides advice on how to resolve the problem swiftly and effectively. The CLEAR system is the first real time expert system to be used in the operational environment of a satellite control center at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Clear has not only demonstrated the utility and potential of an expert system in the demanding environment of a satellite control center, but also has revealed many of the pitfalls and deficiencies of development of expert systems. One of the lessons learned from this and other initial expert system projects is that prototypes can often be developed quite rapidly, but operational expert systems require considerable effort. Development is generally a slow, tedious process that typically requires the special skills of trained programmers. Due to the success of CLEAR and several other systems in the control center domain, a large number of expert systems will certainly be developed to support control center operations during the early 1990's. To facilitate the development of these systems, a project was initiated to develop an integrated, domain-specific tool, the generic spacecraft analyst assistent (GenSAA), that alows the spacecraft analysts to rapidly create simple expert systems themselves. By providing a highly graphical point-and-select method of system development, GenSAA allows the analyst to utilize and/or modify previously developed rule bases and system components; thus, facilitating

  7. ALICE Expert System

    CERN Document Server

    Ionita, C

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in dierent system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by reg...

  8. Web-based Data Exploration, Exploitation and Visualization Tools for Satellite Sensor VIS/IR Calibration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, A.; Doelling, D. R.; Scarino, B. R.; Chee, T.; Haney, C.; Bhatt, R.

    2016-12-01

    The CERES calibration group at NASA/LaRC has developed and deployed a suite of online data exploration and visualization tools targeted towards a range of spaceborne VIS/IR imager calibration applications for the Earth Science community. These web-based tools are driven by the open-source R (Language for Statistical Computing and Visualization) with a web interface for the user to customize the results according to their application. The tool contains a library of geostationary and sun-synchronous imager spectral response functions (SRF), incoming solar spectra, SCIAMACHY and Hyperion Earth reflected visible hyper-spectral data, and IASI IR hyper-spectral data. The suite of six specific web-based tools was designed to provide critical information necessary for sensor cross-calibration. One of the challenges of sensor cross-calibration is accounting for spectral band differences and may introduce biases if not handled properly. The spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) are a function of the earth target, atmospheric and cloud conditions or scene type and angular conditions, when obtaining sensor radiance pairs. The SBAF will need to be customized for each inter-calibration target and sensor pair. The advantages of having a community open source tool are: 1) only one archive of SCIAMACHY, Hyperion, and IASI datasets needs to be maintained, which is on the order of 50TB. 2) the framework will allow easy incorporation of new satellite SRFs and hyper-spectral datasets and associated coincident atmospheric and cloud properties, such as PW. 3) web tool or SBAF algorithm improvements or suggestions when incorporated can benefit the community at large. 4) The customization effort is on the user rather than on the host. In this paper we discuss each of these tools in detail and explore the variety of advanced options that can be used to constrain the results along with specific use cases to highlight the value-added by these datasets.

  9. Alteration mineralogy and geochemistry as an exploration tool for detecting basement heat sources in sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tonguc; Gasparon, Massimo; van Zyl, Jacobus; Wyborn, Doone

    2010-05-01

    The Cooper Basin located in South Australia and Queensland hosts some of the hottest granites in the world at economic drilling depths (240°C at 3.5 km). Investigating the mechanism of heat-producing element enrichment in the Cooper Basin granite is crucial for understanding hot-dry rock geothermal systems and developing exploration strategies. Trace element (by ICP-MS) and stable isotope geochemistry of whole rock granite samples and hydrothermal phyllosilicate alteration minerals separated from the granite and overlying sandstones and mudstones of the Cooper Basin were examined in detail. Granite core samples from relatively shallow depths in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1 are strongly altered with pervasive sericite (illite) and quartz precipitation, probably associated with intense micro-fracturing and veining. The intensity of hydrothermal alteration is less in deeper samples from Mcleod 1, Jolokia and Habanero 1. Highly altered granites from former holes are substantially enriched in lithophile elements, particularly in Cs, Rb, Be, Th, U and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the upper continental crust (UCC). U and Th contents with concentrations of up to 30 and 144 ppm, respectively, are 10 and 13 times higher than those of the UCC. Comparison of the trace element composition of the same samples dissolved by open beaker acid digestion and high-pressure acid bomb digestion (to dissolve zircon) shows that zircon is not the main repository of U and Th in the Cooper Basin granite. Instead, we propose that the enrichment of heat-producing elements was promoted by a regional hydrothermal event leading to the precipitation of U and Th- bearing minerals such as illite, K-feldspar and thorite. Crystallinity index (illite crystallinity) of the sericite indicates hydrothermal temperatures ranging from 250°C (in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1) to 350°C (in McLeod 1 and Jolokia 1). In the overlying sedimentary rocks, crystallinity of authigenic illites translates to lower

  10. Emerging Instructional Technologies: Exploring the Extent of Faculty Use of Web 2.0 Tools at a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Tareq; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide insight into the several aspects of instructional use of emerging web-based technologies. The study first explores the extent of Web 2.0 technology integration into face-to-face classroom activities. In this phase, the main focus of research interests was on the types and dynamics of Web 2.0 tools used by…

  11. Medicine authentication technology as a counterfeit medicine-detection tool: a Delphi method study to establish expert opinion on manual medicine authentication technology in secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Bernard; Roberts, Lindsey; Dopson, Sue; Brindley, David; Chapman, Stephen

    2017-05-06

    This study aims to establish expert opinion and potential improvements for the Falsified Medicines Directive mandated medicines authentication technology. A two-round Delphi method study using an online questionnaire. Large National Health Service (NHS) foundation trust teaching hospital. Secondary care pharmacists and accredited checking technicians. Seven-point rating scale answers which reached a consensus of 70-80% with a standard deviation (SD) of <1.0. Likert scale questions which reached a consensus of 70-80%, a SD of <1.0 and classified as important according to study criteria. Consensus expert opinion has described database cross-checking technology as quick and user friendly and suggested the inclusion of an audio signal to further support the detection of counterfeit medicines in secondary care (70% consensus, 0.9 SD); other important consensus with a SD of <1.0 included reviewing the colour and information in warning pop up screens to ensure they were not mistaken for the 'already dispensed here' pop up, encouraging the dispenser/checker to act on the warnings and making it mandatory to complete an 'action taken' documentation process to improve the quarantine of potentially counterfeit, expired or recalled medicines. This paper informs key opinion leaders and decision makers as to the positives and negatives of medicines authentication technology from an operator's perspective and suggests the adjustments which may be required to improve operator compliance and the detection of counterfeit medicines in the secondary care sector. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2014-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making. PMID:24478664

  13. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella eLaureiro-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time. We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making.

  14. Expert witness perceptions of bias in experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commons, Michael Lamport; Miller, Patrice Marie; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study of perceptions of different sources of expert bias, as well as of personal investment in case outcomes, was performed among attendees at a workshop at an annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. Participants were asked to rate hypothetical responses by experts to various case outcomes and the biasing potential of different kinds of situations for opposing or other experts. A factor analysis produced two factors. Factor 1 included questions about situations that were obviously biasing (such as working only for the defense). Factor 2 included questions assessing the potential of certain situations to cause bias in experts, or how likely experts thought other experts were to be biased. In general, experts identified only four areas to be overtly biasing. All occurred within situations in which experts worked only for one or the other side of civil or criminal cases. Experts otherwise thought other experts were reasonably bias free and well able to compensate for any bias when it occurred. The data suggest that experts may deal with bias by turning down cases that may cause them personal discomfort.

  15. One Size Fits All Learning Preferences: an Exploration of Rapid Authoring Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niav McEvoy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs are increasingly being used by colleges and universities to deliver and/or complement traditional face-to-face courses. The range of learning technologies available for use within these virtual platforms is considerable, but how confident are we that these learning tools support the learning process for students? It is crucial that the learning tools utilised in virtual platforms do not cause additional barriers for the online and distant learner. This Survey research study is designed to determine if rapid authoring tools can meet the needs of a variety of learning preferences of adult learners. The study focuses specifically on the use of virtual tutorials, created using the rapid authoring tool Articulate Presenter 2007, to establish the learning preferences of the students as represented by Fleming's (2011 VARK model. In total, ten variations of the VARK learning preferences were represented across respondents, with the majority indicating a uni-modal preference in an online self-administered questionnaire. Overall, the majority of students responded positively in relation to their experience of the virtual tutorial.

  16. Exploring Predictability of Instructor Ratings Using a Quantitative Tool for Evaluating Soft Skills among MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Robert T.; Gilfoil, David M.; Doll, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Academic researchers have often touted the growing importance of "soft skills" for modern day business leaders, especially leadership and communication skills. Despite this growing interest and attention, relatively little work has been done to develop and validate tools to assess soft skills. Forty graduate students from nine MBA…

  17. Leveraging Observation Tools for Instructional Improvement: Exploring Variability in Uptake of Ambitious Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Julie; Schuldt, Lorien Chambers; Brown, Lindsay; Grossman, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Current efforts to build rigorous teacher evaluation systems has increased interest in standardized classroom observation tools as reliable measures for assessing teaching. However, many argue these instruments can also be used to effect change in classroom practice. This study investigates a model of professional development…

  18. A Visualisation Tool to Aid Exploration of Students' Interactions in Asynchronous Online Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, Sujana; McAvinia, Claire; Keating, John

    2012-01-01

    Much research in recent years has focused on the introduction of virtual learning environments (VLEs) to universities, documenting practice, and sharing experience ([2], [9], [45] and [58]). Attention has been directed towards the importance of online dialogue for learning as a defining feature of the VLE. Communicative tools are an important…

  19. An interactive visualization tool for the analysis of multi-objective embedded systems design space exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghavi, T.; Pimentel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    The design of today’s embedded systems involves a complex Design Space Exploration (DSE) process. Typically, multiple and conflicting criteria (objectives) should be optimized simultaneously such as performance, power, cost, etc. Usually, Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) are used to

  20. Implementing the KPMG Value Explorer: Critical success factors for applying IC measurement tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Daan Andriessen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes the result of an empirical study into the critical success factors for implementing an intellectual capital valuation method, the KPMG Value Explorer®. Methodology/Approach For this study the design approach was used as research methodology. Findings The research shows

  1. Exploring the Validity of a Second Language Intercultural Pragmatics Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpe-Laughlin, Veronika; Choi, Ikkyu

    2017-01-01

    Pragmatics has been a key component of language competence frameworks. While the majority of second/foreign language (L2) pragmatics tests have targeted productive skills, the assessment of receptive pragmatic skills remains a developing field. This study explores validation evidence for a test of receptive L2 pragmatic ability called the American…

  2. Exploring Positioning as an Analytical Tool for Understanding Becoming Mathematics Teachers' Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, Kicki; Andersson, Annica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how a sociopolitical analysis can contribute to a deeper understanding of critical aspects for becoming primary mathematics teachers' identities during teacher education. The question we ask is the following: How may power relations in university settings affect becoming mathematics teachers' subject…

  3. An innovative browser-based data exploration tool with simultaneous scrolling in time and wavelength domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Schiff, David; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Freeland, Samuel L.

    2017-08-01

    We present Cruiser, a new web tool for the precision interactive blending of image series across time and wavelength domains. Scrolling in two dimensions enables discovery and investigation of similarities and differences in structure and evolution across multiple wavelengths. Cruiser works in the latest versions of standards compliant browsers on both desktop and IOS platforms. Co-aligned data cubes have been generated for AIA, IRIS, and Hinode SOT FG, and image data from additional instruments, both space-based and ground-based, can be data sources. The tool has several movie playing and image adjustment controls which will be described in the poster and demonstrated on a MacOS notebook and iPad.

  4. WormGUIDES: an interactive single cell developmental atlas and tool for collaborative multidimensional data exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Santella, Anthony; Catena, Ra?l; Kovacevic, Ismar; Shah, Pavak; Yu, Zidong; Marquina-Solis, Javier; Kumar, Abhishek; Wu, Yicong; Schaff, James; Col?n-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari; Mohler, William A.; Bao, Zhirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Imaging and image analysis advances are yielding increasingly complete and complicated records of cellular events in tissues and whole embryos. The ability to follow hundreds to thousands of cells at the individual level demands a spatio-temporal data infrastructure: tools to assemble and collate knowledge about development spatially in a manner analogous to geographic information systems (GIS). Just as GIS indexes items or events based on their spatio-temporal or 4D location on th...

  5. The remote system explorer modern developer tools for the system I

    CERN Document Server

    Yantzi, Don

    2008-01-01

    Focusing exclusively on the Remote System Explorer (RSE) within the popular WebSphere Development Studio Client (WDSC), this comprehensive study contains both technical and practical tutorials. Allowing developers to use modern techniques within several programs, this survey covers topics such as getting started, terminology, installation, managing i5/OS objects and members, editing, compiling, and debugging. Each chapter features key views, actions, keyboard shortcuts, and troubleshooting tips. Illustrated with countless examples and detailed screen shots, this reference makes the RSE accessi

  6. Magnetic susceptibility as a tool for mineral exploration (Case study: Southern of Zagros Mountains)

    OpenAIRE

    mohammad boroomand; Abdolreza Safari; abbas Bahroudi

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility has been extensively used to determine the magnetic properties of rocks for different applications, such as hydrocarbon or mineral explorations. This magnetic quantity can be directly measured in an accurate but time-consuming operation, or it can be mathematically approximated using a reliable procedure to achieve a desired accuracy. The Poisson theory is one of the most well-known approaches which provide a meaningful relationship between the earth’s gravity and magn...

  7. Region Evolution eXplorer - A tool for discovering evolution trends in ontology regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Victor; Hartung, Michael; Groß, Anika

    2015-01-01

    A large number of life science ontologies has been developed to support different application scenarios such as gene annotation or functional analysis. The continuous accumulation of new insights and knowledge affects specific portions in ontologies and thus leads to their adaptation. Therefore, it is valuable to study which ontology parts have been extensively modified or remained unchanged. Users can monitor the evolution of an ontology to improve its further development or apply the knowledge in their applications. Here we present REX (Region Evolution eXplorer) a web-based system for exploring the evolution of ontology parts (regions). REX provides an analysis platform for currently about 1,000 versions of 16 well-known life science ontologies. Interactive workflows allow an explorative analysis of changing ontology regions and can be used to study evolution trends for long-term periods. REX is a web application providing an interactive and user-friendly interface to identify (un)stable regions in large life science ontologies. It is available at http://www.izbi.de/rex.

  8. An interactive visualization tool to explore the biophysical properties of amino acids and their contribution to substitution matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    desJardins Marie

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative descriptions of amino acid similarity, expressed as probabilistic models of evolutionary interchangeability, are central to many mainstream bioinformatic procedures such as sequence alignment, homology searching, and protein structural prediction. Here we present a web-based, user-friendly analysis tool that allows any researcher to quickly and easily visualize relationships between these bioinformatic metrics and to explore their relationships to underlying indices of amino acid molecular descriptors. Results We demonstrate the three fundamental types of question that our software can address by taking as a specific example the connections between 49 measures of amino acid biophysical properties (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity, a generalized model of amino acid substitution (as represented by the PAM74-100 matrix, and the mutational distance that separates amino acids within the standard genetic code (i.e., the number of point mutations required for interconversion during protein evolution. We show that our software allows a user to recapture the insights from several key publications on these topics in just a few minutes. Conclusion Our software facilitates rapid, interactive exploration of three interconnected topics: (i the multidimensional molecular descriptors of the twenty proteinaceous amino acids, (ii the correlation of these biophysical measurements with observed patterns of amino acid substitution, and (iii the causal basis for differences between any two observed patterns of amino acid substitution. This software acts as an intuitive bioinformatic exploration tool that can guide more comprehensive statistical analyses relating to a diverse array of specific research questions.

  9. 3&4D Geomodeling Applied to Mineral Resources Exploration - A New Tool for Targeting Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Jean-Jacques; Mejia, Pablo; Caumon, Guillaume; Collon-Drouaillet, Pauline

    2013-04-01

    3 & 4D geomodeling, a computer method for reconstituting the past deformation history of geological formations, has been used in oil and gas exploration for more than a decade for reconstituting fluid migration. It begins nowadays to be applied for exploring with new eyes old mature mining fields and new prospects. We describe shortly the 3&4D geomodeling basic notions, concepts, and methodology when applied to mineral resources assessment and modeling ore deposits, pointing out the advantages, recommendations and limitations, together with new challenges they rise. Several 3D GeoModels of mining explorations selected across Europe will be presented as illustrative case studies which have been achieved during the EU FP7 ProMine research project. It includes: (i) the Cu-Au porphyry deposits in the Hellenic Belt (Greece); (ii) the VMS in the Iberian Pyrite Belt including the Neves Corvo deposit (Portugal) and (iii) the sediment-hosted polymetallic Cu-Ag (Au, PGE) Kupferschiefer ore deposit in the Foresudetic Belt (Poland). In each case full 3D models using surfaces and regular grid (Sgrid) were built from all dataset available from exploration and exploitation including geological primary maps, 2D seismic cross-sections, and boreholes. The level of knowledge may differ from one site to another however those 3D resulting models were used to pilot additional field and exploration works. In the case of the Kupferschiefer, a sequential restoration-decompaction (4D geomodeling) from the Upper Permian to Cenozoic was conducted in the Lubin- Sieroszowice district of Poland. The results help in better understanding the various superimposed mineralization events which occurred through time in this copper deposit. A hydro-fracturing index was then calculated from the estimated overpressures during a Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene up-lifting, and seems to correlate with the copper content distribution in the ore-series. These results are in agreement with an Early Paleocene

  10. Understanding Global Change: Tools for exploring Earth processes and biotic change through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, J. R.; White, L. D.; Berbeco, M.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching global change is one of the great pedagogical challenges of our day because real understanding entails integrating a variety of concepts from different scientific subject areas, including chemistry, physics, and biology, with a variety of causes and impacts in the past, present, and future. With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, which emphasize climate change and other human impacts on natural systems, there has never been a better time to provide instructional support to educators on these topics. In response to this clear need, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, in collaboration with the National Center for Science Education, developed a new web resource for teachers and students titled "Understanding Global Change" (UGC) that introduces the drivers and impacts of global change. This website clarifies the connections among deep time, modern Earth system processes, and anthropogenic influences, and provides K-16 instructors with a wide range of easy-to-use tools, strategies, and lesson plans for communicating these important concepts regarding global change and the basic Earth systems processes. In summer 2014, the UGC website was field-tested during a workshop with 25 K-12 teachers and science educators. Feedback from participants helped the UGC team develop and identify pedagogically sound lesson plans and instructional tools on global change. These resources are accessible through UGC's searchable database, are aligned with NGSS and Common Core, and are categorized by grade level, subject, and level of inquiry-based instruction (confirmation, structured, guided, open). Providing a range of content and tools at levels appropriate for teachers is essential because our initial needs assessment found that educators often feel that they lack the content knowledge and expertise to address complex, but relevant global change issues, such as ocean acidification and deforestation. Ongoing needs assessments and surveys of

  11. EXPLICIT: a feasibility study of remote expert elicitation in health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Bogdan; Peters, Jaime; Hyde, Christopher; Stein, Ken

    2017-09-04

    Expert opinion is often sought to complement available information needed to inform model-based economic evaluations in health technology assessments. In this context, we define expert elicitation as the process of encoding expert opinion on a quantity of interest, together with associated uncertainty, as a probability distribution. When availability for face-to-face expert elicitation with a facilitator is limited, elicitation can be conducted remotely, overcoming challenges of finding an appropriate time to meet the expert and allowing access to experts situated too far away for practical face-to-face sessions. However, distance elicitation is associated with reduced response rates and limited assistance for the expert during the elicitation session. The aim of this study was to inform the development of a remote elicitation tool by exploring the influence of mode of elicitation on elicited beliefs. An Excel-based tool (EXPLICIT) was developed to assist the elicitation session, including the preparation of the expert and recording of their responses. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to provide expert opinion about population alcohol consumption behaviours. They were randomised to complete the elicitation by either a face-to-face meeting or email. EXPLICIT was used in the elicitation sessions for both arms. Fifteen GPs completed the elicitation session. Those conducted by email were longer than the face-to-face sessions (13 min 30 s vs 10 min 26 s, p = 0.1) and the email-elicited estimates contained less uncertainty. However, the resulting aggregated distributions were comparable. EXPLICIT was useful in both facilitating the elicitation task and in obtaining expert opinion from experts via email. The findings support the opinion that remote, self-administered elicitation is a viable approach within the constraints of HTA to inform policy making, although poor response rates may be observed and additional time for individual sessions may be required.

  12. Computers that Think Like Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnucan, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of expert systems, including various techniques they use to represent knowledge (such as production rules, semantic networks, frames, first-order logic, and others), system interactions, and such problem domains as science, medicine, computer configuration, trouble-shooting/repair, and oil/mineral exploration. Also discusses…

  13. Exploration tools for drug discovery and beyond: applying SciFinder to interdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Margaret; Vieira, Barbara; Winer, Fred; Knutsen, Lars J S

    2005-06-01

    Chemists have long recognized the value of online databases for surveying the literature of their field. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) databases covering almost a century's worth of journal articles and patent documents are among the best known and widely used for searching information on compounds. Today's research presents a new challenge, however, as the boundaries of chemistry and biological sciences overlap increasingly. This trend is especially true in the drug discovery field where published findings relating to both chemical and biological entities and their interactions are examined. CAS has expanded its resources to meet the requirements of the new, interdisciplinary challenges faced by today's researchers. This is evident both in the content of CAS databases, which have been expanded to include more biology-related information, and in the technology of the search tools now available to researchers on their desktop. It is the integration of content and search-and-retrieval technology that enables new insights to be made in the vast body of accumulated information. CAS's SciFinder is a widely used research tool for this purpose.

  14. Medical Expert Systems Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Nasser, Bassem S.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; There is an increase interest in the area of Artificial Intelligence in general and expert systems in particular. Expert systems are rapidly growing technology. Expert system is a branch of Artificial Intelligence which is having a great impact on many fields of human life. Expert systems use human expert knowledge to solve complex problems in many fields such as Health, science, engineering, business, and weather forecasting. Organizations employing the technology of ...

  15. OECD eXplorer: Making Regional Statistics Come Alive through a Geo-Visual Web-Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Brezzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in web-enabled graphics technologies have the potential to make a dramatic impact on developing highly interactive Geovisual Analytics applications for the Internet. An emerging and challenging application domain is geovisualization of regional (sub-national statistics. Higher integration drivenby institutional processes and economic globalisation is eroding national borders and creating competition along regional lines in the world market. Sound information at sub-national level and benchmark of regions across borders have gained importance in the policy agenda of many countries. In this paper, we introduce “OECD eXplorer” — an interactive tool for analyzing and communicating gained insights and discoveries about spatial-temporal and multivariate OECD regional data. This database is a potential treasure chest for policy-makers, researchers and citizens to gain a better understanding of a region’s structure and performance and to carry out analysis of territorial trends and disparities based on sound information comparableacross countries. Many approaches and tools have been developed in spatial-related knowledge discovery but generally they do not scale well with dynamic visualization of larger spatial data on the Internet. In this context, we introduce a web-compliant Geovisual Analytics toolkit that supports a broad collection offunctional components for analysis, hypothesis generation and validation. The same tool enables the communicationof results on the basis of a snapshot mechanism that captures, re-uses and shares task-related explorative findings. Further developments underway are in the creation of a generic highly interactive web “eXplorer” platform that can be the foundation for easy customization of similar web applications usingdifferent geographical boundaries and indicators. Given this global dimension, a “generic eXplorer” will be a powerful tool to explore different territorial dimensions

  16. Experts in science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    In today's complex world, we have come to rely increasingly on those who have expertise in specific areas and can bring their knowledge to bear on crucial social, political and scientific questions. Taking the viewpoint that experts are consulted when there is something important at stake for an individual, a group, or society at large, Experts in Science and Society explores expertise as a relational concept. How do experts balance their commitment to science with that to society? How does a society actually determine that a person has expertise? What personal traits are valued in an expert? From where does the expert derive authority? What makes new forms of expertise emerge? These and related questions are addressed from a wide range of areas in order to be inclusive, as well as to demonstrate similarities across areas. Likewise, in order to be culturally comparative, this volume includes examples and discussions of experts in different countries and even in different time periods. The topics include the r...

  17. Magnetic susceptibility as a tool for mineral exploration (Case study: Southern of Zagros Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad boroomand

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility has been extensively used to determine the magnetic properties of rocks for different applications, such as hydrocarbon or mineral explorations. This magnetic quantity can be directly measured in an accurate but time-consuming operation, or it can be mathematically approximated using a reliable procedure to achieve a desired accuracy. The Poisson theory is one of the most well-known approaches which provide a meaningful relationship between the earth’s gravity and magnetic fields to derive the magnetic susceptibility. In this approach, the reliability and efficiency of the derived magnetic susceptibility depends on the method of computation of the gravity gradient tensor. We investigated two different methods of determination of gradient tensor; different distance method and Fourier transform technique. From the investigation, the Fourier transform method was more consistent with the geological features which led to more reliable information required for mineral explorations. The performance of the Poisson theory, the different distance method, and the Fourier transform was investigated in the coastal Fars, in Iran. This was highly disposing for geological and mineral features. Salt domes in the study area were detected and results compared with the available geological map.

  18. How Relevant is an Expert Evaluation of User Experience based on a Psychological Needs-Driven Approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Lallemand, Carine; Koenig, Vincent; Gronier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Many methods and tools have been proposed to assess the User Experience (UX) of interactive systems. However, while researchers have empirically studied the relevance and validity of several UX evaluation methods, few studies only have explored expert-based evaluation methods for the assessment of UX. If experts are able to assess something as complex and inherently subjective as UX, how they conduct such an evaluation and what criteria they rely on, thus remain open questions. In the present...

  19. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  20. Dynamic Quantum Clustering: A Tool for Unsupervised Exploration of Structures in Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC; Horn, David; /Tel Aviv U.

    2008-10-30

    A given set of data-points in some feature space may be associated with a Schroedinger equation whose potential is determined by the data. This is known to lead to good clustering solutions. Here we extend this approach into a full-fledged dynamical scheme using a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with a small diffusion component. Moreover, we approximate this Hamiltonian formalism by a truncated calculation within a set of Gaussian wave functions (coherent states) centered around the original points. This allows for analytic evaluation of the time evolution of all such states, opening up the possibility of exploration of relationships among data-points through observation of varying dynamical-distances among points and convergence of points into clusters. This formalism may be further supplemented by preprocessing, such as dimensional reduction through singular value decomposition or feature filtering.

  1. Dynamic quantum clustering: a tool for visual exploration of structures in data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC; Horn, David; /Tel Aviv U.

    2009-10-17

    A given set of data-points in some feature space may be associated with a Schroedinger equation whose potential is determined by the data. This is known to lead to good clustering solutions. Here we extend this approach into a full-fledged dynamical scheme using a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Moreover, we approximate this Hamiltonian formalism by a truncated calculation within a set of Gaussian wave functions (coherent states) centered around the original points. This allows for analytic evaluation of the time evolution of all such states, opening up the possibility of exploration of relationships among data-points through observation of varying dynamical-distances among points and convergence of points into clusters. This formalism may be further supplemented by preprocessing, such as dimensional reduction through singular value decomposition or feature filtering.

  2. "Socratic Circles are a Luxury": Exploring the Conceptualization of a Dialogic Tool in Three Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelin, Michelle Renee

    Research has shown that dialogic instruction promotes learning in students. Secondary science has traditionally been taught from an authoritative stance, reinforced in recent years by testing policies requiring coverage. Socratic Circles are a framework for student-led dialogic discourse, which have been successfully used in English language arts and social studies classrooms. The purpose of this research was to explore the implementation process of Socratic Circles in secondary science classes where they have been perceived to be more difficult. Focusing on two physical science classes and one chemistry class, this study described the nature and characteristics of Socratic Circles, teachers' dispositions toward dialogic instruction, the nature and characteristics of student discussion, and student motivation. Socratic Circles were found to be a dialogic support that influenced classroom climate, social skills, content connections, and student participation. Teachers experienced conflict between using traditional test driven scripted teaching, and exploring innovation through dialogic instruction. Students experienced opportunities for peer interaction, participation, and deeper discussions in a framework designed to improve dialogic skills. Students in two of the classrooms showed evidence of motivation for engaging in peer-led discussion, and students in one class did not. The class that did not show evidence of motivation had not been given the same scaffolding as the other two classes. Two physical science teachers and one chemistry teacher found that Socratic Circles required more scaffolding than was indicated by their peers in other disciplines such as English and social studies. The teachers felt that student's general lack of background knowledge for any given topic in physical science or chemistry necessitated the building of a knowledge platform before work on a discussion could begin. All three of the teachers indicated that Socratic Circles were a

  3. The European Association of Preventive Cardiology Exercise Prescription in Everyday Practice and Rehabilitative Training (EXPERT) tool: A digital training and decision support system for optimized exercise prescription in cardiovascular disease. Concept, definitions and construction methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dominique; Dendale, Paul; Coninx, Karin; Vanhees, Luc; Piepoli, Massimo F; Niebauer, Josef; Cornelissen, Veronique; Pedretti, Roberto; Geurts, Eva; Ruiz, Gustavo R; Corrà, Ugo; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Greco, Eugenio; Davos, Constantinos H; Edelmann, Frank; Abreu, Ana; Rauch, Bernhard; Ambrosetti, Marco; Braga, Simona S; Barna, Olga; Beckers, Paul; Bussotti, Maurizio; Fagard, Robert; Faggiano, Pompilio; Garcia-Porrero, Esteban; Kouidi, Evangelia; Lamotte, Michel; Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Reibis, Rona; Spruit, Martijn A; Stettler, Christoph; Takken, Tim; Tonoli, Cajsa; Vigorito, Carlo; Völler, Heinz; Doherty, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Background Exercise rehabilitation is highly recommended by current guidelines on prevention of cardiovascular disease, but its implementation is still poor. Many clinicians experience difficulties in prescribing exercise in the presence of different concomitant cardiovascular diseases and risk factors within the same patient. It was aimed to develop a digital training and decision support system for exercise prescription in cardiovascular disease patients in clinical practice: the European Association of Preventive Cardiology Exercise Prescription in Everyday Practice and Rehabilitative Training (EXPERT) tool. Methods EXPERT working group members were requested to define (a) diagnostic criteria for specific cardiovascular diseases, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and other chronic non-cardiovascular conditions, (b) primary goals of exercise intervention, (c) disease-specific prescription of exercise training (intensity, frequency, volume, type, session and programme duration), and (d) exercise training safety advices. The impact of exercise tolerance, common cardiovascular medications and adverse events during exercise testing were further taken into account for optimized exercise prescription. Results Exercise training recommendations and safety advices were formulated for 10 cardiovascular diseases, five cardiovascular disease risk factors (type 1 and 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia), and three common chronic non-cardiovascular conditions (lung and renal failure and sarcopaenia), but also accounted for baseline exercise tolerance, common cardiovascular medications and occurrence of adverse events during exercise testing. An algorithm, supported by an interactive tool, was constructed based on these data. This training and decision support system automatically provides an exercise prescription according to the variables provided. Conclusion This digital training and decision support system may contribute in overcoming barriers in

  4. Multi-PK antibodies: Powerful analytical tools to explore the protein kinase world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Sugiyama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverse biological events are regulated through protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases. Some of these protein kinases are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Although 518 protein kinase genes were identified in the human genome, it remains unclear how many and what kind of protein kinases are expressed and activated in cells and tissues under varying situations. To investigate cellular signaling by protein kinases, we developed monoclonal antibodies, designated as Multi-PK antibodies, that can recognize multiple protein kinases in various biological species. These Multi-PK antibodies can be used to profile the kinases expressed in cells and tissues, identify the kinases of special interest, and analyze protein kinase expression and phosphorylation state. Here we introduce some applications of Multi-PK antibodies to identify and characterize the protein kinases involved in epigenetics, glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes, and pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. In this review, we focus on the recently developed technologies for kinomics studies using the powerful analytical tools of Multi-PK antibodies.

  5. Exploring media bias with semantic analysis tools: validation of the Contrast Analysis of Semantic Similarity (CASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Nicholas S; Schott, John Paul; Jones, Michael N; Balota, David A; Yarkoni, Tal

    2011-03-01

    Text-analytic methods have become increasingly popular in cognitive science for understanding differences in semantic structure between documents. However, such methods have not been widely used in other disciplines. With the aim of disseminating these approaches, we introduce a text-analytic technique (Contrast Analysis of Semantic Similarity, CASS, www.casstools.org), based on the BEAGLE semantic space model (Jones & Mewhort, Psychological Review, 114, 1-37, 2007) and add new features to test between-corpora differences in semantic associations (e.g., the association between democrat and good, compared to democrat and bad). By analyzing television transcripts from cable news from a 12-month period, we reveal significant differences in political bias between television channels (liberal to conservative: MSNBC, CNN, FoxNews) and find expected differences between newscasters (Colmes, Hannity). Compared to existing measures of media bias, our measure has higher reliability. CASS can be used to investigate semantic structure when exploring any topic (e.g., self-esteem or stereotyping) that affords a large text-based database.

