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Sample records for experiments combining realistic

  1. Increasing Situational Awareness by Combining Realistic and Non-Realistic Rendering Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Summers, Valerie A; Normoyle, Aline; Flo, Robert

    2005-01-01

    .... The primary objective is to convert the abundance of information into concise knowledge. This paper proposes a method of combining realistic and non-realistic displays to increase display effectiveness, and hence improve situational awareness.

  2. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  3. Realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics and encounter-delayed-choice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, GuiLu; Qin, Wei; Yang, Zhe; Li, Jun-Lin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a realistic interpretation (REIN) of the wave function in quantum mechanics is briefly presented. We demonstrate that in the REIN, the wave function of a microscopic object is its real existence rather than a mere mathematical description. Specifically, the quantum object can exist in disjointed regions of space just as the wave function is distributed, travels at a finite speed, and collapses instantly upon a measurement. Furthermore, we analyze the single-photon interference in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) using the REIN. Based on this, we propose and experimentally implement a generalized delayed-choice experiment, called the encounter-delayed-choice experiment, where the second beam splitter is decided whether or not to insert at the encounter of two sub-waves along the arms of the MZI. In such an experiment, the parts of the sub-waves, which do not travel through the beam splitter, show a particle nature, whereas the remaining parts interfere and thus show a wave nature. The predicted phenomenon is clearly demonstrated in the experiment, thus supporting the REIN idea.

  4. Experimenting with new combinations of old ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Economic experiments have challenged traditional assumptions about, and increased our understanding of, human behavior, resulting in more realistic models. Specialization, both in terms of methods and of situations studied, has contributed considerably to the success of this research program. At the

  5. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: Combining physiological and microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, M.; Wierzchos, J.; De Los Rios, A.; Perez-Ortega, S.; Souza-Egipsy, V.; Ascaso, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. -- Highlights: ► We combined ChlaF measurements with EM images to analyses the biocides action on stone biodeterioration agents. ► At lower biocide concentrations damage to photobiont and mycobiont cells integrity, ultrastructure and vitality were observed. ► The limited action of biocides on fungi and algae were detected using SEM-BSE. ► The combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ. ► This new approach will help to

  6. Experience composite worth: A combination of experience quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research suggests that experience quality and experience value be combined into a single multi-dimensional construct, termed experience composite worth. It briefly describes customer experience, experience quality and experience value and the overlap in the dimensions used in outlining experience quality and ...

  7. Toward a realistic deformation model of the 2008 magmatic intrusion at Etna from combined DInSAR and GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currenti, Gilda; Napoli, Rosalba; Del Negro, Ciro

    2011-12-01

    The combination of (i) DInSAR data, capable of observing deformation pattern at a spatial resolution unachievable with other sparse geodetic measurements, (ii) continuous GPS data, able to provide temporal constraints on source evolution, and (iii) numerical modeling procedures, appropriate to consider a non-uniform opening distribution of a source embedded in a 3D heterogeneous medium, allowed us to infer a complex and realistic deformation model of the magmatic intrusion that occurred in the northern flank of Etna on 13 May 2008. Numerical modeling of ground deformation data defines a near-vertical dyke intruded for 2.5 km starting from a depth of 1400 m asl right below the summit craters and reaching shallow crust level in the northern flank. From the estimated opening distribution of the propagating magma-filled crack, which reached a maximum value of about 2 m, a volumetric expansion of crustal rocks of about 5.3 × 10 6 m 3 was obtained. Also, we clarified the temporal evolution of the northward magmatic intrusion, which lasted just over 5 h with an initial magma propagation velocity of about 1.2 km/h, and decreased to about 0.24 km/h as the driving pressure lowered due to the effusive activity started at southern vents.

  8. Using GPU parallelization to perform realistic simulations of the LPCTrap experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, X., E-mail: fabian@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Mauger, F.; Quéméner, G. [Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Velten, Ph. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Straglingsfysica (Belgium); Ban, G.; Couratin, C. [Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Durand, D. [Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Fabre, B. [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux, CEA/CNRS (France); Finlay, P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Straglingsfysica (Belgium); Fléchard, X.; Liénard, E. [Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Méry, A. [Université de Caen, CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, MSU (United States); Pons, B. [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux, CEA/CNRS (France); Porobic, T.; Severijns, N. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Straglingsfysica (Belgium); Thomas, J. C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France)

    2015-11-15

    The LPCTrap setup is a sensitive tool to measure the β − ν angular correlation coefficient, a{sub βν}, which can yield the mixing ratio ρ of a β decay transition. The latter enables the extraction of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element V{sub ud}. In such a measurement, the most relevant observable is the energy distribution of the recoiling daughter nuclei following the nuclear β decay, which is obtained using a time-of-flight technique. In order to maximize the precision, one can reduce the systematic errors through a thorough simulation of the whole set-up, especially with a correct model of the trapped ion cloud. This paper presents such a simulation package and focuses on the ion cloud features; particular attention is therefore paid to realistic descriptions of trapping field dynamics, buffer gas cooling and the N-body space charge effects.

  9. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bup Kyung; Oh, Tong In; Sajib, Saurav Zk; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-04-01

    To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments.

  10. Exploring the Role of Feel in the Creative Experiences of Modern Dancers: A Realist Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier-Ley, Chantale; Durand-Bush, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Radford (2004) postulated that emotions are fundamentally data that should be used as a guide towards creative acts. Yet, empirically speaking, we know very little about the role of emotions, and more specifically feel, in the creative experiences of dancers. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of feel in the creative experiences of…

  11. CrashEd – A live immersive, learning experience embedding STEM subjects in a realistic, interactive crime scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L. Bassford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactive experiences are rapidly becoming popular via the surge of ‘escape rooms’; part game and part theatre, the ‘escape’ experience is exploding globally, having gone from zero offered at the outset of 2010 to at least 2800 different experiences available worldwide today. CrashEd is an interactive learning experience that parallels many of the attractions of an escape room – it incorporates a staged, realistic ‘crime scene’ and invites participants to work together to gather forensic evidence and question a witness in order to solve a crime, all whilst competing against a ticking clock. An animation can enhance reality and engage with cognitive processes to help learning; in CrashEd, it is the last piece of the jigsaw that consolidates the students’ incremental acquisition of knowledge to tie together the pieces of evidence, identify a suspect and ultimately solve the crime. This article presents the background to CrashEd and an overview of how a timely placed animation at the end of an educational experience can enhance learning. The lessons learned, from delivering bespoke versions of the experience to different demographic groups, are discussed. The article will consider the successes and challenges raised by the collaborative project, future developments and potential wider implications of the development of CrashEd.

  12. Erosion by sliding wear in granular flows: Experiments with realistic contact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, C. P.; Hung, C. Y.; Smith, B.; Li, L.; Grinspun, E.; Capart, H.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flow erosion is a powerful and sometimes dominant process in steep channels. Despite its importance, this phenomenon is relatively little studied in the lab. The large drum experiments of Hsu are a notable exception, in which almost-field-scale impact forces were generated at the head of a synthetic debris flow whose properties (grain size, proportion of fines, etc) were varied widely.A key challenge in these and similar experiments is to explore how erosion rate varies as a function of the scale of the flow (thereby varying inertial stresses, impact forces, etc). The geometrical limitations of most lab experiments, and their short run time, severely limit the scope of such explorations.We achieve this scale exploration in a set of drum erosion experiments by varying effective gravity across several orders of magnitude (1g, 10g, 100g) in a geotechnical centrifuge. By half-filling our 40cm-diameter drum with dry 2.3mm grains, placing a synthetic rock plate at the back and a glass plate at the front 3cm apart, and rotating the drum at 1-50rpm, we simulate wear in a channelized dry granular flow. In contrast to Hsu's experiments, we focus on sliding wear erosion at the flow boundary rather than impact/frictional wear at the flow head. By varying effective gravity from 1g-100g we can tune the pressure exerted by the grains at the boundary without having to change the scale of our apparatus. Using a recently developed depth-averaged, kinetic-energy closure theory for granular flow, we can simultaneously tune the drum rotation rate such that the flow dynamics remain invariant. We can thereby explore how changing the scale of a granular flow, and thus the contact forces of grains on the boundary, controls the rate of rock erosion. Using a small apparatus we can simulate the erosion generated by debris flows several meters deep involving grains up to 10cm in diameter.Our results suggest that sliding wear is the main erosion process, and are consistent with Archard

  13. Experience composite worth: A combination of experience quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kirstam

    13This research suggests that experience quality and experience value be combined into a single ... Dr F. Amoah, Prof. L. Radder & Dr M. Van Eyk are in the Department of Marketing Management, Nelson Mandela Univer- .... hospitality industry (the empirical focus of the current study) by Otto and Ritchie. (1996) and have ...

  14. Modelling Solar Energetic Particle Propagation in Realistic Heliospheric Solar Wind Conditions Using a Combined MHD and Stochastic Differential Equation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsen, N.; Poedts, S.; Pomoell, J.

    2017-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are high energy particles originating from solar eruptive events. These particles can be energised at solar flare sites during magnetic reconnection events, or in shock waves propagating in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These CME-driven shocks are in particular believed to act as powerful accelerators of charged particles throughout their propagation in the solar corona. After escaping from their acceleration site, SEPs propagate through the heliosphere and may eventually reach our planet where they can disrupt the microelectronics on satellites in orbit and endanger astronauts among other effects. Therefore it is of vital importance to understand and thereby build models capable of predicting the characteristics of SEP events. The propagation of SEPs in the heliosphere can be described by the time-dependent focused transport equation. This five-dimensional parabolic partial differential equation can be solved using e.g., a finite difference method or by integrating a set of corresponding first order stochastic differential equations. In this work we take the latter approach to model SEP events under different solar wind and scattering conditions. The background solar wind in which the energetic particles propagate is computed using a magnetohydrodynamic model. This allows us to study the influence of different realistic heliospheric configurations on SEP transport. In particular, in this study we focus on exploring the influence of high speed solar wind streams originating from coronal holes that are located close to the eruption source region on the resulting particle characteristics at Earth. Finally, we discuss our upcoming efforts towards integrating our particle propagation model with time-dependent heliospheric MHD space weather modelling.

  15. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and field (SEF data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  16. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Küpper, Philipp; Heers, Marcel; Kugel, Harald; Galka, Andreas; Hamid, Laith; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Rampp, Stefan; Wolters, Carsten Hermann

    2014-01-01

    To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and field (SEF) data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  17. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-testpost-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realisticmathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this studywere 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ characterwho were treated by realistic mathematics education is better thenstudents’ character who were treated by conventional mathematicseducation The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level

  18. Combining risk analysis and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the systematic utilization of operating experience in the decision making process concerning large industrial facilities. Even before the advent of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), operating experience had always played an important role in such decisions. Of course, operating experience has always been an input to PSA also; however, as PSA becomes more mature and the quality and quantity of operating experience improve, greater emphasis is now being placed on the use of operating experience to update and validate PSA and thereby provide a more rational basis for decision making. This report outlines the ways in which data are collected, processed using mathematical techniques and utilized in decision making. It is not intended to provide details of the methods and procedures to be used in these areas, but is rather intended as an introduction to these topics and some of the relevant literature. The meeting presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: evaluation of nuclear power plants operational experience (5 papers); uncertainties (2 papers); probabilistic safety assessment studies in Member States (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  19. CrashEd--A Live Immersive, Learning Experience Embedding STEM Subjects in a Realistic, Interactive Crime Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassford, Marie L.; Crisp, Annette; O'Sullivan, Angela; Bacon, Joanne; Fowler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Interactive experiences are rapidly becoming popular via the surge of "escape rooms"; part game and part theatre, the "escape" experience is exploding globally, having gone from zero offered at the outset of 2010 to at least 2800 different experiences available worldwide today. CrashEd is an interactive learning experience that…

  20. Implementing health promotion in schools: protocol for a realist systematic review of research and experience in the United Kingdom (UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Mark

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School-based interventions and campaigns are used to promote health and address a wide variety of public health problems. Schools are considered to be key sites for the implementation of health promotion programmes for their potential to reach the whole population in particular age-groups and instil healthy patterns of behavior early in life. However, evidence for the effectiveness of school-based health promotion interventions is highly variable. Systematic reviews of the evidence of school-based interventions tend to be highly problem- or intervention- specific, thereby missing potential generic insights into implementation and effectiveness of such programmes across problems. Methods/design A realist systematic review will be undertaken to explain how, why and in what circumstances schools can provide feasible settings for effective health promotion programmes in the United Kingdom (UK. The review will be conducted in two phases. Phase 1 will identify programme theories about implementation (ideas about what enables or inhibits effective health promotion to be delivered in a school setting. Phase 2 will test the programme theories so that they can be challenged, endorsed and/or refined. A Review Advisory Group of education and health professionals will be convened to help identify and choose potential programme theories, provide a ‘reality check’ on the clarity and explanatory strength of the mechanisms to be tested, and help shape the presentation of findings to be usable by practitioners and decision-makers. Review findings will be disseminated through liaison with decision-makers, and voluntary and professional groups in the fields of education and health.

  1. Policymakers' experience of a capacity-building intervention designed to increase their use of research: a realist process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Abby; Brennan, Sue; Redman, Sally; Williamson, Anna; Makkar, Steve R; Gallego, Gisselle; Butow, Phyllis

    2017-11-23

    An intervention's success depends on how participants interact with it in local settings. Process evaluation examines these interactions, indicating why an intervention was or was not effective, and how it (and similar interventions) can be improved for better contextual fit. This is particularly important for innovative trials like Supporting Policy In health with Research: an Intervention Trial (SPIRIT), where causal mechanisms are poorly understood. SPIRIT was testing a multi-component intervention designed to increase the capacity of health policymakers to use research. Our mixed-methods process evaluation sought to explain variation in observed process effects across the six agencies that participated in SPIRIT. Data collection included observations of intervention workshops (n = 59), purposively sampled interviews (n = 76) and participant feedback forms (n = 553). Using a realist approach, data was coded for context-mechanism-process effect configurations (retroductive analysis) by two authors. Intervention workshops were very well received. There was greater variation of views regarding other aspects of SPIRIT such as data collection, communication and the intervention's overall value. We identified nine inter-related mechanisms that were crucial for engaging participants in these policy settings: (1) Accepting the premise (agreeing with the study's assumptions); (2) Self-determination (participative choice); (3) The Value Proposition (seeing potential gain); (4) 'Getting good stuff' (identifying useful ideas, resources or connections); (5) Self-efficacy (believing 'we can do this!'); (6) Respect (feeling that SPIRIT understands and values one's work); (7) Confidence (believing in the study's integrity and validity); (8) Persuasive leadership (authentic and compelling advocacy from leaders); and (9) Strategic insider facilitation (local translation and mediation). These findings were used to develop tentative explanatory propositions and to revise the

  2. Mechanisms that Trigger a Good Health-Care Response to Intimate Partner Violence in Spain. Combining Realist Evaluation and Qualitative Comparative Analysis Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Marchal, Bruno; Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Otero-García, Laura; García-Quinto, Marta; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals, especially those working in primary health-care services, can play a key role in preventing and responding to intimate partner violence. However, there are huge variations in the way health care professionals and primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence. In this study we tested a previously developed programme theory on 15 primary health care center teams located in four different Spanish regions: Murcia, C Valenciana, Castilla-León and Cantabria. The aim was to identify the key combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that trigger a good primary health care center team response to intimate partner violence. A multiple case-study design was used. Qualitative and quantitative information was collected from each of the 15 centers (cases). In order to handle the large amount of information without losing familiarity with each case, qualitative comparative analysis was undertaken. Conditions (context and mechanisms) and outcomes, were identified and assessed for each of the 15 cases, and solution formulae were calculated using qualitative comparative analysis software. The emerging programme theory highlighted the importance of the combination of each team's self-efficacy, perceived preparation and women-centredness in generating a good team response to intimate partner violence. The use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care were the most relevant contextual/intervention conditions to trigger a good response. However in order to achieve this, they must be combined with other conditions, such as an enabling team climate, having a champion social worker and having staff with training in intimate partner violence. Interventions to improve primary health care teams' response to intimate partner violence should focus on strengthening team's self-efficacy, perceived preparation and the implementation of a woman-centred approach. The use of the protocol combined with a large working

  3. Mechanisms that Trigger a Good Health-Care Response to Intimate Partner Violence in Spain. Combining Realist Evaluation and Qualitative Comparative Analysis Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Marchal, Bruno; Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Otero-García, Laura; García-Quinto, Marta; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care professionals, especially those working in primary health-care services, can play a key role in preventing and responding to intimate partner violence. However, there are huge variations in the way health care professionals and primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence. In this study we tested a previously developed programme theory on 15 primary health care center teams located in four different Spanish regions: Murcia, C Valenciana, Castilla-León and Cantabria. The aim was to identify the key combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that trigger a good primary health care center team response to intimate partner violence. Methods A multiple case-study design was used. Qualitative and quantitative information was collected from each of the 15 centers (cases). In order to handle the large amount of information without losing familiarity with each case, qualitative comparative analysis was undertaken. Conditions (context and mechanisms) and outcomes, were identified and assessed for each of the 15 cases, and solution formulae were calculated using qualitative comparative analysis software. Results The emerging programme theory highlighted the importance of the combination of each team’s self-efficacy, perceived preparation and women-centredness in generating a good team response to intimate partner violence. The use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care were the most relevant contextual/intervention conditions to trigger a good response. However in order to achieve this, they must be combined with other conditions, such as an enabling team climate, having a champion social worker and having staff with training in intimate partner violence. Conclusions Interventions to improve primary health care teams’ response to intimate partner violence should focus on strengthening team’s self-efficacy, perceived preparation and the implementation of a woman-centred approach. The use of the

  4. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  5. Environmentally-realistic concentration of cadmium combined with polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched diets modulated non-specific immunity in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Valérie; Ouaach, Abderrahim; Mandiki, S N M; Flamion, Enora; Ferain, Aline; Van Larebeke, Mélusine; Lemaire, Benjamin; Reyes López, Felipe E; Tort, Lluis; Larondelle, Yvan; Kestemont, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Nutrition is crucial to grow healthy fish particularly in a context of pollution, overcrowding and pathogen risks. Nowadays, the search for food components able to improve fish health is increasingly developing. Here, the influence of four dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) on the sensitivity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) juveniles to environmentally realistic cadmium (Cd, 0.3 μg/L) concentration was investigated. Fish diets were designed to ensure the specific abundance of one of these individual PUFAs, and were given for a 4-week pre-conditioning period followed by a 6-week Cd exposure period. Focus was put on growth performance and immune responses following a short (24 h) and a long-term (6 weeks) Cd exposure. For each experimental condition, some fish were submitted to a bacterial challenge (24 h) with Aeromonas salmonicida achromogenes at the end of Cd conditioning period. DHA-enriched diet improved growth performances as compared to LA-enriched diet, but also increased ROS production (after short-term exposure to Cd) that could lead to a higher inflammation status, and some immunity-related genes (at short and long-term exposure). We notably highlighted the fact that even a low, environmentally-realistic concentration, Cd can strongly impact the immune system of rainbow trout, and that specific dietary PUFA enrichment strategies can improve growth performance (DHA-enriched diet), provide protection against oxidative stress (ALA- and EPA-enriched diet) and stimulate non-specific immunity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary Experiment Combining Virtual Reality Haptic Shoes and Audio Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Berrezag, Amir; Dimitrov, Smilen

    2010-01-01

    , or be covered with crumpling material. In a preliminary discrimination experiment, 15 participants were asked to recognize four different surfaces in a list of sixteen possibilities and under three different conditions, haptics only, audition only and combined haptic-audition. The results indicate that subjects...... are able to recognize most of the stimuli in the audition only condition, and some of the material properties such as hardness in the haptics only condition. The combination of auditory and haptic cues did not improve recognition significantly....

  7. Leg Rejuvenation: A Combination Approach: A Review and Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Margaret; Mahoney, Anne M; Gold, Michael; Lawrence, Naomi

    2016-05-01

    Patients increasingly seek to enhance the appearance of their legs. Elimination of unwanted leg veins, reduction of epidermal photo-aging changes such as solar lentigines and keratoses, tightening of skin laxity and reduction of adipose tissue are among the most commonly requested goals. Many patients require a combination approach to address their concerns. It is important for dermatologists to be aware of the multitude of procedures that can be performed, often in combination, to rejuvenate the leg. The purpose of this review article was to discuss procedures for improving the appearance of the leg and to share the authors experience, especially in the combination approach to leg rejuvenation. A literature search was performed to investigate cosmetic procedures being performed on the leg, with an emphasis on controlled or randomized studies. In addition, the authors contributed their personal experience. Our discussion of the literature review highlights the treatments for leg veins, unwanted fat, cellulite, and photodamage of the legs that are most supported in peer-reviewed publications. A synergistic, combination approach to leg rejuvenation works best. This includes the use of injectable agents, energy-based devices, and more invasive surgical procedures.

  8. Dynamics of fault slip near the stability transition combining laboratory and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele Veedu, D.; Giorgetti, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Barbot, S.; Marone, C.; Collettini, C.

    2017-12-01

    Frictional stability controls the seismogenic potential of faults. Laboratory (1) and theoretical (2) studies document and predict the conditions under which fault slip is seismic or aseismic. However, the full gamut of fault slip behavior near the stable/unstable boundary is still poorly known. Here, we combine insight from laboratory and numerical experiments to identify the wide spectrum of frictional instabilities around that transition, including slow-slip events, period-multiplying events, and chaos. We present a synoptic picture of the dynamics of fault slip in a bifurcation diagram obtained from a series of laboratory and numerical experiments. We compare the laboratory observations with spring-slider and finite-fault numerical models. In the laboratory, we vary the stiffness of the system by modulating the stress field around the experimental fault. In the numerical experiments, we vary the characteristic weakening distance to explore a range of critical nucleation sizes. Contrarily to previously found (3), complex fault dynamics can be obtained with a rate-and-state constitutive law with a single state variable. While the dynamics of fault slip is complicated on large faults by the presence of morphological and rheological heterogeneities, the range of instabilities identified in the laboratory is reminiscent of the variety of slow and fast earthquakes found along subduction zones (4). The accord between laboratory data and theoretical models affords more realistic predictions of fault behavior at slow slip speeds. (1) Scuderi et al., (2016), (2) Ruina (1983), (3) Gu & Wong (1994), (4) Obara & Kato (2016)

  9. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character:Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t-test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ character who were treated by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ character who were treated by conventional mathematics education The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level  Keywords: Critical Thinking, Students’ Character, Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.566.75-94

  10. Differences in the emotional and practical experiences of exclusively breastfeeding and combination feeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninou, Sophia; Fallon, Victoria; Halford, Jason Christian Grovenor; Harrold, Joanne Alison

    2017-07-01

    The majority of research examining the barriers to breastfeeding focuses on the physical challenges faced by mothers rather than the risks of encountering negative emotional and practical feeding experiences. We aimed to quantify the emotional and practical experiences of the overall sample of breastfeeding mothers and identify the differences in the emotional and practical experiences of exclusively breastfeeding mothers and combination feeding mothers, by feeding type and intention. Eight hundred forty-five mothers with infants up to 26 weeks of age and who had initiated breastfeeding were recruited through relevant social media via advertisements providing a link to an online survey. Predictors of emotional experiences included guilt, stigma, satisfaction with feeding method, and the need to defend themselves due to infant feeding choices. Practical predictors included perceived support from health professionals, main sources of infant feeding information, and respect from their everyday environment, workplace, and when breastfeeding in public. Current feeding type and prenatal feeding intention. In the overall sample, 15% of the mothers reported feeling guilty, 38% stigmatized, and 55% felt the need to defend their feeding choice. Binary logit models revealed that guilt and dissatisfaction were directly associated with feeding type, being higher when supplementing with formula. No associations with feeding intention were identified. This study demonstrates a link between current breastfeeding promotion strategies and the emotional state of breastfeeding mothers who supplement with formula to any extent. To minimize the negative impact on maternal well-being, it is important that future recommendations recognize the challenges that exclusive breastfeeding brings and provide a more balanced and realistic target for mothers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kuhn: Realist or Antirealist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ghins

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Kuhn is much more an antirealist than a realist, the earlier and later articulations of realist and antirealist ingredients in his views merit close scrutiny. What are the constituents of the real invariant World posited by Kuhn and its relation to the mutable paradigm-related worlds? Various proposed solutions to this problem (dubbed the "new-world problem" by Ian Hacking are examined and shown to be unsatisfactory. In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the stable World can reasonably be taken to be made up of ordinary perceived objects, whereas in Kuhn's later works the transparadigmatic World is identified with something akin to the Kantian world-in-itself. It is argued that both proposals are beset with insuperable difficulties which render Kuhn's earlier and later versions of antirealism implausible.

  12. Realistic Material Appearance Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Filip, Jiří; Hatka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 81 (2010), s. 13-14 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : bidirectional texture function * texture modelling Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/RO/haindl-realistic material appearance modelling.pdf

  13. Methods and computing challenges of the realistic simulation of physics events in the presence of pile-up in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We are now in a regime where we observe substantial multiple proton-proton collisions within each filled LHC bunch-crossing and also multiple filled bunch-crossings within the sensitive time window of the ATLAS detector. This will increase with increased luminosity in the near future. Including these effects in Monte Carlo simulation poses significant computing challenges. We present a description of the standard approach used by the ATLAS experiment and details of how we manage the conflicting demands of keeping the background dataset size as small as possible while minimizing the effect of background event re-use. We also present details of the methods used to minimize the memory footprint of these digitization jobs, to keep them within the grid limit, despite combining the information from thousands of simulated events at once. We also describe an alternative approach, known as Overlay. Here, the actual detector conditions are sampled from raw data using a special zero-bias trigger, and the simulated physi...

  14. Getting realistic; Endstation Demut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.P.

    2004-01-28

    The fuel cell hype of the turn of the millenium has reached its end. The industry is getting realistic. If at all, fuel cell systems for private single-family and multiple dwellings will not be available until the next decade. With a Europe-wide field test, Vaillant intends to advance the PEM technology. [German] Der Brennstoffzellen-Hype der Jahrtausendwende ist verfolgen. Die Branche uebt sich in Bescheidenheit. Die Marktreife der Systeme fuer Ein- und Mehrfamilienhaeuser wird - wenn ueberhaupt - wohl erst im naechsten Jahrzehnt erreicht sein. Vaillant will durch einen europaweiten Feldtest die Entwicklung der PEM-Technologie vorantreiben. (orig.)

  15. Quantifying denitrification in rippled permeable sands through combined flume experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Adam J.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2012-01-01

    We measured denitrification in permeable sediments in a sealed flume tank with environmentally representative fluid flow and solute transport behavior using novel measurements. Numerical flow and reactive transport models representing the flume experiments were implemented to provide mechanistic...... of permeable sediments with nonmigratory ripples to remove bioavailable nitrogen from coastal ecosystems is lower than that of cohesive sediments. We conclude that while experimental measurements provide a good starting point for constraining key parameters, reactive transport models with realistic kinetic...

  16. Simulación clínica de alto realismo: una experiencia en el pregrado Realistic clinical simulation: an experience with undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Riancho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La simulación con modelos de alto realismo se utiliza a menudo en la formación de los profesionales sanitarios. Sin embargo, son escasas las experiencias en el pregrado. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer la factibilidad y la aceptación de su aplicación con estudiantes de sexto curso de la licenciatura de Medicina. Materiales y métodos. Se diseñaron ocho escenarios que simulaban problemas clínicos frecuentes para su desarrollo con maniquíes de alto realismo. Los estudiantes se dividieron en grupos de 6-8 sujetos, cada uno de los cuales atendió dos casos durante 30 minutos. Posteriormente se llevó a cabo un análisis reflexivo durante 25-40 minutos. La actividad se repitió en dos años consecutivos. Al final se recabó la opinión de los estudiantes mediante encuestas anónimas. Resultados. La actividad fue valorada muy positivamente por los estudiantes, quienes la consideraron como "útil" (4,8 y 4,9 puntos sobre 5 e "interesante" (4,9 y 4,9 puntos. El tiempo preciso para preparar cada escenario fue de unas 3 horas. Fueron necesarias una jornada completa de un profesor, un técnico y un enfermero para que un colectivo de unos 40 estudiantes se expusiera a dos casos clínicos. Conclusiones. Esta experiencia piloto sugiere que la simulación de alto realismo es factible en el pregrado, supone un consumo razonable de recursos y tiene una elevada aceptación por parte de los estudiantes. No obstante, se necesitan otros estudios que confirmen la impresión subjetiva de que resulta útil para potenciar el aprendizaje de los alumnos y su competencia clínica.Introduction. Realistic clinical simulation is commonly used with physicians and other health professionals. However it has been rarely used with undergraduate students. The aim of this study was to explore its feasibility and acceptance with medical students. Materials and methods. Eight clinical scenarios representing common acute problems in medical practice were

  17. Resonant scattering by realistic impurities in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, T O; Yuan, S; Lichtenstein, A I; Geim, A K; Katsnelson, M I

    2010-07-30

    We develop a first-principles theory of resonant impurities in graphene and show that a broad range of typical realistic impurities leads to the characteristic sublinear dependence of the conductivity on the carrier concentration. By means of density functional calculations various organic groups as well as adatoms such as H absorbed to graphene are shown to create midgap states within ±0.03  eV around the neutrality point. A low energy tight-binding description is mapped out. Boltzmann transport theory as well as a numerically exact Kubo formula approach yield the conductivity of graphene contaminated with these realistic impurities in accordance with recent experiments.

  18. Space Weathering of airless bodies in the Solar System - Combining hypervelocity dust impacts with energetic irradiation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, K.; Bennett, C.; Guglielmino, M.; Orlando, T. M.; Trieloff, M.; Srama, R.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of meteorites and their parent asteroids provides us with information about the processes and conditions during the formation of the inner Solar System. However, linking meteorites to their parent bodies is problematic. Astronomical observations aim to reconstruct the surface properties of these bodies primarily by visible and infrared spectra, but space weathering severely modifies the optical, compositional and physical properties of thin surface layers and thus precludes proper identification of chemistry and mineralogy. The effects of space weathering have been experimentally studied mainly with respect to ion bombardment and sputtering. Other studies aimed to simulate the influence of micrometeoroid bombardment by using laser ablation techniques. However, there is sufficient evidence that laser ablation does not realistically lead to the same effects as produced during real micrometeorite impacts. We performed micrometeorite bombardment using a 2MV dust accelerator at the Institute for Space Systems at University of Stuttgart, Germany, capable of generating impact speeds up to 100 km s-1. These results are combined with energetic irradiation experiments at the Electron and Photon Induced Chemistry on Surfaces (EPICS) laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. By simulating highly realistic irradiation conditions, we are able to investigate the processes of particle and solar wind irradiation on solid planetary surfaces and study the formation of e.g., nanophase iron in minerals, the effects on hydrous minerals regarding their volatile budgets, or possible OH-formation in nominally anhydrous minerals and relate these to their optical properties. Using a variety of minerals, this work aims to contribute to a better understanding of the general alteration mechanisms in space environments in dependence of weathering agent and available material. We here present the results of initial comparison analysis and

  19. ANALYSIS OF WELDED POLYPROPYLENE STRUCTURES: COMBINATION OF EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Distlbacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of joining by extrusion welding on the tensional stiffness and strength of a Polypropylene copolymer was analysed. Short-term and creep tests with laboratory specimens were conducted. Welded joint sub-components were simulated with the finite element method and the results were validated by experiments.

  20. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results....... Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges....

  1. Operation experience with the CYCLONE-OCTOPUS combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol, J.-L.; Chevalier, A.; Jongen, Y.; Lacroix, M.; Mathy, F.; Ryckewaert, G.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last year (till September 1986) the CYCLONE-OCTOPUS combination has been operated almost 85 % of the total possible time for nuclear physics, isotope production, radiobiology and neutrontherapy and technological applications. A new ECR-source for multicharged heavy ions using a Sm-Co permanent magnet octupole (OCTOPUS) was constructed at the C.R.C. in Louvain-la- Neuve during 1985. The source was put into full operation with the cyclotron by the end of October 1985. A minor problem of short term instability of the beam intensity was solved by changing the main stage microwave feed from radial to axial. During restart after this modification, a hole was melted, by accident due to a human error, in the octupole envelope, causing a water leak. Except from this, the new source operated continuously and reliably up to now. The performance level, which is comparable now to that of ECREVIS, is still preliminary and should be improved by future development. (author)

  2. Using Screenwriting Techniques To Create Realistic and Ethical Role Plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an innovative training strategy that can be used to make role plays a more realistic learning experience for counseling students. The method involves using techniques that screenwriters use to create believable characters and applying these techniques to help students create realistic role-play clients. This approach also resolves some…

  3. Regularization techniques in realistic Laplacian computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortel, Radoslav; Sovka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    This paper explores regularization options for the ill-posed spline coefficient equations in the realistic Laplacian computation. We investigate the use of the Tikhonov regularization, truncated singular value decomposition, and the so-called lambda-correction with the regularization parameter chosen by the L-curve, generalized cross-validation, quasi-optimality, and the discrepancy principle criteria. The provided range of regularization techniques is much wider than in the previous works. The improvement of the realistic Laplacian is investigated by simulations on the three-shell spherical head model. The conclusion is that the best performance is provided by the combination of the Tikhonov regularization and the generalized cross-validation criterion-a combination that has never been suggested for this task before.

  4. Combining AIET with chemotherapy - lessons learnt from our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidambaram R

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in women and as per the data in 2008, this deadly cancer was responsible for 458,503 deaths worldwide in 2008 [1]. Several researches are on-going for identifying therapeutic strategies for breast cancer. Breast cancer biology is complex and breast cancer stem cells that are often resistant to conventional therapies like chemotherapy [2] increases the complexity as it has been reported that at even early stages of the disease, a portion of the breast cancer cells may have eloped to the bone marrow facilitated by the mesenchymal stem cells [3] and remain dormant becoming active later thereby causing recurrence or advancement of the disease. Natural Killer (NK cell based Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET which has been administered for different types of cancers [4,5] represents a potential option, as NK cells being a part of innate immunity help in tackling circulating cancer cells [6] and cancer stem cells [7] thereby helping to prevent metastasis. Herein we report our experience of NK cell based AIET in a patient of stage III A breast cancer (inflammatory type diagnosed three months post-partum. A 29 year old female with history of pain and tenderness in the left breast post-partum was investigated in October 2012 and the investigations revealed the presence of infiltrating ductal carcinoma (pT3 N2a Mx- Stage III A (T4bN2M0 and the cancer was ER positive, PR negative, Her2neu negative, Ki67 positive (86% of the tumour cells and EGFR, Cytokeratin 5 negative. The patient underwent three cycles of pre-operative chemotherapy (from October 2012 to December 2012 using Doxorubicin, Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide followed by left modified radical mastectomy (December 2012 and then three cycles of post-operative chemotherapy (from January to February 2013. The patient simultaneously underwent 12 transfusions of NK cell based AIET from November 2012 to February 2013 planned in accordance with the

  5. Should scientific realists be platonists?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Jacob; Morrison, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Realists about are arrived at by any inferen- tial route which eschews causes (§3), and nor is there any direct pressure for Scientific Real- ists to change their inferential methods (§4). We suggest that in order to maintain inferential parity with Scientific Realism, proponents of EIA need to give......Enhanced Indispensability Arguments (EIA) claim that Scientific Realists are committed to the existence of mathematical entities due to their reliance on Inference to the Best Explana- tion (IBE). Our central question concerns this purported parity of reasoning: do people who defend the EIA make...... an appropriate use of the resources of Scientific Realism (in particular, IBE) to achieve platonism? (§2) We argue that just because a variety of different inferential strategies can be employed by Scientific Realists does not mean that ontological conclusions concerning which things we should be Scientific...

  6. Making Sense of the Combined Degree Experience: The Example of Criminology Double Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimshurst, Kerry; Manning, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken on student experiences of combined degrees. The few studies report that a considerable number of students experienced difficulty with the contrasting epistemic/disciplinary demands of the component programmes. A mixed-methods approach was employed to explore the experiences of graduates from four double degrees…

  7. A combination of preliminary results on gauge boson couplings measured by the LEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    This note presents a combination of published and preliminary measurements of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) and quartic gauge boson couplings (QGCs) from the four LEP experiments. We give an updated combination of the charged TGCs, g1z, kg and lg in single and multi-parameter fits. Updated results from the QGCs from the ZZgg vertex, ac/Lambda^2 and a0/Lambda^2, are given as well. The combinations of neutral TGCs hiv anf fiv are also presented, including an updated fiv combination.

  8. Realistic Visualization of Virtual Views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    phenomena captured in the reference photographs, (i.e. the transfer of photographic-realism). An overview of most prominent approaches in realistic virtual view synthesis will be presented and briefly discussed. Applications of proposed methods to visual survey, virtual cinematography, as well as mobile...

  9. Assessment and realistic mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M. van den

    1996-01-01

    This book describes the consequences of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) for assessing students’ understanding of mathematics in primary school. RME is the Dutch answer to the worldwide need to reform mathematics education. Changed ideas about mathematics as a school subject, its goals,

  10. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  11. Realist Criminology and its Discontents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Winlow

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical criminology must move beyond twentieth-century empiricist and idealist paradigms because the concepts and research programmes influenced by these paradigms are falling into obsolescence. Roger Matthews’ recent work firmly advocates this position and helps to set the ball rolling. Here we argue that Matthews’ attempt to use critical realist thought to move Left Realism towards an advanced position can help to put criminology on a sound new footing. However, before this becomes possible numerous philosophical and theoretical issues must be ironed out. Most importantly, critical criminology must avoid political pragmatism and adopt a more critical stance towards consumer culture’s spectacle. A searching analysis of these issues suggests that, ultimately, criminology is weighed down with obsolete thinking to such an extent that to remain intellectually relevant it must move beyond both Left Realism and Critical Realism to construct a new ultra-realist position.

  12. Societal impact of combination vaccines: experiences of physicians, nurses, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslap-Petraco, Mary Beth; Judelsohn, Richard G

    2008-01-01

    Crowded immunization schedules can result in missed or delayed dosing. Combination vaccines help immunize children on time, limit the required number of injections, and allow new vaccines to be added to the schedule. In the United States, a pentavalent vaccine combining diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), recombinant hepatitis B (HepB), and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is available. Here, we describe the findings of informal surveys among providers, nurse managers, business managers, and parents on their attitudes toward and experiences with the DTaP-HepB-IPV vaccine. Combination vaccine use is expected to increase as more become available and awareness of their benefits grows.

  13. Realist cinema as world cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Nagib, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The idea that “realism” is the common denominator across the vast range of productions normally labelled as “world cinema” is widespread and seemly uncontroversial. Leaving aside oppositional binaries that define world cinema as the other of Hollywood or of classical cinema, this chapter will test the realist premise by locating it in the mode of production. It will define this mode as an ethics that engages filmmakers, at cinema’s creative peaks, with the physical and historical environment,...

  14. Realist Criminology and its Discontents

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Winlow; Steve Hall

    2016-01-01

    Critical criminology must move beyond twentieth-century empiricist and idealist paradigms because the concepts and research programmes influenced by these paradigms are falling into obsolescence. Roger Matthews’ recent work firmly advocates this position and helps to set the ball rolling. Here we argue that Matthews’ attempt to use critical realist thought to move Left Realism towards an advanced position can help to put criminology on a sound new footing. However, before this becomes possibl...

  15. Simple and Realistic Data Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kenneth Houkjær; Torp, Kristian; Wind, Rico

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generic, DBMS independent, and highly extensible relational data generation tool. The tool can efficiently generate realistic test data for OLTP, OLAP, and data streaming applications. The tool uses a graph model to direct the data generation. This model makes it very simple...... to generate data even for large database schemas with complex inter- and intra table relationships. The model also makes it possible to generate data with very accurate characteristics....

  16. Realistic rhetoric and legal decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Maurício Adeodato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The text aims to lay the foundations of a realistic rhetoric, from the descriptive perspective of how the legal decision actually takes place, without normative considerations. Aristotle's rhetorical idealism and its later prestige reduced rhetoric to the art of persuasion, eliminating important elements of sophistry, especially with regard to legal decision. It concludes with a rhetorical perspective of judicial activism in complex societies.

  17. Realistic modelling of the seismic input Site effects and parametric studies

    CERN Document Server

    Romanelli, F; Vaccari, F

    2002-01-01

    We illustrate the work done in the framework of a large international cooperation, showing the very recent numerical experiments carried out within the framework of the EC project 'Advanced methods for assessing the seismic vulnerability of existing motorway bridges' (VAB) to assess the importance of non-synchronous seismic excitation of long structures. The definition of the seismic input at the Warth bridge site, i.e. the determination of the seismic ground motion due to an earthquake with a given magnitude and epicentral distance from the site, has been done following a theoretical approach. In order to perform an accurate and realistic estimate of site effects and of differential motion it is necessary to make a parametric study that takes into account the complex combination of the source and propagation parameters, in realistic geological structures. The computation of a wide set of time histories and spectral information, corresponding to possible seismotectonic scenarios for different sources and stru...

  18. Tuukka Kaidesoja on Critical Realist Transcendental Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groff Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I argue that critical realists think pretty much what Tukka Kaidesoja says that he himself thinks, but also that Kaidesoja’s objections to the views that he attributes to critical realists are not persuasive.

  19. Realistic simulations of coaxial atomisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Fuster, Daniel; Arrufat Jackson, Tomas; Ling, Yue; Cenni, Matteo; Scardovelli, Ruben; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    We discuss advances in the methodology for Direct Numerical Simulations of coaxial atomization in typical experimental conditions. Such conditions are extremely demanding for the numerical methods. The key difficulty seems to be the combination of high density ratios, surface tension, and large Reynolds numbers. We explore how using a momentum-conserving Volume-Of-Fluid scheme allows to improve the stability and accuracy of the simulations. We show computational evidence that the use of momentum conserving methods allows to reduce the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude in the simple case of a falling rain drop. We then apply these ideas to coaxial atomization. We show that in moderate-size simulations in air-water conditions close to real experiments, instabilities are still present and then discuss ways to fix them. Among those, removing small VOF debris and improving the time-stepping scheme are two important directions.The accuracy of the simulations is then discussed in comparison with experimental results and in particular the angle of ejection of the structures. The code used for this research is free and distributed at http://parissimulator.sf.net.

  20. International experience in addressing combined exposures: Increasing the efficiency of assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meek, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    More efficient methodology for assessing the impact of combined exposures to multiple chemicals has been considered in a project of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS). Recommendations regarding terminology and the status of development of the framework, its content, review and application are described. Evolving experience in its application is illustrated by example (polybrominated diphenyls) with special emphasis on the critical content of problem formulation, the role of predictive tools in grouping of chemicals for consideration and the importance of explicit delineation of relative uncertainty and sensitivity for tiered assessment. Priorities in increasing the efficiency of risk assessment not only for combined exposures, but more generally based on experience acquired in developing the framework and its application in case studies are identified and recommendations included

  1. Two birds with one stone: experiences of combining clinical and research training in addiction medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, J.; McNeil, R.; Ahamad, K.; Mead, A.; Rieb, L.; Cullen, W.; Wood, E.; Small, W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite a large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined the training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research. As such, addiction care is often lacking, or not based on evidence or best practices. We undertook a qualitative study to assess the experiences of physicians who completed a clinician-scientist training programme in addiction medicine within a hospital setting. Methods We interviewed physicians from the S...

  2. Optimization of biomolecule separation by combining microscale filtration and design-of-experiment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amir S; Kawka, Karina; Latulippe, David R

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable interest in developing microscale (i.e., high-throughput) methods that enable multiple filtration experiments to be run in parallel with smaller sample amounts and thus reduce the overall required time and associated cost to run the filtration tests. Previous studies to date have focused on simply evaluating the filtration capacity, not the separation performance. In this work, the stirred-well filtration (SWF) method was used in combination with design-of-experiment (DOE) methods to optimize the separation performance for three binary mixtures of bio-molecules: protein-protein, protein-polysaccharide, and protein-DNA. Using the parallel based format of the SWF method, eight constant-flux ultrafiltration experiments were conducted at once to study the effects of stirring conditions, permeate flux, and/or solution conditions (pH, ionic strength). Four separate filtration tests were conducted for each combination of process variables; in total, over 100 separate tests were conducted. The sieving coefficient and selectivity results are presented to match the DOE design format and enable a greater understanding of the effects of the different process variables that were studied. The method described herein can be used to rapidly determine the optimal combination of process factors that give the best separation performance for a range of membrane-based separations applications and thus obviate the need to run a large number of traditional lab-scale tests. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2131-2139. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Small scale thermal violence experiments for combined insensitive high explosive and booster materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Clare L [AWE, UK; Stennett, C [DCMT SHRIVENHAM, UK; Flower, H M [AWE, UK

    2010-01-01

    A small scale cook-off experiment has been designed to provide a violence metric for both booster and IHE materials, singly and in combination. The experiment has a simple, axisymmetric geometry provided by a 10 mm internal diameter cylindrical steel confinement up to 80 mm in length. Heating is applied from one end of the sample length creating pseudo 1-D heating profile and a thermal gradient across the sample(s). At the opposite end of the confinement to the heating block, a machined groove provides a point of rupture that generates a cylindrical fragment. The displacement of the external face of the fragment is detected by Heterodyne Velocimetry. Proof of concept experiments are reported focusing on HMX and TATB formulations, and are described in relation to confinement, ullage and heating profile. The development of a violence metric, based upon fragment velocity records is discussed.

