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Sample records for experiments vi kinematics

  1. Action experience changes attention to kinematic cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney eFilippi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study used remote corneal reflection eye-tracking to examine the relationship between motor experience and action anticipation in 13-month-old infants. To measure online anticipation of actions infants watched videos where the actor’s hand provided kinematic information (in its orientation about the type of object that the actor was going to reach for. The actor’s hand orientation either matched the orientation of a rod (congruent cue or did not match the orientation of the rod (incongruent cue. To examine relations between motor experience and action anticipation, we used a 2 (reach first vs. observe first x 2 (congruent kinematic cue vs. incongruent kinematic cue between-subjects design. We show that 13-month-old infants in the observe first condition spontaneously generate rapid online visual predictions to congruent hand orientation cues and do not visually anticipate when presented incongruent cues. We further demonstrate that the speed that these infants generate predictions to congruent motor cues is correlated with their own ability to pre-shape their hands. Finally, we demonstrate that following reaching experience, infants generate rapid predictions to both congruent and incongruent hand shape cues—suggesting that short-term experience changes attention to kinematics.

  2. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Lyα, Lyβ, and O VI λλ1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ≤ log (M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ≤ 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ∼40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ∼15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ∼45% for 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ∼90% for 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ∼40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ∼85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼5%. For 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ∼55% and ∼35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ∼90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  3. Analysis of KROTOS KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments with TEXAS-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ronghua, E-mail: rhchen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Jun [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Su, G.H.; Qiu, Suizheng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Corradini, M.L., E-mail: Corradini@engr.wisc.edu [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments were analyzed by TEXAS-VI. • The coarse mixing status up to the explosion triggering time was well predicted by TEXAS-VI. • The predicted dynamic explosion pressure was in good agreement with the experimental results. - Abstract: TEXAS-VI is a transient, three-field, one-dimensional mechanistic model for the steam explosion phenomena. A fuel solidification model and associated fragmentation criteria of the solidifying particle for both the mixing phase and explosion phase were developed and incorporated into TEXAS-VI to account for solidification. In the present study, TEXAS-VI was used to analyze the KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments, which were performed in the KROTOS facility as part of the OECD-SERENA-2 program. In the simulation, the KROTOS experimental facility was modeled as Eulerian control volumes based on the facility geometry. The molten corium jet was divided up into a series of LaGrangian master particles equal to the initial jet diameter. Both the mixing phase and the explosion phase of the experiments were simulated by TEXAS-VI. Comparison to test data indicates that the fuel jet kinematics and the vapor volume during the mixing phase were well predicted by TEXAS-VI. The TEXAS-VI prediction of the dynamic explosion pressure at different axial locations in the test was also in good agreement with the experimental results. The maximum pressure of KS-2 and KS-4 predicted by TEXAS-VI were 16.7 MPa and 41.9 MPa, respectively. The KS-4 maximum steam explosion pressure predicted by TEXAS-VI was higher than that of KS-2, which was consistent with experiment observation. The observed differences of the dynamic explosion pressure between the KS-2 and KS-4 experiments were also successfully simulated by TEXAS-VI. This suggests that TEXAS-VI is able to analyze the effect of prototypic melt compositions on the steam explosion phenomena. Additional benchmarking and evaluations are ongoing.

  4. VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC 2 -2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format

  5. A School Experiment in Kinematics: Shooting from a Ballistic Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjc, T.; Razpet, N.

    2011-01-01

    Many physics textbooks start with kinematics. In the lab, students observe the motions, describe and make predictions, and get acquainted with basic kinematics quantities and their meaning. Then they can perform calculations and compare the results with experimental findings. In this paper we describe an experiment that is not often done, but is…

  6. Experiments indicating a second hydrogen ordered phase of ice VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Tobias M; Thoeny, Alexander V; Plaga, Lucie J; Köster, Karsten W; Etter, Martin; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas

    2018-05-14

    In the last twelve years five new ice phases were experimentally prepared. Two of them are empty clathrate hydrates and three of them represent hydrogen ordered counterparts of previously known disordered ice phases. Here, we report on hydrogen ordering in ice VI samples produced by cooling at pressures up to 2.00 GPa. Based on results from calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction the existence of a second hydrogen ordered polymorph related to ice VI is suggested. Powder X-ray data show the oxygen network to be the one of ice VI. For the 1.80 GPa sample the activation energy from dielectric spectroscopy is 45 kJ mol -1 , which is much larger than for the known hydrogen ordered proxy of ice VI, ice XV. Raman spectroscopy indicates the 1.80 GPa sample to be more ordered than ice XV. It is further distinct from ice XV in that it experiences hydrogen disordering above ≈103 K which is 26 K below the ice XV to ice VI disordering transition. Consequently, below 103 K it is thermodynamically more stable than ice XV, adding a stability region to the phase diagram of water. For the time being we suggest to call this new phase ice β-XV and to relabel it ice XVIII once its crystal structure is known.

  7. A School Experiment in Kinematics: Shooting from a Ballistic Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjc, T.; Razpet, N.

    2011-10-01

    Many physics textbooks start with kinematics. In the lab, students observe the motions, describe and make predictions, and get acquainted with basic kinematics quantities and their meaning. Then they can perform calculations and compare the results with experimental findings. In this paper we describe an experiment that is not often done, but is interesting and attractive to students—the ballistic cart, i.e., the shooting of a ball from a cart moving along a slope. For that, one has to be familiar with one-dimensional uniform motion and one-dimensional motion with constant acceleration, as well as curvilinear motion that is a combination of such motions.1,2 The experimental results confirm theoretical predictions.

  8. Kinematic mounting systems for NSLS beamlines and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversluizen, T.; Stoeber, W.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for kinematically mounting equipment are well established, but applications at synchrotron radiation facilities are subject to constraints not always encountered in more traditional laboratory settings. Independent position adjustment of beamline components can have significant benefits in terms of minimizing time spent aligning, and maximizing time spent acquiring data. In this paper, we use examples taken from beamlines at the NSLS to demonstrate approaches for optimization of the reproducibility, stability, excursion, and set-up time for various situations. From our experience, we extract general principles which we hope will be useful for workers at other synchrotron radiation facilities. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  10. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  11. Criticality experiment for No.2 core of DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Liu Zhenhua; Yan Fengwen; Luo Zhiwen; Chu Chun; Liang Shuhong

    2007-01-01

    At the completion of the DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility, its core changed, and it was restarted and a series of experiments and measurements were made. According to the data from 29 criticality experiments, the criticality element number and mass were calculated, the control rod reactivity worth were measured by period method and rod compensate method, reactivity worth of safety rod and safety block were measured using reactivity instrument; the reactivity worth of outer elements and radial distribution of elements were measured too. Based on all the measurements mentioned above, safety operation parameters for core 2 in DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility were conformed. (authors)

  12. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. VI. Spatial distribution and kinematics of early- and late-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, P. A. M.; Katgert, P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) has shown that the space distribution and kinematics of galaxies with detectable emission lines in their spectra differ significantly from those of galaxies without emission lines. This result, and details of the kinematics, were considered as support for the idea that at least the spirals with emission lines are on orbits that are not isotropic. This might indicate that this subset of late-type galaxies either has `first approach'-orbits towards the dense core of their respective clusters, or has orbits that `avoid' the core. The galaxies with emission lines are essentially all late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the emission-line galaxies represent only about a third of the late-type galaxies, the majority of which do not show detectable emission lines. The galaxies without emission lines are therefore a mix of early- and late-type galaxies. In this paper we attempt to separate early- and late-type galaxies, and we study possible differences in distribution and kinematics of the two galaxy classes. For only about 10% of the galaxies in the ENACS, the morphology is known from imaging. Here, we describe our classification on the basis of the ENACS spectrum. The significant information in each spectrum is compressed into 15 Principal Components, which are used as input for an Artificial Neural Network. The latter is `trained' with 150 of the 270 galaxies for which a morphological type is available from Dressler, and subsequently used to classify each galaxy. This yields a classification for two-thirds of the ENACS galaxies. The Artificial Neural Network has two output classes: early-type (E+S0) and late-type (S+I) galaxies. We do not distinguish E and S0 galaxies, because these cannot be separated very robustly on the basis of the spectrum. The success rate of the classification is estimated from the sample of 120 galaxies with Dressler morphologies which were not used to train the ANN

  13. COMPARISON STUDY OF EXPERIMENTS AND PREDICTIONS OF WAVE KINEMATICS FOR ROGUE WAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Jin Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the wave kinematics under the rogue wave crest, a series of experiments were performed in 2-D wave tank with the application of PIV technique to measure the velocities under the free surface. Three different prediction methods of linear extrapolation, Wheeler stretching, and modified stretching were applied to estimate water wave kinematics and compared with PIV experimental results under the highest wave crest of irregular wave trains satisfying with rogue wave criteria. Also, the cut-off frequency dependence for three prediction methods was investigated with varying spectral peak frequencies to estimate wave kinematics including velocities and accelerations in horizontal and vertical directions. It was suggested that the cut-off frequency for the reasonable prediction of the wave kinematics under the rogue wave crest could be chosen three times of spectral peak wave frequency for the linear extrapolation and higher frequency than four times of spectral peak wave frequency for Wheeler stretching and modified stretching method.

  14. Kinematic segmentation of accretive wedges based on scaled sandbox experiments and their application to nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrmann, J.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2003-04-01

    Recording the incremental displacement field of scaled analogue simulations provides detailed data on wedge kinematics and timing of internal deformation. This is a very efficient tool to develop kinematic concepts and test mechanical theories, e.g. the critical-taper theory. Such models could not be validated until now by the available geological and geophysical data, since there was no information about the incremental displacement field. Recent GPS measurements and seismological investigations at convergent margins provide well-constrained strain-rates and kinematics of short-termed processes. These data allow the kinematic models that are based on analogue simulations to be tested against field observations. We investigate convergent accretive sand wedges in scaled analogue simulations. We define three kinematic segments based on distinctive wedge taper, displacement field and timing of deformation (recorded at a slow sampling rate, which represents the geological scale). Only one of these segments is in a critical state of stress, whereas the other segments are either in a sub-critical or stable state of stress. Such a kinematic segmentation is not predicted for ideally homogeneous wedge-shaped bodies by the critical-taper theory, but can be explained by the formation of localised weak shear zones, which preferentially accommodate deformation. These weak zones are formed in granular analogue materials, and also in natural rocks, since these materials show a strain-softening phase prior to the achievement of stable mechanical conditions. Therefore we suggest that the kinematic segmentation of convergent sand wedges should also be observed in natural settings, such as accretionary wedges, foreland fold-and-thrust belts and even entire orogens. To validate this hypothesis we compare strain rates from GPS measurements and kinematics deduced from focal mechanisms with the respective data from sandbox experiments. We present a strategy to compare strain rates and

  15. Experiments and kinematics analysis of a hand rehabilitation exoskeleton with circuitous joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuhai; Fu, Yili; Zhang, Qinchao; Wang, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients, a wearable hand exoskeleton with circuitous joint is proposed. The circuitous joint adopts the symmetric pinion and rack mechanism (SPRM) with the parallel mechanism. The exoskeleton finger is a serial mechanism composed of three closed-chain SPRM joints in series. The kinematic equations of the open chain of the finger and the closed chains of the SPRM joints were built to analyze the kinematics of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton. The experimental setup of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton was built and the continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation experiment and the test of human-robot interaction force measurement were conducted. Experiment results show that the mechanical design of the hand rehabilitation robot is reasonable and that the kinematic analysis is correct, thus the exoskeleton can be used for the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  16. Uranium(VI) retention on quartz and kaolinite. Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignot, G.

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of uranium in the geosphere is an important issue for safety performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories, or in the context of contaminated sites due to mining activity related to nuclear field. Under aerobic conditions, the fate of uranium is mainly governed by the ability of minerals to sorb U(VI) aqueous species. Hence, a thorough understanding of U(VI) sorption processes on minerals is required to provide a valuable prediction of U(VI) migration in the environment. In this study, we performed sorption/desorption experiments of U(VI) on quartz and kaolinite, for systems favouring the formation in solution (i) of UO 2 2+ and monomeric hydrolysis products or (ii) of di-/tri-meric uranyl aqueous species, and / or U(VI)-colloids or UO 2 (OH) 2 precipitates, or (iii) of uranyl-carbonate complexes. Particular attention was paid to determine the surface characteristics of the solids and their modification due to dissolution/precipitation processes during experiments. A double layer surface complexation model was applied to our experimental data in order to derive surface complexation equilibria and intrinsic constants which allow a valuable description of U(VI) retention over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, initial concentration of uranium [0.1-10μM] and solid - solution equilibration time. U(VI) sorption on quartz was successfully modeled by using two sets of adsorption equilibria, assuming (i) the formation of the surface complexes SiOUO 2 + , SiOUO 2 OH and SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 , or (ii) the formation of the mono-dentate complex SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 and of the bidentate complex (SiO) 2 UO 2 . Assumptions on the density of each type of surface sites of kaolinite and on their acid-base properties were made from potentiometric titrations of kaolinite suspensions. We proposed on such a basis a set of surface complexation equilibria which accounts for U(VI) uptake on kaolinite over a wide range of chemical conditions, with aluminol edge sites as

  17. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE KINEMATICS OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Blakeslee, John P. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bekki, Kenji [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Duc, Pierre-Alain, E-mail: hongxin@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2015-03-20

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs; r{sub h} ≳ 10 pc)—objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies—has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme star clusters, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs and 911 GCs associated with the central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M {sub *} ≳ 2× 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the confirmed sample of Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of blue GCs in the inner ∼70 kpc and as steep as that of red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than GCs, and blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have an orbital anisotropy profile that is tangentially biased at radii ≲40 kpc and radially biased farther out, whereas blue GCs become more tangentially biased at larger radii beyond ∼40 kpc; (4) GCs with M {sub *} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the 'tidally threshed dwarf galaxy' scenario.

  18. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE KINEMATICS OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Blakeslee, John P.; Liu, Chengze; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Caldwell, Nelson; Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Bekki, Kenji; Boselli, Alessandro; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-01-01

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs; r h ≳ 10 pc)—objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies—has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme star clusters, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs and 911 GCs associated with the central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M *  ≳ 2× 10 6 M ☉ and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the confirmed sample of Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of blue GCs in the inner ∼70 kpc and as steep as that of red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than GCs, and blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have an orbital anisotropy profile that is tangentially biased at radii ≲40 kpc and radially biased farther out, whereas blue GCs become more tangentially biased at larger radii beyond ∼40 kpc; (4) GCs with M *  ≳ 2 × 10 6 M ☉ have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the 'tidally threshed dwarf galaxy' scenario

  19. Analysis of benchmark critical experiments with ENDF/B-VI data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J. Jr.; Kahler, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Several clean critical experiments were analyzed with ENDF/B-VI data to assess the adequacy of the data for U 235 , U 238 and oxygen. These experiments were (1) a set of homogeneous U 235 -H 2 O assemblies spanning a wide range of hydrogen/uranium ratio, and (2) TRX-1, a simple, H 2 O-moderated Bettis lattice of slightly-enriched uranium metal rods. The analyses used the Monte Carlo program RCP01, with explicit three-dimensional geometry and detailed representation of cross sections. For the homogeneous criticals, calculated k crit values for large, thermal assemblies show good agreement with experiment. This supports the evaluated thermal criticality parameters for U 235 . However, for assemblies with smaller H/U ratios, k crit values increase significantly with increasing leakage and flux-spectrum hardness. These trends suggest that leakage is underpredicted and that the resonance eta of the ENDF/B-VI U 235 is too large. For TRX-1, reasonably good agreement is found with measured lattice parameters (reaction-rate ratios). Of primary interest is rho28, the ratio of above-thermal to thermal U 238 capture. Calculated rho28 is 2.3 (± 1.7) % above measurement, suggesting that U 238 resonance capture remains slightly overpredicted with ENDF/B-VI. However, agreement is better than observed with earlier versions of ENDF/B

  20. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) which is part of the GCI. The GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality augmentation Broker (DAB-Q) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. The GeoViQua architecture also includes a Feedback Catalog, a particular service brokered by the DAB-Q which is dedicated to the storage and discovery of user feedbacks. A very important issue

  1. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns under sulfate-reducing/fermentative conditions exhibited the greatest Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Two sulfate columns evolved to complete lactate fermentation with acetate and propionate produced in the column effluent after 40 days of experiments. These fermenting columns showed a complete removal of injected Cr(VI), visible precipitation of sulfide minerals, and a significant increase in effluent Fe and Mn concentrations. Reactive transport simulations suggested that direct reduction of Cr(VI) by

  2. Kinematical analysis with the Emulsion Cloud Chamber in the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Capua, F

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at measuring for the first time neutrino oscil- lation in appearance mode through the detection of ni-tau in an almost pure niμ beam produced at CERN SPS (CNGS), 730 km far from the detector. The ni-tau appearance signal is identified through the measurement of the decay daughter particles of the " lepton produced in CC ni-tau interactions. Since the short-lived " particle has, at the energy of the beam, an average decay length shorter than a 1 mm, a micrometric detection resolution is needed. The OPERA appara- tus is hybrid, using nuclear emulsion as high precision tracker and electronic detectors for the time stamp, event localization in the target and muon recon- struction. The Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique fulfils the requirement of a microscopic resolution together with a large target mass. The kinematical analysis allowed by this technique is described.

  3. Modacrylic anion-exchange fibers for Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water in batch and flow-through column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Chan; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Hye; Choi, Nag-Choul; Kim, Song-Bae

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water using modacrylic anion-exchange fibers (KaracaronTM KC31). Batch experiments were performed with synthetic Cr(VI) solutions to characterize the KC31 fibers in Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) removal by the fibers was affected by solution pH; the Cr(VI) removal capacity was the highest at pH 2 and decreased gradually with a pH increase from 2 to 12. In regeneration and reuse experiments, the Cr(VI) removal capacity remained above 37.0 mg g -1 over five adsorption-desorption cycles, demonstrating that the fibers could be successfully regenerated with NaCl solution and reused. The maximum Cr(VI) removal capacity was determined to be 250.3 mg g -1 from the Langmuir model. In Fourier-transform infrared spectra, a Cr = O peak newly appeared at 897 cm -1 after Cr(VI) removal, whereas a Cr-O peak was detected at 772 cm -1 due to the association of Cr(VI) ions with ion-exchange sites. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that Cr(VI) was partially reduced to Cr(III) after the ion exchange on the surfaces of the fibers. Batch experiments with chromium-plating rinse water (Cr(VI) concentration = 1178.8 mg L -1 ) showed that the fibers had a Cr(VI) removal capacity of 28.1-186.4 mg g -1 under the given conditions (fiber dose = 1-10 g L -1 ). Column experiments (column length = 10 cm, inner diameter = 2.5 cm) were conducted to examine Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water by the fibers under flow-through column conditions. The Cr(VI) removal capacities for the fibers at flow rates of 0.5 and 1.0 mL min -1 were 214.8 and 171.5 mg g -1 , respectively. This study demonstrates that KC31 fibers are effective in the removal of Cr(VI) ions from chromium-plating rinse water.

  4. Kinematic Navigation in Total Knee Replacement — Experience from the First 50 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chang

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Use of a kinematic navigation system in TKR provides better accuracy than conventional manual methods. The technique is easy to use, has a short learning curve, and requires an additional operation time of less than 10 minutes. Precise alignment can be achieved with the aid of navigation in most cases.

  5. Aeroelastic experiments with measurement of the kinematic properties based on optical methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládek, Štěpán; Zolotarev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2015), s. 43-53 ISSN 1803-9782 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10527S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : aeroelasticity * optical measurements * vibration frequencies * kinematic properties * profile in the wind tunnel Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. ViCAR: An Adaptive and Landmark-Free Registration of Time Lapse Image Data from Microfluidics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Hattab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand gene function in bacterial life cycles, time lapse bioimaging is applied in combination with different marker protocols in so called microfluidics chambers (i.e., a multi-well plate. In one experiment, a series of T images is recorded for one visual field, with a pixel resolution of 60 nm/px. Any (semi-automatic analysis of the data is hampered by a strong image noise, low contrast and, last but not least, considerable irregular shifts during the acquisition. Image registration corrects such shifts enabling next steps of the analysis (e.g., feature extraction or tracking. Image alignment faces two obstacles in this microscopic context: (a highly dynamic structural changes in the sample (i.e., colony growth and (b an individual data set-specific sample environment which makes the application of landmarks-based alignments almost impossible. We present a computational image registration solution, we refer to as ViCAR: (Visual (Cues based (Adaptive (Registration, for such microfluidics experiments, consisting of (1 the detection of particular polygons (outlined and segmented ones, referred to as visual cues, (2 the adaptive retrieval of three coordinates throughout different sets of frames, and finally (3 an image registration based on the relation of these points correcting both rotation and translation. We tested ViCAR with different data sets and have found that it provides an effective spatial alignment thereby paving the way to extract temporal features pertinent to each resulting bacterial colony. By using ViCAR, we achieved an image registration with 99.9% of image closeness, based on the average rmsd of 4.10−2 pixels, and superior results compared to a state of the art algorithm.

  7. Full kinematic reconstruction of charged B mesons with the upgraded Inner Tracking System of the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074762

    In this thesis, the performance of the full kinematic reconstruction of $\\mathrm{{B}}^{+}$ mesons in the decay channel $\\mathrm{{B}}^{+}\\rightarrow\\mathrm{\\overline{D}^{0}}\\pi^{+}$ ($\\mbox{$\\mathrm{\\overline{D}^{0}}\\rightarrow \\mathrm{K}^{+}\\pi^{-}$}$) and charge conjugates for the 0-10 % most central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}$ = 5.5 TeV is demonstrated for the upgraded ALICE Experiment, which is planned before Run 3 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), beginning in 2020. Within the scope of the foreseen detector and readout upgrades to inspect all Pb-Pb collisions at their interaction rate of 50 kHz, in particular through the installation of a new high-granularity pixel inner tracker, for the first time these rare signals will become accessible using full kinematic reconstruction in central Pb-Pb collisions in ALICE at mid-rapidity at the LHC. Topological and kinematic criteria are used to select the beauty signal against the large combinatorial and correlated background. In addition to a...

  8. ENDF/B VI iron validation onpca-replica (H2O/FE) shielding benchmark experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescarini, M. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia `E. Clementel` - Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The PCA-REPLICA (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment is analysed using the SN 2-D DOT 3.5 code and the 3-D-equivalent flux synthesis method. This engineering benchmark reproduces the ex-core radial geometry of a PWR, including a mild steel reactor pressure vessel (RPV) simulator, and is dsigned to test the accuracy of the calculation of the in-vessel neutron exposure parameters (fast fluence and iron displacement rates). This accuracy is strongly dependent on the quality of the iron neutron cross section used to describe the nuclear reactions within the RPV simulator. In particular, in this report, the cross sections based on the ENDF/B VI iron data files are tested, through a comparison of the calculated integral and spectral results with the corresponding experimental data. In addition, the present results are compared, on the same benchmark experiment, with those of a preceding ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy, New Technologies and Environment)-Bologna validation of the JEF-2.1 iron cross sections. The integral result comparison indicates that, for all the thresold detectors considered (Rh-103 (n,n) Rh-103m, In-115 (n,n) In-115 (n,n) In-115m and S-32 (n.p) P-32), the ENDF/B VI iron data produce better results than the JEF-2.1 iron data. In particular, in the ENDF/B VI calcultaions, an improvement of the in-vessel C/E (Calculated/Experimental) activity ratios for the lower energy threshold detectors, Rh-103 and In-115, is observed. This improvement becomes more evident with increasing neutron penetration depth in the vessel. This is probably attributable to the fact that the inelastic scattering cross section values of the ENDF/B VI Fe-56 data file, approximately in the 0.86 - 1.5 MeV energy range, are lower then the corresponding values of the JEF-2.1 data file.

  9. Decoupling the Wrist: A Cadaveric Experiment Examining Wrist Kinematics Following Midcarpal Fusion and Scaphoid Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A.; Bednar, Michael S.; Havey, Robert M.; Murray, Wendy M.

    2016-01-01

    At the wrist, kinematic coupling (the relationship between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) facilitates function. Although the midcarpal joint is critical for kinematic coupling, many surgeries, such as four-corner fusion (4CF) and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion (SE4CF), modify the midcarpal joint. This study examines how 4CF and SE4CF influence kinematic coupling by quantifying wrist axes of rotation. Wrist axes of rotation were quantified in eight cadaveric specimens using an optimization algorithm, which fit a two-revolute joint model to experimental data. In each specimen, data measuring the motion of the third metacarpal relative to the radius was collected for three conditions (nonimpaired, 4CF, SE4CF). The calculated axes of rotation were compared using spherical statistics. The angle between the axes of rotation was used to assess coupling, as the nonimpaired wrist has skew axes (i.e., angle between axes approximately 60°). Following 4CF and SE4CF, the axes are closer to orthogonal than those of the nonimpaired wrist. The mean angle (±95 percent confidence interval) between the axes was 92.6° ± 25.2° and 99.8° ± 22.0° for 4CF and SE4CF, respectively. The axes of rotation defined in this study can be used to define joint models, which will facilitate more accurate computational and experimental studies of these procedures. PMID:27705062

  10. Interaction between U(VI) and Fe(II) in aqueous solution under anaerobic conditions. Closed system experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllykylae, E.; Ollila, K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these experiments is to investigate the potential reduction of U(VI) carbonate and hydroxide complexes by aqueous Fe(II). This reduction phenomenon could be important under the disposal conditions of spent fuel. If groundwater enters the copper/iron canister, alpha radiolysis of the water may locally induce oxidizing conditions on the surface of UO 2 fuel, leading to the dissolution of UO 2 as more soluble U(VI) species. A potential reducing agent in the intruding water is Fe(II)(aq) from anaerobic corrosion of the copper/iron canister. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would substantially decrease the solubility of U as well as co-precipitate other actinides and radionuclides. The interaction experiments were conducted in 0.01 M NaCl and 0.002 M NaHCO 3 solutions using an initial uranium concentration of either 8.4 x 10 -8 or 4.2 x 10 -7 mol/L with an initial Fe(II) concentration of 1.8 x 10 -6 in the NaCl solutions and 1.3 x 10 -6 mol/L in the NaHCO 3 solutions. Only after an equilibration period for U(VI) complexation was Fe(II) added to the solutions. The reaction times varied from 1 week to 5 months. For extra protection against O 2 , even inside a glove-box (N 2 atmosphere), the plastic reaction vessels were closed in metallic containers. The concentrations of U, Fe TOT and Fe(II) were analysed as a function of time for unfiltered, micro- and ultrafiltered samples. In addition, the precipitate on the ultrafilters was analysed with ESEM-EDS. The evolution of pH and Eh values was measured. The oxidation state of U in solution was preliminarily analysed for chosen periods. The results of the tests in 0.01 M NaCl showed an initial rapid decrease in U concentration after the addition of Fe(II) to the solution. The U found on test vessel walls at the end of the reaction periods, as well as the ESEM-EDS analyses of the filtered precipitates from the test solutions, showed that precipitation of U had occurred. The oxidation state analyses showed the presence

  11. Development and validation of a model of bio-barriers for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers using laboratory column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, T; Bhallamudi, S Murty; Philip, Ligy

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale transport and biotransformation experiments and mathematical model simulations were carried out to study the effectiveness of bio-barriers for the containment of hexavalent chromium in contaminated confined aquifers. Experimental results showed that a 10cm thick bio-barrier with an initial biomass concentration of 0.205mg/g of soil was able to completely contain a Cr(VI) plume of 25mg/L concentration. It was also observed that pore water velocity and initial biomass concentration are the most significant parameters in the containment of Cr(VI). The mathematical model developed is based on one-dimensional advection-dispersion reaction equations for Cr(VI) and molasses in saturated, homogeneous porous medium. The transport of Cr(VI) and molasses is coupled with adsorption and Monod's inhibition kinetics for immobile bacteria. It was found that, in general, the model was able to simulate the experimental results satisfactorily. However, there was disparity between the numerically simulated and experimental breakthrough curves for Cr(VI) and molasses in cases where there was high clay content and high microbial activity. The mathematical model could contribute towards improved designs of future bio-barriers for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers.

  12. Kinematic reconstruction of tau leptons and test for lepton universality in charged weak interactions with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerland, Philip

    2011-04-15

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM) postulates the universal coupling of the three lepton families to the weak current. The most precise measurement of lepton universality in W decays comes from the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). If one compares the couplings of muons and tau leptons to the charged weak current, there is a discrepancy of nearly three standard deviations w.r.t. the SM expectation. There are models beyond the SM, which could explain the violation of lepton universality with new physics processes, if it is more than a statistical fluctuation. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers a great opportunity to study decays of the charged-weak gauge bosons at very high event rates and at unmatched collision energies. This thesis presents an analysis strategy to test lepton universality with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the LHC. The analysis focusses on the decays of the W{sup {+-}} boson to particles of the second and third lepton family. For this purpose detector-simulated proton-proton events are used. The identification and reconstruction of tau leptons is a difficult task at the LHC. The reconstruction is often restricted by the limited precision of the commonly used collinear approximation. The application of a kinematic fit to particular tau-decay modes can improve the experimental resolution and provides an efficient background suppression. The development of such a fit with kinematic constraints derived from the topology of the decay {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{sup {+-}} + {nu}{sub {tau}} is described. The kinematic fit of tau leptons is not limited to the test for lepton universality, but can be deployed by various physics analyses in a broad energy range of the tau leptons. The event topology of W{sup {+-}} decays with leptonic final states is studied. Two event selections are developed: one for the W{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{nu} and one for the W{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{nu} decay. A common online

  13. Kinematic reconstruction of tau leptons and test for lepton universality in charged weak interactions with the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerland, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM) postulates the universal coupling of the three lepton families to the weak current. The most precise measurement of lepton universality in W decays comes from the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). If one compares the couplings of muons and tau leptons to the charged weak current, there is a discrepancy of nearly three standard deviations w.r.t. the SM expectation. There are models beyond the SM, which could explain the violation of lepton universality with new physics processes, if it is more than a statistical fluctuation. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers a great opportunity to study decays of the charged-weak gauge bosons at very high event rates and at unmatched collision energies. This thesis presents an analysis strategy to test lepton universality with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the LHC. The analysis focusses on the decays of the W ± boson to particles of the second and third lepton family. For this purpose detector-simulated proton-proton events are used. The identification and reconstruction of tau leptons is a difficult task at the LHC. The reconstruction is often restricted by the limited precision of the commonly used collinear approximation. The application of a kinematic fit to particular tau-decay modes can improve the experimental resolution and provides an efficient background suppression. The development of such a fit with kinematic constraints derived from the topology of the decay τ → 3π ± + ν τ is described. The kinematic fit of tau leptons is not limited to the test for lepton universality, but can be deployed by various physics analyses in a broad energy range of the tau leptons. The event topology of W ± decays with leptonic final states is studied. Two event selections are developed: one for the W ± → τν and one for the W ± → μν decay. A common online selection is proposed, which is independent of the leptonic final state of

  14. MoViE: Experiences and attitudes—Learning with a mobile social video application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Tuomi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital media is increasingly finding its way into the discussions of the classroom. Particularly interest is placed on mobile learning—the learning and teaching practices done with or via different mobile devices. Learning with the help of mobile devices is increasingly common and it is considered to be one of the 21st century skills children should adapt already in early stages in schools. The article presents both qualitative and quantitative study on mobile social video application, MoViE, as a part of teaching in biology and geography in 8th and 9th grades. The multidisciplinary data was processed to answer the following question: How did the use of mobile videos promote learning? The actual research question is however twofold: On one hand, it studies the use of mobile videos in mobile learning. On the other hand, it sets out to investigate the implementation of mobile video sharing as a part of the teaching and learning activities.

  15. Kinematic tau reconstruction and search for the Higgs boson in hadronic tau pair decays with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perchalla, Lars

    2011-05-11

    The thesis prepares a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the di-tau channel with the CMS experiment. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, two selections are developed for light Higgs bosons produced by the dominant processes, gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion. Both selections exclusively consider the hadronic tau decay into three charged pions. They rely on an efficient algorithm to identify the tau decay products within the hadronic environment at the LHC. A kinematic fit exploits the topology of the particular decay mode and enables the reconstruction of the entire tau momentum including the neutrino. A set of quality criteria is defined on the obtained observables, which is valid for a broad range of tau energies. This provides an efficient suppression of quark and gluon jets that fake tau decays. The Higgs boson is reconstructed from pairs of tau leptons that pass the quality requirements. The selections derive further background suppression from the event kinematics. In case of the gluon fusion, the selected sample is dominated by off-shell Z{sup 0} bosons that decay into tau pairs. The vector-boson fusion involves two additional quark jets. Their signature and the significant transversal momentum of the Higgs boson allow for a background-free selection. The significance of both selections is discussed for an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1}. (orig.)

  16. Kinematic tau reconstruction and search for the Higgs boson in hadronic tau pair decays with the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchalla, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The thesis prepares a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the di-tau channel with the CMS experiment. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, two selections are developed for light Higgs bosons produced by the dominant processes, gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion. Both selections exclusively consider the hadronic tau decay into three charged pions. They rely on an efficient algorithm to identify the tau decay products within the hadronic environment at the LHC. A kinematic fit exploits the topology of the particular decay mode and enables the reconstruction of the entire tau momentum including the neutrino. A set of quality criteria is defined on the obtained observables, which is valid for a broad range of tau energies. This provides an efficient suppression of quark and gluon jets that fake tau decays. The Higgs boson is reconstructed from pairs of tau leptons that pass the quality requirements. The selections derive further background suppression from the event kinematics. In case of the gluon fusion, the selected sample is dominated by off-shell Z 0 bosons that decay into tau pairs. The vector-boson fusion involves two additional quark jets. Their signature and the significant transversal momentum of the Higgs boson allow for a background-free selection. The significance of both selections is discussed for an integrated luminosity of 30 fb -1 . (orig.)

  17. Extraction of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann from kinematically complete neutron-deuteron breakup experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witala, H.; Hueber, D.; Gloeckle, W.; Tornow, W.; Gonzalez Trotter, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Data for the neutron-neutron final-state-interaction cross section obtained recently in a kinematically complete neutron-deuteron breakup experiment have been reanalyzed using rigorous solutions of the three-nucleon Faddeev equations with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. A discrepancy was found with respect to a recent analysis based on the W-matrix approximation to the Paris potential. We also estimate theoretical uncertainties in extracting the neutron-neutron scattering length resulting from the use of different nucleon-nucleon interactions and the possible action of the two pion-exchange three-nucleon force. We find that there exists a certain production angle for the interacting neutron-neutron pair where the uncertainties become minimal. (author)

  18. Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

  19. Relativistic Kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    This lecture note covers Relativistic Kinematics, which is very useful for the beginners in the field of high-energy physics. A very practical approach has been taken, which answers "why and how" of the kinematics useful for students working in the related areas.

  20. Full kinematic reconstruction of charged B mesons with the upgraded inner tracking system of the ALICE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiller, Johannes Hendrik

    2016-05-11

    In this thesis, the performance of the full kinematic reconstruction of B{sup +} mesons in the decay channel B{sup +}→ anti D{sup 0}π{sup +}(anti D{sup 0}→K{sup +}π{sup -}) and charge conjugates for the 0-10% most central Pb-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.5 TeV is demonstrated for the upgraded ALICE Experiment, which is planned before Run 3 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), beginning in 2020. Within the scope of the foreseen detector and readout upgrades to inspect all Pb-Pb collisions at their interaction rate of 50 kHz, in particular through the installation of a new high-granularity pixel inner tracker, for the first time these rare signals will become accessible using full kinematic reconstruction in central Pb-Pb collisions in ALICE at mid-rapidity at the LHC. Topological and kinematic criteria are used to select the beauty signal against the large combinatorial and correlated background. In addition to available full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a fast MC simulation, which includes parameterizations of all relevant detector effects, was developed and is now generally available for all rare probe studies with the upgraded ALICE detector. The fast simulation was used to improve the estimate on the residual combinatorial background in order to maximize the expected signal-to-background ratio and statistical significance. Within the uncertainties of the expected signal yield, a significant measurement (≥5) will be possible down to p{sub T} ≥ 2.0 GeV/c, corresponding to about 88% of the yield. The signal-to-background ratio lies between 0.01 and 4.0, increasing with p{sub T}. The required reference statistics in p+p collisions at √(s)=5.5 TeV was estimated to be about 100 pb{sup -1}. Considering the calculated expected statistics, the precision of the measurements of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} and the elliptic flow v{sub 2} were estimated. A measurement of the theoretically predicted R{sub AA} of 0.2-0.5 above p{sub T}≥5.0 Ge

  1. Critical experiments analyses by using 70 energy group library based on ENDF/B-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Yoshihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Energy Systems Engineering Center; Huria, H.C.; Ouisloumen, M.

    1998-03-01

    The newly developed 70-group library has been validated by comparing kinf from a continuous energy Monte-Carlo code MCNP and two dimensional spectrum calculation code PHOENIX-CP. The code employs Discrete Angular Flux Method based on Collision Probability. The library has been also validated against a large number of critical experiments and numerical benchmarks for assemblies with MOX and Gd fuels. (author)

  2. Minding experience: An exploration of the concept of "experience" in the early French anthropology of Durkheim, Lévy-Bruhl, and Lévi-Strauss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, C Jason

    2003-01-01

    In line with the growing concern with the unexamined reliance upon the concept of "experience" in anthropology, this article explores in some detail the various usages and definitions of the concept in the work of three of early French anthropology's most influential theorists: Emile Durkheim (1858-1918), Lucien Lévy-Bruhl (1857-1939), and Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-). With its important influence on both British and American anthropology, the early French anthropological tradition, as epitomized in the writings of these three thinkers, has indeed played a pivotal role in shaping many current taken-for-granted understandings of the concept of experience in the discipline of anthropology as a whole. In the process of exploring how experience is viewed by these three scholars, this paper will thus take some initial steps toward the historical contextualization of many of the unquestioned assumptions underpinning current understandings of experience in the discipline of anthropology and the social sciences more generally. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Determination of the Kinematics of the Qweak Experiment and Investigation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Valerie M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The Qweak experiment has tested the Standard Model through making a precise measurement of the weak charge of the proton (QpW). This was done through measuring the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattering off of unpolarized protons. The parity-violating asymmetry measured is directly proportional to the four-momentum transfer (Q^2) from the electron to the proton. The extraction of QpW from the measured asymmetry requires a precise Q^2 determination. The Qweak experiment had a Q^2 = 24.8 ± 0.1 m(GeV^2) which achieved the goal of an uncertainty of <= 0.5%. From the measured asymmetry and Q^2, QpW was determined to be 0.0719 ± 0.0045, which is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction. This puts a 7.5 TeV lower limit on possible "new physics". This dissertation describes the analysis of Q^2 for the Qweak experiment. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments similar to the Qweak experiment will measure asymmetries to high precision in order to test the Standard Model. These measurements will require the beam polarization to be measured to sub-0.5% precision. Presently the electron beam polarization is measured through Moller scattering off of a ferromagnetic foil or through using Compton scattering, both of which can have issues reaching this precision. A novel Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter has been proposed as a non-invasive way to measure the polarization of an electron beam via Moller scattering off of polarized monatomic hydrogen gas. This dissertation describes the development and initial analysis of a Monte Carlo simulation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter.

  4. Rational kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Angeles, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    A rational study of kinematics is a treatment of the subject based on invariants, i.e., quantities that remain essentially unchanged under a change of observer. An observer is understood to be a reference frame supplied with a clock (Truesdell 1966). This study will therefore include an introduction to invariants. The language of these is tensor analysis and multilinear algebra, both of which share many isomorphic relations, These subjects are treated in full detail in Ericksen (1960) and Bowen and Wang (1976), and hence will not be included here. Only a short account of notation and definitions will be presented. Moreover, definitions and basic concepts pertaining to the kinematics of rigid bodies will be also included. Although the kinematics of rigid bodies can be regarded as a particular case of the kinematics of continua, the former deserves attention on its own merits for several reasons. One of these is that it describes locally the motions undergone by continua. Another reason is that a whole area of ...

  5. Illness Perception and Clinical Treatment Experiences in Patients with M. Maroteaux-Lamy (Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI) and a Turkish Migration Background in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Hansjörg; Leissner, Linn; Bosanska, Lenka; Lampe, Christina; Plöckinger, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by a mutation of the gene for arylsulfatase B (ASB). Of the thirty-one patients registered in Germany, almost fifty percent have a Turkish migration background. MPS VI is treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which is time-consuming and expensive. Methods This interdisciplinary study explored the illness perceptions and clinical treatment experiences among ten MPS VI patients with a Turkish migration background in two centers for metabolic diseases (Berlin and Mainz, Germany). The clinical treatment situation was observed and semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and health care personnel, in addition to participatory observation in four patients' everyday environments in Berlin. The data from the interviews, patient records, and personal field notes were encoded, cross-related, and analyzed. Results Patients' acknowledgement of the disease and coping strategies are influenced predominantly by the perception of their individual health status and the handling of the disease within their family. Patients' willingness to cooperate with treatment strategies is further modified by their knowledge of the disease and the relationships with their health care providers. In this analysis, cultural factors turned out to be marginally relevant. Conclusion As with other chronic and debilitating diseases, effective treatment strategies have to reach beyond delivering medication. Health care providers need to strengthen the support for patients with a migration background. In this regard, they should respect the patients' cultural and social background and their personal perception of the disease and the therapy. Yet structural and social aspects (clinical setting, family and educational background) may be more crucial here than “cultural barriers.” PMID:23826140

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  7. Inverse Kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Sereno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse kinematics is the process of converting a Cartesian point in space into a set of joint angles to more efficiently move the end effector of a robot to a desired orientation. This project investigates the inverse kinematics of a robotic hand with fingers under various scenarios. Assuming the parameters of a provided robot, a general equation for the end effector point was calculated and used to plot the region of space that it can reach. Further, the benefits obtained from the addition of a prismatic joint versus an extra variable angle joint were considered. The results confirmed that having more movable parts, such as prismatic points and changing angles, increases the effective reach of a robotic hand.

  8. Extraction of the 1S0 neutron-neutron scattering length from a kinematically-complete n-d breakup experiment at TUNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Trotter, D. E.; Tornow, W.; Howell, C. R.; Salinas, F.; Walter, R. L.; Witalea, H.

    1999-01-01

    The 1 S 0 neutron-neutron (nn) scattering length's currently accepted value (a nn =-18.6±0.3 fm) is derived exclusively from two π - -d capture-reaction experiments, in disagreement with the average -16.7±0.5 fm extracted from kinematically-complete nd breakup experiments. This discrepancy may be due to deficiencies in the analyses of n-d breakup data and/or three-nucleon force (3NF) effects. A kinematically-complete n+d→n 1 +n 2 +p breakup experiment at an incident neutron energy of 13.0 MeV was performed recently at TUNL. The value of a nn was extracted from the direct comparison of experimental and rigorously-calculated theoretical nd breakup differential cross sections at four production angles of the nn pair. Using modern nucleon-nucleon potential models in the three-nucleon cross-section calculations we obtained a nn =-18.7±0.6 fm, in agreement with the π - -d result. We found no significant effect due to 3NFs on our a nn value

  9. Jefferson Lab E89-044 experiment: study of the quasi-elastic He3(e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penel-Nottaris, E.