  6. Field and modeling studies of cyclic carbonates: a predictive tool for petroleum exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    In cyclic sequences containing large numbers of 1 to 10-m carbonate cycles, lack of well-defined markers generally prevents construction of detailed stratigraphic cross sections showing detailed facies changes. Fischer plots that graph cumulative cycle thickness corrected for linear subsidence using average cycle period can be used to correlate sections and show relation of individual cycle types to third-order sea level cycles. Interaction between simple or complex sea level curves defined by various frequencies and amplitudes; the sediment-surface, water-depth dependent sedimentation rate; lag time; and subsidence through time can be shown using one-dimensional models. Isostatically balanced two-dimensional models that incorporate the above variables, plus initial platform slope and thermotectonic subsidence (divided into rotational and regional components), can be used to construct detailed cyclic facies cross sections of carbonate platforms. These can be used to define regional relations between cycles; likely vertical and lateral facies changes; distribution of disconformities, conformities, and tidal-flat caps; relative water depths of facies likely to be developed on the platform; as well as likely location of early diagenesis. The integration of field and modeling studies provides a rigorous analysis of cycle deposition that could be of great predictive value in the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs.

  7. AVIRIS as a tool for carbonatite exploration: Comparison of SPAM and Mbandmap data analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Marguerite J.; Crowley, James K.

    1992-01-01

    Data acquired with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) of the Mountain Pass, San Bernadino County, California, area were analyzed to evaluate the use of narrow-band imaging data for carbonatite exploration. Carbonatites are igneous carbonate-rich rocks that are economically important in part because they are the major source for rare-earth minerals. Because the 224 AVIRIS spectral channels have a nominal spectral resolution of 10 nm, narrow absorption features such as those displayed by the rare-earth elements neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm) may be detected. The Mountain Pass region encompasses a well-exposed sequence of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks, including an alkalic carbonatite intrusion. The carbonatite was emplaced in Precambrian granitic rocks that are fault bounded by a thick suite of Paleozoic, sedimentary rock, predominantly dolomite. The carbonatite stock, the major source of light rare-earth elements (REE) in the United States, affords the opportunity to test AVIRIS capabilities for detecting REE absorption features. Nd-bearing minerals display narrow, sharp and distinctive spectral features at 580, 740, 800, and 870 nm. Minerals bearing Sm display similarly sharp features near 1090, 1250, 1410, and 1550 nm. The more common REE, lanthanum and cerium, do not display absorption features in the visible/near-infrared region in their natural oxidation states.

  8. 3D visualization tools to explore ancient architectures in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pierdicca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chan Chan is a wide archaeological site located in Peru. Its knowledge is limited to the visit of Palacio Tschudi, the only restored up to now, whilst the majority of the site remains unknown to the visitors. The reasons are manifold. The site is very large and difficult to visit. Some well-conserved architectures, such as Huaca Arco Iris, are very far from the core centre. Furthermore, there are heavy factors of decay, mainly caused by illegal excavations, by marine salt and by the devastating phenomenon of El Niño. For these reasons, the majority of the decorative elements are protected by new mud brick walls. Finally, the vastness of the buildings makes difficult to understand their real value, even through a direct visit of the site. In order to overcome the aforesaid problems, we designed, developed and realized the museum exhibition presented in this paper. We named Esquina Multimedia an installation where every corner is aimed to solve a specific problem, providing the tourists with interactive and enjoyable applications.  The virtual tour allows reaching also the unreachable areas. An Augmented Reality (AR application has been developed in order to show ancient artefacts covered by the earth.  A web-browser has been specifically designed to show bas-reliefs, with HD visualization, anaglyph stereoscopic view and a 3D virtual model of both the structures and the bas-reliefs. At the same time, a wall-mounted panel representing a metric 3D reconstruction of the building helps the user to find the artefact position.  Descriptions of the hardware components and of the software details are presented, with particular focus regarding the implementation of the application, arguing how the digital approach could represent the only answer towards a full exploitation of archaeological sites. The paper also deals with the implementation of a web tool, specifically designed to display and browse 3D-Models.

  9. Geolokit: An interactive tool for visualising and exploring geoscientific data in Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Watlet, Arnaud; Bastin, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    Virtual globes have been developed to showcase different types of data combining a digital elevation model and basemaps of high resolution satellite imagery. Hence, they became a standard to share spatial data and information, although they suffer from a lack of toolboxes dedicated to the formatting of large geoscientific dataset. From this perspective, we developed Geolokit: a free and lightweight software that allows geoscientists - and every scientist working with spatial data - to import their data (e.g., sample collections, structural geology, cross-sections, field pictures, georeferenced maps), to handle and to transcribe them to Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files. KML files are then automatically opened in the Google Earth virtual globe and the spatial data accessed and shared. Geolokit comes with a large number of dedicated tools that can process and display: (i) multi-points data, (ii) scattered data interpolations, (iii) structural geology features in 2D and 3D, (iv) rose diagrams, stereonets and dip-plunge polar histograms, (v) cross-sections and oriented rasters, (vi) georeferenced field pictures, (vii) georeferenced maps and projected gridding. Therefore, together with Geolokit, Google Earth becomes not only a powerful georeferenced data viewer but also a stand-alone work platform. The toolbox (available online at http://www.geolokit.org) is written in Python, a high-level, cross-platform programming language and is accessible through a graphical user interface, designed to run in parallel with Google Earth, through a workflow that requires no additional third party software. Geolokit features are demonstrated in this paper using typical datasets gathered from two case studies illustrating its applicability at multiple scales of investigation: a petro-structural investigation of the Ile d'Yeu orthogneissic unit (Western France) and data collection of the Mariana oceanic subduction zone (Western Pacific).

  10. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regad, Leslie; Chéron, Jean-Baptiste; Triki, Dhoha; Senac, Caroline; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC), obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at http://www.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr/recherche/plateformes/logiciels.

  11. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Regad

    Full Text Available Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC, obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at

  12. MIPE: A metagenome-based community structure explorer and SSU primer evaluation tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zou

    Full Text Available An understanding of microbial community structure is an important issue in the field of molecular ecology. The traditional molecular method involves amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. However, PCR-based amplicon approaches are affected by primer bias and chimeras. With the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, unbiased SSU rRNA gene sequences can be mined from shotgun sequencing-based metagenomic or metatranscriptomic datasets to obtain a reflection of the microbial community structure in specific types of environment and to evaluate SSU primers. However, the use of short reads obtained through next-generation sequencing for primer evaluation has not been well resolved. The software MIPE (MIcrobiota metagenome Primer Explorer was developed to adapt numerous short reads from metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. Using metagenomic or metatranscriptomic datasets as input, MIPE extracts and aligns rRNA to reveal detailed information on microbial composition and evaluate SSU rRNA primers. A mock dataset, a real Metagenomics Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST test dataset, two PrimerProspector test datasets and a real metatranscriptomic dataset were used to validate MIPE. The software calls Mothur (v1.33.3 and the SILVA database (v119 for the alignment and classification of rRNA genes from a metagenome or metatranscriptome. MIPE can effectively extract shotgun rRNA reads from a metagenome or metatranscriptome and is capable of classifying these sequences and exhibiting sensitivity to different SSU rRNA PCR primers. Therefore, MIPE can be used to guide primer design for specific environmental samples.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation: a tool for exploration and discovery using simple models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Emergent phenomena share the fascinating property of not being obvious consequences of the design of the system in which they appear. This characteristic is no less relevant when attempting to simulate such phenomena, given that the outcome is not always a foregone conclusion. The present survey focuses on several simple model systems that exhibit surprisingly rich emergent behavior, all studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The examples are taken from the disparate fields of fluid dynamics, granular matter and supramolecular self-assembly. In studies of fluids modeled at the detailed microscopic level using discrete particles, the simulations demonstrate that complex hydrodynamic phenomena in rotating and convecting fluids—the Taylor-Couette and Rayleigh-Bénard instabilities—can not only be observed within the limited length and time scales accessible to MD, but even allow quantitative agreement to be achieved. Simulation of highly counter-intuitive segregation phenomena in granular mixtures, again using MD methods, but now augmented by forces producing damping and friction, leads to results that resemble experimentally observed axial and radial segregation in the case of a rotating cylinder and to a novel form of horizontal segregation in a vertically vibrated layer. Finally, when modeling self-assembly processes analogous to the formation of the polyhedral shells that package spherical viruses, simulation of suitably shaped particles reveals the ability to produce complete, error-free assembly and leads to the important general observation that reversible growth steps contribute to the high yield. While there are limitations to the MD approach, both computational and conceptual, the results offer a tantalizing hint of the kinds of phenomena that can be explored and what might be discovered when sufficient resources are brought to bear on a problem.

  14. LIBSLog: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) based logging tool for exploration of boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Chu, P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel downhole instrument, currently under development at Honeybee Robotics with SBIR funding from NASA. The device is designed to characterize elemental composition as a function of depth in terrestrial and non-terrestrial geological formations. The instrument consists of a miniaturized LIBS analyzer integrated in a 2" diameter drill string. While the drill provides subsurface access, the LIBS analyzer provides information on the elemental composition of the borehole wall. This instrument has a variety of space applications ranging from exploration of the Moon for which it was originally designed, to Mars and Europa. The system can also be deployed in a wireline configuration as a logging probe, called LIBSLog. The LIBSLog could be lowered into existing boreholes and scan the borehole wall with depth. Subsurface analysis is usually performed by sample acquisition through a drill or excavator, followed by sample preparation and subsequent sample presentation to an instrument or suite of instruments. An alternative approach consisting in bringing a miniaturized version of the instrument to the sample has many advantages over the traditional methodology, as it allows faster response, reduced probability of cross-contamination and a simplification in the sampling mechanisms. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  15. Operational expert system applications in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Zarri, Gian Piero

    1992-01-01

    Operational Expert System Applications in Europe describes the representative case studies of the operational expert systems (ESs) that are used in Europe.This compilation provides examples of operational ES that are realized in 10 different European countries, including countries not usually examined in the standard reviews of the field.This book discusses the decision support system using several artificial intelligence tools; expert systems for fault diagnosis on computerized numerical control (CNC) machines; and expert consultation system for personal portfolio management. The failure prob

  16. Ground Penetrating Radar Successful In Imaging Hot Spring Deposits: A New Geothermal Exploration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne, B.; Dougherty, A.

    2010-12-01

    Discharging alkali chloride hot springs are surface expressions of a deeper geothermal reservoir. As the discharging hot spring fluid cools, silica carried in solution precipitates and entombs all components (e.g., microbes) within a hot spring channel. This silica accumulates to form rocks referred to as siliceous sinters. Geothermal reservoirs and sinter deposits remain long after hot spring discharge ceases. Therefore ancient sinters provide a direct link with a deeper potentially exploitable geothermal resource in areas where there are no present-day actively discharging hot springs. High, mid and low-temperature microbes create distinctive environmentally-significant textures resulting in a heterogeneous sinter. The recognition of preserved active sinter textures enables mapping of former high temperature vent to low temperature distal-apron flow pathways. Sinter dates enable tracking of fluid flow to the surface, providing a regional context of fluid movement. Sinters undergo diagenesis that involves a five step opal-A to quartz silica phase modification that is accompanied by a density increase and porosity decrease. However, even quartzose sinters retain porosity values of 5-20 %. Textural variation is preserved over time, with a range in density and porosity values, which in addition to the low conductive/highly resistive silica material make GPR a suitable tool for imaging buried sinters. Previously, geologists have been constrained to only examining sinters in locations where they are partially exposed. Our preliminary results from both New Zealand and the United States of America show Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was successful in extending this sinter research into the shallow subsurface by: (1) imaging through opal-A to quartzose sinter deposits; (2) mapping high to low temperature environments such as vents and distal-apron terracettes; (3) locating the true spatial extent of partially buried sinters; (4) imaging completely buried sinters. The

  17. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

    2011-06-17

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools

  18. Surface geophysical exploration: developing noninvasive tools to monitor past leaks around Hanford's tank farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Dale F; Myers, David A; Cubbage, Brian; Levitt, Marc T; Noonan, Gillian E; McNeill, Michael; Henderson, Colin; Lober, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure, specifically the steel-cased wells that surround the tanks, as "long" electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past 7 years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is

  19. Application of an exploration index as a focus tool; Aplicacao do indicador de intensidade exploratoria como ferramenta de focalizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacoccoli, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Metodos Computacionais em Engenharia (LAMCE); Perez Cuinas Filho, Elio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Modelagem de Bacias (LAB2M)

    2004-07-01

    The index of intensity of exploration (IE) is here utilized as the ratio between the sedimentary area (in square kilometers) / number of drilled wells (exploratory or total wells). The IE is a very simple and reliable tool and can be used to compare the exploratory efforts in different basins or in different areas of the same sedimentary basin. Considering the set of all the Brazilian sedimentary basins the IE index shows values varying from around 10 (ten) in the Reconcavo, the most explored, up to more than 21,000 (twenty one thousand) in the scarcely explored Parnaiba Basin. Also should be considered some other frontier areas almost unexplored as, for example, the Parecis-Alto Xingu Basin with only two exploratory wells. The average Brazilian IE is very high, around 1,100 (one thousand one hundred). Beyond to perform a complete revision of the IE index in the Brazilian Sedimentary Basin it is also presented an application in some producing basins where the index was applied in different depth categories. By using this method it was also demonstrated that the scarce exploratory efforts where also generally applied to test shallow targets. The average depth of the Brazilian exploratory wells is in fact around 2,300 m (two thousand three hundred meters). The lack of deep wells could have been a negative factor for the proper evaluation of the gas potential in some basins as the Reconcavo. (author)

  20. A Comprehensive Tool for Exploring the Availability, Scalability and Growth Potential of Conventional and Renewable Energy Sources and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack-Scott, E.; Arnott, J. C.; Katzenberger, J.; Davis, S. J.; Delman, E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been a generational challenge to simultaneously meet the world's energy requirements, while remaining within the bounds of acceptable cost and environmental impact. To this end, substantial research has explored various energy futures on a global scale, leaving decision-makers and the public overwhelmed by information on energy options. In response, this interactive energy table was developed as a comprehensive resource through which users can explore the availability, scalability, and growth potentials of all energy technologies currently in use or development. Extensive research from peer-reviewed papers and reports was compiled and summarized, detailing technology costs, technical considerations, imminent breakthroughs, and obstacles to integration, as well as political, social, and environmental considerations. Energy technologies fall within categories of coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, solar, wind, hydropower, ocean, geothermal and biomass. In addition to 360 expandable cells of cited data, the interactive table also features educational windows with background information on each energy technology. The table seeks not to advocate for specific energy futures, but to succinctly and accurately centralize peer-reviewed research and information in an interactive, accessible resource. With this tool, decision-makers, researchers and the public alike can explore various combinations of energy technologies and their quantitative and qualitative attributes that can satisfy the world's total primary energy supply (TPES) while making progress towards a near zero carbon future.

  1. Climate Twins - a tool to explore future climate impacts by assessing real world conditions: Exploration principles, underlying data, similarity conditions and uncertainty ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Wolfgang; Peters-Anders, Jan; Züger, Johann

    2010-05-01

    To achieve public awareness and thorough understanding about expected climate changes and their future implications, ways have to be found to communicate model outputs to the public in a scientifically sound and easily understandable way. The newly developed Climate Twins tool tries to fulfil these requirements via an intuitively usable web application, which compares spatial patterns of current climate with future climate patterns, derived from regional climate model results. To get a picture of the implications of future climate in an area of interest, users may click on a certain location within an interactive map with underlying future climate information. A second map depicts the matching Climate Twin areas according to current climate conditions. In this way scientific output can be communicated to the public which allows for experiencing climate change through comparison with well-known real world conditions. To identify climatic coincidence seems to be a simple exercise, but the accuracy and applicability of the similarity identification depends very much on the selection of climate indicators, similarity conditions and uncertainty ranges. Too many indicators representing various climate characteristics and too narrow uncertainty ranges will judge little or no area as regions with similar climate, while too little indicators and too wide uncertainty ranges will address too large regions as those with similar climate which may not be correct. Similarity cannot be just explored by comparing mean values or by calculating correlation coefficients. As climate change triggers an alteration of various indicators, like maxima, minima, variation magnitude, frequency of extreme events etc., the identification of appropriate similarity conditions is a crucial question to be solved. For Climate Twins identification, it is necessary to find a right balance of indicators, similarity conditions and uncertainty ranges, unless the results will be too vague conducting a

  2. Expert auditors’ services classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Wisniewska

    2013-01-01

    The profession of an expert auditor is a public trust occupation with a distinctive feature of taking responsibility for actions in the public interest. The main responsibility of expert auditors is performing financial auditing; however, expert auditors are prepared to carry out different tasks which encompass a wide plethora of financial and auditing services for different kinds of institutions and companies. The aim of the article is first of all the description of expert auditors’ service...

  3. Laboratory Tests of a Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer: A Tool for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Evans, C. A.; Hodges, K.

    2011-12-01

    Maximizing the science return from a mission to another planetary surface involves the integration of science objectives with deployable technologies that enable the collection of data and samples. For long duration manned missions, it is likely that more samples will be collected than can be returned to Earth due to mass limits. A niche exists for technologies that help prioritize samples for return, provide data for future sample handling and curation, and characterization for samples that are not returned to Earth. To fill this niche, hardware and protocols for field instruments are currently being developed and evaluated at NASA Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University. Our goal is to develop an easily used, environmentally isolated facility as part of the astronaut surface habitat for preliminary sample characterization and down-selection. NASA has constructed a prototype, GeoLab, as a testbed for evaluating the scientific applicability and operational considerations of various analytical instruments. One instrument under evaluation is a small, portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer that can be also be used by astronaut explorers as part of their field gear while on scientific sorties, or on robotic field assistants. We report on preliminary usability tests for commercially available handheld XRF instruments. These instruments collect data by contacting the surface of a rock or sediment sample with an 8 mm-wide sensor window. Within 60 seconds, the devices can provide relatively precise data on the abundance of major and trace elements heavier than Na. Lab-based handheld XRF analyses of terrestrial and lunar samples, compared with those made with full-scale laboratory XRF systems, show good correlation, but we continue to investigate potential sources of error and the need for careful calibration with standards of known composition. Specifically, we use a suite of five terrestrial and five lunar basalts, all well characterized by conventional

  4. Flood Heterogeneity as a Tool for Exploring Flood Frequency-Climate Linkages from a Watershed Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Reyes, D.; Hirschboeck, K. K.; Valdes, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate discharge estimates derived from flood frequency analysis (FFA) are needed for real-world applications to reduce or eliminate flood hazard impacts. In the US, these estimates are currently calculated following the FFA method described in the 1982 Bulletin 17b (B17b) of the Hydrology Subcommittee of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. Although it has proven to be efficient over the past 30 years, the authors and the hydrologic community agree that it's time for an update. An assumption made in B17b is that all floods come from the same homogeneous population when in reality heterogeneity may exist. For such cases, incorporation of the driving atmospheric mechanisms into the analysis is encouraged even if it becomes a statistically challenging problem. Moreover, watersheds that currently exhibit heterogeneity can benefit from this alternative analysis since climate change might not affect the prevalence of all flood types similarly. Arizona's geographic location and complex terrain are associated with three different types of flood-generating atmospheric processes: summer convective thunderstorms, tropical cyclone-enhanced convective activity, and winter synoptic-scale storms. In an earlier study, regional patterns of flood heterogeneity in Arizona were found to influence flood frequency discharge estimates in individual watersheds. In this study we build on these watershed-based climate-flood linkages by exploring the temporal relationship between flood heterogeneity and climatic variability. US Geological Survey partial duration series (PDS) peak flow discharge records from stations across Arizona were compiled and classified according to meteorological cause. Subsequently, the PDS for each station was analyzed for the prevalence of each flood type by counting the number of peaks-over-threshold in each classification per water year. The observed record revealed distinct periods of temporal dominance by different flood producing mechanisms, e

  5. Fiscal 2000 survey report on overseas geological structure, etc. Project for exchanging experts - Exploration technology (Indonesia); 2000 nendo kaigai chishitsu kozo to chosa hokokusho. Gijutsusha koryu jigyo - Tansa gijutsu bunya (Indonesia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the stabilization of coal supply/demand in the APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference) region and for the stable supply of coal to Japan, Japanese engineers and experts were dispatched to Indonesia, where coal production was remarkably increasing and efforts were being actively exerted to develop new coal mining fields, for training Indonesian specialists there, and Indonesian specialists were invited to Japan for training here. Japanese instructors on dispatch delivered lectures on coal geology, exploration, and exploitation at the human resource development center of Bandung City during the period July 20 through August 4, 2000, which was followed by a coal outcrop survey training session in the field. The trainees were from Kalimantan, Sumatra, Java, etc., and numbered 30. The trainees invited to Japan received lectures and training related to coal geology, exploration, and mining programs during the period October 19 through November 18, 2000, at the Geological Survey of Japan, Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Ministry of International Trade and Industry; Matsushima Coal Mining Co., Ltd.; Enzan Plant, Tone Corporation; DIA Consultants Co., Ltd.; and Mitsubishi Materials Corporation. (NEDO)

  6. Exploring JavaScript and ROOT technologies to create Web-based ATLAS analysis and monitoring tools

    CERN Document Server

    Pineda, A S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the potential of current web applications to create online interfaces that allow the visualization, interaction and real cut-based physics analysis and monitoring of processes through a web browser. The project consists in the initial development of web- based and cloud computing services to allow students and researchers to perform fast and very useful cut-based analysis on a browser, reading and using real data and official Monte- Carlo simulations stored in ATLAS computing facilities. Several tools are considered: ROOT, JavaScript and HTML. Our study case is the current cut-based H → ZZ → llqq analysis of the ATLAS experiment. Preliminary but satisfactory results have been obtained online.

  7. Modelling Social Mobilisation – An interdisciplinary exploration of Twitter as a mediating tool for social acts and information networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Amor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, researchers, social commentators and the mass media have turned their attention to shifts in the use of social media for political and social action. This article provides an overview of the recent discussions focusing on how Twitter specifically functions as a mediating tool for social acts. We present findings from a recent pilot project exploring the mechanics of disseminating information via Twitter across a dynamic human network in order to contribute to an understanding of how people use social media to share information and prompt others into action, and outline some approaches for performing this analysis. Taking the perspective of communities of users operating in hybrid spaces, we make recommendations for further research in this field. Key words: Twitter, hybrid spaces, social networks, social acts, information flow

  8. Exploring JavaScript and ROOT technologies to create Web-based ATLAS analysis and monitoring tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Pineda, A.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the potential of current web applications to create online interfaces that allow the visualization, interaction and real cut-based physics analysis and monitoring of processes through a web browser. The project consists in the initial development of web- based and cloud computing services to allow students and researchers to perform fast and very useful cut-based analysis on a browser, reading and using real data and official Monte- Carlo simulations stored in ATLAS computing facilities. Several tools are considered: ROOT, JavaScript and HTML. Our study case is the current cut-based H → ZZ → llqq analysis of the ATLAS experiment. Preliminary but satisfactory results have been obtained online.

  9. Making a team of experts into an expert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Carol

    2011-10-01

    Health care has traditionally been delivered primarily by experts working individually in a decentralized system lacking cohesive organization among professional disciplines. Only recently have the advantages of teamwork training been acknowledged in health care. This article explores the history, benefits, and recommendations for team training in neonatal care. TeamSTEPPS (Rockville, MD) and the revised Neonatal Resuscitation Program are cited as promising models for improved neonatal outcomes through professional teamwork.

  10. Pedagogical tools to explore Cartesian mind-body dualism in the classroom: philosophical arguments and neuroscience illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Scott; Hamilton, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental discussion in lower-level undergraduate neuroscience and psychology courses is Descartes’s “radical” or “mind-body” dualism. According to Descartes, our thinking mind, the res cogitans, is separate from the body as physical matter or substance, the res extensa. Since the transmission of sensory stimuli from the body to the mind is a physical capacity shared with animals, it can be confused, misled, or uncertain (e.g., bodily senses imply that ice and water are different substances). True certainty thus arises from within the mind and its capacity to doubt physical stimuli. Since this doubting mind is a thinking thing that is distinct from bodily stimuli, truth and certainty are reached through the doubting mind as cogito ergo sum, or the certainty of itself as it thinks: hence Descartes’s famous maxim, I think, therefore I am. However, in the last century of Western philosophy, with nervous system investigation, and with recent advances in neuroscience, the potential avenues to explore student’s understanding of the epistemology and effects of Cartesian mind-body dualism has expanded. This article further explores this expansion, highlighting pedagogical practices and tools instructors can use to enhance a psychology student’s understanding of Cartesian dualistic epistemology, in order to think more critically about its implicit assumptions and effects on learning. It does so in two ways: first, by offering instructors an alternative philosophical perspective to dualistic thinking: a mind-body holism that is antithetical to the assumed binaries of dualistic epistemology. Second, it supplements this philosophical argument with a practical component: simple mind-body illusions that instructors may use to demonstrate contrary epistemologies to students. Combining these short philosophical and neuroscience arguments thereby acts as a pedagogical tool to open new conceptual spaces within which learning may occur. PMID:26321981

  11. The Second Life Researcher Toolkit - An Exploration of Inworld Tools, Methods and Approaches for Researching Educational Projects in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Elena

    Academics are beginning to explore the educational potential of Second LifeTM (SL) by setting up inworld educational activities and projects. Given the relative novelty of the use of virtual world environments in higher education many such projects are still at pilot stage. However the initial pilot and experimentation stage will have to be followed by a rigorous evaluation process as for more traditional teaching projects. The chapter addresses issues about SL research tools and research methods. It introduces a "researcher toolkit" that includes: the various stages in the evaluation of SL educational projects and the theoretical framework that can inform such projects; an outline of the inworld tools that can be utilised or customised for academic research purposes; a review of methods for collecting feedback from participants and of the main ethical issues involved in researching virtual world environments; a discussion on the technical skills required to operate a research project in SL. The chapter also offers an indication of the inworld opportunities for the dissemination of SL research findings.

  12. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein-ligand structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Collins, Patrick; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian; von Delft, Frank

    2017-03-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein-ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallographic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011), Acta Cryst. D67, 235-242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. D66, 213-221] have entrenched the paradigm that a `project' is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects.

  13. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein–ligand structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian

    2017-01-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein–ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallo­graphic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011 ▸), Acta Cryst. D67, 235–242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010 ▸), Acta Cryst. D66, 213–221] have entrenched the paradigm that a ‘project’ is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects. PMID:28291762

  14. Expert status and performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Burgman

    Full Text Available Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. The results indicate that the way experts regard each other is consistent, but unfortunately, ranks are a poor guide to actual performance. Expert advice will be more accurate if technical decisions routinely use broadly-defined expert groups, structured question protocols and feedback.

  15. A behavioral view on chimpanzee personality: exploration tendency, persistence, boldness, and tool-orientation measured with group experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massen, Jorg J M; Antonides, Alexandra; Arnold, Anne-Marie K; Bionda, Thomas; Koski, Sonja E

    2013-09-01

    Human and nonhuman animals show personality: temporal and contextual consistency in behavior patterns that vary among individuals. In contrast to most other species, personality of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, has mainly been studied with non-behavioral methods. We examined boldness, exploration tendency, persistence and tool-orientation in 29 captive chimpanzees using repeated experiments conducted in an ecologically valid social setting. High temporal repeatability and contextual consistency in all these traits indicated they reflected personality. In addition, Principal Component Analysis revealed two independent syndromes, labeled exploration-persistence and boldness. We found no sex or rank differences in the trait scores, but the scores declined with age. Nonetheless, there was considerable inter-individual variation within age-classes, suggesting that behavior was not merely determined by age but also by dispositional effects. In conclusion, our study complements earlier rating studies and adds new traits to the chimpanzee personality, thereby supporting the existence of multiple personality traits among chimpanzees. We stress the importance of ecologically valid behavioral research to assess multiple personality traits and their association, as it allows inclusion of ape studies in the comparison of personality structures across species studied behaviorally, and furthers our attempts to unravel the causes and consequences of animal personality. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Forensic experts' perceptions of expert bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commons, Michael Lamport; Miller, Patrice Marie; Li, Eva Yujia; Gutheil, Thomas Gordon

    2012-01-01

    How do expert witnesses perceive the possible biases of their fellow expert witnesses? Participants, who were attendees at a workshop at the American Academy of Psychiatry and Law were asked to rate for their biasing potential a number of situations that might affect the behavior of an opposing expert. A Rasch analysis produced a linear scale as to the perceived biasing potential of these different kinds of situations from the most biasing to the least biasing. Working for only one side in both civil and criminal cases had large scaled values and also were the first factor. In interesting contrast, a) an opposing expert also serving as the litigant's treater and b) an opposing expert being viewed as a "hired gun" (supplying an opinion only for money) were two situations viewed as not very biasing. Order of Hierarchical Complexity also accounted for items from the 1st, 2nd and 3rd factors. The result suggests that the difficulty in understanding the conceptual basis of bias underlies the perception of how biased a behavior or a situation is. The more difficult to understand the questionnaire item, the less biasing its behavior or situation is perceived by participants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualizing Our Options for Coastal Places: Exploring Realistic Immersive Geovisualizations as Tools for Inclusive Approaches to Coastal Planning and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Newell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective coastal planning is inclusive and incorporates the variety of user needs, values and interests associated with coastal environments. Realistic, immersive geographic visualizations, i.e., geovisualizations, can serve as potentially powerful tools for facilitating such planning because they can provide diverse groups with vivid understandings of how they would feel about certain management outcomes or impacts if transpired in real places. However, the majority of studies in this area have focused on terrestrial environments, and research on applications of such tools in the coastal and marine contexts is in its infancy. The current study aims to advance such research by examining the potential a land-to-sea geovisualization has to serve as a tool for inclusive coastal planning efforts. The research uses Sidney Spit Park (BC, Canada as a study site, and a realistic, dynamic geovisualization of the park was developed (using Unity3D that allows users to interact with and navigate it through the first-person perspective. Management scenarios were developed based on discussions with Parks Canada, and these scenarios included fencing around vegetation areas, positioning of mooring buoys, and management of dog activity within the park. Scenarios were built into the geovisualization in a manner that allows users to toggle different options. Focus groups were then assembled, involving residents of the Capital Regional District (BC, Canada, and participants explored and provided feedback on the scenarios. Findings from the study demonstrate the geovisualization's usefulness for assessing certain qualities of scenarios, such as aesthetics and functionality of fencing options and potential viewshed impacts associated with different mooring boat locations. In addition, the study found that incorporating navigability into the geovisualization proved to be valuable for understanding scenarios that hold implications for the marine environment due to

  18. Expert systems in treating substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, D R; Hink, R H

    1990-05-01

    Computer programs can assist humans in solving complex problems that cannot be solved by traditional computational techniques using mathematic formulas. These programs, or "expert systems," are commonly used in finance, engineering, and computer design. Although not routinely used in medicine at present, medical expert systems have been developed to assist physicians in solving many kinds of medical problems that traditionally require consultation from a physician specialist. No expert systems are available specifically for drug abuse treatment, but at least one is under development. Where access to a physician specialist in substance abuse is not available for consultation, this expert system will extend specialized substance abuse treatment expertise to nonspecialists. Medical expert systems are a developing technologic tool that can assist physicians in practicing better medicine.