  4. Phenomenology and qualitative research: combining the transcendetal orientation of phenomenology with the diversities of lived experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    In different ways philosophers have emphasized that phenomenology aims at accounting for our capacity for being conscious – for example by aiming at describing the structure of subjective experiences. Accordingly, phenomenology involves a transcendental orientation. In the domain of qualitative...... research, researchers involve in describing lived bodies and lived experiences to further explore and understand the diversities of our embodied practices and experiences. The aim of this paper is to present and discus some of the methodological challenges of combining phenomenology and qualitative...... methodologies. I will specifically focus on discussing how the transcendental orientation of phenomenological descriptions has the potential to work through difference by approaching lived bodies according to their lived situation. The discussion will fall in three parts focusing on: a) how the research design...

  5. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  6. Two birds with one stone: experiences of combining clinical and research training in addiction medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, J; McNeil, R; Ahamad, K; Mead, A; Rieb, L; Cullen, W; Wood, E; Small, W

    2017-01-23

    Despite a large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined the training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research. As such, addiction care is often lacking, or not based on evidence or best practices. We undertook a qualitative study to assess the experiences of physicians who completed a clinician-scientist training programme in addiction medicine within a hospital setting. We interviewed physicians from the St. Paul's Hospital Goldcorp Addiction Medicine Fellowship and learners from the hospital's academic Addiction Medicine Consult Team in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26). They included psychiatrists, internal medicine and family medicine physicians, faculty, mentors, medical students and residents. All received both addiction medicine and research training. Drawing on Kirkpatrick's model of evaluating training programmes, we analysed the interviews thematically using qualitative data analysis software (Nvivo 10). We identified five themes relating to learning experience that were influential: (i) attitude, (ii) knowledge, (iii) skill, (iv) behaviour and (v) patient outcome. The presence of a supportive learning environment, flexibility in time lines, highly structured rotations, and clear guidance regarding development of research products facilitated clinician-scientist training. Competing priorities, including clinical and family responsibilities, hindered training. Combined training in addiction medicine and research is feasible and acceptable for current doctors and physicians in training. However, there are important barriers to overcome and improved understanding of the experience of addiction physicians in the clinician-scientist track is required to improve curricula and research productivity.

  7. Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiments: System Identification Rack Hardware Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randy; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The System Identification (SysID) Rack is a real-time hardware-in-the-loop data acquisition (DAQ) and control instrument rack that was designed and built to support inlet testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. This instrument rack is used to support experiments on the Combined-Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiment (CCE? LIMX). The CCE?LIMX is a testbed for an integrated dual flow-path inlet configuration with the two flow paths in an over-and-under arrangement such that the high-speed flow path is located below the lowspeed flow path. The CCE?LIMX includes multiple actuators that are designed to redirect airflow from one flow path to the other; this action is referred to as "inlet mode transition." Multiple phases of experiments have been planned to support research that investigates inlet mode transition: inlet characterization (Phase-1) and system identification (Phase-2). The SysID Rack hardware design met the following requirements to support Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments: safely and effectively move multiple actuators individually or synchronously; sample and save effector control and position sensor feedback signals; automate control of actuator positioning based on a mode transition schedule; sample and save pressure sensor signals; and perform DAQ and control processes operating at 2.5 KHz. This document describes the hardware components used to build the SysID Rack including their function, specifications, and system interface. Furthermore, provided in this document are a SysID Rack effectors signal list (signal flow); system identification experiment setup; illustrations indicating a typical SysID Rack experiment; and a SysID Rack performance overview for Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments. The SysID Rack described in this document was a useful tool to meet the project objectives.

  8. Realistic Simulation of Rice Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-long DING

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing research results of virtual modeling of rice plant, however, is far from perfect compared to that of other crops due to its complex structure and growth process. Techniques to visually simulate the architecture of rice plant and its growth process are presented based on the analysis of the morphological characteristics at different stages. Firstly, the simulations of geometrical shape, the bending status and the structural distortion of rice leaves are conducted. Then, by using an improved model for bending deformation, the curved patterns of panicle axis and various types of panicle branches are generated, and the spatial shape of rice panicle is therefore created. Parametric L-system is employed to generate its topological structures, and finite-state automaton is adopted to describe the development of geometrical structures. Finally, the computer visualization of three-dimensional morphologies of rice plant at both organ and individual levels is achieved. The experimental results showed that the proposed methods of modeling the three-dimensional shapes of organs and simulating the growth of rice plant are feasible and effective, and the generated three-dimensional images are realistic.

  9. Survival and Failure Outcomes in Primary Thyroid Lymphomas: A Single Centre Experience of Combined Modality Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Khosla, Divya; Kumar, Narendra; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Bera, Anjan; Das, Ashim; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL) is a rare malignancy and represents 2%–5% of all thyroid malignancies and 1%–2.5% of all malignant lymphomas. We present our institute’s experience in combined modality management of 16 successive patients of PTL treated from 2005 to 2010. The median age of the patients was 56.0 years. Five patients were males, and 11 patients were females. An enlarging thyroid mass was the most common presenting symptom. 14 patients had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and 2 pati...

  10. Detecting Structural Features in Metallic Glass via Synchrotron Radiation Experiments Combined with Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Guo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the essential structural features of metallic glasses (MGs will enhance the understanding of glass-forming mechanisms. In this work, a feasible scheme is provided where we performed the state-of-the-art synchrotron-radiation based experiments combined with simulations to investigate the microstructures of ZrCu amorphous compositions. It is revealed that in order to stabilize the amorphous state and optimize the topological and chemical distribution, besides the icosahedral or icosahedral-like clusters, other types of clusters also participate in the formation of the microstructure in MGs. This cluster-level co-existing feature may be popular in this class of glassy materials.

  11. Combination procedure for the precise determination of Z boson parameters from results of the LEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The precise determination of the Z boson parameters from the measurements at the Z resonance by the four collaborations ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL in e+e- collisions at the large electron positron collider LEP at CERN is a landmark for precision tests of the electroweak theory. The four experiments measured quantities which were used to extract the mass and width of the Z boson, the hadronic cross-section at the pole of the resonance, the ratio of hadronic and leptonic decay widths, and the leptonic forward-backward asymmetries at the pole. The combination procedure based on these parameters is presented in this paper.

  12. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  13. Optical detection system using time structure of UVSOR for combined laser-SR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, J; Tsujibayashi, T; Itoh, M; Watanabe, M; Arimoto, O; Nakanishi, S; Itoh, H; Kamada, M

    2001-01-01

    A new TAC-MCA detection system has been developed for combined laser-SR spectroscopy such as two-photon excitation or pump-probe experiments in the VUV region. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio, the time structure under partial-filling operation of UVSOR is utilized together with this detection system. In our experiment, where the two-photon excitation efficiency of laser and SR is more important than the time resolution, a pulse stretching technique using optical fiber is applied to the output pulse of a CW mode-locked Ti : sapphire laser. The usefulness of the present system is successfully demonstrated by observing luminescence signals from the two-photon-excited core state in BaF sub 2 crystals.

  14. Highly Efficient Design-of-Experiments Methods for Combining CFD Analysis and Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Haller, Harold S.

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to examine the impact of "highly efficient" Design-of-Experiments (DOE) methods for combining sets of CFD generated analysis data with smaller sets of Experimental test data in order to accurately predict performance results where experimental test data were not obtained. The study examines the impact of micro-ramp flow control on the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction where a complete paired set of data exist from both CFD analysis and Experimental measurements By combining the complete set of CFD analysis data composed of fifteen (15) cases with a smaller subset of experimental test data containing four/five (4/5) cases, compound data sets (CFD/EXP) were generated which allows the prediction of the complete set of Experimental results No statistical difference were found to exist between the combined (CFD/EXP) generated data sets and the complete Experimental data set composed of fifteen (15) cases. The same optimal micro-ramp configuration was obtained using the (CFD/EXP) generated data as obtained with the complete set of Experimental data, and the DOE response surfaces generated by the two data sets were also not statistically different.

  15. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom-up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top-down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel ("aesthetics of perception"), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel ("aesthetics of cognition"). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of aesthetics.

  16. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom–up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top–down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel (“aesthetics of perception”), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel (“aesthetics of cognition”). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of

  17. Age differences in eyewitness memory for a realistic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robin L; Stone, Kevin R

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the effects of misinformation on eyewitnesses of different ages, older and younger adults experienced an event under intentional and incidental learning conditions in a naturalistic experiment using multiple memory tests. Following exposure to the event, which was a brief interruption of a group testing session, participants completed several memory tests. For half of the participants, misinformation was embedded in the first cued recall test. On subsequent free recall and cued recall tests, basic scores and misinformation-based memory errors were examined. As expected, younger adults had higher recall scores than older adults. Older and younger adults made the same number of misinformation errors in free recall and in cued recall with intentional learning. However, in the incidental condition, younger adults made more misinformation errors likely due to the information processing strategies they employed after incidental learning. Misinformation effects were quite strong, even with a realistic scene and intentional learning. Older adult suggestibility was no worse than that of younger adults. When misinformation was combined with incidental learning, younger adults may have used strategic processing to encode misinformation to their detriment.

  18. The Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography (CRICKET) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Kenneth; Coker, Clayton; Bernhardt, Paul; Cohen, Aaron; Crane, Patrick; Kassim, Namir; Lazio, Joseph; Weiler, Kurt; Watts, Christopher; Rickard, Lee J.; Taylor, Greg; Schinzel, Frank; Philstrom, Ylva; Close, Sigrid; Colestock, Patrick; Myers, Steve; Datta, Abirhup

    We report on the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15 and 17, 2007. The experiment used the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) in conjunction with the Very Large Array radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale. Each COSMIC satellite includes three instruments capable of measuring the ionosphere: the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), a UV radiometer; the GPS Occultation experiment (GOX), a dual-frequency GPS occultation receiver; and the Tri-band Beacon (TBB), a three frequency coherently radiating radio beacon. These three instruments have been demonstrated to be a powerful means for characterizing the global-scale ionosphere. The VLA when deployed at its largest extent and while operating at 73.8 MHz is incredibly sensitive to relative total electron content variations of the regional ionosphere over about a 30-100 km diameter area. In this work, we concentrate on the first set of observations on September 15, 2007 at approximately 0830 UT. We have successfully married these heterogeneous data sets, using a tomographic data fusion approach, to produce a consistent ionospheric specification from the global scale down to the regional scale.

  19. The construction of context-mechanisms-outcomes in realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsley, Paul; Howard, David; Owen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the construction of context-mechanisms-outcomes (CMOs) developed as part of a realistic evaluation study of two aggression management training programmes. Realistic evaluation draws on theories and methods derived from the social sciences. It provides a distinctive account of the nature of programmes and how they work. Realistic evaluation is a form of evaluation that is driven by theory, and was based by Pawson and Tilley ( 1997 ) on the philosophy of critical realism. Critical realism is an important perspective in modern philosophy and social science, but it is largely absent in the field of healthcare research. This paper provides a critical discussion on the construction of CMOs as part of a realistic evaluation study. This paper draws on the personal experiences of the author in using realistic evaluation to evaluate training in aggression management. Realistic evaluation stresses four key linked concepts for explaining and understanding programmes: 'mechanism', 'context', 'outcome pattern' and 'context-mechanisms-outcomes (CMO) pattern configuration'. A CMO configuration is a proposition stating what it is about an initiative that works, for whom and in what circumstances. In this way, the effectiveness of the programme is understood, with an explanation of why the outcomes developed as they did and how the programme was able to react to underlying mechanisms and in what contexts. Therefore, a realistic evaluation researcher is not just inspecting outcomes to see if an initiative (implementation) works, but is analysing the outcomes to discover if the conjectured mechanism or context theories are confirmed. This analysis provides not only evidence of effectiveness, but also an explanation that helps to develop and improve the content and the targeting of future programmes. The development of CMOs requires a great deal of skill on the part of the researcher and requires a flexibility of approach when collecting and analysing the data and in

  20. Combined videofluoroscopy and manometry in the diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia: examination technique and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappabianca, S; Reginelli, A; Monaco, L; Del Vecchio, L; Di Martino, N; Grassi, R

    2008-09-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom of different pathological conditions characterised by alteration of the swallowing mechanism, which may manifest at different levels. We report our experience in the evaluation of the swallowing mechanism with combined videofluoroscopy and manometric recordings. For the combined study, we used a Dyno Compact computerised system (Menfis Biomedical s.r.l., Bologna, Italy) equipped with: (1) graphics card for the management of ultrasonographic or radiological images; (2) A.VI.U.S. dedicated software package, which enables digital-quality recording (PAL/NTSC, composite video or S-Video) of the videofluoroscopy study in AVI format with 320 x 240 resolution and 25 Hz acquisition frequency. The delay introduced by the process of image digitalisation is in the order of 200 ms, so for analysis purposes, the images can be considered synchronised with the manometric recordings. The videomanometry study was performed with the administration of contrast material either in bolus form or diluted. Data were collected on a specifically designed grid for the evaluation of 46 videofluoroscopic items, of which 34 are derived from the laterolateral view (seven in the oral preparatory phase, 15 in the oral transport phase and 12 in the pharyngeal phase) and 12 in the anteroposterior view (six in the oral preparatory phase and six in the oropharyngeal phase). A positive finding for the individual parameters is expressed in a binary fashion. Manometric evaluation was based on 11 items divided into four major and seven minor criteria. Dynamic videofluoroscopy swallow study combined with concurrent manometry enabled the simultaneous recording of anatomical alterations and the functional data of oropharyngeal pressure, thus providing a picture of the anatomical, biomechanical and physiological conditions of swallowing and the manner of bolus propulsion and transit. An early and effective diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia means being able to effectively implement

  1. Bell Operator Method to Classify Local Realistic Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Koji

    2010-01-01

    We review the historical fact of multipartite Bell inequalities with an arbitrary number of settings. An explicit local realistic model for the values of a correlation function, given in a two-setting Bell experiment (two-setting model), works only for the specific set of settings in the given experiment, but cannot construct a local realistic model for the values of a correlation function, given in a continuous-infinite settings Bell experiment (infinite-setting model), even though there exist two-setting models for all directions in space. Hence, the two-setting model does not have the property that the infinite-setting model has. Here, we show that an explicit two-setting model cannot construct a local realistic model for the values of a correlation function, given in an M-setting Bell experiment (M-setting model), even though there exist two-setting models for the M measurement directions chosen in the given M-setting experiment. Hence, the two-setting model does not have the property that the M-setting model has. (general)

  2. Survival and Failure Outcomes in Primary Thyroid Lymphomas: A Single Centre Experience of Combined Modality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL is a rare malignancy and represents 2%–5% of all thyroid malignancies and 1%–2.5% of all malignant lymphomas. We present our institute’s experience in combined modality management of 16 successive patients of PTL treated from 2005 to 2010. The median age of the patients was 56.0 years. Five patients were males, and 11 patients were females. An enlarging thyroid mass was the most common presenting symptom. 14 patients had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and 2 patients had follicular lymphoma. The most common stage of presentation was stage II comprising 6 (37.5% patients. All patients received CCT, and only 12 patients received involved field RT with a median dose of 36.0 Gy. 10 patients (62.5% had CR, and 6 patients (27.5% had PR. Eight patients had disease progression in subsequent followup and this included the initial 6 patients with PR. The 5-year DFS was 40.0%, and median DFS was 47 months. The 5-year OS was 41.0%, and median OS was 51 months. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require combined modality management. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of the hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  3. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lukas; Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome. Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize 'student passivity' as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes.

  4. Patient experiences with intensive combination-treatment strategies with glucocorticoids for early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyfroidt, Sabrina; Van der Elst, Kristien; De Cock, Diederik; Joly, Johan; Westhovens, René; Hulscher, Marlies; Verschueren, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    To investigate patients' experiences with intensive combination-treatment strategies with glucocorticoids (ICTS-GCs) in the early phase of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) treatment. We interviewed 26 participants individually, 4-6 months after initiation of ICTS-GCs (t1). Fourteen participants from the same sample took part in one of three focus groups at least 1 year after treatment initiation (t2). Each interview was audio-recorded, literally transcribed and thematically coded. The participants described concerns and feelings about ICTS-GCs that changed over time; for example, a fear of side effects diminished when the treatment effects were beneficial or expected side effects did not materialize. Moreover, participants indicated additional information needs at t1 and t2. The most used sources of information were healthcare professionals, relatives, and the Internet. Furthermore, participants reported on their relationship with healthcare professionals and the need for trust and reassurance, especially at t1. Lastly, participants described their personal self-management strategies. Despite their concerns at treatment initiation, most participants had positive experiences with ICTS-GCs. Healthcare professionals should be aware that, in the early phase of treatment, they can address patients' concerns, they are the most important information source, they need to create a relationship of trust, and guide patients in self-management strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  6. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  7. Tranexamic acid at the point of injury: the Israeli combined civilian and military experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Roy; Gendler, Sami; Benov, Avi; Strugo, Refael; Abramovich, Amir; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-09-01

    Accumulating evidence established the benefit of tranexamic acid (TXA) for traumatic bleeding in the hospital setting. TXA use in the field (at or near the point of injury [POI]) was described in the military setting but not in the civilian one. The current study describes the Israeli combined experience (civilian and military) of administering TXA in the field. The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and Magen David Adom (MDA) (the national Israeli civilian emergency medical service) protocols for giving TXA at the POI are presented. We then review all trauma patients who received TXA in the field in accord with either protocol. Data were abstracted from the IDF Trauma Registry and from the MDA database. Data regarding casualties treated with TXA by the IDF Medical Corps and MDA between December 2011 and August 2013 are presented. One hundred three casualties who received TXA in the field were identified. The median age was 26.5 years, and 83 (88%) were male. The mechanism of injury was penetrating in 48 cases (51%). POI data indicate slightly higher injury severity for the group of patients treated by MDA compared with patients treated by the IDF (systolic blood pressure, 90 mm Hg vs. 110 mm Hg; Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score, 11 vs. 15; hemoglobin, 11.9 vs. 13.3; p < 0.05). On the basis of our combined data, it appears that administering TXA in the field is feasible in the civilian and the military setting. Lessons learned in military settings are applicable to civilian medical systems. Action investigations and comparison of the different protocols may further improve treatment at or near the POI. Therapeutic study, level V.

  8. Generating realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs, and show a connection with the straight skeleton of P. We show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ( ⌊(n-4)/4⌋ (n-4)/2) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n 4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n 5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Sotsialistlik realist Keskküla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Londonis 1998. a. ilmunud inglise kunstikriitiku Matthew Cullerne Bowni monograafias "Socialist Realist Painting" on eesti kunstnikest Enn Põldroos, Nikolai Kormashov, Ando Keskküla, Kormashovi ja Keskküla maalide reproduktsioonid

  10. Results of recent calculations using realistic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Results of recent calculations for the triton using realistic potentials with strong tensor forces are reviewed, with an emphasis on progress made using the many different calculational schemes. Several test problems are suggested. 49 refs., 5 figs

  11. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Martín-López

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent combinations are SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants. The active principle most widely combined is fluoxetine. Conclusions. The prevalence of use of antidepressant combination therapy is 2.2% of the global sample and 8.3% of treated patients. Other than duration of the depressive episode, no clinical characteristics exclusive to patients who received combination rather than monotherapy were found. Our study found that the most frequent combination is SSRIs + TCAs, also being the most studied.

  12. Mycophenolate mofetil combined with steroids: New experiences in the treatment of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrenčević Katarina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF is an uncommon disease characterized by a retroperitoneal fibrotic tissue that often involve the ureters, leading to the obstructive nephropathy and variable impairment of renal function. Findings strongly suggest an autoimmune etiology. Surgery, medical treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, or a combination of both are proposed. The optimal treatment has not been established yet. The aim of this study was to present our experience with combined immunosuppressive therapy of IRF, steroids (S and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF. Methods. We prospectively followed four patients with IRF from January 2004 to December 2006. Three patients had an active disease with bilateral hydronephrosis. In the two of them acute renal failure was presented, and ureteral catheters were inserted in one in order to manage ureteral obstruction. One patient has came to our unit with a relapse of IRF and incipient chronic renal failure after the prior therapy with ureterolysis and immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine and tamoxifen. All patients received steroids and MMF. Two patients were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulses (250 mg each, for three consecutive days, followed by oral prednisone 0.5 mg/kg/day. The other two patients received oral prednisone at the same dose. Prednisone was gradually tappered to a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/day. Simultaneously, all patients received MMF, initially 1 g/day with the increase to 2 g/day. Results. After four weeks of the therapy all symptoms disappeared, as well as a hydronephrosis with a decrease of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and Creactive protein (CRP to normal level in all patients. Three patients remain in remission untill the end of the follow up. One patient had a relapse because of stopping taking the therapy after six months. He was treated by oral prednisone 0.5 mg/kg/day, which was gradually decreased. After twelve weeks hydronephrosis

  13. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  14. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

    2009-07-01

    excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

  15. Combined induction of rubber-hand illusion and out-of-body experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora eOlivé

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of self-consciousness depends on several processes: those of body ownership, attributing self-identity to the body, and those of self-location, localizing our sense of self. Studies of phenomena like the rubber hand illusion (RHi and out-of-body experience (OBE investigate these processes, respectively for representations of a body-part and the full-body. It is supposed that RHi only target processes related to body-part representations, while OBE only relates to full-body representations. The fundamental question whether the body-part and the full-body illusions relate to each other is nevertheless insufficiently investigated. In search for a link between body-part and full-body illusions in the brain we developed a behavioural task combining adapted versions of the RHi and OBE. Furthermore, for the investigation of this putative link we investigated the role of sensory and motor cues. We established a spatial dissociation between visual and proprioceptive feedback of a hand perceived through virtual reality in rest or action. Two experimental measures were introduced: one for the body-part illusion, the proprioceptive drift of the perceived localisation of the hand, and one for the full-body illusion, the shift in subjective-straight-ahead. In the rest and action conditions it was observed that the proprioceptive drift of the left hand and the shift in subjective-straight-ahead towards the manipulation side are equivalent. The combined effect was dependent on the manipulation of the visual representation of body-parts, rejecting any main or even modulatory role for relevant motor programs. Our study demonstrates for the first time that there is a systematic relationship between the body-part illusion and the full-body illusion, as shown by our measures. This suggests a link between the representations in the brain of a body-part and the full-body, and consequently a common mechanism underpinning both forms of ownership and self-location.

  16. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  17. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  18. Lay health worker experiences administering a multi-level combination intervention to improve PMTCT retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Abby; Fayorsey, Ruby; Syengo, Masila; Chege, Duncan; Sirengo, Martin; Reidy, William; Otieno, Juliana; Omoto, Jackton; Hawken, Mark P; Abrams, Elaine J

    2018-01-10

    The recent scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services has rapidly accelerated antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among pregnant and postpartum women in sub-Saharan Africa. The Mother and Infant Retention for Health (MIR4Health) study evaluates the impact of a combination intervention administered by trained lay health workers to decrease attrition among HIV-positive women initiating PMTCT services and their infants through 6 months postpartum. This was a qualitative study nested within the MIR4Health trial. MIR4Health was conducted at 10 health facilities in Nyanza, Kenya from September 2013 to September 2015. The trial intervention addressed behavioral, social, and structural barriers to PMTCT retention and included: appointment reminders via text and phone calls, follow-up and tracking for missed clinic visits, PMTCT health education at home visits and during clinic visits, and retention and adherence support and counseling. All interventions were administered by lay health workers. We describe results of a nested small qualitative inquiry which conducted two focus groups to assess the experiences and perceptions of lay health workers administering the interventions. Discussions were recorded and simultaneously transcribed and translated into English. Data were analyzed using framework analysis approach. Study findings show lay health workers played a critical role supporting mothers in PMTCT services across a range of behavioral, social, and structural domains, including improved communication and contact, health education, peer support, and patient advocacy and assistance. Findings also identified barriers to the uptake and implementation of the interventions, such as concerns about privacy and stigma, and the limitations of the healthcare system including healthcare worker attitudes. Overall, study findings indicate that lay health workers found the interventions to be feasible, acceptable, and well received by clients. Lay

  19. Maximizing Undergraduate Success By Combining Research Experiences with Outreach, Peer Mentoring and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    The C-MORE Scholars Program provides hands-on, closely mentored research experiences to University of Hawaii (UH) undergraduates during the academic year. Students majoring in the geosciences, especially underrepresented students, from all campuses are encouraged to apply. The academic-year research is complemented by outreach, professional development and summer internships. Combined, these experiences help students develop the skills, confidence and passion that are essential to success in a geoscience career. Research. All students enter the program as trainees, where they learn lab and field research methods, computer skills and science principles. After one year, they are encouraged to reapply as interns, where they work on their own research project. Students who have successfully completed their intern year can reapply as fellows, where they conduct an independent research project such as an honors thesis. Students present their research at a Symposium through posters (trainees) or talks (interns and fellows). Interns and fellows help organize program activities and serve as peer mentors to trainees.Multi-tiered programs that build a pathway toward graduation have been shown to increase student retention and graduation success. Outreach. Undergraduate researchers rarely feel like experts when working with graduate students and faculty. For students to develop their identity as scientists, it is essential that they be given the opportunity to assume the role as expert. Engaging students in outreach is a win-win situation. Students gain valuable skills and confidence in sharing their research with their local community, and the public gets to learn about exciting research happening at UH. Professional Development. Each month, the Scholars meet to develop their professional skills on a particular topic, such as outreach, scientific presentations, interviewing, networking, and preparing application materials for jobs, scholarships and summer REUs. Students are

  20. Combining Digital Archives Content with Serious Game Approach to Create a Gamified Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.-T.; Lin, C. L.; Tseng, C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an interdisciplinary to develop content-aware application that combines game with learning on specific categories of digital archives. The employment of content-oriented game enhances the gamification and efficacy of learning in culture education on architectures and history of Hsinchu County, Taiwan. The gamified form of the application is used as a backbone to support and provide a strong stimulation to engage users in learning art and culture, therefore this research is implementing under the goal of "The Digital ARt/ARchitecture Project". The purpose of the abovementioned project is to develop interactive serious game approaches and applications for Hsinchu County historical archives and architectures. Therefore, we present two applications, "3D AR for Hukou Old " and "Hsinchu County History Museum AR Tour" which are in form of augmented reality (AR). By using AR imaging techniques to blend real object and virtual content, the users can immerse in virtual exhibitions of Hukou Old Street and Hsinchu County History Museum, and to learn in ubiquitous computing environment. This paper proposes a content system that includes tools and materials used to create representations of digitized cultural archives including historical artifacts, documents, customs, religion, and architectures. The Digital ARt / ARchitecture Project is based on the concept of serious game and consists of three aspects: content creation, target management, and AR presentation. The project focuses on developing a proper approach to serve as an interactive game, and to offer a learning opportunity for appreciating historic architectures by playing AR cards. Furthermore, the card game aims to provide multi-faceted understanding and learning experience to help user learning through 3D objects, hyperlinked web data, and the manipulation of learning mode, and then effectively developing their learning levels on cultural and historical archives in Hsinchu County.

  1. Combining Digital Archives Content with Serious Game Approach to Create a Gamified Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-T. Shih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interdisciplinary to develop content-aware application that combines game with learning on specific categories of digital archives. The employment of content-oriented game enhances the gamification and efficacy of learning in culture education on architectures and history of Hsinchu County, Taiwan. The gamified form of the application is used as a backbone to support and provide a strong stimulation to engage users in learning art and culture, therefore this research is implementing under the goal of “The Digital ARt/ARchitecture Project”. The purpose of the abovementioned project is to develop interactive serious game approaches and applications for Hsinchu County historical archives and architectures. Therefore, we present two applications, “3D AR for Hukou Old ” and “Hsinchu County History Museum AR Tour” which are in form of augmented reality (AR. By using AR imaging techniques to blend real object and virtual content, the users can immerse in virtual exhibitions of Hukou Old Street and Hsinchu County History Museum, and to learn in ubiquitous computing environment. This paper proposes a content system that includes tools and materials used to create representations of digitized cultural archives including historical artifacts, documents, customs, religion, and architectures. The Digital ARt / ARchitecture Project is based on the concept of serious game and consists of three aspects: content creation, target management, and AR presentation. The project focuses on developing a proper approach to serve as an interactive game, and to offer a learning opportunity for appreciating historic architectures by playing AR cards. Furthermore, the card game aims to provide multi-faceted understanding and learning experience to help user learning through 3D objects, hyperlinked web data, and the manipulation of learning mode, and then effectively developing their learning levels on cultural and historical archives in

  2. Methods and Issues for the Combined Use of Integral Experiments and Covariance Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, M.; Palmiotti, G.; Aliberti, G.; McKnight, R.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dupont, E.; Herman, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugino, K.; Ivanova, T.; Ivanov, E.; Kim, S.J.; Kodeli, I.; Trkov, A.; Manturov, G.; Pelloni, S.; Perfetti, C.; Rearden, B.T.; Plompen, A.; Rochman, D.; Wang, W.; Wu, H.; Yang, W.S.

    2013-01-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) has been established under the aegis of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The WPEC determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: BROND (Russian Federation), ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan) and JEFF (other NEA Data Bank member countries). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-NEA countries, specifically the Chinese CENDL project, is organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report has been issued by the WPEC Subgroup 33, whose mission was to review methods and issues of the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data, with the objective of recommending a set of best and consistent practices in order to improve evaluated nuclear data files. In particular, it is shown that the statistical adjustment methodologies used worldwide are well understood and essentially equivalent. The results of the benchmark adjustment exercise indicate common trends for important data, even when they start from different basic nuclear data and different covariance matrices. In this respect, adjustment methodologies can provide a powerful tool to improve nuclear data (and associated uncertainties) if used in an appropriate manner

  3. Realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-11-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. According to this definition, some roofs may have faces isolated from the boundary of P or even local minima, which are undesirable for several practical reasons. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs and show that the straight skeleton induces a realistic roof with maximum height and volume. We also show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ((n-4)(n-4)/4 /2⌋) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Development of KAERI LBLOCA realistic evaluation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.J.; Lee, Y.J.; Chung, B.D.; Lee, S.Y.

    1994-01-01

    A realistic evaluation model (REM) for LBLOCA licensing calculation is developed and proposed for application to pressurized light water reactors. The developmental aim of the KAERI-REM is to provide a systematic methodology that is simple in structure and to use and built upon sound logical reasoning, for improving the code capability to realistically describe the LBLOCA phenomena and for evaluating the associated uncertainties. The method strives to be faithful to the intention of being best-estimate, that is, the method aims to evaluate the best-estimate values and the associated uncertainties while complying to the requirements in the ECCS regulations. (author)

  5. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  6. Combining sprinkling experiments and superconducting gravimetry in the field: a qualitative approach to identify dominant infiltration patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Marvin; Mikolaj, Michal; Blume, Theresa; Güntner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological process research at the plot to catchment scale commonly involves invasive field methods, leading to a large amount of point data. A promising alternative, which gained increasing interest in the hydrological community over the last years, is gravimetry. The combination of its non-invasive and integrative nature opens up new possibilities to approach hydrological process research. In this study we combine a field-scale sprinkling experiment with continuous superconducting gravity (SG) measurements. The experimental design consists of 8 sprinkler units, arranged symmetrically within a radius of about ten meters around an iGrav (SG) in a field enclosure. The gravity signal of the infiltrating sprinkling water is analyzed using a simple 3D water mass distribution model. We first conducted a number of virtual sprinkling experiments resulting in different idealized infiltration patterns and determined the pattern specific gravity response. In a next step we determined which combination of idealized infiltration patterns was able to reproduce the gravity response of our real-world experiment at the Wettzell Observatory (Germany). This process hypothesis is then evaluated with measured point-scale soil moisture responses and the results of the time-lapse electric resistivity survey which was carried out during the sprinkling experiment. This study demonstrates that a controlled sprinkling experiment around a gravimeter in combination with a simple infiltration model is sufficient to identify subsurface flow patterns and thus the dominant infiltration processes. As gravimeters become more portable and can actually be deployed in the field, their combination with sprinkling experiments as shown here constitutes a promising possibility to investigate hydrological processes in a non-invasive way.

  7. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  8. Biventricular assist using a portable driver in combination with implanted devices: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Segesser, L K; Tkebuchava, T; Leskosek, B; Marty, B; Pei, Y C; Turina, M

    1997-01-01

    Left ventricular assist systems with portable drive units are increasingly used in the clinical setting. However, such systems usually are not suitable for right ventricular support, and therefore, in the case of biventricular heart failure, they must be combined with other support devices that require additional drive consoles. As a result, most of the benefits of the wearable drive units (early mobilization and outpatient care) are lost. This present study was performed to evaluate biventricular support with implanted assist devices and a portable DC/battery-powered driver (Thoratec TLC-II). Electronic control by nonvolatile RAM accessible via RS232 interface, internal backup emergency battery, and optional manual activation are additional features of this 6 kg biventricular drive unit. In 3 bovine experiments (body weight 70 +/- 5 kg) partial cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was established, and two ventricular assist devices were implanted into a preperitoneal pocket on each side after connection to the right atrium and the pulmonary artery and to the left atrium and aorta, respectively. After weaning the patient from CPB, activated coagulation time (ACT) was kept at greater than 180 s, and biventricular support with the portable driver was activated. After 10 min, mean device flow stabilized at 3.5 +/- 0 L/min and remained at that level throughout the ensuing 6 h (3.5 +/- 0.3 L/min; NS). The heart rate moved from 130 +/- 13 beats per minute (bpm) at the end of CPB to 116 +/- 13 bpm after 10 min of assist (p < 0.05). Right atrial pressure moved from 11 +/- 2 mm Hg at the end of CPB to 13 +/- 3 mm Hg after 10 min of assist (not significant [NS]). Mean pulmonary artery pressure was 18 +/- mm Hg at the end of CPB and 17 +/- 5 mm Hg after 10 min of assist (NS). Left atrial pressure was 10 +/- 1 mm Hg at the end of CPB and 13 +/- 3 mm Hg after 10 min of assist (NS). Mean aortic pressure was 73 +/- 11 mm Hg at the end of CPB and 77 +/- 3 mm Hg after 10 min of assist (NS

  9. Designing virtual audiences for fear of public speaking training - an observation study on realistic nonverbal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Virtual Reality technology offers great possibilities for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy of fear of public speaking: Clients can be exposed to virtual fear-triggering stimuli (exposure) and are able to role-play in virtual environments, training social skills to overcome their fear. Usually, prototypical audience behavior (neutral, social and anti-social) serves as stimulus in virtual training sessions, although there is significant lack of theoretical basis on typical audience behavior. The study presented deals with the design of a realistic virtual presentation scenario. An audience (consisting of n=18 men and women) in an undergraduate seminar was observed during three frontal lecture sessions. Behavior frequency of four nonverbal dimensions (eye contact, facial expression, gesture, and posture) was rated by means of a quantitative content analysis. Results show audience behavior patterns which seem to be typical in frontal lecture contexts, like friendly and neutral face expressions. Additionally, combined and even synchronized behavioral patterns between participants who sit next to each other (like turning to the neighbor and start talking) were registered. The gathered data serve as empirical design basis for a virtual audience to be used in virtual training applications that stimulate the experiences of the participants in a realistic manner, thereby improving the experienced presence in the training application.

  10. Realistic modelling of the seismic input: Site effects and parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G.F.

    2002-11-01

    We illustrate the work done in the framework of a large international cooperation, showing the very recent numerical experiments carried out within the framework of the EC project 'Advanced methods for assessing the seismic vulnerability of existing motorway bridges' (VAB) to assess the importance of non-synchronous seismic excitation of long structures. The definition of the seismic input at the Warth bridge site, i.e. the determination of the seismic ground motion due to an earthquake with a given magnitude and epicentral distance from the site, has been done following a theoretical approach. In order to perform an accurate and realistic estimate of site effects and of differential motion it is necessary to make a parametric study that takes into account the complex combination of the source and propagation parameters, in realistic geological structures. The computation of a wide set of time histories and spectral information, corresponding to possible seismotectonic scenarios for different sources and structural models, allows us the construction of damage scenarios that are out of the reach of stochastic models, at a very low cost/benefit ratio. (author)

  11. Effects of Practice on Task Architecture: Combined Evidence from Interference Experiments and Random-Walk Models of Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamienkowski, Juan E.; Pashler, Harold; Dehaene, Stanislas; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Does extensive practice reduce or eliminate central interference in dual-task processing? We explored the reorganization of task architecture with practice by combining interference analysis (delays in dual-task experiment) and random-walk models of decision making (measuring the decision and non-decision contributions to RT). The main delay…

  12. Having one's cake and eating it, too: combining true experiments with regression discontinuity designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Marvin B

    2008-10-01

    Both true experiments and regression discontinuity (RD) designs produce unbiased estimates of effects. However, true experiments are, of course, often criticized on equity grounds, whereas RD designs entail sacrifices in terms of statistical precision. In this article, a hybrid of true experiments and RD designs is considered. This hybrid entails smaller sacrifices in statistical efficiency than RD designs and also is likely to be judged as being considerably more fair than true experiments and possible even RD designs. Moreover, unlike pure RD designs, the hybrid design considered here can be employed in situations in which the variable on which assignment to treatment condition is based takes on only a discrete set of values.

  13. Faculty Development for Educators: A Realist Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O.; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Davies, David; Peile, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities for educators in UK medical schools remains underexplored. This study used a realist approach to evaluate FD and to test the hypothesis that motivation, engagement and perception are key mechanisms of effective FD activities. The authors observed and interviewed 33 course participants at one…

  14. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 71, No. 2. — journal of. August 2008 physics pp. 313–317. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks. PARONGAMA SEN. Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road,. Kolkata 700 009, India .... [4] S Milgram, Psychology Today 1, 60 (1967). J Travers and S Milgram, ...

  15. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider navigation or search schemes on networks which have a degree distribution of the form () ∝ exp(−). In addition, the linking probability is taken to be dependent on social distances and is governed by a parameter . The searches are realistic in the sense that not all search chains can be completed.

  16. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  17. Realistic Approach for Phasor Measurement Unit Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rather, Zakir Hussain; Chen, Zhe; Thøgersen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a realistic cost-effectivemodel for optimal placement of phasor measurement units (PMUs) for complete observability of a power system considering practical cost implications. The proposed model considers hidden or otherwise unaccounted practical costs involved in PMU installat...

  18. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  19. Satellite Maps Deliver More Realistic Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    When Redwood City, California-based Electronic Arts (EA) decided to make SSX, its latest snowboarding video game, it faced challenges in creating realistic-looking mountains. The solution was NASA's ASTER Global Digital Elevation Map, made available by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which EA used to create 28 real-life mountains from 9 different ranges for its award-winning game.

  20. Programmable combinational logic trigger system for high energy particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    A fast logic system designed to select predetermined combinations of three hits in three detectors is described. Central to this system is a random access memory IC that was especially designed for this application

  1. Experience of Acute Respiratory Infections Treatment in Children with Combination Drug Askoril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Kramarev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory diseases are mostly accompanied by changes of mucociliary clearance. The paper presents the possibility of using combination preparation with different points of application for the treatment of tracheobronchial drainage disturbances in respiratory diseases in children.

  2. CLIR Experiments at Maryland for TREC-2002: Evidence Combination for Arabic-English Retrieval

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darwish, Kareem; Oard, Douglas W

    2003-01-01

    .... Evidence from multiple sources of translation knowledge was combined to estimate translation probabilities, and four techniques for estimating query-language term weights from document-language evidence were tried...

  3. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M. Martín-López; Jose E. Rojo; Karina Gibert; Juan Carlos Martín; Lyli Sperry; Lurdes Duñó; Antonio Bulbena; Julio Vallejo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The combination of antidepressants is a useful tool in the treatment of major depression, especially in cases where there is a partial response to antidepressant monotherapy. However, the use of this strategy is a matter of controversy, and its frequency of use in clinical practice is not clear. The aim of our study is to assess the use of antidepressants combination in Spain by reviewing three databases used between 1997 and 2001. Methods. Databases pertain to patien...

  4. Experiences with intercropping design - a survey about pulse cereal-combinations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Fragstein und Niemsdorff, P.; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Gooding, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    A survey was carried out within five European countries with regard to the practice of cereal grain legume intercropping. The mostly given combination was spring barleyspring pea beside 27 other combinations between pulses and cereals. 72 % of all examples consisted of spring varieties, the rest ...... regulation, unequal maturation and additional costs for separation were mostly named. The interviewed farmers showed predominantly positive prospects for the development of intercropping on their farms, problems with sowing techniques were only of minor importance....

  5. CASCADE-IMEI: A learning environment of realistic mathematics for student teachers in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkardi, Z.; Nieveen, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the second phase of a four-year study which aims to develop a learning environment that supports prospective mathematics teachers learning realistic mathematics education (RME) in teacher education in Indonesia. The results suggest that by giving student teachers experiences in doing mathematics as learners during a course and providing additional information about RME in a web site can increase their performance in teaching realistic mathematics in the school classroom.

  6. Urinary incontinence and sport: first and preliminary experience with a combined pelvic floor rehabilitation program in three female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalta, Massimo; Sighinolfi, Maria Chiara; Micali, Salvatore; De Stefani, Stefano; Torcasio, Francesca; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2010-05-01

    A relationship between sport or fitness activities and urinary incontinence (UI) previously has been described in women. We report our preliminary experience with the use of a complete pelvic floor rehabilitation program in three female athletes affected by UI. The athletes were submitted to a combined pelvic floor rehabilitation program, including biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscle exercises, and vaginal cones. After the scheduled rehabilitation scheme, none of the patients reported incontinence, nor referred to urine leakage during sport or during daily life. We therefore conclude that UI that affects female agonistic athletes may be effectively treated with this combined approach.

  7. Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 mutation related combined immune deficiency: A single centre experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhwanee Thakkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8 related combined immune deficiency is a recently discovered entity which differs from the classic STAT3 associated autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome with respect to the genetic origin and the clinical manifestations. It is characterised by increased risk of autoimmunity, malignancy and neurological complications in addition to increased risk of recurrent cutaneous, sinopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections. We report a series 11 children from three families suffering from DOCK8 related combined immunodeficiency. Out of 11 children only 5 were alive at diagnosis and rest 6 were siblings who had died of similar complaints. Among the 5 children only one underwent allogeneic haploidentical stem cell transplant (SCT from his mother but died before engraftment due to infection. Other 4 are alive without SCT but have multiple co-morbidities. A constellation of cutaneous lesions, recurrent sinopulmonary & gastro intestinal infections and allergic manifestations in a child who may have a similar family history should arouse a suspicion of combined immunodeficiency associated with DOCK8 mutation. Early diagnosis in such children can expedite the appropriate management with SCT. Keywords: Combined immunodeficiency, DOCK8, Children

  8. Combining radiation with hyperthermia: a multiscale model informed by in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüningk, S; Powathil, G; Ziegenhein, P; Ijaz, J; Rivens, I; Nill, S; Chaplain, M; Oelfke, U; Ter Haar, G

    2018-01-01

    Combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia offer great potential for the successful treatment of radio-resistant tumours through thermo-radiosensitization. Tumour response heterogeneity, due to intrinsic, or micro-environmentally induced factors, may greatly influence treatment outcome, but is difficult to account for using traditional treatment planning approaches. Systems oncology simulation, using mathematical models designed to predict tumour growth and treatment response, provides a powerful tool for analysis and optimization of combined treatments. We present a framework that simulates such combination treatments on a cellular level. This multiscale hybrid cellular automaton simulates large cell populations (up to 10 7 cells) in vitro , while allowing individual cell-cycle progression, and treatment response by modelling radiation-induced mitotic cell death, and immediate cell kill in response to heating. Based on a calibration using a number of experimental growth, cell cycle and survival datasets for HCT116 cells, model predictions agreed well ( R 2 > 0.95) with experimental data within the range of (thermal and radiation) doses tested (0-40 CEM43, 0-5 Gy). The proposed framework offers flexibility for modelling multimodality treatment combinations in different scenarios. It may therefore provide an important step towards the modelling of personalized therapies using a virtual patient tumour. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  10. Kaonic hydrogen atoms with realistic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Poonsawat, W.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Kobdaj, C.; Suebka, P.