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A E89-044 experiment has measured the He 3 (e,e'p) reaction cross-sections. The extraction of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body break-up He 3 (e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics allows the study of the bound proton electromagnetic properties inside the He 3 nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond plane waves approximations, for missing momenta of 0 and +- 300 MeV/c and transferred momenta from 0.8 to 4.1 GeV 2 . Preliminary cross-sections have been obtained after calibration of the experimental setup by fitting theoretical models averaged over the experimental phase-space using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The 8% systematic error on cross-sections is linked mainly to the absolute normalization of the target density: the elastic scattering data analysis will allow to reduce this error. The preliminary results show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta and sensitivity to final state interactions and He 3 waves functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c. The longitudinal and transverse separation should constraint theoretical models more strongly. (author)

  10. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  11. "We do as well as we can". The experiences of staff assisting disabled people in community residential homes "Við gerum bara eins og við getum" - Þjónusta við fólk með fjölþættar skerðingar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðný Jónsdóttir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Staff supporting young people and adults with complex and severe neurological impairments are the key to their communication, quality of life and participation. This study reports the knowledge and experiences of staff members supporting disabled people living in community residential homes, as well as their perceived needs for information and support. Furthermore, the study aimed to reveal staff´s views on their possibilities to support service users´ wellbeing, participation and quality of life. Participants were twelve experienced staff members. Qualitative methods were used and data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The results of the study reveal that services provided in community residential homes for people with complex and severe impairments are not in line with human rights treaties, including the right to health. Further, it does not mirror the social approach to disability which today is the focus of policy frameworks. The staff were positive toward service users, tried to do their best but lacked resources. Their knowledge of service user´s health-related needs was scarce and little was done to prevent further impairments or increasing health problems. Staff reported lack of human resources, high staff turnover and lack of information, training and support. Recent governmental changes, provide possibilities for revised emphasis in the service provided, on cooperation between different sectors as well as for the development of transdisciplinary services.Aðstoðarfólk á heimilum fólks með fjölþættar skerðingar er mikilvægur hlekkur í lífi þess og lykill að samskiptum, lífsgæðum og þátttöku. Rannsóknin varpar ljósi á sýn þessa starfsfólks á megináherslur í þjónustu við fólk með flóknar stuðningsþarfir og þörf fyrir fræðslu og stuðning í starfi. Ennfremur var leitað eftir skilningi á heilsutengdum þörfum þjónustunotenda og möguleikum til að styðja við velferð

  12. Parallel kinematics type, kinematics, and optimal design

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Parallel Kinematics- Type, Kinematics, and Optimal Design presents the results of 15 year's research on parallel mechanisms and parallel kinematics machines. This book covers the systematic classification of parallel mechanisms (PMs) as well as providing a large number of mechanical architectures of PMs available for use in practical applications. It focuses on the kinematic design of parallel robots. One successful application of parallel mechanisms in the field of machine tools, which is also called parallel kinematics machines, has been the emerging trend in advanced machine tools. The book describes not only the main aspects and important topics in parallel kinematics, but also references novel concepts and approaches, i.e. type synthesis based on evolution, performance evaluation and optimization based on screw theory, singularity model taking into account motion and force transmissibility, and others.   This book is intended for researchers, scientists, engineers and postgraduates or above with interes...

  13. Kinematics and dynamics of salt movement driven by sub-salt normal faulting and supra-salt sediment accumulation - combined analogue experiments and analytical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, Michael; Kukowski, Nina; Kley, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    In extensional sedimentary basins, the movement of ductile salt is mainly controlled by the vertical displacement of the salt layer, differential loading due to syn-kinematic deposition, and tectonic shearing at the top and the base of the salt layer. During basement normal faulting, salt either tends to flow downward to the basin centre driven by its own weight or it is squeezed upward due to differential loading. In analogue experiments and analytical models, we address the interplay between normal faulting of the sub-salt basement, compaction and density inversion of the supra-salt cover and the kinematic response of the ductile salt layer. The analogue experiments consist of a ductile substratum (silicone putty) beneath a denser cover layer (sand mixture). Both layers are displaced by normal faults mimicked through a downward moving block within the rigid base of the experimental apparatus and the resulting flow patterns in the ductile layer are monitored and analysed. In the computational models using an analytical approximative solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, the steady-state flow velocity in an idealized natural salt layer is calculated in order to evaluate how flow patterns observed in the analogue experiments can be translated to nature. The analytical calculations provide estimations of the prevailing direction and velocity of salt flow above a sub-salt normal fault. The results of both modelling approaches show that under most geological conditions salt moves downwards to the hanging wall side as long as vertical offset and compaction of the cover layer are small. As soon as an effective average density of the cover is exceeded, the direction of the flow velocity reverses and the viscous material is squeezed towards the elevated footwall side. The analytical models reveal that upward flow occurs even if the average density of the overburden does not exceed the density of salt. By testing various scenarios with different layer thicknesses

  14. Experimental technique for study on three-particle reactions in kinematically total experiments with usage of the two-processor complex on the M-400 computer basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, F.N.; Kisurin, V.A.; Nemets, O.F.; Ofengenden, R.G.; Pugach, V.M.; Pavlenko, Yu.N.; Patlan', Yu.V.; Savrasov, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental technique for investigation of three-particle nuclear reactions in kinematically total experiments is described. The technique provides the storage of one-dimensional and two- dimensional energy spectra from several detectors. A block diagram of the measuring system, using this technique, is presented. The measuring system consists of analog equipment for rapid-slow coincidences and of a two-processor complex on the base of the M-400 computer with a general bus. Application of a two-processor complex, each computer of which has a possibility of direct access to memory of another computer, permits to separate functions of data collection and data operational presentation and to perform necessary physical calculations. Software of the measuring complex which includes programs written using the ASSEMBLER language for the first computer and functional programs written using the BASIC language for the second computer, is considered. Software of the first computer includes the DISPETCHER dialog control program, driver package for control of external devices, of applied program package and system modules. The technique, described, is tested in experiment on investigation of d+ 10 B→α+α+α three- particle reaction at deutron energy of 13.6 MeV. The two-dimensional energy spectrum reaction obtained with the help of the technique described is presented [ru

  15. Kinematic space and wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian-dong [TianQin Research Center for Gravitational Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082, Guangdong (China); Chen, Bin [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-01-23

    The kinematic space could play a key role in constructing the bulk geometry from dual CFT. In this paper, we study the kinematic space from geometric points of view, without resorting to differential entropy. We find that the kinematic space could be intrinsically defined in the embedding space. For each oriented geodesic in the Poincaré disk, there is a corresponding point in the kinematic space. This point is the tip of the causal diamond of the disk whose intersection with the Poincaré disk determines the geodesic. In this geometric construction, the causal structure in the kinematic space can be seen clearly. Moreover, we find that every transformation in the SL(2,ℝ) leads to a geodesic in the kinematic space. In particular, for a hyperbolic transformation defining a BTZ black hole, it is a timelike geodesic in the kinematic space. We show that the horizon length of the static BTZ black hole could be computed by the geodesic length of corresponding points in the kinematic space. Furthermore, we discuss the fundamental regions in the kinematic space for the BTZ blackhole and multi-boundary wormholes.

  16. Kinematic relations in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gippner, P.; Kalpakchieva, R.

    1988-01-01

    The present work gives a short overview of the non-relativistic kinematics of nuclear reactions derived on the basis of the conservation laws of energy and linear momentum. Section 2 contains kinematic relations valid for two-body reactions, sections 3 makes use of these relations to describe sequential fission as a special case of reactions with three particles in the exit channel. It is the aim of this work to comprise the kinematic formulae essential for planning of experiments, data analysis and critical examination of the obtained results. (author)

  17. Vi, de civiliserede

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?......Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?...

  18. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....

  19. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattione, Paul [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  20. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan, E-mail: vaziri@coe.neu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  1. Advances in robot kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Oussama

    2014-01-01

    The topics addressed in this book cover the whole range of kinematic analysis, synthesis and design and consider robotic systems possessing serial, parallel and cable driven mechanisms. The robotic systems range from being less than fully mobile to kinematically redundant to overconstrained.  The fifty-six contributions report the latest results in robot kinematics with emphasis on emerging areas such as design and control of humanoids or humanoid subsystems. The book is of interest to researchers wanting to bring their knowledge up to date regarding modern topics in one of the basic disciplines in robotics, which relates to the essential property of robots, the motion of mechanisms.

  2. Analysis of the reaction γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} in the neutral decay channel at the BGO-OD experiment using kinematic fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alef, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA facility in Bonn is built to investigate nucleon excitations via meson photoproduction. One research objective is associated strangeness production, which includes the reaction channel γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. Results of the analysis for the neutral decay channel K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} → π{sup 0}π{sup 0}π{sup 0}p will be presented. Due to the small production cross section and branching ratio kinematic fitting is used to discriminate the reaction against background.

  3. Adubação do milho: VI - Ensaios sôbre modos de aplicação dos adubos Fertilizer experiments with corn: VI - Studies on fertilizer placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Viégas

    1956-01-01

    Full Text Available Nêste artigo os autores apresentam os resultados obtidos em quatorze ensaios, realizados, entre 1936-37 e 1944-45, nas Estações Experimentais Central (Campinas, de Mocoea, Pindorama e Ribeirão Prêto, e nos quais foram estudados vários métodos de aplicação de adubos na cultura do milho. Como base de comparação serviu sempre o método geralmente adotado entre nós, segundo o qual os adubos são espalhados, no momento do plantio, nos sulcos destinados às sementes, e levemente misturados com a terra dêsses sulcos. Dentre os outros métodos usados nos ensaios figurou principalmente o da aplicação em sulco aberto 10 cm ao lado do destinado ao plantio. Os adubos empregados no estudo foram : superfosfato, farinha de ossos, cloreto de potássio, cinzas de café, salitre do Chile e torta de algodão. Para os adubos fosfatados, a aplicação nos sulcos de plantio foi tão eficiente quanto a lateral ; para os azotados e potássicos, que, com freqüência, prejudicam a germinação e o desenvolvimento inicial das plantas, a aplicação lateral se mostrou consistentemente superior. Os resultados obtidos indicam que a adoção da aplicação lateral poderia concorrer para aumentar consideravelmente o efeito dos adubos azotados e potássicos em nosso meio.Various methods of fertilizer placement for corn were compared in 14 experiments carried out from 1936-37 to 1944-45 in four experiment stations : Campinas, Mococa, Pindorama, and Ribeirão Prêto. The method of fertilizer placement most generally used in the state of São Paulo was used as a basis for comparison. It consists in adding the fertilizer to the furrow and mixing it slightly with the soil just before sowing. Another method used was the placement of the fertilizer laterally, about 4 inches to one side of the seed row. Superphosphate, bone meal, potassium chloride, coffee bean ashes, Chilean nitrate, and cotton seed meal were used alone or in combinations. The results indicated that

  4. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  5. ViA: a perceptual visualization assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Chris G.; St. Amant, Robert; Elhaddad, Mahmoud S.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an automated visualized assistant called ViA. ViA is designed to help users construct perceptually optical visualizations to represent, explore, and analyze large, complex, multidimensional datasets. We have approached this problem by studying what is known about the control of human visual attention. By harnessing the low-level human visual system, we can support our dual goals of rapid and accurate visualization. Perceptual guidelines that we have built using psychophysical experiments form the basis for ViA. ViA uses modified mixed-initiative planning algorithms from artificial intelligence to search of perceptually optical data attribute to visual feature mappings. Our perceptual guidelines are integrated into evaluation engines that provide evaluation weights for a given data-feature mapping, and hints on how that mapping might be improved. ViA begins by asking users a set of simple questions about their dataset and the analysis tasks they want to perform. Answers to these questions are used in combination with the evaluation engines to identify and intelligently pursue promising data-feature mappings. The result is an automatically-generated set of mappings that are perceptually salient, but that also respect the context of the dataset and users' preferences about how they want to visualize their data.

  6. The role of the intensive care unit in real-time surveillance of emerging pandemics: the Italian GiViTI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, G; Nattino, G; Langer, M; Tavola, M; Crespi, D; Mondini, M; Rossi, C; Previtali, C; Marshall, J; Poole, D

    2016-01-01

    The prompt availability of reliable epidemiological information on emerging pandemics is crucial for public health policy-makers. Early in 2013, a possible new H1N1 epidemic notified by an intensive care unit (ICU) to GiViTI, the Italian ICU network, prompted the re-activation of the real-time monitoring system developed during the 2009-2010 pandemic. Based on data from 216 ICUs, we were able to detect and monitor an outbreak of severe H1N1 infection, and to compare the situation with previous years. The timely and correct assessment of the severity of an epidemic can be obtained by investigating ICU admissions, especially when historical comparisons can be made.

  7. Effect of uranium (VI) on the growth of yeast and influence of metabolism of yeast on adsorption of U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Wakai, Eiichi; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out the growth experiments of 3 strains of yeast in a medium containing uranium (VI) to elucidate the effect of U (VI) on the growth of microorganisms. Hansenula fabianii J640 grew in the liquid medium containing 0.1 mM U (VI) at lower rate than the control, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not grow under this condition. The H. fabianii J640 pre-cultured for 21 h in the liquid medium without U (VI) grew even after the exposure to 1 mM U (VI), but did not grow without pre-cultivation. For the pre-cultured H. fabianii J640, radioactivity of U in the medium was the same as the initial one for 110 h, and then gradually decreased. TEM-EDS analysis of H. fabianii J640 exposed to 1 mM U (VI) for 165 h showed accumulation of U (VI) on the cells. When H. fabianii J640 was not pre-cultured, radioactivity of U in the medium was lower than the initial one. These results indicated that U (VI) inhibits the growth of yeast, and that the adsorption of U (VI) by the cells depends on the metabolism of yeast. (author)

  8. Biquaternions and relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogush, A.A.; Kurochkin, Yu.A.; Fedorov, F.I.

    1979-01-01

    The problems concerning the use of quaternion interpretation of the Lorentz group vector parametrization are considered for solving relativistic kinematics problems. A vector theory convenient for describing the characteristic features of the Lobachevsky space is suggested. The kinematics of elementary particle scattering is investigated on the basis of this theory. A synthesis of vector parametrization and of quaternion calculation has been shown to lead to natural formulation of the theory of vectors in the three-dimensional Lobachevsky space, realized on mass hyperboloids of relativistic particles

  9. Properties of kinematic singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coley, A A [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada); Hervik, S [Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Stavanger, N-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Lim, W C [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); MacCallum, M A H, E-mail: aac@mathstat.dal.c, E-mail: sigbjorn.hervik@uis.n, E-mail: wclim@aei.mpg.d, E-mail: m.a.h.maccallum@qmul.ac.u [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-07

    The locally rotationally symmetric tilted perfect fluid Bianchi type V cosmological model provides examples of future geodesically complete spacetimes that admit a 'kinematic singularity' at which the fluid congruence is inextendible but all frame components of the Weyl and Ricci tensors remain bounded. We show that for any positive integer n there are examples of Bianchi type V spacetimes admitting a kinematic singularity such that the covariant derivatives of the Weyl and Ricci tensors up to the nth order also stay bounded. We briefly discuss singularities in classical spacetimes.

  10. The high-ion content and kinematics of low-redshift Lyman limit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; O'Meara, John M.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel

    2013-01-01

    We study the high-ion content and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at 0.08 < z < 0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In Lehner et al., we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (Δv 90 statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicities in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II) ∼ 17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion) ∼ 10 8.5-10.9 (r/150 kpc) 2 M ☉ , similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.

  11. The high-ion content and kinematics of low-redshift Lyman limit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); O' Meara, John M. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael' s College, One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Davé, Romeel, E-mail: afox@stsci.edu [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2013-12-01

    We study the high-ion content and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at 0.08 < z < 0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In Lehner et al., we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (Δv {sub 90} statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicities in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II) ∼ 17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion) ∼ 10{sup 8.5-10.9} (r/150 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉}, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.

  12. Force generation of bio-inspired hover kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenheede, R.B.R.; Bernal, L.P.; Morrison, C.L.; Humbert, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the aerodynamics of an elliptical flap plate wing in pitch-plunge motion. Several wing motion kinematics are derived from the kinematics of the Agrius Convolvuli (hawk moth) in hover. The experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 4,

  13. Morphological characteristic of surgically removed cardiac myxomas: 25-YEAR EXPERIENCE IN V.I. SHUMAKOV FEDERAL RESEARCH CENTER OF TRANSPLANTOLOGY AND ARTIFICIAL ORGANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Iljinsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of intracardiac space-occupying lesions, surgically removed at V.I. Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artificial Organs over 25 years (in the period from 1992 until 2016 was carried out. During that period 134 patients underwent surgery. Preoperative clinical diagnosis before surgery was heart myxoma. From 134 patients, only in 115 (85.8% patients the removed intracardiac lesions were myxomas: left atrium – 103 (89.7% patients, right atrium – 10 (8.7%, right ventricle – 2 (1.8% and mitral valve – 1 (0.8% patient. 9 patients had thrombi in the heart, 10 patients had not myxomas, but other benign and malignant heart tumors. This article presents macroscopic, histolological and ultrastructural characteristic of cardiac myxomas. Recurrence of the left atrium myxoma occurred in 2 patients. They were re-operated in four and six years after the first removal of myxoma. 2 patients died during hospital period. One patient with atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries as a concurrent disease died of embolization of the stent coronary artery with myxoma particles with the development of acute heart failure. Death of the 2nd patient was not directly related to the surgery, and was due to the acute heart failure as well in connection with the presence of concurrent disease, coronary heart disease.

  14. Teaching about Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  15. Dynamic characteristics of mirrors' kinematic mount

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wenkai; Du Qiang; Li Jingze; Chen Gang; Chen Xiaojuan; Xu Yuanli

    2002-01-01

    Applying exact constrain design principles, kinematic mount for precision positioning large aperture mirrors is designed; theoretical method is introduced to analyze its dynamic characteristics and the result of the experiment for mirrors, stability; accordingly, the methods to improve design are put forward

  16. Quantum deformed magnon kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, César; Hernández Redondo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion relation for planar N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills is identified with the Casimir of a quantum deformed two-dimensional kinematical symmetry, E_q(1,1). The quantum deformed symmetry algebra is generated by the momentum, energy and boost, with deformation parameter q=e^{2\\pi i/\\lambda}. Representing the boost as the infinitesimal generator for translations on the rapidity space leads to an elliptic uniformization with crossing transformations implemented through translations by t...

  17. Analysis of the reaction γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} by the identification of the charged K* decay channel at the BGO-OD experiment using kinematic fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Bjoern-Eric [Physikalisches Institut Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA facility in Bonn is built to investigate nucleon excitations via meson photoproduction. A program of measurements of reactions of associated strangeness in the final state has begun, one of which is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. One research objective is associated production of strange particles. An interesting reaction channel is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. This talk shows the preliminary results of the analysis for the charged decay channel K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} → π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup 0}p. Due to the small production cross section kinematic fitting has been used to discriminate the wanted channel against background.

  18. The Kinematic Learning Model using Video and Interfaces Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, T.; Setiawan, W.; Hamidah, I.

    2017-09-01

    An educator currently in demand to apply the learning to not be separated from the development of technology. Educators often experience difficulties when explaining kinematics material, this is because kinematics is one of the lessons that often relate the concept to real life. Kinematics is one of the courses of physics that explains the cause of motion of an object, Therefore it takes the thinking skills and analytical skills in understanding these symptoms. Technology is one that can bridge between conceptual relationship with real life. A framework of technology-based learning models has been developed using video and interfaces analysis on kinematics concept. By using this learning model, learners will be better able to understand the concept that is taught by the teacher. This learning model is able to improve the ability of creative thinking, analytical skills, and problem-solving skills on the concept of kinematics.

  19. Cinema e reconstrução da experiência: os contratistas de viñas em Historias de un hombre de 561 años.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Alvira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Com base na proposta que o uso do cinema como fonte permite-nos chegar ao conhecimento de como homens e mulheres viveram processos históricos, este artigo usa o filme argentino Historias de un hombre de 561 años com a finalidade de reconstruir as condições de trabalho e de vida dos contratistas de viñas da província de Mendoza (Argentina, no final dos anos 1960. É uma abordagem orientada a reconstrução do âmbito da experiência imediata dos sujeitos: processos de trabalho, condições de vida, imaginários, e as relações de solidariedade e conflito na sua interação diária com outros trabalhadores vitícolas e com a burguesia agroindustrial. Esse âmbito da experiência é necessariamente estudado no contexto do desenvolvimento específico do capitalismo na Argentina.

  20. Kinematic geometry of gearing

    CERN Document Server

    Dooner, David B

    2012-01-01

    Building on the first edition published in 1995 this new edition of Kinematic Geometry of Gearing has been extensively revised and updated with new and original material. This includes the methodology for general tooth forms, radius of torsure', cylinder of osculation, and cylindroid of torsure; the author has also completely reworked the '3 laws of gearing', the first law re-written to better parallel the existing 'Law of Gearing" as pioneered by Leonard Euler, expanded from Euler's original law to encompass non-circular gears and hypoid gears, the 2nd law of gearing describing a unique relat

  1. Experience of organizing and management of experimental researches on animals in V.I. Shumakov National Medical Research Center of Transplantology and Artificial Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Shagidulin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review briefl y discusses the experience of organizing and carrying out experimental studies in our center in order to increase the validity of the researches. The rules of organizational and methodological approaches aimed at increasing the suitability of the results of experimental studies are also given. Each research work in which experiments on laboratory animals are supposed to be carried out should be organized, planned and carried out in accordance with national and international ethical standards. Discussion and publication of both planned and conducted experimental work makes it possible to make the research process more open and objective. The experimental investigation is carried out in the following algorithm: the formulation of the problem and the hypothesis on the basis of the literature data; development of the purpose and objectives of the study with adequate methods and selection of equipment; distribution of material to control and trial groups; creation of a plan for monitoring the indicators during the experiment; processing and interpretation of results; preparation of a scientifi c report. 

  2. THE SURPRISINGLY CONSTANT STRENGTH OF O VI ABSORBERS OVER COSMIC TIME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    O VI absorption is observed in a wide range of astrophysical environments, including the local interstellar medium, the disk and halo of the Milky Way, high-velocity clouds, the Magellanic Clouds, starburst galaxies, the intergalactic medium (IGM), damped Lyα systems, and gamma-ray-burst host galaxies. Here, a new compilation of 775 O VI absorbers drawn from the literature is presented, all observed at high resolution (instrumental FWHM ≤ 20 km s -1 ) and covering the redshift range z = 0-3. In galactic environments [log N(H I) ∼> 20], the mean O VI column density is shown to be insensitive to metallicity, taking a value log N(O VI) ∼ 14.5 for galaxies covering the range -1.6 ∼ 4 K) clouds and hot (∼10 6 K) plasma, although many such layers would have to be intersected by a typical galaxy-halo sight line to build up the characteristic galactic N(O VI). The alternative, widely used model of single-phase photoionization for intergalactic O VI is ruled out by kinematic evidence in the majority of IGM O VI components at low and high redshift.

  3. Multibody Kinematics Optimization for the Estimation of Upper and Lower Limb Human Joint Kinematics: A Systematized Methodological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begon, Mickaël; Andersen, Michael Skipper; Dumas, Raphaël

    2018-03-01

    Multibody kinematics optimization (MKO) aims to reduce soft tissue artefact (STA) and is a key step in musculoskeletal modeling. The objective of this review was to identify the numerical methods, their validation and performance for the estimation of the human joint kinematics using MKO. Seventy-four papers were extracted from a systematized search in five databases and cross-referencing. Model-derived kinematics were obtained using either constrained optimization or Kalman filtering to minimize the difference between measured (i.e., by skin markers, electromagnetic or inertial sensors) and model-derived positions and/or orientations. While hinge, universal, and spherical joints prevail, advanced models (e.g., parallel and four-bar mechanisms, elastic joint) have been introduced, mainly for the knee and shoulder joints. Models and methods were evaluated using: (i) simulated data based, however, on oversimplified STA and joint models; (ii) reconstruction residual errors, ranging from 4 mm to 40 mm; (iii) sensitivity analyses which highlighted the effect (up to 36 deg and 12 mm) of model geometrical parameters, joint models, and computational methods; (iv) comparison with other approaches (i.e., single body kinematics optimization and nonoptimized kinematics); (v) repeatability studies that showed low intra- and inter-observer variability; and (vi) validation against ground-truth bone kinematics (with errors between 1 deg and 22 deg for tibiofemoral rotations and between 3 deg and 10 deg for glenohumeral rotations). Moreover, MKO was applied to various movements (e.g., walking, running, arm elevation). Additional validations, especially for the upper limb, should be undertaken and we recommend a more systematic approach for the evaluation of MKO. In addition, further model development, scaling, and personalization methods are required to better estimate the secondary degrees-of-freedom (DoF).

  4. Kinematic measurements using an infrared sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, F; Paulucci, L

    2016-01-01

    The use of an infrared sensor as a new alternative to measure position as a function of time in kinematic experiments was investigated using a microcontroller as the data acquisition and control device. These are versatile sensors that offer advantages over typical ultrasound devices. The setup described in this paper enables students to develop their own experiments, promoting opportunities for learning physical concepts such as the different types of forces that can act on a body (gravitational, elastic, drag, etc) and the resulting types of movements with good sensitivity within the 4–30 cm range. As a proof of concept we also present the application of a prototype designed to record the kinematics of mass-spring systems. (paper)

  5. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  6. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-01-01

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel and the UO 2+x , in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO 2 2+ polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO 2+x , to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements

  7. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  8. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution by dried activated sludge biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; Zhang Hua; He Pinjing; Yao Qian; Shao Liming

    2010-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using activated sludge biomass. The effects of acid pretreatment of the biomass, initial pH, biomass and Cr(VI) concentrations on Cr(VI) removal efficiency were investigated. Proton consumption during the removal process and the reducing capacity of sludge biomass were studied. The results show that acid pretreatment could significantly improve Cr(VI) removal efficiency and increase Cr(VI) reducing capacity by 20.4%. Cr(VI) removal was remarkably pH-dependent; lower pH (pH = 1, 2) facilitated Cr(VI) reduction while higher pH (pH = 3, 4) favored sorption of the converted Cr(III). Lower Cr(VI) concentration as well as higher biomass concentration could accelerate Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) reduction was not the only reason for proton consumption in the removal process. Pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model could successfully simulate Cr(VI) removal except under higher pH conditions (pH = 3, 4).

  9. Kinematic control of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y P; Zago, M

    2002-10-01

    The planar law of inter-segmental co-ordination we described may emerge from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle contraction intervenes at variable times to re-excite the intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. The hypothesis that a law of coordinative control results from a minimal active tuning of the passive inertial and viscoelastic coupling among limb segments is congruent with the idea that movement has evolved according to minimum energy criteria (1, 8). It is known that multi-segment motion of mammals locomotion is controlled by a network of coupled oscillators (CPGs, see 18, 33, 37). Flexible combination of unit oscillators gives rise to different forms of locomotion. Inter-oscillator coupling can be modified by changing the synaptic strength (or polarity) of the relative spinal connections. As a result, unit oscillators can be coupled in phase, out of phase, or with a variable phase, giving rise to different behaviors, such as speed increments or reversal of gait direction (from forward to backward). Supra-spinal centers may drive or modulate functional sets of coordinating interneurons to generate different walking modes (or gaits). Although it is often assumed that CPGs control patterns of muscle activity, an equally plausible hypothesis is that they control patterns of limb segment motion instead (22). According to this kinematic view, each unit oscillator would directly control a limb segment, alternately generating forward and backward oscillations of the segment. Inter-segmental coordination would be achieved by coupling unit oscillators with a variable phase. Inter-segmental kinematic phase plays the role of global control variable previously postulated for the network of central oscillators. In fact, inter-segmental phase shifts systematically with increasing speed both in man (4) and cat (38). Because this phase-shift is correlated with the net mechanical power

  10. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  11. Kinematic adjustments to seismic recordings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, A.N.; Levii, N.V.; Volovik, U.M.

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of kinematic adjustments by adding the displaced blocks is studied theoretically and in test seismograms. The advantage to this method resulting from the weight variation in the trace is demonstrated together with its kinematic drawback. A variation on the displaced block addition method that does not involve realignment of the travel time curves and that has improved amplitude characteristics is proposed.

  12. Experiment E89-044 of quasi-elastic diffusion 3He(e,e'p) at Jefferson Laboratory: Analyze cross sections of the two body breakup in parallel kinematics; Experience E89-044 de diffusion quasi-elastique 3he(e,e'p) au Jefferson Laboratory : analyse des sections efficaces de desintegration a deux corps en cinematique parallele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penel-Nottaris, Emilie [Univ. Joseph Fourier Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment has measured the 3He(e,e'p) reaction cross sections. The separation of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body breakup reaction in parallel kinematics allows to study the bound proton electromagnetic properties in the 3He nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond impulse approximation. Preliminary cross sections show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta, and sensitivity to final state interactions and 3He wave functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c.

  13. The role of CFD combustion modelling in hydrogen safety management – VI: Validation for slow deflagration in homogeneous hydrogen-air-steam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutrono Rakhimov, A., E-mail: cutrono@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Visser, D.C., E-mail: visser@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, T., E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Deflagration of hydrogen-air-steam homogeneous mixtures is modeled in a medium-scale containment. • Adaptive mesh refinement is applied on flame front positions. • Steam effect influence on combustion modeling capabilities is investigated. • Mean pressure rise is predicted with 18% under-prediction when steam is involved. • Peak pressure is evaluated with 5% accuracy when steam is involved. - Abstract: Large quantities of hydrogen can be generated during a severe accident in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. When released in the containment, the hydrogen can create a potential deflagration risk. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In previous papers, we validated a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based method to determine the pressure loads from a fast deflagration. The combustion model applied in the CFD method is based on the Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (TFC). In our last paper, we presented the extension of this combustion model, Extended Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (ETFC), and its validation against hydrogen deflagration experiments in the slow deflagration regime. During a severe accident, cooling water will enter the containment as steam. Therefore, the effect of steam on hydrogen deflagration is important to capture in a CFD model. The primary objectives of the present paper are to further validate the TFC and ETFC combustion models, and investigate their capability to predict the effect of steam. The peak pressures, the trends of the flame velocity, and the pressure rise with an increase in the initial steam dilution are captured reasonably well by both combustion models. In addition, the ETFC model appeared to be more robust to mesh resolution changes. The mean pressure rise is evaluated with 18% under-prediction and the peak pressure is evaluated with 5

  14. Agent Control for Reconfigurable Open Kinematic Chain Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Sluga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the autonomous control of differently structured open kinematic chains based on multi-agent system technology. The appropriate level of distributing local autonomy (agents to a manipulative structure is defined, which makes it possible to dynamically change the number, type and structure of manipulative components without modifying their behavioural logic. To achieve fast reconfigurable and scalable manipulative systems, a new multi-agent method is developed for controlling the manipulator kinematics. The new method enables independent manipulator structure from the control system because of its structural and system modularity. The proposed method consists of kinematic equations for use in an agent environment, agent motion-planning algorithms, evaluation functions, agent control logic and kinematic algorithms. The results of simulations and real-world experiments demonstrate the usefulness of the approach for different non-redundant and redundant manipulation structures.

  15. Elementary introduction to relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper includes the most important results and applications of the theory of special relativity to high energy phenomena; it provides an analysis of the kinematics of particle decays and reactions as well as an introduction to the Lorentz group

  16. CHROMIUM(VI REDUCTION BY A MIXED CULTURE OF SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA DEVELOPED IN COLUMN REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Henny

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A lactate enriched mixed sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB culture was examined for the reduction of Cr(VI in a continuous flow system. The influent was mineral salts media added with lactate and sulfate with amounts of 8 and 6 mM respectively as electron donor and electron acceptor. The SRB culture was allowed to stabilize in the column before adding the Cr(VI to the influent. Chromium and sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation were examined by measuring the concentrations of Cr(Vl, sulfate and lactate in the influent and the effluent over time. The experiment was discontinued when Cr(VI concentration in the effiuent was breakthrough. In the absence of Cr(VI, sulfate was not completely reduced in the column, although lactate was completely oxidized and acetate as an intermediate product was not often detected. Almost all of Cr(VI loaded was reduced in the column seeded with the SRB culture at influent Cr(VI concentrations of 192,385 and769 mM. There was no significant Cr(VI loss in the control column, indicating that Cr(VI removal was due to the reduction of Cr(VI to Cr (lll by the SRB culture. The instantaneous Cr(VI removal decreased to a minimum of 32%, 24 days after the influent Cr(VI concentration was increased to 1540 mM, ancl sulfate removal efficiency decreased to a minimum of 17%. The SRB population in the column decreased 100 days after C(VI was added to the column. The total mass of Cr(VI reduced was approximately 878 mmol out of 881 mmol of Cr(Vl loaded in 116 days. The results clearly show that our developed SRB culture could reduced Cr(Vl considerably.

  17. Kinematic parameters of signed verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-10-01

    Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production ( Malaia & Wilbur, 2012a) and process these distinctions as part of the phonological structure of these verb classes in comprehension ( Malaia, Ranaweera, Wilbur, & Talavage, 2012). These studies are driven by the event visibility hypothesis by Wilbur (2003), who proposed that such use of kinematic features should be universal to sign language (SL) by the grammaticalization of physics and geometry for linguistic purposes. In a prior motion capture study, Malaia and Wilbur (2012a) lent support for the event visibility hypothesis in ASL, but there has not been quantitative data from other SLs to test the generalization to other languages. The authors investigated the kinematic parameters of predicates in Croatian Sign Language ( Hrvatskom Znakovnom Jeziku [HZJ]). Kinematic features of verb signs were affected both by event structure of the predicate (semantics) and phrase position within the sentence (prosody). The data demonstrate that kinematic features of motion in HZJ verb signs are recruited to convey morphological and prosodic information. This is the first crosslinguistic motion capture confirmation that specific kinematic properties of articulator motion are grammaticalized in other SLs to express linguistic features.

  18. Adsorption of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions by chitosan: kinetics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of chitosan as an adsorbent for Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions in aqueous solution was studied. The experiments were done as batch processes. Equilibrium studies were done on both cross-linked and non-cross-linked chitosan for both metals. Cr (VI) adsorption behaviour could be described using the Langmuir ...

  19. cis-dioxomolybdenum(VI)-(ONO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various ONO type Schiff base ligands L(H)2 used for the preparation of ... and derivatives.6–33 Depending on the method of prepa- ration .... HCl. Scheme 6. Synthesis of a Mo(VI) Schiff base complexe by selective inversion at C–1 carbon of a ...

  20. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  1. Effect of suspension kinematic on 14 DOF vehicle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpattananukul, T.; Chantharasenawong, C.

    2017-12-01

    Computer simulations play a major role in shaping modern science and engineering. They reduce time and resource consumption in new studies and designs. Vehicle simulations have been studied extensively to achieve a vehicle model used in minimum lap time solution. Simulation result accuracy depends on the abilities of these models to represent real phenomenon. Vehicles models with 7 degrees of freedom (DOF), 10 DOF and 14 DOF are normally used in optimal control to solve for minimum lap time. However, suspension kinematics are always neglected on these models. Suspension kinematics are defined as wheel movements with respect to the vehicle body. Tire forces are expressed as a function of wheel slip and wheel position. Therefore, the suspension kinematic relation is appended to the 14 DOF vehicle model to investigate its effects on the accuracy of simulate trajectory. Classical 14 DOF vehicle model is chosen as baseline model. Experiment data is collected from formula student style car test runs as baseline data for simulation and comparison between baseline model and model with suspension kinematic. Results show that in a single long turn there is an accumulated trajectory error in baseline model compared to model with suspension kinematic. While in short alternate turns, the trajectory error is much smaller. These results show that suspension kinematic had an effect on the trajectory simulation of vehicle. Which optimal control that use baseline model will result in inaccuracy control scheme.

  2. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  3. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH · 1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity

  4. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  5. Towards a consistent geochemical model for prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by ferrihydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Daessman, Ellinor; Baeckstroem, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Uranium(VI), which is often elevated in granitoidic groundwaters, is known to adsorb strongly to Fe (hydr)oxides under certain conditions. This process can be used in water treatment to remove U(VI). To develop a consistent geochemical model for U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite, batch experiments were performed and previous data sets reviewed to optimize a set of surface complexation constants using the 3-plane CD-MUSIC model. To consider the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on U(VI) speciation, new parameters for the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) were optimized using previously published data. The model, which was constrained from available X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy evidence, fitted the data well when the surface sites were divided into low- and high-affinity binding sites. Application of the model concept to other published data sets revealed differences in the reactivity of different ferrihydrites towards U(VI). Use of the optimized SHM parameters for U(VI)-DOM complexation showed that this process is important for U(VI) speciation at low pH. However in neutral to alkaline waters with substantial carbonate present, Ca-U-CO 3 complexes predominate. The calibrated geochemical model was used to simulate U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite for a hypothetical groundwater in the presence of several competitive ions. The results showed that U(VI) adsorption was strong between pH 5 and 8. Also near the calcite saturation limit, where U(VI) adsorption was weakest according to the model, the adsorption percentage was predicted to be >80%. Hence U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite-containing sorbents may be used as a method to bring down U(VI) concentrations to acceptable levels in groundwater

  6. Kinematic sensitivity of robot manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuskovic, Marko I.

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic sensitivity vectors and matrices for open-loop, n degrees-of-freedom manipulators are derived. First-order sensitivity vectors are defined as partial derivatives of the manipulator's position and orientation with respect to its geometrical parameters. The four-parameter kinematic model is considered, as well as the five-parameter model in case of nominally parallel joint axes. Sensitivity vectors are expressed in terms of coordinate axes of manipulator frames. Second-order sensitivity vectors, the partial derivatives of first-order sensitivity vectors, are also considered. It is shown that second-order sensitivity vectors can be expressed as vector products of the first-order sensitivity vectors.

  7. Latest Advances in Robot Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Husty, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    This book is  of interest to researchers inquiring about modern topics and methods in the kinematics, control and design of robotic manipulators. It considers the full range of robotic systems, including serial, parallel and cable driven manipulators, both planar and spatial. The systems range from being less than fully mobile to kinematically redundant to overconstrained. In addition to recognized areas, this book also presents recent advances in emerging areas such as the design and control of humanoids and humanoid subsystems, and the analysis, modeling and simulation of human body motions, as well as the mobility analysis of protein molecules and the development of machines which incorporate man.

  8. A combined wet chemistry and EXAFS study of U(VI) uptake by cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Harfouche, M.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Daehn, R.; Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption behaviour and speciation of U(VI) in cementitious systems was investigated by a combination of wet chemistry experiments and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Radiotracer studies using 233 U were carried out on hardened cement paste (HCP) and calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are the major constituents of HCP, to determine the uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms. C-S-H phases were synthesized using different methods for solid phase preparation, which enabled us to study the U(VI) uptake by different types of C-S-H phases and a wide range of Ca/Si compositions, and to distinguish U(VI) sorption on the surface of C-S-H from U(VI) incorporation into the structure. XAS measurements were performed using U(VI) loaded HCP and C-S-H materials (sorption and co-precipitation samples) to gain structural information on the U(VI) speciation in these systems, i.e., the type and number of neighbouring atoms, and bond distances. Examples of studies that have utilized XAS to characterize U(VI) speciation in cementitious systems are still rare, and to the best of our knowledge, detailed XAS investigations of the U(VI)/C-S-H system are lacking. The results obtained from the combined use of wet chemical and spectroscopic techniques allow mechanistic models of the immobilization process to be proposed for cementitious waste forms containing low and high U(VI) inventories. In the latter case U(VI) immobilization is controlled by a solubility-limiting process with the U(VI) mineral predominantly formed under the conditions prevailing in cementitious systems. At low U(VI) concentrations, however, U(VI) appears to be predominantly bound onto C-S-H phases. The coordination environment of U(VI) taken up by C-S-H was found to resemble that of U(VI) in uranophane. A mechanistic understanding of the U(VI) binding by cementitious materials will allow more detailed and scientifically well founded predictions of the retention of

  9. Vi mangler endnu et panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Vi mangler højtuddannede værdiskabere, som transformerer gode idéer og teknologier til indtjening og velstand. Først i mødet med markedet afgøres fremtiden. Troels Lund Poulsen bør nedsætte et kommercialiseringspanel, der byder ind med løsninger, hvordan Danmark bliver et land ikke kun med gode...

  10. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Lulu; Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong; Qiu, Guannan; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na 2 S 2 O 3 supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop

  11. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lulu [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Qiu, Guannan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang@ahau.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop.

  12. Kinematics of machinery through hyperworks

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, J S

    2011-01-01

    Using animations, this book explains the theory of machines concepts and the evolution of Kinematics. The book adopts HyperWorks MotionSolve to perform the analysis and visualizations, though the book is independent of the requirement of any software.

  13. Kinematic Tests of Small Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    muzzle devices, such as flash suppressors and muzzle compensators, if the items are designed to be operator removable. Use the ammunition that will...muzzle brake or adding a sound suppressor . A kinematics study is also a diagnostic tool to investigate weapon problems such as poor functioning with

  14. Clinical evaluation of complete solo surgery with the "ViKY®" robotic laparoscope manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Masanori; Nishinari, Naoto; Matsuya, Hideki; Tosha, Tsutomu; Minagawa, Yukihiro; Shimooki, Osamu; Abe, Tadashi

    2017-02-01

    Advancement in both surgical technique and medical equipment has enabled solo surgery. ViKY ® Endoscope Positioning System (ViKY ® ) is a robotic system that remotely controls an endoscope and provides direct vision control to the surgeon. Here, we report our experience with ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery. We retrospectively examined 25 cases of solo surgery TAPP with ViKY ® . ViKY ® was setup by the surgeon alone, and the setup duration was determined as the time at which the side rail was positioned and that when the endoscope was installed. For assessing the control unit, the number of false movements was counted. We compared the operative results between ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery TAPP and the conventional method with an assistant. The average time to set up ViKY ® was 7.9 min. The average number of commands for ViKY ® during surgery was 98.3, and the average number of errors and no response of control unit was 7.9. The mean duration of surgery was 136 min for the ViKY ® group, including the setup time, and 117 min for the conventional method. No case required an assistant during the operation. There was also no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative complications and the rate of recurrence. ViKY ® proved reliable in recognizing orders with very few failures, and the operations were performed safely and were comparable to the conventional operations with assistants. Solo surgery with ViKY ® was beneficial in this clinical evaluation.

  15. Probing uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of amidoxime ligands using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adetayo M; Pasilis, Sofie P

    2013-10-15

    Extraction processes using poly(acrylamidoxime) resins are being developed to extract uranium from seawater. The main complexing agents in these resins are thought to be 2,6-dihydroxyiminopiperidine (DHIP) and N(1),N(5)-dihydroxypentanediimidamide (DHPD), which form strong complexes with uranyl(VI) at the pH of seawater. It is important to understand uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of these and similar amidoxime ligands to understand factors affecting uranyl(VI) adsorption to the poly(acrylamidoxime) resins. Experiments were carried out in positive ion mode on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The ligands investigated were DHIP, DHPD, and N(1),N(2)-dihydroxyethanediimidamide (DHED). DHED and DHPD differ only in the number of carbons separating the oxime groups. The effects on the mass spectra of changes in uranyl(VI):ligand ratio, pH, and ligand type were examined. DHIP binds uranyl(VI) more effectively than DHPD or DHED in the pH range investigated, forming ions derived from solution-phase species with uranyl(VI):DHIP stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:3. The 2:3 uranyl(VI):DHIP complex appears to be a previously undescribed solution species. Ions related to uranyl(VI):DHPD complexes were detected in very low abundance. DHED is a more effective complexing agent for uranyl(VI) than DHPD, forming ions having uranyl(VI):DHED stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:3. This study presents a first look at the solution chemistry of uranyl(VI)-amidoxime complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The appearance of previously undescribed solution species suggests that the uranyl-amidoxime system is a rich and relatively complex one, requiring a more in-depth investigation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Kinematic, Kevlar(registered) Suspension System for an ADR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voellmer, George M.; Jackson, Michael L.; Shirron, Peter J.; Tuttle, James G.