  19. OPTIMISATION OF OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION IN IMAGE-GUIDED INTERVENTIONS: EXPLORING VIDEO RECORDINGS AS A TOOL IN THE PROCESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Sandblom, Viktor; Rystedt, Hans; von Wrangel, Alexa; Ivarsson, Jonas; Båth, Magnus; Lundh, Charlotta

    2016-06-01

    The overall purpose of this work was to explore how video recordings can contribute to the process of optimising occupational radiation protection in image-guided interventions. Video-recorded material from two image-guided interventions was produced and used to investigate to what extent it is conceivable to observe and assess dose-affecting actions in video recordings. Using the recorded material, it was to some extent possible to connect the choice of imaging techniques to the medical events during the procedure and, to a less extent, to connect these technical and medical issues to the occupational exposure. It was possible to identify a relationship between occupational exposure level to staff and positioning and use of shielding. However, detailed values of the dose rates were not possible to observe on the recordings, and the change in occupational exposure level from adjustments of exposure settings was not possible to identify. In conclusion, the use of video recordings is a promising tool to identify dose-affecting instances, allowing for a deeper knowledge of the interdependency between the management of the medical procedure, the applied imaging technology and the occupational exposure level. However, for a full information about the dose-affecting actions, the equipment used and the recording settings have to be thoroughly planned. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Exploring the Relationship between Web 2.0 Tools Self-Efficacy and Teachers' Use of These Tools in Their Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Riyadh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' self-efficacy in using of Web 2.0 tools and some demographic variables, and their use of those tools in their teaching. The study data was collected from a random sample of public school teachers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The results showed a strong positive relationship…

  1. How Expert Designers Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Peter Sloep; J. van Merrienboer; C. Carr; P. Kirschner

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses two studies - the one in a business context, the other in a university context - carried out with expert educational designers. The studies aimed to determine the priorities experts claim to employ when designing competence-based learning environments. Designers in both contexts

  2. Expert Systems in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartschuh, Wayne

    This paper argues that the concepts and techniques used in the development of expert systems should be expanded and applied to the field of education, particularly in the area of intelligent tutoring systems. It is noted that expert systems are a well known area of artificial intelligence and have been proven effective in well-defined topic areas.…

  3. Exploring the potential of the will, skill, tool model in Ghana: Predicting prospective and practicing teachers’ use of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, Douglas D.; Voogt, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that will (positive attitudes), skill (technology competency), and tool (access to technology tools) are all essential ingredients for a teacher to effectively integrate information technology into classroom practices. This study focuses on the will, skill and tool as essential

  4. Exploring the persona model as a tool to generate user insight through co-creation with users in the early phase of a design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jane Holm; Haase, Louise Møller

    2017-01-01

    The persona model is a widely know tool for synthesizing user research. A persona is a hypothetical archetype based on actual users, which is typically created to create a shared understanding of the user in the design team. Previous research has focused on the personal model as a consensus......-making tool. However, in this paper the aim is to explore, whether the persona model can also be useful and valuable for collecting user insights. More specifically, the paper investigates the potentials and challenges of using the persona model as a generative tool to achieve user insight, when co...... as a generative tool and so far the empirical study includes only two co-creation-workshops, which is too few to make any solid conclusions. Still, the study indicates some interesting insights about the potentials and challenges the persona model has, when used as a generative tool....

  5. Quality assessment of expert answers to lay questions about cystic fibrosis from various language zones in Europe: the ECORN-CF project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d'Alquen Daniela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European Centres of Reference Network for Cystic Fibrosis (ECORN-CF established an Internet forum which provides the opportunity for CF patients and other interested people to ask experts questions about CF in their mother language. The objectives of this study were to: 1 develop a detailed quality assessment tool to analyze quality of expert answers, 2 evaluate the intra- and inter-rater agreement of this tool, and 3 explore changes in the quality of expert answers over the time frame of the project. Methods The quality assessment tool was developed by an expert panel. Five experts within the ECORN-CF project used the quality assessment tool to analyze the quality of 108 expert answers published on ECORN-CF from six language zones. 25 expert answers were scored at two time points, one year apart. Quality of answers was also assessed at an early and later period of the project. Individual rater scores and group mean scores were analyzed for each expert answer. Results A scoring system and training manual were developed analyzing two quality categories of answers: content and formal quality. For content quality, the grades based on group mean scores for all raters showed substantial agreement between two time points, however this was not the case for the grades based on individual rater scores. For formal quality the grades based on group mean scores showed only slight agreement between two time points and there was also poor agreement between time points for the individual grades. The inter-rater agreement for content quality was fair (mean kappa value 0.232 ± 0.036, p Conclusions The quality assessment tool described in this study was feasible and reliable when content quality was assessed by a group of raters. Within ECORN-CF, the tool will help ensure that CF patients all over Europe have equal possibility of access to high quality expert advice on their illness.

  6. Expert F# 20

    CERN Document Server

    Syme, Don; Cisternino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Expert F# 2.0 is about practical programming in a beautiful language that puts the power and elegance of functional programming into the hands of professional developers. In combination with .NET, F# achieves unrivaled levels of programmer productivity and program clarity. Expert F# 2.0 is * The authoritative guide to F# by the inventor of F# * A comprehensive reference of F# concepts, syntax, and features * A treasury of expert F# techniques for practical, real-world programming F# isn't just another functional programming language. It's a general-purpose language ideal for real-world develop

  7. N-glycosylation-negative catalase: a useful tool for exploring the role of hydrogen peroxide in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortz, S; Lenzen, S; Mehmeti, I

    2015-03-01

    Disulfide bond formation during protein folding of nascent proteins is associated with the generation of H2O2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Approaches to quantifying H2O2 directly within the ER failed because of the oxidative environment in the ER lumen, and ER-specific catalase expression to detoxify high H2O2 concentrations resulted in an inactive protein owing to N-glycosylation. Therefore, the N-glycosylation motifs at asparagine-244 and -439 of the human catalase protein were deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. The ER-targeted expression of these variants revealed that the deletion of the N-glycosylation motif only at asparagine-244 (N244) was associated with the maintenance of full enzymatic activity in the ER. Expression of catalase N244 in the ER (ER-Catalase N244) was ER-specific and protected the cells significantly against exogenously added H2O2. With the expression of ER-Catalase N244, a highly effective H2O2 inactivation within the ER was achieved for the first time. Catalase has a high H2O2-inactivation capacity without the need of reducing cofactors, which might interfere with the ER redox homeostasis, and is not involved in protein folding. With these characteristics ER-Catalase N244 is an ideal tool to explore the impact of ER-generated H2O2 on the generation of disulfide bonds or to study the induction of ER-stress pathways through protein folding overload and accumulation of H2O2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring Electronic Medical Record and Self-Administered Medication Risk Screening Tools in a Primary Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Mark J; Cor, Ken; Wong, Tat

    2017-05-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) screening for indicators of medication risk could improve efficiency in identifying primary care clinic patients in need of clinical pharmacist care compared with patient self-reporting. To (a) compare the performance of an EMR medication risk assessment questionnaire (MRAQ) with a self-administered (SA) MRAQ and (b) explore each tool's ability to predict indicators of health behavior, health status, and health care utilization. A prospective cohort study was conducted with 143 adults who attended an academic family medicine center and were taking ≥ 2 medications. All participants completed the 10-item SA-MRAQ, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Chew's health literacy screener, Stanford Health Distress Scale, and SF-36 overall rating of health. A blinded investigator completed the EMR-MRAQ and a chart review to ascertain 6 months of health care utilization. Outcome measures included the following: (a) scores from the 5- and 10-item SA-MRAQs and 5-item EMR-MRAQ; (b) sensitivity and specificity to determine the accuracy of the 5-item EMR versus the 5-item SA risk scores; (c) correlations between risk assessments and health behavior/status scales; and (d) area under the receiver operator curve to determine how well a high-risk score predicted health care utilization. The 5-item SA-MRAQ, the 5-item EMR-MRAQ, and the 10-item SA-MRAQ categorized 52.9% (55/104), 69.2% (99/143), and 17.6% (18/102) of participants as high risk, respectively. For the 104 participants who completed both 5-item MRAQ tools, the EMR-MRAQ had a sensitivity of 81.8% and specificity of 49.0% in detecting a high-risk SA-MRAQ score. Both 5-item risk assessments showed weak correlations with health distress and overall health, while the 10-item SA-MRAQ additionally showed weak correlations with medication adherence. The EMR-MRAQ was most effective in predicting all-cause emergency room visits/hospitalization (c-statistic = 0.69; 95% CI=0.57-0.81) and high clinic

  9. Expert System for ASIC Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shri N.; Arshak, Khalil I.; McDonnell, Pearse; Boyce, Conor; Duggan, Andrew

    1989-07-01

    With the developments in the techniques of artificial intelligence over the last few years, development of advisory, scheduling and similar class of problems has become very convenient using tools such as PROLOG. In this paper an expert system has been described which helps lithographers and process engineers in several ways. The methodology used is to model each work station according to its input, output and control parameters, combine these work stations in a logical sequence based on past experience and work out process schedule for a job. In addition, all the requirements vis-a-vis a particular job parameters are converted into decision rules. One example is the exposure time, develop time for a wafer with different feature sizes would be different. This expert system has been written in Turbo Prolog. By building up a large number of rules, one can tune the program to any facility and use it for as diverse applications as advisory help, trouble shooting etc. Leitner (1) has described an advisory expert system that is being used at National Semiconductor. This system is quite different from the one being reported in the present paper. The approach is quite different for one. There is stress on job flow and process for another.

  10. The new Planetary Science Archive: A tool for exploration and discovery of scientific datasets from ESA's planetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, David

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is the European Space Agency's (ESA) repository of science data from all planetary science and exploration missions. The PSA provides access to scientific datasets through various interfaces (e.g. FTP browser, Map based, Advanced search, and Machine interface): http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa All datasets are scientifically peer-reviewed by independent scientists, and are compliant with the Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. Updating the PSA: The PSA is currently implementing a number of significant changes, both to its web-based interface to the scientific community, and to its database structure. The new PSA will be up-to-date with versions 3 and 4 of the PDS standards, as PDS4 will be used for ESA's upcoming ExoMars and BepiColombo missions. The newly designed PSA homepage will provide direct access to scientific datasets via a text search for targets or missions. This will significantly reduce the complexity for users to find their data and will promote one-click access to the datasets. Additionally, the homepage will provide direct access to advanced views and searches of the datasets. Users will have direct access to documentation, information and tools that are relevant to the scientific use of the dataset, including ancillary datasets, Software Interface Specification (SIS) documents, and any tools/help that the PSA team can provide. A login mechanism will provide additional functionalities to the users to aid / ease their searches (e.g. saving queries, managing default views). Queries to the PSA database will be possible either via the homepage (for simple searches of missions or targets), or through a filter menu for more tailored queries. The filter menu will offer multiple options to search for a particular dataset or product, and will manage queries for both in-situ and remote sensing instruments. Parameters such as start-time, phase angle, and heliocentric distance will be emphasized. A further

  11. Exploring similarities and differences in hospital adverse event rates between Norway and Sweden using Global Trigger Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deilkås, Ellen Tveter; Risberg, Madeleine Borgstedt; Haugen, Marion; Lindstrøm, Jonas Christoffer; Nylén, Urban; Rutberg, Hans; Michael, Soop

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we explore similarities and differences in hospital adverse event (AE) rates between Norway and Sweden by reviewing medical records with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). All acute care hospitals in both countries performed medical record reviews, except one in Norway. Records were randomly selected from all eligible admissions in 2013. Eligible admissions were patients 18 years of age or older, undergoing care with an in-hospital stay of at least 24 hours, excluding psychiatric and care and rehabilitation. Reviews were done according to GTT methodology. Similar contexts for healthcare and similar socioeconomic and demographic characteristics have inspired the Nordic countries to exchange experiences from measuring and monitoring quality and patient safety in healthcare. The co-operation has promoted the use of GTT to monitor national and local rates of AEs in hospital care. 10 986 medical records were reviewed in Norway and 19 141 medical records in Sweden. No significant difference between overall AE rates was found between the two countries. The rate was 13.0% (95% CI 11.7% to 14.3%) in Norway and 14.4% (95% CI 12.6% to 16.3%) in Sweden. There were significantly higher AE rates of surgical complications in Norwegian hospitals compared with Swedish hospitals. Swedish hospitals had significantly higher rates of pressure ulcers, falls and 'other' AEs. Among more severe AEs, Norwegian hospitals had significantly higher rates of surgical complications than Swedish hospitals. Swedish hospitals had significantly higher rates of postpartum AEs. The level of patient safety in acute care hospitals, as assessed by GTT, was essentially the same in both countries. The differences between the countries in the rates of several types of AEs provide new incentives for Norwegian and Swedish governing bodies to address patient safety issues. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  12. An Investigation of Language Teachers' Explorations of the Use of Corpus Tools in the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, John David

    2013-01-01

    Despite claims that the use of corpus tools can have a major impact in language classrooms (e.g., Conrad, 2000, 2004; Davies, 2004; O'Keefe, McCarthy, & Carter, 2007; Sinclair, 2004b; Tsui, 2004), many language teachers express apparent apathy or even resistance towards adding corpus tools to their repertoire (Cortes, 2013b). This study…

  13. PLEXUS--The Expert System for Referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A.; Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a description of PLEXUS, an expert system on gardening designed as a referral tool for public libraries by the University of London. Highlights include determining user characteristics, developing the problem statement, the use of semantic categories, and search strategies that modify the original problem statement using Boolean…

  14. Exploring an educational assessment tool to measure registered nurses' knowledge of hearing impairment and effective communication strategies: A USA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, Amy L

    2018-01-01

    Poor communication between the Registered Nurse and a hearing impaired patient can affect quality of care and health outcomes. Communication skills training programs for healthcare providers are needed to improve patient centered care. A descriptive research study, using a knowledge assessment tool developed and validated by the researcher, was conducted on 339 Registered Nurses to identify knowledge deficits to be addressed in a communication skills training program being designed. The educational tool measured the Registered Nurses' knowledge across four areas - hearing impairment, hearing aids, communication strategies, and regulations regarding access to care for a person with a hearing disability. Knowledge deficits were detected in all four areas. Using this educational assessment tool may enable nurse educators to tailor communication skills training programs to specifically address the gaps identified regarding hearing impairment and how to effectively communicate with the hearing impaired patient. Post training program, nurse educators can use the tool to evaluate effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Capital Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Laurie; Gary, Jack; Illingworth, Bill; Sargent, Tom

    1987-05-01

    Gathering information, necessary forms, and financial calculations needed to generate a "capital investment proposal" is an extremely complex and difficult process. The intent of the capital investment proposal is to ensure management that the proposed investment has been thoroughly investigated and will have a positive impact on corporate goals. Meeting this requirement typically takes four or five experts a total of 12 hours to generate a "Capital Package." A Capital Expert System was therefore developed using "Personal Consultant." The completed system is hybrid and as such does not depend solely on rules but incorporates several different software packages that communicate through variables and functions passed from one to another. This paper describes the use of expert system techniques, methodology in building the knowledge base, contexts, LISP functions, data base, and special challenges that had to be overcome to create this system. The Capital Expert System is the successful result of a unique integration of artificial intelligence with business accounting, financial forms generation, and investment proposal expertise.

  16. Xtal-xplore-R: a graphical tool for exploring the residual function involved in crystal structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Jan Marten; Roth, Georg

    2015-08-01

    This work presents Xtal-xplore-R, a tool dedicated to the visualization of two-dimensional cuts through the multidimensional crystallographic residual function. It imports arbitrary crystal structures, generates artificial diffraction data, and calculates and investigates the residual function in parameter space. The program serves two major purposes. Firstly, it is part of a more general project dealing with structure determination via global optimization techniques. In this context, the tool is being used to systematically analyse characteristic universal features of the target function (residual function) which can be used to develop appropriate problem-specific heuristic optimization algorithms. Secondly, Xtal-xplore-R is intended as a didactic tool to visualize how changes in atom parameters affect the residual function and can be used to demonstrate manual structure optimization for simple crystal structures.

  17. The Delphi Method Online: Medical Expert Consensus Via the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Cam, Kenneth M.; McKnight, Patrick E.; Doctor, Jason N

    2002-01-01

    Delphi is an expert consensus method. The theory behind the Delphi method is that the interaction of experts may lead to a reduction in individual bias. We have developed software that carries out all aspects of the Delphi method via the Internet. The Delphi method online consists of three components: 1) authorship, 2) interactive polling, and 3) reporting/results. We hope that researchers use this tool in future medical expert systems.

  18. Geographical information systems as a tool to explore land characteristics and land use : with reference to Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    An adequate inventory of land characteristics and land use is increasingly necessary to support agricultural land use planning, especially in view of the conflicting demands on scarce land resources. Fortunately new tools like GIS are being developed and adapted to support these

  19. The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeness, Irina; Edwards, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the different mediational means for supporting students' learning with digital tools in science group work in a Norwegian lower-secondary school is examined. Analyses of teacher-student and student-student interactions are located in cultural-historical theory and draw on Galperin's conceptualisation of learning processes.…

  20. Exploring the Divides among Students, Educators, and Practitioners in the Use of Digital Media as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Katherine; Ney, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies pervade the higher education landscape as a way to build student engagement and enhance student learning and teaching. In practice, however, the ways in which these tools are implemented in marketing education appear to be ad hoc, rather than using a systematic approach to build engagement and provide students with the skill…

  1. Expert system for skin problem consultation in Thai traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The tool selected for developing the expert system is a software program written in the PHP language. MySQL database is used to work together with PHP for building database of the expert system. The system is ... The developed system was considered good for learning and consultation.

  2. The GLEaMviz computational tool, a publicly available software to explore realistic epidemic spreading scenarios at the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Wouter; Gioannini, Corrado; Gonçalves, Bruno; Quaggiotto, Marco; Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2011-02-02

    Computational models play an increasingly important role in the assessment and control of public health crises, as demonstrated during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Much research has been done in recent years in the development of sophisticated data-driven models for realistic computer-based simulations of infectious disease spreading. However, only a few computational tools are presently available for assessing scenarios, predicting epidemic evolutions, and managing health emergencies that can benefit a broad audience of users including policy makers and health institutions. We present "GLEaMviz", a publicly available software system that simulates the spread of emerging human-to-human infectious diseases across the world. The GLEaMviz tool comprises three components: the client application, the proxy middleware, and the simulation engine. The latter two components constitute the GLEaMviz server. The simulation engine leverages on the Global Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) framework, a stochastic computational scheme that integrates worldwide high-resolution demographic and mobility data to simulate disease spread on the global scale. The GLEaMviz design aims at maximizing flexibility in defining the disease compartmental model and configuring the simulation scenario; it allows the user to set a variety of parameters including: compartment-specific features, transition values, and environmental effects. The output is a dynamic map and a corresponding set of charts that quantitatively describe the geo-temporal evolution of the disease. The software is designed as a client-server system. The multi-platform client, which can be installed on the user's local machine, is used to set up simulations that will be executed on the server, thus avoiding specific requirements for large computational capabilities on the user side. The user-friendly graphical interface of the GLEaMviz tool, along with its high level of detail and the realism of its embedded modeling approach

  3. The GLEaMviz computational tool, a publicly available software to explore realistic epidemic spreading scenarios at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaggiotto Marco

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational models play an increasingly important role in the assessment and control of public health crises, as demonstrated during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Much research has been done in recent years in the development of sophisticated data-driven models for realistic computer-based simulations of infectious disease spreading. However, only a few computational tools are presently available for assessing scenarios, predicting epidemic evolutions, and managing health emergencies that can benefit a broad audience of users including policy makers and health institutions. Results We present "GLEaMviz", a publicly available software system that simulates the spread of emerging human-to-human infectious diseases across the world. The GLEaMviz tool comprises three components: the client application, the proxy middleware, and the simulation engine. The latter two components constitute the GLEaMviz server. The simulation engine leverages on the Global Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM framework, a stochastic computational scheme that integrates worldwide high-resolution demographic and mobility data to simulate disease spread on the global scale. The GLEaMviz design aims at maximizing flexibility in defining the disease compartmental model and configuring the simulation scenario; it allows the user to set a variety of parameters including: compartment-specific features, transition values, and environmental effects. The output is a dynamic map and a corresponding set of charts that quantitatively describe the geo-temporal evolution of the disease. The software is designed as a client-server system. The multi-platform client, which can be installed on the user's local machine, is used to set up simulations that will be executed on the server, thus avoiding specific requirements for large computational capabilities on the user side. Conclusions The user-friendly graphical interface of the GLEaMviz tool, along with its high level

  4. Exploring a new ultrasound score as a clinical predictive tool in patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting abatacept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Boers, Maarten; Wakefield, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether changes in a composite ( power Doppler/greyscale ultrasound (PDUS)) synovitis score, developed by the OMERACT-EULAR-Ultrasound Task Force, predict disease activity outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA who were methotrexate inadequate resp...

  5. A newly developed tool for intra-tracheal temperature and humidity assessment in laryngectomized individuals: the Airway Climate Explorer (ACE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuur, J.K.; Muller, S.H.; Jongh, F.H.C.; Horst, M.J. van der; Shehata, M.; Leeuwen, J. van; Sinaasappel, M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a postlaryngectomy airway climate explorer (ACE) for assessment of intratracheal temperature and humidity and of influence of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs). Engineering goals were within-device condensation prevention and fast response time characteristics.

  6. Exploring interventions and tools used by REScoops to lower householders’ energy consumption and stimulate investment in RES projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Thomas; Coenen, Frans

    2016-01-01

    REScoops are well positioned to spur energy savings among householders and generate investment in renewable energy projects. As compared to other agents in energy markets they have many benefits, particularly their embeddedness in local, social structures. In this paper we explore in which ways, and

  7. Expert Script Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Nancy E.; Cooper, Eric G.

    1991-01-01

    Program provides additional level of interface to facilitate use of telerobotic system. ESG (Expert Script Generator) is software package automatically generating high-level task objective commands from complex menu-driven language of the NASA Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL). Makes telerobotics laboratory accessible to researchers not familiar with comprehensive language developed by ISRL for interacting with various systems of ISRL test bed. Incorporates expert-system technology to capture typical rules of operation that skilled operator uses. Result: operator interfact optimizing ability of system to perform task remotely in hazardous environment, in timely manner, and without undue stress to operator, while minimizing change for operator erros that damage equipment. Written in CLIPS.

  8. Bioethics for Technical Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    Along with rapidly expanding applications of life science and technology, technical experts have been implicated more and more often with ethical, social, and legal problems than before. It should be noted that in this background there are scientific and social uncertainty elements which are inevitable during the progress of life science in addition to the historically-established social unreliability to scientists and engineers. In order to solve these problems, therefore, we should establish the social governance with ‘relief’ and ‘reliance’ which enables for both citizens and engineers to share the awareness of the issues, to design social orders and criterions based on hypothetical sense of values for bioethics, to carry out practical use management of each subject carefully, and to improve the sense of values from hypothetical to universal. Concerning these measures, the technical experts can learn many things from the present performance in the medical field.

  9. Expert PLSQL Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Beresniewicz, John

    2011-01-01

    Expert PL/SQL Practices is a book of collected wisdom on PL/SQL programming from some of the best and the brightest in the field. Each chapter is a deep-dive into a specific problem, technology, or feature set that you'll face as a PL/SQL programmer. Each author has chosen their topic out of the strong belief that what they share can make a positive difference in the quality and scalability of code that you write. The path to mastery begins with syntax and the mechanics of writing statements to make things happen. If you've reached that point with PL/SQL, then let the authors of Expert PL/SQL

  10. Evolution of expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancoli, L.

    1984-03-01

    A brief exposition of the nature and functions of expert systems (knowledge based systems) and some remarks upon the way in which they resemble, but fall far short of, the very largely intuitive action of the human brain are given. The remainder of the article consists of summaries of the work being done in this field by organisations in Italy, namely: ISPRA; Delphi Electronic Design Systems, VIAREGGIO; SPL Italia SPA, (VA), Milan; Italservice Srl, Milan; and Artificial Intelligence Software, Rovigo.

  11. Exploring Just-in-Time Teaching 3D Development as a Tool for Enhancing Knowledge and Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Morag C. E. McFadyen; Watson, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    The integumentary system (skin) is the first line of defence in the body and part of the innate immune system. Within first year modules on Pharmaceutical Biology and Integrative Physiology in the Masters of Pharmacy degree at Robert Gordon University (RGU) several software tools were used to support both lecture and coursework material for the immune and integumentary systems. However, students had difficulty visualizing the various layers of the skin and how they become affected by differen...

  12. SACA: Software Assisted Call Analysis--an interactive tool supporting content exploration, online guidance and quality improvement of counseling dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkaus, Hans L; Gaisser, Andrea E

    2010-09-01

    Nearly 30,000 individual inquiries are answered annually by the telephone cancer information service (CIS, KID) of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ). The aim was to develop a tool for evaluating these calls, and to support the complete counseling process interactively. A novel software tool is introduced, based on a structure similar to a music score. Treating the interaction as a "duet", guided by the CIS counselor, the essential contents of the dialogue are extracted automatically. For this, "trained speech recognition" is applied to the (known) counselor's part, and "keyword spotting" is used on the (unknown) client's part to pick out specific items from the "word streams". The outcomes fill an abstract score representing the dialogue. Pilot tests performed on a prototype of SACA (Software Assisted Call Analysis) resulted in a basic proof of concept: Demographic data as well as information regarding the situation of the caller could be identified. The study encourages following up on the vision of an integrated SACA tool for supporting calls online and performing statistics on its knowledge database offline. Further research perspectives are to check SACA's potential in comparison with established interaction analysis systems like RIAS. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring probabilistic tools for the development of a platform for Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) of hydro-meteorological hazards in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumpano, V.; Hussin, H. Y.; Breinl, K.

    2012-04-01

    Mass-movements and floods are hydro-meteorological hazards that can have catastrophic effects on communities living in mountainous areas prone to these disastrous events. Environmental, climate and socio-economic changes are expected to affect the tempo-spatial patterns of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks in Europe. These changes and their effects on the occurrence of future hazards need to be analyzed and modeled using probabilistic hazard and risk assessment methods in order to assist stakeholders in disaster management strategies and policy making. Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) using probabilistic methods can further calculate damage and losses to multi-hazards and determine the uncertainties related to all the probabilistic components of the hazard and the vulnerability of the elements at risk. Therefore, in order to develop an effective platform that can quantitatively calculate the risk of mass-movements and floods in several European test sites, an extensive inventory and analysis has been carried out of the available tools and software related to the probabilistic risk assessment of single and multi-hazards. The tools have been reviewed based on whether they are open source and freely available, their required input data, the availability and type of hazard and vulnerability modules, transparency of methods used, their validation and calibration techniques, the inclusion of uncertainties and their state of the art. The analysis also specially focused on the applicability of the tools to European study areas. The findings showed that assumptions and simplifications are made when assessing and quantifying the hazards. The interaction between multiple hazards, like cascading effects are not assessed in most tools and some consider the hazard and vulnerability as qualitative components, rather than quantitative ones. This analysis of hazard and risk assessment tools and software will give future developers and experts a better overview of

  14. [Expert Opinions in Court: Liability of the Expert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Beckmann, Nickolas; Gaidzik, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Experts in criminal, civil and, increasingly, in social court cases have to present their expert opinions in court. This should be regarded not only as a burden, even if this may at times appear superfluous to the expert, perhaps because the discussion is mere repetition of the opinion he has already written, or because the questions appear to be biased against the expert. Nonetheless, the expert is always advised to appear calm and objective during the interrogation by judges and parties or participants and their legal representatives, and should not allow himself or herself to be provoked by questioning. Furthermore, it may be necessary to correct the written expert statement in the course of the interrogation, but this can be a sign of a truly competent medical expert. The expert consulted can be held liable for adverse health effects resulting from the interrogation and investigation, as well as for deliberate or grossly faulty reports. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Exploring Just-in-Time Teaching 3D Development as a Tool for Enhancing Knowledge and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morag C.E. McFadyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The integumentary system (skin is the first line of defence in the body and part of the innate immune system. Within first year modules on Pharmaceutical Biology and Integrative Physiology in the Masters of Pharmacy degree at Robert Gordon University (RGU several software tools were used to support both lecture and coursework material for the immune and integumentary systems. However, students had difficulty visualizing the various layers of the skin and how they become affected by different skin lesions. As a response to these identified learning difficulties, a just-in-time teaching 3-Dimensional elearning object was developed using free-to-use 3D CAD packages alongside common elearning software. The outcome was a virtualised human arm equipped to illustrate and label primary or secondary skin lesions whilst allowing spatial manipulation of the arm. This allowed students to manipulate and identify the specific skin layers involved. Evaluation of student engagement and learning was favourable, with students reflecting that they had a better understanding of the topic. Initial findings from this study highlight the benefits of quick, low-cost 3D production processes as just-in-time teaching elearning tools that have a positive impact on students’ performance.

  16. Exploring the Types of SMEs Which Could use Blogs as a Marketing Tool: a Proposed Future Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Phaik Harn Chua

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Blogs appear to be gaining momentum as a marketing tool which can be used by organisations for such strategies and processes as branding, managing reputation, developing customer trust and loyalty, niche marketing, gathering marketing intelligence and promoting their online presence. There has been limited academic research in this area, and most significantly concerning the types of small and medium enterprises (SMEs for which blogs might have potential as a marketing tool. In an attempt to address the knowledge gap, this paper presents a future research agenda (in the form of research questions which can guide the eBusiness research community in conducting much needed studies in this area. This paper is particularly novel in that it aims to demonstrate how the heterogeneity of SMEs and their specific business uses of eBusiness technology such as blogs can form the central plank of a future research agenda. This is important because the existing eBusiness literature tends to treat eBusiness collectively rather than focusing on the specific business uses of different eBusiness technologies, and to treat SMEs as a homogeneous group. The paper concludes with a discussion of how this research agenda can form the basis of studies which use a range of different research methods, and how this "big picture" agenda approach might help the eBusiness research community build theory which better explains SME adoption and use of eBusiness.

  17. Bipolar Neutrosophic Soft Expert Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Şahin, Mehmet; Deli, İrfan; Uluçay, Vakkas

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce concept of bipolar neutrosophic soft expert set and its some operations. Also, we propose score, certainty and accuracy functions to compare the bipolar neutrosophic soft expert sets. We give examples for these concepts. 

  18. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoter databases as valuable tools in exploring the regulation of gene transcription: a comprehensive overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Małgorzata; Wysokińska, Halina; Kuźma, Łukasz; Szymczyk, Piotr

    2017-11-02

    The complete exploration of the regulation of gene expression remains one of the top-priority goals for researchers. As the regulation is mainly controlled at the level of transcription by promoters, study on promoters and findings are of great importance. This review summarizes forty selected databases that centralize experimental and theoretical knowledge regarding the organization of promoters, interacting transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. The presented databases offer researchers valuable support in elucidating the regulation of gene transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Communicating Ocean Acidification and Climate Change to Public Audiences Using Scientific Data, Interactive Exploration Tools, and Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Rossiter, A.; Spitzer, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a hands-on science museum, explores local environmental conditions of San Francisco Bay to connect audiences to the larger global implications of ocean acidification and climate change. The work is centered in the Fisher Bay Observatory at Pier 15, a glass-walled gallery sited for explorations of urban San Francisco and the Bay. Interactive exhibits, high-resolution data visualizations, and mediated activities and conversations communicate to public audiences the impacts of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ocean. Through a 10-year education partnership with NOAA and two environmental literacy grants funded by its Office of Education, the Exploratorium has been part of two distinct but complementary strategies to increase climate literacy beyond traditional classroom settings. We will discuss two projects that address the ways complex scientific information can be transformed into learning opportunities for the public, providing information citizens can use for decision-making in their personal lives and their communities. The Visualizing Change project developed "visual narratives" that combine scientific visualizations and other images with story telling about the science and potential solutions of climate impacts on the ocean. The narratives were designed to engage curiosity and provide the public with hopeful and useful information to stimulate solutions-oriented behavior rather than to communicate despair about climate change. Training workshops for aquarium and museum docents prepare informal educators to use the narratives and help them frame productive conversations with the pubic. The Carbon Networks project, led by the Exploratorium, uses local and Pacific Rim data to explore the current state of climate change and ocean acidification. The Exploratorium collects and displays local ocean and atmosphere data as a member of the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System and as an observing station for NOAA's Pacific

  20. Limitations of Expert Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Salaçin

    1997-01-01

    Limitations of Expert Evidence Edited by Stephen Leadbeatter MB ChB MCRPath ISBN 1 86016 029 8 Printed in Great Britain by Cathedral Print Services Ltd, Salisbury, 1996 Kitap 25 Ekim 1994 te The Royal College of Physicians ve The Royal College of Pathologists tarafından düzenlenen konferanstan sonra hekimlere ve avukatlara konuyu tartışmaya açmak için basılmış. Bilirkişi görüşünün temel filozofisinin, bu görevi yapanlar ve bu hizmeti alanların yapabileceklerin...

  1. Expert Oracle Exadata

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history, advances in technology have come in spurts. A single great idea can often spur rapid change as the idea takes hold and is propagated, often in totally unexpected directions. Exadata embodies such a change in how we think about and manage relational databases. The key change lies in the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer. That concept is a huge win, and its implementation in the form of Exadata is truly a game changer. Expert Oracle Exadata will give you a look under the covers at how the combination of hardware and software that comprise Exadata actua

  2. Development of a Spacecraft Materials Selector Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, G.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report contains a description of the knowledge base tool and examples of its use. A downloadable version of the Spacecraft Materials Selector (SMS) knowledge base is available through the NASA Space Environments and Effects Program. The "Spacecraft Materials Selector" knowledge base is part of an electronic expert system. The expert system consists of an inference engine that contains the "decision-making" code and the knowledge base that contains the selected body of information. The inference engine is a software package previously developed at Boeing, called the Boeing Expert System Tool (BEST) kit.

  3. Expert Systems - A Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Shadbolt, N. R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the origins, current state and future prospects for expert systems. The origins are traced from the schism with classic Artificial Intelligence. The characteristics of early expert systems are described and contrasted with more recent developments. A number of influential forces operating on present day systems are reviewed. The future trends in the evolution of expert systems are discussed.

