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Sample records for experimentally induced spinal

  1. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

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    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  2. Comparison of Etanercept, Etomidate and Erythropoietin and Their Combinations in Experimentally-Induced Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Caliskan, Murat; Simsek, Serkan; Vural, Sevil Atalay; Besalti, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the preventive effects of Etanercept, Etomidate, Erythropoietin and their combination in experimentally induced spinal cord trauma by clinical, histopathological, electrophysiological parameters and biochemical examination. 85 healthy female Wistar-Albino rats were used in this study. Rats were divided 8 trauma groups that consisted of 10 rats for each, and 5 rats for the sham group. Laminectomy was performed under general anesthesia and the spinal cord was exposed with intact dura mater, and injury was created by the clip compression model. After the spinal cord injury, drugs were administered immediately intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Except the sham group, all groups received drugs and were observed 24 or 72 hours. At the 72nd hour each group was anesthesized and somatosensorial evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded from the interarcuate ligament from the 2 vertebra proximal to the injured spinal cord and spinal cord tissue samples were taken for histopathological and biochemical evaluation. Etomidate groups showed a lower effect on spinal cord injury than etanercept and erythropoietin in terms of clinical, SEP and TNF-α. Etanercept and erythropoietin's neuroprotective effectiveness was shown alone or in combination treatments. More meaningful results were achieved with the use of erythropoietin and etanercept combination after spinal cord injury (SCI) than using erythropoietin alone. After SCI, highest Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores were achieved in the group which Etanercept and Erythropoietin applied together. The neuroprotective activity of etomidate was suspect. The neuroprotective effect of etanercept and erythropoietin after SCI was shown in individual and combined applications in this study. However, more experimental studies are needed for clinical use.

  3. Spinal histamine in attenuation of mechanical hypersensitivity in the spinal nerve ligation-induced model of experimental neuropathy.

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    Wei, Hong; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2016-02-05

    Here we studied whether and through which mechanisms spinal administration of histamine dihydrochloride (histamine) attenuates pain behavior in neuropathic animals. Experiments were performed in rats with spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathy and a chronic intrathecal catheter for spinal drug delivery. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed with monofilaments while radiant heat was used for assessing nociception. Ongoing neuropathic pain and its attenuation by histamine was assessed using conditioned place-preference test. Following spinal administration, histamine at doses 0.1-10µg produced a dose-related mechanical antihypersensitivity effect. With prolonged treatment (twice daily 10µg for five days), the antihypersensitivity effect of spinal histamine was reduced. In place-preference test, neuropathic animals preferred the chamber paired with histamine (10µg). Histamine (10µg) failed to influence heat nociception in neuropathic animals or mechanically induced pain behavior in a group of healthy control rats. Histamine-induced mechanical antihypersensitivity effect was prevented by spinal pretreatment with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), prazosine (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and bicuculline (γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A, GABA(A), receptor antagonist), but not by pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), atipamezole (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), or raclopride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist). A-960656, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist alone that presumably increased endogenous histamine levels reduced hypersensitivity. Additionally, histamine prevented central (presumably postsynaptically-induced) facilitation of hypersensitivity induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The results indicate that spinal histamine at the dose range of 0.1-10µg selectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity and ongoing pain in neuropathy. The spinal histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect involves histamine H2 and GABA(A) receptors and

  4. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on experimentally induced pain: a systematic literature review

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    Millan Mario

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there is evidence that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT can reduce pain, the mechanisms involved are not well established. There is a need to review the scientific literature to establish the evidence-base for the reduction of pain following SMT. Objectives To determine if SMT can reduce experimentally induced pain, and if so, if the effect is i only at the level of the treated spinal segment, ii broader but in the same general region as SMT is performed, or iii systemic. Design A systematic critical literature review. Methods A systematic search was performed for experimental studies on healthy volunteers and people without chronic syndromes, in which the immediate effect of SMT was tested. Articles selected were reviewed blindly by two authors. A summary quality score was calculated to indicate level of manuscript quality. Outcome was considered positive if the pain-reducing effect was statistically significant. Separate evidence tables were constructed with information relevant to each research question. Results were interpreted taking into account their manuscript quality. Results Twenty-two articles were included, describing 43 experiments, primarily on pain produced by pressure (n = 27 or temperature (n = 9. Their quality was generally moderate. A hypoalgesic effect was shown in 19/27 experiments on pressure pain, produced by pressure in 3/9 on pain produced by temperature and in 6/7 tests on pain induced by other measures. Second pain provoked by temperature seems to respond to SMT but not first pain. Most studies revealed a local or regional hypoalgesic effect whereas a systematic effect was unclear. Manipulation of a “restricted motion segment” (“manipulable lesion” seemed not to be essential to analgesia. In relation to outcome, there was no discernible difference between studies with higher vs. lower quality scores. Conclusions These results indicate that SMT has a direct local

  5. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

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    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  6. Spinal motoneurone distress during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

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    Giardino, L; Giuliani, A; Fernandez, M; Calzà, L

    2004-10-01

    The main pathophysiological feature characterizing multiple sclerosis (MS) is demyelination. However, the possibility of neural damage has recently been proposed as a mechanism in chronic disease. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the most widely used experimental model for MS. We investigated occurrences of microglial activation and astrocytosis in the spinal cord, choline acetyl-transferase (ChAT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA regulation in spinal motoneurones during EAE. EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by injecting guinea pig spinal cord tissue in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to which heat-inactivated Mycobacterium had been added. Rats injected with CFA and uninjected rats were used as controls. ChAT and CGRP mRNAs were studied by in situ hybridization in the lumbar spinal cord and a computerized grain counting procedure was used for quantification. No differences in ChAT mRNA level were found between control and CFA-injected rats. ChAT mRNA level was strongly reduced in EAE 14 days after immunization and then recovered (29 days after immunization). CGRP mRNA increased 14 days after immunization, and then recovered to control level. Extensive long-lasting gliosis developed in the spinal cord and around motoneurones and a transient expression of p75LNGFR in motoneurones was also found. These data suggest that during EAE, gliosis induces distress in spinal cord neurones involving the synthesis enzyme for the main transmitter.

  7. Chronic caffeine treatment attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates in Wistar rats.

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    Chen, Guo Qian; Chen, Yan Yan; Wang, Xin Shi; Wu, Sai Zhen; Yang, Hui Min; Xu, Hui Qin; He, Jin Cai; Wang, Xiao Tong; Chen, Jiang Fan; Zheng, Rong Yuan

    2010-01-14

    Dysfunction of adenosinergic systems has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis in humans and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animals. Caffeine, a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, has been shown to provide protection against myelin oligodendroglia glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE in mice. In this study, we showed that chronic caffeine similarly imparts neuroprotection against EAE induced in rats by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates (GPSCH). GPSCH-induced EAE is characterized by extensive tissue inflammation with a typical chronic disease course. We showed that caffeine decreases the incidence of EAE and attenuates EAE pathology at behavioral, histological (inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination) and neurochemical (expression of inflammatory cytokines) levels. The attenuation of GPSCH-induced pathology by chronic caffeine treatment was observed at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and during both peak and recovery phases of EAE. Furthermore, it was showed that chronic treatment with caffeine up-regulated A1 receptor and TGF-beta mRNAs and suppressed interferon-gamma mRNA in EAE rats. Together with previous reports, our data demonstrates that chronic treatment with caffeine exerts a neuroprotective effect against EAE, possibly through an A(1) receptor-mediated shift from Th1 to Th2 cell function, and provides a neurobiological basis for epidemiological investigation into the possible relationship between caffeine consumption and development of multiple sclerosis in humans.