    2003-01-01

    The High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) will use identical Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) to cool their bolometer detectors to 200mK and 100mK, respectively. In order to minimize thermal loads on the salt pill, a Kevlar@ suspension system is used to hold it in place. An innovative, kinematic suspension system is presented. The suspension system is unique in that it consists or two parts that can be assembled and tensioned offline, and later bolted onto the salt pill. The resulting assembly constrains each degree of freedom only once, yielding a kinematic, tensile structure.

  17. Raman spectrometric determination of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantner, E.; Freudenberger, M.; Steinert, D.; Ache, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    The determination of Pu(VI) in nitric acid solutions by spontaneous Laser Raman Spectrometry (LRS) was investigated and a calibration curve was established using U(VI) as internal standard. In addition, the concentrations of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) as a function of time were measured by this method in Pu(VI) solutions of different acidity containing H 2 O 2 as the reducing agent. In solutions which are intensely coloured by the presence of Ru(NO) complexes Pu(VI) can also be determined by LRS using a Kr + laser as excitation source. In future experiments, the study of the Pu(IV)-interaction with Ru using LRS and spectrophotometry as analytical techniques is therefore intended. (orig.) [de

  18. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo F

    2015-10-01

    . Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended.Keywords: mucopolysaccharidosis VI, Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome, dermatan sulfate, arylsulfatase b, enzyme replacement therapy, lysosomal storage diseases

  19. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal by polyethylenimine- and phosphorus-codoped hierarchical porous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shixia; Wang, Jun; Wu, Zeliang; Deng, Qiang; Tu, Wenfeng; Dai, Guiping; Zeng, Zheling; Deng, Shuguang

    2018-08-01

    The amino- and phosphorus-codoped (N,P-codoped) porous carbons derived from oil-tea shells were facilely fabricated through a combination of phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) activation and amino (polyethylenimine, PEI) modification method. The as-synthesized carbon adsorbents were systematically characterized and evaluated for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous solutions. The relationship between adsorbent properties and adsorption behaviors was illustrated. Moreover, the influences of contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, coexisting anions and temperature were also investigated. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) could be perfectly described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) on the carbon adsorbents synthesized in this work was 355.0 mg/g, and this excellent Cr(VI) capacity could be sustained with other coexisting anions. In addition to high surface area and suitable pore size distribution, the high Cr(VI) removal capacity is induced by rich heteroatoms incorporation and the Cr(VI) removal mechanism was clearly illustrated. Furthermore, the continuous column breakthrough experiment on obtained N,P-codoped carbon was conducted and well fitted by the Thomas model. This work revealed that PEI modification and P-containing groups could significantly enhance Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and make these N,P-codoped biomass-derived carbons potent adsorbents in practical water treatment applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  1. Inverse Kinematics With Closed Form Solution For Denso Robot Manipulator

    OpenAIRE

    Ikhsan Eka Prasetia; Trihastuti Agustinah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the forward kinematics and inverse kinematics used on the Denso robot manipulator which has a 6-DOF. The forward kinematics will result in the desired position by end-effector, while inverse kinematics produce angel on each joint. Inverse kinematics problem are very difficult, therefor to obtain the solution of inverse kinematics using closed form solution with geometry approach. The simulation result obtained from forward kinematics and inverse kinematics is determining desire...

  2. Kinematic Model of NAO Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš D. Jovanović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents synthesis of kinematic model of NAO humanoid robot of Aldebaran Robotics. NAO humanoid robot has complex kinematic structure with 25 active degrees of freedom (DOF. Humanoid system is formed through 5 mutually depended kinematic chains. After that we applied standard aspects of kinematic chains synthesis and Denavit-Hartenberg parameters of each of 5 chains of robotic structure were introduced. Also, mutual relationships between chains were described, as well as their physical and structural dependence. Generated kinematic model will be the starting point for further dynamical modeling of NAO humanoid robot and motion synthesis on actual platform.

  3. The Pleiades apex and its kinematical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.; Postnikova, E. S.; Chupina, N. V.; Vereshchagin, S. V.; Sariya, Devesh P.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2018-03-01

    A study of cluster characteristics and internal kinematical structure of the middle-aged Pleiades open star cluster is presented. The individual star apexes and various cluster kinematical parameters including the velocity ellipsoid parameters are determined using both Hipparcos and Gaia data. Modern astrometric parameters were taken from the Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) in combination with the Radial Velocity Experiment Fifth Data Release (DR5). The necessary set of parameters including parallaxes, proper motions and radial velocities are used for n=17 stars from Gaia DR1+RAVE DR5 and for n=19 stars from the Hipparcos catalog using SIMBAD data base. Single stars are used to improve accuracy by eliminating orbital movements. RAVE DR5 measurements were taken only for the stars with the radial velocity errors not exceeding 2 km/s. For the Pleiades stars taken from Gaia, we found mean heliocentric distance as 136.8 ± 6.4 pc, and the apex position is calculated as: A_{CP}=92°.52± 1°.72, D_{CP}=-42°.28± 2°.56 by the convergent point method and A0=95°.59± 2°.30 and D0=-50°.90± 2°.04 using AD-diagram method (n=17 in both cases). The results are compared with those obtained historically before the Gaia mission era.

  4. Sex Differences in Tibiocalcaneal Kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Female runners typically suffer more from chronic running injuries than age-matched males, although the exact biome-chanical mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of female runners are unknown. This study aimed to compare sex differences in tibiocalcaneal kinematics during the stance phase of running. Methods. Twenty male and twenty female participants ran at 4.0 m · s–1. Tibiocalcaneal kinematics were measured using an eight-camera motion analysis system and compared using independent samples t tests. Results. Peak eversion and tibial internal rotation angles were shown to be significantly greater in female runners. Conclusions. based on these observations, it was determined that female runners may be at increased risk from chronic injury development in relation to excessive tibiocalcaneal motions in the coronal and transverse planes.

  5. VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics 17-25 November 2015, Chiapas, Mexico The VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics was held at the MCTP, at the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH), Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico thanks to the Science for Development ICTP-UNACH-UNESCO Regional Seminar, 17-25 November 2015 (http://mctp.mx/e-VI-School-on-Cosmic-Rays-and-Astrophysics.html). The School series started in La Paz, Bolivia in 2004 and it has been, since then, hosted by several Latin American countires: 1.- La Paz, Bolivia (August, 2004), 2.- Puebla, Mexico (September, 2006), 3.- Arequipa, Peru (September, 2008), 4.- Santo André, Brazil (September, 2010), 5.- La Paz, Bolivia (August, 2012). It aims to promote Cosmic Ray (CR) Physics and Astrophysics in the Latin American community and to provide a general overview of theoretical and experimental issues on these topics. It is directed to undergraduates, postgraduates and active researchers in the field. The lectures introduce fundamental Cosmic Ray Physics and Astrophysics with a review of standards of the field. It is expected the school continues happening during the next years following a tradition. In this edition, the list of seminars included topics such as experimental techniques of CR detection, development of CR showers and hadronic interactions, composition and energy spectrum of primary CR, Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), neutrino Astrophysics, spacecraft detectors, simulations, solar modulation, and the current state of development and results of several astroparticle physics experiments such as The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, HAWC in Mexico, KASCADE and KASCADE Grande, HESS, IceCube, JEM-EUSO, Fermi-LAT, and others. This time the school has been complemented with the ICTP-UNACH-UNESCO Seminar of theory on Particle and Astroparticle Physics. The organization was done by MCTP, the Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics. The school had 46 participants, 30 students from Honduras, Brazil

  6. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3 ± 0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  7. Pythagoras Theorem and Relativistic Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaj, Zenun; Dhoqina, Polikron

    2010-01-01

    In two inertial frames that move in a particular direction, may be registered a light signal that propagates in an angle with this direction. Applying Pythagoras theorem and principles of STR in both systems, we can derive all relativistic kinematics relations like the relativity of simultaneity of events, of the time interval, of the length of objects, of the velocity of the material point, Lorentz transformations, Doppler effect and stellar aberration.

  8. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassmann, H.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-03-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup {minus}1} of data from the 1992--1993 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup {minus}1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{bar t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+ {ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+ {ge} 3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks, in agreement with expectations from top, but not compatible with expectations from backgrounds. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992--1993 collider run.

  9. Kinetic study of time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} on biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Bailey, E.H., E-mail: liz.bailey@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Young, S.D. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Biochar, a by-product from the production of biofuel and syngas by gasification, was tested as a material for adsorption and fixation of U{sup VI} from aqueous solutions. A batch experiment was conducted to study the factors that influence the adsorption and time-dependent fixation on biochar at 20 °C, including pH, initial concentration of U{sup VI} and contact time. Uranium (U{sup VI}) adsorption was highly dependent on pH but adsorption on biochar was high over a wide range of pH values, from 4.5 to 9.0, and adsorption strength was time-dependent over several days. The experimental data for pH > 7 were most effectively modelled using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm coupled to a reversible first order kinetic equation to describe the time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} within the biochar structure. Desorption experiments showed that U{sup VI} was only sparingly desorbable from the biochar with time and isotopic dilution with {sup 233}U{sup VI} confirmed the low, or time-dependent, lability of adsorbed {sup 238}U{sup VI}. Below pH 7 the adsorption isotherm trend suggested precipitation, rather than true adsorption, may occur. However, across all pH values (4.5-9) measured saturation indices suggested precipitation was possible: autunite below pH 6.5 and either swartzite, liebigite or bayleyite above pH 6.5.

  10. A simple Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system for rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidative degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yanan; Yang, Shaojie [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China); Zhou, Danna, E-mail: zdncug@163.com [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Feng [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of organic pollutants occur. • Oxysulfur radicals generated in Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system oxidize the organic pollutants. • Acidic pH facilitates the reactions from both directions of reduction and oxidation. • Degradation potential of aromatic amines depends on the substituted groups. • Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system is promising for “waste control by waste”. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a heavy-metal contaminant, can be easily reduced to less toxic trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by sulfite ions (S(IV)). However, S(IV) has not drawn as much attention as the ferrous ion has. We report herein a novel Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system containing sulfite ions that rapidly and simultaneously reduces Cr(VI) and oxidize organic pollutants in the presence of oxygen in aqueous solutions. This Cr(VI)–S(IV)-O{sub 2} system contains the initiator Cr(VI), the reductant S(IV), and the oxidant O{sub 2}, which produce oxysulfur radicals (mainly SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and SO{sub 5}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radicals (OH·). The Cr(VI)/S(IV) molar ratio, pH, and oxygen content play important roles in the entire reaction system. Acidic conditions (pH 3.0) facilitated degradation of organic compounds and reduction of Cr(VI) as well. In addition, experiments of rapid degradation of several kinds of organic pollutants such as azo dye (acid orange 7, AO7), aniline, phenol, bisphenol A etc were also conducted. Preliminary results show that the removal rates of the analogs of phenols or aromatic amines in this Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system have a relationship with the electronic parameters (Hammett constant, σ) of the substituted groups. Thus, the Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system, provides an excellent strategy of “waste control by waste” for removing multiple industrial contaminants.

  11. Experimental Monitoring of Cr(VI) Bio-reduction Using Electrochemical Geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birsen Canan; Gary R. Olhoeft; William A. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with highly carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). In this research, we explore the feasibility of applying complex resistivity to the detection and monitoring of microbially-induced reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to a less toxic form (Cr(III)). We hope to measure the change in ionic concentration that occurs during this reduction reaction. This form of reduction promises to be an attractive alternative to more expensive remedial treatment methods. The specific goal of this research is to define the minimum and maximum concentration of the chemical and biological compounds in contaminated samples for which the Cr(VI) - Cr(III) reduction processes could be detected via complex resistivity. There are three sets of experiments, each comprised of three sample columns. The first experiment compares three concentrations of Cr(VI) at the same bacterial cell concentration. The second experiment establishes background samples with, and without, Cr(VI) and bacterial cells. The third experiment examines the influence of three different bacterial cell counts on the same concentration of Cr(VI). A polarization relaxation mechanism was observed between 10 and 50 Hz. The polarization mechanism, unfortunately, was not unique to bio-chemically active samples. Spectral analysis of complex resistivity data, however, showed that the frequency where the phase minimum occurred was not constant for bio-chemically active samples throughout the experiment. A significant shifts in phase minima occurred between 10 to 20 Hz from the initiation to completion of Cr(VI) reduction. This phenomena was quantified using the Cole-Cole model and the Marquardt-Levenberg nonlinear least square minimization method. The data suggests that the relaxation time and the time constant of this relaxation are the Cole-Cole parameters most sensitive to changes in biologically-induced reduction of Cr(VI)

  12. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  13. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO_3/Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO_3 complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO_3 and Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q_e) and distribution constant (K_d) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q_e and K_d values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO_2CO_3"− or SO–UO_2 (CO_3)_2"3"−. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  14. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3}/Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhibin [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Cao, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhcao@ecit.cn [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Luo, Xuanping [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); and others

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} and Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q{sub e}) and distribution constant (K{sub d}) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q{sub e} and K{sub d} values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sup −} or SO–UO{sub 2} (CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 3−}. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  15. Removal of Cr(VI) from Aqueous Environments Using Micelle-Clay Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurie, Mohannad; Khamis, Mustafa; Manassra, Adnan; Ayyad, Ibrahim; Nir, Shlomo; Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino A.; Karaman, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite) or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI) removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques. PMID:24222757

  16. Study on Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by Activated Carbon from Cassava Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinhui; Li, Chuanshu; Yang, Bin; Kang, Sijun; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a new type of adsorbent prepared by waste sludge from alcohol production industry was used to adsorb Cr (VI) in activated carbon from cassava sludge. A series of static adsorption experiments were carried out on the initial concentration of solution Cr (VI), pH value of solution, adsorption time and dosage of adsorbent. The results of single factor experiments show that the removal rate of Cr (VI) increases with the initial concentration of Cr(VI), while the adsorption amount is opposite. When the pH value of the solution is low, the adsorption effect of activated carbon is better.The adsorption time should be controlled within 40-60min. When the activated carbon dosage is increased, the removal rate increases but the adsorption capacity decreases.

  17. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailides, Michail K. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G., E-mail: atekerle@upatras.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Akratos, Christos S.; Coles, Sandra [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Pavlou, Stavros [Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Vayenas, Dimitrios V. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-01-08

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m{sup 2} d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.

  18. Econophys-Kolkata VI Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the book is to present the ideas and research findings of active researchers such as physicists, economists, mathematicians and financial engineers working in the field of “Econophysics,” who have undertaken the task of modeling and analyzing systemic risk, network dynamics and other topics. Of primary interest in these studies is the aspect of systemic risk, which has long been identified as a potential scenario in which financial institutions trigger a dangerous contagion mechanism, spreading from the financial economy to the real economy. This type of risk, long confined to the monetary market, has spread considerably in the recent past, culminating in the subprime crisis of 2008. As such, understanding and controlling systemic risk has become an extremely important societal and economic challenge. The Econophys-Kolkata VI conference proceedings are dedicated to addressing a number of key issues involved. Several leading researchers in these fields report on their recent work and al...

  19. An electrochemical study of U(VI) and Cr(VI) in molten borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Gregori de Pinochet, I. de

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), in molten Na 2 B 4 O 7 at 800 deg C was studied by means of linear sweep voltammetry, and chronopotentiometry. The reduction of U(VI) to U(V) proceeded reversibly at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for the U(VI) species at 800 deg C was 4.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 . The activation energy of diffusion was (34,8 +- 0,8) kcal. mole -1 . Electrochemical studies of Cr(VI) at 800 0 C reveal a two-step reduction process at a platinum electrode. Only the voltammogram for the first step charge transfer process was studied. Analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is reversibly reduced to Cr(III) at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for Cr(VI) at 800 0 C is 1,9.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 [fr

  20. Design of a Two-Step Calibration Method of Kinematic Parameters for Serial Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Wei; WANG, Lei; YUN, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Serial robots are used to handle workpieces with large dimensions, and calibrating kinematic parameters is one of the most efficient ways to upgrade their accuracy. Many models are set up to investigate how many kinematic parameters can be identified to meet the minimal principle, but the base frame and the kinematic parameter are indistinctly calibrated in a one-step way. A two-step method of calibrating kinematic parameters is proposed to improve the accuracy of the robot's base frame and kinematic parameters. The forward kinematics described with respect to the measuring coordinate frame are established based on the product-of-exponential (POE) formula. In the first step the robot's base coordinate frame is calibrated by the unit quaternion form. The errors of both the robot's reference configuration and the base coordinate frame's pose are equivalently transformed to the zero-position errors of the robot's joints. The simplified model of the robot's positioning error is established in second-power explicit expressions. Then the identification model is finished by the least square method, requiring measuring position coordinates only. The complete subtasks of calibrating the robot's 39 kinematic parameters are finished in the second step. It's proved by a group of calibration experiments that by the proposed two-step calibration method the average absolute accuracy of industrial robots is updated to 0.23 mm. This paper presents that the robot's base frame should be calibrated before its kinematic parameters in order to upgrade its absolute positioning accuracy.

  1. Retention of uranium(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, M.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Shon, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Retention of U(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite as investigated by conducting dynamic and batch sorption experiments in a love-box using a granite core with a natural fracture. The hydrodynamic properties of the granite core were obtained from the elution curve of a on-sorbing tracer, Br - . The elution curve of U(VI) showed a similar behavior to Br - . This reveals that the retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material was not significant when migrating through the fracture at a given condition. From the dynamic sorption experiment, the retardation factor R a and the distribution coefficient K a of U(VI) were obtained as about 2.9 and 0.16 cm, respectively. The distribution coefficient K d ) of U(VI) onto laumontite obtained by conducting a batch sorption experiment resulted in a small value of 2.3±0.5 mL/g. This low K d value greed with the result of the dynamic sorption experiment. For the distribution of uranium on the granite surface investigated by an X-ray image mapping, the fracture region filled with laumontite showed a relatively lower content of uranium compared to the surrounding granite surface. Thus, the low retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material can be explained by following two mechanisms. One is that U(VI) exists as anionic uranyl hydroxides or uranyl carbonates at a given groundwater condition and the other is the remarkably low sorption capacity of the laumontite for U(VI). author)

  2. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  3. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  4. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  5. Effect of blended materials on U(VI) retention characteristics for portland cement solidification product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Ma Xiaoling; Li Yuxiang

    2006-01-01

    Using the simulated groundwater as leaching liquid, the retention capability of U(VI) in solidification products with Portland cement, the Portland cement containing silica fume, the Portland cement containing metakaolin and the Portland cement containing fly ash was researched by leaching experiments at 25 degree C for 42 d. The results indicate silica fume and metakaolin as blended materials can improve the U(VI) retention capability of Portland cement solidification product, but fly ash can not. (authors)

  6. Inverse Kinematic Analysis Of A Quadruped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Arif Sen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an inverse kinematics program of a quadruped robot. The kinematics analysis is main problem in the manipulators and robots. Dynamic and kinematic structures of quadruped robots are very complex compared to industrial and wheeled robots. In this study inverse kinematics solutions for a quadruped robot with 3 degrees of freedom on each leg are presented. Denavit-Hartenberg D-H method are used for the forward kinematic. The inverse kinematic equations obtained by the geometrical and mathematical methods are coded in MATLAB. And thus a program is obtained that calculate the legs joint angles corresponding to desired various orientations of robot and endpoints of legs. Also the program provides the body orientations of robot in graphical form. The angular positions of joints obtained corresponding to desired different orientations of robot and endpoints of legs are given in this study.

  7. Kinematics Control and Analysis of Industrial Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongbo; Cai, Fan; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    The robot’s development present situation, basic principle and control system are introduced briefly. Research is mainly focused on the study of the robot’s kinematics and motion control. The structural analysis of a planar articulated robot (SCARA) robot is presented,the coordinate system is established to obtain the position and orientation matrix of the end effector,a method of robot kinematics analysis based on homogeneous transformation method is proposed, and the kinematics solution of the robot is obtained.Establishment of industrial robot’s kinematics equation and formula for positive kinematics by example. Finally,the kinematic analysis of this robot was verified by examples.It provides a basis for structural design and motion control.It has active significance to promote the motion control of industrial robot.

  8. Nuclear reaction studies using inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reaction studies with reversed kinematics refer to studies of nuclear reactions induced by a heavy projectile colliding with lighter target nuclei. The technique of using reversed kinematics is costly in terms of the available center-of-mass energy. Most of the projectile's energy goes into forward motion of the reaction products in the laboratory system. Examples are presented where the use of reversed kinematics techniques has provided new information on certain reaction processes. A list of kinematic properties and advantages they may afford is shown. Clearly the possible studies listed can be done without using reversed kinematics but because of the difficulty associated with some of these studies they were never performed until more energetic heavier beams have become available and the reversed kinematics technique was utilized

  9. The brown dwarf kinematics project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Jackie K.

    2010-10-01

    Brown dwarfs are a recent addition to the plethora of objects studied in Astronomy. With theoretical masses between 13 and 75 MJupiter , they lack sustained stable Hydrogen burning so they never join the stellar main sequence. They have physical properties similar to both planets and low-mass stars so studies of their population inform on both. The distances and kinematics of brown dwarfs provide key statistical constraints on their ages, moving group membership, absolute brightnesses, evolutionary trends, and multiplicity. Yet, until my thesis, fundamental measurements of parallax and proper motion were made for only a relatively small fraction of the known population. To address this deficiency, I initiated the Brown Dwarf Kinematics (BDKP). Over the past four years I have re-imaged the majority of spectroscopically confirmed field brown dwarfs (or ultracool dwarfs---UCDs) and created the largest proper motion catalog for ultracool dwarfs to date. Using new astrometric information I examined population characteristics such as ages calculated from velocity dispersions and correlations between kinematics and colors. Using proper motions, I identified several new wide co-moving companions and investigated binding energy (and hence formation) limitations as well as the frequency of hierarchical companions. Concurrently over the past four years I have been conducting a parallax survey of 84 UCDs including those showing spectral signatures of youth, metal-poor brown dwarfs, and those within 20 pc of the Sun. Using absolute magnitude relations in J,H, and K, I identified overluminous binary candidates and investigated known flux-reversal binaries. Using current evolutionary models, I compared the MK vs J-K color magnitude diagram to model predictions and found that the low-surface gravity dwarfs are significantly red-ward and underluminous of predictions and a handful of late-type T dwarfs may require thicker clouds to account for their scatter.

  10. Kinematic correction for roller skewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is developed for high-speed cylindrical roller bearings. This stabilization requires race and roller crowning to product changes in the rolling geometry as the roller shifts axially. These changes put a reverse skew in the rolling elements by changing the rolling taper. Twelve basic possible bearing modifications are identified in this paper. Four have single transverse convex curvature in the rollers while eight have rollers with compound transverse curvature composed of a central cylindrical band of constant radius surrounded by symmetric bands with both slope and transverse curvature.

  11. Determination of chromium (VI) in primary and secondary fertilizer and their respective precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Oliver; Fiedler, Francesca; Adam, Christian; Vogel, Christian; Senz, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium species (Cr(VI)) are often carcinogenic, of high acute toxicity, highly mobile, and thus pose a severe risk to health and environment. Fertilizers usually contain significant amounts of chromium. Therefore, a reliable analysis of chromium and the fraction of Cr(VI) are crucial for safe use of fertilizers. This problem is expected to increase in the future, since more and more recycled fertilizers emerge due to increasing fertilizer demand and respective supply risks. However, existing analytical methods have been developed for conventional fertilizers and have to be tested whether they are suitable for the new materials. Thus, we performed a wet-chemical extraction for Cr(VI) on several matrices as well as respective quality control experiments including spiking with Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. We found the Cr(VI) amounts to be below 2 mg/kg except for a thermally post-treated sewage sludge ash (SSA) that showed 12.3 mg/kg. The presence of organic matter e.g. in sludge or precipitated struvite caused a reduction of spiked Cr(VI) and thus no satisfying recovery for quality control. Cr(VI) reduction was also observed for SSA, presumably due to the presence of Fe(II) compounds. Even though the tested procedure can be hampered in some recycled fertilizer matrices, it might be adapted to be applicable also for these complex samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ferrate(VI) as a greener oxidant: Electrochemical generation and treatment of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuhui; Zhang, Qi; Liang, He; Ying, Li; Xiangxu, Meng; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-12-05

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) is a greener oxidant in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The electrochemical synthesis of Fe(VI) may be considered environmentally friendly because it involves one-step process to convert Fe(0) to Fe(VI) without using harmful chemicals. Electrolysis was performed by using a sponge iron as an anode in NaOH solution at different ionic strengths. The cyclic voltammetric (CV) curves showed that the sponge iron had higher electrical activity than the grey cast iron. The optimum current density was 0.054mAcm(-2) in 10M NaOH solution, which is much lower than the electrolyte concentrations used in other electrode materials. A comparison of current efficiency and energy consumption was conducted and is briefly discussed. The generated ferrate solution was applied to degrade phenol in water at two levels (2mgL(-1) and 5mgL(-1)). The maximum removal efficiency was ∼70% and the optimum pH for phenol treatment was 9.0. Experiments on phenol removal using conventional coagulants (ferric chloride (FeCl3) and polyaluminium chloride (PAC)) were performed independently to demonstrate that removal of phenol by Fe(VI) occurred mainly by oxidative transformation. A combination of Fe(VI) and coagulant may be advantageous in enhancing removal efficiency, adjusting pH, and facilitating flocculation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inverse kinematics of OWI-535 robotic arm

    OpenAIRE

    DEBENEC, PRIMOŽ

    2015-01-01

    The thesis aims to calculate the inverse kinematics for the OWI-535 robotic arm. The calculation of the inverse kinematics determines the joint parameters that provide the right pose of the end effector. The pose consists of the position and orientation, however, we will focus only on the second one. Due to arm limitations, we have created our own type of the calculation of the inverse kinematics. At first we have derived it only theoretically, and then we have transferred the derivation into...

  14. Microbial Precipitation of Cr(III)-Hydroxide and Se(0) Nanoparticles During Anoxic Bioreduction of Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yumi; Oh, Jong-Min; Roh, Yul

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the microbial precipitations of Cr(III)-hydroxide and Se(0) nanoparticles during anoxic bioreductions of Cr(VI) and Se(VI) using metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater. Metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT), Daejeon, S. Korea were used. Metal reduction and precipitation experiments with the metal-reducing bacteria were conducted using Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-contaminated water and glucose as a carbon source under an anaerobic environment at room temperature. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses were used to characterize the mineralogy, crystal structure, chemistry, shape, and size distribution of the precipitates. The metal-reducing bacteria reduced Cr(VI) of potassium chromate (K₂CrO₄) to Cr(III) of chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)3], and Se(VI) of sodium selenate (Na₂SeO₄) to selenium Se(0), with changes of color and turbidity. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses revealed that the chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)₃] was formed extracellularly with nanoparticles of 20–30 nm in size, and elemental selenium Se(0) nanoparticles had a sphere shape of 50–250 nm in size. These results show that metal-reducing bacteria in groundwater can aid or accelerate precipitation of heavy metals such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) via bioreduction processes under anoxic environments. These results may also be useful for the recovery of Cr and Se nanoparticles in natural environments.

  15. Monitoring diver kinematics with dielectric elastomer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2017-04-01

    Diving, initially motivated for food purposes, is crucial to the oil and gas industry, search and rescue, and is even done recreationally by millions of people. There is a growing need however, to monitor the health and activity of divers. The Divers Alert Network has reported on average 90 fatalities per year since 1980. Furthermore an estimated 1000 divers require recompression treatment for dive-related injuries every year. One means of monitoring diver activity is to integrate strain sensors into a wetsuit. This would provide kinematic information on the diver potentially improving buoyancy control assessment, providing a platform for gesture communication, detecting panic attacks and monitoring diver fatigue. To explore diver kinematic monitoring we have coupled dielectric elastomer sensors to a wetsuit worn by the pilot of a human-powered wet submarine. This provided a unique platform to test the performance and accuracy of dielectric elastomer strain sensors in an underwater application. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of strain sensors to monitor the kinematics of a diver. This study was in collaboration with the University of Auckland's human-powered submarine team, Team Taniwha. The pilot, completely encapsulated in a hull, pedals to propel the submarine forward. Therefore this study focused on leg motion as that is the primary motion of the submarine pilot. Four carbon-filled silicone dielectric elastomer sensors were fabricated and coupled to the pilot's wetsuit. The first two sensors were attached over the knee joints, with the remaining two attached between the pelvis and thigh. The goal was to accurately measure leg joint angles thereby determining the position of each leg relative to the hip. A floating data acquisition unit monitored the sensors and transmitted data packets to a nearby computer for real-time processing. A GoPro Hero 4 silver edition was used to capture the experiments and provide a means of post-validation. The

  16. Adding Image Constraints to Inverse Kinematics for Human Motion Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-i-Capó, Antoni; Varona, Javier; González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Perales, Francisco J.

    2009-12-01

    In order to study human motion in biomechanical applications, a critical component is to accurately obtain the 3D joint positions of the user's body. Computer vision and inverse kinematics are used to achieve this objective without markers or special devices attached to the body. The problem of these systems is that the inverse kinematics is "blinded" with respect to the projection of body segments into the images used by the computer vision algorithms. In this paper, we present how to add image constraints to inverse kinematics in order to estimate human motion. Specifically, we explain how to define a criterion to use images in order to guide the posture reconstruction of the articulated chain. Tests with synthetic images show how the scheme performs well in an ideal situation. In order to test its potential in real situations, more experiments with task specific image sequences are also presented. By means of a quantitative study of different sequences, the results obtained show how this approach improves the performance of inverse kinematics in this application.

  17. Adsorption of chromium(VI) on pomace-An olive oil industry waste: Batch and column studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoc, Emine; Nuhoglu, Yasar; Dundar, Murat

    2006-01-01

    The waste pomace of olive oil factory (WPOOF) was tested for its ability to remove chromium(VI) from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG o , ΔH o and ΔS o have been calculated. The thermodynamics of chromium(VI) ion onto WPOOF system indicates spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. The ability of WPOOF to adsorb chromium(VI) in a fixed bed column was investigated, as well. The effect of operating parameters such as flow rate and inlet metal ion concentration on the sorption characteristics of WPOOF was investigated. The longest breakthrough time and maximum of Cr(VI) adsorption is obtained at pH 2.0. The total adsorbed quantities, equilibrium uptakes and total removal percents of chromium(VI) related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained at different flow rates and different inlet chromium(VI) concentrations for adsorbent. The data confirmed that the total amount of sorbed chromium(VI) and equilibrium chromium(VI) uptake decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing inlet chromium(VI) concentration. The Adams-Bohart model were used to analyze the experimental data and the model parameters were evaluated

  18. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO 2 NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO 2 and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO 2 nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO 2 nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions

  19. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  20. Quantifying meniscal kinematics in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian H; Banks, Scott A; Pozzi, Antonio

    2017-11-06

    The dog has been used extensively as an experimental model to study meniscal treatments such as meniscectomy, meniscal repair, transplantation, and regeneration. However, there is very little information on meniscal kinematics in the dog. This study used MR imaging to quantify in vitro meniscal kinematics in loaded dog knees in four distinct poses: extension, flexion, internal, and external rotation. A new method was used to track the meniscal poses along the convex and posteriorly tilted tibial plateau. Meniscal displacements were large, displacing 13.5 and 13.7 mm posteriorly on average for the lateral and medial menisci during flexion (p = 0.90). The medial anterior horn and lateral posterior horns were the most mobile structures, showing average translations of 15.9 and 15.1 mm, respectively. Canine menisci are highly mobile and exhibit movements that correlate closely with the relative tibiofemoral positions. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Kinematic Modeling of Distant Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipper Rain

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of galaxies is one of the most actual topics in astrophysics. Among the most important factors determining the evolution are two galactic components which are difficult or even impossible to detect optically: the gaseous disks and the dark matter halo. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope images to construct a two-component (bulge + disk model for stellar matter distribution of galaxies. Properties of the galactic components are derived using a three-dimensional galaxy modeling software, which also estimates disk thickness and inclination angle. We add a gas disk and a dark matter halo and use hydrodynamical equations to calculate gas rotation and dispersion profiles in the resultant gravitational potential. We compare the kinematic profiles with the Team Keck Redshift Survey observations. In this pilot study, two galaxies are analyzed deriving parameters for their stellar components; both galaxies are found to be disk-dominated. Using the kinematical model, the gas mass and stellar mass ratio in the disk are estimated.

  2. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  3. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  4. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Santos, Erika; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L -1 U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L -1 Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  5. Uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate chemically modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.; Ordonez R, E.

    2010-10-01

    This work deals with the uranium (Vi) speciation after sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ) surface, hydrated and in a surface modified with organic acids. Oxalic and citric acids were chosen to modify the ZrP 2 O 7 surface because they have poly carboxylic groups and they mimic the organic matter in nature. Thus the interest of this work is to evaluate the uranium (Vi) sorption edge at different s ph values in natural and modified surfaces. The luminescence technique (fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively) was used for the quantification and speciation of uranyl sorbed at the zirconium diphosphate interface. The fluorescence experiment, showed that adsorption of uranyl on surface of zirconium diphosphate tends to 100%. The speciation shows that there are different complexes in surface which were formed between zirconium diphosphate and uranyl, since it is produced a displacement of wavelength in fluorescence spectra of each system. (Author)

  6. Ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI from contaminated mine water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRomero-Gonzalez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ex-situ bioremoval of U(VI from contaminated water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain 8455 and 13538 was studied under a range of pH and uranium concentrations. The effect of pH on the growth of bacteria was evaluated across the range 1.5 – 4.5 pH units. The respiration rate of At. ferrooxidans at different U(VI concentrations was quantified as a measure of the rate of metabolic activity over time using an oxygen electrode. The biosorption process was quantified using a uranyl nitrate solution, U-spiked growth media and U-contaminated mine water. The results showed that both strains of At. ferrooxidans are able to remove U(VI from solution at pH 2.5 – 4.5, exhibiting a buffering capacity at pH 3.5. The respiration rate of the micro-organism was affected at U(VI concentration of 30 mg L-1. The kinetics of the sorption fitted a pseudo-first order equation, and depended on the concentration of U(VI. The KD obtained from the biosorption experiments indicated that strain 8455 is more efficient for the removal of U(VI. A bioreactor designed to treat a solution of 100 mg U(VI L-1 removed at least 50% of the U(VI in water. The study demonstrated that At. ferrooxidans can be used for the ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI contaminated mine water.

  7. Treatment of selected pharmaceuticals by ferrate(VI): performance, kinetic studies and identification of oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-03-15

    The performance of ferrate(VI) in treating sulfamethoxazole (SMX), diclofenac (DCF), carbamazepine (CBZ) and bezafibrate (BZF) in test solutions containing the four compounds was investigated. A series of jar-test experiments was performed on a bench-scale at pH 6-9 and at a ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg Fe/L. The results suggested that ferrate(VI) can effectively remove SMX, DCF and CBZ from the test solutions, with greater than 80% removal under optimum conditions. However, the removal efficiency of BZF was very low, less than 25% under the studied conditions. Increasing the dose of ferrate(VI) improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH on ferrate(VI) performance varied among the different target compounds. Ferrate(VI) demonstrated the highest reactivity with SMX at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C), with apparent second-order rate constants of 360±17 M(-1) s(-1) and 1.26±0.02 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. However, BZF showed the lowest removal by ferrate(VI) with the smallest rate constants (less than 0.5 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, a number of oxidation products (OPs) of SMX, DCF and CBZ during ferrate(VI) oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and their degradation pathways were tentatively proposed. No OPs of BZF were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  9. Production of radioactive nuclides in inverse reaction kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traykov, E.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Bosswell, M.; Dammalapati, U.; Dendooven, P.; Dermois, O.C.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Sohani, M.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.; Young, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient production of short-lived radioactive isotopes in inverse reaction kinematics is an important technique for various applications. It is particularly relevant when the isotope of interest is only a few nucleons away from a stable isotope. In this article production via charge exchange and stripping reactions in combination with a magnetic separator is explored. The relation between the separator transmission efficiency, the production yield, and the choice of beam energy is discussed. The results of some exploratory experiments will be presented

  10. Extended analysis of Mo VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlen, B.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.; Chaghtai, M.S.Z.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the RbI-like spectrum Mo VI has been extended to include a total of some 110 classified lines and 44 energy levels belonging to the one-electron configurations 4s 2 4p 6 ( 1 S)nl with n ranging up to 9 and l up to 7. The analysis is based on recordings of vacuum spark spectra made at Lund in the region 230-2350 A, complemented by a list of lines from 2193 to 6336 A observed and identified by Romanov and Striganov in a Penning type arc discharge. The one-electron level system is partly mixed with core-excited configurations, not treated in the present paper. Especially the nf series is strongly perturbed by 4s 2 4p 5 4d 2 , and an anomalous behaviour of the ng series is explained by interaction with the 2 G term of 4s4p 6 4d 2 . The ionization limit, derived from 6h, 7i and 8k by means of the polarization formula, is found to be 555 132+-2 cm -1 . (orig.)

  11. Irradiation capsules VISA-2a-f, chapter VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.

    1962-01-01

    Irradiation capsules VISA-2a, b,c,d, and e were constructed in Saclay according to the drawings from Vinca and according to the demand of the experimentators. This chapter VI includes documentation for each type of capsule, review about each experiment within the VISA-2 project, the objective and purpose of the experiment as well as experimental device. Irradiation capsule VISA-2f was placed in the RA reactor core in September 1962. It was completely manufactured in Vinca including sample holders and leak tight shells. It will remain in the reactor core for about month in order to obtain the integral fast neutron flux [sr

  12. O uso da gestão de projetos para a implantação de uma gestão da informação integrada e participativa: a experiência da coordenadoria de educação aberta e a distância da Universidade Federal de Viçosa-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Jaime Ribeiro Faria

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Management of Distance Education demands competences at planning, systematization, organization, and controlling of processes and projects. These tasks cannot be carried out successfully without information management system that meets the requirements of integration, collective responsibility and participation. Therefore, this study aimed at implementing an information management system at the Coordination of Open and Distance Education of Federal University of Viçosa (CEAD-UFV, following the methodology of Project Management. For this purpose, it was developed and implemented an information management system based on the methodology of project management for information, technology and communication companies, by adapting the dotProjec -, an open source software. It was noted that the model implanted offered to CEAD-UFV a systemic view of their projects and a dynamic information flow. The experience also showed that an information management based on project management allows focusing on the synergy between groups required in distance education context.

  13. Surgical gesture classification from video and kinematic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappella, Luca; Béjar, Benjamín; Hager, Gregory; Vidal, René

    2013-10-01

    Much of the existing work on automatic classification of gestures and skill in robotic surgery is based on dynamic cues (e.g., time to completion, speed, forces, torque) or kinematic data (e.g., robot trajectories and velocities). While videos could be equally or more discriminative (e.g., videos contain semantic information not present in kinematic data), they are typically not used because of the difficulties associated with automatic video interpretation. In this paper, we propose several methods for automatic surgical gesture classification from video data. We assume that the video of a surgical task (e.g., suturing) has been segmented into video clips corresponding to a single gesture (e.g., grabbing the needle, passing the needle) and propose three methods to classify the gesture of each video clip. In the first one, we model each video clip as the output of a linear dynamical system (LDS) and use metrics in the space of LDSs to classify new video clips. In the second one, we use spatio-temporal features extracted from each video clip to learn a dictionary of spatio-temporal words, and use a bag-of-features (BoF) approach to classify new video clips. In the third one, we use multiple kernel learning (MKL) to combine the LDS and BoF approaches. Since the LDS approach is also applicable to kinematic data, we also use MKL to combine both types of data in order to exploit their complementarity. Our experiments on a typical surgical training setup show that methods based on video data perform equally well, if not better, than state-of-the-art approaches based on kinematic data. In turn, the combination of both kinematic and video data outperforms any other algorithm based on one type of data alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinematically Decoupled Cores in Dwarf (Elliptical) Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toloba, E.; Peletier, R. F.; Guhathakurta, P.; van de Ven, G.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Brok, M. d.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Lisker, T.; Paudel, S.; Ryś, A.; Salo, H.

    An overview is given of what we know about the frequency of kinematically decoupled cores in dwarf elliptical galaxies. New observations show that kinematically decoupled cores happen just as often in dwarf elliptical as in ordinary early-type galaxies. This has important consequences for the

  15. Separation of Rhenium (VII) from Tungsten (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Lukic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Orlic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Examined were the conditions for an effective separation of tungsten (VI) and rhenium (VII) on alumina if the solution of 0.20 mol dm -3 NaCl, ph=2.6 is used as the aqueous phase. Under the given experimental conditions alumina was found to be much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina at pH=2 are 24 and 78 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 , respectively. With the increase of pH these values decrease. So, at pH=6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 respectively. The elution volume for rhenium for the given column dimensions and quantity of the adsorbent is about 16 ml. These results were confirmed by the experiments of the radiological separations. Tungsten-187 remains firmly bound to the alumina. The radionuclide purity of the eluted 186'188 Re at pH=2 is very high. (authors)

  16. Kiintoainehäviöselvitys

    OpenAIRE

    Ylimys, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Teoriaosassa käydään läpi yleisesti pyörrepuhdistuslaitoksen toimintaa sekä kiintoainehäviöitä paperi- ja kartonkitehtailla. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia Metsä Boardin Kyröskosken tehtaan kiintoainehäviötä. Työssä selvitettiin, minkälaista kiintoainetta jätevesilaitokselle päätyy ja miksi. Selvityksen kohteena oli myös, missä kohteissa kiintoainehäviöt tarkalleen syntyvät ja kuinka paljon häviötä tapahtuu. Kahden edellä mainitun tiedon perusteella selvitettiin, kuinka palj...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  18. Kinematic models of extensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groshong, R.H. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses kinematic models that can relate faults of different types and different positions within a single dynamic system and thereby offer the potential to explain the disparate seismic activity characteristic of extensional terrains. The major styles are full grabens, half grabens, domino blocks, and glide-block systems. Half grabens, the most likely models for Basin and Range structure, are formed above a master fault of decreasing dip with depth and a hangingwall that deforms as it passes over the curved fault. Second-order normal faults, typically domino style, accommodate the required hangingwall deformation. According to the author low-angle detachment faults are consistent with the evidence of seismicity only on high-angle faults if the hangingwall of the detachment is broken by multiple half-graben systems

  19. 24 CFR 971.11 - HOPE VI developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HOPE VI developments. 971.11... § 971.11 HOPE VI developments. Developments with HOPE VI implementation grants that have approved HOPE... with reasonable revitalization plans. Future HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI...

  20. Uranium(VI) speciation by spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of UV-Vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies to direct of uranium(VI) in environmental samples offers various prospects that have, however, serious limitations. While UV-Vis spectroscopy is probably not sensitive enough to detect uranium(VI) species in the majority of environmental samples, TRLFS is principially able to speciate uranium(VI) at very low concentration levels in the nanomol range. Speciation by TRLFS can be based on three parameters: excitation spectrum, emission spectrum and lifetime of the fluorescence emission process. Due to quenching effects, the lifetime may not be expected to be as characteristics as, e.g., the emission spectrum. Quenching of U(VI) fluorescence by reaction with organic substances, inorganic ions and formation of carbonate radicals is one important limiting factor in the application of U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy. Fundamental photophysical criteria are illustrated using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra of U(VI) hydrolysis and carbonato species as examples. (author)

  1. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  2. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  3. Chromium sorption and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by grape stalks and yohimbe bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Núria; Escudero, Carlos; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    In this work, two low cost sorbents, grape stalks and yohimbe bark wastes were used to remove Cr(VI) and Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were designed to obtain Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption data. The mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by the two vegetable wastes, has been investigated. Fourier transform infrared rays (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on solid phase were performed to determine the main functional groups that might be involved in metal uptake and to confirm the presence of Cr(III) on the sorbent, respectively. Results put into evidence that both sorbents are able to reduce Cr(VI) to its trivalent form.