  4. Exploring the use of Low-intensity Ultrasonics as a Tool for Assessing the Salt Content in Pork Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; de Prados, M.; Martínez-Escrivá, G.; González, R.; Mulet, A.; Benedito, J.

    Meat industry demands non-destructive techniques for the control of the salting process to achieve a homogeneous final salt content in salted meat products. The feasibility of using low-intensity ultrasound for characterizing the salting process of pork meat products was evaluated. The ultrasonic velocity (V) and time of flight (TF) were measured by through-transmission and pulse-echo methods, respectively, in salted meat products. Salting involved an increase of the V in meat muscles and a decrease of the time of flight in whole hams. Measuring the V before and after salting, the salt content could be estimated. Moreover, online monitoring of the salting process by computing the TF could be considered a reliable tool for quality control purposes.

  5. Explore Earth Science Datasets for STEM with the NASA GES DISC Online Visualization and Analysis Tool, Giovanni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Acker, J.; Kempler, S.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center(DISC) is one of twelve NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Data Centers that provide Earth science data, information, and services to users around the world including research and application scientists, students, citizen scientists, etc. The GESDISC is the home (archive) of remote sensing datasets for NASA Precipitation and Hydrology, Atmospheric Composition and Dynamics, etc. To facilitate Earth science data access, the GES DISC has been developing user-friendly data services for users at different levels in different countries. Among them, the Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni, http:giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) allows users to explore satellite-based datasets using sophisticated analyses and visualization without downloading data and software, which is particularly suitable for novices (such as students) to use NASA datasets in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) activities. In this presentation, we will briefly introduce Giovanni along with examples for STEM activities.

  6. An online practice and educational networking system for technical skills: learning experience in expert facilitated vs. independent learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Weber, Bryce; Kapralos, Bill; Carnahan, Heather; Bägli, Darius J; Dubrowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the activities of trainees learning technical skills using an educational networking tool with and without expert facilitation. Medical students (participants) were video-recorded practicing suturing and knot tying techniques and the resulting videos were uploaded to an educational networking site. Participants were then divided into two groups (one group containing an expert facilitator while the other group did not) and encouraged to comment on the videos within their group. We monitored the number of logins and comments posted and all participants completed an exit survey. There were no differences between the activities the two groups (p = 0.387). We conclude that the presence of an expert within collaborative Internet environments in not necessary to promote interactivity amongst the learners.

  7. Hydrogeochemical data as a tool for exploration and mapping: a case study from part of Afikpo Basin southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Kalu K; Akaolisa, Casmir C Z

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen (14) characters from six (6) water samples collected from springs, ponds, and streams located in Lower Cretaceous sedimentary area of Afikpo Basin have been analyzed. These include pH, turbidity, conductivity, total dissolved solid, hardness, Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-), and Na+. These sediments, which are Turonian and Coniacian in age, are subdivided into two by a basic rock dyke. Results of the analyses show clearly that the Turonian sediments, intruded by dolerite, have net Fe2+, HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Cl-, and SO4(2-) concentration while those from the younger Coniacian sediment have net higher amounts of K+, Na+, and Mn2+. The overriding mafic minerals in the basic intrusive rock possibly led to higher leaching into ground water system near it. On the other hand, the presence of feldsparthic to kaolinitic sands of the younger Coniacian units led to higher K+ and Na+ matter in the water from these zones. The formations dip away from the older sediments. Concentrations of these characters are within acceptable drinking water standards by World Health Organization but noticeable anomalous zones for Fe2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ are zones of basic rock suites. Areas with greater Na+ and K+ are traceable to sandy units. It is thus concluded that more analysis of surface, subsurface, and pond water samples can be utilized for minerals search and geological mapping. At this stage, it forms a veritable reconnaissance tool.

  8. Sequence stratigraphic analysis as an exploration and production tool in the Ceuta Eocene field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argenis, R. (Intevep S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1990-05-01

    Oil plays in Ceuta field, as in other areas of the Maracaibo Lake were delineated using the common methodology of standard seismic reflection interpretation. Prospective structures were defined and drilled, and suites of logs were then used for petrophysical evaluation of the section of interest. These established seismic and petrophysical techniques for delineating oil-bearing intervals in the Maracaibo basin failed to perform as expected in Ceuta Eocene. Here, after drilling and coring well VLG-3726 in a prospective structure, it was proven that although logs showed high resistivity in sand intervals with good porosity, it did not necessarily mean commercial hydrocarbon accumulation. To explain this phenomenon, a sequence stratigraphic analysis of the cored 600-ft (200-m) section was done. Results showed that petrophysical evaluation correctly identified sand intervals with good porosity, but in particular instances this porosity was unconnected. For example, sand facies S1 and S2, with good secondary, uneffective porosity was not oil bearing. These facts could explain their sand-log response, high resistivity, and noncommercial oil accumulation. This analysis also explained the role played by depositional and diagenetic processes in delineating sand body geometries and reservoir qualities for proposing an exploration or development program. From this study, the author was concluded that application of rock data through a facies analyst subordinates seismic and petrophysical consideration for hydrocarbon evaluation in this and other areas with similar sedimentological characteristics.

  9. ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS AS A TOOL FOR THE PROMOTION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH: A RESOURCE SCIENTIFICALLY FEW EXPLORED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arían Ramón Aladro Gonzalvo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the great impact  that are exerting the networks in society, it is crucial to know the features that distinguish online social networks bringing together users interested in receiving information and resources to improve or maintain the body in shape. This article aims to comment on the limited research interested in studying the features and particularities of online communities that provide information, advice and support in the execution, performance and promotion of the health and fitness activities. Particularly, it underline about the necessity to know of networks structure, user profiles and peer-to-peer interaction, sort of membership, mechanisms of communication, representation of the body image and patterns of association. Likewise, the size of the support networks, telepresence, technology acceptance and perceived risk on the network. Besides, we recommend exploring two Fitness-related online social networks. Finally, it makes known the recurring problems in the analysis in order to characterize psychosocial and communicative aspects of users in the virtual environment.

  10. An EcologicalVisual Exploration Tool to Support the Analysis of Visual Processing Pathways in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cazzato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent improvements in the field of assistive technologies have led to innovative solutions aiming at increasing the capabilities of people with disability, helping them in daily activities with applications that span from cognitive impairments to developmental disabilities. In particular, in the case of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, the need to obtain active feedback in order to extract subsequently meaningful data becomes of fundamental importance. In this work, a study about the possibility of understanding the visual exploration in children with ASD is presented. In order to obtain an automatic evaluation, an algorithm for free (i.e., without constraints, nor using additional hardware, infrared (IR light sources or other intrusive methods gaze estimation is employed. Furthermore, no initial calibration is required. It allows the user to freely rotate the head in the field of view of the sensor, and it is insensitive to the presence of eyeglasses, hats or particular hairstyles. These relaxations of the constraints make this technique particularly suitable to be used in the critical context of autism, where the child is certainly not inclined to employ invasive devices, nor to collaborate during calibration procedures.The evaluation of children’s gaze trajectories through the proposed solution is presented for the purpose of an Early Start Denver Model (ESDM program built on the child’s spontaneous interests and game choice delivered in a natural setting.

  11. Let the Experts Decide?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Rebecca; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    in information quality is large, we find that voting groups largely coordinate on the SVC equilibrium which is also Pareto Optimal. However, we find that when the asymmetry in information quality is not large and the Pareto Optimal equilibrium is for all to participate, significant numbers of voters with low...... quality information abstain. Furthermore, we find that information asymmetry induces voters with low quality information to coordinate on a non-equilibrium outcome. This suggests that coordination on "letting the experts" decide is a likely voting norm that sometimes validates SVC equilibrium predictions......We examine abstention when voters in standing committees are asymmetrically informed and there are multiple pure strategy equilibria-swing voter's curse (SVC) equilibria where voters with low quality information abstain and equilibria when all participants vote their information. When the asymmetry...

  12. Exploring the Stakeholders Salience for the adoption the Principles and Tools of Cleaner Production in Brazil Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Cardoso Oliveira Neto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The key objective of this paper is to show the primary environmental influences exerted by the government, economic agents and society on companies for the implementation of the principles and tools of cleaner production (CP, and the attributes (power, legitimacy and urgency used by stakeholders to coerce companies into adopting these principles. Design/methodology/approach – The research method employed was the application of an exploratory survey in 102 Brazilian companies and the multi-varied evaluation of data by means of multiple correspondent analysis. Findings – The study shows that some principles of CP are little used by companies in Brazil. Concerning the influences on the adoption of CP, the government, economic agents and society are singled out as the important influencers. The government influence is manifest through the adoption of environmental regulating measures (power in conjunction with sincere actions in environmental education (influence. The economic agents possess the power, legitimacy and urgency to influence the adoption of CP. Society’s influences are less relevant, in that Brazilian society has much less awareness of sustainable production and consumption as compared to other countries. Practical implications – This study shows that it is vital that Brazilian society learns more about sustainable production, because a society with no environmental conscience is a society with little means to demand the implementation of CP. Originality/value – The results of the study represent an important theoretical contribution in that, at present, there is little literature on the relationship between stakeholders and Cleaner Production. This is the first study in Brazil to address the subject.

  13. Self-organising maps and correlation analysis as a tool to explore patterns in excitation-emission matrix data sets and to discriminate dissolved organic matter fluorescence components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets.

  14. Development and Implementation of ExPLORE Clinical Practice, a Web-accessible Comparative Outcomes Tool for California Hospitals and Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Peter D; Fang, Jade; Schwarzwaelder, Stephan; Jackson, Terri

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-based clinicians have little information about the outcomes of their care, much less how those outcomes compare with those of their peers. A variety of care quality indicators have been developed, but comparisons tend to be hospitalwide, and often irrelevant to the practice and patient group of many hospital clinicians. Moreover, information is not enough to transform clinical practice, as the human response to such comparisons is, "I'm doing the best I know how." What is needed is granular, clinically specific feedback with peer-mediated advice about how "positive deviants" achieve better results. This case study reports on the development and implementation of a web-accessible comparative outcomes tool, ExPLORE Clinical Practice, for hospitals and clinicians in California. We use iterative development and refinement of web tools to report comparative outcomes; incremental development of suites of procedure-patient outcome pairs specific to particular medical specialty groups; testing and refinement of response time metrics to reduce delays in report generation; and introduction of a comments section for each measure that assists with interpretation and ties results to strategies found to lead to better clinical outcomes. To date, 76 reports, each with 115 to 251 statistically evaluated outcomes, are available electronically to compare individual hospitals in California to statewide outcomes. ExPLORE Clinical Practice is one of a number of emerging systems that attempt to lever available data to improve patient outcomes. The ExPLORE Clinical Practice system combines a clinical focus on highly specific outcome measures with attention to technical issues such as crafting an intuitive user interface and graphic presentation. This case study illustrates the important advances made in using data to support clinicians to improve care for patients. We see this information as a way to start local conversations about quality improvement, and as a means of

  15. Exploration and classification of chromatographic fingerprints as additional tool for identification and quality control of several Artemisia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Goedele; Pieters, Sigrid; Logie, Hans; Van Erps, Jürgen; Merino-Arévalo, Maria; Dejaegher, Bieke; Smeyers-Verbeke, Johanna; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2014-07-01

    The World Health Organization accepts chromatographic fingerprints as a tool for identification and quality control of herbal medicines. This is the first study in which the distinction, identification and quality control of four different Artemisia species, i.e. Artemisia vulgaris, A. absinthium, A. annua and A. capillaris samples, is performed based on the evaluation of entire chromatographic fingerprint profiles developed with identical experimental conditions. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with Diode Array Detection (DAD) was used to develop the fingerprints. Application of factorial designs leads to methanol/water (80:20 (v/v)) as the best extraction solvent for the pulverised plant material and to a shaking bath for 30 min as extraction method. Further, so-called screening, optimisation and fine-tuning phases were performed during fingerprint development. Most information about the different Artemisia species, i.e. the highest number of separated peaks in the fingerprint, was acquired on four coupled Chromolith columns (100 mm × 4.6 mm I.D.). Trifluoroacetic acid 0.05% (v/v) was used as mobile-phase additive in a stepwise linear methanol/water gradient, i.e. 5, 34, 41, 72 and 95% (v/v) methanol at 0, 9, 30, 44 and 51 min, where the last mobile phase composition was kept isocratic till 60 min. One detection wavelength was selected to perform data analysis. The lowest similarity between the fingerprints of the four species was present at 214 nm. The HPLC/DAD method was applied on 199 herbal samples of the four Artemisia species, resulting in 357 fingerprints. The within- and between-day variation of the entire method, as well as the quality control fingerprints obtained during routine analysis, were found acceptable. The distinction of these Artemisia species was evaluated based on the entire chromatographic profiles, developed by a shared method, and visualised in score plots by means of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) exploratory data

  16. ESG - EXPERT SCRIPT GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Automation Technology Branch of NASA's Langley Research Center is employing increasingly complex degrees of operator/robot cooperation (telerobotics). A good relationship between the operator and computer is essential for smooth performance by a telerobotic system. ESG (Expert Script Generator) is a software package that automatically generates high-level task objective commands from the NASA Intelligent Systems Research Lab's (ISRL's) complex menu-driven language. ESG reduces errors and makes the telerobotics lab accessible to researchers who are not familiar with the comprehensive language developed by ISRL for interacting with the various systems of the ISRL testbed. ESG incorporates expert system technology to capture the typical rules of operation that a skilled operator would use. The result is an operator interface which optimizes the system's capability to perform a task remotely in a hazardous environment, in a timely manner, and without undue stress to the operator, while minimizing the chance for operator errors that may damage equipment. The intricate menu-driven command interface which provides for various control modes of both manipulators and their associated sensors in the TeleRobotic System Simulation (TRSS) has a syntax which is both irregular and verbose. ESG eliminates the following two problems with this command "language": 1) knowing the correct command sequence to accomplish a task, and 2) inputting a known command sequence without typos and other errors. ESG serves as an additional layer of interface, working in conjunction with the menu command processor, not supplanting it. By specifying task-level commands, such as GRASP, CONNECT, etc., ESG will generate the appropriate menu elements to accomplish the task. These elements will be collected in a script file which can then be executed by the ISRL menu command processor. In addition, the operator can extend the list of task-level commands to include customized tasks composed of sub

  17. Exploring risks and benefits of point-of-care tests for healthcare and self-tests for laypersons: an interview study assessing complementary expert perspectives on diagnostic lab-on-a-chip systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuecuekbalaban, Pinar; Schmidt, Silke; Kraft, Kathleen; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Muehlan, Holger

    2014-01-01

    A commercial breakthrough of point-of-care testing (POCT) and self-tests for laypersons (direct-to-consumer applications, DTC) is anticipated based on the advancements in the development of lab-on-a-chip system (LOC) technology. The aim of this study was to investigate risks and benefits of LOC based diagnostic devices for healthcare and private self-testers. Interviews with 22 developers/researchers of LOC technology and 10 technology assessment experts were conducted about the (a) need for, (b) benefits, and (c) risks of LOCs for healthcare and as DTC applications. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Need for LOCs were seen mainly for healthcare, but not as DTC applications for fatal diseases. While benefits were seen mainly for healthcare and partially for DTC applications (e.g. faster diagnostics, more favourable diagnostics, POCT), risks were emphasised especially for DTC applications and less frequently for healthcare (e.g. various technical challenges, misinterpretation of test results, quality/reliability requirements). Medical expertise is the key imperative for the application of LOC based portable diagnostic devices in healthcare and particularly for self-testing. LOCs have to be designed to be easily operated and interpreted by self-testers. For healthcare, LOCs are envisaged to be a promising emerging technology with various benefits.

  18. Exploring the potential implementation of a tool to enhance shared decision making (SDM) in mental health services in the United Kingdom: a qualitative exploration of the views of service users, carers and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen; Harris, Kamelia; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina; Rogers, Anne; Drake, Richard

    2017-01-01

    As a response to evidence that mental health service users and carers expect greater involvement in decisions about antipsychotic medication choice and prescribing, shared decision-making (SDM) has increasingly come to be viewed as an essential element of person-centred care and practice. However, this aspiration has yet to be realised in practice, as service users and carers continue to feel alienated from healthcare services. Existing understanding of the factors affecting the use of tools to support SDM is limited to inter-individual influences and wider factors affecting potential implementation are underexplored. To explore the potential use of a tool designed to enhance collaborative antipsychotic prescribing from the perspectives of secondary care mental health service users, carers and professionals. We conducted a qualitative study (semi-structured interviews and focus groups) using a convenience sample of 33 participants (10 mental health service users, 10 carers and 13 professionals) involved in antipsychotic prescribing in one Trust in the North of England. Participants were asked about the potential implementation of a tool to support SDM within secondary mental health services. Framework analysis incorporating the use of constant comparative method was used to analyse the data. The study identified a divergence in the views of service users and professionals, including a previously undocumented tendency for stakeholder groups to blame each other for potential implementation failure. This dissonance was shaped by meso and macro level influences relating to paternalism, legislative frameworks, accountability and lack of resources. Participants did not identify any macro level (policy or structural) facilitators to the use of the tool highlighting the negative impact of mental health contexts. Our study indicated that inter-individual factors are likely to be most important to implementation, given their potential to transcend meso and macro level

  19. Development of new exploration tools for seabed mineral resources - Result of R/V YOKOSUKA research cruise YK09-09 -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, M.; Sayanagi, K.; Kasaya, T.; Sawa, T.; Goto, T.; Tada, N.; Ichihara, H.; Asada, M.; Nakajima, T.; Isezaki, N.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed information on subsurface structure under seafloor is necessary for the estimation of seabed resources such as the hydrothermal deposit and methane hydrate. Although advantages of geophysical exploration near seafloor are expected for the seabed resource survey, efficient method has not been well-established. The authors started a project to develop exploration tools for seabed resources under the financial support of MEXT-Japan. We carry out research and development mainly regarding measurement of the magnetic field with high-resolution and high-sampling rate electric exploration devices with accurately controlled active source signals. Developed tools will be mounted underwater platforms such as deep-tow system, ROV (remotely operated vehicle), and AUV (autonomous undersea vehicle). We carried out the research cruise (vessel: JAMSTEC R/V YOKOSUKA YK09-09, cruise period: 19-29 July 2009, area surveyed: Kumano-nada, off Kii Peninsula, Japan) to investigate the performance of developed equipments for magnetic exploration. We mounted an Overhauser and two flux-gate magnetometers on the deep-tow and the AUV URASHIMA. To inspect the efficiency of equipments, it is better to measure the magnetic anomaly which is caused by known magnetic source. Therefore, we made a magnetic target which is consisted of 50 neodymium magnets. Before the navigation, the magnetic target was put under water and its position was measured by the acoustic method. The depth of target is about 2,050 meters, and the measurement was performed in the circle of a radius of about 300 meters. The vehicles were navigated at heights of 25 meters for AUV, and about 15 meters for deep-tow. Each of underwater navigation was practiced for two times. Both performances were carried out successfully, which means that we detected the significant magnetic anomalies caused by the target. We will be able to estimate three-dimensional distribution of anomalous magnetic field, and the source property of

  20. Expert systems for satellite stationkeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaru, M. M.; Wright, M. A.

    The feasibility of implementing artificial intelligence on satellites is evaluated, with the aim of using an onboard expert system to perform effective stationkeeping functions without assistance from the ground. The Defense Satellite Communication System (DSCS III) is used as an example. The cost for implementing a satellite stationkeeping expert system is analyzed. A ground-based expert system could reduce the current number of support personnel for the stationkeeping task. Results of analyzing a possible flight system are quite promising. An expert system for satellite stationkeeping seems feasible, appears cost-effective, and offers increased satellite endurance through autonomous operations.

  1. Processes in construction of failure management expert systems from device design information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Lance, Nick

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes the tasks and problem solving methods used by an engineer in constructing a failure management expert system from design information about the device to te diagnosed. An expert test engineer developed a trouble-shooting expert system based on device design information and experience with similar devices, rather than on specific expert knowledge gained from operating the device or troubleshooting its failures. The construction of the expert system was intensively observed and analyzed. This paper characterizes the knowledge, tasks, methods, and design decisions involved in constructing this type of expert system, and makes recommendations concerning tools for aiding and automating construction of such systems.

  2. Ask-the-expert: Active Learning Based Knowledge Discovery Using the Expert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kamalika; Avrekh, Ilya; Matthews, Bryan; Sharma, Manali; Oza, Nikunj

    2017-01-01

    Often the manual review of large data sets, either for purposes of labeling unlabeled instances or for classifying meaningful results from uninteresting (but statistically significant) ones is extremely resource intensive, especially in terms of subject matter expert (SME) time. Use of active learning has been shown to diminish this review time significantly. However, since active learning is an iterative process of learning a classifier based on a small number of SME-provided labels at each iteration, the lack of an enabling tool can hinder the process of adoption of these technologies in real-life, in spite of their labor-saving potential. In this demo we present ASK-the-Expert, an interactive tool that allows SMEs to review instances from a data set and provide labels within a single framework. ASK-the-Expert is powered by an active learning algorithm for training a classifier in the backend. We demonstrate this system in the context of an aviation safety application, but the tool can be adopted to work as a simple review and labeling tool as well, without the use of active learning.

  3. Dragon Plant Biology Explorer. A text-mining tool for integrating associations between genetic and biochemical entities with genome annotation and biochemical terms lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Vladimir B; Veronika, Merlin; Veladandi, Pardha Sarathi; Meka, Archana; Heng, Mok-Wei; Rajaraman, Kanagasabai; Pan, Hong; Swarup, Sanjay

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a tool for text mining, Dragon Plant Biology Explorer (DPBE) that integrates information on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes with their functions, based on gene ontologies and biochemical entity vocabularies, and presents the associations as interactive networks. The associations are based on (1) user-provided PubMed abstracts; (2) a list of Arabidopsis genes compiled by The Arabidopsis Information Resource; (3) user-defined combinations of four vocabulary lists based on the ones developed by the general, plant, and Arabidopsis GO consortia; and (4) three lists developed here based on metabolic pathways, enzymes, and metabolites derived from AraCyc, BRENDA, and other metabolism databases. We demonstrate how various combinations can be applied to fields of (1) gene function and gene interaction analyses, (2) plant development, (3) biochemistry and metabolism, and (4) pharmacology of bioactive compounds. Furthermore, we show the suitability of DPBE for systems approaches by integration with "omics" platform outputs. Using a list of abiotic stress-related genes identified by microarray experiments, we show how this tool can be used to rapidly build an information base on the previously reported relationships. This tool complements the existing biological resources for systems biology by identifying potentially novel associations using text analysis between cellular entities based on genome annotation terms. Thus, it allows researchers to efficiently summarize existing information for a group of genes or pathways, so as to make better informed choices for designing validation experiments. Last, DPBE can be helpful for beginning researchers and graduate students to summarize vast information in an unfamiliar area. DPBE is freely available for academic and nonprofit users at http://research.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/DRAGON/ME2/.

  4. GUI design exploration software for microwave antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimizers in commercial electromagnetic (EM simulation software packages are the main tools for performing antenna design exploration today. However, these general purpose optimizers are facing challenges in optimization efficiency, supported optimization types and usability for antenna experts without deep knowledge on optimization. Aiming to fill the gaps, a new antenna design exploration tool, called Antenna Design Explorer (ADE, is presented in this paper. The key features are: (1 State-of-the-art antenna design exploration methods are selected and embedded, addressing efficient antenna optimization (critical but unable to be solved by existing tools and multiobjective antenna optimization (not available in most existing tools; (2 Human-computer interaction for the targeted problem is studied, addressing various usability issues for antenna design engineers, such as automatic algorithmic parameter setting and interactive stopping criteria; (3 Compatibility with existing tools is studied and ADE is able to co-work with existing EM simulators and optimizers, combining advantages. A case study verifies the advantages of ADE.

  5. Using sensor-based technology to capture expert performance and to support expertise development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limbu, Bibeg

    2017-01-01

    This PhD project explores the capturing and training of expert performance using Augmented Reality, Sensors and Wearable Technology. The project focuses on understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in capturing expert performance from an expert in a complex task in order to support modelling

  6. The revelation(s of Asher Levi: An iconographic literacy event as a tool for the exploration of fragmented selves in new literacies studies after 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine M. Staples

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the dynamics of an iconographic literacy event that functions as a tool for explorations of literacy practices and fragmented selves, particularly in relationship to the literate lives of marginalized individuals in the post 9/11 era. The author examines what happened when a group of 10 African American women in an urban area employed new literacies in the teaching/learning spaces of their personal lives (i.e. individual homes, familiar eateries, communicative digital technologies to explore and respond to stories in post 9/11 popular culture narratives. The study employed ethnographic methods (interviews, journaling, email and instant message writing and critical observations with members of the inquiry over the course of two years. The author investigated critically the meeting of biography, fiction and autoethnography as a literacy event used to couch the literacies and fragmented selves of these women in the post 9/11 era. Findings regarding the nature of their post 9/11 literacies, as expressed through fragmented selves, are shared, along with implications for new literacies research and teaching. Findings show that the women’s post 9/11 literacies include a range and variation of critical sensibilities that include, but are not limited to, multiple levels of sociolinguistic integration, sociocultural criticality and heightened awarenesses.

  7. Quality assessment of expert answers to lay questions about cystic fibrosis from various language zones in Europe: the ECORN-CF project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alquen, Daniela; De Boeck, Kris; Bradley, Judy; Vávrová, Věra; Dembski, Birgit; Wagner, Thomas O F; Pfalz, Annette; Hebestreit, Helge

    2012-02-06

    The European Centres of Reference Network for Cystic Fibrosis (ECORN-CF) established an Internet forum which provides the opportunity for CF patients and other interested people to ask experts questions about CF in their mother language. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a detailed quality assessment tool to analyze quality of expert answers, 2) evaluate the intra- and inter-rater agreement of this tool, and 3) explore changes in the quality of expert answers over the time frame of the project. The quality assessment tool was developed by an expert panel. Five experts within the ECORN-CF project used the quality assessment tool to analyze the quality of 108 expert answers published on ECORN-CF from six language zones. 25 expert answers were scored at two time points, one year apart. Quality of answers was also assessed at an early and later period of the project. Individual rater scores and group mean scores were analyzed for each expert answer. A scoring system and training manual were developed analyzing two quality categories of answers: content and formal quality. For content quality, the grades based on group mean scores for all raters showed substantial agreement between two time points, however this was not the case for the grades based on individual rater scores. For formal quality the grades based on group mean scores showed only slight agreement between two time points and there was also poor agreement between time points for the individual grades. The inter-rater agreement for content quality was fair (mean kappa value 0.232 ± 0.036, p language zones) or satisfactory (two language zones) and did not change over time. The quality assessment tool described in this study was feasible and reliable when content quality was assessed by a group of raters. Within ECORN-CF, the tool will help ensure that CF patients all over Europe have equal possibility of access to high quality expert advice on their illness. © 2012 d’Alquen et al; licensee

  8. Earth Exploration Toolbook Workshops: Web-Conferencing and Teleconferencing Professional Development Bringing Earth Science Data Analysis and Visualization Tools to K-12 Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, C.; Ledley, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) Workshops Project provides a mechanism for teachers and students to have successful data-using educational experiences. In this professional development project, teachers learn to use National Science Digital Library (NSDL), the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE), and an Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) chapter. In an EET Data Analysis Workshop, participants walk through an Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) chapter, learning basic data analysis techniques and discussing ways to use Earth science datasets and analysis tools with their students. We have offered twenty-eight Data Analysis Workshops since the project began. The total number of participants in the twenty-eight workshops to date is three hundred eleven, which reflects one hundred eighty different teachers participating in one or more workshops. Our workshops reach middle and high school teachers across the United States at schools with lower socioeconomic levels and at schools with large numbers of minority students. Our participants come from thirty-eight different states including Alaska, Maine, Florida, Montana, and many others. Eighty-six percent of our participants are classroom teachers. The remaining fourteen percent are staff development specialists, university faculty, or outreach educators working with teachers. Of the classroom teachers, one third are middle school teachers (grades 6 to 8) and two thirds are high school teachers (grades 9 to 12.) Thirty-four percent of our participants come from schools where minority populations are the majority make up of the school. Twenty-five percent of our participants are at schools where the majority of the students receive free or reduced cost lunches. Our professional development workshops are helping to raise teachers' awareness of both the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) and the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). Prior to taking one of our workshops, forty-two percent of

  9. Application of expert systems technology in water-quality modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnwell, T.O.; Brown, L.C.; Marek, W.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized modeling is becoming an integral part of decision making in water pollution control. Expert Systems is an innovative methodology that can assist in building, using, and interpreting the output of the models. The paper reviews the use and evaluates the potential of expert systems technology in environmental modeling and describes the elements of an expert advisor for the stream water quality model QUAL2E. Some general conclusions are presented about the tools available to develop the system, the level of available technology in knowledge-based engineering, and the value of approaching problems from a knowledge engineering perspective.

  10. Engineering monitoring expert system's developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1991-01-01

    This research project is designed to apply artificial intelligence technology including expert systems, dynamic interface of neural networks, and hypertext to construct an expert system developer. The developer environment is specifically suited to building expert systems which monitor the performance of ground support equipment for propulsion systems and testing facilities. The expert system developer, through the use of a graphics interface and a rule network, will be transparent to the user during rule constructing and data scanning of the knowledge base. The project will result in a software system that allows its user to build specific monitoring type expert systems which monitor various equipments used for propulsion systems or ground testing facilities and accrues system performance information in a dynamic knowledge base.

  11. Expert performance on a virtual reality simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierinck, Els R; Puttemans, Veerle; Swinnen, Stephan P; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if the essence of expert performance could be captured on a virtual reality simulation system. Six experts in operative dentistry, six experts in periodontology, and six novice dental students performed a Class II tooth preparation task on the lower left second premolar. All subjects performed a pre-test to assess the basic skill level of each group. During the (limited) training component of the study, the three groups practiced three tooth preparations and received augmented feedback. At both a one-minute and one-day interval, subjects performed a final test in the absence of augmented feedback. All preparations were graded by the simulation system. The results showed at pre-test a significantly better performance of the experts in operative dentistry as compared to the novices. During the practice (acquisition) phase, the experts in operative dentistry outperformed both the periodontologists and novices, whereas the experts in periodontology performed more accurately than the novices. After one minute and one day following practice, similar results were obtained. Retention performance was most accurate after a one-day delay. Based on these results, the simulator appears to be a valid and reliable tool to capture expert performance. It is an effective screening device for assessing the level of expert performance.

  12. Challenges in expert user participation in design evaluation meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Farel, Romain; Hisarciklilar, Onur; Boujut, Jean-François; Thomann, Guillaume; Villeneuve, François

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper explores the design collaboration between designers and expert users in the specific case of new surgical instrument design. To this end, two design evaluation meetings were studied. Decision and interaction analysis methods were applied to compare the effectiveness of the design team on discussing and solving design issues with and without active participation of the expert user. The observations showed that, in the absence of the user, the designers were u...

  13. Enhancing Transparency in Multidisciplinary Expert Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hukki, Kristiina; Pulkkinen, Urho [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland)

    2003-10-01

    enhancing mutual understanding the models help in the integration of the knowledge produced by different disciplines and in the reconciliation of the requirements of different parties. They also improve the interaction between the domain experts and the experts of safety assessment. Better awareness of the knowledge-related dependencies enhance the unity of the experts' safety conceptions and contributes to more unified communicating practices in the organization. On the basis of its holistic and integrating character, the safety assessment seems to provide a common perspective to the modelling of the work processes. Using it as a tool for understanding the significance of the safety-critical aspects of work will probably make it more accessible for the domain experts. The safety assessment aims at results, which are expected to be transdisciplinary by nature. It can be assumed, that the common conceptualization and modelling with the help of it facilitate the development from multidisciplinarity to true transdisciplinarity in the expert work.

  14. Resource allocations and expert systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-12

    The work performed to meet the requirement of this task is a continuing effort, evolving toward a general-purpose reasoning tool. The idea here is to build a more-powerful general expert system than the previous one. Towards that, this new Bayesian inference engine is based on the work done by Pearl and Kim. The advantages of this new inference engine over the previous one are that the representation of the knowledge is more compact and the inferencing is suitable for parallel processing. The inference engine is written in Franz lisp on VAX machine. All the code and a typescript of how to load and use the system is attached.