    2010-01-01

    Kaonic hydrogen is studied with various realistic potentials in an accurate numerical approach based on Sturmian functions. It is found that the mass difference between the K - p and K-bar 0 n channels has a considerable effect on theoretical results of the energy shift and decay width of kaonic hydrogen. On average, the theoretical result in the isospin symmetry limit is smaller by a factor of about 20% than the full result where the mass difference between the K - p and K-bar 0 n channels is properly treated. The theoretical results based on realistic local potentials, which reproduce well scattering data, are inconsistent with the recent measurement of the energy shift and decay width of the 1s kaonic hydrogen state by the DEAR Collaboration.

  11. Mathematical modeling in realistic mathematics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, B.; Zulkardi; Putri, R. I. I.; Darmawijoyo

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to produce Mathematical modelling in Realistics Mathematics Education of Junior High School. This study used development research consisting of 3 stages, namely analysis, design and evaluation. The success criteria of this study were obtained in the form of local instruction theory for school mathematical modelling learning which was valid and practical for students. The data were analyzed using descriptive analysis method as follows: (1) walk through, analysis based on the expert comments in the expert review to get Hypothetical Learning Trajectory for valid mathematical modelling learning; (2) analyzing the results of the review in one to one and small group to gain practicality. Based on the expert validation and students’ opinion and answers, the obtained mathematical modeling problem in Realistics Mathematics Education was valid and practical.

  12. Optimum design and sequential treatment allocation in an experiment in deep brain stimulation with sets of treatment combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Anthony; Pedrosa, David

    2017-12-30

    In an experiment including patients who underwent surgery for deep brain stimulation electrode placement, each patient responds to a set of 9 treatment combinations. There are 16 such sets, and the design problem is to choose which sets should be administered and in what proportions. Extensions to the methods of nonsequential optimum experimental design lead to identification of an unequally weighted optimum design involving 4 sets of treatment combinations. In the actual experiment, patients arrive sequentially and present with sets of prognostic factors. The idea of loss due to Burman is extended and used to assess designs with varying randomization structures. It is found that a simple sequential design using only 2 sets of treatments has surprisingly good properties for trials with the proposed number of patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Gauge coupling unification in realistic free-fermionic string models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, K.R.; Faraggi, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the unification of gauge couplings within the framework of a wide class of realistic free-fermionic string models which have appeared in the literature, including the flipped SU(5), SO(6)xSO(4), and various SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) models. If the matter spectrum below the string scale is that of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), then string unification is in disagreement with experiment. We therefore examine several effects that may modify the minimal string predictions. First, we develop a systematic procedure for evaluating the one-loop heavy string threshold corrections in free-fermionic string models, and we explicitly evaluate these corrections for each of the realistic models. We find that these string threshold corrections are small, and we provide general arguments explaining why such threshold corrections are suppressed in string theory. Thus heavy thresholds cannot resolve the disagreement with experiment. We also study the effect of non-standard hypercharge normalizations, light SUSY thresholds, and intermediate-scale gauge structure, and similarly conclude that these effects cannot resolve the disagreement with low-energy data. Finally, we examine the effects of additional color triplets and electroweak doublets beyond the MSSM. Although not required in ordinary grand unification scenarios, such states generically appear within the context of certain realistic free-fermionic string models. We show that if these states exist at the appropriate thresholds, then the gauge couplings will indeed unify at the string scale. Thus, within these string models, string unification can be in agreement with low-energy data. (orig.)

  14. Management for the anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture: a 9-year single centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Liu, Bing; Wang, Kunjie; Liu, Jiaming; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Therapy for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture is difficult and controversial. This study aims to introduce a standard process for managing anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture. Patients and methods: 19 patients with anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture were treated following our standard process. Average (range) age was 52 (21-72) years old. In this standard process, anterior urethral stricture should be treated first. Endoscopic surgery is applied for anterior urethra stricture as a priority as long as obliteration does not occur, and operation for posterior urethral stricture can be conducted in the same stage. Otherwise, an open reconstructive urethroplasty for anterior urethral is needed; while in this condition, the unobliterated posterior urethra can also be treated with endoscopic surgery in the same stage; however, if posterior urethra obliteration exists, then open reconstructive urethroplasty for posterior urethral stricture should be applied 2-3 months later. Results: The median (range) follow-up time was 25.8 (3-56) months. All 19 patients were normal in urethrography after 1 month of the surgery. 4 patients (21.1%) recurred urethral stricture during follow-up, and the locations of recurred stricture were bulbomembranous urethra (2 cases), bulbar urethra (1 case) and bladder neck (1 case). 3 of them restored to health through urethral dilation, yet 1 underwent a second operation. 2 patients (10.5%) complaint of dripping urination. No one had painful erection, stress urinary incontinence or other complications. Conclusions: The management for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture following our standard process is effective and safe. PMID:26064293

  15. Auditory processing and audiovisual integration revealed by combining psychophysical and fMRI experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaskovic, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments conducted in order to investigate human perception and processing of the sound in the human brain. There are several stages in the sound processing. Firstly, in the ear, sound is recorded and transformed into the electrical signal, then information is transported to

  16. Phenomenology and qualitative research: combining the transcendetal orientation of phenomenology with the diversities of lived experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    In different ways philosophers have emphasized that phenomenology aims at accounting for our capacity for being conscious – for example by aiming at describing the structure of subjective experiences. Accordingly, phenomenology involves a transcendental orientation. In the domain of qualitative r...... of dancing, martial arts and elite sports....

  17. IMMERSE: Interactive Mentoring for Multimodal Experiences in Realistic Social Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    barrier as well as the gratification of nearly instant social feedback. The following interactions are possible in the Sandbox: Transactions The box...to be similar to the notion of social “games” developed by Michael Mateas and others at UC Santa Cruz’s (UCSC) Center for Games and Playable Media as...immersive social situations populated by robust social agents, illustrating the keen eye and subtle guidance 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND

  18. Association of Combined Patterns of Tobacco and Cannabis Use in Adolescence With Psychotic Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah J; Gage, Suzanne H; Heron, Jon; Hickman, Matthew; Lewis, Glyn; Munafò, Marcus R; Zammit, Stanley

    2018-01-17

    There is concern about potentially causal effects of tobacco use on psychosis, but epidemiological studies have been less robust in attempts to minimize effects of confounding than studies of cannabis use have been. To examine the association of patterns of cigarette and cannabis use with preceding and subsequent psychotic experiences, and to compare effects of confounding across these patterns. This cohort study used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, which initially consisted of 14 062 children. Data were collected periodically from September 6, 1990, with collection ongoing, and analyzed from August 8, 2016, through June 14, 2017. Cigarette and cannabis use data were summarized using longitudinal latent class analysis to identify longitudinal classes of substance use. Associations between classes and psychotic experiences at age 18 years were assessed. Depending on the analysis model, exposures were longitudinal classes of substance use or psychotic experiences at age 12 years. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between substance use longitudinal classes and subsequent onset of psychotic experiences. Longitudinal classes were derived using 5300 participants (56.1% female) who had at least 3 measures of cigarette and cannabis use from ages 14 to 19 years. Prior to adjusting for a range of potential confounders, there was strong evidence that early-onset cigarette-only use (4.3%), early-onset cannabis use (3.2%), and late-onset cannabis use (11.9%) (but not later-onset cigarette-only use [14.8%]) latent classes were associated with increased psychotic experiences compared with nonusers (65.9%) (omnibus P < .001). After adjusting for confounders, the association for early-onset cigarette-only use attenuated substantially (unadjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.03; 95% CI, 1.13-8.14; adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 0.54-5.88), whereas those for early-onset cannabis use (adjusted OR, 3.70; 95% CI, 1.66-8.25) and late

  19. Combine EPR and two-slit experiments: Interference of advanced waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyshko, D. N.

    1988-10-01

    A nonclassical interference effect, using two-photon correlations in nonlinear optical interactions, is discussed. The apparent nonlocality could be conveniently interpreted in terms of advanced waves, emitted by one detector toward the other. A new Bell-type experiment is proposed, in which the measured photon's parameter is the wave-vector (instead of the polarisation), so that the observable can take more than two possible values.

  20. A new combined wavelet methodology: implementation to GPR and ERT data obtained in the Montagnole experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperovich, L; Eppelbaum, L; Zheludev, V; Dumoulin, J; Soldovieri, F; Proto, M; Bavusi, M; Loperte, A

    2013-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) are well assessed and accurate geophysical methods for the investigation of subsurface geological sections. In this paper, we present the joint exploitation of these methods at the Montagnole (French Alps) experimental site with the final aim to study and monitor effects of possible catastrophic rockslides in transport infrastructures. The overall goal of the joint GPR–ERT deployment considered here is the careful monitoring of the subsurface structure before and after a series of high energetic mechanical impacts at ground level. It is known that factors such as the ambiguity of geophysical field examination, the complexity of geological scenarios and the low signal-to-noise ratio affect the possibility of building reliable physical–geological models of subsurface structure. Here, we applied to the GPR and ERT methods at the Montagnole site, recent advances in wavelet theory and data mining. The wavelet approach was specifically used to obtain enhanced images (e.g. coherence portraits) resulting from the integration of the different geophysical fields. This methodology, based on the matching pursuit combined with wavelet packet dictionaries, permitted us to extract desired signals under different physical–geological conditions, even in the presence of strongly noised data. Tools such as complex wavelets employed for the coherence portraits, and combined GPR–ERT coherency orientation angle, to name a few, enable non-conventional operations of integration and correlation in subsurface geophysics to be performed. The estimation of the above-mentioned parameters proved useful not only for location of buried inhomogeneities but also for a rough estimation of their electromagnetic and related properties. Therefore, the combination of the above approaches has allowed us to set up a novel methodology, which may enhance the reliability and confidence of each separate geophysical method and

  1. Clinical experience with TENS and TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen. Report of 371 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Quarnstrom, F. C.; Milgrom, P.

    1989-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) alone or TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen (N2O) was administered for restorative dentistry without local anesthesia to 371 adult patients. A total of 55% of TENS alone and 84% of TENS/N2O visits were rated successful. A total of 53% of TENS alone and 82% of TENS/N2O patients reported slight or no pain. In multivariable analyses, pain reports were related to the anesthesia technique and patient fear and unrelated to sex, race, age, toot...

  2. First elemental imaging experiments on a combined PGAI and NT setup at the Budapest Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belgya, T.; Kis, Z.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Kasztovszky, Zs.; Materna, T.; Festa, G.; Caroppi, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The European collaboration 'ANCIENT CHARM' (http://ancient-charm.neutron-eu.net/ach/) aims to develop new non-destructive neutron techniques to image the internal composition of complex archaeological objects in order to answer various archaeological questions. Among these techniques, prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI) and neutron tomography (NT) form a unique combination which can determine the 3D distribution of most elements in objects with a non-destructive procedure. A spatial resolution better than 2 mm has already been achieved in a moderately scattering matrix material. (author)

  3. the first experience of phakoemulsification with vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno for combined cataract and glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Trubilin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to describe of a new effective method of combined treatment of patients with primary open- angle glaucoma with mod- erately elevated intraocular pressure and cataract.Methods: Studies have been conducted among 30 patients (30 eyes from 46 to 85 years with a combination of cataract of varying degrees of maturity and open-angle glaucoma of different stages. In addition to the standard techniques there were used special clini- cal and functional methods of research: optical cogerent tomography of the anterior segment of the eye Visante OCt (Carl Zeiss, Ger- many, glaucomatous cupping and thickness of nerve fibers study using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope HRt II (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany. In accordance with the target patients were divided into 2 groups: the basic group consisted of 15 patients (15 eyes aged 63 to 76 years with primary open angle glaucoma of 1-2 stages and cataracts of varying degrees of maturity. In both groups there was performed the ultrasonic phakoemulsification of the lens on the phakoemulsificator Infinity (Alcon, US.Results: the analysis of intraocular pressure measurements showed that among patients from I and II group eye pressure had a downward trend in the early postoperative period, however, the average dynamics of reduction of the intraocular pressure in the group of patients where phakoemulsification and vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno performed was higher than in the control group. In the gonioscopy of the corner of the anterior chamber the clinical presentation remained stable throughout the period of observation. In the postoperative period among patients in the main observation group according to OCt it was noted changing the depth of the anterior chamber of eye towards its increase by an average of 1.39 mm, as well as increasing the angle of the anterior chamber at an average of 9.98.Conclusion: Phakoemulsification with IOL implantation combined with vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno is

  4. the first experience of phakoemulsification with vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno for combined cataract and glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Trubilin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to describe of a new effective method of combined treatment of patients with primary open- angle glaucoma with mod- erately elevated intraocular pressure and cataract.Methods: Studies have been conducted among 30 patients (30 eyes from 46 to 85 years with a combination of cataract of varying degrees of maturity and open-angle glaucoma of different stages. In addition to the standard techniques there were used special clini- cal and functional methods of research: optical cogerent tomography of the anterior segment of the eye Visante OCt (Carl Zeiss, Ger- many, glaucomatous cupping and thickness of nerve fibers study using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope HRt II (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany. In accordance with the target patients were divided into 2 groups: the basic group consisted of 15 patients (15 eyes aged 63 to 76 years with primary open angle glaucoma of 1-2 stages and cataracts of varying degrees of maturity. In both groups there was performed the ultrasonic phakoemulsification of the lens on the phakoemulsificator Infinity (Alcon, US.Results: the analysis of intraocular pressure measurements showed that among patients from I and II group eye pressure had a downward trend in the early postoperative period, however, the average dynamics of reduction of the intraocular pressure in the group of patients where phakoemulsification and vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno performed was higher than in the control group. In the gonioscopy of the corner of the anterior chamber the clinical presentation remained stable throughout the period of observation. In the postoperative period among patients in the main observation group according to OCt it was noted changing the depth of the anterior chamber of eye towards its increase by an average of 1.39 mm, as well as increasing the angle of the anterior chamber at an average of 9.98.Conclusion: Phakoemulsification with IOL implantation combined with vacuum trabeculoplasty ab interno is

  5. Combined liver and kidney transplantation: Our experience and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusuma Ramachandra Halemani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased awareness of organ donation has increased the availability of deceased donors, and it has boosted the opportunities for treating patients with multiple organ dysfunction. Simultaneously replacing two organs gives advantages of single surgery, lower immunosuppression dose and better survival than when one organ alone is transplanted. We present reports of management of three cases of combined liver and kidney transplantation (CLKT from deceased donors. Based on management of these cases we discuss the importance of CLKT and anaesthetic concerns during such complex procedures.

  6. Preliminary Clinical Experience with a Combined Automated Breast Ultrasound and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric D; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Lashbrook, Chris; Davis, Cynthia E; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Carson, Paul L

    2018-03-01

    We analyzed the performance of a mammographically configured, automated breast ultrasound (McABUS) scanner combined with a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system. The GE Invenia ultrasound system was modified for integration with GE DBT systems. Ultrasound and DBT imaging were performed in the same mammographic compression. Our small preliminary study included 13 cases, six of whom had contained invasive cancers. From analysis of these cases, current limitations and corresponding potential improvements of the system were determined. A registration analysis was performed to compare the ease of McABUS to DBT registration for this system with that of two systems designed previously. It was observed that in comparison to data from an earlier study, the McABUS-to-DBT registration alignment errors for both this system and a previously built combined system were smaller than those for a previously built standalone McABUS system. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. WEB ANALYTICS COMBINED WITH EYE TRACKING FOR SUCCESSFUL USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena BORYS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose a new approach for the mobile user experience design process by means of web analytics and eye-tracking. The proposed method was applied to design the LUT mobile website. In the method, to create the mobile website design, data of various users and their behaviour were gathered and analysed using the web analytics tool. Next, based on the findings from web analytics, the mobile prototype for the website was created and validated in eye-tracking usability testing. The analysis of participants’ behaviour during eye-tracking sessions allowed improvements of the prototype.

  8. WEB ANALYTICS COMBINED WITH EYE TRACKING FOR SUCCESSFUL USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN: A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena BORYS; Monika CZWÓRNÓG; Tomasz RATAJCZYK

    2016-01-01

    The authors propose a new approach for the mobile user experience design process by means of web analytics and eye-tracking. The proposed method was applied to design the LUT mobile website. In the method, to create the mobile website design, data of various users and their behaviour were gathered and analysed using the web analytics tool. Next, based on the findings from web analytics, the mobile prototype for the website was created and validated in eye-tracking usability testing. The analy...

  9. Adhesive behaviour of gecko-inspired nanofibrillar arrays: combination of experiments and finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengzhi; Xu Yun; Gu Ping

    2012-01-01

    A polypropylene nanofibrillar array was successfully fabricated by template-assisted nanofabrication strategy. Adhesion properties of this gecko-inspired structure were studied through two parallel and independent approaches: experiments and finite element simulations. Experimental results show relatively good normal adhesion, but accompanied by high preloads. The interfacial adhesion was modelled by effective spring elements with piecewise-linear constitution. The effective elasticity of the fibre-array system was originally calculated from our measured elasticity of single nanowire. Comparisons of the experimental and simulative results reveal quantitative agreement except for some explainable deviations, which suggests the potential applicability of the present models and applied theories. (fast track communication)

  10. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  11. Metastatic Bone Pain Palliation with P-32 in Combination with Vitamin D: Our Preliminary Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.U.; Khan, S.U.; Iqbal, M.; Khan, A.; Shahid, S.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorus-32 ( 32 P) is a routinely used bone pain palliation agent at our institute due to its cost, availability and proven efficacy with mild and self limiting myelo-suppression. Vitamin D is known to de-differentiate tumors and supposed to enhance calcium deposition onto metastatic foci with a hope of reducing the marrow effects. A pilot study showing an increase in the 99m Tc-MDP uptake by skeletal metastatic foci, using single pulse dose of Vitamin D, in some of the patients preceded this study and found the basis for this study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of 32 P alone and in combination with vitamin D in the palliation of bone pain from osseous metastases and to look for its clinical efficacy and reduction in marrow suppression in our clinical environment. 62 patients with extensive osteoblastic bone metastases were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A received 32 P alone, group B combination therapy of 32 P and Vitamin D and group C Vitamin D alone. All these patients were evaluated by a standard protocol on broad parameters of pain reduction, reduction in analgesic consumption, improvement in quality of life and effect on bone marrow suppression at the end of 4th and 8th week post-therapy. Favorable response (≥25%) to treatment was recorded in 55% of cases in-group A, 81% in- group B and 9% in-group C. Reduction in pain score of 50% to 100% were obtained in two cases in group A and 10 in group B. A decrease in pain of 26% to 50% and ≤ 25% was observed in 10 (45%) and 4 (18%) cases respectively in group A, and 8 (36%) and 2 (9%) cases respectively in group B. Analgesic consumption was reduced in both the groups of 32 P, comparatively more in group B. The improvement in mobility and quality of life was observed to be better in group B than A and C. A decrease of white blood cells, hemoglobin level and platelets counts was observed in both groups of 32 P but no significant difference was noted in group A and B was noted at the end

  12. Combining Natural Ingredients and Beliefs: The Dayak Tribe's Experience Caring for Sick Children with Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggerainy, Shinta Widiastuty; Wanda, Dessie; Hayati, Happy

    Instead of seeking conventional health care, the Dayak tribe in Borneo, Indonesia, treats sick children at home with traditional medicine. The objective of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore the Dayak tribe's use of traditional medicine to care for sick children. Comprehensive interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers, with collected data analyzed using content analysis. Key recurring themes identified were: 1) traditional medicine as first aid; 2) ease of access and cost-effectiveness; 3) traditional medicine was not always effective; 4) a combination of natural ingredients and beliefs; 5) the importance of "communicating" with plants; and 6) engagement with metaphysical forces. Health professionals should respect familial cultures' beliefs regarding the provision of health care at home. Furthermore, they need to develop competency in performing cultural assessments and providing information to these parents on the risks of not seeking professional emergency care for children with conditions that can't be handled at home with traditional medicine.

  13. FIRST EXPERIENCE OF CYMEVEN IN THE COMBINED THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R M Balabanova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ummary Objective. To reveal J'reguency of accompaning virus infection and possibility to use antivirus therapy together in therapy RA. Material. 40 patients with RA at the age of 17-45 were studied. The duration of disease was not more than 6 months; patients had 2-3 degrees of activity. Every one had a positive rheumatoid factor. Results. 78,2% of the examined patients connected the beginning of the illness with virus infection they have had. The most difficalt variant of RA course and uneffectiveness of basic therapy were registerd among the patients with combination HSV and CMV infection. Inclusion of Cymevene in complex therapy RA has exerted positive influence on clinical-laboratory, signs stregthened effect of basic therapy. Conclusion. The most difficult variant of RA course was registered among the patients with virus infection. Inclusion of antivirus drugs had a positive influence on effectiveness of basic therapy.

  14. COMBINATION OF FIXATION TECHNIQUES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF COMPLEX DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURE- OUR EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Sunder Sen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to categorically suggest the apt method of surgical technique for a particular type of distal radius fracture (Frykman’s type III-VI. Distal radius fracture are among the most common fractures of the upper extremity inspite of increased focus on regular prevention of osteoporosis, early identification and its prompt management. Most distal radius fractures are the result of low energy mechanisms that can be successfully treated either nonoperatively or with a variety of operative techniques if indicated. Complex distal radius fractures occur most commonly in high-energy injuries with extensive comminution or bone loss and associated soft tissue or vascular injuries. These high-energy fractures can present challenges in reconstructing the distal radius. Effective restoration of the bony architecture requires a thorough knowledge of distal radius anatomy, understanding of the goals of treatment, versatility in surgical approaches and familiarity with multiple fixation options. Although, majority of the extra-articular fracture without signs of instability can be successfully managed with POP immobilisation for a period of 4-5 weeks followed by active physiotherapy, other types (Frykman’s III-VI need surgical management that too with combination of surgical techniques namely augmented spanning external fixator with supplemented K-wire fixation or external fixation followed by fragment specific volar locking compression plate osteosynthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS I have studied 50 cases of distal radius fractures classified using Frykman’s classification using combination of techniques namely augmented spanning external fixator application with K-wire supplementation and spanning external fixator application followed by volar LCP fixation in which external fixator had been used as a reduction tool in majority of the cases and external fixator had been removed after plate osteosynthesis. In some cases retained

  15. Experience with Relatox® in the combination therapy of arm and hand spasticity after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gusev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the botulinum toxin A Relatox® in arm and hand spasticity after ischemic stroke in routine clinical practice.Patients and methods. The instigation enrolled 7 patients after ischemic stroke (7 years ago with the signs of upper limb spasticity. All the patients received combination treatment that involved daily kinesiotherapy sessions and electrical stimulation of the paralyzed limbs. Relatox® was once injected into the forearm muscles of the paralyzed arm 6 months or later after stroke. Muscles were chosen according to clinical and electromyographic findings. The patients' status was assessed before, 2 weeks and 3 months after injection.There were changes in muscle tone, motor abilities of the hand, in the degree of self-service, the presence of subjective sensations, and the degree of local and systemic reactions. The efficiency of therapy was evaluated clinically (Ashworth scale, Frenchay test, Barthel index and on the basis of an analysis of video monitoring a patient's status and of the consideration of care-givers' views.Before included in the study, all the patients were treated with different types of botulinum neurotoxin type A made by other manufacturers.Results. The clinical efficiency of local intramuscular injection of the botulinum toxin type Relatox® in combination with kinesiotherapy and electrical stimulation after 14 days and 3 months after injection was noted in all cases.The good tolerability, efficacy, and long-term of action of relatox, which were comparable to those of other botulinum neurotoxin type A products, were noted during a 3-month follow-up. Neither side effects no adverse events were identified.Conclusion. Accumulation of data on the doses and effects of drugs for the local therapy of post-stroke spasticity, which have been obtained by different clinical centers, and the possibility of choosing a medication will be able to improve treatment in such

  16. Synchronous colorectal neoplasias: our experience about laparoscopic-TEM combined treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzirri, Alessandro; Coccetta, Marco; Cirocchi, Roberto; La Mura, Francesco; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Bravetti, Maurizio; Giuliani, Daniele; De Sol, Angelo; Pressi, Eleonora; Trastulli, Stefano; Di Patrizi, Micol Sole; Avenia, Nicola; Sciannameo, Francesco

    2010-11-25

    Synchronous colorectal neoplasias are defined as 2 or more primary tumors identified in the same patient and at the same time. The most voluminous synchronous cancer is called "first primitive" or "index" cancer. The aim of this work is to describe our experience of minimally invasive approach in patients with synchronous colorectal neoplasias.Since January 2001 till December 2009, 557 patients underwent colectomy for colorectal cancer at the Department of General and Emergency Surgery of the University of Perugia; 128 were right colon cancers, 195 were left colon cancers while 234 patients were affected by rectal cancers. We performed 224 laparoscopic colectomies (112 right, 67 left colectomies and 45 anterior resections of rectum), 91 Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgical Excisions (TEM) and 53 Trans Anal Excisions (TAE). In the same observation period 6 patients, 4 males and 2 females, were diagnosed with synchronous colorectal neoplasias. Minimal invasive treatment of colorectal cancer offers the opportunity to treat two different neoplastic lesions at the same time, with a shorter post-operative hospitalization and minor complications. According to our experience, laparoscopy and TEM may ease the treatment of synchronous diseases with a lower morbidity rate.

  17. MANAJEMEN LABA: PERILAKU MANAJEMEN OPPORTUNISTIC ATAU REALISTIC ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Wijana Asmara Putra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Earnings management is a still attractive issue. It is often associatedwith negative behavior conducted by management for its own interest. In fact,it also has different side to be examined. There is another motivation to do so,such as to improve the company’s operation. This literature study aims toreview management motivation of doing earnings management, whetheropportunistic or realistic. What conflict that earnings management brings,what pro and cons about it, what would happen if earnings is not managed,whether the company would be better off or worse off.

  18. An Introduction to a Realistic Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Preparata, Giuliano

    2003-01-01

    This book is a remarkable synthesis, a clear and simple introduction to Quantum Physics with a sort of Galilean dialogue on the supreme systems of contemporary Physics. The author, whose research interests and work extended from quarks to liquid systems and from crystals to stars, introduces the common conceptual and mathematical framework of all quantum theories, realistic enough to successfully confront Nature: Quantum Field Theory applied to the study of both dilute and condensed matter. In the dilute limit, quantum mechanics is shown to be a good approximation to Quantum Field Theory. Howe

  19. Development of Superconducting Combined Function Magnets for the Proton Transport Line for the J-PARC Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Anerella, Michael; Escallier, John; Fujii, T; Fukui, Yuji; Ganetis, George; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Hashiguchi, E; Higashi, Norio; Ichikawa, Atsuko; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Jain, Animesh K; Kanahara, T; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Makida, Yasuhiro; Muratore, Joseph F; Obana, Tetsuhiro; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, Hirokatsu; Okamura, T; Orikasa, T; Parker, Brett; Sasaki, Ken Ichi; Takasaki, Minoru; Tanaka, Ken Ichi; Terashima, Akio; Tomaru, Takayuki; Wanderer, Peter; Yamamoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    A second generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments has been proposed as one of the main projects at J-PARC jointly built by JAERI and KEK. Superconducting combined function magnets, SCFMs, will be utilized for the 50 GeV, 750 kW proton beam line for the neutrino experiment and an R&D program is in underway at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function of a dipole field of 2.6 T with a quadrupole field of 19 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A series of 28 magnets in the beam line will be operated DC in supercritical helium cooling below 5 K. A design feature of the SCFM is the left-right asymmetry of the coil cross section: current distributions for superimposed dipole- and quadrupole- fields are combined in a single layer coil. Another design feature is the adoption of glass-fiber reinforced phenolic plastic spacers to replace the conventional metallic collars. To evaluate this unique design, fabrication of full-scale prototype magnets is in progress at KEK and the fi...

  20. Added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis combined with digital mammography according to reader experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Perrot, Nicolas; Dechoux, Sophie; Ribeiro, Carine; Chopier, Jocelyne; Bazelaire, Cedric de

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Breast tomosynthesis improves diagnostic performance especially for radiologists with lower experience in mammography. • Adding only one-view digital breast tomosynthesis to mammography improves the cancer detection rate. • Breast tomosynthesis is mainly useful for helping radiologists to detect architectural distortion. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography to characterize breast lesions. Materials and methods: Our institutional ethics committees approved the study and granted a waiver of informed consent. One hundred fifty-five women (mean age, 51.3 years, range: 24–92 years) who systematically underwent mammography and breast tomosynthesis with subsequent percutaneous biopsy were analyzed. Four radiologists (two seniors, R1 and R2, and two juniors, R3 and R4 with 30, 10, 3 and 1 years of experience in breast imaging, respectively) independently reviewed exams in two steps: mammography alone and tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography. The lesions in the cohort included 39.3% (61/155) cancers, 2.5% (4/155) high-risk lesions and 58.1% (90/155) benign lesions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare the results of the two readings. Results: There was almost perfect agreement irrespective of reader experience for the reading of the mammography in adjunct with tomosynthesis, whereas agreement was poor between junior and senior readers for the reading of mammography alone. Area under the ROC (Az) values for the tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography were significantly better than Az values for mammography alone for all readers except the most experienced, for whom only a tendency was noted. The proportion of cancers undiagnosed by mammography alone that were well diagnosed by tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography was 6.5% (4/61), 13.1% (8/61), 27.8% (17/61) and 26.2% (16/61) for Readers 1, 2, 3 and 4

  1. Experiment and computation: a combined approach to study the van der Waals complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent results on the millimetre-wave spectroscopy of weakly bound van der Waals complexes, mostly those which contain H2 and He, is presented. In our work, we compared the experimental spectra to the theoretical bound state results, thus providing a critical test of the quality of the M–H2 and M–He potential energy surfaces (PESs which are a key issue for reliable computations of the collisional excitation and de-excitation of molecules (M = CO, NH3, H2O in the dense interstellar medium. The intermolecular interactions with He and H2 play also an important role for high resolution spectroscopy of helium or para-hydrogen clusters doped by a probe molecule (CO, HCN. Such experiments are directed on the detection of superfluid response of molecular rotation in the He and p-H2 clusters.

  2. Ultra-realistic 3-D imaging based on colour holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjelkhagen, H I

    2013-01-01

    A review of recent progress in colour holography is provided with new applications. Colour holography recording techniques in silver-halide emulsions are discussed. Both analogue, mainly Denisyuk colour holograms, and digitally-printed colour holograms are described and their recent improvements. An alternative to silver-halide materials are the panchromatic photopolymer materials such as the DuPont and Bayer photopolymers which are covered. The light sources used to illuminate the recorded holograms are very important to obtain ultra-realistic 3-D images. In particular the new light sources based on RGB LEDs are described. They show improved image quality over today's commonly used halogen lights. Recent work in colour holography by holographers and companies in different countries around the world are included. To record and display ultra-realistic 3-D images with perfect colour rendering are highly dependent on the correct recording technique using the optimal recording laser wavelengths, the availability of improved panchromatic recording materials and combined with new display light sources.

  3. Improving the Fine-Tuning of Metaheuristics: An Approach Combining Design of Experiments and Racing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista de Moraes Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, metaheuristic algorithms are adapted to a large set of problems by applying few modifications on parameters for each specific case. However, this flexibility demands a huge effort to correctly tune such parameters. Therefore, the tuning of metaheuristics arises as one of the most important challenges in the context of research of these algorithms. Thus, this paper aims to present a methodology combining Statistical and Artificial Intelligence methods in the fine-tuning of metaheuristics. The key idea is a heuristic method, called Heuristic Oriented Racing Algorithm (HORA, which explores a search space of parameters looking for candidate configurations close to a promising alternative. To confirm the validity of this approach, we present a case study for fine-tuning two distinct metaheuristics: Simulated Annealing (SA and Genetic Algorithm (GA, in order to solve the classical traveling salesman problem. The results are compared considering the same metaheuristics tuned through a racing method. Broadly, the proposed approach proved to be effective in terms of the overall time of the tuning process. Our results reveal that metaheuristics tuned by means of HORA achieve, with much less computational effort, similar results compared to the case when they are tuned by the other fine-tuning approach.

  4. Combined chemoradiation of cisplatin versus carboplatin in cervical carcinoma: a single institution experience from Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Lorvidhaya, Vicharn; Kamnerdsupaphon, Pimkhuan; Sukthomya, Vimol; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Supawongwattana, Bongkoch; Pukanhaphan, Nantaka; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2016-01-01

    To report the results of combined chemoradiation (CCRT) with cisplatin versus carboplatin in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. From 2009 to 2013, 255 patients with stage IIB-IVA cervical carcinoma, according to FIGO staging were prospectively assigned to be treated with pelvic radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy given concurrently with cisplatin or carboplatin in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Treatment outcomes and toxicitiy were evaluated. Two-hundred and thirteen patients could be evaluated. At a median follow-up time of 43 months (6–69 months), the 3-year local control, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 93, 80.8, 85.0 and 87.3 %, respectively. No statistical difference in terms of local control, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates between cisplatin and carboplatin treatments was observed in this study. Eighty-six percents of the patients in the carboplatin group could receive more than 4 cycles, while there were only 72 % in the cisplatin group who completed more than 4 cycles (p = 0. 02). In terms of acute toxicity, cisplatin caused significantly more anemia (p = 0.026), neutropenia (p = 0. 044) and nephrotoxicity (p = 0. 031) than carboplatin. No difference in late toxicity was observed in this study. Carboplatin yielded comparable results to cisplatin in concurrent chemo-radiation for locally advanced cervical cancer. In addition, carboplatin was associated with a better compliance rate and was associated with less of anemia, neutropenia and nephrotoxicity

  5. Experience of combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Utsunomiya, Masato; Itoh, Hiroshi; Itatani, Hiroaki; Namiki, Mikio.

    1987-01-01

    Since March, 1981, 13 patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma were treated by combined cisdiamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and full dose radiotherapy. They were 10 men and 3 women. The patient ages ranged from 42 to 79 years, with a median of 59.5 years. The primary sites of transitional cell carcinoma were bladder in 5, ureter in 6, renal pelvis in 1 and prostate in 1. Radiotherapy consisted of a mean tumor dose of 48.7 gray, with a range of 40 to 66.4 gray, was administered with cobalt 60. Cisplatin was infused 5 days a week with a daily dose of 20 to 30 mg. 4 patients recieved 2 courses of cisplatin infusion and others 1 or less. Of the 4 evaluable patients 3 (75 %) achieved a complete response. Toxicity was evaluated for the 13 patients. Mainly gastrointestinal toxicity was noted: appetite loss in 9 (69.2 %), nausea and/or vomiting in 5 (38.5 %) and diarrhea in 5 (38.5 %). Leukocytopenia was noted in 7 patients (53.9 %), but in no one leukocyte count was less than 2000/mm 3 . Mild thrombocytopenia was noted only in 3 patients (23.1 %). All of these toxicities were mild, and the patients recovered soon after the therapy. Herein it is discussed about future problems such as solution of interaction mechanism, detection of practical dose and administering method of cisplatin and radiation. (author)

  6. Combination of Intensive Chemotherapy and Anticancer Vaccines in the Treatment of Human Malignancies: The Hematological Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Liseth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have demonstrated that cancer-specific T cell cytotoxicity can be induced both ex vivo and in vivo, but this therapeutic strategy should probably be used as an integrated part of a cancer treatment regimen. Initial chemotherapy should be administered to reduce the cancer cell burden and disease-induced immune defects. This could be followed by autologous stem cell transplantation that is a safe procedure including both high-dose disease-directed chemotherapy and the possibility for ex vivo enrichment of the immunocompetent graft cells. The most intensive conventional chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation are used especially in the treatment of aggressive hematologic malignancies; both strategies induce T cell defects that may last for several months but cancer-specific T cell reactivity is maintained after both procedures. Enhancement of anticancer T cell cytotoxicity is possible but posttransplant vaccination therapy should probably be combined with optimalisation of immunoregulatory networks. Such combinatory regimens should be suitable for patients with aggressive hematological malignancies and probably also for other cancer patients.

  7. Autologous fat injection combined with palatoplasty and pharyngoplasty for velopharyngeal insufficiency and cleft palate: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yimei; Ma, Tingting; Wu, Di; Yin, Ningbei; Zhao, Zhenmin

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate clinical application of autologous fat transplantation in the posterior pharynx to treat velopharyngeal incompetence and cleft palate. Case series with chart review. Cleft Lip and Palate Center of Plastic Surgery Hospital, an academic medical center. We studied 11 patients (age, 5-26 years) with a cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency who underwent autologous fat injection. Patients were followed for 9 to 40 months. Pronunciation evaluation, visual appearance of the palatopharyngeal area, nasopharyngeal fibroscopy (NPF), palatopharyngeal lateral radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were undertaken before and after the operation. Speech intelligibility was markedly increased in all patients. Pronunciation was good to excellent compared with the preoperative level (P = .001). Mean velopharyngeal insufficiency rate was significantly reduced from 26.05% to 6.96% (P = .028) by NPF and from 26.42% to 7.11% (P = .017) by MRI (axial plane). Magnetic resonance imaging indicated significantly reduced mean minimum velopharyngeal distance, from 10.39 to 3.65 mm (P = .012) in the sagittal plane, and markedly increased thickness of transplanted fat in the posterior pharyngeal wall (sagittal, 5.43 mm; axial, 4.74 mm). There were few complications (sleep apnea, nasopharyngeal regurgitation). Autologous fat transplantation in the posterior pharyngeal wall was a good method for treating velopharyngeal incompetence. The safety profile was good in our sample, and we got a consistent result in the follow-up period. In addition, it also could be combined with routine surgery.

  8. TMS modeling toolbox for realistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Sun; Suh, Hyun Sang; Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique for brain stimulation using rapidly changing magnetic fields generated by coils. It has been established as an effective stimulation technique to treat patients suffering from damaged brain functions. Although TMS is known to be painless and noninvasive, it can also be harmful to the brain by incorrect focusing and excessive stimulation which might result in seizure. Therefore there is ongoing research effort to elucidate and better understand the effect and mechanism of TMS. Lately Boundary element method (BEM) and Finite element method (FEM) have been used to simulate the electromagnetic phenomenon of TMS. However, there is a lack of general tools to generate the models of TMS due to some difficulties in realistic modeling of the human head and TMS coils. In this study, we have developed a toolbox through which one can generate high-resolution FE TMS models. The toolbox allows creating FE models of the head with isotropic and anisotropic electrical conductivities in five different tissues of the head and the coils in 3D. The generated TMS model is importable to FE software packages such as ANSYS for further and efficient electromagnetic analysis. We present a set of demonstrative results of realistic simulation of TMS with our toolbox.

  9. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  10. Methodological challenges for the large N study of local participatory experiences. Combining methods and databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galais, Carolina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyse the effects of different data collection strategies in the study of local participatory experiences in a region of Spain (Andalusia. We examine the divergences and similarities between the data collected using different methods, as well as the implications for the reliability of the data. We have collected participatory experiences through two parallel processes: a survey of municipalities and web content mining. The survey of municipalities used two complementary strategies: an online questionnaire and a CATI follow-up for those municipalities that had not answered our first online contact attempt. Both processes (survey and data mining were applied to the same sample of municipalities, but provided significantly different images of the characteristics of Andalusia’s participatory landscape. The goal of this work is to discuss the different types of biases introduced by each data collection procedure and their implications for substantive analyses.

    En este artículo analizamos los efectos de diferentes estrategias para la recolección de datos en el estudio de las experiencias participativas andaluzas. Examinamos para ello las diferencias y similitudes entre los datos recogidos mediante diferentes métodos, así como las implicaciones para la fiabilidad de los datos. Para ello, hemos utilizado dos procedimientos paralelos. En primer lugar, una encuesta a municipios y la minería de datos en Internet. La encuesta se realizó utilizando dos modos de administración diferentes, un cuestionario online y un cuestionario telefónico de seguimiento a los municipios que no respondieron al primer intento de contacto vía correo electrónico. Tanto la encuesta como la minería de datos fueron aplicados a la misma muestra de municipios, aunque arrojaron diferencias significativas en cuanto a las características del panorama participativo en Andalucía. El objetivo de este trabajo es discutir los diferentes tipos

  11. The Combined Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Subjective Experience, Impulsivity and Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C.; Kassel, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N=146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about 4 standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants’ habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to contribute to

  12. Combining HIV and AIDS surveillance: an experience from an Italian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, P; Piovesan, C; Rezza, G; Moro, G; Serpelloni, G; Ferraro, P

    1997-12-01

    Surveillance systems based on the reporting of AIDS cases do not provide a completely up to date picture of the trend of the HIV epidemic, stressing the need for systems based on the diagnosis of HIV infection. However, implementation of these systems has been hindered by low feasibility, poor access to HIV testing, and problems related to confidentiality. The advantages and disadvantages of the two systems and of combined use were explored by comparing and integrating information from AIDS and HIV testing registries in a region of Northern Italy. Linkage of AIDS and HIV testing registries allowed the annual number of incident and prevalent infections to be calculated. For linked cases, concordance of exposure category was determined. Up to the end of 1995, 2186 AIDS cases and 5306 HIV-positive individuals were diagnosed. Linkage identified 1212 individuals reported to both registries. From 1990 to 1995, annual AIDS incidence steadily increased, while incidence of new HIV diagnoses decreased. The AIDS-to-AIDS-free ratio among those infected decreased from 1:5.6 in 1989 to 1:4.2 in 1995. The proportion of women and noninjecting drug users was higher among AIDS-free cases than among AIDS cases. The concordance of the exposure category was high (K = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.67-0.74), but it varied by exposure category; the highest concordance was for injecting drug users. Integrated use of the information provided by these surveillance systems allowed us to better understand and foresee the AIDS epidemic dynamics. The data also suggested that the reliability of information on exposure category may vary among categories.

  13. Pollination Requirements of Almond (Prunus dulcis): Combining Laboratory and Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henselek, Yuki; Eilers, Elisabeth J; Kremen, Claire; Hendrix, Stephen D; Klein, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-03-08

    Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb; Rosales: Rosaceae) is a cash crop with an estimated global value of over seven billion U.S. dollars annually and commercial varieties are highly dependent on insect pollination. Therefore, the understanding of basic pollination requirements of the main varieties including pollination efficiency of honey bees (Apis mellifera, Linnaeus, Hymenoptera: Apidae) and wild pollinators is essential for almond production. We first conducted two lab experiments to examine the threshold number of pollen grains needed for successful pollination and to determine if varietal identity or diversity promotes fruit set and weight. Further, we examined stigma and ovules of flowers visited by Apis and non-Apis pollinators in the field to study the proportion of almond to non-almond pollen grains deposited, visitation time per flower visit, and tube set. Results indicate that the threshold for successful fertilization is around 60 pollen grains, but pollen can be from any compatible variety as neither pollen varietal identity nor diversity enhanced fruit set or weight. Andrena cerasifolii Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae) was a more effective pollinator on a per single visit basis than Apis and syrphid flies. Nevertheless, Apis was more efficient than A. cerasifolii and syrphid flies as they spent less time on a flower during a single visit. Hence, planting with two compatible varieties and managing for both Apis and non-Apis pollinators is likely to be an optimal strategy for farmers to secure high and stable pollination success.

  14. The virtual promenade, didactic experiments on the potentials of combining conventional and digital modelling of the city experienced in movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette; Bohn, Claus

    2014-01-01

    and digital modelling. The workshop serves as an education-based research project in which we want to investigate the potentials of working consciously with bodily movement as a generator in the creation of architecture by combining actual experience of the city with conventional model building and digital...... in the education of future architects? This paper is therefore likewise divided. The first part is about the city and the architectural tools involved in the workshop. This section is titled Representing the City. The second part is elaborating on the technical aspects of the Virtual Reality technology used...