  8. Tobacco-induced neuronal degeneration via cotinine in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury.

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    Dalgic, Ali; Okay, Onder; Helvacioglu, Fatma; Daglioglu, Ergun; Akdag, Rifat; Take, Gulnur; Belen, Deniz

    2013-05-01

    Cigarette smoke contains over 4000 chemicals including well-characterized toxicants and carcinogens, among which is cotinine. Cotinine is the principal metabolite of nicotine that has adverse affects on the microcirculation via vasoconstriction, hypoxia and the wound-healing cascade. Its impact on spinal cord injury (SCI) has not been investigated yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the cotinine effect on SCI. 48 male Wistar rats were divided into six groups as follows: sham-control, sham-trauma, vehicle-control, vehicle-trauma, cotinine-control, and cotinine-trauma. Initially, a defined concentration of cotinine blood level was maintained by daily intraperitoneal injection of cotinine for 14 days in the cotinine groups. The concentration was similar to the cotinine dose in the blood level of heavy smokers. Only ethyl alcohol was injected in the vehicle groups during the same period. Then, SCI was performed by a Tator clip. The cotinine groups were compared with rats subjected to vehicle and sham groups by immunohistochemical biomarkers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and 2,3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNP) expressions. Electron microscopic examination was also performed. GFAP-positive cells were noted to be localized around degenerated astrocytes. Marked vacuolization with perivascular and perineural edema was seen in the cotinin consumption groups. These findings showed the inhibition of regeneration after SCI. Similarly, vacuolization within myelin layers was noted in the cotinine groups, which was detected through reduced CNP expression. Cotinine, a main metabolite of nicotine, has harmful effects on SCI via GFAP and CNP expression. The findings of the present study support the hypothesis that tobacco causes neuronal degeneration via cotinine. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

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    Oji, Satoru; Nicolussi, Eva-Maria; Kaufmann, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do......, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation...

  10. Experimental contusion of spinal cord

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    Nemecek, S.; Suba, P.

    1982-01-01

    In 34 rabbits with intensive acute spinal trauma caused by an impact, 125 I-labelled human albumin (IHSA) was i.v. administered before injury and the animals were killed after 3 and 24 hours. In another series of experiments, IHSA was administered after injury, i.e., one hour before killing the animals, if they survived, and after 3, 24 and 48 hours. The radioactivity was measured in 1 cm long portions of the spinal cord and compared with serum values. The outflow of plasma from blood vessels was restricted to the site of the injury proper and declined with the period of survival. Exudation was minimal, but still present 48 hours after injury. From this site, as revealed by administration of IHSA before injury, the vasogenic oedema was propagated longitudinally by the spine to neighbouring segments. After 24 hours it proceeded further than after 3 hours. This investigation confirms and supplements former findings pertaining to the microscopic evaluation of spinal trauma after administration of Evans blue. Radioisotope labelled albumin revealed more sensitively the presence of albumin in tissue than Evans blue. (author)

  11. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury.

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    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2009-11-30

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: (1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and (2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury.

  12. Spinal cord hydrolysate ameliorate immunological reaction in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

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    Kwiatkowska-Patzer, Barbara; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Zielińska, Joanna; Kasarello, Kaja; Kurzepa, Katarzyna; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins to induce oral tolerance in the animal model of sclerosis multiplex - experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. The female Lewis rats were fed with hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins in two doses for one week before immunization, which was induced by injection of guinea pig spinal cord homogenate. At the peak of clinical symptoms (the 13th day post immunization) the rats were sacrificed and the spleen removed. Splenocytes were suspended in a culture medium and placed in microculture plates. The cells were stimulated with homogenate. The cells were cultured for seven days. Proliferation of splenocytes was estimated by means of methyl-3H thymidine incorporation. In supernatants of cultures of splenocytes the level of cytokines INF-gamma, IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-gamma was measured. It was demonstrated that homogenate-induced splenocytes of hydrolysate-fed rats gave rise to low proliferation as compared to the controls used. The IFN-gamma was inhibited in hydrolysate-fed animals. The hydrolysate of pig spinal cord proteins has a modulatory effect on the immune reaction, particularly on the orally-induced antigen-specific modulation of autoimmune response.

  13. Assessment of in vivo spinal cord conduction velocity in rats in an experimental model of ischemic spinal cord injury.

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    Basoglu, H; Kurtoglu, T; Cetin, N K; Bilgin, M D; Kiylioglu, N

    2013-08-01

    Experimental laboratory investigation of spinal cord conductivity alterations in a rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). To observe the epidural spinal cord stimulation-induced electromyography responses, and to investigate the possible alterations of spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) after ischemic SCI in rats. Adnan Menderes University, Institute of Health Science, Aydin, Turkey. SCI was induced by transient occlusion of the abdominal aorta in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Spinal cord histopathology was examined to determine neuronal damage and Tarlov scale was used to grade locomotor functions. Epidural electrical stimulation of spinal cord was performed by monopolar needle electrodes sequentially at L1-L2 and L5-L6 levels, and CMAPs were recorded from the left gastrocnemius muscle by surface electrodes. Amplitudes and durations of CMAPs were evaluated and SCCVs were calculated by analyzing the latency difference of CMAPs. Ischemia-induced SCI resulted in significant reduction of Tarlov scores and a significant decline in number of viable neurons. Similarly, a significant decrement was observed in SCCV following spinal cord ischemia. This study demonstrated that measurement of SCCV via epidural electrical stimulation is possible and displays a significant decline after spinal cord ischemia in rats. We suggest that this method can be beneficial to quantify neuronal damage after experimental ischemic SCI.

  14. Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan) inhibits spinal cord injury-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan) inhibits spinal cord injury-induced inflammatory responses in rats. Liang Chen, Wei-Chun Guo. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the effect of Dipsacus asperoides (Xue Duan), a traditional Chinese medicine, on rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: In this study a total of 40 adult rats ...

  15. Comparing the Ease of Inducing Spinal Anaesthesia in the Sitting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sitting position is the favoured for spinal anaesthesia position because identification of midline structures is easier. It is either in the flexed hip or the non flexed hip (hamstring) position. Traditionally spinal anaesthesia has been induced in the flexed hip position, and this has been supported by radiological ...

  16. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

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    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

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    Sandra M. Garraway

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions.

  18. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord.

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    Garraway, Sandra M; Huie, J Russell

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI) influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions.

  19. Ca++ dependent bistability induced by serotonin in spinal motoneurons

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    Hounsgaard, J.; Kiehn, O.

    1985-01-01

    The plateau potential, responsible for the bistable state of spinal motoneurons, recently described in the decerebrate cat, was suggested to depend on serotonin (Hounsgaard et al. 1984). In an in vitro preparation of the spinal cord of the turtle we now show that serotonin, applied directly...... to the bath, transforms the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons, uncovering a plateau potential and voltage sensitive bistability. The changes induced by serotonin were blocked by Mn++, while the plateau potential and the bistability remained after application of tetrodotoxin. We conclude...

  20. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

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    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  1. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

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    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  2. [Changes of somatosensory and transcranial magnetic stimulation motor evoked potentials in experimental spinal cord injury].