  15. Governando a educação pelo espelho do perito: uma análise do pisa como instrumento de regulação Governing education with the expert mirror: an analysis of pisa as a regulation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Miguel Carvalho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa o Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA, desenvolvido sob a égide da OCDE, como um instrumento baseado e gerador de conhecimento que participa na coordenação da acção pública no sector educativo. O texto retoma as análises desenvolvidas numa pesquisa sobre a fabricação supranacional do Programa PISA, realizada no âmbito de um projecto de investigação europeu acerca do papel do conhecimento nas políticas públicas de educação e saúde na Europa - Knowandpol. Equacionando o PISA - em suas actividades de inquirição, organização e publicação - como um complexo processo de construção de um espaço de regulação política transnacional, o artigo analisa os elementos cognitivos e normativos do instrumento relacionados com a definição da "realidade educacional", com a determinação das formas "apropriadas" ao seu governo, e com a produção de conhecimento para a política.The article analyses the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA as a tool - knowledge-based and knowledge-generator - that participates in the coordination of public action in the field of education. The text is based on a previous research on the supranational fabrication of PISA, carried out within a large-scale European research project on the role of knowledge in Health and Education public policies - Knowandpol. The article examines PISA - and its multiple and related activities of inquiry, organization and publication - as a policy tool, and analyses its cognitive and normative features concerning tree issues: the definition of "educational reality"; the set up of appropriate forms of governing education, and the production of knowledge for policy.

  16. Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as an innovative Geothermal Exploration Tool - A case study from the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynski, K. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Walker, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    A utility-grade geothermal system requires increased, near-surface temperatures (>120°C), water to transfer heat, and structural or sedimentological fluid conduits. In extensional tectonic settings, geothermal anomalies often occur in areas with recent, high strain accumulation and complex faulting (i.e., cross-faults, accommodation zones) where exhumation and uplift of footwall rocks transfer heat, via advection, to the near-surface which is further carried by water through structural fluid conduits. Apatite helium (AHe) thermochronometric footwall age mapping can be used in conjunction with these genetic occurrence models to further focus regional-scale geothermal exploration efforts to areas of probabilistic increased fracture permeability and most recent, rapid footwall exhumation. Furthermore, partially reset apatites resulting from interaction with hydrothermal fluids (>40°C) will show which areas have been hottest most recently. This case study in the Wassuk Range, Hawthrone, NV confirms the utility of AHe thermochronometry as a geothermal exploration tool. A dense grid of footwall samples were collected adjacent to the Hawthorne geothermal anomaly (>85°C BHT) located in the hanging wall of the Wassuk Range block. Our data show that the location of the present-day geothermal anomaly correlates with the location of 1) the most recent episode of rapid footwall exhumation at 3.5-4 Ma, 2) km scale accommodation zones between differentially tilted Wassuk Range blocks, and 3) an elevated Miocene geothermal gradient. Furthermore, anomalously young AHe ages (Hawthorne geothermal anomaly and likely resulted from interaction with a deep-seated geothermal cell or hot hydrothermal fluids.

  17. Comparing the quality of crowdsourced data contributed by expert and non-experts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda See

    Full Text Available There is currently a lack of in-situ environmental data for the calibration and validation of remotely sensed products and for the development and verification of models. Crowdsourcing is increasingly being seen as one potentially powerful way of increasing the supply of in-situ data but there are a number of concerns over the subsequent use of the data, in particular over data quality. This paper examined crowdsourced data from the Geo-Wiki crowdsourcing tool for land cover validation to determine whether there were significant differences in quality between the answers provided by experts and non-experts in the domain of remote sensing and therefore the extent to which crowdsourced data describing human impact and land cover can be used in further scientific research. The results showed that there was little difference between experts and non-experts in identifying human impact although results varied by land cover while experts were better than non-experts in identifying the land cover type. This suggests the need to create training materials with more examples in those areas where difficulties in identification were encountered, and to offer some method for contributors to reflect on the information they contribute, perhaps by feeding back the evaluations of their contributed data or by making additional training materials available. Accuracies were also found to be higher when the volunteers were more consistent in their responses at a given location and when they indicated higher confidence, which suggests that these additional pieces of information could be used in the development of robust measures of quality in the future.

  18. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Harold O.; Burford, Anna Marie

    1990-01-01

    Delineates artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts; provides an exposition of some business application areas; relates progress; and creates an awareness of the benefits, limitations, and reservations of AI/ES. (Author)

  19. Expert opinion vs. empirical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Rod A; Raybould, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion is often sought by government regulatory agencies when there is insufficient empirical evidence to judge the safety implications of a course of action. However, it can be reckless to continue following expert opinion when a preponderance of evidence is amassed that conflicts with this opinion. Factual evidence should always trump opinion in prioritizing the information that is used to guide regulatory policy. Evidence-based medicine has seen a dramatic upturn in recent years spurred by examples where evidence indicated that certain treatments recommended by expert opinions increased death rates. We suggest that scientific evidence should also take priority over expert opinion in the regulation of genetically modified crops (GM). Examples of regulatory data requirements that are not justified based on the mass of evidence are described, and it is suggested that expertise in risk assessment should guide evidence-based regulation of GM crops. PMID:24637724

  20. Experts views' on Digital Competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José; Stoyanov, Slavi

    2013-01-01

    Janssen, J., & Stoyanov, S. (2012, 20 November). Online Consultation for a Digital Competence Framework: Experts' views on Digital Competence. Workshop presentation at the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Seville, Spain.

  1. A theory of expert leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Goodall, Amanda H.

    2012-01-01

    How much knowledge should leaders have of their organization's core business? This is an important question but not one that has been addressed in the management literature. In a new 'theory of expert leadership' (TEL), this paper blends conceptual work with recent empirical evidence. It suggests that organizations perform more effectively when led by individuals who have a deep understanding of the core business of their organization. Being a capable general manager is not sufficient. Expert...

  2. Expert opinion vs. empirical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Rod A.; Raybould, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion is often sought by government regulatory agencies when there is insufficient empirical evidence to judge the safety implications of a course of action. However, it can be reckless to continue following expert opinion when a preponderance of evidence is amassed that conflicts with this opinion. Factual evidence should always trump opinion in prioritizing the information that is used to guide regulatory policy. Evidence-based medicine has seen a dramatic upturn in recent years sp...

  3. On the Limitation of the H/V Spectral Ratio Using Seismic Noise as an Exploration Tool: Application to the Grenoble Valley (France), a Small Apex Ratio Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Philippe; Cornou, Cécile; Garambois, Stéphane; Banton, Julien

    2007-01-01

    The H/V spectral ratio method based on seismic noise (HVSRN) was used in the Grenoble Basin (France), an Alpine valley characterized by a small apex ratio. The resonance frequencies obtained in the experiments were compared to the thickness of the sediments deduced from a microgravimetric survey and to the 1-D theoretical assessment of site responses. Given the abundance of data on the sediments and depth of the basin, the values of the theoretical resonance frequency f o can be determined quite accurately. However, it has been observed that the effects of basin geometry can disturb f o measurements using the HVSR method, in particular for a case like the Grenoble Basin, which has a small apex ratio (w/H) and strong suspected 2-D and/or 3-D effects. Interpretation of f o values in terms of bedrock depth gives rise to estimation errors of about 10% in certain cases, with the most significant errors (>50%) occurring on the edges of the basin, where subsurface layers are characterised by larger heterogeneities and where the basin topography is accentuated. This study suggests that great care must be taken when using the HVSRN method as an exploration tool, at least in valleys with a small apex ratio.

  4. Exploring the Complexities of Experimental Design: Using an On-line Reaction Time Program as a Teaching Tool for Diverse Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Alexia E

    2010-01-01

    Students are rarely given an opportunity to think deeply about experimental design or asked to develop experimental protocols on their own. Without participating in these endeavors, they are often unaware of the many decisions necessary to construct a precise methodology. This article describes an on-line reaction time program, and how I have used this program as a teaching tool for students to explore experimental design. This approach can be tailored to meet the level of any undergraduate student - from non-science majors to upper-level biology/psychology/neuroscience majors, affording all students the opportunity to think like a scientist. Described is how I use the reaction time program for a whole class demonstration and discussion, as well as, how it can be used for a written assignment in which each student designs and conducts his/her own experiment outside of the classroom. Comments from several students, who did the written assignment, are included to provide a sense of their thoughts and considerations. When students are given a simple method, such as the measurement of reaction time, it allows them to focus exclusively on developing precise methodology, which taps into types of thinking that they are not often asked to exhibit in other science classes.

  5. Sketching as a communication tool and a vehicle for exploring new ideas in Higher Education of industrial design. Implementation and analysis of new methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Navarro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Freehand drawing is a basic tool to explore shapes and visualize ideas during the first phase of projective process in industrial design. Sketches, expressive and quickly executed, allow designers to highlight the most interesting aspects of the product to be designed and help to define its shape and general features. Due to the immediacy that characterizes the manual drafting industrial designers in training learn to become able to translate any ideas graphically and thus able to communicate with other designers, initiating a dialogue on the product to be designed. In the Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Design and Product Development Engineering at the Jaume I University of Castellón (Spain, the subject 'Artistic Expression II' maintains and strengthens the knowledge gained in other subjects about the different graphic techniques, making drawing a means of expression for represent, synthesize and define the shape of objects. However, it has been found that the subject procedures were not adequate to achieve the learning results proposed, so it was necessary to apply a new approach. This paper describes the implementation of a new methodological strategy on this subject, adapting it to the European Higher Education Area, with the aim that students in Industrial Design acquire the four core competences of this matter. We describe the activities designed to achieve each of the competences and the implemented methodology for each of these activities. Finally, the results are analyzed and the overall positive impact of the measures taken is discussed.

  6. Using blogging tools to help individuals record their experiences: an exploration and review of two commercial web applications in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Samantha A

    2007-01-01

    Blogs, short for "web logs," together with podcasts and wikis are currently important foci of general internet research. These three applications are part of the larger body of next-generation communication applications that comprises "Web 2.0." Within the specific area of health care, however, little attention has been devoted to understanding these technologies and how they are being used by lay health publics. In this article, I will discuss the emergent findings from a new project that looks at blogging interfaces as potential tools for disease prevention and health promotion. I use a literature review combined with "front stage" web analyses of two cases and interviews with the supporting institutions for these sites to discuss the relevant informatics questions that arise with respect to these applications. I further introduce the idea of "goal-oriented" blogging that is found in the first case study. Because this research project is still in preliminary phases, this should be viewed as an exploration into the topic and work in progress. In addition to raising questions, I will outline the important subsequent research steps.

  7. Limitations of Expert Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Salaçin

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Limitations of Expert Evidence Edited by Stephen Leadbeatter MB ChB MCRPath ISBN 1 86016 029 8 Printed in Great Britain by Cathedral Print Services Ltd, Salisbury, 1996 Kitap 25 Ekim 1994 te The Royal College of Physicians ve The Royal College of Pathologists tarafından düzenlenen konferanstan sonra hekimlere ve avukatlara konuyu tartışmaya açmak için basılmış. Bilirkişi görüşünün temel filozofisinin, bu görevi yapanlar ve bu hizmeti alanların yapabileceklerinin sınırlarının tartışılması amaçlanmış.Seksen altı sayfadan oluşan kitabın fiatı on iki İngiliz Sterlini. Kitap üç bölüm ve bunların altında toplanan on ana başlıktan oluşmakta. Elinize aldığınızda küçük boyutu ve anlaşılır dili ile hemen okunup bitirelecek kitaplardan sanılıyor. En azından ben böyle düşünmüştüm. Ancak daha L A Tuınberg ve A J Bellinham’ın ön yazısında ben çarpıldım. Değerli yazarların kaleme aldığı başlıklar ve gündeme getirdiği tartışmaların tüm Adli Bilimlerle uğraşanların dikkatle okuması gereken cinsten olduğu kanısındayım. Birinci bölüm The Legal Perspective iki anabaşlıktan oluşuyor, The Criminal legal perspective Honour Judje Martin Stephens tarafından yazılmış,bilirkişi olarak görev yapabilmek için belgelenmiş bir eğitim olması gerektiği, mahkemelerde ya da yazılı raporlarda verilebilecek görüşlerin incelikleri tartışılmış. Bu bölümün ikinci anabaşlığı The civil legal perspective avukat Jennifer Cummin tarafından yazılmış. Toplum gözünde bilirkişinin anlamı ve mahkemenin bilirkişi görüşünü değişmez bilimsel doğru gibi algılayarak düştüğü bilimsel yanılgı ve raporlardaki kavram farkı dile getirilmiş. İkinci Bölüm The Medical And Scientific Perspective başlığı altında Roger C Evans MD Clinical evidence başlığında toplumun hasta tedavisi ve bilirkişilik hizmetinden beklentilerinin unrealistik olduğu ve

  8. Implementation of expert system in Prolog for infant seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaweł, M.; Tataj, E.; Dunin-Wąsowicz, D.

    2010-09-01

    Expert Systems are found to be very promising as an important advisory tool. They can be useful in different situations where human expert is not available and decision should be undertaken quickly. Expert systems can also be useful in medicine to help doctors or even non-trained personnel (when the doctor is not available). These systems are important in clinical practice and could help in rapid finding of etiology and treatment. To fulfill such requirement in this contribution, we discuss an implementation of expert system, which is written in Prolog language. Since this language has its syntactical limitations, we have developed a general architecture of a shell type, to overcome these difficulties. Next, we have demonstrated its practical utility, by applying the knowledge taken from medical practice.

  9. Trailblazing Medicine Sustaining Explorers During Interplanetary Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2011-01-01

    To prepare for the day when astronauts leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploration missions, space medicine experts must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways of mitigating them. To gain a complete understanding of the effects of space on the human body and to create tools and technologies required for successful exploration, space medicince will become an increasingly collaborative discipline incorporating the skills of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. Trailblazing Medicine examines the future of space medicine in relation to human space exploration; describes what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, including the use of surgical robots, surface-based telemedicine, and remote emergency care; discusses bioethical problems such as euthanasia, sex, and precautionary surgery; investigates the medical challenges faced by interplanetary astronauts; details the process of human hibernation.

  10. Artificial intelligence - New tools for aerospace project managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is currently being used for business-oriented, money-making applications, such as medical diagnosis, computer system configuration, and geological exploration. The present paper has the objective to assess new AI tools and techniques which will be available to assist aerospace managers in the accomplishment of their tasks. A study conducted by Brown and Cheeseman (1983) indicates that AI will be employed in all traditional management areas, taking into account goal setting, decision making, policy formulation, evaluation, planning, budgeting, auditing, personnel management, training, legal affairs, and procurement. Artificial intelligence/expert systems are discussed, giving attention to the three primary areas concerned with intelligent robots, natural language interfaces, and expert systems. Aspects of information retrieval are also considered along with the decision support system, and expert systems for project planning and scheduling.

  11. Expert music performance: cognitive, neural, and developmental bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore what happens in the brain of an expert musician during performance. Understanding expert music performance is interesting to cognitive neuroscientists not only because it tests the limits of human memory and movement, but also because studying expert musicianship can help us understand skilled human behavior in general. In this chapter, we outline important facets of our current understanding of the cognitive and neural basis for music performance, and developmental factors that may underlie musical ability. We address three main questions. (1) What is expert performance? (2) How do musicians achieve expert-level performance? (3) How does expert performance come about? We address the first question by describing musicians' ability to remember, plan, execute, and monitor their performances in order to perform music accurately and expressively. We address the second question by reviewing evidence for possible cognitive and neural mechanisms that may underlie or contribute to expert music performance, including the integration of sound and movement, feedforward and feedback motor control processes, expectancy, and imagery. We further discuss how neural circuits in auditory, motor, parietal, subcortical, and frontal cortex all contribute to different facets of musical expertise. Finally, we address the third question by reviewing evidence for the heritability of musical expertise and for how expertise develops through training and practice. We end by discussing outlooks for future work. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Expert system application education project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzelez, Avelino J.; Ragusa, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) technology, and in particular expert systems, has shown potential applicability in many areas of operation at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In an era of limited resources, the early identification of good expert system applications, and their segregation from inappropriate ones can result in a more efficient use of available NASA resources. On the other hand, the education of students in a highly technical area such as AI requires an extensive hands-on effort. The nature of expert systems is such that proper sample applications for the educational process are difficult to find. A pilot project between NASA-KSC and the University of Central Florida which was designed to simultaneously address the needs of both institutions at a minimum cost. This project, referred to as Expert Systems Prototype Training Project (ESPTP), provided NASA with relatively inexpensive development of initial prototype versions of certain applications. University students likewise benefit by having expertise on a non-trivial problem accessible to them at no cost. Such expertise is indispensible in a hands-on training approach to developing expert systems.

  13. Forms and Levels of Expertness: Interpreting Accounts of Typeface Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Harkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article responds to problems arising from defining the notion of “expert” with respect to the subject of text typeface design. What and who is a type design expert? The author has identified that in both contemporary and historical contexts, paucity exists in relation to recorded knowledge regarding the processes of designing text typefaces. Accounts of knowledge of the practice of text typeface design differ in their perspectives relating to what may be deemed expertness. In attempting to explain or rationalize differences in perspectives of such accounts of practice, the problem of describing expertness arose. In terms of degrees of expertise relative to accounts of subject knowledge in text typeface design, the author developed the concept of “vicinage” in order to explore how we render expertness within research enquiry. This concept has the potential to focus future research in the area of defining expertise in typeface design and more generally beyond this field.

  14. The Transcriptome Analysis and Comparison Explorer--T-ACE: a platform-independent, graphical tool to process large RNAseq datasets of non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, E E R; Kraemer, L; Mountfort, D; Schilhabel, M; Schreiber, S; Rosenstiel, P

    2012-03-15

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allow a rapid and cost-effective compilation of large RNA sequence datasets in model and non-model organisms. However, the storage and analysis of transcriptome information from different NGS platforms is still a significant bottleneck, leading to a delay in data dissemination and subsequent biological understanding. Especially database interfaces with transcriptome analysis modules going beyond mere read counts are missing. Here, we present the Transcriptome Analysis and Comparison Explorer (T-ACE), a tool designed for the organization and analysis of large sequence datasets, and especially suited for transcriptome projects of non-model organisms with little or no a priori sequence information. T-ACE offers a TCL-based interface, which accesses a PostgreSQL database via a php-script. Within T-ACE, information belonging to single sequences or contigs, such as annotation or read coverage, is linked to the respective sequence and immediately accessible. Sequences and assigned information can be searched via keyword- or BLAST-search. Additionally, T-ACE provides within and between transcriptome analysis modules on the level of expression, GO terms, KEGG pathways and protein domains. Results are visualized and can be easily exported for external analysis. We developed T-ACE for laboratory environments, which have only a limited amount of bioinformatics support, and for collaborative projects in which different partners work on the same dataset from different locations or platforms (Windows/Linux/MacOS). For laboratories with some experience in bioinformatics and programming, the low complexity of the database structure and open-source code provides a framework that can be customized according to the different needs of the user and transcriptome project.

  15. A Phenomenology of Expert Musicianship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høffding, Simon

    This dissertation develops a phenomenology of expert musicianship through an interdisciplinary approach that integrates qualitative interviews with the Danish String Quartet with philosophical analyses drawing on ideas and theses found in phenomenology, philosophy of mind, cognitive science...... and psychology of music. The dissertation is structured through the asking, analyzing and answering of three primary questions, namely: 1) What is it like to be an expert? 2) What is the general phenomenology of expert musicianship? 3) What happens to the self in deep musical absorption? The first question...... targets a central debate in philosophy and psychology on whether reflection is conducive for, or detrimental to, skillful performance. My analyses show that the concepts assumed in the literature on this question are poorly defined and gloss over more important features of expertise. The second question...

  16. Database and Expert Systems Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg Andersen, Kim; Debenham, John; Wagner, Roland

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications, DEXA 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005.The 92 revised full papers presented together with 2 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 390......, reasoning and learning, network management and mobile systems, expert systems and decision support, and information modelling.......This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications, DEXA 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005.The 92 revised full papers presented together with 2 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 390...... submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on workflow automation, database queries, data classification and recommendation systems, information retrieval in multimedia databases, Web applications, implementational aspects of databases, multimedia databases, XML processing, security, XML...

  17. Advanced language modeling approaches, case study: Expert search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This tutorial gives a clear and detailed overview of advanced language modeling approaches and tools, including the use of document priors, translation models, relevance models, parsimonious models and expectation maximization training. Expert search will be used as a case study to explain the

  18. Database and Expert Systems Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg Andersen, Kim; Debenham, John; Wagner, Roland

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications, DEXA 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005.The 92 revised full papers presented together with 2 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 390...... submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on workflow automation, database queries, data classification and recommendation systems, information retrieval in multimedia databases, Web applications, implementational aspects of databases, multimedia databases, XML processing, security, XML......, reasoning and learning, network management and mobile systems, expert systems and decision support, and information modelling....

  19. A Phenomenology of Expert Musicianship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høffding, Simon

    targets a central debate in philosophy and psychology on whether reflection is conducive for, or detrimental to, skillful performance. My analyses show that the concepts assumed in the literature on this question are poorly defined and gloss over more important features of expertise. The second question...... and psychology of music. The dissertation is structured through the asking, analyzing and answering of three primary questions, namely: 1) What is it like to be an expert? 2) What is the general phenomenology of expert musicianship? 3) What happens to the self in deep musical absorption? The first question...

  20. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study......, and empirically supports the claim that facilitation skills can be taught to participants to enable them to self-facilitate workshops. Differences were also found, which led to the introduction of a new dimension—‘internal versus external’ facilitation. The implications of our findings for effective training...

  1. A Phenomenology of Expert Musicianship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høffding, Simon

    and psychology of music. The dissertation is structured through the asking, analyzing and answering of three primary questions, namely: 1) What is it like to be an expert? 2) What is the general phenomenology of expert musicianship? 3) What happens to the self in deep musical absorption? The first question...... targets a central debate in philosophy and psychology on whether reflection is conducive for, or detrimental to, skillful performance. My analyses show that the concepts assumed in the literature on this question are poorly defined and gloss over more important features of expertise. The second question...

  2. Expert Systems, Job Aids, and the Future of Instructional Technology; and Decision Tables, the Poor Person's Answer to "Expert Systems."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Paul; Pipe, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Describes design and presents examples of industrial use of small expert systems and guidelines for choosing problems which lend themselves to small tool solutions. Use of microcomputer facilitated decision tables to diagnose and categorize people, things, and issues is suggested, and development of three decision table formats is described. (MBR)

  3. Database and Expert Systems Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg Andersen, Kim; Debenham, John; Wagner, Roland

    submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on workflow automation, database queries, data classification and recommendation systems, information retrieval in multimedia databases, Web applications, implementational aspects of databases, multimedia databases, XML processing, security, XML......, reasoning and learning, network management and mobile systems, expert systems and decision support, and information modelling....

  4. QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perre, M.

    1991-01-01

    TNO Physics and Electronics laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Limburg and the Research Institute for Knowledge Systems, worked on a technology project named 'QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems' [FEL90]. QUEST was carried out under commision of the Dutch Ministry of Defence. A strong

  5. Laserjet Printer Troubleshooting Expert System

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOFTLINKS DIGITAL

    This paper model an expert system called LAPTEX for troubleshooting LaserJet printers' faults. Today, with the innumerable advances in information technologies, computerizing printer's fault troubleshooting and identifying faults is far becoming so vital. Also, printers' fault detection is a complicated process that requires a ...

  6. The Naive Expert and the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, William M.; Jones, Christine

    1989-01-01

    Mentorship programs are described which involve gifted students and subject experts with no prior knowledge about students' personalities or preconceptions about their abilities, known as "naive experts." The students are challenged by the experts' high expectations and respond to the experts' enthusiasm for sharing their knowledge and…

  7. Predicting malicious behavior tools and techniques for ensuring global security

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    A groundbreaking exploration of how to identify and fight security threats at every level This revolutionary book combines real-world security scenarios with actual tools to predict and prevent incidents of terrorism, network hacking, individual criminal behavior, and more. Written by an expert with intelligence officer experience who invented the technology, it explores the keys to understanding the dark side of human nature, various types of security threats (current and potential), and how to construct a methodology to predict and combat malicious behavior. The companion CD demonstrates ava

  8. Improving Students' Intrinsic Motivation in Piano Learning: Expert Teacher Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zijia; Southcott, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Many students learn to play the piano but some lack the motivation to continue learning. Many students learn for extrinsic reasons. This research will explore understandings about student motivation held by expert piano teachers who have developed strategies to improve their students' intrinsic motivation to begin and continue learning. This small…

  9. Systematic methods for knowledge acquisition and expert system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Brenda L.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Nine cooperating rule-based systems, collectively called AUTOCREW, were designed to automate functions and decisions associated with a combat aircraft's subsystem. The organization of tasks within each system is described; performance metrics were developed to evaluate the workload of each rule base, and to assess the cooperation between the rule-bases. Each AUTOCREW subsystem is composed of several expert systems that perform specific tasks. AUTOCREW's NAVIGATOR was analyzed in detail to understand the difficulties involved in designing the system and to identify tools and methodologies that ease development. The NAVIGATOR determines optimal navigation strategies from a set of available sensors. A Navigation Sensor Management (NSM) expert system was systematically designed from Kalman filter covariance data; four ground-based, a satellite-based, and two on-board INS-aiding sensors were modeled and simulated to aid an INS. The NSM Expert was developed using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the ID3 algorithm. Navigation strategy selection is based on an RSS position error decision metric, which is computed from the covariance data. Results show that the NSM Expert predicts position error correctly between 45 and 100 percent of the time for a specified navaid configuration and aircraft trajectory. The NSM Expert adapts to new situations, and provides reasonable estimates of hybrid performance. The systematic nature of the ANOVA/ID3 method makes it broadly applicable to expert system design when experimental or simulation data is available.

  10. TAQL: A Problem Space Tool for Expert System Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    drivers to given itineraries subject to a variety of constraints. ( Filman , 1988a) describes a version of this task. Appendix C presents the complete domain... Filman , 1988b) provide a bewildering array of representations such as rules, frames, and procedural code. PSCM’s simplicity does not constrain its...was derived from a formal description of a larger set of problems in the shipment scheduling domain ( Filman , 1988a). The formal description is for

  11. Rotating Machinery Predictive Maintenance Through Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarath Kumar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern rotating machines such as turbomachines, either produce or absorb huge amount of power. Some of the common applications are: steam turbine-generator and gas turbine-compressor-generator trains produce power and machines, such as pumps, centrifugal compressors, motors, generators, machine tool spindles, etc., are being used in industrial applications. Condition-based maintenance of rotating machinery is a common practice where the machine's condition is monitored constantly, so that timely maintenance can be done. Since modern machines are complex and the amount of data to be interpreted is huge, we need precise and fast methods in order to arrive at the best recommendations to prevent catastrophic failure and to prolong the life of the equipment. In the present work using vibration characteristics of a rotor-bearing system, the condition of a rotating machinery (electrical rotor is predicted using an off-line expert system. The analysis of the problem is carried out in an Object Oriented Programming (OOP framework using the finite element method. The expert system which is also developed in an OOP paradigm gives the type of the malfunctions, suggestions and recommendations. The system is implemented in C++.

  12. Different roles and viewpoints of scientific experts in advising on environmental health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Pita; Knol, Anne B; Torenvlied, René; Lebret, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Environmental health risks are often complex, largescale, and uncertain. The uncertainties inherent in these problems permit differences among experts in the appraisal of risks. This raises the question of whether different expert roles exist and, if so, how this affects the policy advice that is given. Here, we present a pilot study of the different roles and viewpoints that can be discerned among scientific experts in the Netherlands. Q methodology was used to empirically explore existing theoretical treatises on different expert roles. In total, 26 electromagnetic field (EMF) experts and 21 particulate matter (PM) experts participated. The responses were analyzed separately for EMF and PM respondents using Q factor analysis. In both the EMF and PM domain, three different expert roles were identified. This suggests that particular expert roles depend on the specific environmental health risk. The results indicate that different expert roles exist among scientists who provide policy advice on environmental health risks. This empirical study adds new data and insights to the literature on expert roles. The results of this study are relevant for the selection and composition of expert committees and the interpretation of expert advice. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Nephrology nursing: blurring the boundaries: the reality of expert practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Ann; Walker, Annette

    2004-02-01

    Expertise in nursing has been widely studied; there have been no previous studies into what constitute expertise in nephrology (renal) nursing. This paper describes a 'real-world' characteristic of expert nephrology nursing practice. This paper, which is abstracted from a larger study into the acquisition and exercise of nephrology nursing expertise, aims to explore the concept blurring the boundaries. The study utilized grounded theory methodology and symbolic interactionism. The study took place in one renal unit in New South Wales. Sampling was purposive then theoretical; the sample consisting of six non-expert and eleven expert nurses. Simultaneous data collection and analysis using participant observation, review of nursing documentation and semi-structured interviews was undertaken. The study revealed that only expert nephrology nurses 'blurred the boundaries' of professional nursing practice. They did this by moving intermittently and purposefully, for the benefit of particular patients, into medical domains in the areas of prescribing, dispensing and ordering of pathology tests. Non-expert nurses did not cross these professional boundaries. Blurring the boundaries was a significant feature of expert nursing practice, and this study was the first to describe explicitly nursing boundaries as two distinct entities; that is, formal and informal. There are some nephrology nurses who have sufficient knowledge and experience to prescribe some medications and to order certain investigations.

  14. The impact of selected contextual factors on experts' clinical reasoning performance (does context impact clinical reasoning performance in experts?).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durning, S.J.; Artino, A.R.; Boulet, J.R.; Dorrance, K.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Schuwirth, L.

    2012-01-01

    Context specificity, or the variation in a participant's performance from one case, or situation, to the next, is a recognized problem in medical education. However, studies have not explored the potential reasons for context specificity in experts using the lens of situated cognition and cognitive

  15. Expert Consensus on Cosmetic Outcomes After Treatment of Actinic Keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Brian; Ablon, Glynis R; Bhatia, Neal D; Ceilley, Roger I; Goldberg, David J; Nestor, Mark S; Weinkle, Susan H

    2017-03-01

    Dermatologists treat actinic keratosis (AK) primarily because these lesions have the potential to progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Patients, on the other hand, generally seek treatment to remove the lesions and achieve an improved appearance of their skin following treatment. In selecting a treatment option for AK, dermatologists should consider post-treatment cosmesis, because cosmetic outcomes differ across AK treatments. To obtain expert opinion on the cosmetic sequelae related to chronically photodamaged skin and the treatment of AK, an expert panel meeting among dermatologists was conducted in February 2016. These experts reviewed current treatment options for photodamage, including AK, and discussed the relative merits of the various cosmetic assessments commonly used by investigators and patients in both clinical trial and dermatology practice settings. A main goal of the expert panel meeting was to propose assessment tools that could be specifically designed to characterize cosmesis results after treatment of AK. The panel agreed that existing tools for measurement of cosmetic outcomes following treatment of photodamage could also be used to evaluate cosmesis after treatment of AK. Digital photography is probably the best method used for this, with validation by other technologies. Better measurement tools specifically for assessing cosmesis after AK treatment are needed. Once they are developed and validated, regulatory agencies should be educated about the importance of including cosmetic outcomes as a component of product labeling. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(3):260-265..

  16. Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services Recipes for Designing Expert Reports

    CERN Document Server

    Turley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Learn to design more effective and sophisticated business reports. While most users of SQL Server Reporting Services are now comfortable designing and building simple reports, business today demands increasingly complex reporting. In this book, top Reporting Services design experts have contributed step-by-step recipes for creating various types of reports. Written by well-known SQL Server Reporting Services experts, this book gives you the tools to meet your clients' needs: SQL Server Reporting Services enables you to create a wide variety of reports; This guide helps you customize reports fo

  17. Osteoporosis in Latin America: panel expert review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Clark

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Latin American region is undergoing a demographic and epidemiological transition, which is leading to an increase in chronic and degenerative diseases. Osteoporosis (OP and fragility fractures (FF are emerging as main causes of disease burden with great impact on health institutions. Purpose. This review article provides an updated overview of trends in the epidemiology and economic impact of OP and FF, as well as in diagnosis and available treatments in Latin America, including calcium, vitamin D and prevention programs. Methods. Expert panel. Conclusions. According to this review, there is a lack of epidemiological and economic information in the region. It is desirable to obtain information regarding quality of life in OP and FF as well as to highlight prevention as a tool to reduce FF.

  18. Expert system for spacecraft command and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R. E.

    The application of AI techniques to the automation of ground control functions in the defense satellite communication system (DSCS) is described. The aim of this effort is to lower the vulnerability of the DSCS to attack; a first step is the design of software for spacecraft maintenance and control. The benefits of automation and the need for high-level implementation are reviewed. A knowledge-based or expert approach was chosen to automate telemetry-interpretation, trend-analysis, anomaly-resolution, and status-maintenance functions now performed solely by operators; and a design concept was developed to meet the requirements of extendability, simplicity, and explicitness. Rule-based and logic-based knowledge-representation schemes, and data-driven and goal-driven control strategies are compared. The programming tools developed by the different organizations participating in the AI effort are indicated in a table.