  4. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using 13 C NMR of 99.9% 13 C-enriched U VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- and Am VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- systems has been examined by variable temperature 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of ΔG double-dagger 295 = 56 kJ/M, ΔH double-dagger = 38 kJ/M, and ΔS double-dagger = -60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress

  5. Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH -5 to 10 -6 M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH ≤ 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH ≤ 11.6, but at pH ≥ 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10 -4 M

  6. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  7. Effect of selected ligands on the U(VI) immobilization by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noubactep, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Cl - , CO 3 2- , EDTA, NO 2 - , NO 3 - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , and humic substances (HS) on the U(VI) co-precipitation from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated in the neutral pH range.Batch experiments without shaking were conducted for 14 days mostly with five different ZVI materials (15 g/l), selected ligands (10mM) and an U(VI) solution (20 mg/l, 0.084mM). Apart from Cl - , all tested ligands induced a decrease of U(VI) coprecipitation. This decrease is attributed to the surface adsorption and complexation of the ligands at the reactive sites on the surface of ZVI and their corrosion products. The decrease of U(VI) removal was not uniform with the five ZVI materials. Generally, groundwater with elevated EDTA concentration could not be remediated with the ZVI barrier technology. The response of the system on the pre-treating by two ZVI materials in 250mM HCl indicated that in situ generated corrosion products favor an irreversible U(VI) uptake. Thus for the long term performance of ZVI barrier, the iron dissolution should continue in such a way that fresh iron oxide be always available for U(VI) coprecipitation. (author)

  8. Investigating The Kinematics of Canids and Felids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, D.

    2016-12-01

    For all organisms, metabolic energy is critical for survival. While moving efficiently is a necessity for large carnivores, the influence of kinematics on energy demand remains poorly understood. We measured the kinematics of dogs, wolves, and pumas to detect any differences in their respective energy expenditures. Using 22 kinematic parameters measured on 78 videos, we used one-way ANOVAs and paired T-tests to compare 5 experimental treatments among gaits in dogs (n=11 in 3 breed groups), wolves (n=2), and pumas (n=2). Across the measured parameters, we found greater kinematic similarity than expected among dog breeds and no trend in any of the 22 parameters regarding the effect of steepness on locomotion mechanics. Similarly, treadmill kinematics were nearly identical to those measured during outdoor movement. However, in 3 inches of snow, we observed significant differences (pwolf. When comparing canids (wolves and dogs) to a felid (pumas), we found that pumas and dogs are the most kinematically distinct (differing in 13 of 22 parameters, compared with 5 of 22 for wolves and pumas). Lastly, compared with wolves, walking pumas had larger head angles (p=0.0025), forelimb excursion angles (p=0.0045), and hindlimb excursion angles (p=0.0327). After comparing the energetics of pumas and dogs with their respective kinematics, we noted that less dynamic kinematics result in energy savings. Through tracking the locations and gait behavior of large carnivores, novel sensor technology can reveal how indoor kinematics applies to wild animals and improve the conservation of these species.

  9. Removal of Cr(VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) from soil contaminated with tannery wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ritu; Misra, Virendra; Singh, Rana Pratap

    2012-02-01

    The illegal disposal of tannery wastes at Rania, Kanpur has resulted in accumulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a toxic heavy metal in soil posing risk to human health and environment. 27 soil samples were collected at various depths from Rania for the assessment of Cr(VI) level in soil. Out of 27 samples, five samples had shown significant level of Cr(VI) with an average concentration of 15.84 mg Kg(-1). Varied doses of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) were applied on Cr(VI) containing soil samples for remediation of Cr(VI). Results showed that 0.10 g L(-1) nZVI completely reduces Cr(VI) within 120 min following pseudo first order kinetics. Further, to test the efficacy of nZVI in field, soil windrow experiments were performed at the contaminated site. nZVI showed significant Cr(VI) reduction at field also, indicating it an effective tool for managing sites contaminated with Cr(VI).

  10. Study of Cr(VI) adsorption onto magnetite nanoparticles using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Liu, Dian-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Cr(VI) adsorption onto nano-magnetite was examined by batch experiments, and the Cr(VI) adsorption mechanism was investigated using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 10 nm were synthesized using an inexpensive and simple co-precipitation method. It shows a saturation magnetization of 54.3 emu/g, which can be recovered with an external magnetic field. The adsorption data fitted the Langmuir adsorption isotherm well, implying a monolayer adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) onto nano-magnetite. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that the adsorption mechanism involves electron transfer between Fe(II) in nano-magnetite (Fe2+OFe3+ 2O3) and Cr(VI) to transform into Cr(III), which may exist as an Fe(III)-Cr(III) mixed solid phase. Moreover, the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ratio in the final products can be determined by the characteristic pre-edge peak area of Cr(VI) in the Cr K-edge spectrum. These findings suggest that nano-magnetite is effective for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater because it can transform highly poisonous Cr(VI) species into nontoxic Cr(III) compounds, which are highly insoluble and immobile under environmental conditions.

  11. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  13. Inverse Kinematics With Closed Form Solution For Denso Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Eka Prasetia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the forward kinematics and inverse kinematics used on the Denso robot manipulator which has a 6-DOF. The forward kinematics will result in the desired position by end-effector, while inverse kinematics produce angel on each joint. Inverse kinematics problem are very difficult, therefor to obtain the solution of inverse kinematics using closed form solution with geometry approach. The simulation result obtained from forward kinematics and inverse kinematics is determining desired position by Denso robot manipulator. Forward kinematics produce the desired position by the end-effector. Inverse kinematics produce joint angle, where the inverse kinematics produce eight conditions obtained from closed form solution with geometry approach to reach the desired position by the end-effector.

  14. Adaptive control of an exoskeleton robot with uncertainties on kinematics and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Brahim; Saad, Maarouf; Ochoa-Luna, Cristobal; Rahman, Mohammad H

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new adaptive control technique based on nonlinear sliding mode control (JSTDE) taking into account kinematics and dynamics uncertainties. This approach is applied to an exoskeleton robot with uncertain kinematics and dynamics. The adaptation design is based on Time Delay Estimation (TDE). The proposed strategy does not necessitate the well-defined dynamic and kinematic models of the system robot. The updated laws are designed using Lyapunov-function to solve the adaptation problem systematically, proving the close loop stability and ensuring the convergence asymptotically of the outputs tracking errors. Experiments results show the effectiveness and feasibility of JSTDE technique to deal with the variation of the unknown nonlinear dynamics and kinematics of the exoskeleton model.

  15. Robot Kinematics, using Dual Quaternions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Gouasmi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of classical mechanics, deriving the equations of motion for systems of coupled rigid bodies is regarded as a straightforward procedure: once a suitable set of generalized coordinates and reference frames have been chosen, what remains is to either apply Lagrange’s equations or Newton and Euler’s equations to obtain the differential equations of motion. As the complexity of multibody system increases, the need for more elegant formulation of the equation of motion becomes an issue of paramount importance. Our primary focus is on the kinematic analysis of rigid bodies and serial manipulators (robotic systems  using simultaneously, both homogeneous transformations (4x4 matrices and Dual Quaternions, for the sake of results comparisons (cost,complexity,storage capacity etc. . This paper has been done mainly for educational and peadagogical purposes, hoping that the scientific community will finally adopt and use Dual Quaternions at least when dealing with multibody systems and specially robotics.

  16. A Soft Parallel Kinematic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Edward L; Case, Jennifer C; Kramer-Bottiglio, Rebecca

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we describe a novel holonomic soft robotic structure based on a parallel kinematic mechanism. The design is based on the Stewart platform, which uses six sensors and actuators to achieve full six-degree-of-freedom motion. Our design is much less complex than a traditional platform, since it replaces the 12 spherical and universal joints found in a traditional Stewart platform with a single highly deformable elastomer body and flexible actuators. This reduces the total number of parts in the system and simplifies the assembly process. Actuation is achieved through coiled-shape memory alloy actuators. State observation and feedback is accomplished through the use of capacitive elastomer strain gauges. The main structural element is an elastomer joint that provides antagonistic force. We report the response of the actuators and sensors individually, then report the response of the complete assembly. We show that the completed robotic system is able to achieve full position control, and we discuss the limitations associated with using responsive material actuators. We believe that control demonstrated on a single body in this work could be extended to chains of such bodies to create complex soft robots.

  17. Phase 2 testing of ENDF/B-VI shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Wright, R.Q.; Slater, C.O.

    1992-01-01

    Version 6 of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI) was released in early 1990 and is currently undergoing phase 2 testing. In Phase 2 testing, the evaluated data are approximately processed and used in an integral manner to predict the solution of previously specified benchmark experiments. Results are presented for the initial testing of several light elements and structural materials which are important for shielding applications. These initial tests indicate that the relatively subtle changes made to the iron data and the major modernization of the boron-11 data in Version 6 both represent significant and positive advancements in the quality of the evaluated data files

  18. Virtual phantom magnetic resonance imaging (ViP MRI) on a clinical MRI platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Bordelois, Alejandro; Gambarota, Giulio

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI), a technique that allows for generating reference signals in MR images using radiofrequency (RF) signals, on a clinical MR system and to test newly designed virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were conducted on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system was done using the principle of reciprocity. The ViP RF signals were generated using a compact waveform generator (dimensions of 26 cm × 18 cm × 16 cm), connected to a homebuilt 25 mm-diameter RF coil. The ViP RF signals were transmitted to the MRI scanner bore, simultaneously with the acquisition of the signal from the object of interest. Different types of MRI data acquisition (2D and 3D gradient-echo) as well as different phantoms, including the Shepp-Logan phantom, were tested. Furthermore, a uniquely designed virtual phantom - in the shape of a grid - was generated; this newly proposed phantom allows for the investigations of the vendor distortion correction field. High quality MR images of virtual phantoms were obtained. An excellent agreement was found between the experimental data and the inverse cube law, which was the expected functional dependence obtained from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system. Short-term time stability measurements yielded a coefficient of variation in the signal intensity over time equal to 0.23% and 0.13% for virtual and physical phantom, respectively. MR images of the virtual grid-shaped phantom were reconstructed with the vendor distortion correction; this allowed for a direct visualization of the vendor distortion correction field. Furthermore, as expected from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system, a very compact coil (diameter ~ cm) and very small currents (intensity ~ mA) were sufficient to generate a signal comparable to that of physical phantoms in MRI experiments. The ViP MRI technique was successfully implemented on a clinical MR

  19. Surface growth kinematics via local curve evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, Derek E.; Goriely, Alain

    2012-01-01

    of increasing complexity are provided, and we demonstrate how biologically relevant structures such as logarithmic shells and horns emerge as analytical solutions of the kinematics equations with a small number of parameters that can be linked to the underlying

  20. Kinematic anharmonicity of internal rotation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataev, V.A.; Pupyshev, V.I.; Godunov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The methods of analysis the strongly coupled vibrations are proposed for a number of molecules of aromatic and heterocyclic carbonyl (and some others) compounds. The qualitative principles are formulated for molecular systems with a significant kinematic anharmonicity.

  1. Kinematics and resolution at future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Klein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Limitations due to resolution and kinematics are discussed of the (Q 2 , x) range accessible with electron-proton colliders after HERA. For the time after HERA one may think of two electron-proton colliders: an asymmetric energy machine and a rather symmetric one. Both colliders are compared here in order to study the influence of the different E l /E p ratios on the accessible kinematic range which is restricted due to angular coverage, finite detector resolution and calibration uncertainties

  2. Inverse kinematic control of LDUA and TWRMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yih, T.C.; Burks, B.L.; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    1995-01-01

    A general inverse kinematic analysis is formulated particularly for the redundant Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) and Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System (TWRMS). The developed approach is applicable to the inverse kinematic simulation and control of LDUA, TWRMS, and other general robot manipulators. The 4 x 4 homogeneous Cylindrical coordinates-Bryant angles (C-B) notation is adopted to model LDUA, TWRMS, and any robot composed of R (revolute), P (prismatic), and/or S (spherical) joints

  3. DIDACTIC AUTOMATED STATION OF COMPLEX KINEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sosnowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design, control system and software that controls the automated station of complex kinematics. Control interface and software has been developed and manufactured in the West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin in the Department of Automated Manufacturing Systems Engineering and Quality. Conducting classes designed to teach programming and design of structures and systems for monitoring the robot kinematic components with non-standard structures was the reason for installation of the control system and software.

  4. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  5. Chiral quark model with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.

    2003-01-01

    The nonstrange baryon spectrum is studied within a three-body model that incorporates relativistic kinematics. We found that the combined effect of relativistic kinematics together with the pion exchange between quarks is able to reverse the order of the first positive- and negative-parity nucleon excited states as observed experimentally. Including the chiral partner of the pion (the σ meson) leads to an overall good description of the spectrum

  6. Chiral quark model with relativistic kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.

    2003-01-01

    The non-strange baryon spectrum is studied within a three-body model that incorporates relativistic kinematics. We found that the combined effect of relativistic kinematics together with the pion exchange between quarks is able to reverse the order of the first positive- and negative-parity nucleon excited states as observed experimentally. Including the chiral partner of the pion (the $\\sigma$ meson) leads to an overall good description of the spectrum.

  7. Dynamic Control of Kinematically Redundant Robotic Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Lunde

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Several methods for task space control of kinematically redundant manipulators have been proposed in the literature. Most of these methods are based on a kinematic analysis of the manipulator. In this paper we propose a control algorithm in which we are especially concerned with the manipulator dynamics. The algorithm is particularly well suited for the class of redundant manipulators consisting of a relatively small manipulator mounted on a larger positioning part.

  8. Heavy baryon spectroscopy with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A.; Garcilazo, H.; Vijande, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative Faddeev study of heavy baryon spectroscopy with nonrelativistic and relativistic kinematics. We show results for different standard hyperfine interactions with both kinematics in an attempt to learn about the light quark dynamics. We highlight the properties of particular states accessible in nowadays laboratories that would help in discriminating between different dynamical models. The advance in the knowledge of light quark dynamics is a key tool for the understanding of the existence of exotic hadrons.

  9. Kinematic gait analyses in healthy Golden Retrievers

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Gabriela C.A.; Cardoso, Mariana Trés; Gaiad, Thais P.; Brolio, Marina P.; Oliveira, Vanessa C.; Assis Neto, Antonio; Martins, Daniele S.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    Kinematic analysis relates to the relative movement between rigid bodies and finds application in gait analysis and other body movements, interpretation of their data when there is change, determines the choice of treatment to be instituted. The objective of this study was to standardize the march of Dog Golden Retriever Healthy to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. We used a kinematic analysis system to analyse the gait of seven dogs Golden Retriever, female,...

  10. Kinematics analysis of a novel planar parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Haibo; Guo, Sheng [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, a novel planar parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy is proposed. First, the Degrees of freedom (DOF) of the whole parallel manipulator and the Relative DOF (RDOF) between the moving platform and fixed base are studied. The results indicate that the proposed mechanism is kinematically redundant. Then, the kinematics, Jacobian matrices and workspace of this proposed parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy are analyzed. Finally, the statics simulation of the proposed parallel manipulator is performed. The obtained stress and displacement distribution can be used to determine the easily destroyed place in the mechanism configurations.

  11. The role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.; Parker, W.E.; Moses, D.J.; Lacey, R.; Alexander, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of reversed kinematics in nuclear reactions studies are discussed, with particular emphasis on the origin of double solutions in the reaction kinematics. This possibility for double solutions does not exist in normal kinematics, and provides the basis for a new method of imposing important experimental constraints on the uniqueness of fitting complex observations. By gating on one or the other of the two solutions, light particle kinematics can be greatly influenced in coincidence measurements. The power of the method is illustrated with data for the reaction 1030 MeV 121 Sb+ 27 Al, where charged particle emissions arise from several different sources. (orig.)

  12. Kinematics analysis of a novel planar parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Haibo; Guo, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel planar parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy is proposed. First, the Degrees of freedom (DOF) of the whole parallel manipulator and the Relative DOF (RDOF) between the moving platform and fixed base are studied. The results indicate that the proposed mechanism is kinematically redundant. Then, the kinematics, Jacobian matrices and workspace of this proposed parallel manipulator with kinematic redundancy are analyzed. Finally, the statics simulation of the proposed parallel manipulator is performed. The obtained stress and displacement distribution can be used to determine the easily destroyed place in the mechanism configurations

  13. The Emotional Modulation of Facial Mimicry: A Kinematic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Tramacere

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that the observation of emotional facial expression induces facial mimicry responses in the observers. However, how the interaction between emotional and motor components of facial expressions can modulate the motor behavior of the perceiver is still unknown. We have developed a kinematic experiment to evaluate the effect of different oro-facial expressions on perceiver's face movements. Participants were asked to perform two movements, i.e., lip stretching and lip protrusion, in response to the observation of four meaningful (i.e., smile, angry-mouth, kiss, and spit and two meaningless mouth gestures. All the stimuli were characterized by different motor patterns (mouth aperture or mouth closure. Response Times and kinematics parameters of the movements (amplitude, duration, and mean velocity were recorded and analyzed. Results evidenced a dissociated effect on reaction times and movement kinematics. We found shorter reaction time when a mouth movement was preceded by the observation of a meaningful and motorically congruent oro-facial gesture, in line with facial mimicry effect. On the contrary, during execution, the perception of smile was associated with the facilitation, in terms of shorter duration and higher velocity of the incongruent movement, i.e., lip protrusion. The same effect resulted in response to kiss and spit that significantly facilitated the execution of lip stretching. We called this phenomenon facial mimicry reversal effect, intended as the overturning of the effect normally observed during facial mimicry. In general, the findings show that both motor features and types of emotional oro-facial gestures (conveying positive or negative valence affect the kinematics of subsequent mouth movements at different levels: while congruent motor features facilitate a general motor response, motor execution could be speeded by gestures that are motorically incongruent with the observed one. Moreover, valence

  14. The Emotional Modulation of Facial Mimicry: A Kinematic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Antonella; Ferrari, Pier F; Gentilucci, Maurizio; Giuffrida, Valeria; De Marco, Doriana

    2017-01-01

    It is well-established that the observation of emotional facial expression induces facial mimicry responses in the observers. However, how the interaction between emotional and motor components of facial expressions can modulate the motor behavior of the perceiver is still unknown. We have developed a kinematic experiment to evaluate the effect of different oro-facial expressions on perceiver's face movements. Participants were asked to perform two movements, i.e., lip stretching and lip protrusion, in response to the observation of four meaningful (i.e., smile, angry-mouth, kiss, and spit) and two meaningless mouth gestures. All the stimuli were characterized by different motor patterns (mouth aperture or mouth closure). Response Times and kinematics parameters of the movements (amplitude, duration, and mean velocity) were recorded and analyzed. Results evidenced a dissociated effect on reaction times and movement kinematics. We found shorter reaction time when a mouth movement was preceded by the observation of a meaningful and motorically congruent oro-facial gesture, in line with facial mimicry effect. On the contrary, during execution, the perception of smile was associated with the facilitation, in terms of shorter duration and higher velocity of the incongruent movement, i.e., lip protrusion. The same effect resulted in response to kiss and spit that significantly facilitated the execution of lip stretching. We called this phenomenon facial mimicry reversal effect , intended as the overturning of the effect normally observed during facial mimicry. In general, the findings show that both motor features and types of emotional oro-facial gestures (conveying positive or negative valence) affect the kinematics of subsequent mouth movements at different levels: while congruent motor features facilitate a general motor response, motor execution could be speeded by gestures that are motorically incongruent with the observed one. Moreover, valence effect depends on

  15. Synthesis and characterization of polyaniline/zeolite nanocomposite for the removal of chromium(VI from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam A. Shyaa

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were used to investigate the effect of various experimental parameters on the equilibrium adsorption of chromium(VI on PANI/zeolite nanocomposite. The adsorption characteristics of the composite toward Cr(VI in dilute aqueous solution were followed spectrophotometrically. The effect of contact time, size of the sorbent and the concentration of Cr(VI in solution on the metal uptake behavior of the composite were studied. It has been observed that the capacity of chromium adsorption on PANI/zeolite increases with initial metal concentration, the metal ion adsorption on surfactant is well represented by the Freundlich isotherm.

  16. Editorial das organizadoras do VI ENANCIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Arruda Café

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL A história das idéias, em um determinado campo do conhecimento, se faz por meio de seus cientistas e de suas instituições. Ela torna visível a produção intelectual deste campo, construída por seus atores individuais e coletivos. Neste sentido, o ENANCIB é um elemento-chave neste processo de construção, o momento por excelência da disseminação do conhecimento nesta área. Ele permite a continuidade da história, o desenvolvimento da Ciência da Informação que se faz no Brasil e a coesão de sua comunidade. Por meio de debates, da troca de idéias e de experiências, promovem a construção da identidade deste campo científico, sua visibilidade, a delimitação de suas fronteiras e sua interrelação com outras áreas do conhecimento. O ENANCIB permite, além disso, a construção de novas parcerias científicas e a consolidação dos grupos de trabalho existentes. Este evento vem se estabelecendo, desde 1994, como fundamental para a consolidação e estruturação da área da Ciência da Informação brasileira, influenciando o desenvolvimento dos cursos de pós-graduação do país. Um campo se constrói somente se compreender as especificidades dos processos que atravessam o seu caminho. Em sua evolução, a Ciência da Informação, nos últimos 50 anos, tem se caracterizado pela diversidade de suas abordagens buscando definir a sua essência, por diferentes estudos e teorias. Nestes estudos, inúmeros aportes conceituais vêm sendo apresentados por diferentes pensadores por meio da visão particular de cada um deles. Na realidade, cada um adota uma forma distinta de observar, representar e explicitar a realidade com base na sua visão de mundo. Alguns autores enfatizam os aspectos comunicacionais da Ciência da Informação; outros destacam sua função social; outros, ainda, ressaltam sua forte ligação com as tecnologias. Este número da revista Encontros Bibli traz quatorze artigos apresentados no VI ENANCIB

  17. Upscaling of U (VI) desorption and transport from decimeter‐scale heterogeneity to plume‐scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Gary P.; Kohler, Matthias; Kannappan, Ramakrishnan; Briggs, Martin A.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  18. Cr(VI) retention and transport through Fe(III)-coated natural zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Gaoxiang [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Libing [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Hanson, Renee; Leick, Samantha; Hoeppner, Nicole [Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2012-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Breakthrough curves of Cr(VI) from columns packed with raw zeolite (a) and Fe(III)-zeolite (b). The solid line in (b) is the HYDRUS-1D fit to the observed data with adsorption term only, while the dashed line in (b) includes a reduction term in the HYDRUS-1D fit. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite modified with Fe(III) could be used for adsorption and retention of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fe present on zeolite was in an amorphous Fe(OH){sub 3} form. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of 82 mg/kg was found on Fe(III)-zeolite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) retardation factor of 3 or 5 was determined from column and batch studies. - Abstract: Cr(VI) is a group A chemical based on the weight of evidence of carcinogenicity. Its transport and retention in soils and groundwater have been studied extensively. Zeolite is a major component in deposits originated from volcanic ash and tuff after alteration. In this study, zeolite aggregates with the particle size of 1.4-2.4 mm were preloaded with Fe(III). The influence of present Fe(III) on Cr(VI) retention by and transport through zeolite was studied under batch and column experiments. The added Fe(III) resulted in an enhanced Cr(VI) retention by the zeolite with a capacity of 82 mg/kg. The Cr(VI) adsorption on Fe(III)-zeolite followed a pseudo-second order kinetically and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm thermodynamically. Fitting the column experimental data to HYDRUS-1D resulted in a retardation factor of 3 in comparison to 5 calculated from batch tests at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg/L. The results from this study showed that enhanced adsorption and retention of Cr(VI) may happen in soils derived from volcanic ash and tuff that contains significant amounts of zeolite with extensive Fe(III) coating.

  19. Forward kinematics solutions of a special six-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator with three limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxun Fu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a special 6-degree-of freedom parallel manipulator, and the mechanical structure of this robot has been introduced; with this structure, the kinematic constrain equations are decoupled. Based on this character, the polynomial solutions of the forward kinematics problem are also presented. In this method, the closed-loop kinematic chain of the manipulator is divided into two parts, the solution forward position kinematics is obtained by a first-degree polynomial equation first, and then an eighth-degree polynomial equation in a single variable for the forward orientation kinematics is obtained. Based on those solutions, the configurations of the robot, including position and orientation of the end-effector, are graphically displayed. A numerical simulation is given to verify the algorithm, and the result implies that for a given set of input values, the manipulator can be assembled in eight different configurations at most. And a set of experiments illustrate the motion ability for forward kinematics of the prototype of this manipulator.

  20. Exploring the impact of constraints in quantum optimal control through a kinematic formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Ashley; Beltrani, Vincent; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This work lays a foundation for studying constraints in quantum control simulations. • The underlying quantum control landscape in the presence of constraints is explored. • Constrained controls can encounter suboptimal traps in the landscape. • The controls are kinematic stand-ins for dynamic time-dependent controls. • A method is developed to transfer between constrained kinematic and dynamic controls. - Abstract: The control of quantum dynamics with tailored laser fields is finding growing experimental success. In practice, experiments will be subject to constraints on the controls that may prevent full optimization of the objective. A framework is presented for systematically investigating the impact of constraints in quantum optimal control simulations using a two-stage process starting with simple time-independent kinematic controls, which act as stand-ins for the traditional dynamic controls. The objective is a state-to-state transition probability, and constraints are introduced by restricting the kinematic control variables during optimization. As a second stage, the means to map from kinematic to dynamic controls is presented, thus enabling a simplified overall procedure for exploring how limited resources affect the ability to optimize the objective. A demonstration of the impact of imposing several types of kinematic constraints is investigated, thereby offering insight into constrained quantum controls

  1. Cervical kinematics in patients with vestibular pathology vs. patients with neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Grace; Sarig-Bahat, Hilla; Williams, Katrina; Tyrrell, Ryan; Treleaven, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Research has consistently shown cervical kinematic impairments in subjects with persistent neck pain (NP). It could be reasoned that those with vestibular pathology (VP) may also have altered kinematics since vestibular stimulation via head movement can cause dizziness and visual disturbances. However, this has not been examined to date. This pilot study investigated changes in cervical kinematics between asymptomatic control, NP and VP subjects using a Virtual Reality (VR) system. It was hypothesised that there would be altered kinematics in VP subjects, which might be associated with dizziness and visual symptoms. Pilot cross sectional observational study. Twenty control, 14 VP and 20 NP subjects. Not applicable. Measures included questionnaires (neck disability index, pain on movement, dizziness and pain intensity, visual disturbances) and cervical kinematics (range, peak and mean velocity, smoothness, symmetry, and accuracy of cervical motion) using a virtual reality system. Results revealed significantly decreased mean velocity and symmetry of motion in both planes in those with NP but no differences in accuracy or range of motion. No significant differences were seen between VP subjects and asymptomatic controls. However, correlation analysis showed some moderate correlations between dizziness to selected kinematics in both the NP and the VP groups. These results support that cervical kinematics are altered in NP patients, with velocity most affected. There is potential for VP subjects to also have altered kinematics, especially those who experience dizziness. More research is required.

  2. Kinetics of chromium (VI) reduction by ferrous iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R.

    1998-09-01

    Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions

  3. 76 FR 60593 - Title VI; Proposed Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ..., several of them related to ambiguous language in the existing Circular. The proposed Circular reorganizes... regional entity, and inclusive of public and private entities. This term is used exclusively in Chapter IV... revisions to the Title VI Circular. The section that addresses the existing requirement for a Language...

  4. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Vi har selv designet naturens love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Martin Mose

    2014-01-01

    ForskerZonenNaturlovene er universelt gyldige i de flestes øjne. De gælder altid, uanset hvad vi tænker. Men dette billede står ikke uimodsagt i videnskabsfilosofien, og der er meget, der tyder på, at det ikke er specielt empirisk korrekt...

  6. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems

  7. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors)

  8. Removing uranium (VI) from aqueous solution with insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fande; Yuan, Guodong; Larson, Steven L; Ballard, John H; Waggoner, Charles A; Arslan, Zikri; Han, Fengxiang X

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of uranium (U) and depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated wastes from anthropogenic activities is an important environmental problem. Insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite (L-HA) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for immobilizing U in the environment. The effect of initial pH, contact time, U concentration, and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA was assessed. The U(VI) adsorption was pH-dependent and achieved equilibrium in 2 h. It could be well described with pseudo-second-order model, indicating that U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA involved chemisorption. The U(VI) adsorption mass increased with increasing temperature with maximum adsorption capacities of 91, 112 and 120 mg g -1 at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The adsorption reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. We explored the processes of U(VI) desorption from the L-HA-U complex through batch desorption experiments in 1 mM NaNO 3 and in artificial seawater. The desorption process could be well described by pseudo-first-order model and reached equilibrium in 3 h. L-HA possessed a high propensity to adsorb U(VI). Once adsorbed, the release of U(VI) from L-HA-U complex was minimal in both 1 mM NaNO 3 and artificial seawater (0.06% and 0.40%, respectively). Being abundant, inexpensive, and safe, L-HA has good potential for use as a U adsorbent from aqueous solution or immobilizing U in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetics and equilibrium studies for sorption of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions onto polymeric composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions from aqueous solutions was studied using polymeric composite resins. Batch sorption experiments were performed as a function of hydrogen ion concentration, complexing agent concentration, resin weight and ionic strength. Kinetic parameters as a function of initial ion concentration were determined to predict the sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) onto polymeric composite resins. The equilibrium data could be fitted by the frendlich adsorption isotherm equation

  10. Adsorption behavior of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal—polyethyleneimine composite for removal of Cr(VI) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao; Jin, Ru-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-kun, E-mail: xkouyang@zjou.edu.cn; Wang, Yang-Guang

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • A carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal-polyethyleneimine composite (CCN-PEI) was prepared. • The as-prepared CCN-PEI was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS. • Results suggested that the reusable CCN-PEI could remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with a high adsorption capacity. • The adsorption isotherm, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the adsorption process are also discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a composite adsorbent (CCN-PEI) composed of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals (CCN) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) was prepared through an amidation reaction between the carboxyl groups of the CCN and the amine groups of the PEI. The adsorption performance of the CCN-PEI was tested by removing Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The physicochemical properties of the CCN and the Cr(VI) ion-loaded CCN-PEI were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To investigate the adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto this newly developed CCN-PEI, we performed experiments under different adsorption conditions, by varying the contact time, solution pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, and adsorption temperature. The prepared CCN-PEI exhibited an encouraging uptake capacity of 358.42 mg × g{sup −1}. The adsorption process was fast: within the first 100 min, Cr(VI) ion adsorption onto the CCN-PEI was about 65%, and the adsorption equilibrium was reached within 250 min. Kinetics experiments indicated that the adsorption process could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, our adsorption equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherms well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, such as the free energy change (ΔG = −2.93 kJ × mol{sup −1}), enthalpy change (ΔH = −5.69 kJ × mol{sup −1}), and entropy change (ΔS = −9.14 kJ × mol{sup −1}), indicate that the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions onto CCN

  11. Nonpartonic Effects in Pion Electroproduction in the Hermes Kinematical Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uleshchenko, V.; Szczurek, A.

    2002-01-01

    The presentation is concerned with higher twist corrections of nonpartonic origin to semi-inclusive observables in the kinematical region relevant for the HERMES experiment. We demonstrate a strong impact of the VDM-like interaction and the exclusive production of ρ 0 meson on the extraction of the (anti)d - (anti)u asymmetry from charged pion DIS multiplicities. We also show that it is the exclusive- ρ 0 channel which accounts for the experimentally observed effect of the excess of charged over neutral pions produced at large z. (author)

  12. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  13. Kinematically Optimal Robust Control of Redundant Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicki, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work deals with the problem of the robust optimal task space trajectory tracking subject to finite-time convergence. Kinematic and dynamic equations of a redundant manipulator are assumed to be uncertain. Moreover, globally unbounded disturbances are allowed to act on the manipulator when tracking the trajectory by the endeffector. Furthermore, the movement is to be accomplished in such a way as to minimize both the manipulator torques and their oscillations thus eliminating the potential robot vibrations. Based on suitably defined task space non-singular terminal sliding vector variable and the Lyapunov stability theory, we derive a class of chattering-free robust kinematically optimal controllers, based on the estimation of transpose Jacobian, which seem to be effective in counteracting both uncertain kinematics and dynamics, unbounded disturbances and (possible) kinematic and/or algorithmic singularities met on the robot trajectory. The numerical simulations carried out for a redundant manipulator of a SCARA type consisting of the three revolute kinematic pairs and operating in a two-dimensional task space, illustrate performance of the proposed controllers as well as comparisons with other well known control schemes.

  14. Chemical Analysis of the Moon at the Surveyor VI Landing Site: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkevich, A L; Patterson, J H; Franzgrote, E J

    1968-06-07

    The alpha-scattering experiment aboard soft-landing Surveyor VI has provided a chemical analysis of the surface of the moon in Sinus Medii. The preliminary results indicate that, within experimental errors, the composition is the same as that found by Surveyor V in Mare Tranquillitatis. This finding suggests that large portions of the lunar maria resemble basalt in composition.

  15. The ternary sorption system U(VI)-phosphate-silica explained by spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Mueller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Comarmond, M.J.; Payne, T.E. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights (Australia); Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    Spectroscopic data of sorption processes potentially provide direct impact on Surface Complexation Modelling (SCM) approaches. Based on spectroscopic data of the ternary sorption system U(VI)/phosphate/silica strongly suggesting the formation of a precipitate as the predominant surface process, SCM calculations accurately reproduced results from classical batch experiments.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of U (VI) sorbed onto alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Jain, Aishwarya; Tomar, B.S.; Manchanda, V.K.; Poswal, A.K.; Jha, S.N.; Sabharwal, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of U (VI) by alumina varying pH has been studied by X-ray absorption Spectroscopy. The experiments were carried out using the EXAFS beamline (BL-8) of INDUS-2 at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. The absorption intensity was found to increase with the increasing pH of the suspension. (author)

  17. The ternary sorption system U(VI)-phosphate-silica explained by spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Mueller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz; Steudtner, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic data of sorption processes potentially provide direct impact on Surface Complexation Modelling (SCM) approaches. Based on spectroscopic data of the ternary sorption system U(VI)/phosphate/silica strongly suggesting the formation of a precipitate as the predominant surface process, SCM calculations accurately reproduced results from classical batch experiments.

  18. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  19. Feasibility study of experiments to measure inclusive reactions at large x/sub F/ in ISABELLE's small-angle hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Danby, G.; Foley, K.; Paige, F.; Thorndike, A.; Engelmann, R.; McCarthy, R.; Pope, B.

    1979-01-01

    As a way of testing current ideas on the construction of experimental halls at ISABELLE, a particular class of experiments suggested for the small-angle (or 2 o'clock) hall are examined: p + p → p + X, and p + p → c + X, c is not = p. Somewhat more detail has been incorporated than in previous summer study and summer workshop treatments of these experiments. Briefly, the result of this examination is that inclusive single-particle experiments are feasible over a suitable kinematic range without the use of previously proposed special insertion quadrupoles. The forward single-arm spectrometer is housed in a separate tunnel of modest transverse dimension. The extraction of scattered particles (theta > approx. 1 mrad) into the spectrometer is accomplished with Lambertson septa and current sheet septa. Provision is made for overlap with the kinematic region covered by ISR and Fermilab experiments. Section II is a review of the physics objectives of such experiments. Section III describes the general layout of the apparatus, with the extraction system and the spectrometer discussed in more detail in Sections IV and V respectively. A guess at how this experiment would fit into the overall small-angle physics program is presented in Section VI

  20. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession... its Field Offices (Region VI). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region VI. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D...

  1. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given

  2. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  3. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters; Reduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W. [Center for Radioactive Waste Management, Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University, Albuquerque (United States); Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors) 12 refs.

  4. A ATIVIDADE PRÁTICA NA FORMAÇÃO DOS ACADÊMICOS DE HOSPITALIDADE: experiência dos colaboradores voluntários na organização do VI Congresso Internacional de Turismo do Extremo Sul (Cites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Schwab Brandão

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é analisar a inserção de atividades práticas na formação profissional daqueles que atuarão na área da hospitalidade através da experiência dos voluntários que participaram da organização do VI CITES (Congresso Internacional de Turismo do Extremo Sul. Tal evento foi promovido pelo Laboratório de Planejamento Turístico que integra os cursos de Turismo, Hotelaria e Eventos, realizado na FURG/SVP. Teve como objetivos específicos: verificar o processo de tomada de decisão na organização do evento pelos voluntários; identificar a percepção da atividade como parte da formação profissional; relacionar o processo educativo e a prática profissional. Além da pesquisa bibliográfica, realizou-se um estudo de caso em que foram feitas entrevistas diretas e aplicação de questionários. Os resultados indicaram a importância das atividades práticas na formação profissional, especialmente quando o trade encontra-se em estágio embrionário.

  5. Facile synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composites for enhanced U(VI) sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Donglin; Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Changnian; Feng, Shaojie; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Chen, Changlun

    2018-06-01

    A novel magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composite (FGC) was fabricated by a facile one-step reaction route and shown to be effective for sorbing U(VI) from aqueous solution. The structure, properties and application of the prepared FGC composite were well evaluated. The high saturation magnetization (45.6 emu/g) made FGC easier to be separated from the media within several seconds under an external magnetic. Effects of different ambient conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength, contact time, temperatures) on sorption behaviors of U(VI) on FGC were carried out by batch experiments. According to the calculation of Langmuir model, the maximum sorption capacity of U(VI) on the FGC at pH 5.5 and 298 K was 176.47 mg/g. The sorption was correlated with the effects of pH, contact time, and temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that U(VI) was sorbed on FGC via oxygen-containing functional groups. This work demonstrated that FGC could be recycled and used as an effective recyclable sorbent for sorption of U(VI).

  6. Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherm Adsorption Equations for Chromium (VI) Waste Adsorption by Zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murni Handayani; Eko Sulistiyono

    2009-01-01

    The research of chromium (VI) waste adsorption by zeolite has done. Wastes which are produced by Industries, both radioactive waste and heavy metal waste need done more processing so that they are not endanger environment and human health. Zeolite has very well-ordered crystal form with cavity each other to way entirely so that cause surface wide of zeolite become very big and very good as adsorbents. This research intends to know appropriate isotherm adsorption method to determine maximum capacity of zeolite to chromium (VI) waste. The equations which used in adsorption process are Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm Adsorption equations. The instrument was used in adsorption process by using Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The experiment result showed that the biggest mass of chromium (VI) metal ion which was absorb by zeolite in 20 ppm concentration was 7.71 mg/gram zeolite. Adsorption process of Chromium (VI) waste by zeolite followed Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations with R 2 >0,9 . Appropriate equation to determine maximum adsorption capacity of zeolite for chromium (VI) waste adsorption is Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of zeolite is 52.25 mg/gram. (author)

  7. Investigation of the removal of chromium (VI by Nanocomposites Chitosan-tragacanth solution from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Almasi Nahnaji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of chromium (VI by Nanocomposites Chitosan-tragacanth solution from aqueous solution. Methods: In this study, chitosan-tragacanth nanocomposites were synthesized and analyzed by electron microscopy (SEM, (TEM and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FT-IR for the size and shape of the surface. The nano-composite of chitosan-tragacanth, for the adsorption of chromium (VI in aqueous solution was used as adsorbent. Results: The optimum conditions with multiple experiments to enhance the absorption were evaluated. The highest absorption of Cr (VI was occurred in the adsorbent dosage of 0.2 g, 8 ppm concentration of chromium ions, the pH=6 and also retention time of 50 min; in 298 ˚K temperature. After determining optimal conditions of adsorption, isotherms equations and study and thermodynamic parameters were applied. Adsorption process of chromium (VI on nano-composite chitosan - Tragacanth was conformed with Temkin isotherm. Conclusion: The thermodynamic parameters such as standard Gibbs free energy changes, changes in enthalpy and entropy changes in the standard showed that the adsorption process of Cr (VI is spontaneous and heating, and kinetics studies of models Lagergren, Ho , Alovich and intraparticle is used, the results show that the adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second order.

  8. Pneumothoraces in collagen VI-related dystrophy: a case series and recommendations for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagen VI-related dystrophy (collagen VI-RD is a rare neuromuscular condition caused by mutations in the COL6A1, COL6A2 or COL6A3 genes. The phenotypic spectrum includes early-onset Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, adult-onset Bethlem myopathy and an intermediate phenotype. The disorder is characterised by distal hyperlaxity and progressive muscle weakness, joint contractures and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory insufficiency is attributed to chest wall contractures, scoliosis, impaired diaphragmatic function and intercostal muscle weakness. To date, intrinsic parenchymal lung disease has not been implicated in the inevitable respiratory decline of these patients. This series focuses on pneumothorax, an important but previously under-recognised disease manifestation of collagen VI-RD. We describe two distinct clinical presentations within collagen VI-RD patients with pneumothorax. The first cohort consists of neonates and children with a single pneumothorax in the setting of large intrathoracic pressure changes. The second group is made up of adult patients with recurrent pneumothoraces, associated with chest computed tomography scan evidence of parenchymal lung disease. We describe treatment challenges in this unique population with respect to expectant observation, tube thoracostomy and open pleurodesis. Based on this experience, we offer recommendations for early identification of lung disease in collagen VI-RD and definitive intervention.

  9. Stability of uranium(VI) doped CSH phases in high saline water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolter, Jan-Martin; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term stability of U(VI) doped calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) phases at high saline conditions, leaching experiments with NaCl, NaCl/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl/NaHCO{sub 3} containing solutions were performed. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were applied to study the U(VI) binding onto the CSH phases and to get a deeper understanding of structural changes due to leaching. Results indicate that neither NaCl nor Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} affect the structural stability of CSH phases and their retention potential for U(VI). However, carbonate containing solutions lead to a decomposition of CSH phases and thus, to a release of incorporated uranium.

  10. Uranium(VI) retention by Ca-bentonite under (hyper)alkaline conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Thimo; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The sorption behavior of U(VI) on Ca-bentonite was studied in saline, (hyper)alkaline solution via batch experiments. At pH 8.5-9.5 sorption is low in the presence of CO{sub 2} due to the formation of weakly sorbing uranyl carbonate species, which have been observed to dominate speciation up to pH 10 by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In the pH region 10-12, U(VI) retention is almost complete. The retention can either be attributed to strongly sorbing uranyl hydroxo complexes or to a partial precipitation of uranium due to an altered solubility of U(VI) induced by ions leached out of the bentonite.

  11. Kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. Insights from experimental modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Physical experiments were performed to gain a better understanding on the kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. The present study focuses on deformation of sedimentary cover caused by thrust and reverse movements along the basement fault. Our physical models comprise dry quartz sand representing brittle sedimentary rock and viscous silicone polymer representing overpressured mudstone. Computerized X-ray tomography was applied to the experiments to analyze the kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. In the sand models, the width of deformation zone above thrust was wider than that above reverse fault, because back thrust developed on the hanging wall of reverse fault. Within the physical models composed of dry sand and silicone polymer, minor folds and thrusts with minor displacement developed on the footwall of the major monoclinal flexure. These results compare well with the geometry and kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust belts in Japan. (author)

  12. Kinematics and Dynamics of Roller Chain Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglede, Niels

    There are two main subjects of this work: Kinematic and dynamic modeling and analysis of roller chain drives. In the kinematic analysis we contribute first with a complete treatment of the roller chain drive modeled as a four-bar mechanism. This includes a general, exact and approximate analysis...... which is useful for predicting the characteristic loading of the roller chain drive. As a completely novel contribution, a kinematic model and analysis is presented which includes both spans and sprockets in a simple chain drive system. A general procedure for determination of the total wrapping length...... is presented, which also allows for exact sprocket center positions for a chain with a given number of links. Results show that the total chain wrapping length varies periodically with the tooth frequency. These results are of practical importance to both the design, installation and operation of roller chain...