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    Hou, Yong; Nie, Lin; Liu, Li-hong; Shao, Jun; Yuan, Yong-jian

    2008-03-18

    To study the changes of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and transcranial magnetic simulation motor evoked potential (TMS-MEP) in experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-two rabbits were randomly divided into 4 equal groups. All rabbits were anesthetized for 90 min. A group (Group A) underwent only laminectomy of T12 without SCI, stimulation with different intensities was used to induce SEP and TMS-MEP to determine the most appropriate stimulation intensity. The EPs were recorded before and after the operation. The other 3 groups underwent laminectomy of T12 to expose the dura, and a spinal cord compressing apparatus weighing 40 g was put on the intact dura and dorsal surface of spinal cord underneath for 5, 15, and 30 min respectively (Groups B, C, and D). SEP and TMS-MEP were detected after anesthesia, after exposure of spinal cord, and 5 and 30 min, 1 and 6 h, and 1, 3, and 7 d. The latency and amplitude of each wave were measured. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance, t-test and linear correlation. Tarlov behavior score was used to assess the motor function before the operation and 1, 3, and 7 days after SCI. It was found that 100% intensity stimulus obtained stable and reliable MEP waves. Anesthetic did not influence the EPs. The amplitude of SEP began to decrease 5 min after SCI and the latency began to increase 30 min after SCI. And both the amplitude and latency, especially the former, of MEP began to significantly change 5 min after SCI. The latency levels of SEP and MEP increased and the amplitude decreased after compression time-dependently during a certain range of time (all P TMS-MEP are very sensitive to SCI, in particular, the change of amplitude is more sensitive then the latency change and can more accurately reflect the degree of SCI. Combination of SEP and TMS-MEP objectively reflects the SCI degree. EP measurement, as a noninvasive technique, has great value in monitoring spinal cord function.

  3. Early protective effects of Iloprost after experimental spinal cord injury.

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    Attar, A; Tuna, H; Sargon, M F; Yüceer, N; Türker, R K; Egemen, N

    1998-06-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study the early protective effects of Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, after spinal cord injury in rabbit. Sixteen adult male rabbits (New Zealand Albino) were injured by application of epidural aneurysm clip. Eight rabbits received an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 30 micrograms kg-1 Iloprost, and eight rabbits received an infusion of saline (SF). Treatment with Iloprost started immediately after spinal cord injury and continued for one hour. Evoked potentials were recorded for each rabbit at one, 15, and 60 minutes after the spinal cord injury. Twenty-four hours later, all the rabbits were deeply anesthetized and spinal cords were removed for histopathological examinations. There was no meaningful statistical difference between cortical somatosensorial evoked potentials (CSEP) of the saline and Iloprost group. However, light and electron microscopic studies showed that the Iloprost treated group had moderate protection of myelin and axons; and limited edema. These results suggest that intravenous Iloprost treatment after spinal cord injury has a highly protective effect without any side effects.

  4. Mercuric Chloride Induced Cell Death in Spinal Cord of Embryo in Rat

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    Tayebeh Rastegar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C TIntroduction: Because of more exposure to mercury compounds, the prenatal and postnatal neurotoxic effects of mercury compounds have gained more attention in last decade. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mercuric chloride intoxication on spinal cord development during prenatal period. Methods: 36 adult Sprague-dawley rats after observing vaginal mating plaque (zero day of gestation were divided into six groups: three control groups that received normal saline solution and three experimental groups that injected with mercuric chloride, 2mg/kg/IP, in 8th, 9th and 10th days of gestation. Then, embryos were removed from uterus in 15th day and spinal cord of embryos was studied by histological techniques. Results: Microscopic study of spinal cord showed that cell death, mitosis division, and extracellular spaces were increased and cells accumulation were decreased in experimental groups. Diameter of ventricular zone was increased and diameter of mantle and marginal zones were decreased. Discussion: The present study showed that mercuric chloride intoxication in prenatal period can induce cell death and results in neural tube deficits in prenatal rats.

  5. Angelica Sinensis attenuates inflammatory reaction in experimental rat models having spinal cord injury.

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    Xu, Jun; E, Xiao-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Yong; Tian, Jun; Yan, Jing-Long

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of Angelica Sinensis on experimental rat models in which spinal cord injury was induced by studying different factors. Different factors causing inflammation play a key role in pathophysiology of SCI. Here three groups of rats (n=15, each was used). These included a sham control group where only laminectomy was performed, SCI group where SCI was induced and AS/SCI group where although SCI was induced but Angelica Sinensis was also administered to study its effect and draw a comparison with control. The expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65 was also studied using western blotting and after recording optical density (OD) values of western blots. MPO activity was used to measure the effect of 20 mg/kg Angelica Sinensis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also studied. As compared with SCI group and sham control it was observed that Angelica Sinensis significantly reduced the expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65, (PSinensis in rat models can attenuate the secondary damage caused by SCI and thus help in controlling the pathology of SCI in rats.

  6. Chronic MR imaging changes in experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, D.B.; Asato, R.; Finkelstein, S.D.; Markowitz, R.S.; Black, P.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on excised spinal cords of Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to weight drop injury (modified Allen technique). Animals were killed 3 hours, 24 hours, and 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after injury. The length of the resulting lesion was measured on sagittal long repetition time/long echo time images by an investigator who was unaware of the results of functional evaluation. Lesion length was correlated with a combined behavioral score representing a battery of eight tests of sensory and motor function performed just before death. There was a statistically significant correlation between lesion length and the combined behavior score

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  8. Spinal translocator protein (TSPO) modulates pain behavior in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernstadt, Hayley; Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2009-08-25

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is predominantly located in the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays an important role in steroidogenesis, immunomodulation, cell survival and proliferation. Previous studies have shown an increased expression of TSPO centrally in neuropathology, as well as in injured nerves. TSPO has also been implicated in modulation of nociception. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that TSPO is involved in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory pain using a rat model of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced monoarthritis of the tibio-tarsal joint. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Iba-1 (microglia), NeuN (neurons), anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP (astrocytes) and anti-PBR (TSPO) on Days 1, 7 and 14 after CFA-induced arthritis. Rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis showed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia on the ipsilateral hindpaw, which correlated with the increased TSPO expression in ipsilateral laminae I-II on all experimental days. Iba-1 expression in the ipsilateral dorsal horn was also increased on Days 7 and 14. Moreover, TSPO was colocalized with Iba-1, GFAP and NeuN within the spinal cord dorsal horn. The TSPO agonist Ro5-4864, given intrathecally, dose-dependently retarded or prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis. These findings provide evidence that spinal TSPO is involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain behaviors in rats. Thus, spinal TSPO may present a central target as a complementary therapy to reduce inflammatory pain.