  19. Tools used in mineral exploration for measuring the conductivity and the resistivity in drillholes and on drill core: observations on their range of sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Devon; Smith, Richard S.; Mahmoodi, Omid

    2016-07-01

    A study has been undertaken to acquire conductivity data using the EM39 low-induction-number conductivity tool. Measurements were taken in three holes in the Sudbury, Ontario, area: at Victoria in the south-west part of the Sudbury structure; at Levack, in the north range; and at the Lady Violet deposit near Copper Cliff. These data were compared with pre-existing data acquired using four other tools and measurements taken on core extracted from the holes. The four tools are the DGI galvanic downhole resistivity tool, the IFG downhole conductivity tool, and the handheld KT-10 and GDD meters. The comparison shows that each tool has a finite range of sensitivity. The resistivity tool used by DGI Geoscience is sensitive to conductivities primarily in the range 0.01 to 100 mS/m; the EM39 tool is sensitive to conductivities in the range of ~30 mS/m to 3000 mS/m and the IFG tool to conductivities greater than 30 mS/m. In the sub-ranges where the ranges of two instruments overlap, one might expect a good correlation between the measurements derived from the two tools. However, this is not always the case, as the instruments can have a different volume of sensitivity: the EM39 has a coil separation of 50 cm and will see material greater than 20 cm away from the hole; whereas the IFG conductivity tool seems to have a smaller spatial scale of sensitivity due to its 10 cm coil size. The handheld instruments used to log the conductivity of the core are sensitive to more conductive material (greater than ~1 S/m). The scale of the sensors of these handheld instruments is a few cm, so they are focussing on a very local estimate. The spatial characteristics of the handheld instruments are similar to the IFG tool, so there is a reasonable linear correlation between the conductivities derived from these three different instruments. However, the slopes are not unity; for example, the GDD instrument gives values three times greater than the KT-10. When selecting tools for measuring

  20. Psychological expert witness testimony and judicial decision making trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, David L; Mixon, LeKisha; Jackson, Melissa; Shook, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the establishment of the Daubert standard in 1993, the evidentiary criteria are rarely used as a basis for admissibility of expert witness testimony in the behavioral sciences. Ever since the promulgation of Frye and the Federal Rules of Evidence, controversy has surrounded the admissibility of expert testimony in courtrooms. There appears to be no existing uniform application of standards governing the admissibility of psychological expert witness testimony. Therefore, it is essential for the psycho-legal communities to explore judicial decision-making trends regarding psychological expert witness evidence. In this current research, psychological expert witness testimony and judicial decision-making will be explored. In preliminary examination, 97 criminal and civil case summaries from the LexisNexis Academic Database involved issues of admissibility. Analyses conducted by eight trained and paired coders revealed that reliability and assistance to the trier of fact were the most often cited reasons for admissibility in courts. Consistent with prior studies, it was also found that the most applied standards for admissibility of psychological evidence were the Federal Rules of Evidence. Interestingly, while the Daubert scientific criteria for admission of scientific testimony were mentioned, they were rarely utilized. A secondary analysis of 167 civil and criminal appellate cases indicated that the reliability of testimony (18% of all cases), ability to assist the trier of fact (17%), the expert witness' qualifications (17%), and the relevance of the testimony (16%) were the most commonly cited reasons for determining admissibility. A tertiary qualitative analysis focusing on these four categories then revealed eight major trends in admissibility of psychological expert evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A 16th Suggestions for Educational Curriculum Improvement in Jordan, from the Experts Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Omar

    2015-01-01

    The present research was conducted to identify the most important suggestions for educational curriculum improvement in Jordan, from the expert's point of view. A descriptive survey through data and information collection tool (questionnaire) was used as an approach. The study sample consisted of (620) educational experts in the field of…

  2. Comparison expert and novice scan behavior for using e-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novita Sari, Felisia; Insap Santosa, Paulus; Wibirama, Sunu

    2017-06-01

    E-Learning is an important media that an educational institution must have. Successful information design for e-learning depends on its user's characteristics. This study explores differences between novice and expert users' eye movement data. This differences between expert and novice users were compared and identified based on gaze features. Each participant must do three main tasks of e-learning. This paper gives the result that there are differences between gaze features of experts and novices.

  3. Expert witness and Jungian archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallave, Juan Antonio; Gutheil, Thomas Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Jung's theories of archetype, shadow, and the personal and collective unconscious provide a postmodern framework in which to consider the role of the expert witness in judicial proceedings. Archetypal themes, motifs, and influences help to illuminate the shadow of the judicial system and projections and behaviors among the cast of the court in pursuing justice. This article speaks to archetypal influences and dialectical tensions encountered by the expert witness in this judicial drama. The archetype of Justice is born from the human need for order and relational fairness in a world of chaos. The persona of justice is the promise of truth in the drama. The shadow of justice is untruth, the need to win by any means. The dynamics of the trickster archetype serve and promote injustice. These influences are examined by means of a case example. This approach will deepen understanding of court proceedings and the role of the expert witness in the heroic quest for justice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A local area computer network expert system framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Over the past years an expert system called LANES designed to detect and isolate faults in the Goddard-wide Hybrid Local Area Computer Network (LACN) was developed. As a result, the need for developing a more generic LACN fault isolation expert system has become apparent. An object oriented approach was explored to create a set of generic classes, objects, rules, and methods that would be necessary to meet this need. The object classes provide a convenient mechanism for separating high level information from low level network specific information. This approach yeilds a framework which can be applied to different network configurations and be easily expanded to meet new needs.

  5. Applying expert systems technology to communications software validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margaret J.

    This case study describes the use of an expert-systems approach to automation of systems and integration testing for validation of complex, real-time communications software, such as used onboard the Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) aircraft. The approach permits a state-based rather than path- or branch-based testing style. States can be matched with high-level system requirements to give a measure of test coverage. The benefits and weaknesses realized from using the Boeing-built embeddable expert systems shell with a custom relational database interface to construct an automated software verification tool supporting this approach are discussed, along with a brief summary of the utility of applying expert systems technology in this software engineering area. Qualitative measurements of the productivity increase from a prototype demonstration are also included.

  6. Psychological tools for knowledge acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueter, Henry H.; Olson, Judith Reitman

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge acquisition is said to be the biggest bottleneck in the development of expert systems. The problem is getting the knowledge out of the expert's head and into a computer. In cognitive psychology, characterizing metal structures and why experts are good at what they do is an important research area. Is there some way that the tools that psychologists have developed to uncover mental structure can be used to benefit knowledge engineers? We think that the way to find out is to browse through the psychologist's toolbox to see what there is in it that might be of use to knowledge engineers. Expert system developers have relied on two standard methods for extracting knowledge from the expert: (1) the knowledge engineer engages in an intense bout of interviews with the expert or experts, or (2) the knowledge engineer becomes an expert himself, relying on introspection to uncover the basis of his own expertise. Unfortunately, these techniques have the difficulty that often the expert himself isn't consciously aware of the basis of his expertise. If the expert himself isn't conscious of how he solves problems, introspection is useless. Cognitive psychology has faced similar problems for many years and has developed exploratory methods that can be used to discover cognitive structure from simple data.

  7. Acquisition of Expert/Non-Expert Vocabulary from Reformulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Edwige; Grabar, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Technical medical terms are complicated to be correctly understood by non-experts. Vocabulary, associating technical terms with layman expressions, can help in increasing the readability of technical texts and their understanding. The purpose of our work is to build this kind of vocabulary. We propose to exploit the notion of reformulation following two methods: extraction of abbreviations and of reformulations with specific markers. The segments associated thanks to these methods are aligned with medical terminologies. Our results allow to cover over 9,000 medical terms and show precision of extractions between 0.24 and 0.98. The results and analyzed and compared with the existing work.

  8. Bridging the Gap between Experts in Designing Multimedia-Based Instructional Media for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2013-01-01

    The research identified and explored the cognitive knowledge among the instructional multimedia design and development experts comprising of multimedia designer, graphic designer, subject-matter expert and instructional designer. A critical need exists for a solid understanding of the factors that influence team decision making and performance in…

  9. Post-Secondary Students' Relationship to People They Consider to Be Scientific Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    This article is situated in contemporary debates about the ways to achieve a scientific literacy that encourages a greater lay participation in public debates and political decision making. Drawing on the notion of "relationship to scientific experts" (in French, "rapport aux experts scientifiques"), I explore the ways in which…

  10. Expert – Non-expert differences in visual behaviour during alpine slalom skiing

    OpenAIRE

    Decroix, Marjolein; Wazir, Mohd Rozilee Wazir Norjali; Zeuwts, Linus; Deconinck, Frederik; Lenoir, Matthieu; Vansteenkiste, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate visual behaviour of expert and non-expert ski athletes during an alpine slalom. Fourteen non-experts and five expert slalom skiers completed an alpine slalom course in an indoor ski slope while wearing a head-mounted eye tracking device. Experts completed the slalom clearly faster than non-experts, but no significant difference was found in timing and position of the turn initiation. Although both groups already looked at future obstacles approximately...

  11. Addressing complexity and uncertainty: conceptual models and expert judgments applied to migratory birds in the oil sands of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Nelitz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Complexity and uncertainty are inherent in social-ecological systems. Although they can create challenges for scientists and decision makers, they cannot be a reason for delaying decision making. Two strategies have matured in recent decades to address these challenges. Systems thinking, as embodied by conceptual modeling, is a holistic approach in which a system can be better understood by examining it as a whole. Expert elicitation represents a second strategy that enables a greater diversity of inputs to understand complex systems. We explored the use of conceptual models and expert judgments to inform expansion of monitoring around oil sands development in northern Alberta, Canada, particularly related to migratory forest birds. This study area is a complex social-ecological system for which there is an abundance of specific information, but a relatively weak understanding about system behavior. Multiple conceptual models were developed to represent complexity and provide a more fulsome view of influences across the landscape. A hierarchical approach proved useful, and a mechanistic structure of the models clarified the cumulative and interactive nature of factors within and outside the study area. To address gaps in understanding, expert judgments were integrated using a series of structured exercises to derive "weightings" of importance of different components in the conceptual models, specifically pairwise comparisons, Likert scaling, and a maximum difference conjoint approach. These exercises were helpful for discriminating the importance of different influences and illuminating the competing beliefs of experts. Various supporting tools helped us engage a group of experts from across North America, which included a virtual meeting, online polling, desktop sharing, web survey, and financial incentive. This combination of techniques was innovative and proved useful for addressing complexity and uncertainty in a specific natural resource

  12. Lay and Expert Perceptions of Planetary Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret S.; MacGregor, Donald G.; Slovic, Paul

    2000-01-01

    As space scientists and engineers plan new missions to Mars and other planets in our solar system, they will face critical questions about the potential for biological contamination of planetary surfaces. In a society that places ever-increasing importance on the role of public involvement in science and technology policy, questions about risks of biological contamination will be examined and debated in the media, and will lead to the formation of public perceptions of planetary-contamination risks. These perceptions will, over time, form an important input to the development of space policy. Previous research in public and expert perceptions of technological risks and hazards has shown that many of the problems faced by risk-management organizations are the result of differing perceptions of risk (and risk management) between the general public and scientific and technical experts. These differences manifest themselves both as disagreements about the definition (and level) of risk associated with a scientific, technological or industrial enterprise, and as distrust about the ability of risk-management organizations (both public and private) to adequately protect people's health and safety. This report presents the results of a set of survey studies designed to reveal perceptions of planetary exploration and protection from a wide range of respondents, including both members of the general public and experts in the life sciences. The potential value of this research lies in what it reveals about perceptions of risk and benefit that could improve risk-management policies and practices. For example, efforts to communicate with the public about Mars sample return missions could benefit from an understanding of the specific concerns that nonscientists have about such a mission by suggesting areas of potential improvement in public education and information. Assessment of both public and expert perceptions of risk can also be used to provide an advanced signal of

  13. The World (of Warcraft through the eyes of an expert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousri Marzouki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative correlations between pupil size and the tendency to look at salient locations were found in recent studies (e.g., Mathôt et al., 2015. It is hypothesized that this negative correlation might be explained by the mental effort put by participants in the task that leads in return to pupil dilation. Here we present an exploratory study on the effect of expertise on eye-movement behavior. Because there is no available standard tool to evaluate WoW players’ expertise, we built an off-game questionnaire testing players’ knowledge about WoW and acquired skills through completed raids, highest rated battlegrounds, Skill Points, etc. Experts (N = 4 and novices (N = 4 in the massively multiplayer online role-playing game World of Warcraft (WoW viewed 24 designed video segments from the game that differ in regards with their content (i.e, informative locations and visual complexity (i.e, salient locations. Consistent with previous studies, we found a negative correlation between pupil size and the tendency to look at salient locations (experts, r =  − .17, p < .0001, and novices, r =  − .09, p < .0001. This correlation has been interpreted in terms of mental effort: People are inherently biased to look at salient locations (sharp corners, bright lights, etc., but are able (i.e., experts to overcome this bias if they invest sufficient mental effort. Crucially, we observed that this correlation was stronger for expert WoW players than novice players (Z =  − 3.3, p = .0011. This suggests that experts learned to improve control over eye-movement behavior by guiding their eyes towards informative, but potentially low-salient areas of the screen. These findings may contribute to our understanding of what makes an expert an expert.

  14. Expert system for skin problem consultation in Thai traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatkiat, Pornchai; na Nagara, Byaporn; Chansa-ngavej, Chuvej

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to demonstrate the research and development of a rule-based expert system for skin problem consulting in the areas of acne, melasma, freckle, wrinkle, and uneven skin tone, with recommended treatments from Thai traditional medicine knowledge. The tool selected for developing the expert system is a software program written in the PHP language. MySQL database is used to work together with PHP for building database of the expert system. The system is web-based and can be reached from anywhere with Internet access. The developed expert system gave recommendations on the skin problem treatment with Thai herbal recipes and Thai herbal cosmetics based on 416 rules derived from primary and secondary sources. The system had been tested by 50 users consisting of dermatologists, Thai traditional medicine doctors, and general users. The developed system was considered good for learning and consultation. The present work showed how such a scattered body of traditional knowledge as Thai traditional medicine and herbal recipes could be collected, organised and made accessible to users and interested parties. The expert system developed herein should contribute in a meaningful way towards preserving the knowledge and helping promote the use of Thai traditional medicine as a practical alternative medicine for the treatment of illnesses.

  15. Expert elicitation survey on future wind energy costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, Ryan; Jenni, Karen; Seel, Joachim; Baker, Erin; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Smith, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Wind energy supply has grown rapidly over the last decade. However, the long-term contribution of wind to future energy supply, and the degree to which policy support is necessary to motivate higher levels of deployment, depends—in part—on the future costs of both onshore and offshore wind. Here, we summarize the results of an expert elicitation survey of 163 of the world’s foremost wind experts, aimed at better understanding future costs and technology advancement possibilities. Results suggest significant opportunities for cost reductions, but also underlying uncertainties. Under the median scenario, experts anticipate 24-30% reductions by 2030 and 35-41% reductions by 2050 across the three wind applications studied. Costs could be even lower: experts predict a 10% chance that reductions will be more than 40% by 2030 and more than 50% by 2050. Insights gained through expert elicitation complement other tools for evaluating cost-reduction potential, and help inform policy and planning, R&D and industry strategy.

  16. Expert elicitation survey on future wind energy costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Jenni, Karen; Seel, Joachim; Baker, Erin; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Smith, Aaron

    2016-09-12

    Wind energy supply has grown rapidly over the last decade. However, the long-term contribution of wind to future energy supply, and the degree to which policy support is necessary to motivate higher levels of deployment, depends -- in part -- on the future costs of both onshore and offshore wind. Here, we summarize the results of an expert elicitation survey of 163 of the world's foremost wind experts, aimed at better understanding future costs and technology advancement possibilities. Results suggest significant opportunities for cost reductions, but also underlying uncertainties. Under the median scenario, experts anticipate 24-30% reductions by 2030 and 35-41% reductions by 2050 across the three wind applications studied. Costs could be even lower: experts predict a 10% chance that reductions will be more than 40% by 2030 and more than 50% by 2050. Insights gained through expert elicitation complement other tools for evaluating cost-reduction potential, and help inform policy and planning, R&D and industry strategy.

  17. Expert SQL Server 2008 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Machanic, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Expert SQL Server 2008 Development is aimed at SQL Server developers ready to move beyond Books Online. Author and experienced developer Alastair Aitchison shows you how to think about SQL Server development as if it were any other type of development. You'll learn to manage testing in SQL Server and to properly deal with errors and exceptions. The book also covers critical, database-centric topics such as managing concurrency and securing your data and code through proper privileges and authorization. Alastair places focus on sound development and architectural practices that will help you be

  18. Expert Oracle RAC 12c

    CERN Document Server

    Shamsudeen, Riyaj; Yu, Kai; Farooq, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    Expert Oracle RAC 12c is a hands-on book helping you understand and implement Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC), and to reduce the total-cost-of-ownership (TCO) of a RAC database. As a seasoned professional, you are probably aware of the importance of understanding the technical details behind the RAC stack. This book provides deep understanding of RAC concepts and implementation details that you can apply toward your day-to-day operational practices. You'll be guided in troubleshooting and avoiding trouble in your installation. Successful RAC operation hinges upon a fast-performing netwo

  19. Evolving MCDM Applications Using Hybrid Expert-Based ISM and DEMATEL Models: An Example of Sustainable Ecotourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Ming Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological degradation is an escalating global threat. Increasingly, people are expressing awareness and priority for concerns about environmental problems surrounding them. Environmental protection issues are highlighted. An appropriate information technology tool, the growing popular social network system (virtual community, VC, facilitates public education and engagement with applications for existent problems effectively. Particularly, the exploration of related involvement behavior of VC member engagement is an interesting topic. Nevertheless, member engagement processes comprise interrelated sub-processes that reflect an interactive experience within VCs as well as the value co-creation model. To address the top-focused ecotourism VCs, this study presents an application of a hybrid expert-based ISM model and DEMATEL model based on multi-criteria decision making tools to investigate the complex multidimensional and dynamic nature of member engagement. Our research findings provide insightful managerial implications and suggest that the viral marketing of ecotourism protection is concerned with practitioners and academicians alike.

  20. Evolving MCDM applications using hybrid expert-based ISM and DEMATEL models: an example of sustainable ecotourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Huan-Ming; Lin, Chien-Ku; Chen, Da-Ren; Chen, You-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Ecological degradation is an escalating global threat. Increasingly, people are expressing awareness and priority for concerns about environmental problems surrounding them. Environmental protection issues are highlighted. An appropriate information technology tool, the growing popular social network system (virtual community, VC), facilitates public education and engagement with applications for existent problems effectively. Particularly, the exploration of related involvement behavior of VC member engagement is an interesting topic. Nevertheless, member engagement processes comprise interrelated sub-processes that reflect an interactive experience within VCs as well as the value co-creation model. To address the top-focused ecotourism VCs, this study presents an application of a hybrid expert-based ISM model and DEMATEL model based on multi-criteria decision making tools to investigate the complex multidimensional and dynamic nature of member engagement. Our research findings provide insightful managerial implications and suggest that the viral marketing of ecotourism protection is concerned with practitioners and academicians alike.

  1. A vigilante serial killer as ethics educator? An exploration of Dexter as a tool for moral education in the professional domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, M.E. van; Daalmans, S.; Weijers, G.W.M.; Eden, A.; Leeuw, R.N.H. de; Buijzen, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to inform the discussion over the proposed merit of morally ambiguous dramas as a tool in moral education in the professional domain, by providing insight into student groups' moral evaluations of Dexter. In-depth interviews (N = 61) were conducted among a diverse sample of law and

  2. A Vigilante Serial Killer as Ethics Educator? An Exploration of "Dexter" as a Tool for Moral Education in the Professional Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen, Merel; Daalmans, Serena; Weijers, Addy; Eden, Allison; de Leeuw, Rebecca N. H.; Buijzen, Moniek

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to inform the discussion over the proposed merit of morally ambiguous dramas as a tool in moral education in the professional domain, by providing insight into student groups' moral evaluations of "Dexter." In-depth interviews (N = 61) were conducted among a diverse sample of law and (developmental) psychology students.…

  3. The Practical Application of E-Portfolios in K-12 Classrooms: An Exploration of Three Web 2.0 Tools by Three Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Michael; Ozogul, Gamze; Miles, Stacy; Heide, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Portfolios used in K-12 classrooms give students the opportunity to collect, showcase, and reflect upon the work they have completed throughout a class or program. With the advent of the digital age, e-portfolios have allowed for this process to be conducted online through the use of Web 2.0 tools, offering a number of advantages and features that…

  4. A neural network architecture for implementation of expert systems for real time monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Since neural networks have the advantages of massive parallelism and simple architecture, they are good tools for implementing real time expert systems. In a rule based expert system, the antecedents of rules are in the conjunctive or disjunctive form. We constructed a multilayer feedforward type network in which neurons represent AND or OR operations of rules. Further, we developed a translator which can automatically map a given rule base into the network. Also, we proposed a new and powerful yet flexible architecture that combines the advantages of both fuzzy expert systems and neural networks. This architecture uses the fuzzy logic concepts to separate input data domains into several smaller and overlapped regions. Rule-based expert systems for time critical applications using neural networks, the automated implementation of rule-based expert systems with neural nets, and fuzzy expert systems vs. neural nets are covered.

  5. Expert Systems for auditing management information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheroghe Popescu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Expert systems are built with the help of: specialised programming languages or expert system generators (shell. But this structure was reached after tens of years of work and research, because expert systems are nothing but pragmatic capitalisation of the results of research carried out in artificial intelligence and theory of knowledge.

  6. Enhancing the Learning Process with Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karake, Zeinab A.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of artificial intelligence and expert system shells to enhance the learning process of graduate or undergraduate statistics students. A student exercise is described using STAT-EXPERT, an expert system designed to help students select the appropriate statistical analysis technique. (25 references) (LRW)

  7. Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

  8. Fire Effects, Education, and Expert Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Martin

    1987-01-01

    Predicting the effects of fires in the year 2000 and beyond will be enhanced by the use of expert systems. Although our predictions may have broad confidence limits, expert systems should help us to improve the predictions and to focus on the areas where improved knowledge is most needed. The knowledge of experts can be incorporated into previously existing knowledge...

  9. Evaluating Econometric Models and Expert Intuition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Legerstee (Rianne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about forecasting situations which involve econometric models and expert intuition. The first three chapters are about what it is that experts do when they adjust statistical model forecasts and what might improve that adjustment behavior. It is investigated how expert

  10. Contextual Factors for Finding Similar Experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Katja; Balog, Krisztian; Bogers, Toine

    2010-01-01

    -seeking models, are rarely taken into account. In this article, we extend content-based expert-finding approaches with contextual factors that have been found to influence human expert finding. We focus on a task of science communicators in a knowledge-intensive environment, the task of finding similar experts...

  11. Expert system validation in prolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Todd; Stachowitz, Rolf; Chang, Chin-Liang; Combs, Jacqueline

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the Expert System Validation Assistant (EVA) is being implemented in Prolog at the Lockheed AI Center. Prolog was chosen to facilitate rapid prototyping of the structure and logic checkers and since February 1987, we have implemented code to check for irrelevance, subsumption, duplication, deadends, unreachability, and cycles. The architecture chosen is extremely flexible and expansible, yet concise and complementary with the normal interactive style of Prolog. The foundation of the system is in the connection graph representation. Rules and facts are modeled as nodes in the graph and arcs indicate common patterns between rules. The basic activity of the validation system is then a traversal of the connection graph, searching for various patterns the system recognizes as erroneous. To aid in specifying these patterns, a metalanguage is developed, providing the user with the basic facilities required to reason about the expert system. Using the metalanguage, the user can, for example, give the Prolog inference engine the goal of finding inconsistent conclusions among the rules, and Prolog will search the graph intantiations which can match the definition of inconsistency. Examples of code for some of the checkers are provided and the algorithms explained. Technical highlights include automatic construction of a connection graph, demonstration of the use of metalanguage, the A* algorithm modified to detect all unique cycles, general-purpose stacks in Prolog, and a general-purpose database browser with pattern completion.

  12. Sociotechnical scenarios as a new policy tool to explore system innovations: Co-evolution of technology and society in the Netherland's electricity domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Peter; Elzen, Boelem; Geels, F.W.

    2004-01-01

    System innovations are long-term transitions from one sociotechnical system to another. They involve not only changes in technology, but also changes in user practices, regulation, industrial networks, infrastructure, and culture. Current scenario methods are not entirely suited to explore possible

  13. Online social networks and micro-blogging in political campaigning: The exploration of a new campaign tool and a new campaign style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M.R.M.; Hermans, E.A.H.M.; Sams, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how candidates running for the European Parliament (EP) in 2009 used micro-blogging and online social networks – in this case Twitter (www.twitter.com) in the early stage of its adoption – to communicate and connect with citizens. Micro-blogging in general, and Twitter in

  14. Online social networks and micro-blogging in political campaigning: The exploration of a new campaign tool and a new campaign style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M.R.M.; Hermans, E.A.H.M.; Sams, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how candidates running for the European Parliament (EP) in 2009 used micro-blogging and online social networks – in this case Twitter (www.twitter.com) in the early stage of its adoption – to communicate and connect with citizens. Micro-blogging in general, and Twitter in

  15. Operational expert system applications in Canada

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Ching Y

    1992-01-01

    This book is part of a new series on operational expert systems worldwide. Expert systems are now widely used in different parts of the world for various applications. The past four years have witnessed a steady growth in the development and deployment of expert systems in Canada. Research in this field has also gained considerable momentum during the past few years. However, the field of expert systems is still young in Canada. This book contains 13 chapters contributed by 31 experts from both universities and industries across Canada covering a wide range of applications related to electric

  16. Interactional Alarms: Experts' Framing of Health Risks in Live Broadcast News Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon, Rony

    2017-08-23

    This study examined how experts frame health risks in real-time interactions with journalists. Though there is evidence that experts influence media framing of health risks, the ways they respond to journalists' agendas in real-time interactions have yet to be explored. This paper examines instances of risk assessment extracted from a corpus of news interviews to determine how expert assessments were requested and provided. The analysis reveals that experts rarely deliver their assessments neutrally but rather treat these exchanges as opportunities for framing or reframing the topic. Their framing is shown to be responsive to journalistic agendas and to those who experts understand to be accountable when their assessment is elicited. These findings suggest ways in which news interviews can be useful in health communication. The implications for experts, journalists, and public information officers who plan to use interviews for this purpose are discussed.

  17. Tools for negotiating meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of ALT-J we have seven articles that explore how we as learning technologists can use a variety of tools to explore, evaluate, develop and understand our practice and experience. These tools include concepts, theories, symbols and metaphors and are used to:

  18. THE EFFECT OF MODERATE AND HIGH-INTENSITY FATIGUE ON GROUNDSTROKE ACCURACY IN EXPERT AND NON-EXPERT TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lyons

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploring the effects of fatigue on skilled performance in tennis presents a significant challenge to the researcher with respect to ecological validity. This study examined the effects of moderate and high-intensity fatigue on groundstroke accuracy in expert and non-expert tennis players. The research also explored whether the effects of fatigue are the same regardless of gender and player's achievement motivation characteristics. 13 expert (7 male, 6 female and 17 non-expert (13 male, 4 female tennis players participated in the study. Groundstroke accuracy was assessed using the modified Loughborough Tennis Skills Test. Fatigue was induced using the Loughborough Intermittent Tennis Test with moderate (70% and high-intensities (90% set as a percentage of peak heart rate (attained during a tennis-specific maximal hitting sprint test. Ratings of perceived exertion were used as an adjunct to the monitoring of heart rate. Achievement goal indicators for each player were assessed using the 2 x 2 Achievement Goals Questionnaire for Sport in an effort to examine if this personality characteristic provides insight into how players perform under moderate and high-intensity fatigue conditions. A series of mixed ANOVA's revealed significant fatigue effects on groundstroke accuracy regardless of expertise. The expert players however, maintained better groundstroke accuracy across all conditions compared to the novice players. Nevertheless, in both groups, performance following high-intensity fatigue deteriorated compared to performance at rest and performance while moderately fatigued. Groundstroke accuracy under moderate levels of fatigue was equivalent to that at rest. Fatigue effects were also similar regardless of gender. No fatigue by expertise, or fatigue by gender interactions were found. Fatigue effects were also equivalent regardless of player's achievement goal indicators. Future research is required to explore the effects of fatigue on

  19. Expert modeling, expert/self-modeling versus lecture: a comparison of learning, retention, and transfer of rescue skills in health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Butt, Ann; Macy, Rosemary; Harding, Sarah; Roberts, Caleb J; McPherson, Sterling; Waddell, Alexandra; Erickson, Amanda

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether traditional lecture followed by simulation leads to the best learning and knowledge and skill retention over time. A 3×4 mixed design study used three modes of education-traditional lecture with self-guided learning, expert modeling/dual viewing with brief questioning, and expert plus self-modeling-at four time points to compare knowledge, time to treat, and correct steps over time. No significant differences were found in knowledge or time to treat between training methods. An expert modeling/ dual viewing group with brief questioning performed more steps correctly (p = 0.05) than did the other two groups. Expert modeling may help students remember and perform a complex series of tasks in a scenario. Further research is needed to explore expert modeling for novice learners. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  1. The making of expert witness: the valuers' perspective | Babawale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the role of the expert witness in the process of justice administration. As the saying goes, not all 'experts' make good 'expert witness' as there is more to being an 'expert witness' than there is to being an 'expert'. That is, being an 'expert witness' does not necessarily connote that the witness is an expert ...

  2. Database and Expert Systems Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg Andersen, Kim; Debenham, John; Wagner, Roland

    schemata, query evaluation, semantic processing, information retrieval, temporal and spatial databases, querying XML, organisational aspects of databases, natural language processing, ontologies, Web data extraction, semantic Web, data stream management, data extraction, distributed database systems......This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications, DEXA 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005.The 92 revised full papers presented together with 2 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 390...... submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on workflow automation, database queries, data classification and recommendation systems, information retrieval in multimedia databases, Web applications, implementational aspects of databases, multimedia databases, XML processing, security, XML...

  3. Consumer versus expert hazard identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Kit S.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Novel foods have been the object of intense public debate in recent years. Despite efforts to communicate the outcomes of risk assessments to consumers, public confidence in the management of potential risks has been low. Various reasons behind this have been identified, chiefly a disagreement...... between technical experts and consumers over the nature of the hazards on which risk assessments should focus, and perceptions of insufficient openness about uncertainties in risk assessment. Whilst previous research has almost exclusively focused on genetically modified foods, the present paper...... of uncertainty. Furthermore, a number of misconceptions became apparent in the study of laypeople's mental models, often related to the regulatory system governing risk assessments of novel foods. Critical issue are outlined and communication needs are discussed....

  4. Language theory and expert systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Agodi

    1988-11-01

    Full Text Available Some remarks on the problem of knowledge representation and processing, as recognized in connection with the use of computers in the scientific research work, emphasizes the relevance of these problems for the studies on both the theory of languages and the expert system. A consideration of the common traits in the recent history of these studies, with reference to the use of computers on texts in natural language motivates the introduction of set theoretic and algebraic methods, suitable for applications in the analysis and in the automatic treatment of languages, based on the concept of model sets and on relational structures suggested from the connections between syntax and semantics evidenced in some example of sub-languages corresponding to theories of different classes of physical phenomena. Some details of these methods are evidenced, which have already successfully used or whose applications appears suggestive of interesting development.

  5. Identifying key conservation threats to Alpine birds through expert knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Paolo; Brambilla, Mattia; Rolando, Antonio; Girardello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Alpine biodiversity is subject to a range of increasing threats, but the scarcity of data for many taxa means that it is difficult to assess the level and likely future impact of a given threat. Expert opinion can be a useful tool to address knowledge gaps in the absence of adequate data. Experts with experience in Alpine ecology were approached to rank threat levels for 69 Alpine bird species over the next 50 years for the whole European Alps in relation to ten categories: land abandonment, climate change, renewable energy, fire, forestry practices, grazing practices, hunting, leisure, mining and urbanization. There was a high degree of concordance in ranking of perceived threats among experts for most threat categories. The major overall perceived threats to Alpine birds identified through expert knowledge were land abandonment, urbanization, leisure and forestry, although other perceived threats were ranked highly for particular species groups (renewable energy and hunting for raptors, hunting for gamebirds). For groups of species defined according to their breeding habitat, open habitat species and treeline species were perceived as the most threatened. A spatial risk assessment tool based on summed scores for the whole community showed threat levels were highest for bird communities of the northern and western Alps. Development of the approaches given in this paper, including addressing biases in the selection of experts and adopting a more detailed ranking procedure, could prove useful in the future in identifying future threats, and in carrying out risk assessments based on levels of threat to the whole bird community. PMID:26966659

  6. Oregon Hazard Explorer for Lifelines Program (OHELP): A web-based geographic information system tool for assessing potential Cascadia earthquake hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Mood, M.; Olsen, M. J.; Gillins, D. T.; Javadnejad, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) has the ability to generate earthquake as powerful as 9 moment magnitude creating great amount of damage to structures and facilities in Oregon. Series of deterministic earthquake analysis are performed for M9.0, M8.7, M8.4 and M8.1 presenting persistent, long lasting shaking associated with other geological threats such as ground shaking, landslides, liquefaction-induced ground deformations, fault rupture vertical displacement, tsunamis, etc. These ground deformation endangers urban structures, foundations, bridges, roadways, pipelines and other lifelines. Lifeline providers in Oregon, including private and public practices responsible for transportation, electric and gas utilities, water and wastewater, fuel, airports, and harbors face an aging infrastructure that was built prior to a full understanding of this extreme seismic risk. As recently experienced in Chile and Japan, a three to five minutes long earthquake scenario, expected in Oregon, necessities a whole different method of risk mitigation for these major lifelines than those created for shorter shakings from crustal earthquakes. A web-based geographic information system tool is developed to fully assess the potential hazard from the multiple threats impending from Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes in the region. The purpose of this website is to provide easy access to the latest and best available hazard information over the web, including work completed in the recent Oregon Resilience Plan (ORP) (OSSPAC, 2013) and other work completed by the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). As a result, this tool is designated for engineers, planners, geologists, and others who need this information to help make appropriate decisions despite the fact that this web-GIS tool only needs minimal knowledge of GIS to work with.