  13. Probabilistic approach to manipulator kinematics and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.S.; Bhatti, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    A high performance, high speed robotic arm must be able to manipulate objects with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability. As with any other physical system, there are a number of factors causing uncertainties in the behavior of a robotic manipulator. These factors include manufacturing and assembling tolerances, and errors in the joint actuators and controllers. In order to study the effect of these uncertainties on the robotic end-effector and to obtain a better insight into the manipulator behavior, the manipulator kinematics and dynamics are modeled using a probabilistic approach. Based on the probabilistic model, kinematic and dynamic performance criteria are defined to provide measures of the behavior of the robotic end-effector. Techniques are presented to compute the kinematic and dynamic reliabilities of the manipulator. The effects of tolerances associated with the various manipulator parameters on the reliabilities are studied. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the procedures

  14. Separation of Np from U and Pu using a salt-free reductant for Np(VI) by continuous counter-current back-extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Yasutoshi; Asakura, Toshihide; Morita, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    Reduction properties of several salt-free reagents for Np(VI) and Pu(IV) were reviewed to choose selective reductants that reduce only Np(VI) to Np(V) for separating Np from U and Pu in TBP by reductive back-extraction. Allylhydrazine was proposed as a candidate for selective Np(VI) reductant, and it was confirmed by a batch experiment that allylhydrazine reduced almost all Np(VI) to Np(V) and back-extracted Np from organic phase (30 vol.% TBP diluted in n-dodecane) to aqueous phase (3 mol/dm 3 HNO 3 ) within 10 min. A continuous counter-current experiment using a miniature mixer-settler was carried out with allylhydrazine at room temperature. At least 91% of Np(VI) that fed to the mixer-settler was selectively reduced to Np(V) and separated from U and Pu. (author)

  15. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tillotson, Richard Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    , with a mean distribution ratio of 3.74 ± 0.5, using 1 M DAAP extraction. Additionally, the purposeful addition of millimolar amounts of nitrite or H2O2 to bismuthate-treated Am solutions did not prevent oxidation, as long as residual solid bismuthate was present. Finally, a series of irradiation experiments using a Nordion Gammacell 220E 60Co source was performed, and kinetic data for the radiolytic reduction of Am(VI) were obtained. Unsurprisingly, it was found that radiolysis reduces Am(VI), but that the presence of Ce(IV) acts as a radioprotection agent, to scavenge radiolytically-produced reducing agents, thereby enhancing the stability of the higher Am oxidation state. Alternative oxidants: To date, sodium bismuthate is the only practical oxidant for Am with utility in solvent extraction. While successful oxidation has been demonstrated with sodium peroxydisulfate, it is impractical for solvent extraction because it is only useful in dilute acid and it introduces sulfate into the process. Oxidation has been demonstrated using silver and cobalt catalyzed ozone, however, reduction upon contact with an organic phase is instantaneous. Oxidation is successful using Cu(III) periodate, and marginally successful in initial testing using DAAP extraction. However, the distribution ratios for the oxidized Am are marginal, because Cu(III) is also rapidly reduced by the organic phase. The possibility may exist that this can be optimized.

  16. Magnitude and directional measures of water and Cr(VI) fluxes by passive flux meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Timothy J; Hatfield, Kirk; Klammler, Harald; Annable, Michael D; Rao, P S C

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration of the passive fluxmeter (PFM) is presented that provides for simultaneous measurements of both the magnitude and the direction of ambient groundwater specific discharge qo and Cr(VI) mass flux J(Cr). The PFM is configured as a cylindrical unit with an interior divided into a center section and three outer sectors, each packed with a granular anion exchange resin having high sorption capacity for the Cr(VI) oxyanions CrO4(2-) and HCrO4-. The sorbent in the center section is preloaded with benzoate as the "resident" tracer. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which PFMs were placed in porous packed bed columns, through which was passed a measured volume of synthetic groundwater containing Cr(VI). During the deployment period, some of the resident tracer is depleted while the Cr(VI) is sorbed. The resin was then removed from the four sectors separately and extracted to determine the "captured" mass of Cr(VI) and the residual mass of the resident tracer in each. Cumulative specific discharge, q0t, values were assessed using the residual mass of benzoate retained in the center section. The direction of this discharge theta was ascertained from the mass distribution of benzoate intercepted and retained in the outer three sections of the PFM. Cumulative chromium fluxes, J(Cr)t, were quantified using the total Cr(VI) mass intercepted and retained on the PFM. Experiments produced an average measurement error for direction theta of 3 degrees +/- 14 degrees, while the average measurement errors for q0 and J(Cr) were, respectively, -8% +/- 15% and -12% +/- 23%. Results demonstrate the potential utility of the new PFM configuration for characterizing groundwater and contaminant fluxes.

  17. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  18. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... to significantly speed up the particle filtering. It should be stressed that the observation part of the system has not been our focus, and as such is described only from a sense of completeness. With our approach it is possible to construct a robust and computationally efficient system for human motion estimation....

  19. Inverse Kinematics of a Serial Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amici Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a technique to treat the inverse kinematics of a serial manipulator. The inverse kinematics is obtained through the numerical inversion of the Jacobian matrix, that represents the equation of motion of the manipulator. The inversion is affected by numerical errors and, in different conditions, due to the numerical nature of the solver, it does not converge to a reasonable solution. Thus a soft computing approach is adopted to mix different traditional methods to obtain an increment of algorithmic convergence.

  20. Hvad skal vi med Trump-satire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?......Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?...

  1. The status of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussin, R.; Dunford, C.; McKnight, R.; Young, P.

    1988-01-01

    A new version of the United States evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF/B-VI, is presently under development. Major emphasis is being placed on correcting some long-standing nuclear data problems that adversely affect applied calculations for both fission and fusion reactors. The paper reviews modifications to the formats and utility codes, outlines the evaluation activities, discusses the data testing programs, and projects a date for the unrestricted release of the new library. 27 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Prospek pengembangan industri perkulitan pada pelita VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Karyadi

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The leather industry is one of the strong competitive industry, as it comes from renewable natural resources. Therefore, the leather industry has good prospect to develop at the Pelita VI to be the industrial products export competitive. To develop leather industry and leather products should be given closed attention and well managed, especially concerning raw material supply, quality and leather waste treatment.

  3. Vi behøver innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2007-01-01

    -Produktion og Maskiner. Innovation og bæredygtighed er to områder som vi i Skandinavien giver meget stor opmærksomhed for at kunne vedligeholde vores globale konkurrencekraft og stærke velfærdssamfund. Gennem årene har mange brancher bidraget til skabelsen af vidensbaserede innovationer, og det faktum, at de......Analyse: Vi behøver innovation En ny miljøbølge ruller, og danske virksomheder bør ride med Af Tim McAloone, fredag 02. feb 2007 kl. 04:50 Tim McAloone Lektor og ph.d. ved Institut for mekanik, energi og konstruktion ved DTU. Tim McAloone skriver fremover jævnligt kommentarer i Ingeniøren...... skandinaviske lande er relativt små, har ledt til en interessant evne til at etablere og derefter samarbejde inden for tætte netværk, som strækker sig over både faglige og geografiske grænser. Samtidig har vi set miljøhensyn vinde og tabe samfundsmæssig og industriel opmærksomhed på en nærmest periodisk basis...

  4. Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by flocculant with the capacity of reduction and chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gang; Chang, Qing; Han, Xiaoting; Zhang, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We report a novel flocculant with the properties of reduction and chelation for Cr. ► The removal of Cr(VI) by the flocculant depends highly on pH value. ► Some coexisting ions inhibit Cr (VI) removal, but promote total Cr removal. ► Cr and turbidity can be removed simultaneously in the treated wastewater. ► The interaction mechanism is investigated by FTIR and SEM. -- Abstract: A novel agent polyethyleneimine-sodium xanthogenate (PEX) with the multifunction of reduction, chelation, flocculation and precipitation was synthesized by using polyethyleneimine (PEI), carbon disulfide (CS 2 ), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The effects of different important parameters, such as pH value, initial Cr(VI) concentration, coexisting ions and turbidity etc., on the removal of chromium from aqueous solution by PEX were investigated in flocculation experiments. The experiments results demonstrated that PEX could efficiently remove Cr(VI) and total Cr (Cr(VI) + Cr(III)) in strongly acidic media. It was proved that the presence of coexisting ions (Na + , Ca 2+ , F − , Cl − , and SO 4 2− ) in the solution had a little influence on the removal of chromium. Furthermore, it was conformed that Cr(VI) ions and turbidity could be simultaneously removed when water samples contained both Cr(VI) ions and turbidity. Finally, the mechanism of interaction between chromium and PEX was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results reveal that dithiocarboxylic acid groups on PEX macromolecule play a major role in Cr(VI) reduction and Cr(III) chelation, and the flocs formation is attributed to the interparticle bridging mechanism of PEX

  5. Electrochemical investigations on cation-cation interaction between Np(V) and U(VI) in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Murali, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the first report on cation-cation interactions (CCIs) in 1961 by Sullivan et al., many researchers have worked on this using different techniques like optical spectroscopy and potentiometry. However, there is almost no report, in recent times, on this interesting subject using an electrochemical technique. In the present work, we set out to use simple cyclic voltammetry (CV) as a probe to study this phenomenon in the case of Np(V)-U(VI) in nitric acid medium. Accordingly, cyclic voltammograms were recorded individually for Np(V) , U(VI) in 4M HNO 3 and for solutions resulting from a titration of Np(V) with incremental additions of U(VI) in the same medium. These experiments were carried out using AutoLab 30 with three solid electrode system. Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode while Pt wires were used as working and counter electrode. The paper gives the part of CVs for successive additions of only U(VI) (1.4M) at fixed scan rate and room temperature. It can be seen that that the reduction peak shifts only slightly towards left with increased aliquots of U(VI). In contrast, the paper also gives the part of CVs for only U(VI) and for a titration mixture of fixed concentration of Np(V) and successive volume aliquot-additions of U(VI). It can be seen that there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak (∼ -0.15V) for additions of 1225μL of only U(VI) and 3225 μL of U(VI) in presence of Np. This showed that no change occurred till this composition. But with the addition of next aliquot of 4225μL of U(VI), there was an appreciable shift in the peak. This signified the formation of a new complex which can be attributed to the cation-cation interaction envisaged for Np(V)-U(VI). With further addition of an aliquot of 4725 μL of U(VI), it can be seen that again there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak position which probably underlined that the formation of the complex was complete

  6. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Haeussler, Andreas; Hermsdoerfer, Joachim

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10

  7. Assessment of multi class kinematic wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wageningen-Kessels, F.L.M.; Van Lint, J.W.C.; Vuik, C.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade many multi class kinematic wave (MCKW) traffic ow models have been proposed. MCKW models introduce heterogeneity among vehicles and drivers. For example, they take into account differences in (maximum) velocities and driving style. Nevertheless, the models are macroscopic and the

  8. Coordinate transformations, orthographic projections, and robot kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crochetiere, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Humans do not consciously think of moving each of their joints while they move their hands from one place to another. Likewise, robot arms can be commanded to move about in cartesian space without the need to address the individual joints. To do this, the direct and inverse kinematic equations of any robot arm must be derived. The direct kinematic equations uniquely transform the joint positions into the position (and orientation) of the hand, whereas the inverse kinematic equations transform the position (and orientation) of the hand into joint positions. The derivation of the inverse kinematic equations for any particular robot is a difficult problem which may have more than one solution. In this paper, these equations are derived for a six degree of freedom robot arm. A combination of matrix operations to perform coordinate rotations, and trigonometry within the appropriate orthographic projects to perform coordinate translations is employed. This complementary approach yields a solution which is more easily obtained, and also more easily visualized. The resulting solution was programmed into a real-time computer as a part of a higher level software system to control the motion of the arm

  9. About the kinematics of spinning particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, G.; Recami, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan; Campinas State Univ., SP

    1995-06-01

    Inserting the correct Lorentz factor into the definition of the 4-velocity vμ for spinning particles entails new kinematical properties for v 2 . The well-know constraint (identically true for scalar particles, but entering also the Dirac theory, and assumed a priori in all spinning particle models) P μ v μ =m is here derived in a self-consistent way

  10. Compton's Kinematics and Einstein - Ehrenfest's radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1988-09-01

    The Compton Kinematic relations are obtained from entirely classical arguments, that is, without the corpuscular concept of the photon. The calculations are nonrelativistic and result from Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory modified in order to introduce the effects of the classical zero-point fileds characteristic of Stochastic Electrodynamics. (author) [pt

  11. The kinematic algebras from the scattering equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Ricardo; O’Connell, Donal

    2014-01-01

    We study kinematic algebras associated to the recently proposed scattering equations, which arise in the description of the scattering of massless particles. In particular, we describe the role that these algebras play in the BCJ duality between colour and kinematics in gauge theory, and its relation to gravity. We find that the scattering equations are a consistency condition for a self-dual-type vertex which is associated to each solution of those equations. We also identify an extension of the anti-self-dual vertex, such that the two vertices are not conjugate in general. Both vertices correspond to the structure constants of Lie algebras. We give a prescription for the use of the generators of these Lie algebras in trivalent graphs that leads to a natural set of BCJ numerators. In particular, we write BCJ numerators for each contribution to the amplitude associated to a solution of the scattering equations. This leads to a decomposition of the determinant of a certain kinematic matrix, which appears naturally in the amplitudes, in terms of trivalent graphs. We also present the kinematic analogues of colour traces, according to these algebras, and the associated decomposition of that determinant

  12. Kinematic structures in galactic disc simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roca-F� brega, S.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Valenzuela, O.; Henney, W.J.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2011-01-01

    N-body and test particle simulations have been used to characterize the stellar streams in the galactic discs of Milky Way type galaxies. Tools such as the second and third order moments of the velocity ellipsoid and clustering methods -EM-WEKA and FoF- allow characterizing these kinematic

  13. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs

  14. The kinematics of machinery outlines of a theory of machines

    CERN Document Server

    Reuleaux, Franz

    2012-01-01

    A classic on the kinematics of machinery, this volume was written by the Father of Kinematics. Reuleaux writes with authority and precision, developing the subject from its fundamentals. 450 figures. 1876 edition.

  15. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an

  16. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Blankevoort, L.; Stekelenburg, C.; Strackee, S. D.; Carelsen, B.; Jonges, R.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on

  17. Kinematic Optimization in Birds, Bats and Ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Todd

    Birds and bats employ a variety of advanced wing motions in the efficient production of thrust. The purpose of this thesis is to quantify the benefit of these advanced wing motions, determine the optimal theoretical wing kinematics for a given flight condition, and to develop a methodology for applying the results in the optimal design of flapping-wing aircraft (ornithopters). To this end, a medium-fidelity, combined aero-structural model has been developed that is capable of simulating the advanced kinematics seen in bird flight, as well as the highly non-linear structural deformations typical of high-aspect ratio wings. Five unique methods of thrust production observed in natural species have been isolated, quantified and thoroughly investigated for their dependence on Reynolds number, airfoil selection, frequency, amplitude and relative phasing. A gradient-based optimization algorithm has been employed to determined the wing kinematics that result in the minimum required power for a generalized aircraft or species in any given flight condition. In addition to the theoretical work, with the help of an extended team, the methodology was applied to the design and construction of the world's first successful human-powered ornithopter. The Snowbird Human-Powered Ornithopter, is used as an example aircraft to show how additional design constraints can pose limits on the optimal kinematics. The results show significant trends that give insight into the kinematic operation of natural species. The general result is that additional complexity, whether it be larger twisting deformations or advanced wing-folding mechanisms, allows for the possibility of more efficient flight. At its theoretical optimum, the efficiency of flapping-wings exceeds that of current rotors and propellers, although these efficiencies are quite difficult to achieve in practice.

  18. Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueous phase by iron(II) minerals in presence of bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regenspurg, Simona, E-mail: regens@gfz-potsdam.de [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Schild, Dieter; Schaefer, Thorsten; Huber, Florian [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Malmstroem, Maria E. [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Uranium(VI) mobility in groundwater is strongly affected by sorption of mobile U(VI) species (e.g. uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) to mineral surfaces, precipitation of U(VI) compounds, such as schoepite (UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}.6H{sub 2}O), and by reduction to U(IV), forming sparingly soluble phases (uraninite; UO{sub 2}). The latter pathway, in particular, would be very efficient for long-term immobilization of U. In nature, Fe(II) is an important reducing agent for U(VI) because it frequently occurs either dissolved in natural waters, sorbed to matrix minerals, or structurally bound in many minerals. Redox reactions between U(VI) and Fe(II) depend not only on the availability of Fe(II) in the environment, but also on the chemical conditions in the aqueous solution. Under natural groundwater condition U(VI) forms complexes with many anionic ligands, which strongly affect its speciation. Carbonate, in particular, is known to form stable complexes with U, raising the question, if U(VI), when complexed by carbonate, can be reduced to UO{sub 2}. The goal of this study was to find out if Fe(II) when structurally bound in a mineral (as magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) or sorbed to a mineral surface (as corundum, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can reduce U(VI) to U(IV) in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Batch experiments were conducted under anaerobic conditions to observe U removal from the aqueous phase by the two minerals depending on HCO{sub 3}{sup -} addition (1 mM), U concentration (0.01-30 {mu}M) and pH value (6-10). Immediately after the experiments, the mineral surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to obtain information on the redox state of U bound to the solid surfaces. XPS results gave evidence that U(VI) can be reduced both by magnetite and by corundum amended with Fe(II). In the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} the amount of reduced U on the mineral surfaces increased compared to carbonate-free solutions. This can be explained by the formation

  19. Modeling of Cr(VI) Bioreduction Under Fermentative and Denitrifying Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of bioreductive immobilization of Cr(VI) were investigated by reactive transport modeling of a set of flow-through column experiments performed using natural Hanford 100H aquifer sediment. The columns were continuously eluted with 5 μM Cr(VI), 5 mM lactate as the electron donor, and selected electron acceptors (tested individually). Here we focus on the two separate experimental conditions that showed the most removal of Cr(VI) from solution: fermentation and denitrification. In each case, a network of enzymatic and abiotic reaction pathways was considered to interpret the rate of chromate reduction. The model included biomass growth and decay, and thermodynamic limitations on reaction rates, and was constrained by effluent concentrations measured by IC and ICP-MS and additional information from bacterial isolates from column effluent. Under denitrifying conditions, Cr(VI) reduction was modeled as co-metabolic with nitrate reduction based on experimental observations and previous studies on a denitrifying bacterium derived from the Hanford 100H aquifer. The reactive transport model results supported this interpretation of the reaction mechanism and were used to quantify the efficiency of the process. The models results also suggest that biomass growth likely relied on a nitrogen source other than ammonium (e.g. nitrate). Under fermentative conditions and based on cell suspension studies performed on a bacterial isolate from the columns, the model assumes that Cr(VI) reduction is carried out directly by fermentative bacteria that convert lactate into acetate and propionate. The evolution to complete lactate fermentation and Cr(VI) reduction took place over a week's time and simulations were used to determine an estimate for a lower limit of the rate of chromate reduction by calibration with the flow-through column experimental results. In spite of sulfate being added to these columns, sulfate reduction proceeded at a slow rate and was not well

  20. TEM in situ cube-corner indentation analysis using ViBe motion detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, K. H.; Thomas, S.; Swenson, M. J.; Lu, Y.; Wharry, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) in situ mechanical testing is a promising method for understanding plasticity in shallow ion irradiated layers and other volume-limited materials. One of the simplest TEM in situ experiments is cube-corner indentation of a lamella, but the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the experiment is challenging, especially in engineering materials with complex microstructures. In this work, we: (a) develop MicroViBE, a motion detection and background subtraction-based post-processing approach, and (b) demonstrate the ability of MicroViBe, in combination with post-mortem TEM imaging, to carry out an unbiased qualitative interpretation of TEM indentation videos. We focus this work around a Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy, irradiated with Fe2+ ions to 3 dpa at 500 °C. MicroViBe identifies changes in Laue contrast that are induced by the indentation; these changes accumulate throughout the mechanical loading to generate a "heatmap" of features in the original TEM video that change the most during the loading. Dislocation loops with b = ½ identified by post-mortem scanning TEM (STEM) imaging correspond to hotspots on the heatmap, whereas positions of dislocation loops with b = do not correspond to hotspots. Further, MicroViBe enables consistent, objective quantitative approximation of the b = ½ dislocation loop number density.

  1. Remediation of U(VI)-contaminated water using zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of U(VI) reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe 0 ). We conducted batch experiments with granular iron and solutions containing 0.25 and 9.3 mg L -1 U(VI) at 24 deg C. The solution pH ranges between 2 and 9. In all experiments uranium removal was complete within several hours to several days regardless of the pH value. The reduced uranium precipitated as poorly crystallized hydrated uraninite, UO 2 .nH 2 O. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe 0 was found to be the principal mechanism of U removal from the solution. Other mechanisms such as U(VI) sorption on the newly formed Fe(III) hydroxides are insignificant. These results show that zero-valent iron can be used to remedy U-contaminated waters from uranium mines and mill tailings sites, the pH of which usually ranges between 2 and 9. (authors)

  2. Validation and Structural Analysis of the Kinematics Concept Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, A.; Wagner, C.; Hofer, S. I.; Stem, E.; Vaterlaus, A.

    2017-01-01

    The kinematics concept test (KCT) is a multiple-choice test designed to evaluate students' conceptual understanding of kinematics at the high school level. The test comprises 49 multiple-choice items about velocity and acceleration, which are based on seven kinematic concepts and which make use of three different representations. In the first part…

  3. Understanding the role of clay minerals in the chromium(VI) bioremoval by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCTCC AB93066 under growth condition: microscopic, spectroscopic and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chunxi; Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Yuewu; Ruan, Bo; Li, Liping; Tran, Lytuong; Zhu, Nengwu; Dang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to investigate the role of clay minerals, e.g., kaolinite and vermiculite, in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under growth condition in glucose-amended mediums as a method for treating Cr(VI)-contaminated subsurface environment such as soil. Our results indicated that glucose could acted as an essential electron donor, and clay minerals significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by improving the consumption rate of glucose and stimulating the growth and propagation of P. aeruginosa. Cr(VI) bioreduction by both free cells and clay minerals-amended cells followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, with the latter one fitting better. The mass balance analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis found that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) and the adsorption of total chromium on clay minerals-bacteria complex was small, implying that Cr(VI) bioremoval was not mainly due to the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto cells or clay minerals or clay minerals-cells complex but mainly due to the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of P. aeruginosa under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the addition of clay minerals (e.g. vermiculite) decreased the surface roughness of Cr(VI)-laden cells and changed the cell morphology and dimension. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that organic matters such as aliphatic species and/or proteins played an important role in the combination of cells and clay minerals. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the attachment of cells on the surface of clay minerals, indicating that clay minerals could provide a microenvironment to protect cells from Cr(VI) toxicity and serve as growth-supporting materials. These findings manifested the underlying influence of clay minerals on microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and gave an understanding of the interaction between pollutants, the environment and the biota.

  4. Improved Inverse Kinematics Algorithm Using Screw Theory for a Six-DOF Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcheng Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on screw theory, a novel improved inverse-kinematics approach for a type of six-DOF serial robot, “Qianjiang I”, is proposed in this paper. The common kinematics model of the robot is based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H notation method while its inverse kinematics has inefficient calculation and complicated solution, which cannot meet the demands of online real-time application. To solve this problem, this paper presents a new method to improve the efficiency of the inverse kinematics solution by introducing the screw theory. Unlike other methods, the proposed method only establishes two coordinates, namely the inertial coordinate and the tool coordinate; the screw motion of each link is carried out based on the inertial coordinate, ensuring definite geometric meaning. Furthermore, we adopt a new inverse kinematics algorithm, developing an improved sub-problem method along with Paden-Kahan sub-problems. This method has high efficiency and can be applied in real-time industrial operation. It is convenient to select the desired solutions directly from among multiple solutions by examining clear geometric meaning. Finally, the effectiveness and reliability performance of the new algorithm are analysed and verified in comparative experiments carried out on the six-DOF serial robot “Qianjiang I”.

  5. Hierarchical Kinematic Modelling and Optimal Design of a Novel Hexapod Robot with Integrated Limb Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyang Xin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel hexapod robot, hereafter named PH-Robot, with three degrees of freedom (3-DOF parallel leg mechanisms based on the concept of an integrated limb mechanism (ILM for the integration of legged locomotion and arm manipulation. The kinematic model plays an important role in the parametric optimal design and motion planning of robots. However, models of parallel mechanisms are often difficult to obtain because of the implicit relationship between the motions of actuated joints and the motion of a moving platform. In order to derive the kinematic equations of the proposed hexapod robot, an extended hierarchical kinematic modelling method is proposed. According to the kinematic model, the geometrical parameters of the leg are optimized utilizing a comprehensive objective function that considers both dexterity and payload. PH-Robot has distinct advantages in accuracy and load ability over a robot with serial leg mechanisms through the former's comparison of performance indices. The reachable workspace of the leg verifies its ability to walk and manipulate. The results of the trajectory tracking experiment demonstrate the correctness of the kinematic model of the hexapod robot.

  6. Kinematic parameters that influence the aesthetic perception of beauty in contemporary dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrents, Carlota; Castañer, Marta; Jofre, Toni; Morey, Gaspar; Reverter, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Some experiments have stablished that certain kinematic parameters can influence the subjective aesthetic perception of the dance audience. Neave, McCarty, Freynik, Caplan, Hönekopp, and Fink (2010, Biology Letters 7 221-224) reported eleven movement parameters in non-expert male dancers, showing a significant positive correlation with perceived dance quality. We aim to identify some of the kinematic parameters of expert dancers' movements that influence the subjective aesthetic perception of observers in relation to specific skills of contemporary dance. Four experienced contemporary dancers performed three repetitions of four dance-related motor skills. Motion was captured by a VICON-MX system. The resulting 48 animations were viewed by 108 observers. The observers judged beauty using a semantic differential. The data were then subjected to multiple factor analysis. The results suggested that there were strong associations between higher beauty scores and certain kinematic parameters, especially those related to amplitude of movement.

  7. End-Effector Position Analysis Using Forward Kinematics For 5 Dof Pravak Robot Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Atit Shah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Automatic control of the robotic manipulator involves study of kinematics and dynamics as a major issue. This paper involves the kinematic analysis of a Pravak Robot arm which is used for doing successful robotic manipulation task in its workspace. The Pravak Robot Arm is a 5-DOF robot having all the joints revolute. The kinematics problem is defined as the transformation from the Cartesian space to the joint space and vice versa. In this study the Denavit- Hartenberg (D-H model is used to model robot links and joints. Pravak Robot Arm is a simple and safe robotic system designed for laboratory training and research applications. This robot allows to gain theoretical and practical experience in robotics, automation and control systems. The MATLAB R2007 is used to analyse end effectors position for a set of joint parameter.

  8. O uso da gestão de projetos para a implantação de uma gestão da informação integrada e participativa: a experiência da coordenadoria de educação aberta e a distância da Universidade Federal de Viçosa-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Jaime Ribeiro Faria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1983-4535.2012v5n4p78   A gerência da Educação a Distância exige que seus gestores executem tarefas de planejamento, sistematização, organização, direção e controle de processos e projetos e por isso não pode prescindir de um gerenciamento da informação que atenda aos requisitos de integração, de responsabilidade coletiva e de participação. Sendo assim, este trabalho teve como objetivo a implementação da gestão da informação na Coordenadoria de Educação Aberta e a Distância da Universidade Federal de Viçosa (CEAD-UFV, seguindo a metodologia de gerenciamento de projetos com base numa modificação dodotProject, um software livre de código aberto. Para tanto, foi desenvolvido e implementado um sistema de gerenciamento da informação na Coordenadoria, com base na metodologia da gestão de projetos para organizações de tecnologia da informação e comunicação. Constatou-se que o modelo implantado ofereceu à CEAD-UFV uma visão sistêmica de seus projetos e dinamizou o fluxo de informações. A experiência mostrou ainda que a gestão baseada nagerência de projetos permite enfatizar a sinergia entre grupos necessária no contexto de EaD.

  9. Can iron oxides remove Cr(VI) from drinking water at sub-ppb levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprara, Efthymia; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Samaras, Petros; Zouboulis, Anastasios; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2013-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has long been recognized as a potential carcinogen via inhalation, in contrast to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] which is 100 times less toxic and also a necessary nutrient, essential to human glucidic metabolism. Nowadays there is an increasing concern that Cr(VI) is also carcinogenic by the oral route of exposure, while an increased number of publications indicate that Cr(VI) is a common natural pollutant. Hexavalent chromium formation is attributed to natural oxidation of Cr(III) in ultramafic derived soils and ophiolithic rocks. To verify this theory, drinking water samples were collected from targeted areas of Greece e.g. areas in which the geological background is predominated by ultramafic minerals and the water supply depends mainly on groundwater resources. Valuable guide for the samples collection was the geological map of Greece and emphasis was given to regions where the natural occurrence of Cr(VI) is thought to be more possible. A wide range of Cr concentrations (2-100 μg/L) were detected in the areas studied, with most of them ranging below the current limit of 50 μg/L, and the Cr(VI) concentration being more than 90% of the total. Since the Cr(VI) affects significant part of population worldwide, a debate was established concerning the enforcement of stringent regulation, which also demands the drinking water treatment processes re-evaluation in view of Cr(VI) removal at sub-ppb level. In this regard, adsorption has evolved as the front line of defense for chromium removal. The motivation of this work was to investigate the efficiency of iron oxides for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from drinking water and its removal at sub-ppb levels. The adsorbents examined included iron oxy-hydroxides and magnetite prepared using common low cost iron salts. Their effectiveness as Cr(VI) adsorbents was evaluated through the decrease of a Cr(VI) concentration of 100μg/L prepared in NSF water at pH 7. Preliminary batch experiments did not

  10. Treatment of Cr(VI)-containing wastewaters with exopolysaccharide-producing cyanobacteria in pilot flow through and batch systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colica, Giovanni; Mecarozzi, Pier Cesare; De Philippis, Roberto [Florence Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology

    2010-08-15

    Seven exopolysaccharide-producing cyanobacteria were tested with regard to their capability to remove Cr(VI) from the wastewater of a plating industry. The cyanobacterium which showed, under lab conditions, the most promising features with regard to both Cr(VI) removal (about 12 mg of Cr(VI) removed per gram of dry biomass) and growth characteristics (highest growth rate and simplest culture medium) was Nostoc PCC7936. Furthermore, in lab experiments, it was also found that a HCl pretreatment is essential to abate the concentration of Cr(VI) in solution and that the viability of the biomass is not necessary. Subsequently, three pilot devices were tested, one batch (a dialysis cell) and two flow-through systems (a filter press and a column filled with quartz grain). The best performances were obtained with the filter press, where it was observed a sharp decrease in the concentration of Cr(VI), partly due to the adsorption of the metal by the biomass (about 50%) and partly due to its reduction to Cr(III). The results are discussed in terms of the role played by the different components (biomass and polysaccharide) of the cyanobacterial cultures in the removal of Cr(VI). (orig.)

  11. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  12. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Wenfang; Zhao, Yingxin; Zheng, Xinyi; Ji, Min; Zhang, Zhenya

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The main chemical components of Sakura leaves are cellulose 16.6%, hemicellulose 10.4%, lignin 18.3%, ash 11.4%, and others 43.3%. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto Sakura leaves can achieve 435.25 mg g"−"1, much higher than other similar agroforestry wastes. - Highlights: • Sakura leaves were prepared to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached 435.25 mg g"−"1. • Cr(VI) adsorption fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic model. • Isotherm models indicated Cr(VI) adsorption occurred on a monolayer surface. • The influence order of coexisting ions followed PO_4"3"− > SO_4"2"− > Cl"−. - Abstract: A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g"−"1 at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl"−, SO_4"2"− and PO_4"3"− would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO_4"3"− > SO_4"2"− > Cl"−. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  13. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Wenfang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Yingxin, E-mail: yingxinzhao@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zheng, Xinyi [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ji, Min [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Zhenya [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The main chemical components of Sakura leaves are cellulose 16.6%, hemicellulose 10.4%, lignin 18.3%, ash 11.4%, and others 43.3%. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto Sakura leaves can achieve 435.25 mg g{sup −1}, much higher than other similar agroforestry wastes. - Highlights: • Sakura leaves were prepared to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached 435.25 mg g{sup −1}. • Cr(VI) adsorption fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic model. • Isotherm models indicated Cr(VI) adsorption occurred on a monolayer surface. • The influence order of coexisting ions followed PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g{sup −1} at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  14. Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles for Cr(VI) adsorption: Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Tekin, Nalan; Osman, Bilgen; Beşirli, Necati

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cr(VI) can oxidize biological molecules and be one of the most harmful substance. • Magnetic seperation techniques are used on different applications in many fields. • Magnetic systems can be used for rapid and selective removal as a magnetic processor. • We investigate properties of both new material and other magnetic adsorbents reported in the literatures on the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions. • No researchments were reported on adsorption of Cr(VI) with magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles. - Abstract: Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles, poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate(EG)–vinylphenyl boronic acid(VPBA)) [m-poly(EG–VPBA)], produced by suspension polymerization and characterized, was found to be an efficient solid polymer for Cr(VI) adsorption. The m-poly(EG–VPBA) microparticles were prepared by copolymerizing of ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EG) with 4-vinyl phenyl boronic acid (VPBA). The m-poly(EG–VPBA) microparticles were characterized by N 2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and swelling studies. The m-poly(EG–VPBA) microparticles were used at adsorbent/Cr(VI) ion ratios. The influence of pH, Cr(VI) initial concentration, temperature of the removal process was investigated. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2. Langmuir isotherm and Dubinin–Radushkvich isotherm were found to better fit the experiment data rather than Fruendlich isotherm. The kinetics of the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the m-poly(EG–VPBA) microparticles were investigated using the pseudo first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results. The thermodynamic

  15. Study of the removal of mercury(II) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Moroccan stevensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhammou, A.; Yaacoubi, A.; Nibou, L.; Tanouti, B.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of the heavy metals mercury(II) and chromium(VI), from aqueous solutions, onto Moroccan stevensite. A mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of natural stevensite was carried out. In order to improve the adsorption capacity of stevensite for Cr(VI), a preparation of stevensite was carried out. It consists in saturating the stevensite by ferrous iron Fe(II) and reducing the total Fe by Na 2 S 2 O 4 . Then, the adsorption experiments were studied in batch reactors at 25 ± 3 deg. C. The influence of the pH solution on the Cr(VI) and Hg(II) adsorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7.0. The optimum pH for the Cr(VI) adsorption is in the pH range of 2.0-5.0 while that of Hg(II) is at the pH values above 4.0. The adsorption kinetics were tested by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) is 54.35 mmol kg -1 min -1 and that of Cr(VI) is 7.21 mmol kg -1 min -1 . The adsorption equilibrium time for Hg(II) and Cr(VI) was reached within 2 and 12 h, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The maximal adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) increases from 13.7 (raw stevensite) to 48.86 mmol kg -1 (modified stevensite) while that of Hg(II) decreases from 205.8 to 166.9 mmol kg -1 . The mechanism of Hg(II) and Cr(VI) adsorption was discussed

  16. Kinematic structure at the early flight position in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodičar, Janez; Coh, Milan; Jošt, Bojan

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our research was to establish the variability of correlation between the length of the jumps and selected multi-item kinematic variables (n=9) in the early flight phase technique of ski jumping. This study was conducted on a sample of elite Slovenian ski jumpers (N=29) who participated in the experiment on a jumping hill in Hinterzarten, Germany (HS95m) on the 20(th) of August, 2008. The highest and most significant correlations (p=0.01) with the length of the ski jump were found in the multi-item variable height of flying, which was also expressed with the highest level of stability of the explained total variance (TV) on the first factor (TV=69.13%). The most important characteristic of the aerodynamic aspect of early flight was the variable angle between the body chord and the horizontal axis with significantly high correlations (pjump. Only two more variables, the angle between the upper body and the horizontal plane (TV=53.69%), and the angle between left ski and left leg (TV=50.13%), had an explained common variance on the first factor greater than 50% of total variance. The results indicated that some kinematic parameters of ski jumping early flight technique were more important for success considering the length of the jump.

  17. Observation of top quark production using kinematic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shinhong [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); CDF Collaboration

    1995-05-17

    We present analysis results of the top quark production using kinematic techniques in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We analyzed a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 67 pb{sup {minus}1}. First, we compare the kinematic properties, the second and third leading jet E{sub T} of W+ > 3 jet events with expectations for t{bar t} production and its back-ground processes, predominantly direct W + jet production. The probability that backgrounds fake the excess in the signal region was found to be less than 0.26%. Next, we use a scaler sum of the transverse energies of the lepton, neutrino and jets in W+{ge}4 jet events. This analysis shows t{bar t} events exist significantly in the event sample, and enables us to estimate the top quark mass to be M{sub top} = 180 {plus_minus} 12 {sub {minus}15}{sup +19} GeV/c{sup 2}. Finally, we analyse the dijet invariant mass in the W+{ge}4 jet events. It shows a significant mass peak consistent with a mass peak of W decaying into dijet. From these results and counting experiment, we have confirmed previous evidence reported in 1994 April and observed top quark production.

  18. Static and kinematic positioning using WADGPS from geostationary satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalo, R.; Gatti, M.

    2003-04-01

    STATIC AND KINEMATIC POSITIONING USING WADGPS CORRECTIONS FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES Cefalo R. (1), Gatti M (2) (1) Department of Civil Engineering, University of Trieste, P.le Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, cefalo@dic.univ.trieste.it, (2) Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara, Italy, mgatti@ing.unife.it ABSTRACT. Starting from February 2000, static and kinematic experiments have been performed at the Department of Civil Engineering of University of Trieste, Italy and the Department of Engineering of University of Ferrara, Italy, using the WADGPS (Wide Area Differential GPS) corrections up linked by Geostationary Satellites belonging to the American WAAS and European EGNOS. Recently, a prototypal service by ESA (European Space Agency) named SISNet (Signal In Space through Internet), has been introduced using Internet to diffuse the messages up linked through AOR-E and IOR Geostationary Satellites. This service will overcome the problems relative to the availability of the corrections in urban areas. This system is currently under tests by the authors in order to verify the latency of the message and the applicability and accuracies obtainable in particular in dynamic applications.

  19. Voltammetry of Os(VI)-modified polysaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 16 (2010), s. 1837-1845 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP301/10/P548; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Program:KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chemical modification of polysaccharides * electroactive labels * osmium(VI) complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  20. Surface growth kinematics via local curve evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, Derek E.

    2012-11-18

    A mathematical framework is developed to model the kinematics of surface growth for objects that can be generated by evolving a curve in space, such as seashells and horns. Growth is dictated by a growth velocity vector field defined at every point on a generating curve. A local orthonormal basis is attached to each point of the generating curve and the velocity field is given in terms of the local coordinate directions, leading to a fully local and elegant mathematical structure. Several examples of increasing complexity are provided, and we demonstrate how biologically relevant structures such as logarithmic shells and horns emerge as analytical solutions of the kinematics equations with a small number of parameters that can be linked to the underlying growth process. Direct access to cell tracks and local orientation enables for connections to be made to the underlying growth process. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  2. A non-linear kinematic hardening function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1977-05-01

    Based on the classical theory of plasticity, and accepting the von Mises criterion as the initial yield criterion, a non-linear kinematic hardening function applicable both to Melan-Prager's and to Ziegler's hardening rule is proposed. This non-linear hardening function is determined by means of the uniaxial stress-strain curve, and any such curve is applicable. The proposed hardening function considers the problem of general reversed loading, and a smooth change in the behaviour from one plastic state to another nearlying plastic state is obtained. A review of both the kinematic hardening theory and the corresponding non-linear hardening assumptions is given, and it is shown that material behaviour is identical whether Melan-Prager's or Ziegler's hardening rule is applied, provided that the von Mises yield criterion is adopted. (author)

  3. The kinematic advantage of electric cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration of a common car with with a turbocharged diesel engine is compared to the same type with an electric motor in terms of kinematics. Starting from a state of rest, the electric car reaches a distant spot earlier than the diesel car, even though the latter has a better specification for engine power and average acceleration from 0 to 100 km h-1. A three phase model of acceleration as a function of time fits the data of the electric car accurately. The first phase is a quadratic growth of acceleration in time. It is shown that the tenfold higher coefficient for the first phase accounts for most of the kinematic advantage of the electric car.

  4. Directed Neutron Beams From Inverse Kinematic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Guardala, N. A.; Glass, G. A.

    2011-06-01

    Kinematic focusing of an emitted fairly mono-energetic neutron beam by the use of inverse-kinematic reactions, i.e. where the projectile mass is greater than the target atom's mass, can provide for the utilization of a significant fraction of the fast neutron yield and also provide for a safer radiation environment. We examine the merit of various neutron production reactions and consider the practicalities of producing the primary beam using the suitable accelerator technologies. Preliminary progress at the NSWC-Carderock Positive Ion Accelerator Facility is described. Possible important applications for this type of neutron-based system can be both advanced medical imaging techniques and active "stand-off" interrogation of contraband items.

  5. 6th International Workshop on Computational Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia, Alba

    2014-01-01

    Computational kinematics is an enthralling area of science with a rich spectrum of problems at the junction of mechanics, robotics, computer science, mathematics, and computer graphics. The covered topics include design and optimization of cable-driven robots, analysis of parallel manipulators, motion planning, numerical methods for mechanism calibration and optimization, geometric approaches to mechanism analysis and design, synthesis of mechanisms, kinematical issues in biomechanics, construction of novel mechanical devices, as well as detection and treatment of singularities. The results should be of interest for practicing and research engineers as well as Ph.D. students from the fields of mechanical and electrical engineering, computer science, and computer graphics. Indexed in Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S).

  6. Plasma electron hole kinematics. I. Momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Zhou, C. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, which behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  7. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  8. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  9. Fremtidens lavenergibyggeri - kan vi gøre som vi plejer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    2011-01-01

    Stramninger af kravene til energiforbruget i vores boliger medfører stor fokus på energiberegningen, men erfaringer fra lavenergiboliger opført i dag viser, at vi, for at sikre succes for fremtidens boliger, også skal inddrage dokumentation af indeklimaet og forbedre samarbejdet mellem arkitekter...

  10. Analyzing Robotic Kinematics Via Computed Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    Computing system assists in evaluation of kinematics of conceptual robot. Displays positions and motions of robotic manipulator within work cell. Also displays interactions between robotic manipulator and other objects. Results of simulation displayed on graphical computer workstation. System includes both off-the-shelf software originally developed for automotive industry and specially developed software. Simulation system also used to design human-equivalent hand, to model optical train in infrared system, and to develop graphical interface for teleoperator simulation system.

  11. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  12. A new kinematical definition of orbital eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of orbital eccentricity is given. The dimensionless quantities proposed in the present paper to serve as orbital eccentricities have a kinematical nature. The purpose is to use them in describing the motion for the case of three-dimensional orbits. A comparison done for nearly planar orbits shows that the values of the eccentricities proposed here do not differ significantly from those corresponding to the eccentricities of geometric nature usually applied.

  13. Kinematics of Laying an Automated Weapon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 899 Technical Report ARWSE-TR-16024 KINEMATICS OF LAYING AN AUTOMATED WEAPON SYSTEM...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of

  14. Kinematical Test Theories for Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; Braxmaier, Claus; Dittus, Hansjörg; Müller, Holger; Peters, Achim; Schiller, Stephan

    A comparison of certain kinematical test theories for Special Relativity including the Robertson and Mansouri-Sext test theories is presented and the accuracy of the experimental results testing Special Relativity are expressed in terms of the parameters appearing in these test theories. The theoretical results are applied to the most precise experimental results obtained recently for the isotropy of light propagation and the constancy of the speed of light.