  15. Heparan Sulfate Induces Necroptosis in Murine Cardiomyocytes: A Medical-In silico Approach Combining In vitro Experiments and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechendorf, Elisabeth; Vaßen, Phillip; Zhang, Jieyi; Hallawa, Ahmed; Martincuks, Antons; Krenkel, Oliver; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Schuerholz, Tobias; Simon, Tim-Philipp; Marx, Gernot; Ascheid, Gerd; Schmeink, Anke; Dartmann, Guido; Thiemermann, Christoph; Martin, Lukas

    2018-01-01

    Life-threatening cardiomyopathy is a severe, but common, complication associated with severe trauma or sepsis. Several signaling pathways involved in apoptosis and necroptosis are linked to trauma- or sepsis-associated cardiomyopathy. However, the underling causative factors are still debatable. Heparan sulfate (HS) fragments belong to the class of danger/damage-associated molecular patterns liberated from endothelial-bound proteoglycans by heparanase during tissue injury associated with trauma or sepsis. We hypothesized that HS induces apoptosis or necroptosis in murine cardiomyocytes. By using a novel Medical- In silico approach that combines conventional cell culture experiments with machine learning algorithms, we aimed to reduce a significant part of the expensive and time-consuming cell culture experiments and data generation by using computational intelligence (refinement and replacement). Cardiomyocytes exposed to HS showed an activation of the intrinsic apoptosis signal pathway via cytochrome C and the activation of caspase 3 (both p  machine learning algorithms.

  16. Workspace design for crane cabins applying a combined traditional approach and the Taguchi method for design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojević Brkić, Vesna K; Veljković, Zorica A; Golubović, Tamara; Brkić, Aleksandar Dj; Kosić Šotić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Procedures in the development process of crane cabins are arbitrary and subjective. Since approximately 42% of incidents in the construction industry are linked to them, there is a need to collect fresh anthropometric data and provide additional recommendations for design. In this paper, dimensioning of the crane cabin interior space was carried out using a sample of 64 crane operators' anthropometric measurements, in the Republic of Serbia, by measuring workspace with 10 parameters using nine measured anthropometric data from each crane operator. This paper applies experiments run via full factorial designs using a combined traditional and Taguchi approach. The experiments indicated which design parameters are influenced by which anthropometric measurements and to what degree. The results are expected to be of use for crane cabin designers and should assist them to design a cabin that may lead to less strenuous sitting postures and fatigue for operators, thus improving safety and accident prevention.

  17. Fiber-optic combined FPI/FBG sensors for monitoring of radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: ex vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Gallati, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-04-01

    We present a biocompatible, all-glass, 0.2 mm diameter, fiber-optic probe that combines an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry and a proximal fiber Bragg grating sensor; the probe enables dual pressure and temperature measurement on an active 4 mm length, with 40 Pa and 0.2°C nominal accuracy. The sensing system has been applied to monitor online the radiofrequency thermal ablation of tumors in liver tissue. Preliminary experiments have been performed in a reference chamber with uniform heating; further experiments have been carried out on ex vivo porcine liver, which allowed the measurement of a steep temperature gradient and monitoring of the local pressure increase during the ablation procedure.

  18. Neural Correlates of Realistic and Unrealistic Auditory Space Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Callan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Binaural recordings can simulate externalized auditory space perception over headphones. However, if the orientation of the recorder's head and the orientation of the listener's head are incongruent, the simulated auditory space is not realistic. For example, if a person lying flat on a bed listens to an environmental sound that was recorded by microphones inserted in ears of a person who was in an upright position, the sound simulates an auditory space rotated 90 degrees to the real-world horizontal axis. Our question is whether brain activation patterns are different between the unrealistic auditory space (ie, the orientation of the listener's head and the orientation of the recorder's head are incongruent and the realistic auditory space (ie, the orientations are congruent. River sounds that were binaurally recorded either in a supine position or in an upright body position were served as auditory stimuli. During fMRI experiments, participants listen to the stimuli and pressed one of two buttons indicating the direction of the water flow (horizontal/vertical. Behavioral results indicated that participants could not differentiate between the congruent and the incongruent conditions. However, neuroimaging results showed that the congruent condition activated the planum temporale significantly more than the incongruent condition.

  19. Validation of a realistic simulator for veterinary gastrointestinal endoscopy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M; Pérez-Merino, Eva M; Soria-Gálvez, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the face, content, and construct validity of a new realistic composite simulator (Simuldog) used to provide training in canine gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy. The basic endoscopic procedures performed on the simulator were esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), gastric biopsy (GB), and gastric foreign body removal (FBR). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of novices (final-year veterinary students and recent graduates without endoscopic experience, n=30) versus experienced subjects (doctors in veterinary medicine who had performed more than 50 clinical upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures as a surgeon, n=15). Tasks were scored based on completion time, and specific rating scales were developed to assess performance. Internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were assessed. Face and content validity were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire. The novices needed considerably more time than the experts to perform EGD, GB, and FBR, and their performance scores were significantly lower (pinternal validity of the rating scales were good. Face validity was excellent, and both groups agreed that the endoscopy scenarios were very realistic. The experts highly valued the usefulness of Simuldog for veterinary training and as a tool for assessing endoscopic skills. Simuldog is the first validated model specifically developed to be used as a training tool for endoscopy techniques in small animals.

  20. Development of realistic thermal hydraulic system analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Chung, B. D; Kim, K. D.

    2002-05-01

    The realistic safety analysis system is essential for nuclear safety research, advanced reactor development, safety analysis in nuclear industry and 'in-house' plant design capability development. In this project, we have developed a best-estimate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic system code, MARS, which is based on the integrated version of the RELAP5 and COBRA-TF codes. To improve the realistic analysis capability, we have improved the models for multi-dimensional two-phase flow phenomena and for advanced two-phase flow modeling. In addition, the GUI (Graphic User Interface) feature were developed to enhance the user's convenience. To develop the coupled analysis capability, the MARS code were linked with the three-dimensional reactor kinetics code (MASTER), the core thermal analysis code (COBRA-III/CP), and the best-estimate containment analysis code (CONTEMPT), resulting in MARS/MASTER/COBRA/CONTEMPT. Currently, the MARS code system has been distributed to 18 domestic organizations, including research, industrial, regulatory organizations and universities. The MARS has been being widely used for the safety research of existing PWRs, advanced PWR, CANDU and research reactor, the pre-test analysis of TH experiments, and others

  1. Development of realistic thermal hydraulic system analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jae; Chung, B. D; Kim, K. D. [and others

    2002-05-01

    The realistic safety analysis system is essential for nuclear safety research, advanced reactor development, safety analysis in nuclear industry and 'in-house' plant design capability development. In this project, we have developed a best-estimate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic system code, MARS, which is based on the integrated version of the RELAP5 and COBRA-TF codes. To improve the realistic analysis capability, we have improved the models for multi-dimensional two-phase flow phenomena and for advanced two-phase flow modeling. In addition, the GUI (Graphic User Interface) feature were developed to enhance the user's convenience. To develop the coupled analysis capability, the MARS code were linked with the three-dimensional reactor kinetics code (MASTER), the core thermal analysis code (COBRA-III/CP), and the best-estimate containment analysis code (CONTEMPT), resulting in MARS/MASTER/COBRA/CONTEMPT. Currently, the MARS code system has been distributed to 18 domestic organizations, including research, industrial, regulatory organizations and universities. The MARS has been being widely used for the safety research of existing PWRs, advanced PWR, CANDU and research reactor, the pre-test analysis of TH experiments, and others.

  2. Cost of increasing access to artemisinin combination therapy: the Cambodian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socheat Duong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria-endemic countries are switching antimalarial drug policy from cheap ineffective monotherapies to artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and the global community are considering setting up a global subsidy to fund their purchase. However, in order to ensure that ACTs are correctly used and are accessible to the poor and remote communities who need them, specific interventions will be necessary and the additional costs need to be considered. Methods This paper presents an incremental cost analysis of some of these interventions in Cambodia, the first country to change national antimalarial drug policy to an ACT of artesunate and mefloquine. These costs include the cost of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs, the cost of blister-packaging the drugs locally and the costs of increasing access to diagnosis and treatment to remote communities through malaria outreach teams (MOTs and Village Malaria Workers (VMW. Results At optimum productive capacity, the cost of blister-packaging cost under $0.20 per package but in reality was significantly more than this because of the low rate of production. The annual fixed cost (exclusive of RDTs and drugs per capita of the MOT and VMW schemes was $0.44 and $0.69 respectively. However because the VMW scheme achieved a higher rate of coverage than the MOT scheme, the cost per patient treated was substantially lower at $5.14 compared to $12.74 per falciparum malaria patient treated. The annual cost inclusive of the RDTs and drugs was $19.31 for the MOT scheme and $11.28 for the VMW scheme given similar RDT positivity rates of around 22% and good provider compliance to test results. Conclusion In addition to the cost of ACTs themselves, substantial additional investments are required in order to ensure that they reach the targeted population via appropriate delivery systems and to ensure that they are used appropriately. In addition, differences

  3. Capturing and reproducing realistic acoustic scenes for hearing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Marton; Buchholz, Jörg

    Accurate spatial audio recordings are important for a range of applications, from the creation of realistic virtual sound environments to the evaluation of communication devices, such as hearing instruments and mobile phones. Spherical microphone arrays are particularly well-suited for capturing...... spatial audio in three dimensions. However, practical constraints limit the number of microphones that can be used and thus the maximum spatial resolution and frequency bandwidth that can be achieved. Further, most important sound sources are near the horizontal plane, where human spatial hearing is also...... most accurate. This thesis therefore investigated whether the horizontal performance of spherical microphone arrays could be improved (i) through an appropriate placement of a fixed number of transducers on the sphere, and (ii) by applying mixed-order ambisonics (MOA) processing. MOA combines higher...

  4. Using realist evaluation to assess primary healthcare teams' responses to intimate partner violence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Few evaluations have assessed the factors triggering an adequate health care response to intimate partner violence. This article aimed to: 1) describe a realist evaluation carried out in Spain to ascertain why, how and under what circumstances primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence, and 2) discuss the strengths and challenges of its application. We carried out a series of case studies in four steps. First, we developed an initial programme theory (PT1), based on interviews with managers. Second, we refined PT1 into PT2 by testing it in a primary healthcare team that was actively responding to violence. Third, we tested the refined PT2 by incorporating three other cases located in the same region. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and thick descriptions were produced and analysed using a retroduction approach. Fourth, we analysed a total of 15 cases, and identified combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that triggered an adequate response to violence by using qualitative comparative analysis. There were several key mechanisms -the teams' self-efficacy, perceived preparation, women-centred care-, and contextual factors -an enabling team environment and managerial style, the presence of motivated professionals, the use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care- that should be considered to develop adequate primary health-care responses to violence. The full application of this realist evaluation was demanding, but also well suited to explore a complex intervention reflecting the situation in natural settings. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  6. Realistic Simulations of Coronagraphic Observations with WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Maxime; Zimmerman, Neil; Roberge, Aki; Lincowski, Andrew; Arney, Giada; Stark, Chris; Jansen, Tiffany; Turnbull, Margaret; WFIRST Science Investigation Team (Turnbull)

    2018-01-01

    We present a framework to simulate observing scenarios with the WFIRST Coronagraphic Instrument (CGI). The Coronagraph and Rapid Imaging Spectrograph in Python (crispy) is an open-source package that can be used to create CGI data products for analysis and development of post-processing routines. The software convolves time-varying coronagraphic PSFs with realistic astrophysical scenes which contain a planetary architecture, a consistent dust structure, and a background field composed of stars and galaxies. The focal plane can be read out by a WFIRST electron-multiplying CCD model directly, or passed through a WFIRST integral field spectrograph model first. Several elementary post-processing routines are provided as part of the package.

  7. Presupernova neutrinos: realistic emissivities from stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly; Lunardini, Cecilia; Farmer, Rob; Timmes, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present a calculation of neutrino emissivities and energy spectra from a presupernova, a massive star going through the advanced stages of nuclear burning before becoming a supernova. Neutrinos produced from beta decay and electron capture, as well as pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and the photoneutrino process are included. We use the state of the art stellar evolution code MESA to obtain realistic conditions for temperature, density, electron fraction, and nuclear isotopic composition. We have found that beta processes contribute significantly to the neutrino flux at potentially detectable energies of a few MeV. Estimates for the number of events at several current and future detectors are presented for the last few hours before collapse.

  8. E. H. Carr: En kompleks realist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyn, Carina Ann

    2008-01-01

    Edward Hallett Carr er blevet kaldt alt fra realist til utopist til slet og ret ,,farlig". Denne artikel giver en bedre forstaelse af, hvorfor et centralt pejlemærke i disci­plinen international politik bliver beskrevet på så mange - tilsyneladende - modsætningsfyldte måder. I stedet for at tage...... udgangspunkt i en realistisk eller en utopisk læsning af Carrs værker bidrager denne artikel med en tredje læsning af Carrs teori, der samtænker ,,den realistiske Carr" og ,,den utopiske Carr". Det overordnede argument i artiklen er, at for at kunne finde mening og sammen­hæng i Carrs politiske teori, ma man...... nødvendigvis samtænke Carrs realisme og utopisme med hans underliggende radikalisme....

  9. Realistic microscopic level densities for spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear level densities play an important role in nuclear reactions such as the formation of the compound nucleus. We develop a microscopic calculation of the level density based on a combinatorial evaluation from a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation makes use of a fast Monte Carlo algorithm allowing us to consider large shell model spaces which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. Since our model relies on a microscopic basis, it can be applied to exotic nuclei with more confidence than the commonly used semiphenomenological formuals. An exhaustive comparison of our predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented

  10. Level density from realistic nuclear potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calboreanu, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear level density of some nuclei is calculated using a realistic set of single particle states (sps). These states are derived from the parameterization of nuclear potentials that describe the observed sps over a large number of nuclei. This approach has the advantage that one can infer level density for nuclei that are inaccessible for a direct study, but are very important in astrophysical processes such as those close to the drip lines. Level densities at high excitation energies are very sensitive to the actual set of sps. The fact that the sps spectrum is finite has extraordinary consequences upon nuclear reaction yields due to the leveling-off of the level density at extremely high excitation energies wrongly attributed so far to other nuclear effects. Single-particle level density parameter a parameter is extracted by fitting the calculated densities to the standard Bethe formula

  11. Helioseismology of a Realistic Magnetoconvective Sunspot Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.; Rempel, M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We compare helioseismic travel-time shifts measured from a realistic magnetoconvective sunspot simulation using both helioseismic holography and time-distance helioseismology, and measured from real sunspots observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We find remarkable similarities in the travel-time shifts measured between the methodologies applied and between the simulated and real sunspots. Forward modeling of the travel-time shifts using either Born or ray approximation kernels and the sound-speed perturbations present in the simulation indicates major disagreements with the measured travel-time shifts. These findings do not substantially change with the application of a correction for the reduction of wave amplitudes in the simulated and real sunspots. Overall, our findings demonstrate the need for new methods for inferring the subsurface structure of sunspots through helioseismic inversions.

  12. From Minimal to Realistic Supersymmetric SU(5) Grand Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Masina, I; Altarelli, Guido; Feruglio, Ferruccio; Masina, Isabella

    2000-01-01

    We construct and discuss a "realistic" example of SUSY SU(5) GUT model, with an additional U(1) flavour symmetry, that is not plagued by the need of large fine tunings, like those associated with doublet-triplet splitting in the minimal model, and that leads to an acceptable phenomenology. This includes coupling unification with a value of alpha_s(m_Z) in much better agreement with the data than in the minimal version, an acceptable hierarchical pattern for fermion masses and mixing angles, also including neutrino masses and mixings, and a proton decay rate compatible with present limits (but the discovery of proton decay should be within reach of the next generation of experiments). In the neutrino sector the preferred solution is one with nearly maximal mixing both for atmospheric and solar neutrinos.

  13. Breaking with fun, educational and realistic learning games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus Henriksen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    are commonly conceived as means for staging learning processes, and that thinking learning games so has an inhibiting effect in regard to creating learning processes. The paper draws upon a qualitative study of participants' experiences with ‘the EIS Simulation', which is a computer-based learning game......This paper addresses the game conceptions and values that learning games inherit from regular gaming, as well as how they affect the use and development of learning games. Its key points concern the issues of thinking learning games as fun, educative and realistic, which is how learning games...... for teaching change management and change implementation. The EIS is played in groups, who share the game on a computer, and played by making change decisions in order to implement an IT system in an organisation. In this study, alternative participatory incentives, means for creating learning processes...

  14. Generating realistic environments for cyber operations development, testing, and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Vincent H.; Gregorio-de Souza, Ian; Murphy, John P.

    2012-06-01

    Training eective cyber operatives requires realistic network environments that incorporate the structural and social complexities representative of the real world. Network trac generators facilitate repeatable experiments for the development, training and testing of cyber operations. However, current network trac generators, ranging from simple load testers to complex frameworks, fail to capture the realism inherent in actual environments. In order to improve the realism of network trac generated by these systems, it is necessary to quantitatively measure the level of realism in generated trac with respect to the environment being mimicked. We categorize realism measures into statistical, content, and behavioral measurements, and propose various metrics that can be applied at each level to indicate how eectively the generated trac mimics the real world.

  15. Experiences with using a concept of organ-dose combination as a basis for practical measures in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernli, C.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of organ-dose combination is presented and its practical consequences for working-place and personnel monitoring and for the improvement of working methods are shown. Two years of practical experience have demonstrated the applicability and usefullness of the concept and have resulted in a better concentration and economization of the monitoring and protection efforts. The values for external total body dose and skin dose, in special cases also those for hand dose and internal contamination, are combined to form a criterion for the total radiation detriment which is easy to use and interpret: each measured external or internal exposure is registered as a fraction of the appropriate maximum permissible annual limit (expressed as dose for external exposures and as activity for incorporations). This fraction is called 'exposure index'. Over one year the sum of all registered 'exposure index' values for an employee must not exceed one. This 'total exposure index' values can also be expressed as an 'effective dose' if its value is multiplied by five rem. While the external body exposures clearly dominate in most departments of EIR, the 'effective doses' in the isotope production department are combinations of different organ doses. 'Low' and 'high risk' groups of employee differ by the relative importance of the four 'effective dose' components: 'low risk group' (effective dose 2 rem): (hand dose, total body dose, incorporation, skin dose). The total value of the 'effective dose' and the relative importance of its components determine the practical radiation protection measures and the appropriate combination and frequency of personnel monitoring for each employee

  16. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  17. The Immersive Virtual Reality Experience: A Typology of Users Revealed Through Multiple Correspondence Analysis Combined with Cluster Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Pedro J; Morais, Diogo; Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2016-03-01

    Immersive virtual reality is thought to be advantageous by leading to higher levels of presence. However, and despite users getting actively involved in immersive three-dimensional virtual environments that incorporate sound and motion, there are individual factors, such as age, video game knowledge, and the predisposition to immersion, that may be associated with the quality of virtual reality experience. Moreover, one particular concern for users engaged in immersive virtual reality environments (VREs) is the possibility of side effects, such as cybersickness. The literature suggests that at least 60% of virtual reality users report having felt symptoms of cybersickness, which reduces the quality of the virtual reality experience. The aim of this study was thus to profile the right user to be involved in a VRE through head-mounted display. To examine which user characteristics are associated with the most effective virtual reality experience (lower cybersickness), a multiple correspondence analysis combined with cluster analysis technique was performed. Results revealed three distinct profiles, showing that the PC gamer profile is more associated with higher levels of virtual reality effectiveness, that is, higher predisposition to be immersed and reduced cybersickness symptoms in the VRE than console gamer and nongamer. These findings can be a useful orientation in clinical practice and future research as they help identify which users are more predisposed to benefit from immersive VREs.

  18. Combining paleo-data and modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of megafauna extinctions on woody vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S; Gill, Jacquelyn L; Johnson, Christopher N; Vera, Frans W M; Sandom, Christopher J; Asner, Gregory P; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-26

    Until recently in Earth history, very large herbivores (mammoths, ground sloths, diprotodons, and many others) occurred in most of the World's terrestrial ecosystems, but the majority have gone extinct as part of the late-Quaternary extinctions. How has this large-scale removal of large herbivores affected landscape structure and ecosystem functioning? In this review, we combine paleo-data with information from modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of large herbivores (and their disappearance) on woody species, landscape structure, and ecosystem functions. In modern landscapes characterized by intense herbivory, woody plants can persist by defending themselves or by association with defended species, can persist by growing in places that are physically inaccessible to herbivores, or can persist where high predator activity limits foraging by herbivores. At the landscape scale, different herbivore densities and assemblages may result in dynamic gradients in woody cover. The late-Quaternary extinctions were natural experiments in large-herbivore removal; the paleoecological record shows evidence of widespread changes in community composition and ecosystem structure and function, consistent with modern exclosure experiments. We propose a conceptual framework that describes the impact of large herbivores on woody plant abundance mediated by herbivore diversity and density, predicting that herbivore suppression of woody plants is strongest where herbivore diversity is high. We conclude that the decline of large herbivores induces major alterations in landscape structure and ecosystem functions.

  19. Species traits outweigh nested structure in driving the effects of realistic biodiversity loss on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfi, Amelia A; Zavaleta, Erika S

    2015-01-01

    While most studies of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning have examined randomized diversity losses, several recent experiments have employed nested, realistic designs and found that realistic species losses had larger consequences than random losses for ecosystem functioning. Progressive, realistic, biodiversity losses are generally strongly nested, but this nestedness is a potentially confounding effect. Here, we address whether nonrandom trait loss or degree of nestedness drives the relationship between diversity and productivity in a realistic biodiversity-loss experiment. We isolated the effect of nestedness through post hoc analyses of data from an experimental biodiversity manipulation in a California serpentine grassland. We found that the order in which plant traits are lost as diversity declines influences the diversity-productivity relationship more than the degree of nestedness does. Understanding the relationship between the expected order of species loss and functional traits is becoming increasingly important in the face of ongoing biodiversity loss worldwide. Our findings illustrate the importance of species composition and the order of species loss, rather than nestedness per se, for understanding the mechanisms underlying the effects of realistic species losses on ecosystem functioning.

  20. Realistic generation cost of solar photovoltaic electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Parm Pal; Singh, Sukhmeet

    2010-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (SPV) power plants have long working life with zero fuel cost and negligible maintenance cost but requires huge initial investment. The generation cost of the solar electricity is mainly the cost of financing the initial investment. Therefore, the generation cost of solar electricity in different years depends on the method of returning the loan. Currently levelized cost based on equated payment loan is being used. The static levelized generation cost of solar electricity is compared with the current value of variable generation cost of grid electricity. This improper cost comparison is inhibiting the growth of SPV electricity by creating wrong perception that solar electricity is very expensive. In this paper a new method of loan repayment has been developed resulting in generation cost of SPV electricity that increases with time like that of grid electricity. A generalized capital recovery factor has been developed for graduated payment loan in which capital and interest payment in each installment are calculated by treating each loan installment as an independent loan for the relevant years. Generalized results have been calculated which can be used to determine the cost of SPV electricity for a given system at different places. Results show that for SPV system with specific initial investment of 5.00 cents /kWh/year, loan period of 30 years and loan interest rate of 4% the levelized generation cost of SPV electricity with equated payment loan turns out to be 28.92 cents /kWh, while the corresponding generation cost with graduated payment loan with escalation in annual installment of 8% varies from 9.51 cents /kWh in base year to 88.63 cents /kWh in 30th year. So, in this case, the realistic current generation cost of SPV electricity is 9.51 cents /kWh and not 28.92 cents /kWh. Further, with graduated payment loan, extension in loan period results in sharp decline in cost of SPV electricity in base year. Hence, a policy change is required

  1. A realist review to explore how low-income pregnant women use food vouchers from the UK's Healthy Start programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohly, Heather; Crossland, Nicola; Dykes, Fiona; Lowe, Nicola; Hall-Moran, Victoria

    2017-04-21

    To explore how low-income pregnant women use Healthy Start food vouchers, the potential impacts of the programme, and which women might experience these impacts and why. A realist review. Primary or empirical studies (of any design) were included if they contributed relevant evidence or insights about how low-income women use food vouchers from the Healthy Start (UK) or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programmes. The assessment of 'relevance' was deliberately broad to ensure that reviewers remained open to new ideas from a variety of sources of evidence. A combination of evidence synthesis and realist analysis techniques was used to modify, refine and substantiate programme theories, which were constructed as explanatory 'context-mechanism-outcome'-configurations. 38 primary studies were included in this review: four studies on Healthy Start and 34 studies on WIC. Two main outcome strands were identified: dietary improvements (intended) and financial assistance (unintended). Three evidence-informed programme theories were proposed to explain how aspects of context (and mechanisms) may generate these outcomes: the 'relative value' of healthy eating (prioritisation of resources); retailer discretion (pressure to 'bend the rules'); the influence of other family members (disempowerment). This realist review suggests that some low-income pregnant women may use Healthy Start vouchers to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables and plain cow's milk, whereas others may use them to reduce food expenditure and save money for other things. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Assessing Outcomes of a Realistic Major Preview in an Introductory Sport Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David; Wanless, Elizabeth; Johnson, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper assessed the outcomes of a field experience assignment (FEA) in an introductory sport management course designed as a realistic major preview. Student learning outcomes assessed were commitment to the major, intent to pursue the major, expectation of a career in sports, and perceived preparation for a career in sports. A…

  3. CASCADE-IMEI: A learning environment of realistic mathematics for student teachers in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulkardi, Z.; Nieveen, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the second phase of a four-year study which aims to develop a learning environment that supports prospective mathematics teachers learning realistic mathematics education (RME) in teacher education in Indonesia. The results suggest that by giving student teachers experiences in

  4. Challenges and solutions for realistic room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2002-05-01

    Virtual room acoustic simulation (auralization) techniques have traditionally focused on answering questions related to speech intelligibility or musical quality, typically in large volumetric spaces. More recently, auralization techniques have been found to be important for the externalization of headphone-reproduced virtual acoustic images. Although externalization can be accomplished using a minimal simulation, data indicate that realistic auralizations need to be responsive to head motion cues for accurate localization. Computational demands increase when providing for the simulation of coupled spaces, small rooms lacking meaningful reverberant decays, or reflective surfaces in outdoor environments. Auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy levels indicate that much of the information captured in acoustical measurements is inaudible, minimizing the intensive computational requirements of real-time auralization systems. Results are presented for early reflection thresholds as a function of azimuth angle, arrival time, and sound-source type, and reverberation thresholds as a function of reverberation time and level within 250-Hz-2-kHz octave bands. Good agreement is found between data obtained in virtual room simulations and those obtained in real rooms, allowing a strategy for minimizing computational requirements of real-time auralization systems.

  5. Quantifying introgression risk with realistic population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Atiyo; Meirmans, Patrick G; Haccou, Patsy

    2012-12-07

    Introgression is the permanent incorporation of genes from the genome of one population into another. This can have severe consequences, such as extinction of endemic species, or the spread of transgenes. Quantification of the risk of introgression is an important component of genetically modified crop regulation. Most theoretical introgression studies aimed at such quantification disregard one or more of the most important factors concerning introgression: realistic genetical mechanisms, repeated invasions and stochasticity. In addition, the use of linkage as a risk mitigation strategy has not been studied properly yet with genetic introgression models. Current genetic introgression studies fail to take repeated invasions and demographic stochasticity into account properly, and use incorrect measures of introgression risk that can be manipulated by arbitrary choices. In this study, we present proper methods for risk quantification that overcome these difficulties. We generalize a probabilistic risk measure, the so-called hazard rate of introgression, for application to introgression models with complex genetics and small natural population sizes. We illustrate the method by studying the effects of linkage and recombination on transgene introgression risk at different population sizes.

  6. Determination of Realistic Fire Scenarios in Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper expands on previous work that examined how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). The previous work introduced a simplified model that treated the fire primarily as a source of heat and combustion products and sink for oxygen prescribed (input to the model) based on terrestrial standards. The model further treated the spacecraft as a closed system with no capability to vent to the vacuum of space. The model in the present work extends this analysis to more realistically treat the pressure relief system(s) of the spacecraft, include more combustion products (e.g. HF) in the analysis and attempt to predict the fire spread and limiting fire size (based on knowledge of terrestrial fires and the known characteristics of microgravity fires) rather than prescribe them in the analysis. Including the characteristics of vehicle pressure relief systems has a dramatic mitigating effect by eliminating vehicle overpressure for all but very large fires and reducing average gas-phase temperatures.

  7. Cerebral blood flow simulations in realistic geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szopos Marcela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to perform the computation of the blood flow in all the cerebral network, obtained from medical images as angiographies. We use free finite elements codes as FreeFEM++. We first test the code on analytical solutions in simplified geometries. Then, we study the influence of boundary conditions on the flow and we finally perform first computations on realistic meshes. L’objectif est ici de simuler l’écoulement sanguin dans tout le réseau cérébral (artériel et veineux obtenu à partir d’angiographies cérébrales 3D à l’aide de logiciels d’éléments finis libres, comme FreeFEM++. Nous menons d’abord une étude détaillée des résultats sur des solutions analytiques et l’influence des conditions limites à imposer dans des géométries simplifiées avant de travailler sur les maillages réalistes.

  8. Realistic Scheduling Mechanism for Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danish Mahmood

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a Realistic Scheduling Mechanism (RSM to reduce user frustration and enhance appliance utility by classifying appliances with respective constraints and their time of use effectively. Algorithms are proposed regarding functioning of home appliances. A 24 hour time slot is divided into four logical sub-time slots, each composed of 360 min or 6 h. In these sub-time slots, only desired appliances (with respect to appliance classification are scheduled to raise appliance utility, restricting power consumption by a dynamically modelled power usage limiter that does not only take the electricity consumer into account but also the electricity supplier. Once appliance, time and power usage limiter modelling is done, we use a nature-inspired heuristic algorithm, Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO, optimally to form schedules with given constraints representing each sub-time slot. These schedules tend to achieve an equilibrium amongst appliance utility and cost effectiveness. For validation of the proposed RSM, we provide a comparative analysis amongst unscheduled electrical load usage, scheduled directly by BPSO and RSM, reflecting user comfort, which is based upon cost effectiveness and appliance utility.

  9. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Alejandro [Instituto de Matemática, UFRJ, CEP 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Faria, Edson de [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, USP, Rua do Matão 1010, SP 05508-090 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Pujals, Enrique [IMPA, Estrada Dona Castorina 110, 22460-320 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tresser, Charles [IBM, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We prove a version of Bell’s theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell’s theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  10. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation.

  11. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation

  12. Global atmospheric response to specific linear combinations of the main SST modes. Part I: numerical experiments and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Trzaska

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates through numerical experiments the controversial question of the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO phenomena on climate according to large-scale and regional-scale interhemispheric thermal contrast. Eight experiments (two considering only inversed Atlantic thermal anomalies and six combining ENSO warm phase with large-scale interhemispheric contrast and Atlantic anomaly patterns were performed with the Météo-France atmospheric general circulation model. The definition of boundary conditions from observed composites and principal components is presented and preliminary results concerning the month of August, especially over West Africa and the equatorial Atlantic are discussed. Results are coherent with observations and show that interhemispheric and regional scale sea-surface-temperature anomaly (SST patterns could significantly modulate the impact of ENSO phenomena: the impact of warm-phase ENSO, relative to the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP climatology, seems stronger when embedded in global and regional SSTA patterns representative of the post-1970 conditions [i.e. with temperatures warmer (colder than the long-term mean in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere]. Atlantic SSTAs may also play a significant role.

  13. Combining choice experiments with psychometric scales to assess the social acceptability of wind energy projects: A latent class approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strazzera, Elisabetta; Mura, Marina; Contu, Davide

    2012-01-01

    A choice experiment exercise is combined with psychometric scales in order: (1) to identify factors that explain support/opposition toward a wind energy development project; and (2) to assess (monetary) trade-offs between attributes of the project. A Latent Class estimator is fitted to the data, and different utility parameters are estimated, conditional on class allocation. It is found that the probability of class membership depends on specific psychometric variables. Visual impacts on valued sites are an important factor of opposition toward a project, and this effect is magnified when identity values are attached to the specific site, so much that no trade-off would be acceptable for a class of individuals characterized by strong place attachment. Conversely, other classes of individuals are willing to accept compensations, in form of private and/or public benefits. The distribution of benefits in the territory, and preservation of the option value related to the possible development of an archeological site, are important for a class of individuals concerned with the sustainability of the local economy. - Highlights: ► A Choice Experiment approach is used to assess acceptability of a wind farm project. ► Psychometric variables are used to model heterogeneity in a Latent Class model. ► No trade-off would be acceptable for a class of individuals. ► Another class of individuals is interested in private benefits. ► Other classes are interested in public benefits and sustainability of the development.

  14. Realistic biological approaches for improving thermoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    components of tumours. Strategies include targeting the radiation DNA repair processes, improving drug delivery using nanoparticles, exploiting immunotherapy mechanisms, reducing tumour pH, or modifying the tumour vascular supply. All of these approaches have been combined with either hyperthermia...... or radiation in preclinical models and clear benefits in tumour response observed. But few of these methods have actually been combined with thermoradiotherapy. Furthermore, very few combinations have been tested in relevant normal tissue studies, despite the fact that it is the normal tissue response...

  15. Methods and Issues for the Combined Use of Integral Experiments and Covariance Data: Results of a NEA International Collaborative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatores, M.; Palmiotti, G.; Aliberti, G.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dupont, E.; Herman, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Ivanova, T.; Ivanov, E.; Kim, S.-J.; Kodeli, I.; Manturov, G.; McKnight, R.; Pelloni, S.; Perfetti, C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Rearden, B. T.; Rochman, D.; Sugino, K.; Trkov, A.; Wang, W.; Wu, H.; Yang, W.-S.

    2014-04-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the Nuclear Science Committee under the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) established a Subgroup (called "Subgroup 33") in 2009 on "Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data." The first stage was devoted to producing the description of different adjustment methodologies and assessing their merits. A detailed document related to this first stage has been issued. Nine leading organizations (often with a long and recognized expertise in the field) have contributed: ANL, CEA, INL, IPPE, JAEA, JSI, NRG, IRSN and ORNL. In the second stage a practical benchmark exercise was defined in order to test the reliability of the nuclear data adjustment methodology. A comparison of the results obtained by the participants and major lessons learned in the exercise are discussed in the present paper that summarizes individual contributions which often include several original developments not reported separately. The paper provides the analysis of the most important results of the adjustment of the main nuclear data of 11 major isotopes in a 33-group energy structure. This benchmark exercise was based on a set of 20 well defined integral parameters from 7 fast assembly experiments. The exercise showed that using a common shared set of integral experiments but different starting evaluated libraries and/or different covariance matrices, there is a good convergence of trends for adjustments. Moreover, a significant reduction of the original uncertainties is often observed. Using the a-posteriori covariance data, there is a strong reduction of the uncertainties of integral parameters for reference reactor designs, mainly due to the new correlations in the a-posteriori covariance matrix. Furthermore, criteria have been proposed and applied to verify the consistency of differential and integral data used in the adjustment. Finally, recommendations are given for an

  16. Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data: results of a NEA international collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, M.; Palmiotti, G.; Aliberti, G.; McKnight, R.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dupont, E.; Herman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the Nuclear Science Committee under the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) established a Subgroup (called 'Subgroup 33') in 2009 on 'Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data'. The first stage was devoted to producing the description of different adjustment methodologies and assessing their merits. A detailed document related to this first stage has been issued. Nine leading organizations (often with a long and recognized expertise in the field) have contributed: ANL, CEA, INL, IPPE, JAEA, JSI, NRG, IRSN and ORNL. In the second stage a practical benchmark exercise was defined in order to test the reliability of the nuclear data adjustment methodology. A comparison of the results obtained by the participants and major lessons learned in the exercise are discussed in the present paper that summarizes individual contributions which often include several original developments not reported separately. The paper provides the analysis of the most important results of the adjustment of the main nuclear data of 11 major isotopes in a 33-group energy structure. This benchmark exercise was based on a set of 20 well defined integral parameters from 7 fast assembly experiments. The exercise showed that using a common shared set of integral experiments but different starting evaluated libraries and/or different covariance matrices, there is a good convergence of trends for adjustments. Moreover, a significant reduction of the original uncertainties is often observed. Using the a-posteriori covariance data, there is a strong reduction of the uncertainties of integral parameters for reference reactor designs, mainly due to the new correlations in the a-posteriori covariance matrix. Furthermore, criteria have been proposed and applied to verify the consistency of differential and integral data used in the adjustment. Finally, recommendations

  17. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  18. Heparan Sulfate Induces Necroptosis in Murine Cardiomyocytes: A Medical-In silico Approach Combining In vitro Experiments and Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Zechendorf

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening cardiomyopathy is a severe, but common, complication associated with severe trauma or sepsis. Several signaling pathways involved in apoptosis and necroptosis are linked to trauma- or sepsis-associated cardiomyopathy. However, the underling causative factors are still debatable. Heparan sulfate (HS fragments belong to the class of danger/damage-associated molecular patterns liberated from endothelial-bound proteoglycans by heparanase during tissue injury associated with trauma or sepsis. We hypothesized that HS induces apoptosis or necroptosis in murine cardiomyocytes. By using a novel Medical-In silico approach that combines conventional cell culture experiments with machine learning algorithms, we aimed to reduce a significant part of the expensive and time-consuming cell culture experiments and data generation by using computational intelligence (refinement and replacement. Cardiomyocytes exposed to HS showed an activation of the intrinsic apoptosis signal pathway via cytochrome C and the activation of caspase 3 (both p < 0.001. Notably, the exposure of HS resulted in the induction of necroptosis by tumor necrosis factor α and receptor interaction protein 3 (p < 0.05; p < 0.01 and, hence, an increased level of necrotic cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, using this novel Medical-In silico approach, our data suggest (i that HS induces necroptosis in cardiomyocytes by phosphorylation (activation of receptor-interacting protein 3, (ii that HS is a therapeutic target in trauma- or sepsis-associated cardiomyopathy, and (iii indicate that this proof-of-concept is a first step toward simulating the extent of activated components in the pro-apoptotic pathway induced by HS with only a small data set gained from the in vitro experiments by using machine learning algorithms.

  19. Realistic Chest Tube Simulator Using Pork Belly with Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Patrick Mebust

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The pork belly chest tube simulator is designed to instruct Emergency Medicine residents and Emergency Medicine-bound students. Introduction: Chest tube insertion is an essential procedural skill that must be mastered by practicing emergency and surgical providers. It is a lifesaving procedure indicated in cases of pneumothorax, hemothorax, chylothorax, empyema, esophageal/gastric rupture into the pleural space, and traumatic arrest.1,2 These critical patients require immediate decompression and evacuation of pleural space pathology. Therefore, chest tube insertion must be performed competently and expeditiously to prevent further morbidity and mortality. Performed improperly, chest tube placement can lead to ineffective decompression as well as life threatening visceral and vascular injury. Overall complications rates have been quoted up to 37%.3,4 Simulation offers a safe and effective method to master such procedural techniques. Unfortunately, many chest tube simulators are expensive5 or do not offer a realistic simulation experience. Therefore, we have designed an economical device that has a life-like feel, very similar to human skin and tissue. Objective: The purpose of this model is to teach residents and students how to competently perform and properly secure a surgical chest tube. Methods: This chest tube simulator uses a piece of pork belly that includes skin with underlying muscle and fascia. This tissue is placed over wooden strips and foam tape which are a proxy for human ribs and pleura. This chest wall anatomy allows the learner to locate landmarks, palpate intercostal spaces on real skin, and perform blunt dissection with a realistic “pop” of pleural tissue. Finally, since chest tube dislodgment is a common and unfortunate cause of morbidity and mortality, this chest wall design allows the learner to practice the essential and various techniques of securing the chest tube to real skin.

  20. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Tokamak Turbulence and Transport in Realistic Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnish, Geoffrey Mark

    Computational modelling of fusion plasmas is very resource intensive, so much so that the Numerical Tokamak Project has recently been recognized as a Grand Challenge of high performance computing. In order to apply computational modelling to the analysis of fusion plasma performance and eventually to attain predictive capability, an increasing emphasis on sophisticated algorithms and computational performance is required. In this work, an advanced three dimensional particle simulation code was developed, supporting simulations in realistic machine geometries, including both toroidal topology and shaping in the cross section. Gyrokinetic ions are employed in order to approach realistic tokamak parameter regimes. The code employs an object-oriented design supporting flexible, run-time selection of interchangeable components, including geometry model, particle dynamics, field solution strategy, grid configuration, etc. The code is designed for efficient, scalable execution on massively parallel computers, using an object-oriented wrapper over conventional message passing as the parallelization technology, and supports execution on uniprocessors as a limiting case. Simulations of tokamak turbulence and transport were performed. Toroidicity was seen to cause coupling of poloidal modes, resulting in the formation of a mode that is of global radial extent. The resultant transport was significantly elevated over that in cylindrical geometry, and moreover, exhibits a functional form increasing with radius, bearing significant similarity to experiment. The ion pressure gradient driven mode was studied to determine scaling of transport with the critical parameter a/rho_{i}. Runs were performed with eta_{i} = 4 over the range 70 <=q a/rho _{i} <=q 540, providing a computational picture of this mode extending well into the operating regime of current and future tokamaks. The ion thermal diffusivity chi_{i } was seen to possess Bohm-like scaling features.

  1. On the realistic validation of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Lin, C.-A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Gieseke, F.; de Souza, R. S.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Hattab, M. W.; Krone-Martins, A.

    2017-07-01

    Two of the main problems encountered in the development and accurate validation of photometric redshift (photo-z) techniques are the lack of spectroscopic coverage in the feature space (e.g. colours and magnitudes) and the mismatch between the photometric error distributions associated with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. Although these issues are well known, there is currently no standard benchmark allowing a quantitative analysis of their impact on the final photo-z estimation. In this work, we present two galaxy catalogues, Teddy and Happy, built to enable a more demanding and realistic test of photo-z methods. Using photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectroscopy from a collection of sources, we constructed data sets that mimic the biases between the underlying probability distribution of the real spectroscopic and photometric sample. We demonstrate the potential of these catalogues by submitting them to the scrutiny of different photo-z methods, including machine learning (ML) and template fitting approaches. Beyond the expected bad results from most ML algorithms for cases with missing coverage in the feature space, we were able to recognize the superiority of global models in the same situation and the general failure across all types of methods when incomplete coverage is convoluted with the presence of photometric errors - a data situation which photo-z methods were not trained to deal with up to now and which must be addressed by future large-scale surveys. Our catalogues represent the first controlled environment allowing a straightforward implementation of such tests. The data are publicly available within the COINtoolbox (https://github.com/COINtoolbox/photoz_catalogues).

  2. Art, Meet Chemistry; Chemistry, Meet Art: Case Studies, Current Literature, and Instrumental Methods Combined to Create a Hands-On Experience for Nonmajors and Instrumental Analysis Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivens, Delana A.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Verges, Katie J.; Jamieson, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    Case studies and current literature are combined with spectroscopic analysis to provide a unique chemistry experience for art history students and to provide a unique inquiry-based laboratory experiment for analytical chemistry students. The XRF analysis method was used to demonstrate to nonscience majors (art history students) a powerful…

  3. Assessment of vectorial total variation penalties on realistic dual-energy CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigie, David S; Sanchez, Adrian A; La Rivière, Patrick J

    2017-04-21

    Vectorial extensions of total variation have recently been developed for regularizing the reconstruction and denoising of multi-channel images, such as those arising in spectral computed tomography. Early studies have focused mainly on simulated, piecewise-constant images whose structure may favor total-variation penalties. In the current manuscript, we apply vectorial total variation to real dual-energy CT data of a whole turkey in order to determine if the same benefits can be observed in more complex images with anatomically realistic textures. We consider the total nuclear variation ([Formula: see text]) as well as another vectorial total variation based on the Frobenius norm ([Formula: see text]) and standard channel-by-channel total variation ([Formula: see text]). We performed a series of 3D TV denoising experiments comparing the three TV variants across a wide range of smoothness parameter settings, optimizing each regularizer according to a very-high-dose 'ground truth' image. Consistent with the simulation studies, we find that both vectorial TV variants achieve a lower error than the channel-by-channel TV and are better able to suppress noise while preserving actual image features. In this real data study, the advantages are subtler than in the previous simulation study, although the [Formula: see text] penalty is found to have clear advantages over either [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] when comparing material images formed from linear combinations of the denoised energy images.