  7. Exploring guideline adaptation strategy for Turkey: Is "ADAPTE" feasible or does it need adaptation as well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan Baser, Duygu; Kahveci, Rabia; Baydar Artantas, Aylin; Yasar, İlknur; Aksoy, Hilal; Koc, Esra Meltem; Kasim, İsmail; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Özkara, Adem

    2017-04-27

    Clinical Practice Guidelines are mostly developed by 3 methods; namely, de novo, adoption, and adaptation. Nonpublished studies and authors experience shows that most guidelines in Turkey are either by adoption or by adaptation. There is no available local tool for adaptation, so the process is not standardized and most of the time not explicitly defined. The objective of this study is to search for international guideline adaptation tools and test their feasibility in Turkish context, to serve a final goal of developing a unique local strategic tool for guideline adaptation. The methodological design of this study includes selection of an international tool for Clinical Practice Guideline adaptation, piloting this tool with selected Turkish guidelines, identifying the feasibility of this tool and exploring the needs for adaptation of the tool, drawing recommendations for adaptation of the strategies, and validation of the process by local experts. The study from planning phase to finalizing the guidance, including pilot studies and panel but excluding translation of ADAPTE, lasted 18 months. Nine researchers were involved in the adaptation process and 15 more experts were involved in the validation panel. Following the suggestions of the research team on modifications and validation through the expert panel; 2 steps of the ADAPTE toolkit were rejected, 2 steps were accepted by modification, 7 steps were accepted by additional recommendations. In addition, 2 tools were suggested to be added to the toolkit. This is the first study on adaptation of guidelines in Turkey. Pilot adaptation of 2 guidelines with ADAPTE revealed that ADAPTE is a useful and feasible tool in Turkish setting, but might require certain changes in recommendations and revision of tools. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Novices and Experts in Geoinformatics: the Cognitive Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, M.

    2012-04-01

    Modern geoinformatics is an extremely powerful tool for problem analysis and decision making in various fields. Currently general public uses geoinformatics predominantly for navigating (GPS) and sharing information about particular places (GoogleMaps, Wikimapia). Communities also use geoinformatics for particular purposes: fans of history use it to correspond historical and actual maps (www.retromap.ru), birdwatchers point places where they met birds (geobirds.com/rangemaps) etc. However the majority of stakeholders local authorities are not aware of advantages and possibilities of geoinformatics. The same problem is observed for students. At the same time many professional geoinformatic tools are developed, but sometimes the experts even can't explain their purpose to non-experts. So the question is how to shrink the gap between experts and non-experts in understanding and application of geoinformatics. We think that this gap has a cognitive basis. According to modern cognitive theories (Shiffrin-Atkinson and descending) the information primary has to pass through the perceptual filter that cuts off the information that seems to be irrelevant. The mind estimates the relevance implicitly (unconsciously) basing on previous knowledge and judgments what is important. Then it comes to the working memory which is used (a) for proceeding and (b) for problem solving. The working memory has limited capacity and can operate only with about 7 objects simultaneously. Then information passes to the long-term memory that is of unlimited capacity. There it is stored as more or less complex structures with associative links. When necessary it is extracted into the working memory. If great amount of information is linked ("chunked") the working memory operates with it as one object of seven thus overcoming the limitations of the working memory capacity. To adopt any information it should (a) pass through the perceptual filter, (b) not to overload the working memory and (c) to be

  9. Methods for combining experts' probability assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, R A

    1995-09-01

    This article reviews statistical techniques for combining multiple probability distributions. The framework is that of a decision maker who consults several experts regarding some events. The experts express their opinions in the form of probability distributions. The decision maker must aggregate the experts' distributions into a single distribution that can be used for decision making. Two classes of aggregation methods are reviewed. When using a supra Bayesian procedure, the decision maker treats the expert opinions as data that may be combined with its own prior distribution via Bayes' rule. When using a linear opinion pool, the decision maker forms a linear combination of the expert opinions. The major feature that makes the aggregation of expert opinions difficult is the high correlation or dependence that typically occurs among these opinions. A theme of this paper is the need for training procedures that result in experts with relatively independent opinions or for aggregation methods that implicitly or explicitly model the dependence among the experts. Analyses are presented that show that m dependent experts are worth the same as k independent experts where k < or = m. In some cases, an exact value for k can be given; in other cases, lower and upper bounds can be placed on k.

  10. Exploring factors related to the adoption and acceptance of an internet-based electronic personal health management tool (EPHMT) in a low income, special needs population of people living with HIV and AIDS in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlum, Michelle; Gordon, Peter; Camhi, Eli; Valdez, Esmerlin; Bakken, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Access to personal health information assists efforts to improve health outcomes and creates a population of active and informed health consumers. Understanding this significance, Healthy People 2020 retained, as a Focus Area, the need for improved interactive Health Communication and HIT. Attainment of this goal includes increasing the use of Internet-based electronic personal health management tools (EPHMT). Health information management, essential for favorable health outcomes, can be problematic in low income, special needs populations with complex chronic illnesses such as HIV/AIDS. Furthermore, barriers to the adoption and acceptance of an EPHMT in such populations have not been well explored. The current study seeks to explore the usability of an EPHMT entitled MyHealthProfile and to identify perceived health information needs in a vulnerable population of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWH) that have access to an EPHMT through their Medicaid Special Needs Plan.

  11. A method for knowledge acquisition in diagnostic expert system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weishi; Li, Aiping; Li, Shudong

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge acquisition plays very important role in the diagnostic expert system. It usually takes a long period to acquire disease knowledge using the traditional methods. To solve this problem, this paper describes relations between rough set theory and rule-based description of diseases, which corresponds to the process of knowledge acquisition of diagnostic expert system. Then the exclusive rules, inclusive rules and disease images of disease are built based on the PDES diagnosis model, and the definition of probability rule is put forward. At last, the paper presents the rule-based automated induction reasoning method, including exhaustive search, post-processing procedure, estimation for statistic test and the bootstrap and resampling methods. We also introduce automated induction of the rule-based description, which is used in our diseases diagnostic expert system. The experimental results not only show that rough set theory gives a very suitable framework to represent processes of uncertain knowledge extraction, but also that this method induces diagnostic rules correctly. This method can act as the assistant tool for development of diagnosis expert system, and has an extensive application in intelligent information systems.

  12. Expert systems for C3I. Volume 1. A user's introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J. A.; Hockett, S. M.; Prelle, M. J.; Tallant, A. M.; Triant, D. D.

    1985-10-01

    There has been a tremendous burgeoning of interest in artificial intelligence (AI) over the last few years. Investments of commercial and government sponsors reflect a widespread belief that AI is now ready for practical applications. The area of AI currently receiving the greatest attention and investment is expert system technology. Most major high tech corporations have begun to develop expert systems, and many software houses specializing in expert system tools and applications have recently appeared. The defense community is one of the heaviest investors in expert system technology, and within this community one of the application areas receiving greatest attention is C3I. Many ESD programs are now beginning to ask whether expert system applications for C3I are ready for incorporation into ESD-developed systems, and, if so, what are the potential benefits and risks of doing so. This report was prepared to help ESD and MITRE personnel working on acquisition programs to address these issues and to gain a better understanding of what expert systems are all about. The primary intention of this report is to investigate what expert systems are and the advances that are being made in expert system technology for C3I applications. The report begins with a brief tutorial on expert systems, emphasizing how they differ from conventional software systems and what they are best at doing.

  13. Visual intelligence Microsoft tools and techniques for visualizing data

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Mark; Jorgensen, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Go beyond design concepts and learn to build state-of-the-art visualizations The visualization experts at Microsoft's Pragmatic Works have created a full-color, step-by-step guide to building specific types of visualizations. The book thoroughly covers the Microsoft toolset for data analysis and visualization, including Excel, and explores best practices for choosing a data visualization design, selecting tools from the Microsoft stack, and building a dynamic data visualization from start to finish. You'll examine different types of visualizations, their strengths and weaknesses, a

  14. Expert Meeting Report: Foundations Research Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the Expert Meeting Plan, the NorthernSTAR Team proposed to host two Expert Meetings in calendar year 2011. Invitees to the meetings would include experts in the current field of study, other BA team members, and representatives from DOE and NREL. They will invite leading industry experts to present at these meetings. The Expert Meetings will focus on key systems areas that will be required to meet the Building America performance goals and shall be sufficiently narrow in scope that specific conclusions, action items, and delegation of future tasks can be identified and completed. The two expert meeting topics are 'Foundations' and 'Window Retrofit.' The first session is designed as a webinar only and the second will be a live meeting.

  15. Exploring Systems That Support Good Clinical Care in Indigenous Primary Health-care Services: A Retrospective Analysis of Longitudinal Systems Assessment Tool Data from High-Improving Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Cindy; Carlisle, Karen; Larkins, Sarah; Thompson, Sandra Claire; Tsey, Komla; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement is a process for raising the quality of primary health care (PHC) across Indigenous PHC services. In addition to clinical auditing using plan, do, study, and act cycles, engaging staff in a process of reflecting on systems to support quality care is vital. The One21seventy Systems Assessment Tool (SAT) supports staff to assess systems performance in terms of five key components. This study examines quantitative and qualitative SAT data from five high-improving Indigenous PHC services in northern Australia to understand the systems used to support quality care. High-improving services selected for the study were determined by calculating quality of care indices for Indigenous health services participating in the Audit and Best Practice in Chronic Disease National Research Partnership. Services that reported continuing high improvement in quality of care delivered across two or more audit tools in three or more audits were selected for the study. Precollected SAT data (from annual team SAT meetings) are presented longitudinally using radar plots for quantitative scores for each component, and content analysis is used to describe strengths and weaknesses of performance in each systems' component. High-improving services were able to demonstrate strong processes for assessing system performance and consistent improvement in systems to support quality care across components. Key strengths in the quality support systems included adequate and orientated workforce, appropriate health system supports, and engagement with other organizations and community, while the weaknesses included lack of service infrastructure, recruitment, retention, and support for staff and additional costs. Qualitative data revealed clear voices from health service staff expressing concerns with performance, and subsequent SAT data provided evidence of changes made to address concerns. Learning from the processes and strengths of high-improving services may be useful

  16. Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tara G; Burgman, Mark A; Fidler, Fiona; Kuhnert, Petra M; Low-Choy, Samantha; McBride, Marissa; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-02-01

    Expert knowledge is used widely in the science and practice of conservation because of the complexity of problems, relative lack of data, and the imminent nature of many conservation decisions. Expert knowledge is substantive information on a particular topic that is not widely known by others. An expert is someone who holds this knowledge and who is often deferred to in its interpretation. We refer to predictions by experts of what may happen in a particular context as expert judgments. In general, an expert-elicitation approach consists of five steps: deciding how information will be used, determining what to elicit, designing the elicitation process, performing the elicitation, and translating the elicited information into quantitative statements that can be used in a model or directly to make decisions. This last step is known as encoding. Some of the considerations in eliciting expert knowledge include determining how to work with multiple experts and how to combine multiple judgments, minimizing bias in the elicited information, and verifying the accuracy of expert information. We highlight structured elicitation techniques that, if adopted, will improve the accuracy and information content of expert judgment and ensure uncertainty is captured accurately. We suggest four aspects of an expert elicitation exercise be examined to determine its comprehensiveness and effectiveness: study design and context, elicitation design, elicitation method, and elicitation output. Just as the reliability of empirical data depends on the rigor with which it was acquired so too does that of expert knowledge. ©2011 Australian Governmemt Conservation Biology©2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Succession planning for technical experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cain, Ronald A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, Shaheen A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Agreda, Carla L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a methodology for identifying, evaluating, and mitigating the loss of key technical skills at nuclear operations facilities. The methodology can be adapted for application within regulatory authorities and research and development organizations, and can be directly applied by international engagement partners of the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The resultant product will be of direct benefit to two types of NNSA missions: (1) domestic human capital development programs tasked to provide focused technical expertise to succeed an aging nuclear operations workforce, and (2) international safeguards programs charged with maintaining operational safeguards for developing/existing nuclear power program in nations where minimal available resources must be used effectively. This report considers succession planning and the critical skills necessary to meet an institution’s goals and mission. Closely tied to succession planning are knowledge management and mentorship. In considering succession planning, critical skill sets are identified and are greatly dependent on the subject matter expert in question. This report also provides examples of critical skills that are job specific.

  18. Exploring a new ultrasound score as a clinical predictive tool in patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting abatacept: results from the APPRAISE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Boers, Maarten; Wakefield, Richard J; Berner Hammer, Hilde; Vittecoq, Olivier; Filippou, Georgios; Balint, Peter; Möller, Ingrid; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Østergaard, Mikkel; Gaillez, Corine; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    To explore whether changes in a composite (power Doppler/greyscale ultrasound (PDUS)) synovitis score, developed by the OMERACT-EULAR-Ultrasound Task Force, predict disease activity outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA who were methotrexate inadequate responders starting abatacept were evaluated. Individual joint PDUS scores were combined in the Global OMERACT-EULAR Synovitis Score (GLOESS) for metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) 2-5, all joints (22 paired) and a reduced (9 paired) joint set. The predictive value of changes in GLOESS at week 1-16 evaluations for clinical status and response (Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 (C reactive protein, CRP) <2.6; DAS28(CRP) ≤3.2; DAS28(CRP) ≥1.2 improvement) up to week 24, and correlations between DAS28 and GLOESS were assessed. Eighty-nine patients completed the 24-week treatment period. Changes in GLOESS (MCPs 2-5) from weeks 1 to 16 were unable to predict DAS28 outcomes up to week 24. However, significant improvements in GLOESS (MCPs 2-5) were observed at week 12 in patients with DAS28 ≥1.2 improvement at week 24 versus those who did not achieve that clinical response. In patients achieving DAS28 ≥1.2 improvement or DAS28 ≤3.2 at week 24, changes in GLOESS (22 and 9 paired joint sets) were greater in patients who already achieved DAS28 ≥1.2 at week 12 than in those who did not. No significant correlations were found between changes in DAS28 and GLOESS definitions at any time point. PDUS was not correlated with clinical status or response as measured by DAS28-derived criteria, and PDUS changes were not predictive of clinical outcome. The discrepancies require further exploration. NCT00767325; Results.

  19. Expert systems to improve plant operability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopocy, D.M.; Glazer, A.R. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (USA)); Jonas, O. (Jonas, Inc., Wilmington, DE (US)); Rice, J.K. (James K. Rice, Chartered, Olney, MD (US))

    1988-01-01

    Prospective expert system applications in the power industry generally are in one of the following categories:esign, information management, plant operations, and equipment diagnostics. Many power facility expert system efforts are four plant operations. Several of these applications help optimize plant operation and also detect developing problems and suggest remedial action before the occurrence of any serious consequences. Many types of plant processes and equipment can benefit from routine trending and evaluation of operating data by this type of expert system. This paper discusses a variety of special considerations for the development and implementation of expert systems for plant operations, both in general and as exemplified by CYCLEXPRT.

  20. An expert system for diagnosing environmentally induced spacecraft anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolincik, Mark; Lauriente, Michael; Koons, Harry C.; Gorney, David

    1992-01-01

    A new rule-based, machine independent analytical tool was designed for diagnosing spacecraft anomalies using an expert system. Expert systems provide an effective method for saving knowledge, allow computers to sift through large amounts of data pinpointing significant parts, and most importantly, use heuristics in addition to algorithms, which allow approximate reasoning and inference and the ability to attack problems not rigidly defined. The knowledge base consists of over two-hundred (200) rules and provides links to historical and environmental databases. The environmental causes considered are bulk charging, single event upsets (SEU), surface charging, and total radiation dose. The system's driver translates forward chaining rules into a backward chaining sequence, prompting the user for information pertinent to the causes considered. The use of heuristics frees the user from searching through large amounts of irrelevant information and allows the user to input partial information (varying degrees of confidence in an answer) or 'unknown' to any question. The modularity of the expert system allows for easy updates and modifications. It not only provides scientists with needed risk analysis and confidence not found in algorithmic programs, but is also an effective learning tool, and the window implementation makes it very easy to use. The system currently runs on a Micro VAX II at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The inference engine used is NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS).

  1. Expert Knowledge-Based Automatic Sleep Stage Determination by Multi-Valued Decision Making Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Sugi, Takenao; Kawana, Fusae; Wang, Xingyu; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    In this study, an expert knowledge-based automatic sleep stage determination system working on a multi-valued decision making method is developed. Visual inspection by a qualified clinician is adopted to obtain the expert knowledge database. The expert knowledge database consists of probability density functions of parameters for various sleep stages. Sleep stages are determined automatically according to the conditional probability. Totally, four subjects were participated. The automatic sleep stage determination results showed close agreements with the visual inspection on sleep stages of awake, REM (rapid eye movement), light sleep and deep sleep. The constructed expert knowledge database reflects the distributions of characteristic parameters which can be adaptive to variable sleep data in hospitals. The developed automatic determination technique based on expert knowledge of visual inspection can be an assistant tool enabling further inspection of sleep disorder cases for clinical practice.

  2. The Suitability of Expert System Application in Czech Small and Medium‑Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Khitilova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium-sized enterprises play an important role in the economy of Czech Republic. Expert systems are one of the alternatives evaluated the effectiveness of the relationship between supplier and customer. Currently, measurement and increase in efficiency of supplier-customer relations is very topical subject. The requirements for tools the improvement supplier- customer relationship can be specified on the base the literature analysis. The article defines basic requirements for expert system. The presentation of expert system and its suitability in the surroundings of small and medium sized enterprises is the part of this article. The comparison of the expert system possibilities and the compiled requirements leads to suitability analysis of selected solution. Actual questions and the way of future work are derived from current results, presented in the paper. The article defined the directions of development this expert system.

  3. Use of bacterial surrogates as a tool to explore antimalarial drug interaction: Synergism between inhibitors of malarial dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talawanich, Yuwadee; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2015-09-01

    Interaction between antimalarial drugs is important in determining the outcome of chemotherapy using drug combinations. Inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) such as pyrimethamine and of dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) such as sulfa drugs are known to have synergistic interactions. However, studies of the synergism are complicated by the fact that the malaria parasite can also salvage exogenous folates, and the salvage may also be affected by the drugs. It is desirable to have a convenient system to study interaction of DHFR and DHPS inhibitors without such complications. Here, we describe the use of Escherichia coli transformed with malarial DHFR and DHPS, while its own corresponding genes have been inactivated by optimal concentration of trimethoprim and genetic knockout, respectively, to study the interaction of the inhibitors. Marked synergistic effects are observed for all combinations of pyrimethamine and sulfa inhibitors in the presence of trimethoprim. At 0.05μM trimethoprim, sum of fractional inhibitory concentrations, ΣFIC of pyrimethamine with sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine with sulfathiazole, pyrimethamine with sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine with dapsone are in the range of 0.24-0.41. These results show synergism between inhibitors of the two enzymes even in the absence of folate transport and uptake. This bacterial surrogate system should be useful as a tool for assessing the interactions of drug combinations between the DHFR and DHPS inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the Association of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Recombinant MHC:Ig Hybrid Protein as a Tool for Detecting T Lymphocytes in Mice Infected with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenilton Silva da Silveira-Júnior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance- (SPR- based recognition method applying H-2 Ld:Ig/peptides complexes for ex vivo monitoring cellular immune responses during murine infection with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis is described. Lymphocytes from lesion-draining popliteal lymph nodes were captured on a carboxylated sensor chip surface previously functionalized with H-2 Ld:Ig (DimerX protein bound to synthetic peptides derived from the COOH-terminal region of cysteine proteinase B of L. (L. amazonensis. In computational analysis, these peptides presented values of kinetic constants favorable to form complexes with H-2 Ld at neutral pH, with a Gibbs free energy ΔG°<0. The assayed DimerX:peptide complexes presented the property of attaching to distinct T lymphocytes subsets, obtained from experimentally infected BALB/c mice, in each week of infection, thus indicating a temporal variation in specific T lymphocytes populations, each directed to a different COOH-terminal region-derived peptide. The experimental design proposed herein is an innovative approach for cellular immunology studies of a neglected disease, providing a useful tool for the analysis of specific T lymphocytes subsets.

  5. Foodborne proportion of gastrointestinal illness: estimates from a Canadian expert elicitation survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, André; Davidson, Valerie J; Ruzante, Juliana M; Fazil, Aamir

    2010-12-01

    absence of more reliable estimates, the observed discrepancy between experts must be explored and understood before one can judge which opinion is the best.

  6. Explosion probability of unexploded ordnance: expert beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline Anne; Small, Mitchell J; Morgan, M G

    2008-08-01

    This article reports on a study to quantify expert beliefs about the explosion probability of unexploded ordnance (UXO). Some 1,976 sites at closed military bases in the United States are contaminated with UXO and are slated for cleanup, at an estimated cost of $15-140 billion. Because no available technology can guarantee 100% removal of UXO, information about explosion probability is needed to assess the residual risks of civilian reuse of closed military bases and to make decisions about how much to invest in cleanup. This study elicited probability distributions for the chance of UXO explosion from 25 experts in explosive ordnance disposal, all of whom have had field experience in UXO identification and deactivation. The study considered six different scenarios: three different types of UXO handled in two different ways (one involving children and the other involving construction workers). We also asked the experts to rank by sensitivity to explosion 20 different kinds of UXO found at a case study site at Fort Ord, California. We found that the experts do not agree about the probability of UXO explosion, with significant differences among experts in their mean estimates of explosion probabilities and in the amount of uncertainty that they express in their estimates. In three of the six scenarios, the divergence was so great that the average of all the expert probability distributions was statistically indistinguishable from a uniform (0, 1) distribution-suggesting that the sum of expert opinion provides no information at all about the explosion risk. The experts' opinions on the relative sensitivity to explosion of the 20 UXO items also diverged. The average correlation between rankings of any pair of experts was 0.41, which, statistically, is barely significant (p= 0.049) at the 95% confidence level. Thus, one expert's rankings provide little predictive information about another's rankings. The lack of consensus among experts suggests that empirical studies

  7. Practical problems in aggregating expert opinions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, J.M.; Picard, R.R.; Meyer, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Expert opinion is data given by a qualified person in response to a technical question. In these analyses, expert opinion provides information where other data are either sparse or non-existent. Improvements in forecasting result from the advantageous addition of expert opinion to observed data in many areas, such as meteorology and econometrics. More generally, analyses of large, complex systems often involve experts on various components of the system supplying input to a decision process; applications include such wide-ranging areas as nuclear reactor safety, management science, and seismology. For large or complex applications, no single expert may be knowledgeable enough about the entire application. In other problems, decision makers may find it comforting that a consensus or aggregation of opinions is usually better than a single opinion. Many risk and reliability studies require a single estimate for modeling, analysis, reporting, and decision making purposes. For problems with large uncertainties, the strategy of combining as diverse a set of experts as possible hedges against underestimation of that uncertainty. Decision makers are frequently faced with the task of selecting the experts and combining their opinions. However, the aggregation is often the responsibility of an analyst. Whether the decision maker or the analyst does the aggregation, the input for it, such as providing weights for experts or estimating other parameters, is imperfect owing to a lack of omniscience. Aggregation methods for expert opinions have existed for over thirty years; yet many of the difficulties with their use remain unresolved. The bulk of these problem areas are summarized in the sections that follow: sensitivities of results to assumptions, weights for experts, correlation of experts, and handling uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the sources of these problems and describe their effects on aggregation.

  8. COACH – EXPLORER - MANAGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđe Nićin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays technologies are characterised by the expert specialists. In training technologies there are also coaches-experts for some sports. Aport from governing training technology, thus he performs manager’s work (planning, programing, accomplishing, controlling, correcting the coach also performs the work of an explorer, because the work of the coach is creative, creating, exploring and it is necessary to include innovation into training process, and innovations are nothing but rehearse of someting new, what is but scientific approach to the training. More the coach succeeds in controlling more factors which influence the sport achievement, he will be more successful. To be able to do all that, the coach must observe, follow, control and correct sportist’s reactions on exercises and loads all the time. The coach demonstrates his activity even through marketing, educational psychological, administrative- technical, nutritional and entire useful social role, so his work is interdisciplinary very complex, important, public, and thus it is a subject to critics. In order to be successful, a modern coach must be an exellent expert-specialist, but also an explorer and manager, and before all a creator of training technology

  9. Comparing Expert and Novice Driving Behavior in a Driving Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiran B. Ekanayake

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study focused on comparing driving behavior of expert and novice drivers in a mid-range driving simulator with the intention of evaluating the validity of driving simulators for driver training. For the investigation, measurements of performance, psychophysiological measurements, and self-reported user experience under different conditions of driving tracks and driving sessions were analyzed. We calculated correlations between quantitative and qualitative measures to enhance the reliability of the findings. The experiment was conducted involving 14 experienced drivers and 17 novice drivers. The results indicate that driving behaviors of expert and novice drivers differ from each other in several ways but it heavily depends on the characteristics of the task. Moreover, our belief is that the analytical framework proposed in this paper can be used as a tool for selecting appropriate driving tasks as well as for evaluating driving performance in driving simulators.

  10. User's guide for the thermal analyst's help desk expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsby, Rachel A.

    1994-01-01

    A guide for users of the Thermal Analyst's Help Desk is provided. Help Desk is an expert system that runs on a DOS based personal computer and operates within the EXSYS expert system shell. Help Desk is an analysis tool designed to provide users having various degrees of experience with the capability to determine first approximations of thermal capacity for spacecraft and instruments. The five analyses supported in Help Desk are: surface area required for a radiating surface, equilibrium temperature of a surface, enclosure temperature and heat loads for a defined position in orbit, enclosure temperature and heat loads over a complete orbit, and selection of appropriate surface properties. The two geometries supported by Help Desk are a single flat plate and a rectangular box enclosure.

  11. Tying eHealth Tools to Patient Needs: Exploring the Use of eHealth for Community-Dwelling Patients With Complex Chronic Disease and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele Gray, Carolyn; Miller, Daniel; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2014-11-26

    with transportation, and costs. A visual depiction of these perceived needs and their relation to each other is included as part of the discussion, which will be used to guide development of our eHealth technologies. Participants recognized the potential for eHealth technologies to support and improve their care but also expressed common concerns regarding their adoption. Specifically, they mentioned privacy and data security, accessibility, the loss of necessary visits, increased social isolation, provider burden, downloading responsibility onto patients for care management, entry errors, training requirements, and potentially confusing interfaces. From the perspective of our participants, there is a significant potential for eHealth tools to support patients with CCDD in community and primary care settings, but we need to be wary of the potential downfalls of adopting eHealth technologies and pay special attention to patient-identified needs and concerns. eHealth tools that support ongoing patient-provider interaction, patient self-management (such as telemonitoring), and provider-provider interactions (through electronic health record integration) could be of most benefit to patients similar to those in our study.

  12. [Expert systems in medicine: possible uses in anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J; Kochs, E; Kochs, H D

    1994-04-01

    The euphoric assumption that powerful computers fed with sophisticated software programmes may serve as a substitute for human knowledge and decision making has been replaced by a more realistic concept of how computers may help in collecting data and their interpretation on the basis of human knowledge and experience. The computer is now used as a dedicated tool to support man in overtaking cumbersome and monotonous processes and tedious calculations. Running 24 hours a day, a specific feature of the computer is that depending on unequivocal software programmes it does neither forget or alter commands and information. Computer programmes imitating human thinking and information processing are called expert or knowledge based systems. These are especially useful when multiple possible combinations of data make a given task very complex. This review presents several systems used in different medical disciplines to describe fundamental ideas, different problem-solving methods, techniques and possible working fields including anaesthesia. It is made clear why computers have found widespread use in all administrative areas. In contrast, no system comparable in potency has been developed for use in clinical medicine in spite of 25 years of research in expert systems. This review starts with a definition of expert knowledge and the appropriate transformation of this knowledge to the computer. In addition, a general survey about the structure of expert systems and a state of the art in some current problem solving methods is given. Additional aspects and restrictions including technical, psychological and legal problems which seem to be unimportant from the outside but are essential for the development of expert systems are presented.

  13. A condition metric for Eucalyptus woodland derived from expert evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Steve J; Bruce, Matthew J; Griffioen, Peter; Dodd, Amanda; White, Matthew D

    2018-02-01

    The evaluation of ecosystem quality is important for land-management and land-use planning. Evaluation is unavoidably subjective, and robust metrics must be based on consensus and the structured use of observations. We devised a transparent and repeatable process for building and testing ecosystem metrics based on expert data. We gathered quantitative evaluation data on the quality of hypothetical grassy woodland sites from experts. We used these data to train a model (an ensemble of 30 bagged regression trees) capable of predicting the perceived quality of similar hypothetical woodlands based on a set of 13 site variables as inputs (e.g., cover of shrubs, richness of native forbs). These variables can be measured at any site and the model implemented in a spreadsheet as a metric of woodland quality. We also investigated the number of experts required to produce an opinion data set sufficient for the construction of a metric. The model produced evaluations similar to those provided by experts, as shown by assessing the model's quality scores of expert-evaluated test sites not used to train the model. We applied the metric to 13 woodland conservation reserves and asked managers of these sites to independently evaluate their quality. To assess metric performance, we compared the model's evaluation of site quality with the managers' evaluations through multidimensional scaling. The metric performed relatively well, plotting close to the center of the space defined by the evaluators. Given the method provides data-driven consensus and repeatability, which no single human evaluator can provide, we suggest it is a valuable tool for evaluating ecosystem quality in real-world contexts. We believe our approach is applicable to any ecosystem. © 2017 State of Victoria.

  14. Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald G Singh

    Full Text Available The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of prior judgements, but groups are also prone to uncritical "groupthink" errors. When the problem context is underspecified the probability that experts commit groupthink errors may increase. This study addresses how structured workshops affect expert variability among and certainty within responses in a New Zealand case study. We find that experts' risk estimates before and after a workshop differ, and that group elicitations provided greater consistency of estimates, yet also greater uncertainty among experts, when addressing prominent impacts to four different ecosystem services in coastal New Zealand. After group workshops, experts provided more consistent ranking of risks and more consistent best estimates of impact through increased clarity in terminology and dampening of extreme positions, yet probability distributions for impacts widened. The results from this case study suggest that group elicitations have favorable consequences for the quality and uncertainty of risk judgments within and across experts, making group elicitation techniques invaluable tools in contexts of limited data.

  15. Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gerald G; Sinner, Jim; Ellis, Joanne; Kandlikar, Milind; Halpern, Benjamin S; Satterfield, Terre; Chan, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of prior judgements, but groups are also prone to uncritical "groupthink" errors. When the problem context is underspecified the probability that experts commit groupthink errors may increase. This study addresses how structured workshops affect expert variability among and certainty within responses in a New Zealand case study. We find that experts' risk estimates before and after a workshop differ, and that group elicitations provided greater consistency of estimates, yet also greater uncertainty among experts, when addressing prominent impacts to four different ecosystem services in coastal New Zealand. After group workshops, experts provided more consistent ranking of risks and more consistent best estimates of impact through increased clarity in terminology and dampening of extreme positions, yet probability distributions for impacts widened. The results from this case study suggest that group elicitations have favorable consequences for the quality and uncertainty of risk judgments within and across experts, making group elicitation techniques invaluable tools in contexts of limited data.

  16. Assessment on EXPERT Descent and Landing System Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H.; Muylaert, J.; Northey, D.; Riley, D.

    2009-01-01

    EXPERT is a re-entry vehicle designed for validation of aero-thermodynamic models, numerical schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and test facilities for measuring flight data under an Earth re-entry environment. This paper addresses the design for the descent and landing sequence for EXPERT. It includes the descent sequence, the choice of drogue and main parachutes, and the parachute deployment condition, which can be supersonic or subsonic. The analysis is based mainly on an engineering tool, PASDA, together with some hand calculations for parachute sizing and design. The tool consists of a detailed 6-DoF simulation performed with the aerodynamics database of the vehicle, an empirical wakes model and the International Standard Atmosphere database. The aerodynamics database for the vehicle is generated by DNW experimental data and CFD codes within the framework of an ESA contract to CIRA. The analysis will be presented in terms of altitude, velocity, accelerations, angle-of- attack, pitch angle and angle of rigging line. Discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each parachute deployment condition is included in addition to some comparison with the available data based on a Monte-Carlo method from a Russian company, FSUE NIIPS. Sensitivity on wind speed to the performance of EXPERT is shown to be strong. Supersonic deployment of drogue shows a better performance in stability at the expense of a larger G-load than those from the subsonic deployment of drogue. Further optimization on the parachute design is necessary in order to fulfill all the EXPERT specifications.