  9. Vitamin A active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid, induces spinal cord sensitization. II. Effects after intrathecal administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alique, M; Lucio, F J; Herrero, J F

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In our previous study (see accompanying paper) we observed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) p.o. induces changes in spinal cord neuronal responses similar to those observed in inflammation-induced sensitization. In the present study we assessed the it. effects of ATRA, and its mechanisms of action. Experimental approach: The effects of all drugs were studied after it. administration in nociceptive withdrawal reflexes using behavioural tests in awake male Wistar rats. Key results: The administration of ATRA in normal rats induced a dose-dependent enhancement of nociceptive responses to noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation, as well as responses to innocuous stimulation. The intensity of the responses was similar to that observed in non-treated animals after carrageenan-induced inflammation. The effect induced by ATRA was fully prevented by the previous administration of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) pan-antagonist LE540 but not by the retinoid X receptor (RXR) pan-antagonist HX531, suggesting a selective action on spinal cord RARs. The COX inhibitor dexketoprofen and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist IL-1ra inhibited ATRA effect. The results indicate that COX and interleukin-1 are involved in the effects of ATRA in the spinal cord, similar to that seen in inflammation. Conclusions and implications: In conclusion, ATRA induces changes in the spinal cord similar to those observed in inflammation. The sensitization-like effect induced by ATRA was mediated by RARs and associated with a modulation of COX-2 and interleukin-1 activities. ATRA might be involved in the mechanisms underlying the initiation and/or maintenance of sensitization in the spinal cord. PMID:16847438

  10. A Mushroom Extract Piwep from Phellinus igniarius Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Inhibiting Immune Cell Infiltration in the Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a mushroom extract from Phellinus igniarius in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. The medicinal mushroom, Phellinus igniarius, contains biologically active compounds that modulate the human immune system. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG 35–55 in C57BL/6 female mice. A water-ethanol extract of Phellinus igniarius (Piwep was delivered intraperitoneally every other day for the entire experimental course. Three weeks after the initial immunization, demyelination and immune cell infiltration in the spinal cord were examined. Piwep injection profoundly decreased the daily incidence rate and clinical score of EAE. The Piwep-mediated inhibition of the clinical course of EAE was accompanied by suppression of demyelination and infiltration of encephalitogenic immune cells including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, macrophages, and B cells in the spinal cord. Piwep reduced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 in the spinal cord and integrin-α4 in the lymph node of EAE mice. Piwep also inhibited proliferation of lymphocytes and secretion of interferon-γ in the lymph node of EAE mice. The results suggest that a mushroom extract, Piwep, may have a high therapeutic potential for ameliorating multiple sclerosis progression.

  11. PD-L1 is increased in the spinal cord and infiltrating lymphocytes in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Jiang, Jiandong; Fu, Bing; Chen, Jiechun; Xue, Qun; Dong, Wanli; Gu, Yanzheng; Tang, Lingtao; Xue, Limin; Fang, Qi; Wang, Mingyuan; Zhang, Xueguang

    2013-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis is a mouse model of human multiple sclerosis with similar pathology and pathogenesis. Th1 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. This study determined the potential effect of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 in the pathogenesis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis induced by injecting myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, complete Freund's adjuvant and Bordetella pertussis toxin into C57BL/6J mice. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice developed disease and showed inflammatory changes in the central nervous system by hematoxylin-eosin staining of spinal cord pathological sections, demyelination by Luxol fast-blue staining and clinical manifestations. The expression of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 in mice was detected by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The expression of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 in the spinal cord and splenocytes of mice was significantly increased compared with normal mice. Our findings suggest the involvement of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 in the pathogenesis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and suggest this should be studied in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25206651

  12. Spinal myelopathy induced by subarachnoid batrachotoxin: ultrastructure and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J H; Deshpande, S S; Pence, R S; Albuquerque, E X

    1978-01-20

    A combined structural and electrophysiologic analysis on the effects of subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin was conducted in rats. Swelling of neuronal perikarya, accompanied by areas of clearing, satellitosis, fatty metamorphosis and central chromatolysis were demonstrated in the spinal anterior horns. Studies on isolated extensor digitorum longus (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles showed membrane depolarization in the extensor 24 h after injection, with progressive augmentation of this phenomenon in animals given multiple injections of the toxin. Differential sensitivity of fast and slow muscles was evident: soleus was only slightly affected. Subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin, which induced swelling of neuronal perikarya and axonal processes, also caused signs of denervation in the extensor muscle 7 days after injection, while spontaneous transmitter release was still present. Some structural and and most electrophysiologic alterations after batrachotoxin injections were reversible.

  13. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A.; Silva, C.A. da; Defino, H.L.A.; Bel, E.A.Del

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury

  14. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A. [Departamento de Morfofisiologia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Silva, C.A. da [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Defino, H.L.A. [Departamento de Orthopedia e Traumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bel, E.A.Del [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-12

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury.

  15. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  16. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Spinal Inflammation Impairs Respiratory Motor Plasticity by a Spinal p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Smith, Stephanie M C; Peterson, Timothy J; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-04-29

    Inflammation is characteristic of most clinical disorders that challenge the neural control of breathing. Since inflammation modulates neuroplasticity, we studied the impact of inflammation caused by prolonged intermittent hypoxia on an important form of respiratory plasticity, acute intermittent hypoxia (three, 5 min hypoxic episodes, 5 min normoxic intervals) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Because chronic intermittent hypoxia elicits neuroinflammation and pLTF is undermined by lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that one night of intermittent hypoxia (IH-1) elicits spinal inflammation, thereby impairing pLTF by a p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. pLTF and spinal inflammation were assessed in anesthetized rats pretreated with IH-1 (2 min hypoxia, 2 min normoxia; 8 h) or sham normoxia and allowed 16 h for recovery. IH-1 (1) transiently increased IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2-fold; p = 0.02) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (2.4 ± 0.4-fold; p = 0.01) mRNA in cervical spinal homogenates, (2) elicited a sustained increase in IL-1β mRNA (2.4 ± 0.2-fold; p e.g., sleep apnea, apnea of prematurity, spinal injury, or motor neuron disease). Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356871-10$15.00/0.

  17. The effects of fasudil on the permeability of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier following experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X N; Fu, J; Wang, W Z

    2011-10-28

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a primary characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). We evaluated the protective effects of fasudil, a selective ROCK inhibitor, in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) that was induced by guinea-pig spinal cord. In addition, we studied the effects of fasudil on BBB and BSCB permeability. We found that fasudil partly alleviated EAE-dependent damage by decreasing BBB and BSCB permeability. These results provide rationale for the development of selective inhibitors of Rho kinase as a novel therapy for MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of spinal cord injury decompression in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is major permanent sequelae of trauma with high burden and low frequency. In the setting of SCI is there any correlation between the timing of surgical decompression and sensory-motor improvement.Material and Methods: A literature review was performed using PUBMED from 1966 to 25th January 2010. Cross referencing of discovered articles was also reviewed.Results: The results of animal studies have shown that aside from the kind of procedure and species, when compression is less severe and of shorter duration, the neurological and histopathological recovery is significantly good. One meta-analysis, nine prospective studies, and one randomized clinical trial were identified. Conclusion: There are presently no standards regarding the role and timing of decompression in acute SCI. As a practice guideline, early surgery in less than 24 hours can be done safely in patients with acute SCI and urgent decompression is a reasonable practice option. Traction is the most practical method of achieving urgent decompression after cervical SCI. There are class III data to support a recommendation for urgent decompression in any patient with incomplete SCI with or without neurologic deterioration, with or without bilateral irreducible facet dislocations. There is emerging evidence that surgery within 24 hours may reduce both the length of intensive care unit stay and incidence of medical complications

  19. Early spread of hyperexcitability to caudal dorsal horn networks after a chemically-induced lesion of the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deumens, R; Mazzone, G L; Taccola, G