  15. Local galactic kinematics: an isothermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, J.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematical parameters of galactic rotation in the solar neighborhood and the corrections to the precession have been calculated. For this purpose, an isothermal model for the solar neighborhood has been used together with the high order momenta of the local stellar velocity distribution and the Ogorodnikov-Milne model. Both have been calculated using some samples of the ''512 Distant FK4/FK4 Sup. Stars'' of Fricke (1977) and of Gliese's Gatalogue. (author)

  16. Synthesis, characterization and oxidative behaviour of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, D.D.; Rastogi, Rachana

    1995-01-01

    Dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes are found to give low yield of epoxide but good yield of cyclohexanone. The complexes are electro active giving metal centered Ru VI /Ru V couple. Cis-stilbene gives trans epoxide and benzaldehyde. Norbornene gives exo epoxy norbornene. The selectivity for allylic oxidation is high. In the present note the synthesis of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes and their oxidation behaviour is reported. The dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes have been stoichiometrically found to be good oxidants. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab

  17. Enzymatic U(VI) reduction by Desulfosporosinus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; Banfield, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Here we tested U(VI) reduction by a Desulfosporosinus species (sp.) isolate and type strain (DSM 765) in cell suspensions (pH 7) containing 1 mM U(VI) and lactate, under an atmosphere containing N 2 -CO 2 -H 2 (90: 5: 5). Although neither Desulfosporosinus species (spp.) reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions with 0.25% Na-bicarbonate or 0.85% NaCl, U(VI) was reduced in these solutions by a control strain, desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 642). However, both Desulfosporosinus strains reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions depleted in bicarbonate and NaCl. No U(VI) reduction was observed without lactate and H 2 electron donors or with heat-killed cells, indicating enzymatic U(VI) reduction. Uranium(VI) reduction by both strains was inhibited when 1 mM CuCl 2 was added to the cell suspensions. Because the Desulfosporosinus DSM 765 does not contain cytochrome c 3 used by Desulfovibrio spp. to reduce U(VI), Desulfosporosinus species reduce uranium via a different enzymatic pathway. (orig.)

  18. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gretchen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg, with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly.

  20. Kinematics in special and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodside, R.W.M.

    1979-05-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of motion for extended bodies from the viewpoint of classical field theory, where the classical field is the body's energy-momentum or matter tensor. In special relativity a symmetric and divergence-free matter tensor combined with inertial frames is used to generate a kinematics for extended bodies. In general relativity the author suggests an analogous kinematics and applies it to the simplest non-trivial example of static, spherical stars, looking for special sets of vector fields whose matter currents are conserved. Such a set of ten vector fields defines a special frame, and integrals of the conserved matter currents define ten momenta whcih give the kinematics. Application of de Rham cohomology theory shows that the conserved matter currents for isolated bodies will have mechanical potentials which enable the momenta to be found from flux integrals evaluated in the vacuum region surrounding the body. These potentials contain the full Riemann curvature, allowing a body's general relativistic momenta to be determined by its vacuum graviational field

  1. Color-Kinematics Duality for QCD Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We show that color-kinematics duality is present in tree-level amplitudes of quantum chromodynamics with massive flavored quarks. Starting with the color structure of QCD, we work out a new color decomposition for n-point tree amplitudes in a reduced basis of primitive amplitudes. These primitives, with k quark-antiquark pairs and (n-2k) gluons, are taken in the (n-2)!/k! Melia basis, and are independent under the color-algebra Kleiss-Kuijf relations. This generalizes the color decomposition of Del Duca, Dixon, and Maltoni to an arbitrary number of quarks. The color coefficients in the new decomposition are given by compact expressions valid for arbitrary gauge group and representation. Considering the kinematic structure, we show through explicit calculations that color-kinematics duality holds for amplitudes with general configurations of gluons and massive quarks. The new (massive) amplitude relations that follow from the duality can be mapped to a well-defined subset of the familiar BCJ relations for gluo...

  2. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of CR(VI)-reducer basalt-inhabiting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsibakhashvili, N.Ya.; Kalabegishvili, T.L.; Murusidze, I.G.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Kirkesali, E.I.; Aksenova, N.G.; Holman, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(VI) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 μg/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental conditions typical of the basalts. The concentrations of at least 12-19 different elements ranging from major- to ultratrace ones were determined in each type of bacteria simultaneously. The range of concentrations spans over 8 orders of magnitude

  3. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, J. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, J.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rodriguez, E. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Ramirez, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, J.L. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)]. E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu

    2005-04-15

    The temperature dependence of the Cr(VI) bioadsorption and its possible reduction to Cr(III) by Agave lechuguilla biomass were studied. The experimental data obtained in batch experiments at different temperatures were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich model. The average model parameters calculated from Freundlich's isotherms (adsorption capacity K{sub F} = 4 . 10{sup -2} mol . g{sup -1} and an average adsorption intensity value n = 13.07) showed that A. lechuguilla can be considered as an effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. Thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G{sup .}, {delta}H{sup .}, and {delta}S{sup .}) for Cr(VI) adsorption determined in the temperature range from (283 to 313) K suggest that a portion of Cr(VI) may be bound to functional groups on the surface of the adsorbent and then reduced to Cr(III). Additionally, the parameters of the Dubinin-Radushkevick equation indicated that the sorption of chromium species onto lechuguilla biomass mainly proceeds through binding surface functional groups.

  4. Sorption of U(VI) on natural sepiolite and sepiolite-agar agar composite adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esen, K.; Donat, R.; Cetisli, H.; Aytas, S.

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (VI) ions onto clay minerals is one of the significant reactions affecting the transport of uranium in the environment. The use of composite adsorbents for the removal of metal ions and radionuclide from industrial wastes has attracted great interest to researchers in recent years[1]. In this study, natural sepiolite type clay and an organic compound, agar agar, were chosen as the adsorbent material. Composite adsorbent was prepared from sepiolite and agar agar. Adsorption of uranium (VI) on this composite and on natural sepiolite adsorbent was investigated. Thermodynamic investigations were carried out to get more information about the adsorption of uranium. Adsorption of U (VI) has been studied as a function of solution pH, time, temperature and initial concentration of uranium on natural sepiolite and agar agar composite. The maximum sorption yield of U (VI) on composite and on sepiolite from batch experiments is calculated approximately 89% and 76% respectively in the optimum experimental adsorption condition. The adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. Using the experimental data obtained different temperatures, thermodynamic constants ΔH d egree, ΔS d egree and ΔG d egree were calculated. The results show that the adsorption process on natural sepiolite and sepiolite-agar agar composite are both egzothermic natures. [1] S. M. Hasany, M. M. Saeed, M. Ahmed, J. Radioanal. Nucl. Chem. Vol. 252 (3), 477-484 (2002)

  5. The derivation of the general form of kinematics with the universal reference system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Szostek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the whole class of time and position transformations was derived. These transformations were derived based on the analysis of the Michelson-Morley experiment and its improved version, that is the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment. It is possible to derive a different kinematics of bodies based on each of these transformations. In this way, we demonstrated that the Special Theory of Relativity is not the only theory explaining the results of experiments with light. There is the whole continuum of the theories of kinematics of bodies which correctly explain the Michelson-Morley experiment and other experiments in which the velocity of light is measured. Based on the derived transformations, we derive the general formula for the velocity of light in vacuum measured in any inertial reference system. We explain why the Michelson-Morley and Kennedy-Thorndike experiments could not detect the ether. We present and discuss three examples of specific transformations. Finally, we explain the phenomenon of anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation by means of the presented theory. The theory derived in this work is called the Special Theory of Ether – with any transverse contraction. The entire article contains only original research conducted by its authors. Keywords: Kinematics of bodies, Universal frame of reference, Transformation of time and position, One-way speed of light, Anisotropy of cosmic microwave background

  6. Selective removal of U(VI) from low concentration wastewater by functionalized HKUST-1@H3PW12O40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhang; Jinhua Xue; Nan Hu; Jing Sun; Dexin Ding; Yongdong Wang; Le Li

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of U(VI) from low concentration solution by HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 was studied as a function of various experimental parameters including pH, interfering ions, contact time, initial uranium concentration and temperature by batch experiments. Equilibrium data were found to fit with Langmuir isotherm model better than Freundlich isotherm model. The kinetic adsorption was fitted by the pseudo-second-order model well. Thermodynamic data from the adsorption experiments indicate that adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 can selectively adsorb U(VI) from multi-metal ion solutions and the adsorption capacity of HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 don't decrease significantly after three cycles of desorption-reuse. The results show that HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 is suitable for removal of U(VI) from low concentration solutions. (author)

  7. The adsorption of molybdenum(VI) onto activated carbon from acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, H.F.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of molybdenum(VI) onto activated carbon is dependent on which nuclides are present in the solution. In this study the adsorption of Mo(VI) onto activated carbon is examined as a function of two variables, namely: the total molybdenum concentration and the pH. The equilibration time, the influence of ionic strength and the reversibility of the system was also examined. A series of solutions of a specified molybdenum concentration were equilibrated with activated carbon. In these experiments the pH varied from 5,5 to 0,9 while the temperature and ionic strength remained constant. The solutions were analysed colorimetrically and the pH equilibrium of each was measured. The molybdenum concentration for the series of experiments varied from 5x10 -4 M to 2x10 -2 M. 61 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs

  8. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  9. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula snap traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Poppinga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional–morphological and biomimetic context.

  10. The spallation in reverse kinematics: what for a coincidence measurement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducret, J.E.

    2006-07-01

    The Spaladin installation has been designed to study spallation reactions in reverse kinematics. Furthermore, the heavy and light fragments are detected by coincidence which allows us to get an instantaneous picture of the reaction at a level of accuracy better than that obtained through inclusive measurement. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical description of the different mechanisms involved in the spallation reactions. In the second part we describe the Spaladin installation and report some results on the reaction: Fe 56 + p at an energy of 1 GeV/nucleon. In the third part we expose the performance of the installation through its simulation with the Geant-IV model. We present a study about the sensitivity of the Spaladin installation to theoretical predictions. The fourth part is dedicated to the future experiments that will be performed with the Spaladin installation. (A.C.)

  11. Wave kinematics and response of slender offshore structures. Vol 4: Wave kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riber, H.J.

    1999-08-01

    The kinematics of large surface waves has been measured by means of sonar's placed on the sea floor at the Tyra field. Measurements from the most severe storm are analysed and extreme wave velocity profiles are compared to Stoke wave velocity profiles. Statistical distributions of crest velocity and wave celerity are presented. The analysis shows how the deviation from the Stokes prediction varies with wave heights and steepness. Analyses of the directional wave field leads to the conclusion that the extreme waves are three-dimensional. It is shown that the peculiar kinematics of extreme waves is of great relevance to the design of jacket type structures. (au)

  12. The Effect of Temperature on Cr (VI) Removal by Using Guava Leaves as a Biosorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana,; Mulana, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary research on Cr(IV) removal in a liquid waste using guava leaves (Psidium Guajava) as a bio-sorbent has been done. The experiments were conducted in a stirred batch reactor. The effect of temperature on efficiency and absorption capacity has been studied. Both the efficiency and absorptioncapacity are directly proportional to the temperature under the current experimental conditions. The results showed that optimum absorption capacity and absorption efficiency of Cr(VI) use of guav...

  13. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  14. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured

  15. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  16. A CMOS rail-to-rail linear VI-converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, P.P.; Vervoort, P.P.; Wassenaar, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    A linear CMOS VI-converter operating in strong inversion with a common-mode input range from the negative to the positive supply rail is presented. The circuit consists of three linear VI-converters based on the difference of squares principle. Two of these perform the actual V to I conversion,

  17. Cloning and expression of a Vi mimotope of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... A recombinant His-Vi protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was successfully constructed and cloned into ... mainly through consumption of food or water contami- nated with .... and healthy individuals (double arrows) followed by the detection using recombinant His-Vi protein as the primary antibody ...

  18. Research progress in the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macova, Zuzana; Bouzek, Karel; Hives, Jan; Sharma, Virender K.; Terryn, Raymond J.; Baum, J. Clayton

    2009-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the +6 oxidation state of iron, ferrate (VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- ), because of its potential as a benign oxidant for organic synthesis, as a chemical in developing cleaner ('greener') technology for remediation processes, and as an alternative for environment-friendly battery cathodes. This interest has led many researchers to focus their attention on the synthesis of ferrate(VI). Of the three synthesis methods, electrochemical, wet chemical and thermal, electrochemical synthesis has received the most attention due to its ease and the high purity of the product. Moreover, electrochemical processes use an electron as a so-called clean chemical, thus avoiding the use of any harmful chemicals to oxidize iron to the +6 oxidation state. This paper reviews the development of electrochemical methods to synthesize ferrate(VI). The approaches chosen by different laboratories to overcome some of the difficulties associated with the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI) are summarized. Special attention is paid to parameters such as temperature, anolyte, and anode material composition. Spectroscopic work to understand the mechanism of ferrate(VI) synthesis is included. Recent advances in two new approaches, the use of an inert electrode and molten hydroxide salts, in the synthesis of ferrate(VI) are also reviewed. Progress made in the commercialization of ferrate(VI) continuous production is briefly discussed as well

  19. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  20. Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Anam; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Ok, Yong Sik; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shahid, Muhammad; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Li, Dongwei; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-07-03

    In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the -OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and -OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

  1. Effect of pH and Fe/U ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yukui; Luo, Yingfeng; Fang, Qi; Xie, Yanpei; Wang, Zhihong; Zhu, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    As for the decommissioned uranium deposits of acid in-situ leaching, both of the concentrations of U(VI) and Fe(II) are relatively high in groundwater. In the presence of O2, the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) that forms Fe-hydroxides could effectively remove U(VI) in the forms of sorption or co-precipitation. In this process, pH condition and Fe content will have a significant effect on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. In the present work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of pH values and Fe/U mass ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. Experiment results show that the removal rate of U(VI) is mainly controlled by pH and secondly by Fe/U mass ratio. In the neutral conditions with pH at 7 and 8, the removal rate of U(VI) reaches up to 90% for all solutions with different initial Fe(II) concentrations. The optimal pH for the removal rate of U(VI) is above 7. In the acidic conditions with pH below 6, the effect of Fe/U mass ratio on the removal rate of U(VI) becomes more obvious and the optimal Fe/U mass ratio for U(VI) removal is 1:2.

  2. Testing of ENDF/B-VI data for shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    Version VI of the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data File (END/B-VI) was released for open distribution in 1990 after an extensive multiyear, multilaboratory evaluation effort coordinated by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). More than 75 of the 320 evaluations contained in the library are new for Version VI, including many relatively important nuclides and many with substantial changes to the cross-section data. Also, several important changes were made to the basic data formats for Version VI to permit better representation of the data and to allow additional types of data. Although these format changes yielded improved evaluations, they hindered processing of the data for use in applications codes and delayed the timely integral testing of the data. It has been only during the past year that significant integral testing of END/B-VI data has been achieved. The results and conclusions from some of these efforts are summarized in the following paragraphs

  3. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  4. Spectrophotometry of Comet West 1976 VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenbush, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Spectra obtained for the coma, nuclear fragments A and D, and tail of Comet West 1976 VI on April 1, 2 and 7, 1976 are noted to encompass coma spectra which differed from those of the nuclear fragments, which exhibited a strong continuum with superimposed emissions that included a stronger CO(+)-band system than that of the coma. A detailed comparison between fragment spectra has revealed great differences in both quasi-simultaneously obtained and five-day-separated cases. The relative intensities of different CO(+) bands are compared to the theoretical ones, and the abundances of CO(+) ions corresponding to different vibrational transitions are determined relative to that of CN. 24 references

  5. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  6. New energy level identifications in Kr VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauheed, A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Ansbacher, W.; Kernahan, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Beam-foil delayed spectra from 89.0 to 101.0 nm are used to identify the intercombination lines connecting the 4s4p 2 4 P and 4s 2 4p 2 P levels in Kr VI. The existing analysis is extended to include the 4s 2 5s 2 S 1/2 , 4f 2 F 5/2 , 2 F 7/2 , 4p 3 2 D 3/2 , 2 D 5/2 , 2 P 3/2 , 4 S 3/2 and 4s4p 2 4 P 1/2 , 4 P 3/2 , 4 P 5/2 levels. Lifetime measurements for the 4s4p 2 4 P 1/2 , 4 P 5/2 , 4p 3 2 D 3/2 and 2 D 5/2 levels are also discussed in support of these assignments. (orig.)

  7. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  8. Spectrum and energy levels of Y VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, W.; Reader, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the five-times-ionized yttrium atom (Y VI), excited in a sliding-spark discharge, was studied in the 160--2500 A-circle range. About 900 Y VI lines were classified as transitions between 101 odd and 69 even energy levels.The energy-level system established includes almost all levels of the 4s 2 4p 4 , 4s4p 5 , 4s 2 4p 3 4d, 5d, 5s, 6s, and 5p configurations and a number of levels of the 7s, 4f, and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. The observed level system has been theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree--Fock calculations and least-squares parametric fits. Strong configuration mixings are found between the 4s4p 5 and 4s 2 4p 3 4d configurations, between the 4s 2 4p 3 5p and 4s4p 4 4d configurations, and between the 4s 2 4p 3 4f and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. From the optimized energy-level values, a system of Ritz-type wavelength standards with accuracies varying from 0.0003 to 0.003 A-circle in the range 179--500 A-circle has been determined. The ionization energy as determined from 4s 2 4p 3 ns levels (n = 5-7) is 737 110 +- 200 cm/sup -1/ (91.390 +- 0.025 eV)

  9. Investigation of uranium (VI) adsorption by polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi, S. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasiri, M., E-mail: mnasiri@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mesbahi, A. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khani, M.H. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran, 14395-836 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The adsorbent (polypyrrole) was synthesized by a chemical method using PEG, DBSNa and CTAB as the surfactant. • The solution pH was one of the most important parameters affecting the adsorption of uranium. • The CTAB provided higher removal percentage compared with the other surfactants. • The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm was 87.72 mg/g. • The pseudo second-order model fitted well with the adsorption kinetic of polypyrrole to uranium. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption of uranium (VI) ions on the polypyrrole adsorbent. Polypyrrole was synthesized by a chemical method using polyethylene glycol, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant and iron (III) chloride as an oxidant in the aqueous solution. The effect of various surfactants on the synthesized polymers and their performance as the uranium adsorbent were investigated. Adsorbent properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The effect of different parameters such as pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentrations, adsorbent dose, and the temperature was investigated in the batch system for uranium adsorption process. It has been illustrated that the adsorption equilibrium time is 7 min. The results showed that the Freundlich model had the best agreement and the maximum adsorption capacity of polypyrrole for uranium (VI) was determined 87.72 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the mentioned adsorption process was fast and the kinetic data were fitted to the Pseudo first and second order models. The adsorption kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0} showed that the uranium adsorption process by polypyrrole was endothermic and spontaneous.

  10. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  11. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  12. JFKengine: A Jacobian and Forward Kinematics Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K.N.

    2003-02-13

    During robot path planning and control the equations that describe the robot motions are determined and solved. Historically these expressions were derived analytically off-line. For robots that must adapt to their environment or perform a wide range of tasks, a way is needed to rapidly re-derive these expressions to take into account the robot kinematic changes, such as when a tool is added to the end-effector. The JFKengine software was developed to automatically produce the expressions representing the manipulator arm motion, including the manipulator arm Jacobian and the forward kinematic expressions. Its programming interface can be used in conjunction with robot simulation software or with robot control software. Thus, it helps to automate the process of configuration changes for serial robot manipulators. If the manipulator undergoes a geometric change, such as tool acquisition, then JFKengine can be invoked again from the control or simulation software, passing it parameters for the new arm configuration. This report describes the automated processes that are implemented by JFKengine to derive the kinematic equations and the programming interface by which it is invoked. Then it discusses the tree data structure that was chosen to store the expressions, followed by several examples of portions of expressions as represented in the tree. The C++ classes and their methods that implement the expression differentiation and evaluation operations are described. The algorithms used to construct the Jacobian and forward kinematic equations using these basic building blocks are then illustrated. The activity described in this report is part of a larger project entitled ''Multi-Optimization Criteria-Based Robot Behavioral Adaptability and Motion Planning'' that focuses on the development of a methodology for the generalized resolution of robot motion equations with time-varying configurations, constraints, and task objective criteria. A specific

  13. Theory of gearing kinematics, geometry, and synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Radzevich, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    The first book of its kind, Theory of Gearing: Kinematics, Geometry, and Synthesis systematically develops a scientific theory of gearing that makes it possible to synthesize novel gears with the desired performance. Written by a leading gearing expert who holds more than 200 patents, it presents a modern methodology for gear design. The proposed theory is based on a key postulate: all the design parameters for an optimal gear pair for a particular application can be derived from (a) a given configuration of the rotation vectors of the driving and driven shafts and (b) the power transmitted by

  14. Kinematical program package for nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Nengxiong; Xie Ying

    1988-01-01

    A FORTRAN package is designed to provide users as many conveniences as possible. Besides adopting man-machine interaction mode and setting nuclide mass file, there are still some other features which are, for examples, the functions of offering the initial values for some transcendental equations and evaluating all the kinematic variables in nuclear reactions at low energies of the form of T (p,1)2, T (p,12)3 and T (p,12)34. All these make the users much easier to use the package

  15. Null-strut calculus. I. Kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheyfets, A.; LaFave, N.J.; Miller, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the kinematics of null-strut calculus---a 3+1 Regge calculus approach to general relativity. We show how to model the geometry of spacetime with simplicial spacelike three-geometries (TET's) linked to ''earlier'' and ''later'' momentumlike lattice surfaces (TET * ) entirely by light rays or ''null struts.'' These three-layered lattice spacetime geometries are defined and analyzed using combinatorial formulas for the structure of polytopes. The following paper in this series describes how these three-layered spacetime lattices are used to model spacetimes in full conformity with Einstein's theory of gravity

  16. Kinematic reversal schemes for the geomagnetic dipole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in the distribution of cyclonic convective cells, in the earth's core, can reverse the sign of the geomagnetic field. Two kinematic reversal schemes are discussed. In the first scheme, a field maintained by cyclones concentrated at low latitude is reversed by a burst of cyclones at high latitude. Conversely, in the second scheme, a field maintained predominantly by cyclones in high latitudes is reversed by a fluctuation consisting of a burst of cyclonic convection at low latitude. The precise fluid motions which produce the geomagnetic field are not known. However, it appears that, whatever the details are, a fluctuation in the distribution of cyclonic cells over latitude can cause a geomagnetic reversal.

  17. Kinematics of the CSE in VY CMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung

    2009-07-01

    We report on astrometric results of H2O and SiO masers in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) carried out with VERA for 2 years. Absolute positions and proper motions of 3 different frequencies of masers were measured with phase-referencing analyses. Using the positions and the 3-dimensional velocities of the masers, we considered the 3-dimensional structures and kinematics of the circumstellar envelopes around VY CMa. The H2O masers show bipolar outflow along the line of sight, and the SiO masers have both expanding and contracting motions with less than 5 km/s.

  18. Spectral gaps, inertial manifolds and kinematic dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2005-10-17

    Inertial manifolds are desirable objects when ones wishes a dynamical process to behave asymptotically as a finite-dimensional ones. Recently [Physica D 194 (2004) 297] these manifolds are constructed for the kinematic dynamo problem with time-periodic velocity. It turns out, however, that the conditions imposed on the fluid velocity to guarantee the existence of inertial manifolds are too demanding, in the sense that they imply that all the solutions tend exponentially to zero. The inertial manifolds are meaningful because they represent different decay rates, but the classical dynamos where the magnetic field is maintained or grows are not covered by this approach, at least until more refined estimates are found.

  19. Shoulder and Scapular Kinematics during the Windmill Softball Pitch

    OpenAIRE

    Backus, Sherry I.; Kraszewski, Andrew; Kontaxis, Andreas; Gibbons, Mandi; Bido, Jennifer; Graziano, Jessica; Hafer, Jocelyn; Jones, Kristofer J.; Hillstrom, Howard; Fealy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Pitch count has been studied extensively in the overhand throwing athlete. However, pitch count and fatigue have not been systematically evaluated in the female windmill (underhand) throwing athlete. Direct kinematic measurements of the glenohumeral and scapulo-thoracic joint have not to be correlated and determined. The purpose is to measure scapular kinematics for the high school female windmill softball pitcher and identify kinematic adaptions and changes in pitching performanc...

  20. Kinematics and Workspace of a 4-DOF Hybrid Palletizing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We presented the kinematical analysis of a 4-DOF hybrid palletizing robot. The palletizing robot structure was proposed and the arm model of the robot was presented. The kinematical analysis of the end robotic manipulator was given. As a result, the position, velocity, and acceleration curves as well as the maximum workspace were demonstrated by simulation in Matlab. This study would be useful for the kinematical characteristics of the 4-DOF palletizing robot in space.

  1. Static and kinematic formulation of planar reciprocal assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    Planar reciprocal frames are two dimensional structures formed by elements joined together according to the principle of structural reciprocity. In this paper a rigorous formulation of the static and kinematic problem is proposed and developed extending the theory of pin-jointed assemblies....... This formulation is used to evaluate the static and kinematic determinacy of reciprocal assemblies from the properties of their equilibrium and kinematic matrices...

  2. Technology-derived storage solutions for stabilizing insulin in extreme weather conditions I: the ViViCap-1 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Pesach, Gidi; Nagar, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Injectable life-saving drugs should not be exposed to temperatures 30°C/86°F. Frequently, weather conditions exceed these temperature thresholds in many countries. Insulin is to be kept at 4-8°C/~ 39-47°F until use and once opened, is supposed to be stable for up to 31 days at room temperature (exception: 42 days for insulin levemir). Extremely hot or cold external temperature can lead to insulin degradation in a very short time with loss of its glucose-lowering efficacy. Combined chemical and engineering solutions for heat protection are employed in ViViCap-1 for disposable insulin pens. The device works based on vacuum insulation and heat consumption by phase-change material. Laboratory studies with exposure of ViViCap-1 to hot outside conditions were performed to evaluate the device performance. ViViCap-1 keeps insulin at an internal temperature phase-change process and 'recharges' the device for further use. ViViCap-1 performed within its specifications. The small and convenient device maintains the efficacy and safety of using insulin even when carried under hot weather conditions.

  3. U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. Effects of pH, U(VI) concentration and oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gao; Ziqian Yang; Keliang Shi; Xuefeng Wang; Zhijun Guo; Wangsuo Wu

    2010-01-01

    U(VI) sorption on kaolinite was studied as functions of contact time, pH, U(VI) concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V) by using a batch experimental method. The effects of sulfate and phosphate on U(VI) sorption were also investigated. It was found that the sorption kinetics of U(VI) can be described by a pseudo-second-order model. Potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strengths indicated that the titration curves of kaolinite were not sensitive to ionic strength, and that the pH of the zero net proton charge (pH PZNPC ) was at 6.9. The sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite increased with pH up to 6.5 and reached a plateau at pH >6.5. The presence of phosphate strongly increased U(VI) sorption especially at pH <5.5, which may be due to formation of ternary surface complexes involving phosphate. In contrast, the presence of sulfate did not cause any apparent effect on U(VI) sorption. A double layer model was used to interpret both results of potentiometric titrations and U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. (author)

  4. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of NpO 2+ and PuO 2 2+ by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO 2 O 2+ was rapidly reduced to form NpO 2 + organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO 2 2+ was predominantly reduced to Pu 4+ , resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO 2 2+ and PuO 2 P 2+ in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present

  5. The biogeochemical behaviour of U(VI) in the simulated near-field of a low-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, James R.; Mortimer, Robert J.G.; Lear, Gavin; Lloyd, Jonathan R.; Beadle, Ian; Morris, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Microbial processes have the potential to affect the mobility of radionuclides, including U in radioactive wastes. A range of geochemical, molecular biological and mineralogical techniques were applied to investigate stable element biogeochemistry and U solubility in the simulated 'near-field' (or local environment) of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) repository. The experiments used a microbial inoculum from the trench disposal area of the UK LLW repository at Drigg, Cumbria, England, in combination with a synthetic trench leachate representing the local environment at the Drigg site. In batch culture experiments in the absence of U, a classic redox progression of terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) occurred in the order NO 3 - , Fe(III) and SO 4 2- reduction. When 126μM U was added to the system as U(VI) aq , up to 80% was reduced to U(IV) by the indigenous microbial consortium. The U(IV) was retained in solution in these experiments, most likely by complexation with citrate present in the experimental medium. No U(VI) aq was reduced in sterile cultures, confirming that U(VI) aq reduction was microbially mediated. Interestingly, when U(VI) aq was present, the progression of TEAPs was altered. The rate of Fe(III) reduction slowed compared to experiments without U(VI) aq , and SO 4 reduction occurred at the same time as U(VI) reduction. Finally, an experiment where SO 4 2- -reducing microorgansisms were inhibited by Na molybdate showed no ingrowth of sulfide minerals, but U(VI) reduction continued in this experiment. This suggested that sulfide minerals did not play a significant role in abiotically reducing U(VI) in these systems, and that metal-reducing microorganisms were dominant in mediating U(VI) reduction. Bacteria closely related to microorganisms found in engineered and U-contaminated environments dominated in the experiments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on 16SrRNA products amplified from broad specificity primers showed

  6. Exclusive measurements of quasi-free proton scattering reactions in inverse and complete kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Panin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-free scattering reactions of the type (p,2p were measured for the first time exclusively in complete and inverse kinematics, using a 12C beam at an energy of ∼400 MeV/u as a benchmark. This new technique has been developed to study the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei in experiments with radioactive-ion beams. The outgoing pair of protons and the fragments were measured simultaneously, enabling an unambiguous identification of the reaction channels and a redundant measurement of the kinematic observables. Both valence and deeply-bound nucleon orbits are probed, including those leading to unbound states of the daughter nucleus. Exclusive (p,2p cross sections of 15.8(18 mb, 1.9(2 mb and 1.5(2 mb to the low-lying 0p-hole states overlapping with the ground state (3/2− and with the bound excited states of 11B at 2.125 MeV (1/2− and 5.02 MeV (3/2−, respectively, were determined via γ-ray spectroscopy. Particle-unstable deep-hole states, corresponding to proton removal from the 0s-orbital, were studied via the invariant-mass technique. Cross sections and momentum distributions were extracted and compared to theoretical calculations employing the eikonal formalism. The obtained results are in a good agreement with this theory and with direct-kinematics experiments. The dependence of the proton–proton scattering kinematics on the internal momentum of the struck proton and on its separation energy was investigated for the first time in inverse kinematics employing a large-acceptance measurement.

  7. Rigid-body kinematics versus flapping kinematics of a flapping wing micro air vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caetano, J.V.; Weehuizen, M.B.; De Visser, C.C.; De Croon, G.C.H.E.; Mulder, M.

    2015-01-01

    Several formulations have been proposed to model the dynamics of ornithopters, with inconclusive results regarding the need for complex kinematic formulations. Furthermore, the impact of assumptions made in the collected results was never assessed by comparing simulations with real flight data. In

  8. Comparative EXAFS study of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Jermolajev, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: We investigated the surface sorption process of U(VI) and Np(V) on kaolinite by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 10 μM concentration range. Batch experiments with kaolinite in CO 2 -equilibrated systems showed that the adsorption edge of U(VI) occurs at pH 5.5, i.e., near the pH PZC of kaolinite. The adsorption edge of Np(V) occurs well above the pH PZC value at pH 8.5. This may indicate that the bonds between Np(V) and the surface functional groups of kaolinite are not as strong as in the case of U(VI). U(VI) and Np(V) have in common that the amount which is adsorbed decreases when the pH is increased beyond the absorption maximum. This behavior can be attributed to the formation of U(VI) and Np(V) carbonato complexes in the aqueous solutions. The aim of this comparative EXAFS study was to investigate the reason for the different affinities of U(VI) and Np(V) for kaolinite by measuring their local environments at the clay surface. Samples were prepared from 4 g/L kaolinite, 0.1 M NaClO 4 , pH 3.0 - 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 . The U L 3 - and Np L 2 -edge EXAFS spectra of the wet paste samples were measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured U-O and U-Al/Si distances indicate inner-sphere sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite. There was no evidence of uranium neighbors in the EXAFS spectra, suggesting that the adsorbed U(VI) complexes were predominantly monomeric. The average distance between uranium and its equatorial oxygen atoms, O eq , increased from 2.32 to 2.38 Angstrom in the presence of atmospheric CO 2 when the pH was increased from 5.0 to 8.5. In the CO 2 -free system, the U-O eq distance was independent from pH and equal to 2.32 Angstrom. The lengthening of the average U-O eq distance in the presence of carbonate (or bicarbonate) suggests the formation of ternary U(VI

  9. Kinematics modeling and simulation of an autonomous omni-directional mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garcia Sillas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although robotics has progressed to the extent that it has become relatively accessible with low-cost projects, there is still a need to create models that accurately represent the physical behavior of a robot. Creating a completely virtual platform allows us to test behavior algorithms such as those implemented using artificial intelligence, and additionally, it enables us to find potential problems in the physical design of the robot. The present work describes a methodology for the construction of a kinematic model and a simulation of the autonomous robot, specifically of an omni-directional wheeled robot. This paper presents the kinematic model development and its implementation using several tools. The result is a model that follows the kinematics of a triangular omni-directional mobile wheeled robot, which is then tested by using a 3D model imported from 3D Studio® and Matlab® for the simulation. The environment used for the experiment is very close to the real environment and reflects the kinematic characteristics of the robot.

  10. Human Body Parts Tracking and Kinematic Features Assessment Based on RSSI and Inertial Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddi Blumrosen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN, capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts’ displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  11. Transfer-induced fission in inverse kinematics: Impact on experimental and evaluated nuclear data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farget, F.; Schmidt, K.H.; Clement, E.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Golabek, C.; Lemasson, A.; Roger, T.; Schmitt, C. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Caamano, M.; Ramos, D.; Benlliure, J.; Cortina, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rodriguez-Tajes, C. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Casarejos, E. [Universidade de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Dore, D.; Salsac, M.D. [Centre de Saclay, CEA, Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA DAM Ile-de-France, BP 12, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Heinz, A. [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Jurado, B. [Universite Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France)

    2015-12-15

    Inverse kinematics is a new tool to study nuclear fission. Its main advantage is the possibility to measure with an unmatched resolution the atomic number of fission fragments, leading to new observables in the properties of fission-fragment distributions. In addition to the resolution improvement, the study of fission based on nuclear collisions in inverse kinematics beneficiates from a larger view with respect to the neutron-induced fission, as in a single experiment the number of fissioning systems and the excitation energy range are widden. With the use of spectrometers, mass and kinetic-energy distributions may now be investigated as a function of the proton and neutron number sharing. The production of fissioning nuclei in transfer reactions allows studying the isotopic yields of fission fragments as a function of the excitation energy. The higher excitation energy resulting in the fusion reaction leading to the compound nucleus {sup 250}Cf at an excitation energy of 45MeV is also presented. With the use of inverse kinematics, the charge polarisation of fragments at scission is now revealed with high precision, and it is shown that it cannot be neglected, even at higher excitation energies. In addition, the kinematical properties of the fragments inform on the deformation configuration at scission. (orig.)

  12. Influence of chronic back pain on kinematic reactions to unpredictable arm pulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Martin; Ernst, Michael; Koch, Markus; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence that muscle reflexes are delayed in patients with chronic low back pain in response to perturbations. It is still unrevealed whether these delays accompanied by an altered kinematic or compensated by adaption of other muscle parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic low back pain patients show an altered kinematic reaction and if such data are reliable for the classification of chronic low back pain. In an experiment involving 30 females, sudden lateral perturbations were applied to the arm of a subject in an upright, standing position. Kinematics was used to distinguish between chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls. A calculated model of a stepwise discriminant function analysis correctly predicted 100% of patients and 80% of healthy controls. The estimation of the classification error revealed a constant rate for the classification of the healthy controls and a slightly decreased rate for the patients. Observed reflex delays and identified kinematic differences inside and outside the region of pain during impaired movement indicated that chronic low back pain patients have an altered motor control that is not restricted to the lumbo-pelvic region. This applied paradigm of external perturbations can be used to detect chronic low back pain patients and also persons without chronic low back pain but with an altered motor control. Further investigations are essential to reveal whether healthy persons with changes in motor function have an increased potential to develop chronic back pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lagrangian approach to understanding the origin of the gill-kinematics switch in mayfly nymphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabreyrie, R; Balaras, E; Abdelaziz, K; Kiger, K

    2014-12-01

    The mayfly nymph breathes under water through an oscillating array of plate-shaped tracheal gills. As the nymph grows, the kinematics of these gills change abruptly from rowing to flapping. The classical fluid dynamics approach to consider the mayfly nymph as a pumping device fails in giving clear reasons for this switch. In order to shed some light on this switch between the two distinct kinematics, we analyze the problem under a Lagrangian viewpoint. We consider that a good Lagrangian transport that effectively distributes and stirs water and dissolved oxygen between and around the gills is the main goal of the gill motion. Using this Lagrangian approach, we are able to provide possible reasons behind the observed switch from rowing to flapping. More precisely, we conduct a series of in silico mayfly nymph experiments, where body shape, as well as gill shapes, structures, and kinematics are matched to those from in vivo. In this paper, we show both qualitatively and quantitatively how the change of kinematics enables better attraction, confinement, and stirring of water charged of dissolved oxygen inside the gills area. We reveal the attracting barriers to transport, i.e., attracting Lagrangian coherent structures, that form the transport skeleton between and around the gills. In addition, we quantify how well the fluid particles are stirred inside the gills area, which by extension leads us to conclude that it will increase the proneness of molecules of dissolved oxygen to be close enough to the gills for extraction.

  14. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, S.P.; Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Campbell, K.M.; Hayes, K.F.; Long, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  15. Sorption Studies of Chromium(VI and Mercury(II by High Temperature Activated Carbon from Syzygium Jambolanum Nut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sophie Beulah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature activated Syzygium Jambolanum nut carbon (HSJC has been effectively used for the removal of Cr(VI and Hg(II from aqueous solution by batch experiments. Effect of pH, carbon dose and equilibration time were determined. Adsorption followed Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Kinetic studies indicated that the removal process followed reversible first order equation. Desorption of Cr(VI was done with 1 M NaOH and 10% H2O2 mixture and Hg(II with 2% Na2S in 1% NaOH. The performance of HSJC was compared with a commercial activated carbon (CAC.

  16. Chromium(VI Removal from Aqueous Solution by Magnetite Coated by a Polymeric Ionic Liquid-Based Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thania Alexandra Ferreira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the chromium(VI adsorption capacity of four magnetite sorbents coated with a polymer phase containing polymethacrylic acid or polyallyl-3-methylimidazolium is presented. Factors that influence the chromium(VI removal such as solution pH and contact time were investigated in batch experiments and in stirred tank reactor mode. Affinity and rate constants increased with the molar ratio of the imidazolium. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 2.0 due to the contribution of electrostatic interactions.

  17. Chromium(VI) Removal from Aqueous Solution by Magnetite Coated by a Polymeric Ionic Liquid-Based Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Thania Alexandra; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Paez-Hernandez, María Elena; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Barrado, Enrique; Hernandez, Prisciliano

    2017-01-01

    An evaluation of the chromium(VI) adsorption capacity of four magnetite sorbents coated with a polymer phase containing polymethacrylic acid or polyallyl-3-methylimidazolium is presented. Factors that influence the chromium(VI) removal such as solution pH and contact time were investigated in batch experiments and in stirred tank reactor mode. Affinity and rate constants increased with the molar ratio of the imidazolium. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 2.0 due to the contribution of electrostatic interactions. PMID:28772865

  18. MCNP calculations for criticality-safety benchmarks with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, J.L.; Mosteller, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code, in conjunction with its continuous-energy ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries, has been benchmarked against results from 27 different critical experiments. The predicted values of k eff are in excellent agreement with the benchmarks, except for the ENDF/B-V results for solutions of plutonium nitrate and, to a lesser degree, for the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI results for a bare sphere of 233 U

  19. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF FINSWIMMING AT SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Giorgio Zanone

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Finswimming is a sport of speed practiced on the surface or underwater, in which performance is based on whole-body oscillations. The present study investigated the undulatory motion performed by finswimmers at the surface. This study aiming to analyze the influence of the interaction of gender, practice level, and race distance on selected kinematic parameters. Six elite and six novices finswimmers equipped with joints markers (wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle were recorded in the sagittal plane. The position of these anatomical marks was digitized at 50 Hz. An automated motion analysis software yielded velocity, vertical amplitude, frequency, and angular position. Results showed that stroke frequency decreased whereas the mean amplitude of all joints increased with increasing race distance (p < 0.01. Mean joint amplitude for the upper limbs (wrist, elbow and shoulder was smaller for experts than for novices. Whereas that of the ankle was larger, so that the oscillation amplitude increased from shoulder to ankle. Elite male finswimmers were pitching more acutely than female. Moreover, elite male finswimmers showed a smaller knee bending than novices and than elite females (p < 0.01. This indicated that elite male finswimmers attempt to reduce drag forces thanks to a weak knee bending and a low upper limbs pitch. To sum up, gender, expertise, and race distance affect the performance and its kinematics in terms frontal drag. Expertise in finswimming requires taking advantage of the mechanical constraints pertaining to hydrodynamic constraints in order to optimize performance

  20. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  1. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-01-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10 6 cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO 3 - ] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with

  2. ZnO-PLLA Nanofiber Nanocomposite for Continuous Flow Mode Purification of Water from Cr(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Burks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials of ZnO-PLLA nanofibers have been used for the adsorption of Cr(VI as a prime step for the purification of water. The fabrication and application of the flexible ZnO-PLLA nanofiber nanocomposite as functional materials in this well-developed architecture have been achieved by growing ZnO nanorod arrays by chemical bath deposition on synthesized electrospun poly-L-lactide nanofibers. The nanocomposite material has been tested for the removal and regeneration of Cr(IV in aqueous solution under a “continuous flow mode” by studying the effects of pH, contact time, and desorption steps. The adsorption of Cr(VI species in solution was greatly dependent upon pH. SEM micrographs confirmed the successful fabrication of the ZnO-PLLA nanofiber nanocomposite. The adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI species were more likely due to the electrostatic interaction between ZnO and Cr(VI ions as a function of pH. The adsorption and desorption experiments utilizing the ZnO-PLLA nanofiber nanocomposite have appeared to be an effective nanocomposite in the removal and regeneration of Cr(VI species.

  3. Adsorption of uranium(VI) to manganese oxides: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface complexation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zimeng; Lee, Sung-Woo; Catalano, Jeffrey G; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Bargar, John R; Tebo, Bradley M; Giammar, Daniel E

    2013-01-15

    The mobility of hexavalent uranium in soil and groundwater is strongly governed by adsorption to mineral surfaces. As strong naturally occurring adsorbents, manganese oxides may significantly influence the fate and transport of uranium. Models for U(VI) adsorption over a broad range of chemical conditions can improve predictive capabilities for uranium transport in the subsurface. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to synthetic and biogenic MnO(2), surface complexation modeling, ζ-potential analysis, and molecular-scale characterization of adsorbed U(VI) with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The surface complexation model included inner-sphere monodentate and bidentate surface complexes and a ternary uranyl-carbonato surface complex, which was consistent with the EXAFS analysis. The model could successfully simulate adsorption results over a broad range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations. U(VI) adsorption to synthetic δ-MnO(2) appears to be stronger than to biogenic MnO(2), and the differences in adsorption affinity and capacity are not associated with any substantial difference in U(VI) coordination.

  4. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal from groundwater by Fe0-H2O system with bio-amended iron corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Wu, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A one-pot bio-iron system was established to investigate synergetic abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on Cr(VI) removal. More diverse iron corrosion and reactive solids, such as green rusts, lepidocrocite and magnetite were found in the bio-iron system than...... transfer on the solid phase. The results also showed that the reduction of Cr(VI) by microorganisms was insignificant, indicating the adsorption/co-precipitation of Cr by iron oxides on iron surface was responsible for the overall Cr(VI) removal. Our study demonstrated that the bio-amended iron corrosion...... in the Fe0-H2O system, leading to 4.3 times higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency in the bio-iron system than in the Fe0-H2O system. The cycling experiment also showed that the Cr(VI) removal capacity of Fe0 in the bio-iron system was 12.4 times higher than that in the Fe0-H2O system. A 62 days of life...