  17. Research on architecture of intelligent design platform for artificial neural network expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Honghong

    2017-09-01

    Based on the review of the development and current situation of CAD technology, the necessity of combination of artificial neural network and expert system, and then present an intelligent design system based on artificial neural network. Moreover, it discussed the feasibility of realization of a design-oriented expert system development tools on the basis of above combination. In addition, knowledge representation strategy and method and the solving process are given in this paper.

  18. An expert system for valvular heart disease using MRI and its clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    中川, 富夫

    1992-01-01

    MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing heart disease today. The cardiac blood flow is determined by an MRI image analysis and expert system. Image data are taken by a TV camera and digitalized. After gray level thresholding and region segmentation, the boundary of the regurgitant flow region is precisely extracted. Using this expert system, a doctor can easily make an accurate diagnosis of the valvular heart disease. This method should prove useful for the diagnosis of various heart diseases.

  19. 40 CFR 194.26 - Expert judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR THE CERTIFICATION AND RE-CERTIFICATION OF THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT'S COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40... judgment elicitation processes and the reasoning behind those results. Documentation of interviews used to... and technical views to expert panels as input to any expert elicitation process. ...

  20. Knowledge acquisition for a simple expert controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, B.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for process control which has the properties of being incremental, cyclic and top-down. It is described on the basis of the development of an expert controller for a simple, but nonlinear control route. A quality comparison between expert controller and process operator shows the ability of the method for knowledge acquisition.

  1. [How to expose fraudulent expert witnesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, W

    1990-01-01

    In our courtrooms you can meet, up to this day, experts of dubious qualities if not mere shams and deceivers. They are found in all sciences, but also in pseudo-sciences as paramedicine and parapsychology. In any case such expert pretenders must be exposed by the judge to prevent dangerous miscarriage of justice. Examples are given how to unmask the fraudulent rascals.

  2. Contextual factors for finding similar experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.; Balog, K.; Bogers, T.; de Rijke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Expertise-seeking research studies how people search for expertise and choose whom to contact in the context of a specific task. An important outcome are models that identify factors that influence expert finding. Expertise retrieval addresses the same problem, expert finding, but from a

  3. Expert2OWL: A Methodology for Pattern-Based Ontology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, Kais; Xu, Jie; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    The formalization of expert knowledge enables a broad spectrum of applications employing ontologies as underlying technology. These include eLearning, Semantic Web and expert systems. However, the manual construction of such ontologies is time-consuming and thus expensive. Moreover, experts are often unfamiliar with the syntax and semantics of formal ontology languages such as OWL and usually have no experience in developing formal ontologies. To overcome these barriers, we developed a new method and tool, called Expert2OWL that provides efficient features to support the construction of OWL ontologies using GFO (General Formal Ontology) as a top-level ontology. This method allows a close and effective collaboration between ontologists and domain experts. Essentially, this tool integrates Excel spreadsheets as part of a pattern-based ontology development and refinement process. Expert2OWL enables us to expedite the development process and modularize the resulting ontologies. We applied this method in the field of Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) and used Expert2OWL to automatically generate an accurate Chinese Herbology ontology (CHO). The expressivity of CHO was tested and evaluated using ontology query languages SPARQL and DL. CHO shows promising results and can generate answers to important scientific questions such as which Chinese herbal formulas contain which substances, which substances treat which diseases, and which ones are the most frequently used in CHM.

  4. Expert Evidence and International Criminal Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appazov, Artur

    The book is a comprehensive narration of the use of expertise in international criminal trials offering reflection on standards concerning the quality and presentation of expert evidence. It analyzes and critiques the rules governing expert evidence in international criminal trials...... and the strategies employed by counsel and courts relying upon expert evidence and challenges that courts face determining its reliability. In particular, the author considers how the procedural and evidentiary architecture of international criminal courts and tribunals influences the courts' ability to meaningfully...... incorporate expert evidence into the rational fact-finding process. The book provides analysis of the unique properties of expert evidence as compared with other forms of evidence and the challenges that these properties present for fact-finding in international criminal trials. It draws conclusions about...

  5. A software tool for network intrusion detection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Walt, C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation illustrates how a recently developed software tool enables operators to easily monitor a network and detect intrusions without requiring expert knowledge of network intrusion detections....

  6. TimeSpan: Using Visualization to Explore Temporal Multi-dimensional Data of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loorak, Mona Hosseinkhani; Perin, Charles; Kamal, Noreen; Hill, Michael; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    We present TimeSpan, an exploratory visualization tool designed to gain a better understanding of the temporal aspects of the stroke treatment process. Working with stroke experts, we seek to provide a tool to help improve outcomes for stroke victims. Time is of critical importance in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients. Every minute that the artery stays blocked, an estimated 1.9 million neurons and 12 km of myelinated axons are destroyed. Consequently, there is a critical need for efficiency of stroke treatment processes. Optimizing time to treatment requires a deep understanding of interval times. Stroke health care professionals must analyze the impact of procedures, events, and patient attributes on time-ultimately, to save lives and improve quality of life after stroke. First, we interviewed eight domain experts, and closely collaborated with two of them to inform the design of TimeSpan. We classify the analytical tasks which a visualization tool should support and extract design goals from the interviews and field observations. Based on these tasks and the understanding gained from the collaboration, we designed TimeSpan, a web-based tool for exploring multi-dimensional and temporal stroke data. We describe how TimeSpan incorporates factors from stacked bar graphs, line charts, histograms, and a matrix visualization to create an interactive hybrid view of temporal data. From feedback collected from domain experts in a focus group session, we reflect on the lessons we learned from abstracting the tasks and iteratively designing TimeSpan.

  7. Expert and Competent Non-Expert Visual Cues during Simulated Diagnosis in Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare eMcCormack

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the information acquisition strategies of expert and competent non-expert intensive care physicians during two simulated diagnostic scenarios involving respiratory distress in an infant. Specifically, the information acquisition performance of six experts and 12 competent non-experts was examined using an eye tracker during the initial 90 seconds of the assessment of the patient. The results indicated that, in comparison to competent non-experts, experts recorded longer mean fixations, irrespective of the scenario. When the dwell times were examined against specific areas of interest, the results revealed that competent non-experts recorded greater overall dwell times on the nurse, where experts recorded relatively greater dwell times on the head and face of the manikin. In the context of the scenarios, experts recorded differential dwell times, spending relatively more time on the head and face during the seizure scenario than during the coughing scenario. The differences evident between experts and competent non-experts were interpreted as evidence of the relative availability of task-specific cues or heuristics in memory that might direct the process of information acquisition amongst expert physicians. The implications are discussed for the training and assessment of diagnostic skills.

  8. Can experts judge elections? Testing the validity of expert judgments for measuring election integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez i Coma, F.; van Ham, C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Expert surveys have been used to measure a wide variety of phenomena in political science, ranging from party positions, to corruption, to the quality of democracy and elections. However, expert judgments raise important validity concerns, both about the object being measured as well as the experts.

  9. Inter-expert and intra-expert reliability in sleep spindle scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To measure the inter-expert and intra-expert agreement in sleep spindle scoring, and to quantify how many experts are needed to build a reliable dataset of sleep spindle scorings. Methods The EEG dataset was comprised of 400 randomly selected 115 s segments of stage 2 sleep from 110 sl...

  10. Responses to work complexity: the novice to expert effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jeri L; Parker, Karen; Cason, Linda; Hauck, Sheila; Kaetzel, Denise; O'Nan, Cathy; White, Ann

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in how advanced beginners, competent, and expert nurses prioritize and reprioritize patient care. This qualitative study had a purposive sample of 23 nurses on cardiac/ telemetry units at five hospitals. Four themes emerged from the data: cognitive strategies, communication, integration of roles, and response to the work environment. As the nurses progressed in expertise, they were better able to organize, more effectively deal with interruptions, anticipate patient needs, integrate varied nursing roles into their work, and communicate effectively. The significance of this study is the identification of factors that affect the nurse's ability to work productively in today's care environment. It increases understanding of the graduate nurses' perception and response to the complexity and work of nursing. An understanding of these factors provides the basis for further research to understand and promote transition of nurses from advanced beginner to expert.

  11. Christiano’s Deliberative Expertism and Choice Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Ivanković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores Thomas Christiano’s account of the moral division of labor in democracy. Christiano’s incorporation of experts serves the purpose of alleviating the epistemic burdens of ordinary citizens in the decision-making process and decreasing the amount of work they would otherwise be required to take on in a modern democracy. The gist of my contribution to the debate is assessing whether Christiano’s account successfully tackles the issues brought about by cognitive biases that people suffer from in communicating their values in decision-making. I argue that Christiano’s notion of experts needs to be extended to choice architects, who possess the knowledge on methods for influencing choice. I also claim that choice architecture is a social fact that an informed deliberative democratic theory needs to deal with.

  12. Expert system for compressor maintenance support; Sistema especialista para apoio a manutencao de compressores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonny Carlos da [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Caletti, Luciano [KEOHPS - Knowledge Engineering on Hydraulic and Pneumatic System, SC (Brazil); Luna, Paulo de T.M. [Universidade Regional de Blumenau - FURB, SC (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The performance of critical machines in industrial processes, such as compressors used in industrial plants, is fundamental for overall company operation. In this context, it becomes strategic the application of methods and tools to support the operation and maintenance of the most relevant process equipment. Among these computational tools are the Expert Systems, which aim to emulate the decision making process of human experts in a specific knowledge domain. In Oil and Gas domain, an example of such tools is the SEGRED project, which combines expert system techniques with dynamic simulation of transport and distribution natural gas networks. The SECOMP project, Expert System for Compressor Maintenance, is considered a spin-off of the SEGRED. Its objective is to develop an expert system to support maintenance activities, aiming to increase reliability, improve performance and reduce maintenance and operational costs. This article presents the first phase of the SECOMP project, which is related to the development of an expert system prototype for corrective maintenance of natural gas reciprocating compressors. The paper discusses the context of this knowledge domain, the prototype development and its potential contribution in an industrial environment. (author)

  13. Good expert knowledge, small scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Horst

    2014-01-01

    During many years of occupational stress research, mostly within the German governmental program for "Humanization of Work Life'', remarkable deficits concerning visual work were seen, the most striking being the lack of cooperation between the different experts. With regard to this article hard arguments and ideas for solutions had to be found. A pilot study in 21 enterprises was realized (1602 employees with different visual work tasks). A test set of screening parameters (visual acuity, refraction, phoria, binocular cooperation and efficiency, accommodation range and color vision) were measured. The glasses and/or contact lenses worn were registered and the visual tasks analyzed. In work at visual display units (VDU) the eye movements were recorded and standardized questionnaires were given (health, stress, visual work situation). Because of the heterogeneity of the sample only simple statistics were applied: in groups of different visual work the complaints, symptoms, hassles and uplifts were clustered (SAS software) and correlated with the results of the visual tests. Later a special project in 8 companies (676 employees) was carried out. The results were published in [14]. Discomfort and asthenopic symptoms could be seen as an interaction of the combination of tasks and working conditions with the clusters of individual functionalisms, frequently originating in postural compromises. Mainly three causes for stress could be identified: 1. demands inadequate with regard to intensity, resolution, amount and/or time structure; 2. prevention of elementary perceptive needs; 3. entire use of partial capacities of the visual organ. Symptoms also were correlated with heteronomy. Other findings: influence of adaptation/accommodation ratio, the distracting role of attractors, especially in multitasking jobs; influence of high luminance differences. Dry eyes were very common, they could be attributed to a high screen position, low light, monotonous tasks and office

  14. Porphyry Cu indicator minerals in till as an exploration tool: Example from the giant pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Lang, J.; Smith, Steven M.; Fey, David L.

    2011-01-01

    glacial processes. Overall the results of this study indicate that porphyry Cu indicator minerals in till samples may be useful in the exploration for porphyry deposits in SW Alaska.

  15. Exploring ESASky

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; ESASky Team

    2017-06-01

    ESASky is a science-driven discovery portal for all ESA space astronomy missions. It also includes missions from international partners such as Suzaku and Chandra. The first public release of ESASky features interfaces for sky exploration and for single and multiple target searches. Using the application requires no prior-knowledge of any of the missions involved and gives users world-wide simplified access to high-level science-ready data products from space-based Astronomy missions, plus a number of ESA-produced source catalogues, including the Gaia Data Release 1 catalogue. We highlight here the latest features to be developed, including one that allows the user to project onto the sky the footprints of the JWST instruments, at any chosen position and orientation. This tool has been developed to aid JWST astronomers when they are defining observing proposals. We aim to include other missions and instruments in the near future.

  16. Engaging Students with Subject Matter Experts and Science Content Through Classroom Connection Webinars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Rampe, E.; Stefanov, W. L.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Higgins, M.

    2015-01-01

    Connecting students and teachers in classrooms with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts provides an invaluable opportunity. Subject matter experts can share exciting science and science-related events as well as help to "translate" science being conducted by professionals. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center, has been providing virtual access to subject matter experts through classroom connection webinars for the last five years. Each year, the reach of these events has grown considerably, especially over the last nine months. These virtual connections not only help engage students with role models, but are also designed to help teachers address concepts and content standards they are required to teach. These events also enable scientists and subject matter experts to help "translate" current science in an engaging and understandable manner while actively involving classrooms in the journey of science and exploration.

  17. The concept and feasibility of EXPERT: intelligent armrest using robotics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Yako, Takehiro; Hara, Yosuke; Okamoto, Jun; Toyoda, Kazutaka; Fujie, Masakatsu G; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Continuous precise motions are required in microneurosurgery to provide high-quality surgical results. Stabilizing the surgeon's arm and reducing fatigue during surgery are expected to improve the precision of microsurgical procedures. We have developed an intelligent armrest, EXPERT, that follows the surgeon's hand and fixes at an adequate position automatically using robotics technology. To understand the feasibility of EXPERT by using the system in laboratory experiments and clinical situations. EXPERT has an arm holder and acts as a passive controlled robot with 5 degrees of freedom. The system has 3 modes: transfer, arm-holding, and arm-free mode, which are selected automatically. In the transfer mode, the arm holder follows the surgeon's arm. In the arm-holding mode, EXPERT supports the surgeon's arm weight by fixing the arm holder. The surgeon can move his/her arm away from the arm holder in the arm-free mode. The surgeon can change the position of armrest while looking through the microscope and can continue the microsurgical procedure while holding surgical instruments. Since 2010, EXPERT has been applied in 13 surgeries. The EXPERT system decreased surgeon fatigue and reduced difficulty in performing surgical procedures. The EXPERT system markedly reduced surgeon hand tremor. There were no complications related to the use of this system. EXPERT is a useful tool for holding the surgeon's arm comfortably and following the surgeon's arm automatically.

  18. New genome sequence data and molecular tools promote the use of photosynthetic and edible cyanobacteria in bioregenerative systems to support human space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Natalie; Morin, Nicolas; Janssen, Paul; Mergeay, Max

    Cyanobacteria are daily used as nutritional supplements (e.g. Spirulina) and are considered for promising applications beyond Earth, in space, where they can play a crucial role in closed miniaturised biological waste recycling systems that are currently developed to support future long-term space missions. Cyanobacteria can be cultured with artificial light in controllable photobioreactors, and used for the efficient removal of CO2 from and production of O2 in the at-mosphere of the confined spacecraft, for removal of nitrate from waste water that is recycled to potable water, and as complementary food source. In this context, the filamentous cyanobac-terium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected as part of the bio-regenerative life-support system MELiSSA from the European Space Agency. For bioprocess control and optimisation, the access to its genetic information and the development of molecular tools is crucial. Here we report on our efforts to determine the full genome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005. The obtained sequence data were analysed in detail to gain a better insight in the photosynthetic, nutritive, or potential toxic potential of this strain. In addition, the sensitivity of PCC 8005 to ionizing radiation was investigated because prolonged exposure of PCC 8005 to cosmic radiation in space might have a deleterious effect on its metabolism and oxygenic properties. To our knowledge, of the 6 different research groups across the globe trying to sequence Arthrospira strains, none of them, including us, were yet able to obtain a complete genome sequence. For Arthrospira sp. strain PCC 8005, we obtained 119 contigs (assembled in 16 scaffolds), representing 6,3 Mb, with 5,856 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and 176 genes encoding RNA. The PCC 8005 genome displays an unusual high number of large repeated sequences, covering around 8% of the genome, which likely hampered the sequenc-ing. The PCC 8005 genome is also ridden by mobile

  19. Values in breast cancer screening: an empirical study with Australian experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa; Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy

    2015-05-20

    To explore what Australian experts value in breast screening, how these values are conceptualised and prioritised, and how they inform experts' reasoning and judgement about the Australian breast-screening programme. Qualitative study based on interviews with experts. 33 experts, including clinicians, programme managers, policymakers, advocates and researchers selected for their recognisable influence in the Australian breast-screening setting. Australian breast-screening policy, practice and research settings. Experts expressed 2 types of values: ethical values (about what was good, important or right) and epistemological values (about how evidence should be created and used). Ethical values included delivering benefit, avoiding harm, promoting autonomy, fairness, cost effectiveness, accountability, professionalism and transparency. Epistemological values informed experts' arguments about prioritising and evaluating evidence methodology, source population and professional interests. Some values were conceptualised differently by experts: for example, delivering benefit could mean reducing breast cancer mortality, reducing all-cause mortality, reducing mortality in younger women, reducing need for aggressive treatment, and/or reassuring women they were cancer free. When values came into conflict, experts prioritised them differently: for example, when experts perceived a conflict between delivering benefits and promoting autonomy, there were differences in which value was prioritised. We explain the complexity of the relationship between held values and experts' overall views on breast cancer screening. Experts' positions in breast screening are influenced by evidence and a wide range of ethical and epistemological values. We conclude that discussions about values should be a regular part of breast-screening review in order to build understanding between those who hold different positions, and provide a mechanism for responding to these differences. Published by

  20. Expert judgement models in quantitative risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosqvist, T. [VTT Automation, Helsinki (Finland); Tuominen, R. [VTT Automation, Tampere (Finland)

    1999-12-01

    Expert judgement is a valuable source of information in risk management. Especially, risk-based decision making relies significantly on quantitative risk assessment, which requires numerical data describing the initiator event frequencies and conditional probabilities in the risk model. This data is seldom found in databases and has to be elicited from qualified experts. In this report, we discuss some modelling approaches to expert judgement in risk modelling. A classical and a Bayesian expert model is presented and applied to real case expert judgement data. The cornerstone in the models is the log-normal distribution, which is argued to be a satisfactory choice for modelling degree-of-belief type probability distributions with respect to the unknown parameters in a risk model. Expert judgements are qualified according to bias, dispersion, and dependency, which are treated differently in the classical and Bayesian approaches. The differences are pointed out and related to the application task. Differences in the results obtained from the different approaches, as applied to real case expert judgement data, are discussed. Also, the role of a degree-of-belief type probability in risk decision making is discussed.

  1. Sherlock Holmes: an expert's view of expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Didierjean; Fernand, Gobet

    2008-02-01

    In recent years, there has been an intense research effort to understand the cognitive processes and structures underlying expert behaviour. Work in different fields, including scientific domains, sports, games and mnemonics, has shown that there are vast differences in perceptual abilities between experts and novices, and that these differences may underpin other cognitive differences in learning, memory and problem solving. In this article, we evaluate the progress made in the last years through the eyes of an outstanding, albeit fictional, expert: Sherlock Holmes. We first use the Sherlock Holmes character to illustrate expert processes as described by current research and theories. In particular, the role of perception, as well as the nature and influence of expert knowledge, are all present in the description of Conan Doyle's hero. In the second part of the article, we discuss a number of issues that current research on expertise has barely addressed. These gaps include, for example, several forms of reasoning, the influence of emotions on cognition, and the effect of age on experts' knowledge and cognitive processes. Thus, although nearly 120-year-old, Conan Doyle's books show remarkable illustrations of expert behaviour, including the coverage of themes that have mostly been overlooked by current research.

  2. Use (and abuse) of expert elicitation in support of decision making for public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M Granger

    2014-05-20

    The elicitation of scientific and technical judgments from experts, in the form of subjective probability distributions, can be a valuable addition to other forms of evidence in support of public policy decision making. This paper explores when it is sensible to perform such elicitation and how that can best be done. A number of key issues are discussed, including topics on which there are, and are not, experts who have knowledge that provides a basis for making informed predictive judgments; the inadequacy of only using qualitative uncertainty language; the role of cognitive heuristics and of overconfidence; the choice of experts; the development, refinement, and iterative testing of elicitation protocols that are designed to help experts to consider systematically all relevant knowledge when they make their judgments; the treatment of uncertainty about model functional form; diversity of expert opinion; and when it does or does not make sense to combine judgments from different experts. Although it may be tempting to view expert elicitation as a low-cost, low-effort alternative to conducting serious research and analysis, it is neither. Rather, expert elicitation should build on and use the best available research and analysis and be undertaken only when, given those, the state of knowledge will remain insufficient to support timely informed assessment and decision making.

  3. Visual explorer facilitator's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Palus, Charles J

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in research and practice, the Visual Explorer™ Facilitator's Guide provides a method for supporting collaborative, creative conversations about complex issues through the power of images. The guide is available as a component in the Visual Explorer Facilitator's Letter-sized Set, Visual Explorer Facilitator's Post card-sized Set, Visual Explorer Playing Card-sized Set, and is also available as a stand-alone title for purchase to assist multiple tool users in an organization.

  4. Expert witness testimony in ophthalmology malpractice litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Friedman, Remy; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Langer, Paul D

    2015-03-01

    To examine the relative qualifications of expert witnesses testifying on behalf of plaintiffs vs defendants in ophthalmology malpractice litigation. Correlational and descriptive study; analysis of expert witness and physician demographic data available on several databases. The Westlaw legal database was searched for ophthalmologist expert witness testimony from January 2006 to June 2014. Physician demographic data were used as the main outcome measures, including length of experience, scholarly impact (as measured by the h-index), practice setting, and fellowship training status and were obtained from state medical licensing board sites and online medical facility and practice sites. H-indices were obtained from the Scopus database. Defendant and plaintiff expert witnesses had comparable mean years of experience (32.9 and 35.7, respectively) (P = .12) and scholarly impact (h-index = 8.6 and 8.3, respectively) (P = .42). Cases tended to resolve on the side of the expert witness with the higher h-index (P = .04). Significantly higher proportions of defendant witnesses were in academic practice (P < .05) and underwent fellowship training (P < .001). Ophthalmologist expert witnesses testifying for both plaintiffs and defendants had over 30 years of experience and high scholarly impact. Practitioners testifying on behalf of plaintiffs were statistically less likely to work in an academic setting and have subspecialty training. Scholarly impact of expert witnesses appeared to affect trial outcomes. Surgical societies should stringently police for appropriate expert witness testimony given by both plaintiff and defense experts in malpractice litigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Shared Knowledge among Graphic Designers, Instructional Designers and Subject Matter Experts in Designing Multimedia-Based Instructional Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2013-01-01

    The research identified and explored the shared knowledge among the instructional multimedia design and development experts comprising of subject matter expert, graphic designer and instructional designer. The knowledge shared by the team was categorized into three groups of multimedia design principles encompasses of basic principles, authoring…

  6. Revamping Grooving Process for Sustainability using Fuzzy Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqba Asif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an application of a fuzzy expert system for renovating a metal cutting process to cope with the sustainability requirements. The work seeks a sustainable balance between energy consumption, productivity and tool damage. Cylindrical grooving experiments were performed to generate data related to quantification of the effects of material hardness, cutting speed, width of cut and feed rate on the aforementioned sustainability measures. A fuzzy knowledge-base was developed that suggests the most suitable adjustments of the controlled variables that would lead to achievement of various combinations of the objectives.

  7. Shell Scripting Expert Recipes for Linux, Bash and more

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A compendium of shell scripting recipes that can immediately be used, adjusted, and applied The shell is the primary way of communicating with the Unix and Linux systems, providing a direct way to program by automating simple-to-intermediate tasks. With this book, Linux expert Steve Parker shares a collection of shell scripting recipes that can be used as is or easily modified for a variety of environments or situations. The book covers shell programming, with a focus on Linux and the Bash shell; it provides credible, real-world relevance, as well as providing the flexible tools to get started

  8. Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Gerald G.

    2017-08-02

    The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of prior judgements, but groups are also prone to uncritical

  9. Expert Mining for Solving Social Harmony Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jifa; Song, Wuqi; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Liu, Yijun

    Social harmony problems are being existed in social system, which is an open giant complex system. For solving such kind of problems the Meta-synthesis system approach proposed by Qian XS et al will be applied. In this approach the data, information, knowledge, model, experience and wisdom should be integrated and synthesized. Data mining, text mining and web mining are good techniques for using data, information and knowledge. Model mining, psychology mining and expert mining are new techniques for mining the idea, opinions, experiences and wisdom. In this paper we will introduce the expert mining, which is based on mining the experiences, knowledge and wisdom directly from experts, managers and leaders.

  10. Expert systems and ballistic range data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Wayne; Steinhoff, Mark; Whyte, Robert; Brown, David; Choate, Jeff; Adelgren, Russ

    1992-07-01

    A program aimed at the development of an expert system for the reduction of ballistic range data is described. The program applies expert system and artificial intelligence techniques to develop a mathematically complex state-of-the-art spark range data reduction procedure that includes linear theory and six-degree-of-freedom analysis. The scope of the knowledge base includes both spin and statically stable vehicles. The expert system is expected to improve the quality of the data reduction process while reducing the work load on the senior range engineer.

  11. Psychiatric expert witnesses in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutheil, Thomas G

    2006-09-01

    We may anticipate changes in who is the expert in terms of gender, ethnicity, and professional discipline. We anticipate elaboration of training approaches. We foresee emergence of the "forensic tutor" role. We expect expansion of expert roles outside the courtroom. We expect demands for more constraint of expert roles, increased rigor, and empiric support. We expect vast expansion of technologic approaches to assessment and presentation. We expect evolution of ethical issues with preservation of core forensic values but changes in confidentiality, due process, and the nature of assessments. We expect extreme expansion of hard sciences in relation to understanding psychopathology.

  12. Expert - Non-expert differences in visual behaviour during alpine slalom skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroix, Marjolein; Wazir, Mohd Rozilee Wazir Norjali; Zeuwts, Linus; Deconinck, Frederik F J A; Lenoir, Matthieu; Vansteenkiste, Pieter

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate visual behaviour of expert and non-expert ski athletes during an alpine slalom. Fourteen non-experts and five expert slalom skiers completed an alpine slalom course in an indoor ski slope while wearing a head-mounted eye tracking device. Experts completed the slalom clearly faster than non-experts, but no significant difference was found in timing and position of the turn initiation. Although both groups already looked at future obstacles approximately 0,5s before passing the upcoming pole, the higher speed of experts implied that they shifted gaze spatially earlier in the bend than non-experts. Furthermore, experts focussed more on the second next pole while non-expert slalom skiers looked more to the snow surface immediately in front of their body. No difference was found in the fixation frequency, average fixation duration, and quiet eye duration between both groups. These results suggest that experts focus on the timing of their actions while non-experts still need to pay attention to the execution of these actions. These results also might suggest that ski trainers should instruct non-experts and experts to focus on the next pole and, shift their gaze to the second next pole shortly before reaching it. Based on the current study it seems unadvisable to instruct slalom skiers to look several poles ahead during the actual slalom. However, future research should test if these results still hold on a real outdoor slope, including multiple vertical gates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Unintended Side Effects of Digital Transition: Perspectives of Japanese Experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Sugiyama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The core of the digital transition is the representation of all kinds of real-world entities and processes and an increasing number of cognitive processes by digital information and algorithms on computers. These allow for seemingly unlimited storage, operation, retrieval, and transmission capacities that make digital tools economically available for all domains of society and empower human action, particularly combined with real-world interfaces such as displays, robots, sensors, 3D printers, etc. Digital technologies are general-purpose technologies providing unprecedented potential benefits for sustainability. However, they will bring about a multitude of potential unintended side effects, and this demands a transdisciplinary discussion on unwanted societal changes as well as a shift in science from analog to digital modeling and structure. Although social discourse has begun, the topical scope and regional coverage have been limited. Here, we report on an expert roundtable on digital transition held in February 2017 in Tokyo, Japan. Drawing on a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, our discussions highlight the importance of cultural contexts and the need to bridge local and global conversations. Although Japanese experts did mention side effects, their focus was on how to ensure that AI and robots could coexist with humans. Such a perspective is not well appreciated everywhere outside Japan. Stakeholder dialogues have already begun in Japan, but greater efforts are needed to engage a broader collection of experts in addition to stakeholders to broaden the social debate.

  14. Research on an expert system for TRIZ Method applying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Burz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available TRIZ method is a powerful creative technique, used in the most diverse and competitive fields of engineering, and, among others, in value analysis / engineering. Psychological creativity tools, including brainstorming and related methods, have the disadvantage that they have unpredictable and unrepeatable results. Unlike these TRIZ provides repeatability, predictability, reliability and algorithmic approach. One of the fundamental concepts of TRIZ is that contradiction which must be removed from a technical system. It was found that there are 39 standard technical features that could lead to contradictions in the technical system analysis and 40 inventive principles that can resolve generated conflicts creatively. For this a method was developed to correlate the conflicts with inventive principles known as the “contradictions matrix”. On the other hand, a problem in a particular area, it is a good candidate for expert system technology if it meets several criteria. One of the most important activities that precede construction of an expert system is knowledge representation, among the most popular models of knowledge representation being decision tables. The contradictions matrix can be transformed in decision tables with standard structure. An expert system for TRIZ method should, based on the 39 parameters that may in conflict, choose the inventive principles from contradictions matrix and then for each inventive principle chosen provide examples and afferent details and other related items resulting from experience.

  15. EXPERT SYSTEMS USED IN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan Constantin Dima; Mariana Man; Ciurea Vergil; Iwona Grabara

    2010-01-01

    In the conditions of computing the human society, the operational management activities can be improved by using artificial intelligence. Therefore, an expert system is proposed, for the metallurgical industry, for the casting activity for parts necessary in mining industry.

  16. School Construction Management: Expert Administrators Speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents expert opinion on school construction management communication concerning educational needs, obtaining consensus among diverse groups, and envisioning what schools must offer in the future. Why furniture issues are also important is highlighted. (GR)

  17. Implicit Communication in Novice and Expert Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swain, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    ... (military, sporting or business teams). This suggests that expert teams may be utilising shared mental models of both the roles of their teammates and how they should be working together in a group situation...

  18. Automated expert modeling for automated student evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    The 8th International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems provides a leading international forum for the dissemination of original results in the design, implementation, and evaluation of intelligent tutoring systems and related areas. The conference draws researchers from a broad spectrum of disciplines ranging from artificial intelligence and cognitive science to pedagogy and educational psychology. The conference explores intelligent tutoring systems increasing real world impact on an increasingly global scale. Improved authoring tools and learning object standards enable fielding systems and curricula in real world settings on an unprecedented scale. Researchers deploy ITS's in ever larger studies and increasingly use data from real students, tasks, and settings to guide new research. With high volumes of student interaction data, data mining, and machine learning, tutoring systems can learn from experience and improve their teaching performance. The increasing number of realistic evaluation studies also broaden researchers knowledge about the educational contexts for which ITS's are best suited. At the same time, researchers explore how to expand and improve ITS/student communications, for example, how to achieve more flexible and responsive discourse with students, help students integrate Web resources into learning, use mobile technologies and games to enhance student motivation and learning, and address multicultural perspectives.

  19. Jess, the Java expert system shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman-Hill, E.J.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes Jess, a clone of the popular CLIPS expert system shell written entirely in Java. Jess supports the development of rule-based expert systems which can be tightly coupled to code written in the powerful, portable Java language. The syntax of the Jess language is discussed, and a comprehensive list of supported functions is presented. A guide to extending Jess by writing Java code is also included.

  20. An Expert Instructor's Use of Social Congruence, Cognitive Congruence, and Expertise in an Online Case-Based Instructional Design Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koehler, Adrie A; Kim, WooRi; Watson, Sunnie Lee; Rico, Rudy; Ertmer, Peggy

    2017-01-01

    ...—is a skill that eludes many instructors (Darling-Hammond, 2008; Ge, Yamashiro, & Lee, 2000). This study explored the role and strategies of an expert instructor in an online advanced instructional design...