    2013-01-15

    Hyperexcitability of dorsal horn neurons has been shown to play a key role in neuropathic pain following chronic experimental spinal cord injury. With a neonatal in vitro spinal cord injury model, we show that a chemically-induced lesion leads to rapid gain-of-function of sublesional dorsal horn networks biased to hyperexcitation. The expression of the GABA synthetic enzyme GAD65 was significantly reduced at the same level of the spinal cord, suggesting a compromised inhibitory system. We propose that our model could be useful to test early approaches to contrast spinal cord injury-induced central sensitization of dorsal horn circuits. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of intermittent traction therapy in an experimental spinal column model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Hun; Jun, Seung-lyul; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hyo; Hwang, Sung-Yeoun; Ahn, Seong-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Traction therapy, which is known to be a treatment method for scoliosis, one of many muscles disease, has been used since Hippocrates introduced it. However, the effects of traction therapy are still not clear. In addition, the meridian sinew theory, which is related to muscle treatment and is mentioned in the book on meridian sinews in the Miraculous Pivot of Huangdi's Internal Classic, has not been the subject of much study. For these reasons, experimental spinal models were made for this study to observe and analyze the lengths of vertebral interspaces after intermittent traction therapy, which is known to be excellent among muscle treatment methods, with various tensile forces. The results showed that the effects of intermittent traction therapy were unclear and that it might be harmful, especially when the pain was induced by muscle weakness. Because the results of this study on intermittent traction therapy were different from those expected from osteopathy or craniosacral theory, better studies of the subject are necessary. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Spinal Glia Division Contributes to Conditioning Lesion-Induced Axon Regeneration Into the Injured Spinal Cord: Potential Role of Cyclic AMP-Induced Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Angert, Mila; Nishihara, Tasuku; Shubayev, Igor; Dolkas, Jennifer; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of sensory neurons after spinal cord injury depends on the function of dividing neuronal-glial antigen 2 (NG2)-expressing cells. We have shown that increases in the number of dividing NG2-positive cells through short-term pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases contributes to recovery after spinal cord injury. A conditioning sciatic nerve crush (SNC) preceding spinal cord injury stimulates central sensory axon regeneration via the intraganglionic action of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Here, using bromodeoxyuridine, mitomycin (mitosis inhibitor), and cholera toxin B tracer, we demonstrate that SNC-induced division of spinal glia is related to the spinal induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and contributes to central sensory axon growth into the damaged spinal cord. Dividing cells were mainly NG2-positive and Iba1-positive and included myeloid NG2-positive populations. The cells dividing in response to SNC mainly matured into oligodendrocytes and microglia within the injured spinal cord. Some postmitotic cells remained NG2-reactive and were associated with regenerating fibers. Moreover, intraganglionic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression was induced after administration of SNC or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog (dbcAMP) to dorsal root ganglia in vivo and in primary adult dorsal root ganglia cultures. Collectively, these findings support a novel model whereby a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated regeneration program induced in sensory neurons by a conditioning peripheral nerve lesion uses tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 to protect against short-term proteolysis, enabling glial cell division and promoting axon growth into the damaged CNS.

  2. Military gunshot wound-induced spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaca, Ridvan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Gunduz, Sukru

    2002-11-01

    Gunshot wounds are the second leading cause of spinal cord injuries in developed countries, whereas in undeveloped and developing countries, this likelihood is much more. However, the weapon and injury characteristics are very different between those two groups of countries. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gunshot wound-caused spinal cord injury during our struggle with terrorism, to examine surgical and medical complications, and to determine the difference between civilian and military gunshot wounds. One hundred five male patients (mean, 25 years of age) were examined according to completeness, spinal and nonspinal injuries, American Spinal Injury Association classification, motor and pinprick scores, surgical and nonsurgical interventions, surgical complications, and spinal cord injury-related medical complications. This study has shown that the likelihood of completeness was higher in gunshot wounds with high velocity weapons. Because of their higher wounding capacity, the difference between vertebral and neurological levels was not very different as it was on the other etiologies. Fortunately, spinal cord injury-related medical complications were less than expected.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kumano, Kouichi; Kadoya, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    Correlation between pathological findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of experimental cord injury were investigated. Cord injuries were made on ten Wistar rats weighing 80-170 gm by epidural compression of the thoracic cord with a Biemer cerebral vascular clip for 5-20 seconds. Several hours after the procedure animals were examined by spin echo axial MR images with a pulse sequence of TR/TE=1000/36 msec. MR studies were repeated on 4 animals 3-7 days after the initial examination. Immediately after the latest MRI examination animals were sacrificed and fixed with 10% formalin. Three micron thickness paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were evaluated under a microscope. The pathological finding was hemorrhagic necrosis with edema of various severity depending on duration of clip application. The hemorrhagic necrosis was observed either unilaterally or bilaterally to the cord. MR findings of the cord were of high intensity in five animals which were severely injured, while central low intensity of the injured cord appeared in three mildly injured animals. Of the remaining two animals which had mild injury, one showed unilateral high intensity, while no definitive change was demonstrated in the other. The high intensity in the MRI suggested edema associated with hemorrhagic necrosis rather than hemorrhage. The central low intensity appearing in the mildly injured cord might be hemorrhage in the gray matter. It is concluded that MRI was useful to diagnose not only the level and severity but also the pathological process in the injured cord, and thus to estimate the prognosis of the cord injuries. (author)

  4. Behavioral recovery induced by applied electric fields after spinal cord hemisection in guinea pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgens, R.B.; Blight, A.R.; McGinnis, M.E.

    1987-10-16

    Applied electric fields were used to promote axonal regeneration in spinal cords of adult guinea pigs. A propriospinal intersegmental reflex (the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex) was used to test lateral tract function after hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. An electrical field (200 microvolts per millimeter, cathode rostral) applied across the lesion led to functional recovery of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in 25 percent of experimental animals, whereas the functional deficit remained in control animals, which were implanted with inactive stimulators.

  5. Casein kinase II regulates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity in spinal cords and pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Zhou, Hong-Yi; Byun, Hee Sun; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Increased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity and phosphorylation in the spinal cord are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity and central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms underlying increased NMDAR activity in neuropathic pain conditions remain poorly understood. Here we show that peripheral nerve injury induces a large GluN2A-mediated increase in NMDAR activity in spinal lamina II, but not lamina I, neurons. However, NMDAR currents in spinal dorsal horn neurons are not significantly altered in rat models of diabetic neuropathic pain and resiniferatoxin-induced painful neuropathy (postherpedic neuralgia). Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases or protein kinase C has little effect on NMDAR currents potentiated by nerve injury. Strikingly, casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors normalize increased NMDAR currents of dorsal horn neurons in nerve-injured rats. In addition, inhibition of calcineurin, but not protein phosphatase 1/2A, augments NMDAR currents only in control rats. CK2 inhibition blocks the increase in spinal NMDAR activity by the calcineurin inhibitor in control rats. Furthermore, nerve injury significantly increases CK2α and CK2β protein levels in the spinal cord. In addition, inhibition of CK2 or CK2β knockdown at the spinal level substantially reverses pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. Our study indicates that neuropathic pain conditions with different etiologies do not share the same mechanisms, and increased spinal NMDAR activity is distinctly associated with traumatic nerve injury. CK2 plays a prominent role in the potentiation of NMDAR activity in the spinal dorsal horn and may represent a new target for treatments of chronic pain caused by nerve injury. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Protection of rats from experimental allergic encephalomyelitis with antiserum to guinea-pig spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. A. C.