  5. Biotransformation of chromium (VI) in liquid effluents by resistant bacteria isolated from the Matanza-Riachuelo basin, in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana Julieta; Caimán, Carolina; Gorino, Natalia; Fortunato, María Susana; Radice, Marcela; Gómez, Carlos; Mujica, Carolina; Marquina, Lorena; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2017-10-10

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the bacterial resistance to zinc, copper, chromium (VI) and lead in surface water streams from Buenos Aires, Argentina; to select a chromium-resistant strain able to remove the metal in batch process and to evaluate the potential of this strain to remove chromium (VI) in liquid effluents. Bacterial resistance to the metals was evaluated by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration. The kinetic of chromium (VI) removal by one of the resistant strains was studied in nutrient broth with 50 and 100 mg L -1 of the metal, as well as an effluent from an electroplating industry. High resistance to all the metals under study was observed in the bacterial communities of the Matanza-Riachuelo basin. A chromium-resistant strain was isolated and identified as Microbacterium sp. It was able to remove 50 and 100 mg L -1 of Cr (VI) in 36 and 66 h respectively, with efficiency higher than 99%. Experiments with liquid effluents showed the ability of the strain to transform 150 mg L -1 of the metal in 84 h, with efficiency higher than 99%. These results show the potential of this native strain for the treatment of liquid effluents that contain chromium (VI).

  6. Approaches to surface complexation modeling of Uranium(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Meece, D.E.; Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium(VI) adsorption onto aquifer sediments was studied in batch experiments as a function of pH and U(VI) and dissolved carbonate concentrations in artificial groundwater solutions. The sediments were collected from an alluvial aquifer at a location upgradient of contamination from a former uranium mill operation at Naturita, Colorado (USA). The ranges of aqueous chemical conditions used in the U(VI) adsorption experiments (pH 6.9 to 7.9; U(VI) concentration 2.5 ?? 10-8 to 1 ?? 10-5 M; partial pressure of carbon dioxide gas 0.05 to 6.8%) were based on the spatial variation in chemical conditions observed in 1999-2000 in the Naturita alluvial aquifer. The major minerals in the sediments were quartz, feldspars, and calcite, with minor amounts of magnetite and clay minerals. Quartz grains commonly exhibited coatings that were greater than 10 nm in thickness and composed of an illite-smectite clay with occluded ferrihydrite and goethite nanoparticles. Chemical extractions of quartz grains removed from the sediments were used to estimate the masses of iron and aluminum present in the coatings. Various surface complexation modeling approaches were compared in terms of the ability to describe the U(VI) experimental data and the data requirements for model application to the sediments. Published models for U(VI) adsorption on reference minerals were applied to predict U(VI) adsorption based on assumptions about the sediment surface composition and physical properties (e.g., surface area and electrical double layer). Predictions from these models were highly variable, with results overpredicting or underpredicting the experimental data, depending on the assumptions used to apply the model. Although the models for reference minerals are supported by detailed experimental studies (and in ideal cases, surface spectroscopy), the results suggest that errors are caused in applying the models directly to the sediments by uncertain knowledge of: 1) the proportion and types of

  7. Assessing distances and consistency of kinematics in Gaia/TGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönrich, Ralph; Aumer, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We apply the statistical methods by Schönrich, Binney & Asplund to assess the quality of distances and kinematics in the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE)-Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) and Large Sky Area Multiobject Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)-TGAS samples of Solar neighbourhood stars. These methods yield a nominal distance accuracy of 1-2 per cent. Other than common tests on parallax accuracy, they directly test distance estimations including the effects of distance priors. We show how to construct these priors including the survey selection functions (SSFs) directly from the data. We demonstrate that neglecting the SSFs causes severe distance biases. Due to the decline of the SSFs in distance, the simple 1/parallax estimate only mildly underestimates distances. We test the accuracy of measured line-of-sight velocities (vlos) by binning the samples in the nominal vlos uncertainties. We find: (i) the LAMOST vlos have a ∼-5 km s-1 offset; (ii) the average LAMOST measurement error for vlos is ∼7 km s-1, significantly smaller than, and nearly uncorrelated with the nominal LAMOST estimates. The RAVE sample shows either a moderate distance underestimate, or an unaccounted source of vlos dispersion (e∥) from measurement errors and binary stars. For a subsample of suspected binary stars in RAVE, our methods indicate significant distance underestimates. Separating a sample in metallicity or kinematics to select thick-disc/halo stars, discriminates between distance bias and e∥. For LAMOST, this separation yields consistency with pure vlos measurement errors. We find an anomaly near longitude l ∼ (300 ± 60)° and distance s ∼ (0.32 ± 0.03) kpc on both sides of the galactic plane, which could be explained by either a localized distance error or a breathing mode.

  8. Role of VI/II ratio on the growth of ZnO nanostructures using chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgessa, Z.N., E-mail: zelalem.urgessa@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, O.S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag XI, 5117 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper the growth process and morphological evolution of ZnO nanostructures were investigated in a series of experiments using chemical bath deposition. The experimental results indicate that the morphological evolution depends on the reaction conditions, particularly on OH{sup -} to Zn{sup 2+} ratio (which directly affects the pH). For low VI/II ratios, quasi-spherical nanoparticles of an average diameter 30 nm are obtained, whereas for larger VI/II ratios, nanorods with an average diameter less than 100 nm are produced, which indicates that by systematically controlling the VI/II ratio, it is possible to produce different shapes and sizes of ZnO nanostructures. A possible mechanism for the nanostructural change of the as-synthesized ZnO from particle to rod was elucidated based on the relative densities of H{sup +} and OH{sup -} in the solution.

  9. Role of VI/II ratio on the growth of ZnO nanostructures using chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgessa, Z.N.; Oluwafemi, O.S.; Botha, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the growth process and morphological evolution of ZnO nanostructures were investigated in a series of experiments using chemical bath deposition. The experimental results indicate that the morphological evolution depends on the reaction conditions, particularly on OH − to Zn 2+ ratio (which directly affects the pH). For low VI/II ratios, quasi-spherical nanoparticles of an average diameter 30 nm are obtained, whereas for larger VI/II ratios, nanorods with an average diameter less than 100 nm are produced, which indicates that by systematically controlling the VI/II ratio, it is possible to produce different shapes and sizes of ZnO nanostructures. A possible mechanism for the nanostructural change of the as-synthesized ZnO from particle to rod was elucidated based on the relative densities of H + and OH − in the solution.

  10. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) sorption on GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jie [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Luo, Daojun [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Qiao, Yahua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chunming [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ye, Yuanlv [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory

    2017-03-01

    In this work, experiments and modeling for the interactions between uranyl ion and GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid are presented. The results demonstrated that FA is strongly bound to GMZ bentonite, and these molecules have a very large effect on the U(VI) sorption. The results also demonstrated that U(VI) sorption to GMZ bentonite in the presence and absence of sorbed FA can be well predicted by combining SHM and DLM. According to the model calculations, the nature of the interactions between FA with U(VI) at GMZ bentonite surface is mainly surface complex. The first attempt to simulate clay interaction with humus by the SHM model.

  11. Behaviour of chromium(VI) in stormwater soil infiltration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Ingvertsen, Simon T.; Jensen, Marina B.

    2013-01-01

    mm in 2 h) and extreme (100 mm in 3 h) rain events. The objectives were to understand the behaviour of the anionic and toxic Cr(VI) in soil at neutral pH and to asses treatment efficiency towards Cr(VI). During normal rain events Cr(VI) was largely retained (more than 50, even though pH was neutral......The ability of stormwater infiltration systems to retain Cr(VI) was tested by applying a synthetic stormwater runoff solution with a neutral pH and high Cr(VI) concentrations to four intact soil columns excavated from two roadside infiltration swales in Germany. Inlet flow rates mimicked normal (10......, while under extreme rain events approximately 20% of Cr(VI) was retained. In both cases effluent concentrations of Cr(VI) would exceed the threshold value of 3.4 mu g/L if the infiltrated water were introduced to freshwater environments. More knowledge on the composition of the stormwater runoff...

  12. Electrochemical alkaline Fe(VI) water purification and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Yu, Xingwen

    2005-10-15

    Fe(VI) is an unusual and strongly oxidizing form of iron, which provides a potentially less hazardous water-purifying agent than chlorine. A novel on-line electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification methodology is introduced. Fe(VI) addition had been a barrier to its effective use in water remediation, because solid Fe(VI) salts require complex (costly) syntheses steps and solutions of Fe(VI) decompose. Online electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification avoids these limitations, in which Fe(VI) is directly prepared in solution from an iron anode as the FeO42- ion, and is added to the contaminant stream. Added FeO42- decomposes, by oxidizing a wide range of water contaminants including sulfides (demonstrated in this study) and other sulfur-containing compounds, cyanides (demonstrated in this study), arsenic (demonstrated in this study), ammonia and other nitrogen-containing compounds (previously demonstrated), a wide range of organics (phenol demonstrated in this study), algae, and viruses (each previously demonstrated).

  13. The Impact of the Support System’s Kinematic Structure on Selected Kinematic and Dynamic Quantities of an Experimental Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trąbka Arkadiusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of two kinematic structures of the support system (with supports with bilateral and unilateral constraints, which were used in an experimental model of a crane. The computational model was developed by using the ADAMS software. The impact of the kinematic structure of the support system on selected kinematic and dynamic values that were recorded during the slewing motion was analysed. It was found, among other things, that an increased number of degrees of freedom of the support system leads to multiple distortions of time characteristics of kinematic and dynamic quantities.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  15. Detached-eddy simulation of flow around the NREL phase VI blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.; Michelsen, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    the blade axis. Computed blade characteristics are compared with experimental data from the NREL/NASA Ames Phase VI unsteady experiment. The detached-eddy simulation model is a method for predicting turbulence in computational fluid dynamics computations, which combines a Reynolds-averaged Navier......-eddy simulation show considerably more three-dimensional flow structures compared to conventional two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes turbulence models, but no particular improvements are seen in the global blade characteristics. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......The detached-eddy simulation model implemented in the computational fluid dynamics code EllipSys3D is used to calculate the flow around the non-rotating NREL Phase VI wind turbine blade. Results are presented for flow around a parked blade at fixed angle of attack and a blade pitching along...

  16. Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the second iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi), a set theoretical visual analytics dashboard of big social data. In order to further demonstrate its usefulness in large-scale visual analytics tasks of individual and collective behavior of actors in social networks......, the current iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) in version II builds on recent advancements in visualizing set intersections. The development of the SoSeVi dashboard involved cutting-edge open source visual analytics libraries (D3.js) and creation of new visualizations such as of actor mobility...

  17. Wavelengths and energy levels of I V and I VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, V.; Sugar, J.; Joshi, Y.N.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of iodine were photographed in the 139--1500-Aat;O region on various spectrographs. Earlier analyses of I V and I VI were revised and extended. For I V 26 lines were classified, and for I VI 35 lines were classified. Ionization energies have been estimated to be 415 510 atm≅ 300 cm -1 (51.52 atm≅ 0.04 eV) and 599 800 atm≅ 3 000 cm -1 (74.37 atm≅ 0.37 eV) for I V and I VI, respectively

  18. Comparative study of adsorption properties of Turkish fly ashes II. The case of chromium (VI) and cadmium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, Belgin

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study described in this paper was to compare the removal of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from an aqueous solution using two different Turkish fly ashes; Afsin-Elbistan and Seyitomer as adsorbents. The influence of four parameters (contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration in solution and ash quality) on the removal at 20±2 deg. C was studied. Fly ashes were found to have a higher adsorption capacity for the adsorption of Cd(II) as compared to Cr(VI) and both Cr(VI) and Cd(II) required an equilibrium time of 2 h. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was higher at pH 4.0 for Afsin-Elbistan fly ash (25.46%) and pH 3.0 for Seyitomer fly ash (30.91%) while Cd(II) was adsorbed to a greater extent (98.43% for Afsin-Elbistan fly ash and 65.24% for Seyitomer fly ash) at pH 7.0. The adsorption of Cd(II) increased with an increase in the concentrations of these metals in solution while Cr(VI) adsorption decreased by both fly ashes. The lime (crystalline CaO) content in fly ash seemed to be a significant factor in influencing Cr(VI) and Cd(II) ions removal. The linear forms of the Langmuir and Freundlich equations were utilised for experiments with metal concentrations of 55±2 mg/l for Cr(VI) and 6±0.2 mg/l for Cd(II) as functions of solution pH (3.0-8.0). The adsorption of Cr(VI) on both fly ashes was not described by both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms while Cd(II) adsorption on both fly ashes satisfied only the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption capacities of both fly ashes were nearly three times less than that of activated carbon for the removal of Cr(VI) while Afsin-Elbistan fly ash with high-calcium content was as effective as activated carbon for the removal of Cd(II). Therefore, there are possibilities for use the adsorption of Cd(II) ions onto fly ash with high-calcium content in practical applications in Turkey

  19. The origin of kinematically distinct cores and misaligned gas discs in galaxies from cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip; Federrath, Christoph; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2018-06-01

    Integral field spectroscopy surveys provide spatially resolved gas and stellar kinematics of galaxies. They have unveiled a range of atypical kinematic phenomena, which require detailed modelling to understand. We present results from a cosmological simulation that includes stellar and AGN feedback. We find that the distribution of angles between the gas and stellar angular momenta of galaxies is not affected by projection effects. We examine five galaxies (≈6 per cent of well resolved galaxies) that display atypical kinematics; two of the galaxies have kinematically distinct cores (KDC), while the other three have counter-rotating gas and stars. All five form the majority of their stars in the field, subsequently falling into cosmological filaments where the relative orientation of the stellar angular momentum and the bulk gas flow leads to the formation of a counter-rotating gas disc. The accreted gas exchanges angular momentum with pre-existing co-rotating gas causing it to fall to the centre of the galaxy. This triggers low-level AGN feedback, which reduces star formation. Later, two of the galaxies experience a minor merger (stellar mass ratio ˜1/10) with a galaxy on a retrograde orbit compared to the spin of the stellar component of the primary. This produces the KDCs, and is a different mechanism than suggested by other works. The role of minor mergers in the kinematic evolution of galaxies may have been under-appreciated in the past, and large, high-resolution cosmological simulations will be necessary to gain a better understanding in this area.

  20. Kinematic and neuromuscular relationships between lower extremity clinical movement assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauntel, Timothy C; Cram, Tyler R; Frank, Barnett S; Begalle, Rebecca L; Norcross, Marc F; Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2018-06-01

    Lower extremity injuries have immediate and long-term consequences. Lower extremity movement assessments can assist with identifying individuals at greater injury risk and guide injury prevention interventions. Movement assessments identify similar movement characteristics and evidence suggests large magnitude kinematic relationships exist between movement patterns observed across assessments; however, the magnitude of the relationships for electromyographic (EMG) measures across movement assessments remains largely unknown. This study examined relationships between lower extremity kinematic and EMG measures during jump landings and single leg squats. Lower extremity three-dimensional kinematic and EMG data were sampled from healthy adults (males = 20, females = 20) during the movement assessments. Pearson correlations examined the relationships of the kinematic and EMG measures and paired samples t-tests compared mean kinematic and EMG measures between the assessments. Overall, significant moderate correlations were observed for lower extremity kinematic (r avg  = 0.41, r range  = 0.10-0.61) and EMG (r avg  = 0.47, r range  = 0.32-0.80) measures across assessments. Kinematic and EMG measures were greater during the jump landings. Jump landings and single leg squats place different demands on the body and necessitate different kinematic and EMG patterns, such that these measures are not highly correlated between assessments. Clinicians should, therefore, use multiple assessments to identify aberrant movement and neuromuscular control patterns so that comprehensive interventions can be implemented.

  1. Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Tawakal Hasnain Baluch; Adnan Masood; Javaid Iqbal; Umer Izhar; Umar Shahbaz Khan

    2012-01-01

    This paper will provide the kinematic and dynamic analysis of a lower limb exoskeleton. The forward and inverse kinematics of proposed exoskeleton is performed using Denevit and Hartenberg method. The torques required for the actuators will be calculated using Lagrangian formulation technique. This research can be used to design the control of the proposed exoskeleton.

  2. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  3. Kinematic synthesis of a new 3D printing solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giberti Hermes

    2016-01-01

    The object of this article is the kinematic synthesis of a 5Dofs robot, based on two PKM machines, for additive manufacturing in order to compliant with the requirements of this new technology. Robot kinematics have been optimized by genetic algorithm in order to cover the required workspace and the design of the robot and outline of the control system are also given.

  4. Kinematic analysis of competitive sprinting | Ansari | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the study showed that the kinematic variables i.e. knee angle, hip angle, ankle angle, shoulder rotation and extension had a significant influence on sprinting style. The results indicated that the kinematic variables of running style, knee angle at landing, hip flexion, ankle angle at landing, ankle angle at take-off, ...

  5. Wind tunnel test of musi VI bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permata, Robby; Andika, Matza Gusto; Syariefatunnisa, Risdhiawan, Eri; Hermawan, Budi; Noordiana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Musi VI Bridge is planned to cross the Musi River in Palembang City, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia. The main span is a steel arch type with 200 m length and side span length is 75 m. Finite element analysis results showed that the bridge has frequency ratio for torsional and heaving mode (torsional frequency/heaving frequency)=1.14. This close to unity value rises concern about aerodynamic behaviour and stability of the bridge deck under wind loading. Sectional static and free vibration wind tunnel test were performed to clarify this phenomena in B2TA3 facility in Serpong, Indonesia. The test followed the draft of Guide of Wind Tunnel Test for Bridges developed by Indonesian Ministry of Public Works. Results from wind tunnel testing show that the bridge is safe from flutter instability and no coupled motion vibration observed. Therefore, low value of frequency ratio has no effect to aerodynamic behaviour of the bridge deck. Vortex-induced vibration in heaving mode occurred in relatively low wind velocity with permissible maximum amplitude value.

  6. Plastic frames: Reduction of the kinematical inequality and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brousse, P.

    1979-01-01

    It is well-known that the following inequality plays an essential part in the theory of perfectly plastic frames: for all kinematically admissible mechanisms and for bending moments associated with the hinge rotations by the flow rule, the plastic dissipation power is greater than or equal to the load power. This inequality will be termed as the kinematic inequality. It contains parameters generating the mechanisms. In simple cases, several ingenious authors obtained appreciable results excluding parameters. But, in more complicated cases, for instance when the given quantities are not numerical, the parameters remain in the kinematic inequality, thereby precluding exploitation of the kinematic approach. In the present work we overcome this dificulty: we reduce the kinematic inequality, i.e., we replace it by inequalities containing no variable parameter; we then state a process giving automatically such inequalities; finally, we treat a practical application. (orig.)

  7. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  8. Kinematic Analysis of Continuum Robot Consisted of Driven Flexible Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhong Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the kinematic analysis of a continuum bionic robot with three flexible actuation rods. Since the motion of the end-effector is actuated by the deformation of the rods, the robot structure is with high elasticity and good compliance and the kinematic analysis of the robot requires special treatment. We propose a kinematic model based on the geometry with constant curvature. The analysis consists of two independent mappings: a general mapping for the kinematics of all robots and a specific mapping for this kind of robots. Both of those mappings are developed for the single section and for the multisections. We aim at providing a guide for kinematic analysis of the similar manipulators through this paper.

  9. 21st Century Kinematics : The 2012 NSF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    21st Century Kinematics focuses on algebraic problems in the analysis and synthesis of mechanisms and robots, compliant mechanisms, cable-driven systems and protein kinematics. The specialist contributors provide the background for a series of presentations at the 2012 NSF Workshop. The text shows how the analysis and design of innovative mechanical systems yield increasingly complex systems of polynomials, characteristic of those systems. In doing so, takes advantage of increasingly sophisticated computational tools developed for numerical algebraic geometry and demonstrates the now routine derivation of polynomial systems dwarfing the landmark problems of even the recent past. The 21st Century Kinematics workshop echoes the NSF-supported 1963 Yale Mechanisms Teachers Conference that taught a generation of university educators the fundamental principles of kinematic theory. As such these proceedings will be provide admirable supporting theory for a graduate course in modern kinematics and should be of consid...

  10. Expressions of manipulator kinematic equations via symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shinobu

    1993-09-01

    While it is simple in principle to determine the position and orientation of the manipulator hand, its computational process has been regarded as extremely laborious since trigonometric functions must be calculated many times in operations of revolute or rotation. Due to development of a general class of kinematic algorithm based on iterative methods, however, we have come to a satisfactory settlement of this problem. In the present article, we consider to construct symbolic kinematic equations in an automatic fashion making use of the algorithm. To this end, recursive expressions are applied to a symbolic computation system REDUCE. As a concrete result, a complete kinematic model for a six-jointed arm having all kinematic attributes is provided. Together with work space analysis, the computer-aided generation of kinematic equations in symbolic form will serve to liberate us from their cumbersome derivations. (author)

  11. 2nd Conference on Interdisciplinary Applications in Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This book collects a number of important contributions presented during the Second Conference on Interdisciplinary Applications of Kinematics (IAK 2013) held in Lima, Peru. The conference brought together scientists from several research fields, such as computational kinematics, multibody systems, industrial machines, robotics, biomechanics, mechatronics, computational chemistry, and vibration analysis, and embraced all key aspects of kinematics, namely, theoretical methods, modeling, optimization, experimental validation, industrial applications, and design. Kinematics is an exciting area of computational mechanics and plays  a central role in a great variety of fields and industrial applications nowadays. Apart from research in pure kinematics, the field deals with problems of practical relevance that need to be solved in an interdisciplinary manner in order for new technologies to develop. The results presented in this book should be of interest for practicing and research engineers as well as Ph.D. stud...

  12. Gas Kinematics in GRB Host Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam

    towards a relation between gas kinematics and mass. This also provides information on how the metallicities measured from absorption and emission methods differ from each other. Finally, in a direct study I show that gas velocity widths in both phases can be used as a proxy of stellar mass...... that their interstellar media imprint on the GRBs’ spectra. Hence they are invaluable tools to probe the star formation history of the Universe back to the earliest cosmic epochs. To this end, it is essential to achieve a comprehensive picture of the interplay between star formation and its fuel, neutral gas, in GRB...... simultaneously with a high velocity resolution. For the large GRB sample, I find the spatially averaged velocity to correlate with metallicity in both gas phases. This is an indicator of a mass-metallicity relation. Moreover, the velocity widths in the two gas phases correlate with each other which too points...

  13. Top quark kinematics and mass determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis is presented of 10 W + ≥ 3 jet events, each with evidence for the presence of a b quark, that were recently observed by the CDF collaboration. Seven of these events include a fourth jet and can be explicitly reconstructed as t bar t production. The best estimate of the top quark mass is M t = 174 ± 10 -12 +13 GeV/c 2 . A study has also been performed to see if the kinematical properties of events with W + ≥ 3 jets gives evidence for top production. An excess of events with large jet energies, compared to that expected from direct production of W + ≥ 3 jets, is observed. A large fraction of these events also contain a b-quark and a fourth jet

  14. Differential Kinematics Of Contemporary Industrial Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkodny, T.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a simple method of avoiding singular configurations of contemporary industrial robot manipulators of such renowned companies as ABB, Fanuc, Mitsubishi, Adept, Kawasaki, COMAU and KUKA. To determine the singular configurations of these manipulators a global form of description of the end-effector kinematics was prepared, relative to the other links. On the basis of this description , the formula for the Jacobian was defined in the end-effector coordinates. Next, a closed form of the determinant of the Jacobian was derived. From the formula, singular configurations, where the determinant's value equals zero, were determined. Additionally, geometric interpretations of these configurations were given and they were illustrated. For the exemplary manipulator, small corrections of joint variables preventing the reduction of the Jacobian order were suggested. An analysis of positional errors, caused by these corrections, was presented

  15. Kinematics gait disorder in men with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Jimenez, Jose M; Soto-Hermoso, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the kinematics disorder of gait in men with fibromyalgia. We studied 12 male with fibromyalgia and 14 healthy men. Each participant of the study walked five trials along a 18.6-m walkway. Fibromyalgia patients completed a Spanish version of Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. Significant differences between fibromyalgia and control groups were found in velocity, stride length, and cadence. Gait parameters of men affected by fibromyalgia were impaired when compared to those of healthy group due to bradykinesia. According to previous studies to assess gait variables in female patients, the male with fibromyalgia also showed lower values of velocity, cadence, and stride length than healthy group but not reported significant differences in swing, stance, single, or double support phase.

  16. Color-kinematic duality for form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Kniehl, Bernd A.; Tarasov, Oleg V.; Yang, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Recently a powerful duality between color and kinematics has been proposed for integrands of scattering amplitudes in quite general gauge theories. In this paper the duality proposal is extended to the more general class of gauge theory observables formed by form factors. After a discussion of the general setup the existence of the duality is verified in two and three loop examples in four dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory which involve the stress energy tensor multiplet. In these cases the duality reproduces known results in a particularly transparent and uniform way. As a non-trivial application we obtain a very simple form of the integrand of the four-loop two-point (Sudakov) form factor which passes a large set of unitarity cut checks.

  17. Color-kinematic duality for form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Kniehl, Bernd A.; Tarasov, Oleg V.; Yang, Gang [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-12-15

    Recently a powerful duality between color and kinematics has been proposed for integrands of scattering amplitudes in quite general gauge theories. In this paper the duality proposal is extended to the more general class of gauge theory observables formed by form factors. After a discussion of the general setup the existence of the duality is verified in two and three loop examples in four dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory which involve the stress energy tensor multiplet. In these cases the duality reproduces known results in a particularly transparent and uniform way. As a non-trivial application we obtain a very simple form of the integrand of the four-loop two-point (Sudakov) form factor which passes a large set of unitarity cut checks.

  18. SPACEBAR: Kinematic design by computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interactive graphics computer program SPACEBAR, conceived to reduce the time and complexity associated with the development of kinematic mechanisms on the design board, was described. This program allows the direct design and analysis of mechanisms right at the terminal screen. All input variables, including linkage geometry, stiffness, and applied loading conditions, can be fed into or changed at the terminal and may be displayed in three dimensions. All mechanism configurations can be cycled through their range of travel and viewed in their various geometric positions. Output data includes geometric positioning in orthogonal coordinates of each node point in the mechanism, velocity and acceleration of the node points, and internal loads and displacements of the node points and linkages. All analysis calculations take at most a few seconds to complete. Output data can be viewed at the scope and also printed at the discretion of the user.

  19. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Turner, M.S.; NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Batavia, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-de Sitter model of the universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the universe which posses a smooth component of energy density. The kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings is studied in detail. The observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models are also discussed. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations. 58 references

  20. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early Universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-deSitter model of the Universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the Universe which possess a smooth component by energy density. We study in detail the kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings. We also discuss the observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations

  1. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, J.C.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early Universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-deSitter model of the Universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the Universe which possess a smooth component by energy density. We study in detail the kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings. We also discuss the observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations.

  2. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M.; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D.; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J.; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 (micro)M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water ( -1 or 0.126 (micro)M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L -1 ) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 (micro)M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 (micro)M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp

  3. The WMO RA VI Regional Climate Centre Network - a support to users in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, S.

    2012-04-01

    Climate, like weather, has no limits. Therefore the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a specialized United Nations organization, has established a three-level infrastructure to better serve its member countries. This structure comprises Global Producing Centres for Long-range Forecasts (GPCs), Regional Climate Centres (RCCs) and National Meteorological or Hydrometeorological Services (NMHSs), in most cases representing their countries in WMO governance bodies. The elements of this infrastructure are also part of and contribute to the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) agreed to be established by World Climate Conference 3 (WCC-3) and last year's Sixteenth World Meteorological Congress (WMO Cg-XVI). RCCs are the core element of this infrastructure at the regional level and are being establish in all WMO Regional Associations (RAs), i.e. Africa (RA I); Asia (II); South America (III); North America, Central America and the Caribbean (IV); South-West Pacific (V); Europe (VI). Addressing inter-regional areas of common interest like the Mediterranean or the Polar Regions may require inter-regional RCCs. For each region the RCCs follow a user driven approach with regard to governance and structure as well as products generated for the users in the respective region. However, there are common guidelines all RCCs do have to follow. This is to make sure that services are provided based on best scientific standards, are routinely and reliably generated and made available in an operational mode. These guidelines are being developed within WMO and make use of decade-long experience gained in the business of operational weather forecast. Based on the requirements of the 50 member countries of WMO RA VI it was agreed to establish the WMO RCC as a network of centres of excellence that create regional products including long-range forecasts that support regional and national climate activities, and thereby strengthen the capacity of WMO Members in the region to

  4. Assessment of representational competence in kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Klein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A two-tier instrument for representational competence in the field of kinematics (KiRC is presented, designed for a standard (1st year calculus-based introductory mechanics course. It comprises 11 multiple choice (MC and 7 multiple true-false (MTF questions involving multiple representational formats, such as graphs, pictures, and formal (mathematical expressions (1st tier. Furthermore, students express their answer confidence for selected items, providing additional information (2nd tier. Measurement characteristics of KiRC were assessed in a validation sample (pre- and post-test, N=83 and N=46, respectively, including usefulness for measuring learning gain. Validity is checked by interviews and by benchmarking KiRC against related measures. Values for item difficulty, discrimination, and consistency are in the desired ranges; in particular, a good reliability was obtained (KR20=0.86. Confidence intervals were computed and a replication study yielded values within the latter. For practical and research purposes, KiRC as a diagnostic tool goes beyond related extant instruments both for the representational formats (e.g., mathematical expressions and for the scope of content covered (e.g., choice of coordinate systems. Together with the satisfactory psychometric properties it appears a versatile and reliable tool for assessing students’ representational competency in kinematics (and of its potential change. Confidence judgments add further information to the diagnostic potential of the test, in particular for representational misconceptions. Moreover, we present an analytic result for the question—arising from guessing correction or educational considerations—of how the total effect size (Cohen’s d varies upon combination of two test components with known individual effect sizes, and then discuss the results in the case of KiRC (MC and MTF combination. The introduced method of test combination analysis can be applied to any test

  5. Assessment of representational competence in kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P.; Müller, A.; Kuhn, J.

    2017-06-01

    A two-tier instrument for representational competence in the field of kinematics (KiRC) is presented, designed for a standard (1st year) calculus-based introductory mechanics course. It comprises 11 multiple choice (MC) and 7 multiple true-false (MTF) questions involving multiple representational formats, such as graphs, pictures, and formal (mathematical) expressions (1st tier). Furthermore, students express their answer confidence for selected items, providing additional information (2nd tier). Measurement characteristics of KiRC were assessed in a validation sample (pre- and post-test, N =83 and N =46 , respectively), including usefulness for measuring learning gain. Validity is checked by interviews and by benchmarking KiRC against related measures. Values for item difficulty, discrimination, and consistency are in the desired ranges; in particular, a good reliability was obtained (KR 20 =0.86 ). Confidence intervals were computed and a replication study yielded values within the latter. For practical and research purposes, KiRC as a diagnostic tool goes beyond related extant instruments both for the representational formats (e.g., mathematical expressions) and for the scope of content covered (e.g., choice of coordinate systems). Together with the satisfactory psychometric properties it appears a versatile and reliable tool for assessing students' representational competency in kinematics (and of its potential change). Confidence judgments add further information to the diagnostic potential of the test, in particular for representational misconceptions. Moreover, we present an analytic result for the question—arising from guessing correction or educational considerations—of how the total effect size (Cohen's d ) varies upon combination of two test components with known individual effect sizes, and then discuss the results in the case of KiRC (MC and MTF combination). The introduced method of test combination analysis can be applied to any test comprising

  6. Synthetic tsunami waveform catalogs with kinematic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Jorge Miguel; Matias, Luis; Omira, Rachid

    2017-07-01

    In this study we present a comprehensive methodology to produce a synthetic tsunami waveform catalogue in the northeast Atlantic, east of the Azores islands. The method uses a synthetic earthquake catalogue compatible with plate kinematic constraints of the area. We use it to assess the tsunami hazard from the transcurrent boundary located between Iberia and the Azores, whose western part is known as the Gloria Fault. This study focuses only on earthquake-generated tsunamis. Moreover, we assume that the time and space distribution of the seismic events is known. To do this, we compute a synthetic earthquake catalogue including all fault parameters needed to characterize the seafloor deformation covering the time span of 20 000 years, which we consider long enough to ensure the representability of earthquake generation on this segment of the plate boundary. The computed time and space rupture distributions are made compatible with global kinematic plate models. We use the tsunami empirical Green's functions to efficiently compute the synthetic tsunami waveforms for the dataset of coastal locations, thus providing the basis for tsunami impact characterization. We present the results in the form of offshore wave heights for all coastal points in the dataset. Our results focus on the northeast Atlantic basin, showing that earthquake-induced tsunamis in the transcurrent segment of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary pose a minor threat to coastal areas north of Portugal and beyond the Strait of Gibraltar. However, in Morocco, the Azores, and the Madeira islands, we can expect wave heights between 0.6 and 0.8 m, leading to precautionary evacuation of coastal areas. The advantages of the method are its easy application to other regions and the low computation effort needed.

  7. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  8. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingchia Huang; Donghwang Chen; Muchang Shieh; Chingtsven Huang

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  9. BEHA VI OUR OF TOPI IN A SHADELESS ENVIRONMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BEHA VI OUR OF TOPI IN A SHADELESS ENVIRONMENT ... one population for signs of behavioural adaptiveness in the species' environmental relation- .... The major change is obviously in the proportion of topi which had their heads up, as.

  10. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Matos, Antonio Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  11. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, El-Maraghy B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO 4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  12. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, E M.B. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Education

    1980-08-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO/sub 4/ and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible.

  13. Potentiometric studies on quaternary complexes of dioxouranium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Vinod; Chaturvedi, G K [Agra Coll., (India). Chemical Laboratories

    1979-10-01

    The formation of quaternary complexes of dioxouranium(VI) with three different organic acids (OX, MALN and SA, SSA, TAR or TMA) has been inferred from the potentiometric studies. The formation constants for the resulting triligand complexes have been evaluated.

  14. strong>Hvad skal vi med en hjerne?strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Judy

    2009-01-01

    neurologen Antonio Damasio, at sikre vores overlevelse og velbefindende (i nævnte rækkefølge). Vi ved, at der findes såkaldte belønningsstrukturer i hjernen på både dyr og mennesker, som aktiverer følelser af velbehag, når vi gør "det rigtige", dvs. noget der er godt for os. Men hvordan de mere konkret...

  15. Extraction of uranium (VI) sulphate complexes by Adogen amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyamani, I S; Abd Elmessieh, E N [Nuclear chemistry department, hot laboratories center, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The distribution of U(VI) between aqueous H{sub 2} So{sub 4} solutions and organic phases of adogen-368 has been described. The dependence of extraction on acidity, diluent type, metal and extractant concentrations was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism is discussed in the light of results obtained. The separation of U(VI) from rare earths is suggested. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Tengborn, E

    Research on the structure of exotic nuclei is one of the most intriguing topics in present day nuclear physics. With the use of facilities for isotope separation on-line, such as ISOLDE at CERN, short-lived isotopes can be studied experimentally. Since 2002, the REX-ISOLDE facility enables radioactive ions produced by ISOLDE to be post-accelerated, increasing the energy of the ions enough to do nuclear transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. In this thesis, transfer reactions are used to study the structure of neutron-rich lithium isotopes through a series of experiments at REX-ISOLDE. The first experiment used a 9Li beam at 2.36 MeV/u impinging on a deuterated polyethylene target to study 10Li, 9Li and 8Li. For the (d,p)-channel the resonance ground state and a first excited state are observed and the results agree with theoretical calculations. The elastic channel agrees with Optical Model, OM, calculations. For the (d,t)-channel the shape of the angular distribution agrees with Distorted Wave Born Approx...

  17. Production of light radioactive ion beams (RIB) using inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, J.J.; Sugathan, P.; Madhavan, N.; Madhusudhana Rao, P.V.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Barua, S.; Nath, S.; Sinha, A.K.; Kumar, B.; Zacharias, J.

    2005-01-01

    At Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, we have implemented a facility to produce low energy light radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using (p,n) type of reactions in inverse kinematics. For this purpose primary beams from the 15-UD Pelletron accelerator impinged on a thin polypropylene foil mounted on a rotating/linearly moving target assembly. For efficiently separating the secondary beam from primary beam, the existing recoil mass spectrometer (RMS) HIRA was operated with new ion optics. Suitable hardware modifications were also made. Using this facility, we have extracted a 7 Be beam of purity better than 99% and spot-size ∼4 mm in diameter. This 7 Be beam has been utilized in a variety of experiments in the energy range of 15-22 MeV. Typical beam parameters are: intensity 10 4 pps, angular spread ±30 mrad and energy spread ±0.5 MeV. Development of appropriate detector setup/target arrangement were also made to perform these experiments. In this paper, we describe the implementation of this project

  18. Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Cable-Climbing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Fengyu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To inspect broken cables or a cracked protective layer on cable-stayed bridges, a cable-climbing robot has been proposed and designed. In this paper, the complex 3D obstacles that may be encountered on cables are theoretically described, in order to investigate the obstacle-climbing capability of the cable-climbing robot. A climbing model is then proposed and used to design the robot. In the climbing model, two driven wheels are independently supported with a spring. Kinematics and dynamics models are further derived for the obstacle-climbing capabilities of the driving and driven wheels of the robot. In addition, the robot's obstacle-climbing tracks and its obstacle-climbing performance are simulated. Payload and obstacle-climbing experiments were conducted on the climbing robot in the laboratory. Based on the results of the simulation and the experiments, we obtained the variation of the driving torque in obstacle climbing. The contribution of this paper is intended to provide a basis for the precise motion control of the robot.

  19. Electronic structure, fluorescence and photochemistry of the uranyl ion, and comparison with octahedral uranium (VI), ruthenyl (VI), rhenium (V) and osmium (VI) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, C K [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland)

    1977-01-01

    The highly anisotropic uranyl complexes (with very short U-O distances and very long distances to the ligating atoms in the equatorial plane) are compared with trans-dioxo complexes of 4d/sup 2/Ru(VI) and 5d/sup 2/Re(V) and Os(VI). A major difference is the low-lying empty 5f orbitals, and the first excited state is highly oxidizing, and sufficiently long-lived to abstract hydrogen atoms from most organic molecules. It is argued that even the low concentrations of uranyl carbonate present in sea water is excited by solar radiation roughly every 10 minutes. Octahedral U(VI)O/sub 6/ in perovskites and UF/sub 6/ are also discussed, as well as trans-lawrencium chemistry.

  20. Vi-da: vitiligo diagnostic assistance mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, G. A.; Nurhudatiana, A.; Bahana, R.

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disorder in which white patches of depigmentation appear on different parts of the body. Usually, patients come to hospitals or clinics to have their vitiligo conditions assessed. This can be very tiring to the patients, as vitiligo treatments usually take a relatively long period of time, which can range from months to years. To address this challenge, we present in this paper a prototype of an Android-based mobile application called Vi-DA, which stands for Vitiligo Diagnostic Assistance. Vi-DA consists of three subsystems, which are user sign-up subsystem, camera and image analysis subsystem, and progress report subsystem. The mobile application was developed in Java programming language and uses MySQL as the database system. Vi-DA adopts a vitiligo segmentation algorithm to segment input image into normal skin area, vitiligo skin area, and non-skin area. Results showed that Vi-DA gave comparable results to the previous system implemented in Matlab. User acceptance testing results also showed that all respondents agreed on the usefulness of the system and agreed to use Vi-DA again in the future. Vi-DA benefits both dermatologists and patients as not only a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool but also as a smart application that can be used for self-assessment at home.

  1. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Brian; Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth. L.

    2008-06-10

    The dissolution of synthetic boehmite (?-AlOOH) by 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) was examined in a series of batch adsorption/dissolution experiments. Additionally, the leaching behavior of {sup 233}U(VI) from boehmite was examined as a function of pH and HEDPA concentration. The results are discussed in terms of sludge washing procedures that may be utilized during underground tank waste remediation. In the pH range 4 to 10, complexation of Al(III) by HEDPA significantly enhanced dissolution of boehmite. This phenomenon was especially pronounced in the neutral pH region where the solubility of aluminum, in the absence of complexants, is limited by the formation of sparsely soluble aluminum hydroxides. At pH higher than 10, dissolution of synthetic boehmite was inhibited by HEDPA, likely due to sorption of Al(III):HEDPA complexes. Addition of HEDPA to equilibrated U(VI)-synthetic boehmite suspensions yielded an increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration. Partitioning of uranium between the solid and aqueous phase is described in terms of U(VI):HEDPA speciation and dissolution of the boehmite solid phase.

  3. Micro-electrolysis of Cr (VI) in the nanoscale zero-valent iron loaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limei; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng; Qin, Faxiang; He, Yujuan; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2013-06-15

    In this paper we prepared a novel material of activated carbon/nanoscale zero-valent iron (C-Fe(0)) composite. The C-Fe(0) was proved to possess large specific surface area and outstanding reducibility that result in the rapid and stable reaction with Cr (VI). The prepared composite has been examined in detail in terms of the influence of solution pH, concentration and reaction time in the Cr (VI) removal experiments. The results showed that the C-Fe(0) formed a micro-electrolysis which dominated the reaction rate. The Micro-electrolysis reaches equilibrium is ten minutes. Its reaction rate is ten times higher than that of traditional adsorption reaction, and the removal rate of Cr reaches up to 99.5%. By analyzing the obtained profiles from the cyclic voltammetry, PXRD and XPS, we demonstrate that the Cr (VI) is reduced to insoluble Cr (III) compound in the reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetic and equilibrium study of uranium(VI) adsorption by Bacillus licheniformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng-ji Yi; University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing; Jun Yao

    2012-01-01

    Uranium pollution is a severe problem worldwide. Biosorption has been proposed as one of the most promising technologies for the removal of uranyl cations. Here we report on the adsorption behavior of uranium(VI) [U(VI)] on Bacillus licheniformis biomass to explore the potentiality of its application in uranium contamination control. The adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and effects of temperature, pH and initial biosorbent dosage on the adsorption equilibrium were investigated in detail through batch experiments. The adsorption process is pronouncedly affected by the solution pH and the optimum pH range should be 4.5-5.0.Temperature range from 25 to 45 deg C has a certain effect on the rate of biosorption, but little effect on the equilibrium adsorption capacity. The U(VI) percentage removal increased concurrently with increasing biomass dosage, whereas the adsorption capacity decreased. The process follows the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics data were fitted very well by the pseudo-first-order rate model. Finally, the calculation results of thermodynamic constant (ΔG a = 9.98 kJ/mol) reveal that the adsorption process can be identified as a spontaneous chemical process. The present results suggest that B. licheniformis has considerable potential for the removal of uranyl from aqueous solution. (author)

  5. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  6. In-situ porous reactive wall for treatment of Cr(VI) and trichloroethylene in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowes, D.W.; Bennett, T.A.; Gillham, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A permeable reactive wall for treating groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trichloroethylene (TCE) was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, NC in June, 1996. The porous reactive wall is 46 m long, 0.6 m wide, and 7.3 m deep. The reactive wall was installed in less then six hours using a continuous trenching technique which simultaneously removed the aquifer material and replaced it with reactive material. The wall is composed of 100% elemental iron in the form of iron filings. Preliminary laboratory experiments, with site groundwater and reactive materials similar to the full-scale wall components, were successful in decreasing 11 mg/L Cr(VI) to < 0.01 mg/L and 1700 μg/L TCE to < 1 μg/L. Detailed field monitoring commenced in November, 1996. The monitoring program includes groundwater sampling upgradient, downgradient and within the reactive wall, and collection of core samples for mineralogical and microbiological study. Preliminary results from the monitoring program indicate that the wall successfully removes Cr(VI) from influent concentrations of 6 mg/L to < 0.01 mg/L, and TCE from 5600 μg/L to 5.3 μg/L within the wall

  7. ViSlang: A system for interpreted domain-specific languages for scientific visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Rautek, Peter

    2014-12-31

    Researchers from many domains use scientific visualization in their daily practice. Existing implementations of algorithms usually come with a graphical user interface (high-level interface), or as software library or source code (low-level interface). In this paper we present a system that integrates domain-specific languages (DSLs) and facilitates the creation of new DSLs. DSLs provide an effective interface for domain scientists avoiding the difficulties involved with low-level interfaces and at the same time offering more flexibility than high-level interfaces. We describe the design and implementation of ViSlang, an interpreted language specifically tailored for scientific visualization. A major contribution of our design is the extensibility of the ViSlang language. Novel DSLs that are tailored to the problems of the domain can be created and integrated into ViSlang. We show that our approach can be added to existing user interfaces to increase the flexibility for expert users on demand, but at the same time does not interfere with the user experience of novice users. To demonstrate the flexibility of our approach we present new DSLs for volume processing, querying and visualization. We report the implementation effort for new DSLs and compare our approach with Matlab and Python implementations in terms of run-time performance.