  4. Group Augmentation in Realistic Visual-Search Decisions via a Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Davide; Cinel, Caterina; Poli, Riccardo

    2017-08-10

    Groups have increased sensing and cognition capabilities that typically allow them to make better decisions. However, factors such as communication biases and time constraints can lead to less-than-optimal group decisions. In this study, we use a hybrid Brain-Computer Interface (hBCI) to improve the performance of groups undertaking a realistic visual-search task. Our hBCI extracts neural information from EEG signals and combines it with response times to build an estimate of the decision confidence. This is used to weigh individual responses, resulting in improved group decisions. We compare the performance of hBCI-assisted groups with the performance of non-BCI groups using standard majority voting, and non-BCI groups using weighted voting based on reported decision confidence. We also investigate the impact on group performance of a computer-mediated form of communication between members. Results across three experiments suggest that the hBCI provides significant advantages over non-BCI decision methods in all cases. We also found that our form of communication increases individual error rates by almost 50% compared to non-communicating observers, which also results in worse group performance. Communication also makes reported confidence uncorrelated with the decision correctness, thereby nullifying its value in weighing votes. In summary, best decisions are achieved by hBCI-assisted, non-communicating groups.

  5. Combined Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS and CMS Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Sumorok, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Zablocki, J; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Verzetti, M; Demortier, L; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Christian, A; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Gomber, B; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2015-05-15

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the H→γγ and H→ZZ→4ℓ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is m_{H}=125.09±0.21 (stat)±0.11 (syst) GeV.

  6. Combining experimentalist knowledge with modelling approaches to evaluate a controlled herbicide application experiment in an agricultural headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Lorenz; Fenicia, Fabrizio; Doppler, Tobias; Reichert, Peter; Stamm, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Although only a small fraction of the herbicide mass sprayed on agricultural fields reaches the stream in usual conditions, concentrations in streams may reach levels proven to affect organisms. Therefore, diffuse pollution of water bodies by herbicides in catchments dominated by agricultural land-use is a major concern. The process of herbicide wash off has been studied through experiments at lab and field scales. Fewer studies are available at the scales of small catchments and larger watersheds, as the lack of spatial measurements at these scales hinders model parameterization and evaluation. Even fewer studies make explicit use of the combined knowledge of experimentalists and modellers. As a result, the dynamics and interactions of processes responsible for herbicide mobilization and transport at the catchment scale are insufficiently understood. In this work, we integrate preexisting experimentalist knowledge aquired in a large controlled herbicide application experiment into the model development process. The experimental site was a small (1.2 km2) agricultural catchment with subdued topography (423 to 473 m a.s.l.), typical for the Swiss Plateau. The experiment consisted of an application of multiple herbicides, distributed in-stream concentration measurements at high temporal resolution as well as soil and ponding water samples. The measurements revealed considerable spatio-temporal variation in herbicide loss rates. The objective of our study is to better understand the processes that caused this variation. In an iterative dialogue between modellers and experimentalists, we constructed a simple hydrological model structure with multiple reservoirs, considering degradation and sorption of herbicides. Spatial heterogeneity was accounted for through Hydrological Response Units (HRUs). Different model structures were used for dinstinct HRUs to account for spatial variability in the perceived dominant processes. Some parameters were linked between HRUs to

  7. Evaluation of a knowledge transfer scheme to improve policy making and practices in health promotion and disease prevention setting in French regions: a realist study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Linda; Petit, Audrey; Ridde, Valery; Dagenais, Christian; Porcherie, Marion; Pommier, Jeanine; Ferron, Chrisine; Minary, Laetitia; Alla, François

    2017-06-29

    Evidence-based decision-making and practice are pivotal in public health. However, barriers do persist and they relate to evidence properties, organisations and contexts. To address these major knowledge transfer (KT) issues, we need to rethink how knowledge is produced and used, to enhance our understanding of decision-making processes, logics and mechanisms and to examine the ability of public health services to integrate research findings into their decisions and operations. This article presents a realist evaluation protocol to assess a KT scheme in prevention policy and practice at local level in France. This study is a comparative multiple case study, using a realist approach, to assess a KT scheme in regional health agencies (ARS) and regional non-profit organisations for health education and promotion (IREPS), by analysing the configurations contexts/mechanisms/outcomes of it. The KT scheme assessed is designed for the use of six reviews of systematic reviews concerning the following themes: nutrition, alcohol, tobacco smoking, physical activity, emotional and sexual life and psychosocial skills. It combines the following activities: supporting the access to and the adaptation of scientific and usable evidences; strengthening professionals' skills to analyse, adopt and use the evidences in the course of their practices and their decision-making process; facilitating the use of evidence in the organisations and processes. RAMESE II reporting standards for realist evaluations was used. The aims of this study are to experiment and characterise the factors related to the scheme's ability to enable public health stakeholders to address the challenges of KT and to integrate scientific knowledge into policy and practice. We will use the realist approach in order to document the parameters of successful KT strategies in the specific contexts of preventive health services in France, while seeking to determine the transferability of such strategies.

  8. FROG The Fast and Realistic OPENGL Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light ($<3\\textrm{MB}$) and fast (browsing time ~20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL and GLUT libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This document describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisations, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  9. Hyper-realistic face masks: a new challenge in person identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jet Gabrielle; Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Minemoto, Kazusa; Noyes, Eilidh; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Jenkins, Rob

    2017-01-01

    We often identify people using face images. This is true in occupational settings such as passport control as well as in everyday social environments. Mapping between images and identities assumes that facial appearance is stable within certain bounds. For example, a person's apparent age, gender and ethnicity change slowly, if at all. It also assumes that deliberate changes beyond these bounds (i.e., disguises) would be easy to spot. Hyper-realistic face masks overturn these assumptions by allowing the wearer to look like an entirely different person. If unnoticed, these masks break the link between facial appearance and personal identity, with clear implications for applied face recognition. However, to date, no one has assessed the realism of these masks, or specified conditions under which they may be accepted as real faces. Herein, we examined incidental detection of unexpected but attended hyper-realistic masks in both photographic and live presentations. Experiment 1 (UK; n = 60) revealed no evidence for overt detection of hyper-realistic masks among real face photos, and little evidence of covert detection. Experiment 2 (Japan; n = 60) extended these findings to different masks, mask-wearers and participant pools. In Experiment 3 (UK and Japan; n = 407), passers-by failed to notice that a live confederate was wearing a hyper-realistic mask and showed limited evidence of covert detection, even at close viewing distance (5 vs. 20 m). Across all of these studies, viewers accepted hyper-realistic masks as real faces. Specific countermeasures will be required if detection rates are to be improved.

  10. Towards a realistic plasma simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    Several new developments in the technology of simulating plasmas, both in particle and fluid models, now allow a stage of synthesis in which many of these advances can be combined into one simulation model. Accuracy and efficiency are the criteria to be satisfied in this quest. We want to build on the following research: 1. the development of the δf method of Barnes. 2. The moving node Galerkin model of Glasser, Miller and Carlson. 3. Particle moving schemes on unstructured grids by Ambrosiano and Bradon. 4. Particle simulations using sorted particles Anderson and Shumaker. Rather than being competing developments,these presumably can be combined into one computational model. We begin by summarizing the physics model for the plasma. The Vlasov equation can be solved as an initial value problem by integrating the plasma distribution function forward in time. 5 refs

  11. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    simulations on real networks [7–9] have been made also. In these studies, one is interested in the length of the dynamic paths, i.e., the number of steps actually taken to transmit a message or signal to another node. In the real experiments, this is done by fixing a target node and randomly selecting source nodes. The.

  12. Realistic and interactive high-resolution 4D environments for real-time surgeon and patient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L N; Farooq, A R; Smith, M L; Ivanov, I E; Orlando, A

    2017-06-01

    Remote consultations that are realistic enough to be useful medically offer considerable clinical, logistical and cost benefits. Despite advances in virtual reality and vision hardware and software, these benefits are currently often unrealised. The proposed approach combines high spatial and temporal resolution 3D and 2D machine vision with virtual reality techniques, in order to develop new environments and instruments that will enable realistic remote consultations and the generation of new types of useful clinical data. New types of clinical data have been generated for skin analysis and respiration measurement; and the combination of 3D with 2D data was found to offer potential for the generation of realistic virtual consultations. An innovative combination of high resolution machine vision data and virtual reality online methods, promises to provide advanced functionality and significant medical benefits, particularly in regions where populations are dispersed or access to clinicians is limited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. An Exploratory Study of the Relative Effectiveness of Realistic and Non-Realistic Color in Visual Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Louis H.

    In order to compare the instructional effectiveness of realistic and non-realistic color cueing on visualized instruction, an instructional unit on the human heart, using slides and an audiotape, was presented to 244 college students. Four treatment groups received the same oral presentation, with the addition of different types of visual…

  14. Realistic calculations of carbon-based disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A R; Fazzio, A; Rossi, Mariana; Silva, Antonio J R da

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes rank amongst potential candidates for a new family of nanoscopic devices, in particular for sensing applications. At the same time that defects in carbon nanotubes act as binding sites for foreign species, our current level of control over the fabrication process does not allow one to specifically choose where these binding sites will actually be positioned. In this work we present a theoretical framework for accurately calculating the electronic and transport properties of long disordered carbon nanotubes containing a large number of binding sites randomly distributed along a sample. This method combines the accuracy and functionality of ab initio density functional theory to determine the electronic structure with a recursive Green's functions method. We apply this methodology on the problem of nitrogen-rich carbon nanotubes, first considering different types of defects and then demonstrating how our simulations can help in the field of sensor design by allowing one to compute the transport properties of realistic nanotube devices containing a large number of randomly distributed binding sites.

  15. A Realistic Seizure Prediction Study Based on Multiclass SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César A; Sales, Francisco; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dourado, António

    2017-05-01

    A patient-specific algorithm, for epileptic seizure prediction, based on multiclass support-vector machines (SVM) and using multi-channel high-dimensional feature sets, is presented. The feature sets, combined with multiclass classification and post-processing schemes aim at the generation of alarms and reduced influence of false positives. This study considers 216 patients from the European Epilepsy Database, and includes 185 patients with scalp EEG recordings and 31 with intracranial data. The strategy was tested over a total of 16,729.80[Formula: see text]h of inter-ictal data, including 1206 seizures. We found an overall sensitivity of 38.47% and a false positive rate per hour of 0.20. The performance of the method achieved statistical significance in 24 patients (11% of the patients). Despite the encouraging results previously reported in specific datasets, the prospective demonstration on long-term EEG recording has been limited. Our study presents a prospective analysis of a large heterogeneous, multicentric dataset. The statistical framework based on conservative assumptions, reflects a realistic approach compared to constrained datasets, and/or in-sample evaluations. The improvement of these results, with the definition of an appropriate set of features able to improve the distinction between the pre-ictal and nonpre-ictal states, hence minimizing the effect of confounding variables, remains a key aspect.

  16. Realistic theory of electronic correlations in nanoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Malte; Barthel, Stefan; Wehling, Tim; Karolak, Michael; Valli, Angelo; Sangiovanni, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Nanostructures with open shell transition metal or molecular constituents host often strong electronic correlations and are highly sensitive to atomistic material details. This tutorial review discusses method developments and applications of theoretical approaches for the realistic description of the electronic and magnetic properties of nanostructures with correlated electrons. First, the implementation of a flexible interface between density functional theory and a variant of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) highly suitable for the simulation of complex correlated structures is explained and illustrated. On the DMFT side, this interface is largely based on recent developments of quantum Monte Carlo and exact diagonalization techniques allowing for efficient descriptions of general four fermion Coulomb interactions, reduced symmetries and spin-orbit coupling, which are explained here. With the examples of the Cr (001) surfaces, magnetic adatoms, and molecular systems it is shown how the interplay of Hubbard U and Hund's J determines charge and spin fluctuations and how these interactions drive different sorts of correlation effects in nanosystems. Non-local interactions and correlations present a particular challenge for the theory of low dimensional systems. We present our method developments addressing these two challenges, i.e., advancements of the dynamical vertex approximation and a combination of the constrained random phase approximation with continuum medium theories. We demonstrate how non-local interaction and correlation phenomena are controlled not only by dimensionality but also by coupling to the environment which is typically important for determining the physics of nanosystems.

  17. Implementation of a combined SAXS/WAXS/QEXAFS set-up for time-resolved in situ experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikitenko, S.; Beale, A.M.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Jacques, S.D.M.; Leynaud, O.; O'Brien, M.; Detollenaere, D.; Kaptein, Reinier; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Bras, W.

    2008-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there are many benefits to be obtained in combining several techniques in one in situ set-up to study chemical processes in action. Many of these combined set-ups make use of two techniques, but in some cases it is possible and useful to combine even more. A set-up

  18. O uso da simulação realística como metodologia de ensino e aprendizagem para as equipes de enfermagem de um hospital infanto-juvenil: relato de experiência = The use of realistic simulation as teaching-learning methodology for nursing staff in a child-adolescent hospital: experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu, Aguilda Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O presente artigo tem como objetivo relatar a primeira experiência vivenciada pelo serviço de Educação Continuada de um hospital infanto-juvenil do Estado do Paraná com a utilização da simulação realística como uma metodologia de ensino e aprendizagem para as equipes de enfermagem. Descrição da experiência: As simulações aconteceram em dois dias consecutivos, em ambiente de trabalho, guiadas por enfermeiros instrutores, que são gestores das Unidades de atendimento do hospital infanto-juvenil. Foram preparados 6 cenários distintos, com as seguintes temáticas: cuidados de enfermagem na administração de quimioterápicos, cuidados de enfermagem com acessos venosos periféricos e hemocomponentes, cuidados e aspiração de traqueostomia, cuidados c om nutrição e sondas, administração de medicamentos, medicamentos de alta vigilância e registros e anotações de enfermagem em prontuário. Participaram nas simulações um total de 195 colaboradores de enfermagem. Percebemos que para estes colaboradores as si mulações permitiram a identificação e a reconstrução de condutas, por meio de um feedback imediato após o término das simulações. As experiências também possibilitaram a estes profissionais, ter maior segurança e confiança para a execução da prática real no trabalho cotidiano nos diversos setores de assistência na Instituição. Conclusão: O uso da simulação realística mostrou-se como uma metodologia inovadora para realização de treinamentos na instituição, por replicar experiências da vida real favorecendo um ambiente de interatividade entre os participantes, facilitando o processo de ensino - aprendizagem das equipes de enfermagem que atuam no Hospital infanto-juvenil

  19. Demonstrating correction of low levels of astigmatism with realistic scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Andy; Murphy, Michael; Rose, Ben; Olivares, Giovanna; Little, Borm Kim; Lau, Charis; Sulley, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Modern standard visual acuity tests are primarily designed as diagnostic tools for use during subjective refraction and normally bear little relation to real-world situations. We have developed a methodology to create realistic rendered scenes that demonstrate potential vision improvement in a relevant and engaging way. Low-cylindrical refractive error can be made more noticeable by optimizing the contrast and spatial frequencies, and by testing four different visual perception skills: motion tracking, pattern recognition, visual clutter differentiation and contrast sensitivity. Using a 1.00DC lens during iteration, we created a range of still and video scenes before optimizing to a selection 3-D rendered street scenes. These were assessed on everyday relevance, emotional and visual engagement and sensitivity to refractive correction for low-cylinder astigmats (0.75-1.00DC, n=74) wearing best spherical equivalent correction and then with astigmatism corrected. The most promising visual elements involved or combined optimized textures, distracting patterns behind text, faces at a distance, and oblique text. 91.9% of subjects (95% CI: 83.2, 97.0) reported an overall visual improvement when viewing the images with astigmatic correction, and 96% found the images helpful to determine which type of contact lens to use. Our method, which combines visual science with design thinking, takes a new approach to creating vision tests. The resultant test scenes can be used to improve patient interaction and help low cylinder astigmats see relevant, every-day benefits in correcting low levels (0.75 & 1.00DC) of astigmatism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Study of Aerosol Deposition in a Realistic Lung Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František LÍZAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhalation route for administration of medicaments is becoming more and more popular in recent years. The reason is non-invasiveness of the method and instantaneous absorption of drugs to the blood circulation. It is necessary to deliver exact amount of drug to the specific segment because of occurrence of diverse diseases in different segments of lungs. The aim of our work is to contribute to better understanding of transport and deposition of aerosolized drugs in lungs and hence to more effective treatment of respiratory diseases due to the targeted drug delivery. We provided measurements of aerosol deposition in segmented realistic model of lungs without a mouth cavity. Monodisperse particles marked with fluorescein were supplied to the model. The model was then disassembled to segments and each segment was rinsed with isopropanol, whereby fluorescent samples were created. Each sample was analysed by fluorometer and an amount of aerosol deposited in the segment was calculated. Experiences obtained by this study were used for creation of a new model with the mouth cavity. This model will be used for future studies with porous and fiber aerosols.

  1. Compiling quantum circuits to realistic hardware architectures using temporal planners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Davide; Do, Minh; Rieffel, Eleanor; Frank, Jeremy

    2018-04-01

    To run quantum algorithms on emerging gate-model quantum hardware, quantum circuits must be compiled to take into account constraints on the hardware. For near-term hardware, with only limited means to mitigate decoherence, it is critical to minimize the duration of the circuit. We investigate the application of temporal planners to the problem of compiling quantum circuits to newly emerging quantum hardware. While our approach is general, we focus on compiling to superconducting hardware architectures with nearest neighbor constraints. Our initial experiments focus on compiling Quantum Alternating Operator Ansatz (QAOA) circuits whose high number of commuting gates allow great flexibility in the order in which the gates can be applied. That freedom makes it more challenging to find optimal compilations but also means there is a greater potential win from more optimized compilation than for less flexible circuits. We map this quantum circuit compilation problem to a temporal planning problem, and generated a test suite of compilation problems for QAOA circuits of various sizes to a realistic hardware architecture. We report compilation results from several state-of-the-art temporal planners on this test set. This early empirical evaluation demonstrates that temporal planning is a viable approach to quantum circuit compilation.

  2. Blending critical realist and emancipatory practice development methodologies: making critical realism work in nursing research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Parlour, Randal

    2012-12-01

    This paper examines the efficacy of facilitation as a practice development intervention in changing practice within an Older Person setting and in implementing evidence into practice. It outlines the influences exerted by the critical realist paradigm in guiding emancipatory practice development activities and, in particular, how the former may be employed within an emancipatory practice development study to elucidate and increase understanding pertinent to causation and outcomes. The methodology is based upon an emancipatory practice development approach set within a realistic evaluation framework. This allows for systematic analysis of the social and contextual elements that influence the explication of outcomes associated with facilitation. The study is concentrated upon five practice development cycles, within which a sequence of iterative processes is integrated. The authors assert that combining critical realist and emancipatory processes offers a robust and practical method for translating evidence and implementing changes in practice, as the former affirms or falsifies the influence that emancipatory processes exert on attaining culture shift, and enabling transformation towards effective clinical practice. A new framework for practice development is proposed that establishes methodological coherency between emancipatory practice development and realistic evaluation. This augments the existing theoretical bases for both these approaches by contributing new theoretical and methodological understandings of causation.

  3. Frequency of victimization experiences and well-being among online, offline and combined victims on social online network sites of German children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eGlüer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Victimization is associated with negative developmental outcomes in childhood and adolescence. However, previous studies have provided mixed results regarding the association between offline and online victimization and indicators of social, psychological, and somatic well-being. In this study, we investigated 1,906 German children and adolescents (grades 5 to 10, mean age = 13.9; SD = 2.1 with and without offline or online victimization experiences who participated in a social online network (SNS. Online questionnaires were used to assess previous victimization (offline, online, combined, and without, somatic and psychological symptoms, self-esteem, and social self-concept (social competence, resistance to peer influence, esteem by others. In total, 1,362 (71.4% children and adolescents reported being a member of at least one social online network, and 377 students (28.8% reported previous victimization. Most children and adolescents had offline victimization experiences (17.5%, whereas 2.7% reported online victimization, and 8.6% reported combined experiences. Girls reported more online and combined victimization, and boys reported more offline victimization. The type of victimization (offline, online, combined was associated with increased reports of psychological and somatic symptoms, lower self-esteem and esteem by others, and lower resistance to peer influences. The effects were comparable for the groups with offline and online victimization. They were, however, increased in the combined group in comparison to victims with offline experiences alone.

  4. "easyMine" – realistic and systematic mine detection simulation tooltion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Böttger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mine detection is to date mainly performed with metal detectors, although new methods for UXO detection are explored worldwide. The main problem for the mine detection to date is, that there exist some ideas of which sensor combinations could yield a high score, but until now there is no systematic analysis of mine detection methods together with realistic environmental conditions to conclude on a physically and technically optimized sensor combination. This gap will be removed by a project “easyMine" (Realistic and systematic Mine Detection Simulation Tool which will result in a simulation tool for optimizing land mine detection in a realistic mine field. The project idea for this software tool is presented, that will simulate the closed chain of mine detection, including the mine in its natural environment, the sensor, the evaluation and application of the measurements by an user. The tool will be modularly designed. Each chain link will be an independent, exchangeable sub- module and will describe a stand alone part of the whole mine detection procedure. The advantage of the tool will be the evaluation of very different kinds of sensor combinations in relation of their real potential for mine detection. Three detection methods (metal detector, GPR and imaging IR-radiometry will be explained to be introduced into the easyMine software tool in a first step. An actual example for land mine detection problem will be presented and approaches for solutions with easyMine will be shown.

  5. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  6. Concepts, features, and design of a sixteen-to-four beam combiner for ILSE [Induction Linac Systems Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.L.; Celata, C.; Close, E.; Faltens, A.; Hahn, K.; La Mon, K.; Lee, E.P.; Smith, L.; Thur, W.

    1989-03-01

    Sixteen intense parallel ion beams are to be transversely combined into four by dispersionless double bends. Emittance growth due to electrostatic energy redistribution and to the geometry is evaluated. Most bending elements are electric, and alternate with AG electrostatic quadrupoles similar to those upstream. The final elements are magnetic, combining focusing and ''unbending''. Electrode shapes and pulsed-current arrays (having very small clearances), and mechanical and electric features of the combiner, and described. 1 ref., 7 figs

  7. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations for Realistic Flows (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2007-01-01

    Strategies used to verify and validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are described via case studies of realistic flow simulations, each representing a complex flow physics and complex geometry...

  8. RISING POWERS AND GLOBALIZATION IN STRUCTURAL REALIST SENSE

    OpenAIRE

    AYTEKİN, Cavit Emre; MİKAİL, Elnur Hasan

    2016-01-01

    The Globalization is a phenomenon in International Relations which is expected to bring a systemic outputs especially in the polarity of International system. The rising powers concept is referred to indicate the states encouraging shifts in power structure of international system In this study the structural realist understanding of globalization and rising powers concept will be evaluated. For providing a structural-realist explanation of globalization phenomenon and rising powers concept w...

  9. Combination of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV-1-infected patients: a review of pharmacokinetics and clinical experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, R. P.; Veldkamp, A.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Lange, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the combination of at least three different antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, has greatly improved the prognosis for HIV-1-infected patients. The efficacy of a combination of a protease inhibitor (PI) plus two nucleoside

  10. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  12. Realistic modeling of radiation transmission inspection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sale, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    We have applied Monte Carlo particle transport methods to assess a proposed neutron transmission inspection system for checked luggage. The geometry of the system and the time, energy and angle dependence of the source have been modeled in detail. A pulsed deuteron beam incident on a thick Be target generates a neutron pulse with a very broad energy spectrum which is detected after passage through the luggage item by a plastic scintillator detector operating in current mode (as opposed to pulse counting mode). The neutron transmission as a function of time information is used to infer the densities of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in the volume sampled. The measured elemental densities can be compared to signatures for explosives or other contraband. By using such computational modeling it is possible to optimize many aspects of the design of an inspection system without costly and time consuming prototyping experiments or to determine that a proposed scheme will not work. The methods applied here can be used to evaluate neutron or photon schemes based on transmission, scattering or reaction techniques

  13. Didactic Contracts in Realistic Mathematics Education Teaching Practice in Indonesia: A lesson on addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putra, Zetra Hainul

    This paper aims to investigate characterize features of didactic contracts in realistic mathematics education teaching practice in Indonesia in the case of a lesson on addition. We just focus on some episodes of 26 first grade students and a female teacher from SDN 197 Palembang learning...... combinations that make ten based on a Palembang traditional food, pempek, and tablets of medicine. The result shows that some features such as formulation and validation appear during the teaching and learning process. The students are able to produce combinations that make ten individually and collectively...

  14. Combined Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass in $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS and CMS Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Qun; Xu, Zijun; Yang, Daneng; Zhang, Zhaoru; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Ali, Ahmed; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Lotfy, Ahmad; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Masod, Rehab; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Amstutz, Christian; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Beskidt, Conny; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Eber, Robert; Feindt, Michael; Fink, Simon; Fischer, Max; Frensch, Felix; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Funke, Daniel; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Harbaum, Tanja; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kudella, Simon; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Printz, Martin; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sudhakar, Katta; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Du Pree, Tristan; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Ferro, Cristina; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Yin, Hang; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Wang, Sean-jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mareskas-palcek, Darren; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Mcginn, Christopher; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank J.M; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Demortier, Luc; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin

    2015-05-14

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is $m_{H} = 125.09\\pm0.21\\,\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm0.11\\,\\mathrm{(syst.)}~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  15. [Combined treatment supported by piracetam and/or acyclovir in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: experience with 81 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, Süleyman Emre; Ozkul, Mehmet Doğan; Cukurova, Ibrahim; Demirhan, Erhan; Yiğitbaşi, Orhan Gazi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of piracetam and acyclovir in treating sudden hearing loss. Eightyone patients (44 males, 37 females; mean age 40.4 year; range 18 to 72 years) who had treatment between January 2002 and December 2006 with diagnosis of idiopathic sudden hearing loss were evaluated retrospectively. These patients were divided into four groups according to the treatment they received. The patients who had combined treatment constituted the first group; those who had combined treatment and piracetam the second; those who had combined treatment and acyclovir the third; those who had combined treatment, acyclovir, and piracetam the fourth group. For the four treatment groups, in the pre-and post-treatment (10th day) evaluation of the treatment efficiency made by calculation of the hearing thresholds in 250-8000 Hz frequencies, no significant difference between the groups was determined (p>0.05). No additional benefit was obtained with acyclovir and piracetam in treatment.

  16. A Realistic Human Exposure Assessment of Indoor Radon released from Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2002-01-01

    The work presents a realistic human exposure assessment of indoor radon released from groundwater in a house. At first, a two-compartment model is developed to describe the generation and transfer of radon in indoor air from groundwater. The model is used to estimate radon concentrations profile of indoor air in a house using by showering, washing clothes, and flushing toilets. Then, the study performs an uncertainty analysis of model input parameters to quantify the uncertainty in radon concentration profile. In order to estimate a daily internal dose of a specific tissue group in an adult through the inhalation of such indoor radon, a PBPK(Physiologically-Based Pharmaco-Kinetic) model is developed. Combining indoor radon profile and PBPK model is used to a realistic human assessment for such exposure. The results obtained from this study would be used to the evaluation of human risk by inhalation associated with the indoor radon released from groundwater

  17. Development of Realistic Safety Analysis Technology for CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Rhee, B. W.; Rho, G. H.

    2010-04-01

    The following 3 research items have been studied to develop and establish the realistic safety analysis and the associated technologies for a CANDU reactor. At the first, WIMS-CANDU which is physics cell code for a CANDU has been improved and validated against the physics criticality experiment data transferred through the international cooperation programs. Also an improved physics model to take into account the pressure tube creep was developed and utilized to assess the effects of the pressure tube creep of 0%, 2.5% and 5% diametral increase of pressure tube on core physics parameters. Secondly, the interfacing module between physics and thermal-hydraulics codes has been developed to provide the enhancement of reliability and convenience of the calculation results of the physics parameters such as power coefficient which was calculated by independent code systems. Finally, the important parameters related to the complex heat transfer mechanisms in the crept pressure tubes were identified to find how to improve the existing fuel channel models. One of the important parameters such as the oxidation model of Zr-steam reaction was identified, implemented and verified with the experimental data of the high pressure and temperature fuel channel and its model was utilized for CFD analysis of the crept pressure tube effect on the reactor safety. The results were also provided to validate the CATNENA models of the crept pressure tube and the effects of the pressure tube creep on the blowdown and post-blowdown phase during LOCA was assessed. The results of this study can be used to assess the uncertainty analysis of coolant void reactivity and the effects of the creep deformed pressure tubes on physics/TH/safety issues. Also, those results will be used to improve the current design and operational safety analysis codes, and to technically support the related issues to resolve their problems

  18. Assessment of vectorial total variation penalties on realistic dual-energy CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigie, David S.; Sanchez, Adrian A.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2017-04-01

    Vectorial extensions of total variation have recently been developed for regularizing the reconstruction and denoising of multi-channel images, such as those arising in spectral computed tomography. Early studies have focused mainly on simulated, piecewise-constant images whose structure may favor total-variation penalties. In the current manuscript, we apply vectorial total variation to real dual-energy CT data of a whole turkey in order to determine if the same benefits can be observed in more complex images with anatomically realistic textures. We consider the total nuclear variation (\\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{N}} ) as well as another vectorial total variation based on the Frobenius norm (\\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{F}} ) and standard channel-by-channel total variation (\\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{S}} ). We performed a series of 3D TV denoising experiments comparing the three TV variants across a wide range of smoothness parameter settings, optimizing each regularizer according to a very-high-dose ‘ground truth’ image. Consistent with the simulation studies, we find that both vectorial TV variants achieve a lower error than the channel-by-channel TV and are better able to suppress noise while preserving actual image features. In this real data study, the advantages are subtler than in the previous simulation study, although the \\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{N}} penalty is found to have clear advantages over either \\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{S}} or \\text{T}{{\\text{V}}\\text{F}} when comparing material images formed from linear combinations of the denoised energy images.

  19. Design and validation of realistic breast models for use in multiple alternative forced choice virtual clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Cooke, Victoria; Wilkinson, Louise; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M; Wallis, Matthew G; Wells, Kevin

    2017-04-07

    A novel method has been developed for generating quasi-realistic voxel phantoms which simulate the compressed breast in mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The models are suitable for use in virtual clinical trials requiring realistic anatomy which use the multiple alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm and patches from the complete breast image. The breast models are produced by extracting features of breast tissue components from DBT clinical images including skin, adipose and fibro-glandular tissue, blood vessels and Cooper's ligaments. A range of different breast models can then be generated by combining these components. Visual realism was validated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study of patches from simulated images calculated using the breast models and from real patient images. Quantitative analysis was undertaken using fractal dimension and power spectrum analysis. The average areas under the ROC curves for 2D and DBT images were 0.51  ±  0.06 and 0.54  ±  0.09 demonstrating that simulated and real images were statistically indistinguishable by expert breast readers (7 observers); errors represented as one standard error of the mean. The average fractal dimensions (2D, DBT) for real and simulated images were (2.72  ±  0.01, 2.75  ±  0.01) and (2.77  ±  0.03, 2.82  ±  0.04) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. Excellent agreement was found between power spectrum curves of real and simulated images, with average β values (2D, DBT) of (3.10  ±  0.17, 3.21  ±  0.11) and (3.01  ±  0.32, 3.19  ±  0.07) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. These results demonstrate that radiological images of these breast models realistically represent the complexity of real breast structures and can be used to simulate patches from mammograms and DBT images that are indistinguishable from

  20. Design and validation of realistic breast models for use in multiple alternative forced choice virtual clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cooke, Victoria; Wilkinson, Louise; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Wells, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    A novel method has been developed for generating quasi-realistic voxel phantoms which simulate the compressed breast in mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The models are suitable for use in virtual clinical trials requiring realistic anatomy which use the multiple alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm and patches from the complete breast image. The breast models are produced by extracting features of breast tissue components from DBT clinical images including skin, adipose and fibro-glandular tissue, blood vessels and Cooper’s ligaments. A range of different breast models can then be generated by combining these components. Visual realism was validated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study of patches from simulated images calculated using the breast models and from real patient images. Quantitative analysis was undertaken using fractal dimension and power spectrum analysis. The average areas under the ROC curves for 2D and DBT images were 0.51  ±  0.06 and 0.54  ±  0.09 demonstrating that simulated and real images were statistically indistinguishable by expert breast readers (7 observers); errors represented as one standard error of the mean. The average fractal dimensions (2D, DBT) for real and simulated images were (2.72  ±  0.01, 2.75  ±  0.01) and (2.77  ±  0.03, 2.82  ±  0.04) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. Excellent agreement was found between power spectrum curves of real and simulated images, with average β values (2D, DBT) of (3.10  ±  0.17, 3.21  ±  0.11) and (3.01  ±  0.32, 3.19  ±  0.07) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. These results demonstrate that radiological images of these breast models realistically represent the complexity of real breast structures and can be used to simulate patches from mammograms and DBT images that are indistinguishable from

  1. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  2. Problem Posing with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach in Geometry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, R.; Slamet, I.; Budiyono

    2017-09-01

    One of the difficulties of students in the learning of geometry is on the subject of plane that requires students to understand the abstract matter. The aim of this research is to determine the effect of Problem Posing learning model with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach in geometry learning. This quasi experimental research was conducted in one of the junior high schools in Karanganyar, Indonesia. The sample was taken using stratified cluster random sampling technique. The results of this research indicate that the model of Problem Posing learning with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach can improve students’ conceptual understanding significantly in geometry learning especially on plane topics. It is because students on the application of Problem Posing with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach are become to be active in constructing their knowledge, proposing, and problem solving in realistic, so it easier for students to understand concepts and solve the problems. Therefore, the model of Problem Posing learning with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach is appropriately applied in mathematics learning especially on geometry material. Furthermore, the impact can improve student achievement.

  3. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Plasmonic Nanoantennas with Realistic 3D Roughness and Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P. Drachev

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured plasmonic metamaterials, including optical nanoantenna arrays, are important for advanced optical sensing and imaging applications including surface-enhanced fluorescence, chemiluminescence, and Raman scattering. Although designs typically use ideally smooth geometries, realistic nanoantennas have nonzero roughness, which typically results in a modified enhancement factor that should be involved in their design. Herein we aim to treat roughness by introducing a realistic roughened geometry into the finite element (FE model. Even if the roughness does not result in significant loss, it does result in a spectral shift and inhomogeneous broadening of the resonance, which could be critical when fitting the FE simulations of plasmonic nanoantennas to experiments. Moreover, the proposed approach could be applied to any model, whether mechanical, acoustic, electromagnetic, thermal, etc, in order to simulate a given roughness-generated physical phenomenon.

  5. Review of European regulatory and tariff experience with the sale of heat and electricity from combined heat and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyrelund, A.

    1991-12-01

    The Prince Edward Island Energy Corporation, Edmonton Power, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada and the Canadian Electrical Association commissioned a study to understand how electrical power and district heat from combined heat and power (CHP) plants is priced in Europe. Four northern European countries were investigated, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and Finland. These countries produce 45.8 TWh of power from combined heat and power plants, 7.1% of their annual consumption. In the case of Denmark, CHP accounts for 37.5% of its total power production. The energy situation in each country is reviewed using published statistics, and in particular the rapidly changing situation with regard to environmental and fuel taxes is examined. In order to obtain practical insights with regard to tariffs used by the various utilities, a series of generic examples were examined, supported by specific case studies. Technologies reviewed included: CHP from coal-fuelled extraction plant, CHP from coal-fuelled back pressure plant, waste heat from a municipal waste plant, and gas turbine with waste heat recovery. The benefits and risks associated with different tariff designs are discussed in detail including tariff formulae. This should enable interested parties to develop appropriate tariffs for combined heat and power plants in the context of current electrical utility policies. As a complement to the tariffs for combined heat and power plants, the design of district heating tariffs is also addressed. The typical concepts used in different countries are presented and discussed. 23 tabs

  6. Analysis of the ITQ-12 zeolite performance in propane-propylene separations using a combination of experiments and molecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J.J.; Dubbeldam, D.; Rey, F.; Valencia, S.; Palomino, M.; Martín-Calvo, A.; Calero, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a combined computational and experimental approach to evaluate the suitability of the ITQ-12 nanoporous material (ITW) as a propane−propylene separation device. For this, we have computed adsorption and diffusion of propane and propylene in the ITQ-12 zeolite. The propane isotherm is

  7. Survey of Approaches to Generate Realistic Synthetic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Sangkeun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Sarah S [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Imam, Neena [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A graph is a flexible data structure that can represent relationships between entities. As with other data analysis tasks, the use of realistic graphs is critical to obtaining valid research results. Unfortunately, using the actual ("real-world") graphs for research and new algorithm development is difficult due to the presence of sensitive information in the data or due to the scale of data. This results in practitioners developing algorithms and systems that employ synthetic graphs instead of real-world graphs. Generating realistic synthetic graphs that provide reliable statistical confidence to algorithmic analysis and system evaluation involves addressing technical hurdles in a broad set of areas. This report surveys the state of the art in approaches to generate realistic graphs that are derived from fitted graph models on real-world graphs.

  8. Realistic Visualization of Virtual Views and Virtual Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Visualization is a new field of research which has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the increased popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of computer...... generated characters, "virtual actors", in the motion picture production increases every day. While the most known computer graphics techniques have largely been adopted successfully in nowadays fictions, it still remains very challenging to implement virtual actors which would resemble, visually, human...... is then gaining consensus: the augmented actor. Fundamental concepts and examples of methods proposed for realistic view synthesis, based on the transfer of photorealism from reference photographs to novel views, will be presented. The application of methods for realistic image synthesis to virtual cinematography...

  9. Photo-Realistic Image Synthesis and Virtual Cinematography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Synthesis is a new field of research that has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the grown popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of computer generated...... characters, "virtual actors", in the motion picture production increases every day. While the most known computer graphics techniques have largely been adopted successfully in nowadays fictions, it still remains very challenging to implement virtual actors which would resemble, visually, human beings......: the augmented actor. Fundamental concepts and examples of methods proposed for realistic view synthesis based on the transfer of photo-realism from reference photographs to novel views, will be presented. The application of methods for realistic image synthesis to virtual cinematography will also be illustrated...

  10. Is the number of registered abortions in Serbia realistic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašević Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    most cases induced abortions performed in private health clinics are not included. Moreover, nurses, namely doctors often experience the filling out of prescribed forms for registration of fetal death as unnecessary, imposed, an additional obligation, without sensing the meaning and not understanding the significance of data as such. The abortion problem in Serbia is serious, complex and demands solving. This assumes the carrying out of many measures, including solving the matter of induced abortions registration. Determination of the realistic number of abortions in a community is very important, because in that way attention is drawn to this health and social problem and enables evaluation of actions to be taken for its alleviation. It remains that the state is to pay due attention to the problem of abortions in Serbia and to put private health clinics in which gynecologists perform abortions under control, as well as to promote the role and significance of statistics among health workers. .

  11. Evaluation of photovoltaic panel temperature in realistic scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yanping; Fell, Christopher J.; Duck, Benjamin; Chen, Dong; Liffman, Kurt; Zhang, Yinan; Gu, Min; Zhu, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The developed realistic model captures more reasonably the thermal response and hysteresis effects. • The predicted panel temperature is as high as 60 °C under a solar irradiance of 1000 W/m 2 in no-wind weather. • In realistic scenarios, the thermal response normally takes 50–250 s. • The actual heating effect may cause a photoelectric efficiency drop of 2.9–9.0%. - Abstract: Photovoltaic (PV) panel temperature was evaluated by developing theoretical models that are feasible to be used in realistic scenarios. Effects of solar irradiance, wind speed and ambient temperature on the PV panel temperature were studied. The parametric study shows significant influence of solar irradiance and wind speed on the PV panel temperature. With an increase of ambient temperature, the temperature rise of solar cells is reduced. The characteristics of panel temperature in realistic scenarios were analyzed. In steady weather conditions, the thermal response time of a solar cell with a Si thickness of 100–500 μm is around 50–250 s. While in realistic scenarios, the panel temperature variation in a day is different from that in steady weather conditions due to the effect of thermal hysteresis. The heating effect on the photovoltaic efficiency was assessed based on real-time temperature measurement of solar cells in realistic weather conditions. For solar cells with a temperature coefficient in the range of −0.21%∼−0.50%, the current field tests indicated an approximate efficiency loss between 2.9% and 9.0%.

  12. Fatigue - determination of a more realistic usage factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, H.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to use a suitable counting method for determining the stress range spectrum in elastic and simplified elastic-plastic fatigue analyses is of crucial importance for enabling determination of a realistic usage factor. Determination of elastic-plastic strain range using the K e factor from fictitious elastically calculated loads is also important in the event of elastic behaviour being exceeded. This paper thus examines both points in detail. A fatigue module with additional options, which functions on this basis is presented. The much more realistic determination of usage factor presented here offers various economic benefits depending on the application

  13. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Fields Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of "realistic" solenoids on low energy particle transport. The findings in this paper may be applicable to the lower energy particle transport system design.

  14. Putting a Realistic Theory of Mind into Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Stea, Diego

    2014-01-01

    concerning other such content. More realistically, individuals have some limited access to the minds of others. We explore the implications for classical agency theory of realistic assumptions regarding the human potential for interpersonal sensemaking. We discuss implications for the design and management......Agency theory is one of the most important foundational theories in management research, but it rests on contestable cognitive assumptions. Specifically, the principal is assumed to hold a perfect (correct) theory regarding some of the content of the agent's mind, while he is entirely ignorant...

  15. A realist review to explore how low-income pregnant women use food vouchers from the UK’s Healthy Start programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohly, Heather; Crossland, Nicola; Dykes, Fiona; Lowe, Nicola; Hall-Moran, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore how low-income pregnant women use Healthy Start food vouchers, the potential impacts of the programme, and which women might experience these impacts and why. Design A realist review. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Primary or empirical studies (of any design) were included if they contributed relevant evidence or insights about how low-income women use food vouchers from the Healthy Start (UK) or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programmes. The assessment of ‘relevance’ was deliberately broad to ensure that reviewers remained open to new ideas from a variety of sources of evidence. Analysis A combination of evidence synthesis and realist analysis techniques was used to modify, refine and substantiate programme theories, which were constructed as explanatory ‘context–mechanism–outcome’–configurations. Results 38 primary studies were included in this review: four studies on Healthy Start and 34 studies on WIC. Two main outcome strands were identified: dietary improvements (intended) and financial assistance (unintended). Three evidence-informed programme theories were proposed to explain how aspects of context (and mechanisms) may generate these outcomes: the ‘relative value’ of healthy eating (prioritisation of resources); retailer discretion (pressure to ‘bend the rules’); the influence of other family members (disempowerment). Conclusions This realist review suggests that some low-income pregnant women may use Healthy Start vouchers to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables and plain cow’s milk, whereas others may use them to reduce food expenditure and save money for other things. PMID:28432063

  16. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  17. Optimizing Wind And Hydropower Generation Within Realistic Reservoir Operating Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, T. M.; Clement, M. A.; Zagona, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the benefits of utilizing the flexibility of hydropower systems to balance the variability and uncertainty of wind generation. However, previous hydropower and wind coordination studies have simplified non-power constraints on reservoir systems. For example, some studies have only included hydropower constraints on minimum and maximum storage volumes and minimum and maximum plant discharges. The methodology presented here utilizes the pre-emptive linear goal programming optimization solver in RiverWare to model hydropower operations with a set of prioritized policy constraints and objectives based on realistic policies that govern the operation of actual hydropower systems, including licensing constraints, environmental constraints, water management and power objectives. This approach accounts for the fact that not all policy constraints are of equal importance. For example target environmental flow levels may not be satisfied if it would require violating license minimum or maximum storages (pool elevations), but environmental flow constraints will be satisfied before optimizing power generation. Additionally, this work not only models the economic value of energy from the combined hydropower and wind system, it also captures the economic value of ancillary services provided by the hydropower resources. It is recognized that the increased variability and uncertainty inherent with increased wind penetration levels requires an increase in ancillary services. In regions with liberalized markets for ancillary services, a significant portion of hydropower revenue can result from providing ancillary services. Thus, ancillary services should be accounted for when determining the total value of a hydropower system integrated with wind generation. This research shows that the end value of integrated hydropower and wind generation is dependent on a number of factors that can vary by location. Wind factors include wind penetration level

  18. The visualizable, the representable and the inconceivable: realist and non-realist mathematical models in physics and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2016-01-13

    The project of this article is twofold. First, it aims to offer a new perspective on, and a new argument concerning, realist and non-realist mathematical models, and differences and affinities between them, using physics as a paradigmatic field of mathematical modelling in science. Most of the article is devoted to this topic. Second, the article aims to explore the implications of this argument for mathematical modelling in other fields, in particular in cognitive psychology and economics. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W.; Barnes, Vernon A.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information may be filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system. PMID:26379573

  20. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder eJerath

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information is filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system.

  1. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W; Barnes, Vernon A

    2015-01-01

    The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information may be filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system.