    1974-01-01

    Inbred AS rats were immunized with guinea-pig spinal cord. The severity of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in groups treated with antiserum to guinea-pig spinal cord and control groups treated with antiserum to other guinea-pig tissue. Prolonged treatment throughout the experiment strikingly reduced the severity of the clinical disease. Early treatment for the first 8 days after immunization had a similar protective effect. Late treatment starting on the 10th day after immunization did not produce significant protection. Protection was produced by antiserum from both EAE-resistant and EAE-susceptible strains. The protective effect of the serum did not correlate with the presence of haemagglutinating antibodies to basic protein or the titre of complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside. These results suggest that antiserum to undefined central nervous system antigens contains an `enhancing' antibody which inhibits a relatively early stage of the immune response causing EAE. PMID:4212280

  7. Thoracic 9 Spinal Transection-Induced Model of Muscle Spasticity in the Rat: A Systematic Electrophysiological and Histopathological Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corleto, Jose A; Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Kamizato, Kota; Kakinohana, Osamu; Santucci, Camila; Navarro, Michael R; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Cizkova, Dasa; Lukacova, Nadezda; Taylor, Julian; Marsala, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The development of spinal hyper-reflexia as part of the spasticity syndrome represents one of the major complications associated with chronic spinal traumatic injury (SCI). The primary mechanism leading to progressive appearance of muscle spasticity is multimodal and may include loss of descending inhibitory tone, alteration of segmental interneuron-mediated inhibition and/or increased reflex activity to sensory input. Here, we characterized a chronic thoracic (Th 9) complete transection model of muscle spasticity in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isoflurane-anesthetized rats received a Th9 laminectomy and the spinal cord was transected using a scalpel blade. After the transection the presence of muscle spasticity quantified as stretch and cutaneous hyper-reflexia was identified and quantified as time-dependent changes in: i) ankle-rotation-evoked peripheral muscle resistance (PMR) and corresponding electromyography (EMG) activity, ii) Hoffmann reflex, and iii) EMG responses in gastrocnemius muscle after paw tactile stimulation for up to 8 months after injury. To validate the clinical relevance of this model, the treatment potency after systemic treatment with the clinically established anti-spastic agents baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), tizanidine (α2-adrenergic agonist) and NGX424 (AMPA receptor antagonist) was also tested. During the first 3 months post spinal transection, a progressive increase in ankle rotation-evoked muscle resistance, Hoffmann reflex amplitude and increased EMG responses to peripherally applied tactile stimuli were consistently measured. These changes, indicative of the spasticity syndrome, then remained relatively stable for up to 8 months post injury. Systemic treatment with baclofen, tizanidine and NGX424 led to a significant but transient suppression of spinal hyper-reflexia. These data demonstrate that a chronic Th9 spinal transection model in adult SD rat represents a reliable experimental platform to be used in studying the

  8. Thoracic 9 Spinal Transection-Induced Model of Muscle Spasticity in the Rat: A Systematic Electrophysiological and Histopathological Characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Corleto

    Full Text Available The development of spinal hyper-reflexia as part of the spasticity syndrome represents one of the major complications associated with chronic spinal traumatic injury (SCI. The primary mechanism leading to progressive appearance of muscle spasticity is multimodal and may include loss of descending inhibitory tone, alteration of segmental interneuron-mediated inhibition and/or increased reflex activity to sensory input. Here, we characterized a chronic thoracic (Th 9 complete transection model of muscle spasticity in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Isoflurane-anesthetized rats received a Th9 laminectomy and the spinal cord was transected using a scalpel blade. After the transection the presence of muscle spasticity quantified as stretch and cutaneous hyper-reflexia was identified and quantified as time-dependent changes in: i ankle-rotation-evoked peripheral muscle resistance (PMR and corresponding electromyography (EMG activity, ii Hoffmann reflex, and iii EMG responses in gastrocnemius muscle after paw tactile stimulation for up to 8 months after injury. To validate the clinical relevance of this model, the treatment potency after systemic treatment with the clinically established anti-spastic agents baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist, tizanidine (α2-adrenergic agonist and NGX424 (AMPA receptor antagonist was also tested. During the first 3 months post spinal transection, a progressive increase in ankle rotation-evoked muscle resistance, Hoffmann reflex amplitude and increased EMG responses to peripherally applied tactile stimuli were consistently measured. These changes, indicative of the spasticity syndrome, then remained relatively stable for up to 8 months post injury. Systemic treatment with baclofen, tizanidine and NGX424 led to a significant but transient suppression of spinal hyper-reflexia. These data demonstrate that a chronic Th9 spinal transection model in adult SD rat represents a reliable experimental platform to be used in studying the

  9. Experimental radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    Of the various neoplasms induced by ionizing radiation in human and animal populations, leukemias and lymphomas were among the first to receive systematic study and have remained under intensive investigation up to the present time. The reticular tissue neoplasm that has been the most thoroughly studied is a lymphoma of the thymus which characteristically predominates in whole- bodyirradiated mice. Thanks to intensive research on this tumor, much is now known about its pathogenesis. The purpose of this report is to review the knowledge of pathogenesis of other types of radiation-induced leukemias and lymphomas, in an effort to assess the extent to which the comparative data for all such diseases can be integrated into a single unifying framework

  10. Idazoxan attenuates spinal cord injury by enhanced astrocytic activation and reduced microglial activation in rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Chen, Yan-Yan; Shang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Zhen-Guo; Chen, Guo-Qian; Han, Zhao; Shao, Bei; Yang, Hui-Min; Xu, Hui-Qin; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2009-02-09

    Idazoxan, an imidazoline 2 receptor (I(2)R) ligand, has been shown to protect against brain injury in several animal models of neurological disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of idazoxan on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. EAE was induced by immunizing Wistar rats with guinea pig spinal cord homogenates emulsified in CFA, followed by daily treatment of idazoxan (0, 0.5 mg/kg, 1.5 mg/kg, 4.5 mg/kg, i.p, bid) for 10 days. The results showed that the treatment of idazoxan (1.5 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the incidence and alleviated inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination in spinal cords and cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the protective effect of idazoxan on EAE was associated with the enhanced astrocytic activation and attenuated microglial activation and with the subsequent down-regulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and IFN-gamma and up-regulated expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta(1). Thus, the daily treatment of the I(2)R ligand idazoxan for 10 days attenuates EAE pathology by differential modulation of astrocytic and microglial activations, raising a possibility that the I(2)R ligand may be a novel strategy for treating EAE.

  11. MRI in the early stage of spinal cord injury: does it have clinical relevance? An experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannmann, T.T.; Freund, M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: An experimental technique for producing a ventral spinal trauma which imitates a slipped intervertebral disc or a fractured vertebra was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging and histology. The results were evaluated with respect to their clinical importance. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 Wistar rats were used for this study. An inflatable angioplasty balloon device was placed dorsally or ventrally to the spinal cord in order to produce a spinal trauma. 30 rats were used to compare neurological pathologies between ventral and dorsal trauma. 30 animals underwent graded ventral spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and the results were compared to histology. Results: Using this technique, the balloon device can be placed ventrally to the spinal cord. The compression time had a direct effect on changes on magnetic resonance images and edema in histology, but a longer compression time did not produce increased bleeding. The T2-weighted MRI scans showed hyperintense changes immediately after spinal compression. Therefore, they are the appropriate way for diagnosing acute spinal injuries. Although the T1-weighted MRI scans did not change after spinal compression, they are important for diagnosing epidural hematomas. (orig.)