  8. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis (ENAA) of Cr(VI)-reducer Basalt-inhabiting Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsibakhashvili, N Ya; Kirkesali, E I; Aksenova, N G; Kalabegishvili, T L; Murusidze, I G; Mosulishvili, L M; Holman, H Y N

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(V) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 $\\mu $g/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental condition...

  9. Fat ViP MRI: Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging of water-fat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Roberto; Hitti, Eric; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI) is a method to generate reference signals on MR images, using external radiofrequency (RF) signals. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ViP MRI to generate complex-data images of phantoms mimicking water-fat systems. Various numerical phantoms with a given fat fraction, T2* and field map were designed. The k-space of numerical phantoms was converted into RF signals to generate virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were performed at 4.7T using a multi-gradient-echo sequence on virtual and physical phantoms. The data acquisition of virtual and physical phantoms was simultaneous. Decomposition of the water and fat signals was performed using a complex-based water-fat separation algorithm. Overall, a good agreement was observed between the fat fraction, T2* and phase map values of the virtual and numerical phantoms. In particular, fat fractions of 10.5±0.1 (vs 10% of the numerical phantom), 20.3±0.1 (vs 20%) and 30.4±0.1 (vs 30%) were obtained in virtual phantoms. The ViP MRI method allows for generating imaging phantoms that i) mimic water-fat systems and ii) can be analyzed with water-fat separation algorithms based on complex data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  11. Vi har intet lært - hvornår lærer vi det?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en kerneakti......WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en...

  12. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, Luiz Claudio Barbosa

    2007-01-01

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U0 2 2+ , was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L -1 . In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g -1 . In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U0 2 2+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion

  13. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI

  14. Sorption of Uranium(VI and Thorium(IV by Jordanian Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature, and column techniques at 25.0∘C and . The highest rate of metal ions uptake was observed after 18 h of shaking, and the uptake has increased with increasing pH and reached a maximum at . Bentonite has shown high metal ion uptake capacity toward uranium(VI than thorium(IV. Sorption data were evaluated according to the pseudo- second-order reaction kinetic. Sorption isotherms were studied at temperatures 25.0∘C, 35.0∘C, and 45.0∘C. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R sorption models equations were applied and the proper constants were derived. It was found that the sorption process is enthalpy driven for uranium(VI and thorium(IV. Recovery of uranium(VI and thorium(IV ions after sorption was carried out by treatment of the loaded bentonite with different concentrations of HNO3 1.0 M, 0.5 M, 0.1 M, and 0.01 M. The best percent recovery for uranium(VI and thorium(IV was obtained when 1.0 M HNO3 was used.

  15. The surface characteristics of hyperbranched polyamide modified corncob and its adsorption property for Cr(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hai, E-mail: linhai@ces.ustb.edu.cn [School of Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory on Resource-oriented Treatment of Industrial Pollutants, Beijing 100083 (China); Han, Shaoke; Dong, Yingbo; He, Yinhai [School of Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory on Resource-oriented Treatment of Industrial Pollutants, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • An anion adsorbent was synthesized by hyperbranched polyamide modified corncob (HPMC). • The surface characteristics of samples (RCC, HPMC, HPMC-Cr) were studied. • Langmuir isotherm provided more fit and maximum adsorption capacity was 131.6 mg/g. • The adsorption process was chemisorption, controlled by intra-particle diffusion and film diffusion. • Adsorption is fast, stable, spontaneous and endothermic. - Abstract: A low-cost anion adsorbent for Cr(VI) effectively removing was synthesized by hyperbranched polyamide modified corncob (HPMC). Samples were characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and zeta potential analysis. Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics studies of HPMC for Cr(VI) adsorption were investigated in batch static experiments, in the temperature range of 25–45 °C, pH = 2.0. Results showed that the adsorption was rapid and stable, with the uptake capacity higher than 80% after 30 min. Adsorption behavior and rate-controlling mechanisms were analyzed using three kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intra-particle kinetic model). Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of HPMC to Cr(VI) relied the pseudo-second-order model, and controlled both by the intra-particle diffusion and film diffusion. Equilibrium data was tested by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Langmuir model was more suitable to indicate a homogeneous distribution of active sites on HPMC and monolayer adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model, q{sub max}, was 131.6 mg/g at pH 2.0 and 45 °C for HPMC. Thermodynamic parameters revealed spontaneous and endothermic nature of the Cr(VI) adsorption onto HPMC.

  16. Adsorption studies for Cr(VI) onto magnetic particles covered with chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Yamamura, Amanda P. Gualberto; Costa, Caroline Hastenreiter

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic carrier, called magnetic biosorbent, was prepared using magnetite nanoparticles and a biopolymer from the chitin of exoskeletons of marine invertebrates, the chitosan. Experiments of adsorption in batch systems were carried out to investigate the removal of Cr(VI) ions from pH 3 solution using this magnetic biosorbent. Radioisotope Cr-51 was used as the radioactive tracer to mark the Cr in solution, so the concentrations of Cr(VI) ions were determined by gamma spectrometry with a NaI(Tl) detector. Dosage of magnetic biosorbent was studied in the adsorption of chromium ions from dilute metal ion solutions. The removal efficiency obtained was 97% at a dosage of 50 g L -1 . Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to evaluate the data of equilibrium isotherm in the range of Cr(VI) concentration from 50 mg L -1 to 1200 mg L -1 . The Langmuir model was found to best represent the equilibrium isotherm. Recovery of the Cr(VI) ions from loaded magnetic biosorbent was possible by desorption process using a NaOH solution of pH 10. The results demonstrated that the magnetic biosorbent is effective for the removal of hexavalent Cr ion from solutions by sorption process and the recovery by desorption process is possible. The suspended particles of the magnetic biosorbent exhibited a strong magnetization in the presence of a magnetic field, and being easily attracted and removed from aqueous solutions using a magnet, so indicating the application viability in magnetic separation process. (author)

  17. The reduction of U(VI) on corroded iron under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Spahiu, K.

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of iron and the interaction between corroded iron and U(VI) in anoxic conditions were investigated. The anoxic conditions were obtained by flushing an 99.97% Ar-0.03% CO 2 gas mixture through the test vessel, in which an oxygen trap and six reaction bottles containing synthetic groundwater (10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - .) were placed. The dark-green coloured corrosion product, formed on iron surface after three months corrosion in synthetic groundwater solutions, was identified by powder X-ray diffraction to be carbonate green rust, Fe 4 II Fe 2 III (OH) 12 CO 3 . The iron foil that reacted in a solution (10 ppm U(VI), 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - ) for three months was analysed by SEM-EDS. The result shows that: (i) an uneven layer of carbonate green rust (1-5 μm thick) formed on the metallic iron; (ii) a thin (0.3 μm) uranium-rich layer deposited on top of the carbonate green rust layer; and (iii) some UO 2 crystals (3-5 μm sized) on the thin uranium layer. The experimental results proved that the U(VI) removal capacity of metal iron is not hindered by formation of a layer of carbonate green rust on the iron. Tests with cast iron and pure iron indicate that they have similar U(VI) removal capacities. At the end of experiment, U concentrations in solution approached the solubility of UO 2 (s), 10 -8 M. The stability of the carbonate green rust at the experimental conditions, pH, E h , [Fe 2+ ] and [HCO 3 - ], is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  19. Synthesis, structure and properties of oxo- and dioxochloride complexes of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, V.L.; Sergienko, V.S.; Egorova, O.A.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of oxo- and dioxochlorides of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline of molecular and intracomplex type are synthesized and studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. The complexes have octahedral structure. It is proposed that 8-oxyquinoline in molecular complexes is coordinated by central atom through nitrogen atom of heterocycle, but in intracomplex compounds - through heterocyclic nitrogen atom and oxygen atom of deprotonated OH-group. Thermal stability of the complexes is studied [ru

  20. Kinematics Modelling of Tendon-Driven Continuum Manipulator with Crossed Notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z. X.; Yang, W. L.; Du, Z. J.

    2018-03-01

    Single port surgical robot (SPSR) is a giant leap in the development of minimally invasive surgical robot. An innovative manipulator with high control accuracy and good kinematic dexterity can reduce wound, expedite recovery, and improve the success rate. This paper presents a tendon-driven continuum manipulator with crossed notches. This manipulator has two degrees of freedom (DOF), which possesses good flexibility and high capacity. Then based on cantilever beam theory, a mechanics model is proposed, which connects external force and deformation of a single flexible ring (SFR). By calculating the deformation of each SFR, the manipulator is considered as a series robot whose joint numbers is equal to SFR numbers, and the kinematics model is established through Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) procedure. In this paper, the total manipulator is described as a curve tube whose curvature is increased from tip to base. Experiments were conducted and the comparison between theoretical and actual results proved the rationality of the models.

  1. A Subject-Specific Kinematic Model to Predict Human Motion in Exoskeleton-Assisted Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Diego; Cortés, Camilo; Lete, Nerea; Bertelsen, Álvaro; Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose E; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Dimbwadyo, Iris; Moreno, Juan C; Florez, Julian; Pons, Jose L

    2018-01-01

    The relative motion between human and exoskeleton is a crucial factor that has remarkable consequences on the efficiency, reliability and safety of human-robot interaction. Unfortunately, its quantitative assessment has been largely overlooked in the literature. Here, we present a methodology that allows predicting the motion of the human joints from the knowledge of the angular motion of the exoskeleton frame. Our method combines a subject-specific skeletal model with a kinematic model of a lower limb exoskeleton (H2, Technaid), imposing specific kinematic constraints between them. To calibrate the model and validate its ability to predict the relative motion in a subject-specific way, we performed experiments on seven healthy subjects during treadmill walking tasks. We demonstrate a prediction accuracy lower than 3.5° globally, and around 1.5° at the hip level, which represent an improvement up to 66% compared to the traditional approach assuming no relative motion between the user and the exoskeleton.

  2. Proposal for the ion optics and for the kinematical fitting at the magnetic spectrograph BIG KARL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterberger, F.

    1986-01-01

    For the magnetic spectrograph BIG KARL the installation of an additional quadrupole lens is purposed. From this the possibility of a telescopic ion optic results. For future experiments a standard focusing with a spatial dispersion of 6.6 m and vanishing angular dispersion is proposed. The D/M ratio (dispersion/magnification) extends to 14.0 m, the maximal spatial angle lies at 3 msr. The energy range extends at a focal plane length of 0.66 m to 20%. For the kinematical fitting of the spectrograph the focal plane is shifted. This shift can be simply and rapidly realized for different K values by means of a software correction, if generally two spatial spectra in the focal plane are taken up. By this additionally for each event the actual scattering angle can be determined with relatively good resolution. The dispersion fit is completely decoupled from the kinematical fitting of the magnetic spectrograph. (orig.) [de

  3. Kinematic approximation in the theory of stimulated nuclear polarization in radical recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, S.A.; Purtov, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Within the kinematic approximation, we have developed the theory of stimulated nuclear polarization (SNP) in reactions of geminal recombination of radicals in a strong d.c. magnetic field. We have obtained analytical formulas which are applicable for analysis of SNP effects occurring when the reactions are carried out in nonviscous solutions. The result is represented in the form of integrals with respect to the Green's function determining the kinematics of reagent approach. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we have calculated the polarization of nuclei formed in the reaction products of p-benzoquinone in CD 3 OD and in C 6 D 6 with addition of phenol, and we compare with experiment

  4. Validation and structural analysis of the kinematics concept test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lichtenberger

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinematics concept test (KCT is a multiple-choice test designed to evaluate students’ conceptual understanding of kinematics at the high school level. The test comprises 49 multiple-choice items about velocity and acceleration, which are based on seven kinematic concepts and which make use of three different representations. In the first part of this article we describe the development and the validation process of the KCT. We applied the KCT to 338 Swiss high school students who attended traditional teaching in kinematics. We analyzed the response data to provide the psychometric properties of the test. In the second part we present the results of a structural analysis of the test. An exploratory factor analysis of 664 student answers finally uncovered the seven kinematics concepts as factors. However, the analysis revealed a hierarchical structure of concepts. At the higher level, mathematical concepts group together, and then split up into physics concepts at the lower level. Furthermore, students who seem to understand a concept in one representation have difficulties transferring the concept to similar problems in another representation. Both results have implications for teaching kinematics. First, teaching mathematical concepts beforehand might be beneficial for learning kinematics. Second, instructions have to be designed to teach students the change between different representations.

  5. Validation and structural analysis of the kinematics concept test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, A.; Wagner, C.; Hofer, S. I.; Stern, E.; Vaterlaus, A.

    2017-06-01

    The kinematics concept test (KCT) is a multiple-choice test designed to evaluate students' conceptual understanding of kinematics at the high school level. The test comprises 49 multiple-choice items about velocity and acceleration, which are based on seven kinematic concepts and which make use of three different representations. In the first part of this article we describe the development and the validation process of the KCT. We applied the KCT to 338 Swiss high school students who attended traditional teaching in kinematics. We analyzed the response data to provide the psychometric properties of the test. In the second part we present the results of a structural analysis of the test. An exploratory factor analysis of 664 student answers finally uncovered the seven kinematics concepts as factors. However, the analysis revealed a hierarchical structure of concepts. At the higher level, mathematical concepts group together, and then split up into physics concepts at the lower level. Furthermore, students who seem to understand a concept in one representation have difficulties transferring the concept to similar problems in another representation. Both results have implications for teaching kinematics. First, teaching mathematical concepts beforehand might be beneficial for learning kinematics. Second, instructions have to be designed to teach students the change between different representations.

  6. Kinematic aspects of pion-nucleus elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.L.; Ernst, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The inclusion of relativistic kinematics in the theory of elastic scattering of pions from nuclei is examined. The investigation is performed in the context of the first order impulse approximation which incorporates the following features: (1) Relative momentum are defined according to relativistic theories consistent with time reversal invariance. (2) The two-nucleon interaction is a new, multichannel, separable potential model consistent with the most recent data derived from a recent nonpotential model of Ernst and Johnson. (3) The recoil of the pion-nucleon interacting pair and its resultant nonlocality are included. (4) The Fermi integral is treated by an optimal factorization approximation. It is shown how a careful definition of an intrinsic target density leads to an unambiguous method for including the recoil of the target. The target recoil corrections are found to be large for elastic scattering from 4 He and not negligible for scattering from 12 C. Relativistic potential theory kinematics, kinematics which result from covariant reduction approaches, and kinematics which result from replacing masses by energies in nonrelativistic formulas are compared. The relativistic potential theory kinematics and covariant reduction kinematics are shown to produce different elastic scattering at all pion energies examined (T/sub π/<300 MeV). Simple extensions of nonrelativistic kinematics are found to be reasonable approximations to relativistic potential theory

  7. Kinematic design considerations for minimally invasive surgical robots: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Hsing; Dai, Jian S; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2012-06-01

    Kinematic design is a predominant phase in the design of robotic manipulators for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). However, an extensive overview of the kinematic design issues for MIS robots is not yet available to both mechanisms and robotics communities. Hundreds of archival reports and articles on robotic systems for MIS are reviewed and studied. In particular, the kinematic design considerations and mechanism development described in the literature for existing robots are focused on. The general kinematic design goals, design requirements, and design preferences for MIS robots are defined. An MIS-specialized mechanism, namely the remote center-of-motion (RCM) mechanism, is revisited and studied. Accordingly, based on the RCM mechanism types, a classification for MIS robots is provided. A comparison between eight different RCM types is given. Finally, several open challenges for the kinematic design of MIS robotic manipulators are discussed. This work provides a detailed survey of the kinematic design of MIS robots, addresses the research opportunity in MIS robots for kinematicians, and clarifies the kinematic point of view to MIS robots as a reference for the medical community. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Kinematics of electroweak single top quark production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, Jan; Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the t-channel matching procedure of two single-top signal Monte Carlo samples is optimized. The s- and matched t-channel samples, generated by MadEvent, are validated by comparing to ZTOP next-to-leading-order calculations. We find good agreement for all kinematic distributions we investigate, except for softer light quark jets due to gluon radiation. Since this has only minor impact on the s-channel, the corresponding MadEvent sample performs its task as expected. For the t-channel, we can conclude that the applied matching procedure leads to a MadEvent sample that successfully describes the kinematic distributions and rates of the 2nd-b quark. However, small differences remain. The discrepancy in the p T -ordered 2nd-leading light jets is mainly due to the absence of initial state gluon splitting and initial and final state gluon radiation matrix elements in the MadEvent sample production. The subsequent PYTHIA showering of the partons is apparently inappropriate for modeling those contributions and not intended for this purpose. The proper way would be to produce all relevant NLO matrix elements and match them as proposed in reference [15]. At present, an NLO-MC-generator for single-top is in preparation [41]. Probably it will be available for future iterations of single-top analyses and will redundantize further matching procedures. We estimate the systematic uncertainty on the single-top acceptance due to the Monte Carlo modeling and find an uncertainty of about 1% on the t-channel acceptance. We obtain a negligible uncertainty well below 1% on the s-channel acceptance. These acceptance uncertainties are very well acceptable for the single-top analyses that are currently under way. A sensitivity study of the simultaneous cross section measurement of the s- and t-channel single-top production modes is conducted. For this purpose, only statistical uncertainties are included. For a future integrated luminosity of 1 fb -1 , we expect to obtain an s

  9. Dose exposure work planning using DMU kinematics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli Darmawan

    2010-01-01

    The study on the possibility of using DMU Kinematics module in CAE tools for dose exposure work planning was carried out. A case scenario was created using 3D CAD software and transferred to DMU Kinematics module in CAE software. A work plan was created using DMU Kinematics tools and animated to simulate a real time scenario. Data on the phantom position against the radioactive source was collected by activating positioning sensors in the module. The data was used to estimate dose rate exposure for the phantom. The results can be used to plan the safest and optimum procedures in carrying out the radiation related task. (author)

  10. An adaptive inverse kinematics algorithm for robot manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for solving the inverse kinematics problem for robot manipulators is presented. The algorithm is derived using model reference adaptive control (MRAC) theory and is computationally efficient for online applications. The scheme requires no a priori knowledge of the kinematics of the robot if Cartesian end-effector sensing is available, and it requires knowledge of only the forward kinematics if joint position sensing is used. Computer simulation results are given for the redundant seven-DOF robotics research arm, demonstrating that the proposed algorithm yields accurate joint angle trajectories for a given end-effector position/orientation trajectory.

  11. New Synthesis of nZVI/C Composites as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Uptake of U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Li, Mengxue; Chen, Tianhu; Chen, Changlun; Alharbi, Njud S; Hayat, Tasawar; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Yubing

    2017-08-15

    New nanoscale zerovalent iron/carbon (nZVI/C) composites were successfully prepared via heating natural hematite and pine sawdust at 800 °C under nitrogen conditions. Characterization by SEM, XRD, FTIR, and XPS analyses indicated that the as-prepared nZVI/C composites contained a large number of reactive sites. The lack of influence of the ionic strength revealed inner-sphere complexation dominated U(VI) uptake by the nZVI/C composites. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction were involved in the uptake process of U(VI) according to the results of XPS and XANES analyses. The presence of U-C/U-U shells demonstrated that innersphere complexation and surface coprecipitation dominated the U(VI) uptake at low and high pH conditions, respectively. The uptake behaviors of U(VI) by the nZVI/C composites were fitted well by surface complexation modeling with two weak and two strong sites. The maximum uptake capacity of U(VI) by the nZVI/C composites was 186.92 mg/g at pH 4.0 and 328 K. Additionally, the nZVI/C composites presented good recyclability and recoverability for U(VI) uptake in regeneration experiments. These observations indicated that the nZVI/C composites can be considered as potential adsorbents to remove radionuclides for environmental remediation.

  12. Mechanistic investigations of Se(VI) treatment in anoxic groundwater using granular iron and organic carbon: An EXAFS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Blair D.; Blowes, David W.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Ptacek, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate treatment of aqueous Se(VI) under anoxic conditions. ► We utilize granular Fe 0 and organic carbon to promote Se(VI) removal. ► We characterize Se speciation using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. ► Granular Fe 0 promotes removal of Se(VI) by reduction to Se(0). ► Organic carbon promotes removal through sorption processes without reduction. - Abstract: The removal of aqueous Se(VI) from a simulated groundwater by granular iron (GI), organic carbon (OC), and a mixture of these reactive materials (GI–OC) was evaluated in laboratory batch experiments. The experiments were performed under anoxic conditions to simulate subsurface treatment. A total reaction time of 120 h (5 d) was chosen to investigate the rapid changes in speciation occurring over reaction times that are reasonable for permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems. After 120 h, concentrations of Se decreased by >90% in the GI system, 15% in the OC system and 35% in the GI–OC mixture. Analysis of the materials after contact with Se using synchrotron-radiation based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated the presence of Se(IV) and Se(0) on the margins of GI grains after 6 h with evidence of Se-O and Se-Se bonding, whereas Se(VI) was not observed. After 72 h, Se(0) was the only form of Se present in the GI experiments. In the OC batches, the XAS analysis indicated binding consistent with sorption of aqueous Se(VI) onto the OC with only minor reduction to Se(IV) and Se(0) after 120 h. Selenium XAS spectra collected for the GI–OC mixture were consistent with spectra for Se(IV) and Se(0) on both the margins of GI grains and OC particles, suggesting that the presence of dissolved Fe may have mediated the reduction of sorbed Se(VI). The results suggest that the application of granular Fe is effective at inducing aqueous Se removal in anoxic conditions through reductive precipitation processes.

  13. Inhibition of bacterial U(VI) reduction by calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Scott C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Carroll, S. L.; Kennedy, David W.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-01-01

    The rapid kinetics of bacterial U(VI) reduction and low solubility of uraninite (UO2,cr) make this process an attractive option for removing uranium from groundwater. Nevertheless, conditions that may promote or inhibit U(VI) reduction are not well-defined. Recent descriptions of Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes indicate that these species may dominate the aqueous speciation of U(VI) in many environments. We monitored the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in bicarbonate-buffered solution in the presence and absence of Ca. XAFS measurements confirmed the presence of a Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complex in the initial solutions containing calcium. Calcium, at millimolar concentrations (0.45-5 mM), caused a significant decrease in the rate and extent of bacterial U(VI) reduction. Both facultative (Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32) and obligate (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Geobacter sulfurreducens) anaerobic bacteria were affected by the presence of calcium. Reduction of U(VI) ceased when the calculated system Eh re ached -0.046+/- 0.001 V, based on the Ca2UO2(CO3)(3) -- > UO2,cr couple. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that U is a less energetically favorable electron acceptor when the Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes are present. The results do not support Ca inhibition caused by direct interactions with the cells or with the electron donor as the reduction of fumarate or Tc(VII)O-4(-) under identical conditions was unaffected by the presence of Ca

  14. Unraveling the mechanism responsible for the contrasting tolerance of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to Cr(VI): Enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Alka [Molecular Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ballal, Anand, E-mail: aballal@barc.gov.in [Molecular Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 40085 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Cr(VI) accumulation generates higher ROS in Synechocystis than in Synechococcus. • Synechococcus exhibits better photosynthetic activity in response to Cr(VI). • Synechococcus has higher enzymatic/non-enzymatic antioxidants than Synechocystis. • Synechococcus shows better tolerance to other oxidative stresses than Synechocystis. • Differential detoxification of ROS is responsible for the contrasting tolerance to Cr(VI) - Abstract: Two unicellular cyanobacteria, Synechocystis and Synechococcus, showed contrasting tolerance to Cr(VI); with Synechococcus being 12-fold more tolerant than Synechocystis to potassium dichromate. The mechanism responsible for this differential sensitivity to Cr(VI) was explored in this study. Total content of photosynthetic pigments as well as photosynthetic activity decreased at lower concentration of Cr(VI) in Synechocystis as compared to Synechococcus. Experiments with {sup 51}Cr showed Cr to accumulate intracellularly in both the cyanobacteria. At lower concentrations, Cr(VI) caused excessive ROS generation in Synechocystis as compared to that observed in Synechococcus. Intrinsic levels of enzymatic antioxidants, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase and 2-Cys-peroxiredoxin were considerably higher in Synechococcus than Synechocystis. Content of total thiols (both protein as well as non-protein) and reduced glutathione (GSH) was also higher in Synechococcus as compared to Synechocystis. This correlated well with higher content of carbonylated proteins observed in Synechocystis than Synechococcus. Additionally, in contrast to Synechocystis, Synechococcus exhibited better tolerance to other oxidative stresses like high intensity light and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The data indicate that the disparity in the ability to detoxify ROS could be the primary mechanism responsible for the differential tolerance of these cyanobacteria to Cr(VI)

  15. The derivation of the general form of kinematics with the universal reference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostek, Karol; Szostek, Roman

    2018-03-01

    In the article, the whole class of time and position transformations was derived. These transformations were derived based on the analysis of the Michelson-Morley experiment and its improved version, that is the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment. It is possible to derive a different kinematics of bodies based on each of these transformations. In this way, we demonstrated that the Special Theory of Relativity is not the only theory explaining the results of experiments with light. There is the whole continuum of the theories of kinematics of bodies which correctly explain the Michelson-Morley experiment and other experiments in which the velocity of light is measured. Based on the derived transformations, we derive the general formula for the velocity of light in vacuum measured in any inertial reference system. We explain why the Michelson-Morley and Kennedy-Thorndike experiments could not detect the ether. We present and discuss three examples of specific transformations. Finally, we explain the phenomenon of anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation by means of the presented theory. The theory derived in this work is called the Special Theory of Ether - with any transverse contraction. The entire article contains only original research conducted by its authors.

  16. A new recoil distance technique using low energy coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, W., E-mail: wolfram.rother@googlemail.com [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Dewald, A.; Pascovici, G.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Hackstein, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Ilie, G. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Iwasaki, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Jolie, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Melon, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) I-50019 (Italy); Petkov, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); INRNE-BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria); Pfeiffer, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Pissulla, Th. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Bundesumweltministerium, Robert-Schuman-Platz 3, D - 53175 Bonn (Germany); Zell, K.-O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Jones, P.; Ketelhut, S.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); and others

    2011-10-21

    We report on the first experiment combining the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift technique and multistep Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at beam energies of 3-10 A MeV. The setup involves a standard plunger device equipped with a degrader foil instead of the normally used stopper foil. An array of particle detectors is positioned at forward angles to detect target-like recoil nuclei which are used as a trigger to discriminate against excitations in the degrader foil. The method has been successfully applied to measure lifetimes in {sup 128}Xe and is suited to be a useful tool for experiments with radioactive ion beams.

  17. Experimental determination of frequency response function estimates for flexible joint industrial manipulators with serial kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saupe, Florian; Knoblach, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Two different approaches for the determination of frequency response functions (FRFs) are used for the non-parametric closed loop identification of a flexible joint industrial manipulator with serial kinematics. The two applied experiment designs are based on low power multisine and high power chirp excitations. The main challenge is to eliminate disturbances of the FRF estimates caused by the numerous nonlinearities of the robot. For the experiment design based on chirp excitations, a simple iterative procedure is proposed which allows exploiting the good crest factor of chirp signals in a closed loop setup. An interesting synergy of the two approaches, beyond validation purposes, is pointed out.

  18. Virtual sine arm kinematic mount system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Randall, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    A novel kinematic mount system for a vertical focusing mirror of the soft x-ray spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is described. The system contains three points in a horizontal plane. Each point consists of two horizontal linear precision stages, a spherical ball bearing, and a vertical precision stage. The horizontal linear stages are aligned orthogonally and are conjoined by a spherical ball bearing, supported by the vertical linear stage at each point. The position of each confined horizontal stage is controlled by a motorized micrometer head by spring-loading the flat tip of the micrometer head onto a tooling ball fixing on the carriage of the stage. A virtual sine arm is formed by tilting the upstream horizontal stage down and the two downstream horizontal stages up by a small angle. The fine pitch motion is achieved by adjusting the upstream stage. This supporting structure is extremely steady due to a relatively large span across the supporting points and yields extremely high resolution on the pitch motion. With a one degree tilt and a microstepping motor, the authors achieved a 0.4 nanoradian resolution on the mirror pitch motion

  19. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The Effect of Si and Al Concentration Ratios on the Removal of U(VI) under Hanford Site 200 Area Conditions-12115

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Gonzalez, Nathan; Moreno-Pastor, Carol; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Injection of reactive gases, such as NH{sub 3}, is an innovative technique to mitigate uranium contamination in soil for a vadose zone (VZ) contaminated with radionuclides. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of the concentration ratio of silicon to aluminum in the presence of various bicarbonate concentrations on the coprecipitation process of U(VI). The concentration of Al in all tests remained unchanged at 2.8 mM. Experiments showed that the removal efficiency of uranium was not significantly affected by the different bicarbonate and U(VI) concentrations tested. For the lower Si:Al molar ratios of 2:1 and 18:1, the removal efficiency of uranium was relatively low (≤ 8%). For the Si:Al molar ratio of 35:1, the removal efficiency of uranium was increased to an average of ∼82% for all bicarbonate concentrations tested. At higher Si:Al molar ratios (53:1 and above), a relatively high removal efficiency of U(VI), approximately 85% and higher, was observed. These results demonstrate that the U(VI) removal efficiency is more affected by the Si:Al molar ratio than by the bicarbonate concentration in solution. The results of this experiment are promising for the potential implementation of NH{sub 3} gas injection for the remediation of U(VI) -contaminated VZ. (authors)

  1. Role of U(VI) adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovely, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium, and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms. Results from this study showed that the U(VI) sorption capacity of G. uraniireducens was relatively similar in simple solutions, such as sodium chloride or bicarbonate. However, this ability to sorb uranium significantly decreased in groundwater. This suggested that certain chemicals present in the groundwater were inhibiting the ability of cell components of Geobacter to adsorb uranium. It was hypothesized that uranium removal would also be diminished in the bicarbonate solution. However, this did not seem to be the case, as uranium was as easily removed in the bicarbonate solution as in the sodium chloride solution.

  2. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(α,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  3. Kinematics and Path Following Control of an Articulated Drum Roller

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIAN, Yongming; YANG, Meng; FANG, Xiaojun; WANG, Xiahui

    2017-07-01

    Automatic navigation of an articulated drum roller, which is an articulated steering type vehicle widely used in the construction industry, is highly expected for operation cost reduction and improvement of work efficiency. In order to achieve the path following control, considering that its steering system is articulated steering and two frames are articulated by an active revolute joint, a kinematic model and an error dynamic state-space equation of an articulated drum roller are proposed. Besides, a state-feedback control law based on Lyapunov stability theory is also designed, which can be proved to achieve the purpose of control by the analysis of stability. What's more, to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, simulation under the MATLAB/Simulink and experiments using positioning algorithm and errors correction at the uneven construction site are performed, with initial displacement error (-1.5 m), heading error (-0.11 rad) and steering angle (-0.19 rad). Finally, simulation and experimental results show that the errors and steering angle can decrease gradually, and converge to zero with time. Meanwhile, the control input is not saturated. An articulated drum roller can lock into a desired path with the proposed method in uneven fields.

  4. Kinematics of Nonlinearly Interacting MHD Instabilities in a Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Alexander K.

    2000-01-01

    Plasmas play host to a wide variety of instabilities. For example, tearing instabilities use finite plasma resistivity to exploit the free energy provided by plasma currents parallel to the magnetic field to alter the magnetic topology of the plasma through a process known as reconnection. These instabilities frequently make themselves known in magnetic confinement experiments such as tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). In RFP plasmas, in fact, several tearing instabilities (modes) are simultaneously active, and are of large amplitude. Theory predicts that in addition to interacting linearly with magnetic perturbations from outside the plasma, such as field errors or as resistive wall, the modes in the RFP can interact nonlinearly with each other through a three-wave interaction. In the current work investigations of both the linear (external) and nonlinear contributions to the kinematics of the tearing modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP are reported Theory predicts that tearing modes will respond only to magnetic perturbations that are spatially resonant with them, and was supported by experimental work done on tokamak devices. The results in this work verified that the theory is still applicable to the RFP, in spite of its more complicated magnetic mode structure, involving perturbations of a single poloidal mode number

  5. Kinematic feedback control laws for generating natural arm movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Jang, Cheongjae; Park, Frank C

    2014-01-01

    We propose a stochastic optimal feedback control law for generating natural robot arm motions. Our approach, inspired by the minimum variance principle of Harris and Wolpert (1998 Nature 394 780–4) and the optimal feedback control principles put forth by Todorov and Jordan (2002 Nature Neurosci. 5 1226–35) for explaining human movements, differs in two crucial respects: (i) the endpoint variance is minimized in joint space rather than Cartesian hand space, and (ii) we ignore the dynamics and instead consider only the second-order differential kinematics. The feedback control law generating the motions can be straightforwardly obtained by backward integration of a set of ordinary differential equations; these equations are obtained exactly, without any linear–quadratic approximations. The only parameters to be determined a priori are the variance scale factors, and for both the two-DOF planar arm and the seven-DOF spatial arm, a table of values is constructed based on the given initial and final arm configurations; these values are determined via an optimal fitting procedure, and consistent with existing findings about neuromuscular motor noise levels of human arm muscles. Experiments conducted with a two-link planar arm and a seven-DOF spatial arm verify that the trajectories generated by our feedback control law closely resemble human arm motions, in the sense of producing nearly straight-line hand trajectories, having bell-shaped velocity profiles, and satisfying Fitts Law. (paper)

  6. Integrated Cr(VI) removal using constructed wetlands and composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Mar-Yam; Chowdhury, Abu Khayer Md Muktadirul Bari; Michailides, Michail K; Akratos, Christos S; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2015-01-08

    The present work was conducted to study integrated chromium removal from aqueous solutions in horizontal subsurface (HSF) constructed wetlands. Two pilot-scale HSF constructed wetlands (CWs) units were built and operated. One unit was planted with common reeds (Phragmites australis) and one was kept unplanted. Influent concentrations of Cr(VI) ranged from 0.5 to 10mg/L. The effect of temperature and hydraulic residence time (8-0.5 days) on Cr(VI) removal were studied. Temperature was proved to affect Cr(VI) removal in both units. In the planted unit maximum Cr(VI) removal efficiencies of 100% were recorded at HRT's of 1 day with Cr(VI) concentrations of 5, 2.5 and 1mg/L, while a significantly lower removal rate was recorded in the unplanted unit. Harvested reed biomass from the CWs was co-composted with olive mill wastes. The final product had excellent physicochemical characteristics (C/N: 14.1-14.7, germination index (GI): 145-157%, Cr: 8-10mg/kg dry mass), fulfills EU requirements and can be used as a fertilizer in organic farming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Adsorptive Stabilization of Soil Cr (VI) Using HDTMA Modified Montmorillonite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A series of organo-montomorillonites were prepared using Na-montomorillonite and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA). The organo-montomorillonites were then investigated for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. FT-IR, XRD, SEM and N2 -BET, CEC, Zeta potential measurement were conducted to understand the structural changes of montmorillonites as different amounts of HDTMAs were added as modifier. The characterization results indicated that the clay interlayer spacing distance increased from 1. 25 nm to 2. 13 nm, the clay surface roughness decreased, the clay surface area reduced from 38.91 m² · g⁻¹ to 0.42 m² · g⁻¹, the clay exchangeable cation amount reduced from 62 cmol · kg⁻¹ to 9.9 cmol · kg⁻¹ and the clay surface charge changed from -29.1 mV to 5.59 mV as the dosage of HDTMA in montmorillonite was increased. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of Cr(VI). The effects of the initial soil Cr(VI) concentration, montmorillonites dosage, reaction time and HDTMA modification amount were investigated, respectively. The results revealed that modification of montmorillonites would manifest an attenuated physical adsorptive effect and an enhanced electrostatic adsorptive effect on Cr(VI), suggesting electrostatic effect was the major force that resulted in improved Cr(VI) adsorption onto HDTMA modified montmorillonites.

  8. Global-local optimization of flapping kinematics in hovering flight

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi; Hajj, M. R.; Mook, Dean T.; Stanford, Bret K.; Bé ran, Philip S.; Watson, Layne T.

    2013-01-01

    The kinematics of a hovering wing are optimized by combining the 2-d unsteady vortex lattice method with a hybrid of global and local optimization algorithms. The objective is to minimize the required aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. The hybrid optimization is used to efficiently navigate the complex design space due to wing-wake interference present in hovering aerodynamics. The flapping wing is chosen so that its chord length and flapping frequency match the morphological and flight properties of two insects with different masses. The results suggest that imposing a delay between the different oscillatory motions defining the flapping kinematics, and controlling the way through which the wing rotates at the end of each half stroke can improve aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. Furthermore, our optimization analysis identified optimal kinematics that agree fairly well with observed insect kinematics, as well as previously published numerical results.

  9. Analytical kinematics analysis and synthesis of planar mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Gans, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Using computational techniques and a complex variable formulation, this book teaches the student of kinematics to handle increasingly difficult problems in both the analysis and design of mechanisms all based on the fundamental loop closure equation.

  10. Improving vertex position determination by using a kinematic fit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forden, G.E.; Saxon, D.H.

    1985-05-01

    A method is developed for improving decay vertex reconstruction by using kinematic fits. This is applied to generated charm meson decays. An improvement of 16% in the vertex position measurement along the flight path is achieved. (author)

  11. Cluster algebras in scattering amplitudes with special 2D kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marcus A.C. [Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-15

    We study the cluster algebra of the kinematic configuration space Conf{sub n}(P{sup 3}P3) of an n-particle scattering amplitude restricted to the special 2D kinematics. We found that the n-point two-loop MHVremainder function in special 2D kinematics depends on a selection of the X-coordinates that are part of a special structure of the cluster algebra related to snake triangulations of polygons. This structure forms a necklace of hypercube beads in the corresponding Stasheff polytope. Furthermore at n = 12, the cluster algebra and the selection of theX-coordinates in special2Dkinematics replicates the cluster algebra and the selection of X-coordinates of the n = 6 two-loop MHV amplitude in 4D kinematics. (orig.)

  12. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  13. Global-local optimization of flapping kinematics in hovering flight

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2013-06-01

    The kinematics of a hovering wing are optimized by combining the 2-d unsteady vortex lattice method with a hybrid of global and local optimization algorithms. The objective is to minimize the required aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. The hybrid optimization is used to efficiently navigate the complex design space due to wing-wake interference present in hovering aerodynamics. The flapping wing is chosen so that its chord length and flapping frequency match the morphological and flight properties of two insects with different masses. The results suggest that imposing a delay between the different oscillatory motions defining the flapping kinematics, and controlling the way through which the wing rotates at the end of each half stroke can improve aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. Furthermore, our optimization analysis identified optimal kinematics that agree fairly well with observed insect kinematics, as well as previously published numerical results.

  14. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator...

  15. Overground-Propulsion Kinematics and Acceleration in Elite Wheelchair Rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, David S; Pinder, Ross A; Grimshaw, Paul N; Robertson, William S P

    2018-02-01

    Maximal acceleration from standstill has been identified as a key performance indicator in wheelchair rugby; however, the impact of classification and kinematic variables on performance has received limited attention. This study aimed to investigate kinematic variables during maximal acceleration, with level of activity limitation accounted for using sport-classification scores. Based on their sporting classification scores, which reflect combined trunk, arm, and hand function, 25 elite wheelchair rugby players were analyzed in high-, mid-, and low-point groups before completing five 5-m sprints from a stationary position. Inertial measurement units and video analysis were used to monitor key kinematic variables. Significant differences in kinematic variables were evident across the classification groups, particularly for the first stroke-contact angle (1-way ANOVA F 2,122  = 51.5, P propulsion approaches exist across classification groups, with this information potentially informing individual wheelchair setups and training programs.

  16. Development of advanced blade pitching kinematics for cycloturbines and cyclorotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary Howard

    Cycloturbines and cyclorotors are established concepts for extracting freesteam fluid energy and producing thrust which promise to exceed the performance of traditional horizontal axis turbines and rotors while maintaining unique operational advantages. However, their potential is not yet realized in widespread applications. A central barrier to their proliferation is the lack of fundamental understanding of the aerodynamic interaction between the turbine and the freestream flow. In particular, blade pitch must be precisely actuated throughout the revolution to achieve the proper blade angle of attack and maximize performance. So far, there is no adequate method for determining or implementing the optimal blade pitching kinematics for cyclorotors or cycloturbines. This dissertation bridges the pitching deficiency by introducing a novel low order model to predict improved pitch kinematics, experimentally demonstrating improved performance, and evaluating flow physics with a high order Navier-Stokes computational code. The foundation for developing advanced blade pitch motions is a low order model named Fluxline Theory. Fluid calculations are performed in a coordinate system fixed to streamlines whose spatial locations are not pre-described in order to capture the flow expansion/contraction and bending through the turbine. A transformation then determines the spatial location of streamlines through the rotor disk and finally blade element method integrations determine the power and forces produced. Validation against three sets of extant cycloturbine experimental data demonstrates improvement over other existing streamtube models. Fluxline Theory was extended by removing dependence on a blade element model to better understand how turbine-fluid interaction impacts thrust and power production. This pure momentum variation establishes a cycloturbine performance limit similar to the Betz Limit for horizontal axis wind turbines, as well as the fluid deceleration required

  17. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2012-04-20

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) leaching from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding into important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of G975 Arthrobacter oxydans strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorus-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 1-10 mM in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile cultureware with inserts was used in non-contact bioleaching experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest the G975 bacteria is able to enhance U(VI) leaching from autunite without the direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the U(VI) bioleaching from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  18. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) release from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2•3H2O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of the Arthrobacter oxydans G975 strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorous-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate (ranging between 1 and 10 mM) in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with the G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated that G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile culture-ware with inserts was used in non-contact dissolution experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest that G975 bacteria is able to enhance the release of U(VI) from autunite without direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the release of U(VI) from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  19. Kinematic power corrections in off-forward hard reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2011-11-11

    We develop a general approach to the calculation of kinematic corrections ∝t/Q(2), m(2)/Q(2) in hard processes which involve momentum transfer from the initial to the final hadron state. As the principal result, the complete expression is derived for the time-ordered product of two electromagnetic currents that includes all kinematic corrections to twist-four accuracy. The results are immediately applicable, e.g., to the studies of deeply virtual Compton scattering.

  20. Inverse kinematics problem in robotics using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Charles

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Multilayer Feedforward Networks are applied to the robot inverse kinematic problem. The networks are trained with endeffector position and joint angles. After training, performance is measured by having the network generate joint angles for arbitrary endeffector trajectories. A 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial manipulator is used for the study. It is found that neural networks provide a simple and effective way to both model the manipulator inverse kinematics and circumvent the problems associated with algorithmic solution methods.