  2. Large-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Incipient Motion, Transport, and Fate of Underwater Munitions Under Waves, Currents, and Combined Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    different roughness (smooth PVC versus pitted steel) in unidirectional flow. In addition , based on flows resulting in initiation of motion, particle image...roughly 0.047 mm. The flume was temporarily narrowed to 0.55 m wide with cinder blocks and a plastic waterproof covering for these experiments (see...determining and recording even a small amount of movement by hand can become prohibitively time-consuming. In addition , while the movement of the cartridge

  3. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Element release during fly ash extraction experiments controlled by mineralogy. ► Strontium isotopes in fly ash are not homogenized during coal combustion. ► Element correlations with 87 Sr/ 86 Sr indicate chemically resistant silicate phase. ► Sr isotopes can uniquely identify fly ash fluids leaking into the environment. - Abstract: The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural

  4. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  5. Generalized Warburg impedance on realistic self-affine fractals ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Generalized Warburg impedance on realistic self-affine fractals: Comparative study of statistically corrugated and isotropic roughness. RAJESH KUMAR and RAMA KANT. Journal of Chemical Sciences, Vol. 121, No. 5, September 2009, pp. 579–588. 1. ( ) c. L. R ω on page 582, column 2, para 2, after eq (8) should read as ...

  6. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    so different from the classical trajectories that they are sometimes called surrealistic [4]!. The answer to the first problem above is in the construction of maximally realistic quan- tum mechanics [5,6] which treats position and momentum symmetrically. We present in this paper the answer to the second problem in the form of a ...

  7. Towards a Realist Sociology of Education: A Polyphonic Review Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Michael; Hood, Susan; Barrett, Brian D.; Schubert, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This review essay evaluates Karl Maton's "Knowledge and Knowers: Towards a Realist Sociology of Education" as a recent examination of the sociological causes and effects of education in the tradition of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu and the British educational sociologist Basil Bernstein. Maton's book synthesizes the…

  8. Creating a Realistic Context for Team Projects in HCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Herman; van Dijk, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Team projects are nowadays common practice in HCI education. This paper focuses on the role of clients and users in team projects in introductory HCI courses. In order to provide projects with a realistic context we invite people from industry to serve as clients for the student teams. Some of them

  9. Hope in Janusz Korczak's Pedagogy of Realistic Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the approach of "Realistic Idealism" to moral education developed by the humanist-progressive moral educator Janusz Korczak, and the role hope plays in it. This pair of terms seems to be an oxymoron. However, their employment is intentional and the article will demonstrate their dialectical interdependence:…

  10. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  11. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  12. Representations of Adoption in Contemporary Realistic Fiction for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sue Christian; Fuxa, Robin; Kander, Faryl; Hardy, Dana

    2017-01-01

    In this critical content analysis of thirty-seven contemporary realistic fiction books about adoption, the authors examine how adoption and adoptive families are depicted in young adult (YA) literature. The critical literacy theoretical frame brings into focus significant social implications of these depictions as the researchers illuminate and…

  13. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  14. Two-Capacitor Problem: A More Realistic View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the two-capacitor problem by considering the self-inductance of the circuit used and by determining how well the usual series RC circuit approximates the two-capacitor problem when realistic values of L, C, and R are chosen. (GA)

  15. Engendering Anthropocentrism: Lessons from Children's Realistic Animal Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kathleen R.

    In children's realistic stories about animals a number of wholly and unambiguously anthropocentric assumptions are at work. For instance, in a study most of the books (81%) in one sampling of 50 stories involve a pet or the process of domesticating a wild animal. In most cases the primary animal character is a dog or horse. The predominance of…

  16. Nuclear properties with realistic Hamiltonians through spectral distribution theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.; Belehrad, R.; Dalton, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Motivated by the need of non-perturbative methods for utilizing realistic nuclear Hamiltonians H, the authors use spectral distribution theory, based on calculated moments of H, to obtain specific bulk and valence properties of finite nuclei. The primary emphasis here is to present results for the binding energies of nuclei obtained with and without an assumed core. (Auth.)

  17. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2-dimensional phase space, a maximally realistic quantum mechanics can have quantum probabilities of no more than + 1 complete commuting cets (CCS) of observables coexisting as marginals of one positive ...

  18. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics. S M ROY. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Abstract. Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2N-dimensional phase space, ...

  19. Place of a Realistic Teacher Education Pedagogy in an ICT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on a study undertaken to examine the impact of introducing a realistic teacher education pedagogy (RTEP) oriented learning environment supported by ICT on distance teacher education in Uganda. It gives an overview of the quality, quantity and training of teachers in primary and secondary schools

  20. Critical Realist Review: Exploring the Real, beyond the Empirical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgley, Alison; Stickley, Theodore; Timmons, Stephen; Meal, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This article defines the "critical realist review", a literature-based methodological approach to critical analysis of health care studies (or any discipline charged with social interventions) that is robust, insightful and essential for the complexities of twenty-first century evidence-based health and social care. We argue that this…

  1. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2-dimensional phase space, a maximally realistic quantum mechanics can have quantum probabilities of no more than + 1 complete commuting cets (CCS) of observables coexisting as marginals of one positive ...

  2. Synthesis Of Realistic Animations Of A Person Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth C.; Kagels, David S.; Watson, Stephen H.; Rom, Hillel S.; Lorre, Jean J.; Wright, John R.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1995-01-01

    Actors computer program implements automated process that synthesizes realistic animations of person speaking. Produces "newscaster" type video sequences. Uses images of person and, therefore, not limited to cartoons and cartoonlike movies. Potential applications also include use of process for automatically producing on-the-fly animations for human/computer interfaces and for reducing bandwidth needed to transmit video telephone signals.

  3. Realistic human muscle pressure for driving a mechanical lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresnel Emeline

    2014-12-01

    Based on the equation of the respiratory movement and its electrical analogy, the respiratory muscle pressure was simulated with more consistency in regards of physiological evidences than those provided by the ASL 5000 software. The great variability in the so-produced inspiratory efforts can cover most of realistic patho-physiological conditions.

  4. Using a Realist Research Methodology in Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourie, Megan; Rata, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the usefulness of a realist methodology in linking sociological theory to empirically obtained data through the development of a methodological device. Three layers of analysis were integrated: 1. the findings from a case study about Maori language education in New Zealand; 2. the identification and analysis of contradictions…

  5. A possible definition of a {\\it Realistic} Physics Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A definition of a {\\it Realistic} Physics Theory is proposed based on the idea that, at all time, the set of physical properties possessed (at that time) by a system should unequivocally determine the probabilities of outcomes of all possible measurements.

  6. Using Realistic Business Data in Teaching Business Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    Describes a business data generator to assist instructors in generating realistic business data in great volume for teaching and learning activities. Illustrates how the software application allows instructors to manipulate parameters to customize the data to reflect problem situation. (Contains 40 references.) (JOW)

  7. Experience in Nonsurgical Treatment of Patients with Intervertebral Disc Protrusions and Herniated Discs Combined with Lumbar Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ye. Pashkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the data from 40 patients with instability and herniated disc in the lumbar spine has been carried out. The short-term (1 month and long-term (1.5 years results of conservative treatment were analyzed, and also the nature and characteristics of their course in the early and late periods were examined. Combined use of manual therapy and traction is not allowed as a method of conservative treatment for disc herniation associated with instability. Rehabilitation of the patient (targeted recovery of reliability of the spine functioning under physiological, common and industrial loads is advisable.

  8. Experimental study on centerline velocities of a rectangular capture hood under realistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjian; Lewis, Braxton V; Guffey, Steven E

    2018-02-01

    Capture hoods are an important component of a local ventilation system designed to reduce exposures to airborne contaminants. The velocity at any point along the centerline of the hood (V x ) is currently estimated using one of many predictive equations developed since the 1930s. It is unproven that those predictive equations for V x are accurate, despite the prodigious number of studies concerning them. Among other issues, almost all experimental verifications were conducted for conditions that were either unrealistically ideal without competing air currents (e.g., zero cross draft) or were not described. This study measured values of V x along the midline using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) at distances of 1-14 inches in front of a rectangular capture hood. The experiments were conducted in a large wind tunnel (9' × 12' × 40', H × W × L) using a heated, breathing, anthropomorphically sized manikin. Three 0 degree draft velocities (V draft = 4, 14, and 50 ft/min) were tested, all directed toward the hood face and the back of the manikin (if present). For each value of V draft , the velocity fields were measured in a factorial design with and without the manikin, and with and without a worktable underneath the hood. An ideal condition was represented by a freestanding hood at the 4 fpm draft. Nonideal conditions included the presence of a worktable or manikin, and the combination of table and manikin. Each condition was tested at the three levels of V draft . The experimental results found significant effects (p < 0.001) for V draft , the presence of the manikin, the presence of the worktable, and all combinations of those factors. The effects of the independent variables were most pronounced at distances greater than 10 in (25.4 cm) from the hood face. It is concluded that none of the previously published models accurately predicted V x under the realistic conditions tested in this study. A satisfactory model will have to include terms for V draft and the

  9. Rapid creation, Monte Carlo simulation, and visualization of realistic 3D cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Jacob; Dittrich, Markus; Stiles, Joel R

    2009-01-01

    Spatially realistic diffusion-reaction simulations supplement traditional experiments and provide testable hypotheses for complex physiological systems. To date, however, the creation of realistic 3D cell models has been difficult and time-consuming, typically involving hand reconstruction from electron microscopic images. Here, we present a complementary approach that is much simpler and faster, because the cell architecture (geometry) is created directly in silico using 3D modeling software like that used for commercial film animations. We show how a freely available open source program (Blender) can be used to create the model geometry, which then can be read by our Monte Carlo simulation and visualization softwares (MCell and DReAMM, respectively). This new workflow allows rapid prototyping and development of realistic computational models, and thus should dramatically accelerate their use by a wide variety of computational and experimental investigators. Using two self-contained examples based on synaptic transmission, we illustrate the creation of 3D cellular geometry with Blender, addition of molecules, reactions, and other run-time conditions using MCell's Model Description Language (MDL), and subsequent MCell simulations and DReAMM visualizations. In the first example, we simulate calcium influx through voltage-gated channels localized on a presynaptic bouton, with subsequent intracellular calcium diffusion and binding to sites on synaptic vesicles. In the second example, we simulate neurotransmitter release from synaptic vesicles as they fuse with the presynaptic membrane, subsequent transmitter diffusion into the synaptic cleft, and binding to postsynaptic receptors on a dendritic spine.

  10. Realist synthesis: illustrating the method for implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Realist synthesis is an increasingly popular approach to the review and synthesis of evidence, which focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which an intervention works (or not. There are few published examples of realist synthesis. This paper therefore fills a gap by describing, in detail, the process used for a realist review and synthesis to answer the question ‘what interventions and strategies are effective in enabling evidence-informed healthcare?’ The strengths and challenges of conducting realist review are also considered. Methods The realist approach involves identifying underlying causal mechanisms and exploring how they work under what conditions. The stages of this review included: defining the scope of the review (concept mining and framework formulation; searching for and scrutinising the evidence; extracting and synthesising the evidence; and developing the narrative, including hypotheses. Results Based on key terms and concepts related to various interventions to promote evidence-informed healthcare, we developed an outcome-focused theoretical framework. Questions were tailored for each of four theory/intervention areas within the theoretical framework and were used to guide development of a review and data extraction process. The search for literature within our first theory area, change agency, was executed and the screening procedure resulted in inclusion of 52 papers. Using the questions relevant to this theory area, data were extracted by one reviewer and validated by a second reviewer. Synthesis involved organisation of extracted data into evidence tables, theming and formulation of chains of inference, linking between the chains of inference, and hypothesis formulation. The narrative was developed around the hypotheses generated within the change agency theory area. Conclusions Realist synthesis lends itself to the review of complex interventions because it accounts for context as well as

  11. Characterization of water dissociation on α-Al2O3(11[combining macron]02): theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Jonas; Kirsch, Harald; Wlosczyk, Sebastian; Tong, Yujin; Saalfrank, Peter; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of water with α-alumina (i.e. α-Al2O3) surfaces is important in a variety of applications and a useful model for the interaction of water with environmentally abundant aluminosilicate phases. Despite its significance, studies of water interaction with α-Al2O3 surfaces other than the (0001) are extremely limited. Here we characterize the interaction of water (D2O) with a well defined α-Al2O3(11[combining macron]02) surface in UHV both experimentally, using temperature programmed desorption and surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy, and theoretically, using periodic-slab density functional theory calculations. This combined approach makes it possible to demonstrate that water adsorption occurs only at a single well defined surface site (the so-called 1-4 configuration) and that at this site the barrier between the molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed forms is very low: 0.06 eV. A subset of OD stretch vibrations are parallel to this dissociation coordinate, and thus would be expected to be shifted to low frequencies relative to an uncoupled harmonic oscillator. To quantify this effect we solve the vibrational Schrödinger equation along the dissociation coordinate and find fundamental frequencies red-shifted by more than 1500 cm(-1). Within the context of this model, at moderate temperatures, we further find that some fraction of surface deuterons are likely delocalized: dissociatively and molecularly absorbed states are no longer distinguishable.

  12. Combined arterial and venous whole-body MR angiography with cardiac MR imaging in patients with thromboembolic disease - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Florian M.; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herborn, Christoph U. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medical Prevention Center Hamburg (MPCH) at University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kroger, Knut [University Hospital Essen, Department of Angiology, Essen (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of a combined arterial and venous whole-body three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, together with a cardiac MR examination, in patients with arterial thromboembolism. Ten patients with arterial thromboembolism underwent a contrast-enhanced whole-body MR examination of the arterial and venous vessels, followed by a cardiac MR examination on a separate occasion within 24 h. All examinations were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner. For both arterial and venous MR angiography only one injection of contrast agent was necessary. The cardiac imaging protocol included dark-blood-prepared half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, fast steady-state free precession cine sequences, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences and inversion recovery gradient-echo fast low-angle-shot sequences after injection of contrast agent. MR imaging revealed additional clinically unknown arterial thromboembolisms in four patients. The thoracic aorta was depicted as embolic source in four patients, while deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in one patient as the underlying disease. Unsuspected infarction of parenchymal organs was detected by MRI in two patients. An unknown additional DVT was found in one patient. Four patients were considered to have arterial emboli of cardiac origin. In conclusion, acquisition of arterial and venous MR angiograms of the entire vascular system combined with cardiac MR imaging is a most comprehensive and valuable strategy in patients with arterial thromboembolism. (orig.)

  13. Co-phasing experiment of a segmented mirror using a combined broadband and two-wavelength algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Wen-Hao; Chen, Mo; Tang, Jin-Long; Xian, Hao

    2017-11-10

    In this paper, a broadband phasing algorithm is combined with a two-wavelength phasing algorithm to detect the piston error of a segmented mirror with the advantages of long range, high precision, and fast detection. Moreover, an active optics co-phasing experimental system of the segmented mirror is built to verify the algorithm's effectiveness. The segmented mirror consists of four hexagonal segments, with flat-to-flat lengths of 100 mm and radii of curvature of 2000 mm. First, a Shack-Hartmann sensor and piezoelectric actuators are used to finely co-focus the segmented mirror. Then, the broadband phasing algorithm is used to reduce the piston error of the segmented mirror to several micrometers. Finally, the two-wavelength phasing algorithm is used to reduce the piston error of the segmented mirror to zero. The experimental results show that the measurement accuracy is better than 26 nm, and the adjustment accuracy is approximately 55 nm, which demonstrates that the combined algorithm is valuable for segmented-mirror co-phasing measurement and adjustment.

  14. Comparative study of the effectiveness of three learning environments: Hyper-realistic virtual simulations, traditional schematic simulations and traditional laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Guadalupe; Naranjo, Francisco L.; Pérez, Ángel L.; Suero, Maria Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2011-12-01

    This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output. This new virtual environment concept, which we call hyper-realistic, transcends basic schematic simulation; it provides the user with a more realistic perception of a physical phenomenon being simulated. We compared the learning achievements of three equivalent, homogeneous groups of undergraduates—an experimental group who used only the hyper-realistic virtual laboratory, a first control group who used a schematic simulation, and a second control group who used the traditional laboratory. The three groups received the same theoretical preparation and carried out equivalent practicals in their respective learning environments. The topic chosen for the experiment was optical aberrations. An analysis of variance applied to the data of the study demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p value learning achievements attained by the group using the hyper-realistic virtual environment were 6.1 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional schematic simulations and 9.5 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional laboratory.

  15. Comparative study of the effectiveness of three learning environments: Hyper-realistic virtual simulations, traditional schematic simulations and traditional laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Suero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output. This new virtual environment concept, which we call hyper-realistic, transcends basic schematic simulation; it provides the user with a more realistic perception of a physical phenomenon being simulated. We compared the learning achievements of three equivalent, homogeneous groups of undergraduates—an experimental group who used only the hyper-realistic virtual laboratory, a first control group who used a schematic simulation, and a second control group who used the traditional laboratory. The three groups received the same theoretical preparation and carried out equivalent practicals in their respective learning environments. The topic chosen for the experiment was optical aberrations. An analysis of variance applied to the data of the study demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p value <0.05 between the three groups. The learning achievements attained by the group using the hyper-realistic virtual environment were 6.1 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional schematic simulations and 9.5 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional laboratory.

  16. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique.

  17. Critical reflections on realist review: insights from customizing the methodology to the needs of participatory research assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagosh, Justin; Pluye, Pierre; Wong, Geoff; Cargo, Margaret; Salsberg, Jon; Bush, Paula L; Herbert, Carol P; Green, Lawrence W; Greenhalgh, Trish; Macaulay, Ann C

    2014-06-01

    Realist review has increased in popularity as a methodology for complex intervention assessment. Our experience suggests that the process of designing a realist review requires its customization to areas under investigation. To elaborate on this idea, we first describe the logic underpinning realist review and then present critical reflections on our application experience, organized in seven areas. These are the following: (1) the challenge of identifying middle range theory; (2) addressing heterogeneity and lack of conceptual clarity; (3) the challenge of appraising the quality of complex evidence; (4) the relevance of capturing unintended outcomes; (5) understanding the process of context, mechanism, and outcome (CMO) configuring; (6) incorporating middle-range theory in the CMO configuration process; and (7) using middle range theory to advance the conceptualization of outcomes - both visible and seemingly 'hidden'. One conclusion from our experience is that the degree of heterogeneity of the evidence base will determine whether theory can drive the development of review protocols from the outset, or will follow only after an intense period of data immersion. We hope that presenting a critical reflection on customizing realist review will convey how the methodology can be tailored to the often complex and idiosyncratic features of health research, leading to innovative evidence syntheses. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Structural Studies of Phycobiliproteins from Spirulina: Combining Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, and Molecular Modeling in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann T. S.; Feller, Scott E.

    2002-12-01

    Molecular modeling provides a powerful mechanism for students to connect molecular-level structural changes with macroscopically observable properties. We describe an experiment that integrates spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and molecular modeling into a single activity examining structural changes in phycobiliproteins upon denaturation with urea. Phycobiliproteins contain a covalently attached chromophore, phycocyanobilin, which is constrained in a planar conformation by the folded protein. Upon denaturation of the protein, the chromophore undergoes a conformational change, leading to a significant alteration of the absorption spectrum. By measuring the absorbance at 625 nm as a function of urea concentration, the free energy of unfolding can be determined. Students determine the dihedral angles in the chromophore and map the contacts between protein and chromophore using Protein Explorer, a structure visualization program freely available on the Internet. The change in absorption wavelength can be related to the difference between the LUMO and HOMO energies, obtained using PC Spartan Pro, for the chromophore in the folded and unfolded phycobiliprotein. This experiment could be used in a physical chemistry class in a curriculum that integrates biochemistry throughout the course work as well as in a traditional biochemistry course. Featured on the Cover

  19. Combining short-term manipulative experiments with long-term palaeoecological investigations at high resolution to assess the response of Sphagnum peatlands to drought, fire and warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lamentowicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Northern hemisphere peatlands are substantial carbon stores. However, recent climate change and human impacts (e.g., drainage and atmospheric nutrient deposition may trigger the emission of their stored carbon to the atmosphere. Biodiversity losses are also an important consequence of those changes. Therefore, there is a need to recognise these processes in space and time. Global change experiments are often conducted to improve our understanding of the potential responses of various ecosystems to global warming and drought. Most of the experiments carried out in peatlands are focused on carbon balance and nitrogen deposition. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how fast peatlands respond to temperature changes and water-table lowering in the continental climate setting. This is important because continental regions account for a significant proportion of all northern hemisphere peatlands. A combination of short-term and long-term approaches in a single research project is especially helpful because it facilitates the correct interpretation of experimental data. Here we describe the CLIMPEAT project - a manipulative field experiment in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland supported by a high-resolution multi-proxy palaeoecological study. The design of the field experiment (e.g., treatments, methodology and biogeographical setting are presented. We suggest it is beneficial to support field experiments with an investigation of past environmental changes in the studied ecosystem, as human impacts during the past 300 years have already caused substantial changes in ecosystem functioning which may condition the response in experimental studies.

  20. A video, text, and speech-driven realistic 3-d virtual head for human-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Zeng-Fu

    2015-05-01

    A multiple inputs-driven realistic facial animation system based on 3-D virtual head for human-machine interface is proposed. The system can be driven independently by video, text, and speech, thus can interact with humans through diverse interfaces. The combination of parameterized model and muscular model is used to obtain a tradeoff between computational efficiency and high realism of 3-D facial animation. The online appearance model is used to track 3-D facial motion from video in the framework of particle filtering, and multiple measurements, i.e., pixel color value of input image and Gabor wavelet coefficient of illumination ratio image, are infused to reduce the influence of lighting and person dependence for the construction of online appearance model. The tri-phone model is used to reduce the computational consumption of visual co-articulation in speech synchronized viseme synthesis without sacrificing any performance. The objective and subjective experiments show that the system is suitable for human-machine interaction.

  1. Structure and electronic properties of MoVO type mixed-metal oxides - a combined view by experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Cheng-Chau; Vogt, Thomas; Zhao, Lili; Genest, Alexander; Rösch, Notker

    2015-08-21

    In this review we address recent efforts from experimental and theoretical side to study MoVO-type mixed metal oxides (MMOs) and their properties. We illustrate how structures of MMOs have been evaluated using a large variety of experimental techniques, such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, we discuss the current view on structure-catalysis correlations, derived from recent experiments. In a second part, we examine useful tools of theoretical chemistry for exploring MoVO-type systems. We discuss the need for using hybrid DFT methods and we analyze how, in the context of MMOs studies, semi-local DFT approximations can encounter problems due to a notable self-interaction error when describing oxidic species and reactions on them. In addition, we discuss various aspects of the model that are important when attempting to map complex MMO systems.

  2. Use of angiotensin II receptor blockers alone and in combination with other drugs: a large clinical experience trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Weir

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II receptor blockers are the newest class of antihypertensive drugs to be developed. No large-scale clinical trials have been performed to evaluate their efficacy alone, or in combination with other drugs. A large-scale, eight week, open-label, non-placebo-controlled, single-arm trial evaluated the efficacy, tolerability and dose-response of candesartan cilexetil, 16—32 mg once-daily, either as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy, in a diverse hypertensive population in actual practice settings. 6465 patients with high blood pressure, of whom 52% were female and 16% African American, with a mean age of 58 years, were included. 5446 patients had essential hypertension and 1014 patients had isolated systolic hypertension. In order to be included in this study, patients had either untreated or uncontrolled hypertension (systolic blood pressure (SBP 140—179 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP 90—109 mmHg inclusive at baseline, despite a variety of other antihypertensive drugs. Of the 5156 patients with essential hypertension and at least one post baseline efficacy measurement, the mean pretreatment blood pressure (BP was 156/97 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil monotherapy reduced mean SBP/DBP by 18.0/12.2 mmHg. Similarly, in the 964 patients with isolated systolic hypertension and at least one post baseline efficacy measurement, candesartan cilexetil monotherapy reduced SBP/DBP from 158/81 by 16.5/4.5 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil was similarly effective when employed as add-on therapy. When added to baseline antihypertensive medication in 51% of the patients with essential hypertension not achieving BP control, additional reduction in BP was achieved regardless of the background therapy, including diuretics (17.8/11.7 mmHg calcium antagonists (16.6/11.2 mmHg, beta-blockers (16.5/10.4 mmHg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I (15.3/10.0 mmHg, and alpha blockers (16.4/10.4 mmHg. Likewise, when

  3. In vitro measurement of ambient pressure changes using a realistic clinical setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    In vitro measurement of ambient pressure changes using a realistic clinical setup Klaus Scheldrup Andersen and Jørgen Arendt Jensen Motivation and objective: Many attempts to find a non-invasive procedure to measure the local blood pressure have been made. In the last decade independent experiments...... cosine tapered pulse with a center frequency of 4 MHz and an acoustic pressure of 485 kPa was used for excitation. 64 elements were used in receive and the RF data was filtered and beamformed before further processing. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust...

  4. Power generation based on biomass by combined fermentation and gasification--a new concept derived from experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methling, Torsten; Armbrust, Nina; Haitz, Thilo; Speidel, Michael; Poboss, Norman; Braun-Unkhoff, Marina; Dieter, Heiko; Kempter-Regel, Brigitte; Kraaij, Gerard; Schliessmann, Ursula; Sterr, Yasemin; Wörner, Antje; Hirth, Thomas; Riedel, Uwe; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2014-10-01

    A new concept is proposed for combined fermentation (two-stage high-load fermenter) and gasification (two-stage fluidised bed gasifier with CO2 separation) of sewage sludge and wood, and the subsequent utilisation of the biogenic gases in a hybrid power plant, consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell and a gas turbine. The development and optimisation of the important processes of the new concept (fermentation, gasification, utilisation) are reported in detail. For the gas production, process parameters were experimentally and numerically investigated to achieve high conversion rates of biomass. For the product gas utilisation, important combustion properties (laminar flame speed, ignition delay time) were analysed numerically to evaluate machinery operation (reliability, emissions). Furthermore, the coupling of the processes was numerically analysed and optimised by means of integration of heat and mass flows. The high, simulated electrical efficiency of 42% including the conversion of raw biomass is promising for future power generation by biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Kolkata, India, and In Vitro Experiments on Effect of Combined Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamapada Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication states the changing patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi isolates causing enteric fever in and around Kolkata, India. Among the isolates resistance to ampicillin (A, chloramphenicol (C, cotrimoxazole (Co and tetracycline (T were plasmid mediated; the plasmid was unstable in S. Typhi, and the other enteric bacteria like Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris were found to be the potential source of dissemination of such plasmids into S. Typhi. The infection with such S. Typhi strains were successfully treated with ciprofloxacin (Cp: MICs 0.0075–0.075 μg mL−1 and/or ofloxacin (Ofx: MICs 0.0125–0.075 μg mL−1, but in the later course, the S. Typhi strains, showing resistance to nalidixic acid, developed low level of resistance to Cp and Ofx, causing the treatment failure. Thus, the treatment regimen was shifted to the third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone (Ct and cefotaxime (Cf. Keeping in mind the anticipation of development of resistance to Ct/Cf, we prepared the treatment regimen for MDR enteric fever, based on the double-drug synergy tests in vitro; Cp-gentamycin (FICI 0.121–0.216 and Cp-trimethoprim (FICI 0.14–0.483 combinations were found effective against S. Typhi isolates having decreased sensitivity to cp (MICs: 0.5–1.25 μg mL−1.

  6. Four-years experience with monitoring of persons at the treatment of children patients with neuroblastoma by 131I-MIBG combination with hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanska, J.; Zimak, J.; Paskova, Z.; Dosel, P.

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of children patients with neuroblastoma by 131 I-MIBG in combination with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) started in the Czech Republic in 1997. Estimation of radiation load from extemal irradiation plays very important role in the treatment scheme elaborated at the Department of Nuclear Medicine. According to this scheme, activities of 5.5 GBq and 3.7 GBq are administered at the first and repeated therapies,respectively. 3 rd , 4 th , 5 th and 6 th day after the administration patients undergo HBO in the Institute of Aviation Medicine Prague. Activity administration and following care are realised at the bed station of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, which is the workplace of III. category with unsealed radionuclide sources. Real dose equivalents were checked during the reported four-year period. Members of both groups were equipped by personal digital dosemeters STEPHEN 6000 for inspection. From the presented results, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Monitoring of family members has to be performed in spite of the fact that exceeding of equivalent dose of 5 mSv is non-realistic. Unexpected situation concerning behaviour of both parents and children cannot be excluded. Moreover, records of H-values have to be stored and analysed in the case of possible pregnancy. (2) A question arises in connection with the special limit 5 mSv: What is the whole time of the treatment? Is it possible to understand it, similarly as in the case of iodine therapy, as 5 mSv per year or is it necessary to take into account really the whole, often very long, time of the treatment? (3) Monitoring of the staff maintaining the hyperbaric chamber and ambulance drivers seems to be unnecessary. Under normal condition, the staff is outside the chamber and its contact with a patient is minimal. In unusual situation, the instructed nurse from the Department of Nuclear Medicine equipped by STEPHEN 6000 will estimate dose equivalent and contact responsible medical

  7. Experience of combined liver-kidney transplantation for acute-on-chronic liver failure patients with renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, T; Zhong, L; Chen, D; Peng, Z

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or combined liver-kidney transplantation (CLKT) for acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) patients with renal dysfunction. From January 2001 to December 2009, 133 patients underwent OLT for ACLF at our center. Among them, 30 had both ACLF and renal dysfunction. Of the 30 patients, 12 underwent CLKT for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the other 18 with hepatorenal syndrome type 1 (HRS1) underwent OLT alone. ACLF was defined according to the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of Liver Consensus Meeting. Clinical data were reviewed for survival outcomes. The median model for end-stage liver disease score (MELD) of patients with ACLF was 28. Among the 133 patients, all of whom received deceased donor liver grafts, 12 also got the kidney grafts from the same deceased donor. The hospital mortality rate was 21.8% for all patients with ACLF. The 5-year survival rates were 72.8% for patients without renal dysfunction and 70% for patients with renal dysfunction. The results of patients with ESRD who underwent CLKT were better than those of subjects without renal dysfunction or patients with HRS1 who underwent OLT alone. OLT alone improved renal function in most patients with HRS1, including those requiring short-term hemodialysis. Simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation was an excellent strategy for patients with both ACLF and ESRD. It provided protection to the kidney allograft for liver-based metabolic diseases affecting the kidney. The rate of acute rejection episodes in kidneys was low. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Severe combined immunodeficiency in Serbia and Montenegro between years 1986 and 2010: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasic, Srdjan; Vujic, Dragana; Veljković, Dobrila; Slavkovic, Bojana; Mostarica-Stojkovic, Marija; Minic, Predrag; Minic, Aleksandra; Ristic, Goran; Giliani, Silvia; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina; Lilić, Desa; Abinun, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), including the 'variant' Omenn syndrome (OS), represent a heterogeneous group of monogenic disorders characterized by defect in differentiation of T- and/or B lymphocytes and susceptibility to infections since birth. In the period of 25 years, between January 1986 and December 2010, a total of 21 patients (15 SCID, 6 OS) were diagnosed in Mother & Child Health Institute of Serbia, a tertiary-care teaching University hospital and a national referral center for patients affected with primary immunodeficiency (PID). The diagnoses were based on anamnestic data, clinical findings, and immunological and genetic analysis. The median age at the onset of the first infection was the 2nd month of life. Seven (33 %) patients had positive family history for SCID. Out of five male infants with T-B+NK- SCID phenotype, mutation analysis revealed interleukin-2 (common) gamma-chain receptor (IL2RG) mutations in 3 with positive X-linked family history, and Janus-kinase (JAK)-3 gene defects in the other two. Six patients had T-B-NK+ SCID phenotype and further 6 features of OS, 11 of which had recombinase-activating gene (RAG1or RAG2) and 1 Artemis gene mutations. One child with T+B+NK+ SCID phenotype as well had proven RAG mutation. One child each with T-B+NK+ SCID phenotype, CD8 lymphopenia and unknown phenotype remained without known underlying genetic defect. Of the eight patients who underwent hematopoetic stem cell transplant (HSCT) 5 survived, the other 13 died between 2 days and 12 months after diagnosis was made. Early diagnosis of SCID, before onset of severe infections, offers possibility for HSCT and cure. Education of primary-care pediatricians, in particular including awareness of the risk of using live vaccines and non-irradiated blood products, should improve prognosis of SCID in our setting.

  9. Experience with combination of docetaxel, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chengrun; Ying Hongmei; Zhou Junjun; Hu Chaosu; Zhang Youwang

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin, fluorouracil, and docetaxel chemotherapy plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were enrolled. Patients received IMRT plus three courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and two courses of adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel (60 mg/m 2 /day on day 1), cisplatin (25 mg/m 2 /day on days 1-3), and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /day on days 1-3). The overall response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 89%. Three months after the completion of radiotherapy, 53 (93%) patients achieved complete regression, 3 (5%) achieved partial response (PR), and 1 experienced liver metastasis. However, among the 3 PR patients, 2 patients had no evidence of relapse in the follow-up. With a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-43), the 2-year estimated locoregional failure-free survival, distant failure-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 96.6, 93.3, 89.9, and 98.3%, respectively. Leukopenia was the main adverse effect in chemotherapy; 14 patients experienced grade 3 or grade 4 neutropenia, and 1 patient developed febrile neutropenia. The nonhematological adverse events included alopecia, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and diarrhea. The incidence of grade 3 acute radiotherapy-related mucositis was 28.3%; no grade 4 acute mucositis was observed. No grade 3 or grade 4 hematological toxicity occurred during radiotherapy. None of the patients had interrupted radiotherapy. The common late adverse effects included xerostomia and hearing impairment. Neoadjuvant-adjuvant chemotherapy using cisplatin, fluorouracil, plus docetaxel combined with IMRT was an effective and well-tolerated alternative for advanced NPC. (author)

  10. Operating experiences, on-site performances and thermoeconomical analysis of a 5 MW combined cycle plant in agrofood industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficarella, A.; Laforgia, D. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Materials Science

    1996-11-01

    A solar Taurus 60-T6200 4237 kW{sub e} gas turbine has been operating for about a year at an agro-food industry in cogeneration applications; 15 t/h of 5.0 MPA-410 deg C steam is there produced. About 400 kW of mechanical energy for the main pump of the steam generator and for the cooling water pump is produced by steam turbines, driven by the steam expansion from 5.0 MPa to 1.2 or 0.5 MPa. Experiences in commissioning, start-up and the early months of operation are discussed. The analysis of the on-site performance test data, recorded from the available station instrumentation, assesses the output power and the heat rate of the plant. The thermoeconomic analysis of the energy transformation plant has been completed studying a performance evaluation based on a first-law as well as second-law analysis. 8 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs

  11. Increased Carbon Throughput But No Net Soil Carbon Loss in Field Warming Experiments: Combining Data Assimilation and Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, N.; Shi, Z.; van Groenigen, K. J.; Osenberg, C. W.; Andresen, L. C.; Dukes, J. S.; Hovenden, M. J.; Michelsen, A.; Pendall, E.; Reich, P.; Schuur, E.; Hungate, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Minor changes in soil C dynamics in response to warming can strongly modulate climate change. Approaches to estimate long-term changes in soil carbon stocks from shorter-term warming experiments should consider temporal trends in soil carbon dynamics. Here we used data assimilation to take into account the soil carbon time series data collected from the upper soil layer (materials. We show that on average experimental warming enhanced fluxes of incoming and outgoing carbon with no change in predicted equilibrium stocks of carbon. Experimental warming increased the decomposition rates of the fast soil carbon pools by 10.7% on average, but also increased soil carbon input by 8.1%. When projecting the carbon pools to equilibrium stocks we found that warming decreased the size of the fast pool (-3.7%), but did not affect the slow or total carbon pools. We demonstrate that warming increases carbon throughput without an overall effect on total equilibrium carbon stocks. Hence, our findings do not support a generalizable soil carbon-climate feedback for soil carbon in the upper soil layer.

  12. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudini, N. [Laboratoire des plasmas de décharges, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R. [Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Benallal, R. [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables, BP 119, Université Abou Bekr Belkaïd, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Taccogna, F. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e di Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bendib, A. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Quantique, Faculté de Physique, USTHB, El Alia BP 32, Bab Ezzouar, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  13. Interferometric data modelling: issues in realistic data generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Soma

    2004-01-01

    This study describes algorithms developed for modelling interferometric noise in a realistic manner, i.e. incorporating non-stationarity that can be seen in the data from the present generation of interferometers. The noise model is based on individual component models (ICM) with the application of auto regressive moving average (ARMA) models. The data obtained from the model are vindicated by standard statistical tests, e.g. the KS test and Akaike minimum criterion. The results indicate a very good fit. The advantage of using ARMA for ICMs is that the model parameters can be controlled and hence injection and efficiency studies can be conducted in a more controlled environment. This realistic non-stationary noise generator is intended to be integrated within the data monitoring tool framework

  14. Realistic electricity market simulator for energy and economic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal-Agustin, Jose L. [University of Zaragoza, C/Maria de Luna, 3, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Contreras, Javier; Conejo, Antonio J. [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, Ciudad Real 13071 (Spain); Martin-Flores, Raul [Airbus Spain S.L., Paseo John Lennon, Getafe 28906 (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    Electricity market simulators have become a useful tool to train engineers in the power industry. With the maturing of electricity markets throughout the world, there is a need for sophisticated software tools that can replicate the actual behavior of power markets. In most of these markets, power producers/consumers submit production/demand bids and the Market Operator clears the market producing a single price per hour. What makes markets different from each other are the bidding rules and the clearing algorithms to balance the market. This paper presents a realistic simulator of the day-ahead electricity market of mainland Spain. All the rules that govern this market are modeled. This simulator can be used either to train employees by power companies or to teach electricity markets courses in universities. To illustrate the tool, several realistic case studies are presented and discussed. (author)

  15. Realistic full wave modeling of focal plane array pixels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Jorgenson, Roy E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Davids, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.; Peters, David W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.

    2017-11-01

    Here, we investigate full-wave simulations of realistic implementations of multifunctional nanoantenna enabled detectors (NEDs). We focus on a 2x2 pixelated array structure that supports two wavelengths of operation. We design each resonating structure independently using full-wave simulations with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the whole infinite array. We then construct a supercell made of a 2x2 pixelated array with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the full NED; in this case, however, each pixel comprises 10-20 antennas per side. In this way, the cross-talk between contiguous pixels is accounted for in our simulations. We observe that, even though there are finite extent effects, the pixels work as designed, each responding at the respective wavelength of operation. This allows us to stress that realistic simulations of multifunctional NEDs need to be performed to verify the design functionality by taking into account finite extent and cross-talk effects.

  16. Resonance and continuum Gamow shell model with realistic nuclear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z. H.; Wu, Q.; Zhao, Z. H.; Hu, B. S.; Dai, S. J.; Xu, F. R.

    2017-06-01

    Starting from realistic nuclear forces, we have developed a core Gamow shell model which can describe resonance and continuum properties of loosely-bound or unbound nuclear systems. To describe properly resonance and continuum, the Berggren representation has been employed, which treats bound, resonant and continuum states on equal footing in a complex-momentum (complex-k) plane. To derive the model-space effective interaction based on realistic forces, the full Q ˆ -box folded-diagram renormalization has been, for the first time, extended to the nondegenerate complex-k space. The CD-Bonn potential is softened by using the Vlow-k method. Choosing 16O as the inert core, we have calculated sd-shell neutron-rich oxygen isotopes, giving good descriptions of both bound and resonant states. The isotopes 25,26O are calculated to be resonant even in their ground states.

  17. How to estimate realistic energy savings in Energy Performance Certificates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Altmann, Nagmeh; Berecová, Monika

    to suggested building energy upgrading in the EPC will also deviate from the actual achieved energy savings. Adjusting input boundary condition to the actual values, will often result in realistic (comparable with measured energy consumption) calculated energy demands. This even happens in simple, quasi...... renovation. In this context, it is important to distinguish between benchmarking/certification and calculation of expected energy demand based on realistic input data.......Given the fact that most MS use fixed or other kinds of default values as boundary condition input for energy performance calculations, it is not surprising that the calculated energy performance differs from the measured energy consumption. As a consequence, the calculated energy savings due...

  18. Realistic minimum accident source terms - Evaluation, application, and risk acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation, application, and risk acceptance for realistic minimum accident source terms can represent a complex and arduous undertaking. This effort poses a very high impact to design, construction cost, operations and maintenance, and integrated safety over the expected facility lifetime. At the 2005 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD) Meeting in Knoxville Tenn., two papers were presented mat summarized the Y-12 effort that reduced the number of criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) detectors originally designed for the new Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) from 258 to an eventual as-built number of 60. Part of that effort relied on determining a realistic minimum accident source term specific to the facility. Since that time, the rationale for an alternate minimum accident has been strengthened by an evaluation process that incorporates realism. A recent update to the HEUMF CAAS technical basis highlights the concepts presented here. (authors)

  19. Realistic electricity market simulator for energy and economic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Agustin, Jose L.; Contreras, Javier; Conejo, Antonio J.; Martin-Flores, Raul

    2007-01-01

    Electricity market simulators have become a useful tool to train engineers in the power industry. With the maturing of electricity markets throughout the world, there is a need for sophisticated software tools that can replicate the actual behavior of power markets. In most of these markets, power producers/consumers submit production/demand bids and the Market Operator clears the market producing a single price per hour. What makes markets different from each other are the bidding rules and the clearing algorithms to balance the market. This paper presents a realistic simulator of the day-ahead electricity market of mainland Spain. All the rules that govern this market are modeled. This simulator can be used either to train employees by power companies or to teach electricity markets courses in universities. To illustrate the tool, several realistic case studies are presented and discussed. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the structure of amorphous tungsten oxide W28O72 by the combination of electron-, X-ray- and neutron-diffraction (three-beam experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankele, J.; Mayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    From the combination of quantitative electron-diffraction data with X-ray- and neutron-diffraction data (so-called three-beam experiment) the partial structure factors and pair correlation functions of amorphous sputter deposited W 28 O 72 were determined. On the basis of the experimental atomic distances and coordination numbers, and by comparison with crystalline WO 3 , a structural model was developed, which consists of twisted WO 6 octahedra. Reverse Monte Carlo simulation in accordance with the experimental data was performed to verify the results. (orig.)

  1. Validation of the transport parameters of silica at 30°C in Boom Clay by a combined glass dissolution/diffusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aertsens, M.; Lemmens, K.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In Belgium the disposal of vitrified radioactive waste in Boom Clay is considered. The Boom Clay beneath the Mol-Dessel nuclear zone is a reference methodological site for supporting R and D. Safety studies require to estimate the release rate of hazardous radionuclides from the host glass and their transport rate in Boom Clay. The radionuclides are released as a result of the glass matrix dissolution. In the present Belgian reference 'supercontainer' disposal design, the waste glass is surrounded by a concrete buffer, but in the previous disposal design, a bentonite backfill was foreseen. The close interaction between the dissolving glass and clayey materials was studied using Boom Clay as a reference clay. Dissolution of glass next to clay is described by a model initially developed by Pescatore, according to which at large times the glass dissolution rate is controlled by the transport parameters of dissolved silica in Boom Clay: the apparent diffusion coefficient D and the product?R of the diffusion accessible porosity? and the retardation factor R. The values of these parameters have been measured by diffusion experiments. These values and the Pescatore model are validated by experiments where 32 Si doped glass dissolves next to clay. These experiments allow to determine not only the glass mass loss as a function of time, but also the 32 Si profile in the clay and the pore water composition close to the glass. The combination of these measurements makes it possible to determine all parameters of the Pescatore model. Because at 90 deg. C silica precipitates have been observed next to a dissolving glass by Pozo, the Pescatore model is extended with a precipitation term. Another extension takes into account the finite size of the clay cores. Three combined glass dissolution/diffusion tests with durations up to 1600 days were performed with SON68 glass in compact Boom Clay at 30 deg. C. These tests were

  2. Blend Shape Interpolation and FACS for Realistic Avatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Saba, Tanzila

    2015-03-01

    The quest of developing realistic facial animation is ever-growing. The emergence of sophisticated algorithms, new graphical user interfaces, laser scans and advanced 3D tools imparted further impetus towards the rapid advancement of complex virtual human facial model. Face-to-face communication being the most natural way of human interaction, the facial animation systems became more attractive in the information technology era for sundry applications. The production of computer-animated movies using synthetic actors are still challenging issues. Proposed facial expression carries the signature of happiness, sadness, angry or cheerful, etc. The mood of a particular person in the midst of a large group can immediately be identified via very subtle changes in facial expressions. Facial expressions being very complex as well as important nonverbal communication channel are tricky to synthesize realistically using computer graphics. Computer synthesis of practical facial expressions must deal with the geometric representation of the human face and the control of the facial animation. We developed a new approach by integrating blend shape interpolation (BSI) and facial action coding system (FACS) to create a realistic and expressive computer facial animation design. The BSI is used to generate the natural face while the FACS is employed to reflect the exact facial muscle movements for four basic natural emotional expressions such as angry, happy, sad and fear with high fidelity. The results in perceiving the realistic facial expression for virtual human emotions based on facial skin color and texture may contribute towards the development of virtual reality and game environment of computer aided graphics animation systems.