  12. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  13. Radiation-induced apoptosis in the neonatal and adult rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y Q; Wong, C S

    2000-09-01

    This study was designed to characterize radiation-induced apoptosis in the spinal cord of the neonatal and young adult rat. Spinal cords (C2-T2) of 1-, 2- and 10-week-old rats were irradiated with a single dose of 8, 18 or 22 Gy. Apoptosis was assessed histologically according to its specific morphological features or by using the TUNEL assay. Cell proliferation was assessed immunohistochemically using BrdU. Identities of cell types undergoing apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization using markers for neurons, glial progenitor cells, microglia, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The time course of radiation-induced apoptosis in 1- or 2-week-old rat spinal cord was similar to that in the young adult rat spinal cord. A peak response was observed at about 8 h after irradiation, and the apoptosis index returned to the levels in nonirradiated spinal cords at 24 h. The neonatal rat spinal cord demonstrated increased apoptosis compared to the adult. Values for total yield of apoptosis over 24 h induced by 8 Gy in the neonatal rat spinal cord were significantly greater than that in the adult. Immunohistochemistry studies using Leu7, galactocerebroside, Rip and adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor protein indicated that most apoptotic cells were cells of the oligodendroglial lineage regardless of the age of the animal. No evidence of Gfap or factor VIII-related antigen-positive apoptotic cells was observed, and there was a small number of apoptotic microglial cells (lectin-Rca1 positive) in the neonatal and adult rat spinal cord. In the neonatal but not adult rat spinal cord, about 10% of the apoptotic cells appeared to be neurons and were immunoreactive for synaptophysin. Labeling indices (LI) for BrdU in nonirradiated 1- and 2-week-old rat spinal cord were 20.0 and 16.3%, respectively, significantly greater than the LI of 1.0% in the 10-week-old rat spinal cord. At 8 h after a single dose of 8 Gy, 13.4% of the apoptotic cells were

  14. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bo; Wang, He; Sun, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ai, Chun-Yu; Tan, Wen-Fei; White, Paul F; Ma, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Intrathecal administration of bone marrow stromal cells has been found to produce beneficial effects on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord. The blood-spinal cord barrier is critical to maintain spinal cord homeostasis and neurologic function. However, the effects of bone marrow stromal cells on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury are not well understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of bone marrow stromal cells on blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. This was a prospective animal study conducted at the Central Laboratory of the First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University. The study used 81 Japanese white rabbits (weight, 1.8-2.6 kg). Spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Two days before the injury was induced, bone marrow stromal cells (1 × 10(8) in 0.2-mL phosphate-buffered saline) were transplanted by intrathecal injection. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histologic examination. The permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier was examined using Evans blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The expression and localization of tight junction protein occludin were assessed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression were also measured. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathologic deficits (P spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, bone marrow stromal cells treatment suppressed spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury-induced decreases in occludin (P bone marrow stromal cells reduced the excessive expression of MMP-9 and TNF-α (P bone marrow

  15. Chemical stimulation of the ST36 acupoint reduces both formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors and spinal astrocyte activation via spinal alpha-2 adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk-Yun; Kim, Chi-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Hye-Jung; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2011-11-25

    Spinal astrocytes have emerged as important mechanistic contributors to pathological and chronic pain. Recently, we have demonstrated that injection of diluted bee venom (DBV) into the Zusanli (ST36) acupoint produces a potent anti-nociceptive effect via the activation of spinal alpha-2 adrenoceptors. However, it is unclear if this anti-nociceptive effect is associated with alterations in spinal astrocytes. Thus, the present study was designed to determine: (1) whether DBV's anti-nociceptive effect in the formalin test involves suppression of spinal astrocyte activation; (2) whether DBV-induced astrocyte inhibition is mediated by spinal alpha-2 adrenoceptors; and (3) whether this glial modulation is potentiated by intrathecal administration of the glial metabolic inhibitor, fluorocitrate (FC) in combination with DBV injection. DBV was injected directly into the ST36 acupoint, and spinal expression of the astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was assessed together with effects on formalin-induced nociception. DBV treatment reduced pain responses in the late phase of the formalin test and significantly blocked the formalin-evoked increase in spinal GFAP expression. These effects of DBV were prevented by intrathecal pretreatment with selective alpha-2A and alpha-2C adrenoceptor antagonists. Moreover, low dose intrathecal injection of FC in conjunction with low dose DBV injection into the ST36 acupoint synergistically suppressed pain responses and GFAP expression. These results demonstrate that DBV stimulation of the ST36 acupoint inhibits the formalin-induced activation of spinal astrocytes and nociceptive behaviors in this inflammatory pain model and this inhibition is associated with the activation of spinal alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stimulation-induced optical signals in rat spinal cord slices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka; Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2002), s. 34 ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease. Rome - Italy, 21.05.2002-25.05.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004; CEZ:MSM 5011112 Keywords : spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.600, year: 2002

  17. Spinal cord blood flow and ischemic injury after experimental sacrifice of thoracic and abdominal segmental arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; Homann, Tobias M; Luehr, Maximilian; Kari, Fabian A; Weisz, Donald J; Kleinman, George; Plestis, Konstadinos A; Griepp, Randall B

    2008-06-01

    Spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) after sacrifice of thoracoabdominal aortic segmental arteries (TAASA) during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains poorly understood. This study explored SCBF for 72 h after sacrifice of all TAASA. Fourteen juvenile Yorkshire pigs underwent complete serial TAASA sacrifice (T4-L5). Six control pigs underwent anesthesia and cooling to 32 degrees C with no TAASA sacrifice. In the experimental animals, spinal cord function was continuously monitored using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) until 1h after clamping the last TAASA. Fluorescent microspheres enabled segmental measurement of SCBF along the entire spinal cord before, and 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, 24 h and 72 h after complete TAASA sacrifice. A modified Tarlov score was obtained for 3 days after surgery. All the pigs with complete TAASA sacrifice retained normal cord function (MEP) until 1h after TAASA ligation. Seven pigs (50%) with complete TAASA sacrifice recovered after 72 h; seven pigs suffered paraparesis or paraplegia. Intraoperatively, and until 1h postoperatively, SCBF was similar among the three groups along the entire cord. Postoperatively, SCBF did not decrease in any group, but significant hyperemia occurred at 5h in controls and recovery animals, but did not occur in pigs that developed paraparesis or paraplegia in the T8-L2 segments (p=0.0002) and L3-S segments (p=0.0007). At 24h, SCBF remained marginally lower from T8 caudally; at 72h, SCBF was similar among all groups along the entire cord. SCBF in the segments T8-L2 at 5h predicted functional recovery (p=0.003). This study suggests that critical spinal cord ischemia after complete TAASA sacrifice does not occur immediately (intraoperatively), but is delayed 1-5h or longer after clamping, and represents failure to mount a hyperemic response to rewarming and awakening. The short duration of low SCBF associated with spinal cord injury suggests that hemodynamic and metabolic manipulation lasting only 24-72 h may