  3. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  4. Real-time Realistic Rendering and Lighting of Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Bruneton, Eric; Neyret, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Special issue: Proceedings of Eurographics 2011; International audience; Realistic real-time rendering and lighting of forests is an important aspect for simulators and video games. This is a difficult problem, due to the massive amount of geometry: aerial forest views display millions of trees on a wide range of distances, from the camera to the horizon. Light interactions, whose effects are visible at all scales, are also a problem: sun and sky dome contributions, shadows between trees, ins...

  5. Face to Face: From Real Humans to Realistic Facial Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Jörg; Kähler, Kolja; Albrecht, Irene; Yamauchi, Hitoshi; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    We present a system for photo-realistic facial modeling and animation, which includes several tools that facilitate necessary tasks such as mesh processing, texture registration, and assembling of facial components. The resulting head model reflects the anatomical structure of the human head including skull, skin, and muscles. Semiautomatic generation of high-quality models from scan data for physics-based animation becomes possible with little effort. A state-o...

  6. A scan for models with realistic fermion mass patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijnens, J.; Wetterich, C.

    1986-03-01

    We consider models which have no small Yukawa couplings unrelated to symmetry. This situation is generic in higher dimensional unification where Yukawa couplings are predicted to have strength similar to the gauge couplings. Generations have then to be differentiated by symmetry properties and the structure of fermion mass matrices is given in terms of quantum numbers alone. We scan possible symmetries leading to realistic mass matrices. (orig.)

  7. Who has realistic income expectations: students or workers?

    OpenAIRE

    Jerrim, John

    2010-01-01

    I analyse a nationally representative, longitudinal dataset to investigate the income expectations of 20 American year old men over a 10 year time horizon. Specifically, I compare the accuracy of students’ expectations to young adults from the same cohort who have chosen to enter the labour force. The results indicate that 20 year old American men overestimate their income at age 30 by an average of 50%. Yet, there is little evidence that those in the labour force are more realistic than thei...

  8. Providing oxygen to children in hospitals: a realist review

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Hamish; Tosif, Shidan; Gray, Amy; Qazi, Shamim; Campbell, Harry; Peel, David; McPake, Barbara; Duke, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify and describe interventions to improve oxygen therapy in hospitals in low-resource settings, and to determine the factors that contribute to success and failure in different contexts. Methods Using realist review methods, we scanned the literature and contacted experts in the field to identify possible mechanistic theories of how interventions to improve oxygen therapy systems might work. Then we systematically searched online databases for evaluations of improve...

  9. Validation of a realistic powder sample using data from DMC at PSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Filges, U.; Keller, L.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a virtual experiment, carried out by means of a McStas simulation of the powder diffractometer DMC at PSI, using the new powder sample component PowderN. This powder component takes tabulated crystallographic input to define realistic powder lines. The simulated output data...... from the virtual experiment on the compound Na2Ca3Al2F14 are compared to real measurement data from the DMC instrument. The agreement is very good with respect to peak positions, widths, background intensity and relative peak intensities. This work represents an important step towards reliable virtual...... experiments and also act as a validation of the PowderN sample component in McStas....

  10. A realistic approach of the quantum non-locality and their experimental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryff, Luiz Carlos Bandeira.

    1992-01-01

    A realistic approach to quantum nonlocality is proposed, and four experiments that can be used to test this approach, using pairs of correlated photons are discussed. The first experiment proposed would allow us to investigate the role of the interaction of a quantum system with a macroscopic apparatus (detector) in the so-called collapse of the state vector. The second would investigate the interaction with a polarizer. Following the line of the second, the third experiment raises questions concerning the partial collapse of the state vector. The fourth suggests ways of investigating some possible properties of the superluminal interaction needed to explain nonlocality according to realism. The extension of this approach to include pairs of photons produced via parametric down-conversion of light is discussed. (author). 57 refs, 19 figs

  11. The work is never ending: uncovering teamwork sustainability using realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykman, Mandus; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Hasson, Henna; Mazzocato, Pamela

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover the mechanisms influencing the sustainability of behavior changes following the implementation of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach Realistic evaluation was combined with a framework (DCOM®) based on applied behavior analysis to study the sustainability of behavior changes two and a half years after the initial implementation of teamwork at an emergency department. The DCOM® framework was used to categorize the mechanisms of behavior change interventions (BCIs) into the four categories of direction, competence, opportunity, and motivation. Non-participant observation and interview data were used. Findings The teamwork behaviors were not sustained. A substantial fallback in managerial activities in combination with a complex context contributed to reduced direction, opportunity, and motivation. Reduced direction made staff members unclear about how and why they should work in teams. Deterioration of opportunity was evident from the lack of problem-solving resources resulting in accumulated barriers to teamwork. Motivation in terms of management support and feedback was reduced. Practical implications The implementation of complex organizational changes in complex healthcare contexts requires continuous adaption and managerial activities well beyond the initial implementation period. Originality/value By integrating the DCOM® framework with realistic evaluation, this study responds to the call for theoretically based research on behavioral mechanisms that can explain how BCIs interact with context and how this interaction influences sustainability.

  12. Validation of CT brain perfusion methods using a realistic dynamic head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Alan J; Prokop, Mathias; Viergever, Max A; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Smit, Ewoud J; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2011-06-01

    Development and evaluation of a realistic hybrid head phantom for the validation of quantitative CT brain perfusion methods. A combination, or hybrid, of CT images of an anthropomorphic head phantom together with clinically acquired MRI brain images was used to construct a dynamic hybrid head phantom. Essential CT imaging parameters such as spatially dependent noise, effects of resolution, tube settings, and reconstruction parameters were intrinsically included by scanning a skull phantom using CT perfusion (CTP) protocols with varying mAs. These data were combined with processed high resolution 7T clinical MRI images to include healthy and diseased brain parenchyma, as well as the cerebral vascular system. Time attenuation curves emulating contrast bolus passage based on perfusion as observed in clinical studies were added. Using the phantom, CTP images were generated using three brain perfusion calculation methods: bcSVD, sSVD, and fit-based deconvolution, and the linearity and accuracy of the three calculation methods was assessed. Dependency of perfusion outcome on calculation method was compared to clinical data. Furthermore, the potential of the phantom to optimize brain perfusion packages was investigated. All perfusion calculation methods showed overestimation of low perfusion values and underestimation of high perfusion values. Good correlation in behavior between phantom and clinical data was found (R2 = 0.84). A dynamic hybrid head phantom constructed from CT and MRI data was demonstrated to realistically represent clinical CTP studies, which is useful for assessing CT brain perfusion acquisition, reconstruction, and analysis.

  13. SU-F-P-33: Combining Research and Professional Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Medical Physicist Personal Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J [Consorcio Hospitalario Provincial de Castello, Castello de la Plana (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To initiate a discussion on the current and evolving role of Medical Physicists based on author’s professional and research experience in patient safety and quality control. Methods: Several professionals of the departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, chiefly devoted to clinical tasks, began a research program on patient safety and quality control in a framework provided by the implementation of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). We performed studies on virtual simulation for IORT, in vivo dosimetry, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), statistical process control (SPC), and receiver operating characteristics of dosimetric equipment. This was done with the support of our research foundation and different grants while continuing with our departmental clinical routine involving about 1600 annual treatments with two linacs and different brachytherapy techniques. Results: We published 5 papers in international journals in the last two years. This author conducted a doctoral research which resulted in a dissertation in 2015. The extra time spent after treatments was essential to succeed. Funding and support achieved via our foundation played a crucial role; but this would have not been possible without punctual external mentoring and partnership. FMEA conclusions were able to be implemented only with staff commitment; however, conclusions concerning equipment cannot be easily communicated to manufacturers. These tasks required extra training in the appropriated methods. Conclusion: Research needed the support of a dedicated foundation, which would have been very difficult to obtain with the sole participation of our departments. FMEA and SPC results may need engagement of staff and manufacturers, respectively, hard to achieve without strong recommendations or even a regulatory framework. All these fields need evolution of Medical Physicists’ roles and additional training. Devotion to both clinical tasks and research could be unfeasible

  14. SU-F-P-33: Combining Research and Professional Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Medical Physicist Personal Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To initiate a discussion on the current and evolving role of Medical Physicists based on author’s professional and research experience in patient safety and quality control. Methods: Several professionals of the departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, chiefly devoted to clinical tasks, began a research program on patient safety and quality control in a framework provided by the implementation of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). We performed studies on virtual simulation for IORT, in vivo dosimetry, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), statistical process control (SPC), and receiver operating characteristics of dosimetric equipment. This was done with the support of our research foundation and different grants while continuing with our departmental clinical routine involving about 1600 annual treatments with two linacs and different brachytherapy techniques. Results: We published 5 papers in international journals in the last two years. This author conducted a doctoral research which resulted in a dissertation in 2015. The extra time spent after treatments was essential to succeed. Funding and support achieved via our foundation played a crucial role; but this would have not been possible without punctual external mentoring and partnership. FMEA conclusions were able to be implemented only with staff commitment; however, conclusions concerning equipment cannot be easily communicated to manufacturers. These tasks required extra training in the appropriated methods. Conclusion: Research needed the support of a dedicated foundation, which would have been very difficult to obtain with the sole participation of our departments. FMEA and SPC results may need engagement of staff and manufacturers, respectively, hard to achieve without strong recommendations or even a regulatory framework. All these fields need evolution of Medical Physicists’ roles and additional training. Devotion to both clinical tasks and research could be unfeasible

  15. Realistic simplified gaugino-higgsino models in the MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Benjamin; Klasen, Michael; Schmiemann, Saskia; Sunder, Marthijn

    2018-03-01

    We present simplified MSSM models for light neutralinos and charginos with realistic mass spectra and realistic gaugino-higgsino mixing, that can be used in experimental searches at the LHC. The formerly used naive approach of defining mass spectra and mixing matrix elements manually and independently of each other does not yield genuine MSSM benchmarks. We suggest the use of less simplified, but realistic MSSM models, whose mass spectra and mixing matrix elements are the result of a proper matrix diagonalisation. We propose a novel strategy targeting the design of such benchmark scenarios, accounting for user-defined constraints in terms of masses and particle mixing. We apply it to the higgsino case and implement a scan in the four relevant underlying parameters {μ , tan β , M1, M2} for a given set of light neutralino and chargino masses. We define a measure for the quality of the obtained benchmarks, that also includes criteria to assess the higgsino content of the resulting charginos and neutralinos. We finally discuss the distribution of the resulting models in the MSSM parameter space as well as their implications for supersymmetric dark matter phenomenology.

  16. Behaviorly realistic simulations of stock market traders with a soul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sorin

    1999-09-01

    The price fluctuations of the stocks in the financial markets are the result of the individual operations by many individual investors. However for many decades the financial theory did not use directly this “microscopic representation” of the markets. The main difficulties preventing this approach were solved recently with the advent of modern computer technology: - massive detailed data on the individual market operations became available; - “microscopic simulations” of the stock markets in terms of their individual participating agents allow very realistic treatment of the problem. By taking advantage of the modern computer processing and simulation techniques, we are now able to confront real market data with the results of simulating “microscopic” realistic models of the markets. These models have the potential to include and study the effects on the market of any desired feature in the investors behavior: departures from rationality, herding effects, heterogeneous investor-specific trading strategies. We propose to use the comparison of computer simulations of microscopic models with the actual market data in order to validate and enhance the knowledge on the financial behavior of individuals. Moreover we hope to explain, understand (and may be predict and control) macroscopic market dynamical features (e.g., cycles of booms and crashes, investors wealth distribution, market returns probability distribution etc.) based on realistic models using this knowledge.

  17. Relating realist metatheory to issues of gender and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, M; Wells, John S G; Owen, Sara

    2010-06-01

    This paper seeks to advance the debate that considers critical realism as an alternative approach for understanding gender and mental health and its relatedness to mental health research and practice. The knowledge base of how 'sex' and 'gender' affect mental health and illness is expanding. However, the way we conceptualize gender is significant and challenging as quite often our ability to think about 'gender' as independent of 'sex' is not common. The influences and interplay of how sex (biological) and gender (social) affect mental health and illness requires consideration. Critical realism suggests a shared ontology and epistemology for the natural and social sciences. While much of the debate surrounding gender is guided within a constructivist discourse, an exploration of the concept 'gender' is reflected on and some key realist propositions are considered for mental health research and practice. This is achieved through the works of some key realist theorists. Critical realism offers potential for research and practice in relation to gender and mental health because it facilitates changes in our understanding, while simultaneously, not discarding that which is already known. In so doing, it allows the biological (sex) and social (gender) domains of knowledge for mental health and illness to coexist, without either being reduced to or defined by the other. Arguably, greater depth and explanations for gender and mental health issues are presented within a realist metatheory.

  18. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  19. Flank Collapse Assessment At Kick-'em-Jenny Submarine Volcano (Lesser Antilles): A Combined Approach Using Modelling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondin, F. J. Y.; Heap, M. J.; Robertson, R. E. A.; Dorville, J. F. M.; Carey, S.

    2016-12-01

    -andesite and pyroclastic deposit; (ii) the conduit composed of fresh basaltic andesite rocks; (iii) a hydrothermally altered body surrounding the conduit. Our combined approach hopes to improve previous quantification of initial volumes of potential collapses and therefore refine the tsunami hazards assessment related to flank instabilities at KeJ.

  20. Combined liver-thoracic transplantation: single-center experience with introduction of the 'Liver-first' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, Laurens J; Strypstein, Sébastien; Neyrinck, Arne; Verleden, Stijn; Ruttens, David; Monbaliu, Diethard; De Leyn, Paul; Vanhaecke, Johan; Meyns, Bart; Nevens, Frederik; Verleden, Geert; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Pirenne, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Combined liver/thoracic transplantation (cLiThTx) is a complex procedure for end-stage/advanced liver and heart(H)/lung(Lu) disease. To avoid futile use of multiple organs in single recipients, results should be scrutinously analyzed. Single-center cLiThTx (04/2000-12/2015) were reviewed for the following: demographics, indications, surgical technique, complications, rejection, and five-year patient survival. Results are reported as median (range). Fourteen consecutive patients underwent cLiThTx: 3 cLiHTx, 10 cLiLuTx, and 1 cLiHLuTx. Recipient age was 42 years (17-63 years). Most frequent indications were cystic fibrosis (n = 5), hepatopulmonary fibrosis (n = 2), amyloidosis (n = 2), and epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma (n = 2). Thoracic organs were transplanted first, except in three where LiTx preceded LuTx. In the latter, lungs were preserved by normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion. Stenting was performed for stenosis of bile duct (n = 4), hepatic artery (n = 2), and bronchus (n = 2). Abdominal interventions were required for bleeding (n = 3), evisceration (n = 1), and adhesiolysis (n = 1). One liver (cLiLuTx) was lost to hepatic artery thrombosis 3 months post-transplant and successfully retransplanted. One patient (cLiHTx) died 4 months post-transplant (myocardial infarction). Follow-up was 4 years (2 months-16 years). One liver and 5 pulmonary rejections occurred, all mild and reversible. Two patients developed bronchiolitis obliterans, one is clinically well 16 years post-transplant, and the other successfully retransplanted. Estimated 5-year patient survival is 90%. CLiThTx is safe with excellent short-/long-term surgical and immunological results. © 2016 Steunstichting ESOT.

  1. Combining Gravitational Wave Events with their Electromagnetic Counterparts: A Realistic Joint False-Alarm Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Team

    2017-01-01

    We present a false-alarm rate for a joint detection of gravitational wave (GW) events and associated electromagnetic (EM) counterparts for Advanced LIGO and Virgo (LV) observations during the first years of operation. Using simulated GW events and their recostructed probability skymaps, we tile over the error regions using sets of archival wide-field telescope survey images and recover the number of astrophysical transients to be expected during LV-EM followup. With the known GW event injection coordinates we inject artificial electromagnetic (EM) sources at that site based on theoretical and observational models on a one-to-one basis. We calculate the EM false-alarm probability using an unsupervised machine learning algorithm based on shapelet analysis which has shown to be a strong discriminator between astrophysical transients and image artifacts while reducing the set of transients to be manually vetted by five orders of magnitude. We also show the performance of our method in context with other machine-learned transient classification and reduction algorithms, showing comparability without the need for a large set of training data opening the possibility for next-generation telescopes to take advantage of this pipeline for LV-EM followup missions.

  2. Investigation of the Airflow inside Realistic and Semi-Realistic Replicas of Human Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizal Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of velocity in human lungs during breathing cycle is a challenging task for researchers, since the measuring location is accessible only with significant difficulties. A special measuring rig consisting of optically transparent replica of human lungs, breathing simulator, particle generator and Laser-Doppler anemometer was developed and used for investigation of the velocity in specific locations of lungs during simulated breathing cycle. Experiments were performed on two different replicas of human lungs in corresponding measuring points to facilitate the analysis of the influence of the geometry and its simplification on the flow. The analysis of velocity course and turbulence intensity revealed that special attention should be devoted to the modelling of vocal cords position during breathing, as the position of laryngeal jet created by vocal cords significantly influences velocity profiles in trachea. The shapes of velocity courses during expiration proved to be consistent for both replicas; however magnitudes of peak expiratory velocity differ between the corresponding measuring points in both the replicas.

  3. A realistic evaluation: the case of protocol-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background 'Protocol based care' was envisioned by policy makers as a mechanism for delivering on the service improvement agenda in England. Realistic evaluation is an increasingly popular approach, but few published examples exist, particularly in implementation research. To fill this gap, within this paper we describe the application of a realistic evaluation approach to the study of protocol-based care, whilst sharing findings of relevance about standardising care through the use of protocols, guidelines, and pathways. Methods Situated between positivism and relativism, realistic evaluation is concerned with the identification of underlying causal mechanisms, how they work, and under what conditions. Fundamentally it focuses attention on finding out what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. Results In this research, we were interested in understanding the relationships between the type and nature of particular approaches to protocol-based care (mechanisms), within different clinical settings (context), and what impacts this resulted in (outcomes). An evidence review using the principles of realist synthesis resulted in a number of propositions, i.e., context, mechanism, and outcome threads (CMOs). These propositions were then 'tested' through multiple case studies, using multiple methods including non-participant observation, interviews, and document analysis through an iterative analysis process. The initial propositions (conjectured CMOs) only partially corresponded to the findings that emerged during analysis. From the iterative analysis process of scrutinising mechanisms, context, and outcomes we were able to draw out some theoretically generalisable features about what works, for whom, how, and what circumstances in relation to the use of standardised care approaches (refined CMOs). Conclusions As one of the first studies to apply realistic evaluation in implementation research, it was a good fit, particularly given the growing emphasis on

  4. Motivational and neural correlates of self-control of eating: A combined neuroimaging and experience sampling study in dieting female college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Richard B.; Milyavskaya, Marina; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation is a critical ability for maintaining a wide range of health behaviors, especially in preventing overeating and weight gain. Previous work has identified various threats to self-control in the eating domain, chief among which are desire strength and negative affect. In the present study, we examined individual differences in college-aged dieters’ experiences of these threats as they encountered temptations to eat in their daily lives, and tested whether these differences characterized sub-groups of dieters with divergent self-control outcomes. Specifically, 75 dieting females (age range: 18-23) participated in a combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and experience sampling study. Participants passively viewed food cues during an fMRI session, and then reported their daily eating behaviors for one week via ecological momentary assessment. We examined the characteristics of dieters who exhibited the most favorable combination of the aforementioned factors (i.e., low desire strength and positive mood) and who were thus most successful at regulating their eating. These dieters endorsed more autonomous reasons for their self-regulatory goals, and during the food cue reactivity task more readily recruited the inferior frontal gyrus, a brain region associated with inhibitory control. We suggest that these motivational and neural correlates may also be implicated in self-regulation of other important health behaviors. PMID:27058281

  5. Precision robotic control of agricultural vehicles on realistic farm trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas

    High-precision "autofarming", or precise agricultural vehicle guidance, is rapidly becoming a reality thanks to increasing computing power and carrier-phase differential GPS ("CPDGPS") position and attitude sensors. Realistic farm trajectories will include not only rows but also arcs created by smoothly joining rows or path-planning algorithms, spirals for farming center-pivot irrigated fields, and curved trajectories dictated by nonlinear field boundaries. In addition, fields are often sloped, and accurate control may be required either on linear trajectories or on curved contours. A three-dimensional vehicle model which adapts to changing vehicle and ground conditions was created, and a low-order model for controller synthesis was extracted based on nominal conditions. The model was extended to include a towed implement. Experimentation showed that an extended Kalman filter could identify the vehicle's state in real-time. An approximation was derived for the additional positional uncertainty introduced by the noisy "lever-arm correction" necessary to translate the GPS position measurement at the roof antenna to the vehicle's control point on the ground; this approximation was then used to support the assertion that attitude measurement accuracy was as important to control point position measurement as the original position measurement accuracy at the GPS antenna. The low-order vehicle control model was transformed to polar coordinates for control on arcs and spirals. Experimental data showed that the tractor's control, point tracked an arc to within a -0.3 cm mean and a 3.4 cm standard deviation and a spiral to within a -0.2 cm mean and a 5.3 cm standard deviation. Cubic splines were used to describe curve trajectories, and a general expression for the time-rate-of-change of curve-related parameters was derived. Four vehicle control algorithms were derived for curve tracking: linear local-error control based on linearizing the vehicle about the curve's radius of

  6. It's About Me: Patients' Experiences of Patient Participation in the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity in Combination With Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Catharina; Michaelson, Peter; Eriksson, Margareta K; Gard, Gunvor

    2017-01-18

    Patients' participation in their health care is recognized as a key component in high-quality health care. Persons with persistent pain are recommended treatments with a cognitive approach from a biopsychosocial explanation of pain, in which a patient's active participation in their rehabilitation is in focus. Web-based interventions for pain management have the potential to increase patient participation by enabling persons to play a more active role in rehabilitation. However, little is known about patients' experiences of patient participation in Web-based interventions in clinical practice. The objective of our study was to explore patients' experiences of patient participation in a Web Behavior Change Program for Activity (Web-BCPA) in combination with multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) among patients with persistent pain in primary health care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 women and 4 men, with a mean age of 45 years. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. One theme, "It's about me," and 4 categories, "Take part in a flexible framework of own priority," "Acquire knowledge and insights," "Ways toward change," and "Personal and environmental conditions influencing participation," were developed. Patient participation was depicted as being confirmed in an individualized and structured rehabilitation framework of one's own choice. Being confirmed was fundamental to patient participation in the interaction with the Web-BCPA and with the health care professionals in MMR. To acquire knowledge and insights about pain and their life situation, through self-reflection in the solitary work in the Web-BCPA and through feedback from the health care professionals in MMR, was experienced as patient participation by the participants. Patient participation was described as structured ways to reach their goals of behavior change, which included analyzing resources and restrictions, problem solving, and evaluation. The individual's emotional and

  7. Towards dense, realistic granular media in 2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The development of an applicable theory for granular matter—with both qualitative and quantitative value—is a challenging prospect, given the multitude of states, phases and (industrial) situations it has to cover. Given the general balance equations for mass, momentum and energy, the limiting case of dilute and almost elastic granular gases, where kinetic theory works perfectly well, is the starting point. In most systems, low density co-exists with very high density, where the latter is an open problem for kinetic theory. Furthermore, many additional nonlinear phenomena and material properties are important in realistic granular media, involving, e.g.: 1. multi-particle interactions and elasticity; 2. strong dissipation,; 3. friction,; 4. long-range forces and wet contacts,; 5. wide particle size distributions and; 6. various particle shapes. Note that, while some of these issues are more relevant for high density, others are important for both low and high densities; some of them can be dealt with by means of kinetic theory, some cannot. This paper is a review of recent progress towards more realistic models for dense granular media in 2D, even though most of the observations, conclusions and corrections given are qualitatively true also in 3D. Starting from an elastic, frictionless and monodisperse hard sphere gas, the (continuum) balance equations of mass, momentum and energy are given. The equation of state, the (Navier–Stokes level) transport coefficients and the energy-density dissipation rate are considered. Several corrections are applied to those constitutive material laws—one by one—in order to account for the realistic physical effects and properties listed above. (invited article)

  8. MetAssimulo:Simulation of Realistic NMR Metabolic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Iorio Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probing the complex fusion of genetic and environmental interactions, metabolic profiling (or metabolomics/metabonomics, the study of small molecules involved in metabolic reactions, is a rapidly expanding 'omics' field. A major technique for capturing metabolite data is 1H-NMR spectroscopy and this yields highly complex profiles that require sophisticated statistical analysis methods. However, experimental data is difficult to control and expensive to obtain. Thus data simulation is a productive route to aid algorithm development. Results MetAssimulo is a MATLAB-based package that has been developed to simulate 1H-NMR spectra of complex mixtures such as metabolic profiles. Drawing data from a metabolite standard spectral database in conjunction with concentration information input by the user or constructed automatically from the Human Metabolome Database, MetAssimulo is able to create realistic metabolic profiles containing large numbers of metabolites with a range of user-defined properties. Current features include the simulation of two groups ('case' and 'control' specified by means and standard deviations of concentrations for each metabolite. The software enables addition of spectral noise with a realistic autocorrelation structure at user controllable levels. A crucial feature of the algorithm is its ability to simulate both intra- and inter-metabolite correlations, the analysis of which is fundamental to many techniques in the field. Further, MetAssimulo is able to simulate shifts in NMR peak positions that result from matrix effects such as pH differences which are often observed in metabolic NMR spectra and pose serious challenges for statistical algorithms. Conclusions No other software is currently able to simulate NMR metabolic profiles with such complexity and flexibility. This paper describes the algorithm behind MetAssimulo and demonstrates how it can be used to simulate realistic NMR metabolic profiles with

  9. Black holes in realistic branes: Black string-like objects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M., E-mail: hoff@feg.unesp.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Roldão da, E-mail: roldao.rocha@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-25

    A realistic model describing a black string-like object in an expanding Universe is analyzed in the context of the McVittie's solution of the Einstein field equations. The bulk metric near the brane is provided analogously to previous solutions for black strings. In particular, we show that at least when the Hubble parameter on the brane is positive, a black string-like object seems to play a fundamental role in the braneworld scenario, generalizing the standard black strings in the context of a dynamical brane.

  10. Scaling up complex interventions: insights from a realist synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Stockton, Lisa; Abramowicz, Aneta; Zummach, Dana; Wong, Geoff; Robinson, Kerry L; Best, Allan

    2016-12-19

    Preventing chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, requires complex interventions, involving multi-component and multi-level efforts that are tailored to the contexts in which they are delivered. Despite an increasing number of complex interventions in public health, many fail to be 'scaled up'. This study aimed to increase understanding of how and under what conditions complex public health interventions may be scaled up to benefit more people and populations.A realist synthesis was conducted and discussed at an in-person workshop involving practitioners responsible for scaling up activities. Realist approaches view causality through the linkages between changes in contexts (C) that activate mechanisms (M), leading to specific outcomes (O) (CMO configurations). To focus this review, three cases of complex interventions that had been successfully scaled up were included: Vibrant Communities, Youth Build USA and Pathways to Education. A search strategy of published and grey literature related to each case was developed, involving searches of relevant databases and nominations from experts. Data extracted from included documents were classified according to CMO configurations within strategic themes. Findings were compared and contrasted with guidance from diffusion theory, and interpreted with knowledge users to identify practical implications and potential directions for future research.Four core mechanisms were identified, namely awareness, commitment, confidence and trust. These mechanisms were activated within two broad scaling up strategies, those of renewing and regenerating, and documenting success. Within each strategy, specific actions to change contexts included building partnerships, conducting evaluations, engaging political support and adapting funding models. These modified contexts triggered the identified mechanisms, leading to a range of scaling up outcomes, such as commitment of new communities, changes in relevant

  11. Building Realistic Mobility Models for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pullin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A mobile ad hoc network (MANET is a self-configuring wireless network in which each node could act as a router, as well as a data source or sink. Its application areas include battlefields and vehicular and disaster areas. Many techniques applied to infrastructure-based networks are less effective in MANETs, with routing being a particular challenge. This paper presents a rigorous study into simulation techniques for evaluating routing solutions for MANETs with the aim of producing more realistic simulation models and thereby, more accurate protocol evaluations. MANET simulations require models that reflect the world in which the MANET is to operate. Much of the published research uses movement models, such as the random waypoint (RWP model, with arbitrary world sizes and node counts. This paper presents a technique for developing more realistic simulation models to test and evaluate MANET protocols. The technique is animation, which is applied to a realistic scenario to produce a model that accurately reflects the size and shape of the world, node count, movement patterns, and time period over which the MANET may operate. The animation technique has been used to develop a battlefield model based on established military tactics. Trace data has been used to build a model of maritime movements in the Irish Sea. Similar world models have been built using the random waypoint movement model for comparison. All models have been built using the ns-2 simulator. These models have been used to compare the performance of three routing protocols: dynamic source routing (DSR, destination-sequenced distance-vector routing (DSDV, and ad hoc n-demand distance vector routing (AODV. The findings reveal that protocol performance is dependent on the model used. In particular, it is shown that RWP models do not reflect the performance of these protocols under realistic circumstances, and protocol selection is subject to the scenario to which it is applied. To

  12. Turbulence studies in tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.; Por, G.D. ter; Rognlien, T.D.; Ryutov, D.D.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Moyer, R.; Groebner, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT and the linearized shooting code BAL for studies of turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the E x B drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters. (author)

  13. Turbulence studies in tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.; Porter, G.D.; Rognlien, T.; Ryutov, D.D.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Moyer, R.; Groebner, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT and the linearized shooting code BAL for studies of turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and nite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters. (author)

  14. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient. (author)

  15. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Uchiyama, J; Yamamoto, T

    2002-01-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient.

  16. Realistic Paleobathymetry of the Cenomanian–Turonian (94 Ma Boundary Global Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Goswami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, global paleoclimate simulations are prepared with bathtub-like, flat, featureless and steep walled ocean bathymetry, which is neither realistic nor suitable. In this article, we present the first enhanced version of a reconstructed paleobathymetry for Cenomanian–Turonian (94 Ma time in a 0.1° × 0.1° resolution, that is both realistic and suitable for use in paleo-climate studies. This reconstruction is an extrapolation of a parameterized modern ocean bathymetry that combines simple geophysical models (standard plate cooling model for the oceanic lithosphere based on ocean crustal age, global modern oceanic sediment thicknesses, and generalized shelf-slope-rise structures calibrated from a published global relief model of the modern world (ETOPO1 at active and passive continental margins. The base version of this Cenomanian–Turonian paleobathymetry reconstruction is then updated with known submarine large igneous provinces, plateaus, and seamounts to minimize the difference between the reconstructed paleobathymetry and the real bathymetry that once existed.

  17. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  18. A Modern Syllogistic Method in Intuitionistic Fuzzy Logic with Realistic Tautology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Muhammad Rushdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Modern Syllogistic Method (MSM of propositional logic ferrets out from a set of premises all that can be concluded from it in the most compact form. The MSM combines the premises into a single function equated to 1 and then produces the complete product of this function. Two fuzzy versions of MSM are developed in Ordinary Fuzzy Logic (OFL and in Intuitionistic Fuzzy Logic (IFL with these logics augmented by the concept of Realistic Fuzzy Tautology (RFT which is a variable whose truth exceeds 0.5. The paper formally proves each of the steps needed in the conversion of the ordinary MSM into a fuzzy one. The proofs rely mainly on the successful replacement of logic 1 (or ordinary tautology by an RFT. An improved version of Blake-Tison algorithm for generating the complete product of a logical function is also presented and shown to be applicable to both crisp and fuzzy versions of the MSM. The fuzzy MSM methodology is illustrated by three specific examples, which delineate differences with the crisp MSM, address the question of validity values of consequences, tackle the problem of inconsistency when it arises, and demonstrate the utility of the concept of Realistic Fuzzy Tautology.

  19. Asymmetric focusing study from twin input power couplers using realistic rf cavity field maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Shemelin, Valery

    2011-03-01

    Advanced simulation codes now exist that can self-consistently solve Maxwell’s equations for the combined system of an rf cavity and a beam bunch. While these simulations are important for a complete understanding of the beam dynamics in rf cavities, they require significant time and computing power. These techniques are therefore not readily included in real time simulations useful to the beam physicist during beam operations. Thus, there exists a need for a simplified algorithm which simulates realistic cavity fields significantly faster than self-consistent codes, while still incorporating enough of the necessary physics to ensure accurate beam dynamics computation. To this end, we establish a procedure for producing realistic field maps using lossless cavity eigenmode field solvers. This algorithm incorporates all relevant cavity design and operating parameters, including beam loading from a nonrelativistic beam. The algorithm is then used to investigate the asymmetric quadrupolelike focusing produced by the input couplers of the Cornell ERL injector cavity for a variety of beam and operating parameters.

  20. Asymmetric focusing study from twin input power couplers using realistic rf cavity field maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced simulation codes now exist that can self-consistently solve Maxwell’s equations for the combined system of an rf cavity and a beam bunch. While these simulations are important for a complete understanding of the beam dynamics in rf cavities, they require significant time and computing power. These techniques are therefore not readily included in real time simulations useful to the beam physicist during beam operations. Thus, there exists a need for a simplified algorithm which simulates realistic cavity fields significantly faster than self-consistent codes, while still incorporating enough of the necessary physics to ensure accurate beam dynamics computation. To this end, we establish a procedure for producing realistic field maps using lossless cavity eigenmode field solvers. This algorithm incorporates all relevant cavity design and operating parameters, including beam loading from a nonrelativistic beam. The algorithm is then used to investigate the asymmetric quadrupolelike focusing produced by the input couplers of the Cornell ERL injector cavity for a variety of beam and operating parameters.

  1. A Modern Syllogistic Method in Intuitionistic Fuzzy Logic with Realistic Tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, Ali Muhammad; Zarouan, Mohamed; Alshehri, Taleb Mansour; Rushdi, Muhammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The Modern Syllogistic Method (MSM) of propositional logic ferrets out from a set of premises all that can be concluded from it in the most compact form. The MSM combines the premises into a single function equated to 1 and then produces the complete product of this function. Two fuzzy versions of MSM are developed in Ordinary Fuzzy Logic (OFL) and in Intuitionistic Fuzzy Logic (IFL) with these logics augmented by the concept of Realistic Fuzzy Tautology (RFT) which is a variable whose truth exceeds 0.5. The paper formally proves each of the steps needed in the conversion of the ordinary MSM into a fuzzy one. The proofs rely mainly on the successful replacement of logic 1 (or ordinary tautology) by an RFT. An improved version of Blake-Tison algorithm for generating the complete product of a logical function is also presented and shown to be applicable to both crisp and fuzzy versions of the MSM. The fuzzy MSM methodology is illustrated by three specific examples, which delineate differences with the crisp MSM, address the question of validity values of consequences, tackle the problem of inconsistency when it arises, and demonstrate the utility of the concept of Realistic Fuzzy Tautology.

  2. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  3. Effects of realistic satellite shielding on SEE rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    Realistic models of satellite shielding have been used to calculate SEE rates for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and solar flare protons. The results are compared with those obtained with a nominal 0.1 inch spherical shield. The rates for GCR (solar minimum) are systematically lower than those calculated with the nominal shield. The ratio of rates is greater than 75% for lightly shielded devices, but may be as high as a factor of two where there is shielding by other circuit boards. A more nearly realistic estimate of the rates would be obtained with a spherical shield with a thickness of at least 0.4 inches (3 gm/cm 2 ) for the typical satellites considered. The calculation of the SEE rate due to protons was reformulated to expedite shielding calculations. When the method was applied to the 93L422 RAM for various flare spectra, it was apparent that shielding has a first order effect on rate predictions. The calculated flare upset rates for the TDRS satellite were within 20% of the observed rates. A spherical shield of thickness 0.3 inches (2 gm/cm 2 ) would reproduce the rates. The method was also applied to a trapped proton environment predicted from standard models for CRRES. The predicted rate was consistent with the uncertainties of the environment

  4. A conceptual ENSO model under realistic noise forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saynisch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of atmospheric noise on the generation of interannual El Niño variability. Therefore, we perturbed a conceptual ENSO delay model with surrogate windstress data generated from tropical windspeed measurements. The effect of the additional stochastic forcing was studied for various parameter sets including periodic and chaotic regimes. The evaluation was based on a spectrum and amplitude-period relation comparison between model and measured sea surface temperature data. The additional forcing turned out to increase the variability of the model output in general. The noise-free model was unable to reproduce the observed spectral bandwidth for any choice of parameters. On the contrary, the stochastically forced model is capable of producing a realistic spectrum. The weakly nonlinear regimes of the model exhibit a proportional relation between amplitude and period matching the relation derived from measurement data. The chaotic regime, however, shows an inversely proportional relation. A stability analysis of the different regimes revealed that the spectra of the weakly nonlinear regimes are robust against slight parameter changes representing disregarded physical mechanisms, whereas the chaotic regime exhibits a very unstable realistic spectrum. We conclude that the model including stochastic forcing in a parameter range of moderate nonlinearity best matches the real conditions. This suggests that atmospheric noise plays an important role in the coupled tropical pacific ocean-atmosphere system.

  5. Toward the classification of the realistic free fermionic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-08-01

    The realistic free fermionic models have had remarkable success in providing plausible explanations for various properties of the Standard Model which include the natural appearance of three generations, the explanation of the heavy top quark mass and the qualitative structure of the fermion mass spectrum in general, the stability of the proton and more. These intriguing achievements makes evident the need to understand the general space of these models. While the number of possibilities is large, general patterns can be extracted. In this paper the author presents a detailed discussion on the construction of the realistic free fermionic models with the aim of providing some insight into the basic structures and building blocks that enter the construction. The role of free phases in the determination of the phenomenology of the models is discussed in detail. The author discusses the connection between the free phases and mirror symmetry in (2,2) models and the corresponding symmetries in the case of (2,0) models. The importance of the free phases in determining the effective low energy phenomenology is illustrated in several examples. The classification of the models in terms of boundary condition selection rules, real world-sheet fermion pairings, exotic matter states and the hidden sector is discussed

  6. Generation of anatomically realistic numerical phantoms for optoacoustic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Appleton, Catherine M.; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Because optoacoustic tomography (OAT) can provide functional information based on hemoglobin contrast, it is a promising imaging modality for breast cancer diagnosis. Developing an effective OAT breast imaging system requires balancing multiple design constraints, which can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, computer- simulation studies are often conducted to facilitate this task. However, most existing computer-simulation studies of OAT breast imaging employ simple phantoms such as spheres or cylinders that over-simplify the complex anatomical structures in breasts, thus limiting the value of these studies in guiding real-world system design. In this work, we propose a method to generate realistic numerical breast phantoms for OAT research based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The phantoms include a skin layer that defines breast-air boundary, major vessel branches that affect light absorption in the breast, and fatty tissue and fibroglandular tissue whose acoustical heterogeneity perturbs acoustic wave propagation. By assigning realistic optical and acoustic parameters to different tissue types, we establish both optic and acoustic breast phantoms, which will be exported into standard data formats for cross-platform usage.

  7. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  8. Combined thoracoscopic and laparoscopic robotic-assisted minimally invasive esophagectomy using a four-arm platform: experience, technique and cautions during early procedure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Rizk, Nabil P; Finley, David J; Bains, Manjit S; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Huang, James; Rusch, Valerie W

    2013-05-01

    This study reports an early, single-institution experience of combined thoracoscopic and laparoscopic robotic-assisted minimally invasive esophagectomy (RAMIE) using a four-arm robotic platform, with special attention given to the pitfalls and complications during procedure development. We conducted a prospective, single-cohort, observational study of patients undergoing RAMIE at a single institution. A total of 21 patients (median age, 62 years [range, 37-83 years]) underwent RAMIE with a four-arm robotic platform (17 by Ivor Lewis and 4 by McKeown). Of the patients, 17 (81%) had a complete (R0) resection, and 16 (76%) received induction treatment, the majority (14/21 [67%]) with combined chemoradiation. The median operative time was 556 min (range, 395-807 min), which decreased to 414 min (range, 405-543 min) for the last 5 cases in the series. The median estimated blood loss was 307 cm(3) (range, 200-500 cm(3)), and the median length of hospital stay was 10 days (range, 7-70 days). The median number of lymph nodes resected was 20 (range, 10-49). Five (24%) patients were converted to open procedures. Five patients (24%) had major complications. One (5%) died of complications on postoperative Day 70, and 3 (14%) had clinically significant anastomotic leaks (Grade II or greater, by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0). Three patients (14%) in this early experience developed airway fistulas. While four-arm RAMIE may offer advantages over standard minimally invasive esophagectomy approaches, its adoption in a structured program, with critical evaluation of adverse events and subsequent adjustment of technique, is paramount to maximize patient safety, minimize complications and improve the conduct of operation early in the learning curve. Particular technical consideration should be given to prevention of airway complications.

  9. Adnexal Masses Treated Using a Combination of the SILS Port and Noncurved Straight Laparoscopic Instruments: Turkish Experience and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polat Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report our experience treating adnexal masses using a combination of the SILS port and straight nonroticulating laparoscopic instruments. Study Design. This prospective feasibility study included 14 women with symptomatic and persistent adnexal masses. Removal of adnexal masses via single-incision laparoscopic surgery using a combination of the SILS port and straight nonroticulating laparoscopic instruments was performed. Results. All of the patients had symptomatic complex adnexal masses. Mean age of the patients was 38.4 years (range: 21–61 years and mean duration of surgery was 71 min (range: 45–130 min. All surgeries were performed using nonroticulating straight laparoscopic instruments. Mean tumor diameter was 6 cm (range: 5–12 cm. All patient pathology reports were benign. None of the patients converted to laparotomy. All the patients were discharged on postoperative d1. Postoperatively, all the patients were satisfied with their incision and cosmetic results. Conclusion. All 14 patients were successfully treated using standard, straight nonroticulating laparoscopic instruments via the SILS port. This procedure can reduce the cost of treatment, which may eventually lead to more widespread use of the SILS port approach. Furthermore, concomitant surgical procedures are possible using this approach. However, properly designed comparative studies with single port and classic laparoscopic surgery are urgently needed.

  10. Design principles and optimal performance for molecular motors under realistic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yuhai; Cao, Yuansheng

    2018-02-01

    The performance of a molecular motor, characterized by its power output and energy efficiency, is investigated in the motor design space spanned by the stepping rate function and the motor-track interaction potential. Analytic results and simulations show that a gating mechanism that restricts forward stepping in a narrow window in configuration space is needed for generating high power at physiologically relevant loads. By deriving general thermodynamics laws for nonequilibrium motors, we find that the maximum torque (force) at stall is less than its theoretical limit for any realistic motor-track interactions due to speed fluctuations. Our study reveals a tradeoff for the motor-track interaction: while a strong interaction generates a high power output for forward steps, it also leads to a higher probability of wasteful spontaneous back steps. Our analysis and simulations show that this tradeoff sets a fundamental limit to the maximum motor efficiency in the presence of spontaneous back steps, i.e., loose-coupling. Balancing this tradeoff leads to an optimal design of the motor-track interaction for achieving a maximum efficiency close to 1 for realistic motors that are not perfectly coupled with the energy source. Comparison with existing data and suggestions for future experiments are discussed.

  11. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  12. Development of a vessel-mimicking material for use in anatomically realistic Doppler flow phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deirdre M; Moran, Carmel M; McNamara, John D; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-05-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol cryogel (PVA-C) is presented as a vessel-mimicking material for use in anatomically realistic Doppler flow phantoms. Three different batches of 10% wt PVA-C containing (i) PVA-C alone, (ii) PVA-C with antibacterial agent and (iii) PVA-C with silicon carbide particles were produced, each with 1-6 freeze-thaw cycles. The resulting PVA-C samples were characterized acoustically (over a range 2.65 to 10.5 MHz) and mechanically to determine the optimum mixture and preparation for mimicking the properties of healthy and diseased arteries found in vivo. This optimum mix was reached with the PVA-C with antibacterial agent sample, prepared after two freeze/thaw cycles, which achieved a speed of sound of 1538 ± 5 m s(-1) and a Young's elastic modulus of 79 ± 11 kPa. This material was used to make a range of anatomically realistic flow phantoms with varying degrees of stenoses, and subsequent flow experiments revealed that higher degrees of stenoses and higher velocities could be achieved without phantom rupturing compared with a phantom containing conventional wall-less vessels. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  13. The German ISS-experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP): The effects of single and combined space flight conditions on mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Thelen, M.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future manned space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. Previous space flight experiments gave contradictory results: from inhibition of DNA repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. At the Radiation Biology Department of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), recombinant bacterial and mammalian cell systems were developed as reporters for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The space experiment “Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space” (CERASP) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) will make use of such reporter cell lines thereby supplying basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological endpoints will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP). A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized d2EGFP variant. The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumor genesis. Results obtained with X-rays and accelerated heavy ions produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL imply that densely ionizing radiation has a stronger potential to activate NF-κB dependent gene expression than sparsely ionizing radiation. The correlation of NF-κB activation to negative regulation of apoptosis could favor

  14. High-precision absolute distance measurement using dual-laser frequency scanned interferometry under realistic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.-J.; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report on new high-precision absolute distance measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distances were determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the frequencies of the two chopped lasers. High-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometers were used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Dual lasers with oppositely scanning directions, combined with a multi-distance-measurement technique previously reported, were used to cancel drift errors and to suppress vibration effects and interference fringe uncertainties. Under realistic conditions, a precision about 0.2μm was achieved for a distance of 0.41m. With a precision that exceeds requirements, the frequency scanned interferometry is a promising high-precision optical alignment technique for International Linear Collider silicon tracker detector

  15. A Fibrocontractive Mechanochemical Model of Dermal Wound Closure Incorporating Realistic Growth Factor Kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Murphy, Kelly E.

    2012-01-13

    Fibroblasts and their activated phenotype, myofibroblasts, are the primary cell types involved in the contraction associated with dermal wound healing. Recent experimental evidence indicates that the transformation from fibroblasts to myofibroblasts involves two distinct processes: The cells are stimulated to change phenotype by the combined actions of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and mechanical tension. This observation indicates a need for a detailed exploration of the effect of the strong interactions between the mechanical changes and growth factors in dermal wound healing. We review the experimental findings in detail and develop a model of dermal wound healing that incorporates these phenomena. Our model includes the interactions between TGFβ and collagenase, providing a more biologically realistic form for the growth factor kinetics than those included in previous mechanochemical descriptions. A comparison is made between the model predictions and experimental data on human dermal wound healing and all the essential features are well matched. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  16. An overview of the combined second sage iii ozone loss and validation experiment (solve-ii) and the validations of international ozone loss - european polar stratospheric cloud and lee wave experiment (vintersol-euplex)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P.; Stroh, F.; Solve-Ii / Vintersol-Euplex Science Teams

    2003-04-01

    The SOLVE II/VINTERSOL-EUPLEX Field mission was an international field campaign designed to investigate polar ozone loss, polar stratospheric clouds, processes that lead to ozone loss, the dynamics of the polar stratosphere, and to acquire correlative data needed to validate satellite measurements of the polar stratosphere. The campaign was staged over the course of the winter of 2002-2003. Measurements were made from both aircraft (the NASA DC-8, the DLR Falcon, and the Russian M55 Geophysica), ozonesondes and other balloon payloads, ground-based instruments, and satellites. In particular SOLVE-II was designed to validate the Meteor-3M/Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III satellite mission. In this presentation we will review the overall objectives of the combined campaigns, discuss some of the broad observations of the winter of 2002-2003, and highlight the major findings of this campaign.

  17. Agribusiness: The Realistic Learning Center for Postsecondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Thomas; Fog, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Student work experience programs using the facilities and environment of cooperating businesses to provide opportunities for teaching and learning are used at the University of Minnesota Technical College. These experiences include a quarter of work experience in agribusiness, a specialized work experience program, and directed study experiences…

  18. Radioactive waste management in Brazil: a realistic view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Perez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present a realistic view of the main issues related to the management of radioactive waste in Brazil as well as a comprehensive picture of the regulatory waste management status in the country and internationally. Technical aspects that must be considered to ensure a safe construction of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste of low and medium levels of radiation are addressed. Different types of deposits, the basic regulatory issues involving the licensing of these facilities, the development of a financial compensation model for the Brazilian Municipalities where deposits are to be placed, the importance of the participation of the scientific community and society in the process of radioactive waste site selection and disposal, guidance for the application of the basic requirements of safety and radiation protection, the general safety aspects involved and the current actions for the disposal of radioactive waste in Brazil are highlighted. (author)

  19. Human Hibernation for Space Flight - Utopistic Vision or Realistic Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D.

    Slowing-down the ageing process and prolongation of our life-times have been dreams of mankind for a very long time. Nowadays, in the age of expeditions to space, reduction of energetic needs has become a more practical goal, as it could help in the exploration of extraterrestrial destinations which otherwise, due to their huge distance away from earth and to the insufficient velocity of space vehicles, would be out of human reach [1]. Even though this might seem somewhat utopistic, the new goal gives reason to reconsider the current knowledge on metabolic reduction in nature and to adopt a realistic view of the degree of hypometabolism which might be achievable in humans. In the following, two aspects of this problem will be reviewed: first, the theoretical (biological) position of human adults among hibernating and non- hibernating mammals, and second, the practical (clinical) attempts to make humans hypometabolic.

  20. High-definition displays for realistic simulator and trainer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.; Beyer, Steve; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1998-09-01

    Current flight simulators and trainers do not provide acceptable levels of visual display performance (performance that would allow ground based trainers to economically replace aircraft flying training) for many air-to-air and air-to- ground training scenarios. Ground training for pilots could be made significantly more realistic, allowing the ground-based curricula to be enlarged. The enhanced ground based training could then more readily augment actual aircraft flying (training) time. This paper presents the technology need and opportunity to create a new class of immersive simulator- trainer systems having some 210 million pixels characterized especially by a 20-20 visual acuity synthetic vision system having some 150 million pixels. The same new display technology base is needed for planned crew stations for uninhabited combat air vehicles (UCAV), advanced aircraft cockpits and mission crewstations, and for the space plane.

  1. Radioactive waste management in Brazil: a realistic view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Perez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador, E-mail: paulo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jperez@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Xavier, Ana Maria, E-mail: axavier@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (ESPOA/CNEN-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this article is to present a realistic view of the main issues related to the management of radioactive waste in Brazil as well as a comprehensive picture of the regulatory waste management status in the country and internationally. Technical aspects that must be considered to ensure a safe construction of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste of low and medium levels of radiation are addressed. Different types of deposits, the basic regulatory issues involving the licensing of these facilities, the development of a financial compensation model for the Brazilian Municipalities where deposits are to be placed, the importance of the participation of the scientific community and society in the process of radioactive waste site selection and disposal, guidance for the application of the basic requirements of safety and radiation protection, the general safety aspects involved and the current actions for the disposal of radioactive waste in Brazil are highlighted. (author)

  2. Realistic finite temperature simulations of magnetic systems using quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We have performed realistic atomistic simulations at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo and atomistic spin dynamics simulations incorporating quantum (Bose-Einstein) statistics. The description is much improved at low temperatures compared to classical (Boltzmann) statistics normally used in these kind of simulations, while at higher temperatures the classical statistics are recovered. This corrected low-temperature description is reflected in both magnetization and the magnetic specific heat, the latter allowing for improved modeling of the magnetic contribution to free energies. A central property in the method is the magnon density of states at finite temperatures, and we have compared several different implementations for obtaining it. The method has no restrictions regarding chemical and magnetic order of the considered materials. This is demonstrated by applying the method to elemental ferromagnetic systems, including Fe and Ni, as well as Fe-Co random alloys and the ferrimagnetic system GdFe3.

  3. Realistic electrostatic potentials in a neutron star crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, Claudio; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We study the electrostatic properties of inhomogeneous nuclear matter which can be formed in the crusts of neutron stars or in supernova explosions. Such matter is represented by Wigner–Seitz cells of different geometries (spherical, cylindrical, cartesian), which contain nuclei, free neutrons and electrons under the conditions of electrical neutrality. Using the Thomas–Fermi approximation, we have solved the Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential and calculated the corresponding electron density distributions in individual cells. The calculations are done for different shapes and sizes of the cells and different average baryon densities. The electron-to-baryon fraction was fixed at 0.3. Using realistic electron distributions leads to a significant reduction in electrostatic energy and electron chemical potential. (paper)

  4. Using Concrete and Realistic Data in Evaluating Initial Visualization Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Pedersen, Jeppe Gerner; Herdal, Thor

    2016-01-01

    We explore means of designing and evaluating initial visualization ideas, with concrete and realistic data in cases where data is not readily available. Our approach is useful in exploring new domains and avenues for visualization, and contrasts other visualization work, which typically operate...... under the assumption that data has already been collected, and is ready to be visualized. We argue that it is sensible to understand data requirements and evaluate the potential value of visualization before devising means of automatic data collection. We base our exploration on three cases selected...... the design case and problem, the manner in which we collected data, and the findings obtained from evaluations. Afterwards, we describe four factors of our data collection approach, and discuss potential outcomes from it....

  5. Realistically Rendering SoC Traffic Patterns with Interrupt Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angiolini, Frederico; Mahadevan, Sharkar; Madsen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    In Multi-Processor System-on-Chip (MPSoC) design stages, accurate modeling of IP behaviour is crucial to analyze interconnect effectiveness. However, parallel development of components may cause IP core models to be still unavailable when tuning communication performance. Traditionally, synthetic...... to generate realistic test traffic. This paper presents a selection of applications using interrupt-based synchronization; a reference methodology to split such applications in execution subflows and to adjust the overall execution stream based upon hardware events; a reactive simulation device capable...... of correctly replicating such software behaviours in the MPSoC design phase. Additionally, we validate the proposed concept by showing cycle-accurate reproduction of a previously traced application flow....

  6. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    ICIC configuration leads to modest gains, whereas the set of proposed fast dynamic eICIC algorithms result in capacity gains on the order of 35-120% depending on the local environment characteristics. These attractive gains together with the simplicity of the proposed solutions underline the practical relevance...... area. Rather than the classical semi-static and network-wise configuration, the importance of having highly dynamic and distributed mechanisms that are able to adapt to local environment conditions is revealed. We propose two promising cell association algorithms: one aiming at pure load balancing...... and an opportunistic approach exploiting the varying cell conditions. Moreover, an autonomous fast distributed muting algorithm is presented, which is simple, robust, and well suited for irregular network deployments. Performance results for realistic network deployments show that the traditional semi-static e...

  7. Supersymmetry and light quark masses in a realistic superstring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halyo, Edi.

    1993-10-01

    We examine the light quark masses in a standard-like superstring model in the four dimensional free fermionic formulation. We find that the supersymmetry constraints in the observable and hidden sectors eliminate all large contributions to m u and m d and force them to be much smaller than the other quark masses. The requirement for an acceptable Higgs doublet spectrum results in m u d . In these models a realistic m d can always be obtained whereas m u is at most 10 -5 MeV. For particular choices on flat direction or vacua m u can be as small as 10 -7 MeV but cannot vanish. (author) 15 refs, 2 tabs

  8. Finite Time Blowup in a Realistic Food-Chain Model

    KAUST Repository

    Parshad, Rana

    2013-05-19

    We investigate a realistic three-species food-chain model, with generalist top predator. The model based on a modified version of the Leslie-Gower scheme incorporates mutual interference in all the three populations and generalizes several other known models in the ecological literature. We show that the model exhibits finite time blowup in certain parameter range and for large enough initial data. This result implies that finite time blowup is possible in a large class of such three-species food-chain models. We propose a modification to the model and prove that the modified model has globally existing classical solutions, as well as a global attractor. We reconstruct the attractor using nonlinear time series analysis and show that it pssesses rich dynamics, including chaos in certain parameter regime, whilst avoiding blowup in any parameter regime. We also provide estimates on its fractal dimension as well as provide numerical simulations to visualise the spatiotemporal chaos.

  9. Realistic 3D resistive MHD calculations on the CRAY-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.R.; Carreras, B.

    1979-01-01

    CPU times for nonlinear resistive MHD calculations are very strongly dependent on the input variables. Although some regions of parameter space can be studied very cheaply, the conditions that correspond to Tokamak plasmas are extremely time consuming to study. Unfortunately, it is not possible to extrapolate reliably from the easy cases to the interesting regime. In recent years we have improved the efficiency of our codes by two orders of magnitude. As a result it is now feasible for us to run some realistic Tokamak cases on a CDC 7600. An additional factor of four reduction in run time is obtained by going to the CRAY-1 where the most time consuming routines are vectorized. This last factor makes a program of systematic studies feasible

  10. Ultra-Reliable Communications in Failure-Prone Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Lauridsen, Mads; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential of different diversity and interference management techniques to achieve the required downlink SINR outage probability for ultra-reliable communications. The evaluation is performed in a realistic network deployment based on site-specific data from a European capital....... Micro and macroscopic diversity techniques are proved to be important enablers of ultra-reliable communications. Particularly, it is shown how a 4x4 MIMO scheme with three orders of macroscopic diversity can achieve the required SINR outage performance. Smaller gains are obtained from interference...... cancellation, since this technique does not increase the diversity order of the desired signal. In addition, failures or malfunction of the cellular infrastructure are analysed. Among different types of failures evaluated, results show that failures spanning over large geographical areas can have a significant...

  11. Magnetic exchange at realistic CoO/Ni interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsiuk, Sergii

    2012-07-30

    We study the CoO/Ni interface by first principles calculations. Because the lattice mismatch is large, a realistic description requires a huge supercell. We investigate two interface configurations: in interface 1 the coupling between the Ni and Co atoms is mediated by O, whereas in interface 2 the Ni and Co atoms are in direct contact. We find that the magnetization (including the orbital moment) in interface 1 has a similar value as in bulk Ni but opposite sign, while in interface 2 it grows by 164%. The obtained magnetic moments can be explained by the local atomic environments. In addition, we find effects of charge transfer between the interface atoms. The Co 3d local density of states of interface 2 exhibits surprisingly small deviations from the corresponding bulk result, although the first coordination sphere is no longer octahedral. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  12. Recovering the quantum formalism from physically realist axioms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffèves, Alexia; Grangier, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    We present a heuristic derivation of Born’s rule and unitary transforms in Quantum Mechanics, from a simple set of axioms built upon a physical phenomenology of quantization. This approach naturally leads to the usual quantum formalism, within a new realistic conceptual framework that is discussed in details. Physically, the structure of Quantum Mechanics appears as a result of the interplay between the quantized number of “modalities” accessible to a quantum system, and the continuum of “contexts” that are required to define these modalities. Mathematically, the Hilbert space structure appears as a consequence of a specific “extra-contextuality” of modalities, closely related to the hypothesis of Gleason’s theorem, and consistent with its conclusions.

  13. Realistic limitations of detecting planets around young active stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfield D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current planet hunting methods using the radial velocity method are limited to observing middle-aged main-sequence stars where the signatures of stellar activity are much less than on young stars that have just arrived on the main-sequence. In this work we apply our knowledge from the surface imaging of these young stars to place realistic limitations on the possibility of detecting orbiting planets. In general we find that the magnitude of the stellar jitter is directly proportional to the stellar vsini. For G and K dwarfs, we find that it is possible, for models with high stellar activity and low stellar vsini, to be able to detect a 1 MJupiter mass planet within 50 epochs of observations and for the M dwarfs it is possible to detect a habitable zone Earth-like planet in 10s of observational epochs.

  14. Rapid Method Development in Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography for Pharmaceutical Analysis Using a Combination of Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationships and Design of Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraji, Maryam; Haddad, Paul R; Amos, Ruth I J; Talebi, Mohammad; Szucs, Roman; Dolan, John W; Pohl, Chris A

    2017-02-07

    A design-of-experiment (DoE) model was developed, able to describe the retention times of a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) under all possible combinations of acetonitrile content, salt concentration, and mobile-phase pH with R 2 > 0.95. Further, a quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) model was developed to predict retention times for new analytes, based only on their chemical structures, with a root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) as low as 0.81%. A compound classification based on the concept of similarity was applied prior to QSRR modeling. Finally, we utilized a combined QSRR-DoE approach to propose an optimal design space in a quality-by-design (QbD) workflow to facilitate the HILIC method development. The mathematical QSRR-DoE model was shown to be highly predictive when applied to an independent test set of unseen compounds in unseen conditions with a RMSEP value of 5.83%. The QSRR-DoE computed retention time of pharmaceutical test analytes and subsequently calculated separation selectivity was used to optimize the chromatographic conditions for efficient separation of targets. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the risk of uncertainty in the model's prediction, and to define the design space where the desired quality criterion was met. Experimental realization of peak selectivity between targets under the selected optimal working conditions confirmed the theoretical predictions. These results demonstrate how discovery of optimal conditions for the separation of new analytes can be accelerated by the use of appropriate theoretical tools.

  15. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers: behaviour under realistic disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners, London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste (HLW) forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. In this final stage of the project, analysis of an HLW overpack of realistic design is performed to predict its behaviour when subjected to likely repository loads. This analysis work is undertaken with the benefit of experience gained in previous phases of the project in which the ability to accurately predict overpack behaviour, when subjected to a uniform external pressure, was demonstrated. Burial in clay, granite and salt environments has been considered and two distinct loading arrangements identified, in an attempt to represent the worst conditions that could be imposed by such media. The analysis successfully demonstrates the ability of the containers to withstand extreme, yet credible, repository loads

  16. Dipole response in neutron-rich nuclei within self-consistent approaches using realistic potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Iudice N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A nucleon-nucleon chiral potential with a corrective density dependent term simulating a three-body force is used in a self-consistent calculation of the dipole strength distribution in neutron-rich nuclei, with special attention to the low-lying spectra associated to the pygmy resonance. A Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov basis is generated and adopted in Tamm-Dancoff and random-phase approximations and, then, in an equation of motion approach which includes a basis of two-phonon states. The direct use of the mentioned chiral potential improves the description of both giant and pygmy dipole modes with respect to other realistic interactions. Moreover, the inclusion of the two-phonon states induces a pronounced fragmentation of the giant resonance and enhances the density of the low-lying levels in the pygmy region in agreement with recent experiments.

  17. Characteristics of 454 pyrosequencing data--enabling realistic simulation with flowsim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Susanne; Malde, Ketil; Lanzén, Anders; Sharma, Animesh; Jonassen, Inge

    2010-09-15

    The commercial launch of 454 pyrosequencing in 2005 was a milestone in genome sequencing in terms of performance and cost. Throughout the three available releases, average read lengths have increased to approximately 500 base pairs and are thus approaching read lengths obtained from traditional Sanger sequencing. Study design of sequencing projects would benefit from being able to simulate experiments. We explore 454 raw data to investigate its characteristics and derive empirical distributions for the flow values generated by pyrosequencing. Based on our findings, we implement Flowsim, a simulator that generates realistic pyrosequencing data files of arbitrary size from a given set of input DNA sequences. We finally use our simulator to examine the impact of sequence lengths on the results of concrete whole-genome assemblies, and we suggest its use in planning of sequencing projects, benchmarking of assembly methods and other fields. Flowsim is freely available under the General Public License from http://blog.malde.org/index.php/flowsim/.

  18. Optimized slice-selective 1H NMR experiments combined with highly accurate quantitative 13C NMR using an internal reference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, Tangi; Silvestre, Virginie; Dinis, Katy; Giraudeau, Patrick; Akoka, Serge

    2018-04-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR spectrometry (irm-13C NMR) provides the complete 13C intramolecular position-specific composition at natural abundance. It represents a powerful tool to track the (bio)chemical pathway which has led to the synthesis of targeted molecules, since it allows Position-specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA). Due to the very small composition range (which represents the range of variation of the isotopic composition of a given nuclei) of 13C natural abundance values (50‰), irm-13C NMR requires a 1‰ accuracy and thus highly quantitative analysis by 13C NMR. Until now, the conventional strategy to determine the position-specific abundance xi relies on the combination of irm-MS (isotopic ratio monitoring Mass Spectrometry) and 13C quantitative NMR. However this approach presents a serious drawback since it relies on two different techniques and requires to measure separately the signal of all the carbons of the analyzed compound, which is not always possible. To circumvent this constraint, we recently proposed a new methodology to perform 13C isotopic analysis using an internal reference method and relying on NMR only. The method combines a highly quantitative 1H NMR pulse sequence (named DWET) with a 13C isotopic NMR measurement. However, the recently published DWET sequence is unsuited for samples with short T1, which forms a serious limitation for irm-13C NMR experiments where a relaxing agent is added. In this context, we suggest two variants of the DWET called Multi-WET and Profiled-WET, developed and optimized to reach the same accuracy of 1‰ with a better immunity towards T1 variations. Their performance is evaluated on the determination of the 13C isotopic profile of vanillin. Both pulse sequences show a 1‰ accuracy with an increased robustness to pulse miscalibrations compared to the initial DWET method. This constitutes a major advance in the context of irm-13C NMR since it is now possible to perform isotopic analysis with high

  19. Patients' and therapists' experiences with a new treatment programme for eating disorders that combines physical exercise and dietary therapy: the PED-t trial. A qualitative study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Gunn; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Bakland, Maria; Wynn, Rolf; Mathisen, Therese Fostervold; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn

    2018-01-08

    Women with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder often suffer for many years before they seek professional help. Evidence-based treatments like cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) might be poorly accessible, and about 50% of those who receive CBT respond to it. Such outcome may reflect the heterogeneous nature of eating disorders, and addressing this heterogeneity calls for expanding the portfolio of treatment options. In particular, it is important to explore such options' acceptability, tolerability and affordability expressed through experiences with the treatment. This protocol outlines the rationale and design of a qualitative study. It captures experiences from patients and therapists who were involved in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) exploring the efficacy of a new group-based treatment programme combining physical exercise and dietary therapy. 15 patients with bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder, 10 therapists (physical trainers and dietitians) and 6-10 patients who dropped out of the RCT will be semistructurally interviewed. All interviews will be analysed using a systematic text condensation approach. Results will be presented in peer-reviewed international journals, and at relevant international conferences. Key findings will be available to study participants as well as to patient organisations and health authorities. The overall study meets the intent and requirements of the Health Research Act and the Declaration of Helsinki. It is approved by the regional committee for medical research ethics (2013/1871). NCT02079935; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Effective realistic interactions for low momentum Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials are an essential ingredient of modern microscopic many-body calculations. These potentials can be represented in two different ways: operator representation or matrix element representation. In operator representation the potential is represented by a set of quantum mechanical operators while in matrix element representation it is defined by the matrix elements in a given basis. Many modern potentials are constructed directly in matrix element representation. While the matrix element representation can be calculated from the operator representation, the determination of the operator representation from the matrix elements is more difficult. Some methods to solve the nuclear many-body problem, such as Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) or the Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) method, however require explicitly the operator representation of the potential, as they do not work in a fixed many-body basis. It is therefore desirable to derive an operator representation also for the interactions given by matrix elements. In this work a method is presented which allows the derivation of an approximate operator representation starting from the momentum space partial wave matrix elements of the interaction. For that purpose an ansatz for the operator representation is chosen. The parameters in the ansatz are determined by a fit to the partial wave matrix elements. Since a perfect reproduction of the matrix elements in general cannot be achieved with a finite number of operators and the quality of the results depends on the choice of the ansatz, the obtained operator representation is tested in nuclear many-body calculations and the results are compared with those from the initial interaction matrix elements. For the calculation of the nucleon-nucleon scattering phase shifts and the deuteron properties a computer code written within this work is used. For larger nuclei the No Core Shell Model (NCSM) and FMD are applied. The described

  2. The 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    The ATLAS CTB Team, .

    2004-01-01

    In the year 2004, ATLAS has been involved in a huge combined test beam (CTB) effort in H8. A complete slice of the barrel detector and of the Muon End-cap has been tested, with the following clear goals: pre-commission the final elements and study the detector performance in a realistic combined data taking. Thanks to this experience, a lot of expertise in the operations has been acquired and much data (~ 4.6 TB of data, ~ 90 million events on castor) has been collected and is already under analysis. The CTB has been characterized by different phases with an incremental presence of sub-detectors modules and associated DAQ infrastructure, as well as incremental improvement of analysis tools for prompt data certification. The physics goals of the CTB have been defined in consultation with the physics coordinator, all the sub-detector representatives and the combined performance group representative. With all these indications, a detailed run plan day-by-day schedule was defined before the CTB start and was foll...

  3. Factors influencing intercultural doctor-patient communication: a realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, Emma; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Lee, Nadine; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-04-01

    Due to migration, doctors see patients from different ethnic backgrounds. This causes challenges for the communication. To develop training programs for doctors in intercultural communication (ICC), it is important to know which barriers and facilitators determine the quality of ICC. This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature and to explore how ICC works. A systematic search was performed to find literature published before October 2012. The search terms used were cultural, communication, healthcare worker. A realist synthesis allowed us to use an explanatory focus to understand the interplay of communication. In total, 145 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found ICC challenges due to language, cultural and social differences, and doctors' assumptions. The mechanisms were described as factors influencing the process of ICC and divided into objectives, core skills and specific skills. The results were synthesized in a framework for the development of training. The quality of ICC is influenced by the context and by the mechanisms. These mechanisms translate into practical points for training, which seem to have similarities with patient-centered communication. Training for improving ICC can be developed as an extension of the existing training for patient-centered communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Urban renewal, gentrification and health equity: a realist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipanah, Roshanak; Marra, Giulia; Melis, Giulia; Gelormino, Elena

    2018-04-01

    Up to now, research has focused on the effects of urban renewal programs and their impacts on health. While some of this research points to potential negative health effects due to gentrification, evidence that addresses the complexity associated with this relation is much needed. This paper seeks to better understand when, why and how health inequities arise from urban renewal interventions resulting in gentrification. A realist review, a qualitative systematic review method, aimed to better explain the relation between context, mechanism and outcomes, was used. A literature search was done to identify theoretical models of how urban renewal programs can result in gentrification, which in turn could have negative impacts on health. A systematic approach was then used to identify peer-reviewed studies that provided evidence to support or refute the initial assumptions. Urban renewal programs that resulted in gentrification tended to have negative health effects primarily in residents that were low-income. Urban renewal policies that were inclusive of populations that are vulnerable, from the beginning were less likely to result in gentrification and more likely to positively impact health through physical and social improvements. Research has shown urban renewal policies have significant impacts on populations that are vulnerable and those that result in gentrification can result in negative health consequences for this population. A better understanding of this is needed to impact future policies and advocate for a community-participatory model that includes such populations in the early planning stages.

  5. Dimensioning of Signalized Intersections in Realistic Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Dobovšek

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available It is very complex to assure the dynamics of traffic networkin urban environment because of the intensity of traffic flowsand the limited space in the urban area. Signalized intersectionsare undoubtedly very important and frequent element inroad traffic network in urban regions, which greatly influencesthe traffic flow dynamics on each section as in the whole trafficnetwork. The time (delay a vehicle needs to drive through anintersection directly influences the travel comfort, fuel consumption,traffic pollution and so on. There are many methodsfor dimensioning signalized intersections in the world literature.One of the most applied methods is the HIGHWAY CAPACI1YMANUAL (HCM 2000 which is based on competentinput traffic flows and other characteristics of traffic signalregulations. The intention of this paper is to establish whetherwe can use the HCM 2000 method directly in the Slovenian realenvironment. Based on the established methodology of researchand limited number of delay measurement in real environmentintersections, there have been some deviations. Thecompletion of the level of service criterion for signalized intersectionshas been proposed, with the intention for more suitabilityestimation in the realistic environment.

  6. Atomistic simulations of graphite etching at realistic time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussems, D U B; Bal, K M; Morgan, T W; van de Sanden, M C M; Neyts, E C

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogen-graphite interactions are relevant to a wide variety of applications, ranging from astrophysics to fusion devices and nano-electronics. In order to shed light on these interactions, atomistic simulation using Molecular Dynamics (MD) has been shown to be an invaluable tool. It suffers, however, from severe time-scale limitations. In this work we apply the recently developed Collective Variable-Driven Hyperdynamics (CVHD) method to hydrogen etching of graphite for varying inter-impact times up to a realistic value of 1 ms, which corresponds to a flux of ∼10 20 m -2 s -1 . The results show that the erosion yield, hydrogen surface coverage and species distribution are significantly affected by the time between impacts. This can be explained by the higher probability of C-C bond breaking due to the prolonged exposure to thermal stress and the subsequent transition from ion- to thermal-induced etching. This latter regime of thermal-induced etching - chemical erosion - is here accessed for the first time using atomistic simulations. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that accounting for long time-scales significantly affects ion bombardment simulations and should not be neglected in a wide range of conditions, in contrast to what is typically assumed.

  7. Uncovering gender discrimination cues in a realistic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis-Roy, Nicolas; Fortin, Isabelle; Fiset, Daniel; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2009-02-10

    Which face cues do we use for gender discrimination? Few studies have tried to answer this question and the few that have tried typically used only a small set of grayscale stimuli, often distorted and presented a large number of times. Here, we reassessed the importance of facial cues for gender discrimination in a more realistic setting. We applied Bubbles-a technique that minimizes bias toward specific facial features and does not necessitate the distortion of stimuli-to a set of 300 color photographs of Caucasian faces, each presented only once to 30 participants. Results show that the region of the eyes and the eyebrows-probably in the light-dark channel-is the most important facial cue for accurate gender discrimination; and that the mouth region is driving fast correct responses (but not fast incorrect responses)-the gender discrimination information in the mouth region is concentrated in the red-green color channel. Together, these results suggest that, when color is informative in the mouth region, humans use it and respond rapidly; and, when it's not informative, they have to rely on the more robust but more sluggish luminance information in the eye-eyebrow region.

  8. Applying a realistic evaluation model to occupational safety interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recent literature characterizes occupational safety interventions as complex social activities, applied in complex and dynamic social systems. Hence, the actual outcomes of an intervention will vary, depending on the intervention, the implementation process, context, personal characte......Background: Recent literature characterizes occupational safety interventions as complex social activities, applied in complex and dynamic social systems. Hence, the actual outcomes of an intervention will vary, depending on the intervention, the implementation process, context, personal...... characteristics of key actors (defined mechanisms), and the interplay between them, and can be categorized as expected or unexpected. However, little is known about ’how’ to include context and mechanisms in evaluations of intervention effectiveness. A revised realistic evaluation model has been introduced...... and qualitative methods. This revised model has, however, not been applied in a real life context. Method: The model is applied in a controlled, four-component, integrated behaviour-based and safety culture-based safety intervention study (2008-2010) in a medium-sized wood manufacturing company. The interventions...

  9. Towards realistic string vacua from branes at singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    We report on progress towards constructing string models incorporating both realistic D-brane matter content and moduli stabilisation with dynamical low-scale supersymmetry breaking. The general framework is that of local D-brane models embedded into the LARGE volume approach to moduli stabilisation. We review quiver theories on del Pezzo n (dPn) singularities including both D3 and D7 branes. We provide supersymmetric examples with three quark/lepton families and the gauge symmetries of the Standard, Left-Right Symmetric, Pati-Salam and Trinification models, without unwanted chiral exotics. We describe how the singularity structure leads to family symmetries governing the Yukawa couplings which may give mass hierarchies among the different generations. We outline how these models can be embedded into compact Calabi-Yau compactifications with LARGE volume moduli stabilisation, and state the minimal conditions for this to be possible. We study the general structure of soft supersymmetry breaking. At the singularity all leading order contributions to the soft terms (both gravity- and anomaly-mediation) vanish. We enumerate subleading contributions and estimate their magnitude. We also describe model-independent physical implications of this scenario. These include the masses of anomalous and non-anomalous U(1)'s and the generic existence of a new hyperweak force under which leptons and/or quarks could be charged. We propose that such a gauge boson could be responsible for the ghost muon anomaly recently found at the Tevatron's CDF detector.

  10. From Delivery to Adoption of Physical Activity Guidelines: Realist Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Liliana; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-10-08

    Evidence-based guidelines published by health authorities for the promotion of health-enhancing physical activity (PA), continue to be implemented unsuccessfully and demonstrate a gap between evidence and policies. This review synthesizes evidence on factors influencing delivery, adoption and implementation of PA promotion guidelines within different policy sectors (e.g., health, transport, urban planning, sport, education). Published literature was initially searched using PubMed, EBSCO, Google Scholar and continued through an iterative snowball technique. The literature review spanned the period 2002-2017. The realist synthesis approach was adopted to review the content of 39 included studies. An initial programme theory with a four-step chain from evidence emersion to implementation of guidelines was tested. The synthesis furthers our understanding of the link between PA guidelines delivery and the actions of professionals responsible for implementation within health services, school departments and municipalities. The main mechanisms identified for guidance implementation were scientific legitimation, enforcement, feasibility, familiarity with concepts and PA habits. Threats emerged to the successful implementation of PA guidelines at national/local jurisdictional levels. The way PA guidelines are developed may influence their adoption by policy-makers and professionals. Useful lessons emerged that may inform synergies between policymaking and professional practices, promoting win-win multisectoral strategies.

  11. A realistic 3+1D Viscous Hydro Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romatschke, Paul [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-05-31

    DoE funds were used as bridge funds for the faculty position for the PI at the University of Colorado. The total funds for the Years 3-5 of the JET Topical Collaboration amounted to about 50 percent of the academic year salary of the PI.The PI contributed to the JET Topical Collaboration by developing, testing and applying algorithms for a realistic simulation of the bulk medium created in relativistic ion collisions.Specifically, two approaches were studied, one based on a new Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) framework, and one on a more traditional viscous hydro-dynamics framework. Both approaches were found to be viable in principle, with the LB approach being more elegant but needing still more time to develop.The traditional approach led to the super-hybrid model of ion collisions dubbed 'superSONIC', and has been successfully used for phenomenology of relativistic heavy-ion and light-on-heavy-ion collisions.In the time-frame of the JET Topical Collaboration, the Colorado group has published 15 articles in peer-reviewed journals, three of which were published in Physical Review Letters. The group graduated one Master student during this time-frame and two more PhD students are expected to graduate in the next few years. The PI has given more than 28 talks and presentations during this period.

  12. Bayesian inversion using a geologically realistic and discrete model space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggli, C.; Julien, S.; Renard, P.

    2017-12-01

    Since the early days of groundwater modeling, inverse methods play a crucial role. Many research and engineering groups aim to infer extensive knowledge of aquifer parameters from a sparse set of observations. Despite decades of dedicated research on this topic, there are still several major issues to be solved. In the hydrogeological framework, one is often confronted with underground structures that present very sharp contrasts of geophysical properties. In particular, subsoil structures such as karst conduits, channels, faults, or lenses, strongly influence groundwater flow and transport behavior of the underground. For this reason it can be essential to identify their location and shape very precisely. Unfortunately, when inverse methods are specially trained to consider such complex features, their computation effort often becomes unaffordably high. The following work is an attempt to solve this dilemma. We present a new method that is, in some sense, a compromise between the ergodicity of Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) methods and the efficient handling of data by the ensemble based Kalmann filters. The realistic and complex random fields are generated by a Multiple-Point Statistics (MPS) tool. Nonetheless, it is applicable with any conditional geostatistical simulation tool. Furthermore, the algorithm is independent of any parametrization what becomes most important when two parametric systems are equivalent (permeability and resistivity, speed and slowness, etc.). When compared to two existing McMC schemes, the computational effort was divided by a factor of 12.

  13. Realistic Hamiltonians for no-core moment method studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Motivated by the need to test the adequacy of realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials for yielding the dynamics of many-nucleon systems we develop effective Hamiltonians for large-space moment method studies. These Hamiltonians consist of the relative kinetic energy operator and an exact Brueckner G-matrix acting between all pairs of nucleons in the nucleus. That is, there is no core and the nuclear properties are obtained through moment methods as a function of the size of the model space. The primary initial emphasis is to obtain the binding energy and comparisons are made with results of the coupled-cluster or exp(s) calculations. We find a systematic but slow decrease in the importance of three and higher body effective forces as the model space is increased. The results with the Reid soft core interaction for the binding energy of 16 O appear to be converging close the the exp(s) results. Further tests of the moment methods themselves are indicated as well as the desirability of increasing still further the model space for the no-core studies

  14. Emulating Realistic Bidirectional Spatial Channels for MIMO OTA Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses over the air (OTA testing for multiple input multiple output (MIMO capable terminals with emphasis on modeling bidirectional spatial channel models in multiprobe anechoic chamber (MPAC setups. In the literature, work on this topic has been mainly focused on how to emulate downlink channel models, whereas uplink channel is often modeled as free space line-of-sight channel without fading. Modeling realistic bidirectional (i.e., both uplink and downlink propagation environments is essential to evaluate any bidirectional communication systems. There have been works stressing the importance of emulating full bidirectional channel and proposing possible directions to implement uplink channels in the literature. Nevertheless, there is no currently published work reporting an experimental validation of such concepts. In this paper, a general framework to emulate bidirectional channels for time division duplexing (TDD and frequency division duplexing (FDD communication systems is proposed. The proposed technique works for MPAC setups with arbitrary uplink and downlink probe configurations, that is, possibly different probe configurations (e.g., number of probes or their configurations in the uplink and downlink. The simulation results are further supported by measurements in a practical MPAC setup. The proposed algorithm is shown to be a valid method to emulate bidirectional spatial channel models.

  15. Realistic Matematic Approach through Numbered Head Together Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihatno, A. C. M. S.; Budiyono; Slamet, I.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the teaching process which is conducted based on teacher center affect the students interaction in the class. It causes students become less interest to participate. That is why teachers should be more creative in designing learning using other types of cooperative learning model. Therefore, this research is aimed to implement NHT with RMA in the teaching process. We utilize NHT since it is a variant of group discussion whose aim is giving a chance to the students to share their ideas related to the teacher’s question. By using NHT in the class, a teacher can give a better understanding about the material which is given with the help of Realistic Mathematics Approach (RMA) which known for its real problem contex. Meanwhile, the researcher assumes instead of selecting teaching model, Adversity Quotient (AQ) of student also influences students’ achievement. This research used the quasi experimental research. The samples is 60 students in junior high school, it was taken by using the stratified cluster random sampling technique. The results show NHT-RMA gives a better learning achievement of mathematics than direct teaching model and NHT-RMA teaching model with categorized as high AQ show different learning achievement from the students with categorized as moderate and low AQ.

  16. Steering Microbubbles in Physiologically Realistic Flows Using the Bjerknes Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are lipid-coated microbubbles that are used to increase contrast in ultrasound imaging due to their ability to scatter sound. Additionally, UCAs can be used in conjunction with ultrasound in medical applications such as targeted drug delivery and thrombolysis. These applications utilize the Bjerknes force, an ultrasound-induced force caused by the phase difference between the incoming ultrasound pressure wave and the microbubble volume oscillations. The dynamics of microbubbles under ultrasound excitation have been studied thoroughly in stagnant fluid baths; however, understanding of the fundamental physics of microbubbles in physiologically realistic flows is lacking. An in vitroexperiment that reproduces the dynamics (Reynolds and Womersley numbers) of a medium-sized blood vessel was used to explore the behavior of microbubbles. Using Lagrangian tracking, the trajectory of each individual bubble was reconstructed using information obtained from high speed imaging. The balance of hydrodynamic forces (lift, drag, added mass, etc.) against the primary Bjerknes force was analyzed. The results show that an increase in ultrasound pulse repetition frequency leads to a linear increase in the Bjerknes force and the increase in the force is quadratic with the amplitude of the excitation.

  17. Improved calculation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar, F.; Johner, J.; Granata, G.

    2001-01-01

    Owing to the complexity of the exact calculation, synchrotron losses are usually estimated in system studies, with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, a complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using a quasi-exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficients, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analysed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma centre as, for example, in internal transport barrier confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy content. Such an effect is not included in presently used approximate expressions. As an illustration, it is shown that in the case of an advanced high temperature plasma envisaged for a steady state commercial reactor, synchrotron losses represent approximately 20% of the total losses, so that this term becomes significant in the power balance of such a plasma. Finally, the authors propose a seven variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation, and is optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  18. Modelisation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar, F.; Johner, J.; Granata, G.

    2000-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation losses become significant in the power balance of high-temperature plasmas envisaged for next step tokamaks. Due to the complexity of the exact calculation, these losses are usually roughly estimated with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, the complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using an exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficient, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analyzed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma center, as for example in ITB confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy contents. Such an effect is not included in present approximate expressions. Finally, we propose a seven-variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database, which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation and optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  19. Knowing how to look predicts the ability to draw realistically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    Some young children are able to create stunningly realistic drawings resembling those of adult artists. What perceptual abilities underlie this talent? This study examined two candidate skills on which adult artists excel: the ability to segment a complex form mentally (measured by the Block Design Task) and the ability to see hidden forms (measured by the Group Embedded Figures Test). Sixty-seven 6- to 13-year-olds with a wide range of drawing abilities completed these tasks as well as an IQ test and an observational drawing task. While children who scored high on drawing realism outperformed those who scored low in drawing realism on both perceptual tasks, only detection of embedded figures predicted drawing realism. This occurred independently of age, gender, years of training, and verbal and non-verbal IQ. There are certainly many contributors to this complex ability, but one component appears to be the tendency to see things more as they really are and thereby recognize the continuous contour of an object despite interference from other overlapping objects. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Nonstandard Farey sequences in a realistic diode map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, G.; Sinha, S.; Cerdeira, H.

    1991-06-01

    We study a realistic coupled map system, modelling a p - i - n diode structure. As we vary the parameter corresponding to the (scaled) external potential in the model, the dynamics goes through a flip bifurcation and then a Hopf bifurcation, and as the parameter is increased further, we find evidence of a sequence of mode locked windows embedded in the quasiperiodic motion, with periodic attractors whose winding numbers p = p/q, are given by a Farey series. The interesting thing about this Farey sequence is that it is generated between two parent attractors with p = 2/7 and 2/8, where 2/8 implies two distinct coexisting attractors with p = 1/4, and the correct series is obtained only when we use parent winding number 2/8 and not 1/4. So unlike a regular Farey tree, p and q need not be relatively prime here, p = 2 x p/2 x q is permissible, where such attractors are actually comprised of two coexisting attractors with p = p/q. We also checked that the positions and widths of these windows exhibit well defined power law scaling. When the potential is increased further, the Farey windows still provide a ''skeleton'' for the dynamics, and within each window there is a host of other interesting dynamical features, including multiple forward and reverse Feigenbaum trees. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  1. Use of clinical guidelines in remote Australia: A realist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep; Orpin, Victoria; Herring, Sally; Mackie-Schneider, Stephanie; Struber, Janet

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to assess the acceptability, accessibility, and compliance with the 2014 editions of the Remote Primary Health Care Manuals (RPHCM) in health care centres across remote areas of Northern and Central Australia. To undertake a comprehensive evaluation that considered context, the evaluation used a realist evaluation framework. The evaluation used a variety of methods including interviews and survey to develop and test a programme theory. Many remote health practitioners have adopted standardized, evidence-based practice because of the use of the RPHCM. The mechanisms that led to the use of the manuals include acceptance of the worth of the protocols to their clinical practice, reliance on manual content to guide their practice, the perception of credibility, the applicability of RPHCM content to the context, and a fear of the consequences of not using the RPHCMs. Some remote health practitioners are less inclined to use the RPHCM regularly because of a perception that the content is less suited to their needs and daily practice or it is hard to navigate or understand. The evaluation concluded that there is work to be done to widen the RPHCM user base, and organizations need to increase support for their staff to use the RPHCM protocols better. These measures are expected to enable standardized clinical practice in the remote context. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Lean thinking in healthcare: a realist review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Savage, Carl; Brommels, Mats; Aronsson, Håkan; Thor, Johan

    2010-10-01

    To understand how lean thinking has been put into practice in healthcare and how it has worked. A realist literature review. Data sources The authors systematically searched for articles in PubMed, Web of Science and Business Source Premier (January 1998 to February 2008) and then added articles through a snowball approach. The authors included empirical studies of lean thinking applications in healthcare and excluded those articles that did not influence patient care, or reported hybrid approaches. The authors conducted a thematic analysis based on data collected using an original abstraction form. Based on this, they articulated interactions between context, lean interventions, mechanisms and outcomes. The authors reviewed 33 articles and found a wide range of lean applications. The articles describe initial implementation stages and emphasise technical aspects. All articles report positive results. The a