  18. Effects of prophylactic ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Zheng, G; Han, J; Wang, Y; Zheng, J

    2015-11-01

    A range of strategies including physical interventions, intravenous fluids and vasopressor drugs have been used to minimize or prevent spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension. Recent studies suggest that ondansetron, a commonly used antiemetic, also affects hypotension. This systematic review investigated the effects of prophylactic ondansetron on hemodynamic changes following spinal anesthesia. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library databases and www.clinicaltrials.gov were searched for randomized controlled trials studying the effects of ondansetron on hemodynamic changes induced by spinal anesthesia. The primary outcome was hypotension. Relative risk (RR) or mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were used to analyze outcomes. Ten randomized controlled trials with 863 patients were included in the analysis. Prophylactic ondansetron reduced the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. The RR of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension after ondansetron administration was 0.53 (95% CI 0.32 to 0.86) in obstetric patients and 0.16 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.51) in non-obstetric patients. There was significant heterogeneity among obstetric studies (I(2) = 71%). Ondansetron also reduced the incidence of bradycardia, nausea and vomiting after spinal anesthesia with RRs of 0.27 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.47), 0.24 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.42) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.08 to 3.08), respectively. The doses of ephedrine and phenylephrine required to treat hypotension were reduced by ondansetron with mean differences of -2.35 mg (95% CI -4.14 to -0.55 mg) and -31.16 μg (95% CI -57.46 to -4.87 μg), respectively. This review suggests that prophylactic ondansetron reduces the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and vasopressor consumption in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. In addition, ondansetron can also reduce related adverse outcomes such as bradycardia, nausea and vomiting. However, given the relatively large

  19. The Important Liaison Between Onuf Nucleus-Pudendal Nerve Ganglia Complex Degeneration and Urinary Retention in Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolas, Coskun; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Ozturk, Cengiz; Kabalar, Esref; Akca, Nezih; Eren, Huseyin; Gundogdu, Cemal; Kotan, Dilcan; Aydin, Nazan

    2016-05-01

    The Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) supplies pudendal nerve roots and conus medullaris. The aim of this study was to elucidate if there is any relationship between neurodegenerative changes of the Onuf nucleus (ON)-pudendal nerve ganglia complex secondary to vasospasm of the AKA after spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was conducted on 22 rabbits, which were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (n = 5), sham (n = 5), and spinal SAH (n = 12). Experimental spinal SAH was induced at the L2 level. After 2 weeks, the ON-pudendal nerve ganglia complex and AKA were examined histopathologically. Bladder volume values were estimated, and results were analyzed statistically. Two animals died within the first week of experiment. Histopathologically, severe vasospasm of the AKA and neuronal degeneration and neuronal apoptosis were observed in the ON-pudendal nerve ganglia complex in 5 animals of the SAH group. The mean volume of the imaginary AKA, mean bladder volumes, and degenerated neuron densities of ON and pudendal nerve ganglia were estimated. We found that vasospasm of the AKA led to numerous neuron degenerations in ON and pudendal ganglia and consequently urinary retention (P < 0.005). ON-pudendal nerve ganglia complex degeneration secondary to vasospasm of the AKA may be a cause of urinary retention after spinal SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-Term Spinal Cord Stimulation Alleviates Mechanical Hypersensitivity and Increases Peripheral Cutaneous Blood Perfusion in Experimental Painful Diabetic Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Maarten; Hermes, Denise; Honig, Wiel M; Linderoth, Bengt; van Kuijk, Sander M J; van Kleef, Maarten; Joosten, Elbert A

    2018-03-09

    This study utilizes a model of long-term spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in experimental painful diabetic polyneuropathy (PDPN) to investigate the behavioral response during and after four weeks of SCS (12 hours/day). Second, we investigated the effect of long-term SCS on peripheral cutaneous blood perfusion in experimental PDPN. Mechanical sensitivity was assessed in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats (n = 50) with von Frey analysis. Hypersensitive rats (n = 24) were implanted with an internal SCS battery, coupled to an SCS electrode covering spinal levels L2-L5. The effects of four weeks of daily conventional SCS for 12 hours (n = 12) or Sham SCS (n = 12) were evaluated with von Frey assessment, and laser Doppler imaging (LDI). Average paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) increased during long-term SCS in the SCS group, in contrast to a decrease in the Sham group (Sham vs. SCS; p = 0.029). Twenty-four hours after long-term SCS average PWT remained higher in the SCS group. Furthermore, the SCS group showed a higher cutaneous blood perfusion during long-term SCS compared to the Sham group (Sham vs. SCS; p = 0.048). Forty-eight hours after long-term SCS, no differences in skin perfusion were observed. We demonstrated that long-term SCS results in decreased baseline mechanical hypersensitivity and results in increased peripheral blood perfusion during stimulation in a rat model of PDPN. Together, these findings indicate that long-term SCS results in modulation of the physiological circuitry related to the nociceptive system in addition to symptomatic treatment of painful symptoms. © 2018 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Novel role for SLPI in MOG-induced EAE revealed by spinal cord expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigner Ludwig

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG in female Dark Agouti (DA rats is a chronic demyelinating animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. To identify new candidate molecules involved in the evolution or repair of EAE-lesions we used Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to compare the spinal cord transcriptome at the peak of EAE, during remission and at the first relapse with healthy DA rats. Methods Untreated DA rats and DA rats immunised with MOG protein were sacrificed at defined time points. Total RNA was isolated from spinal cord tissue and used for hybridization of Affymetrix rat genome arrays RG U34 A-C. Selected expression values were confirmed by RealTime PCR. Adult neural stem cells were incubated with recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation, cyclin D1 and HES1 expression by RealTime PCR, cell differentiation by immunofluorescence analysis and IkappaBalpha degradation by Western blot. Results Among approximately 26,000 transcripts studied more than 1,100 were differentially regulated. Focussing on functional themes, we noticed a sustained downregulation of most of the transcripts of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, we found new candidate genes possibly contributing to regenerative processes in the spinal cord. Twelve transcripts were solely upregulated in the recovery phase, including genes not previously associated with repair processes. Expression of SLPI was upregulated more than hundredfold during EAE attack. Using immunohistochemistry, SLPI was identified in macrophages, activated microglia, neuronal cells and astrocytes. Incubation of adult neural stem cells (NSC with recombinant SLPI resulted in an increase of cell proliferation and of differentiation towards oligodendrocytes. These processes were paralleled by an upregulation of the cell-cycle promotor cyclin D1 and a

  2. Effect of neurotransmitters and bone marrow cells for neuronal regeneration in iatrogenic spinal cord injury: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ps; Paulose, Cs; Sreekanth, R

    2010-07-01

    Spinal cord trauma is a major health problem with associated physical, social, economic and psychological sequelae. Despite many advances in research and treatment modalities, the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury remains unclear, and morbidity and mortality among these patients remain high. This experimental study investigates the regenerative cell proliferation effects of bone marrow supplemented with neurotransmitters combinations in the regeneration of spinal cord injury Ethical Committee Clearance was obtained for animal study. All animal care and procedures were in accordance with the CPCSEA and National Institute of Health guidelines. Thirty Wistar rats with monoplegia following surgical hemitransection of the spinal cord were used for the study. Half of them were randomly selected as the test group and the rest as the control group. Spinal cord injury model of Wistar rats in the test group were treated by infusing a combination of neurotransmitters and bone marrow at the site of injury using a special polythene tube and reservoir for 21 days. In the control group of rats with monoplegia, normal saline was infused at the site of injury for 21 days. The observations are recorded along with results. The monoplegia in the test group of rats recovered significantly (P value bone marrow cells and neurotransmitters combination. In the control group of rats, there was no recovery. The reward-seeking locomotor test and sensory recovery test confirmed recovery from spinal cord injury in the test group with significance. The neurotransmitters and bone marrow combination was responsible for functional recovery in the test group of rats with experimental spinal cord injury We believe that the combination of neurotransmitters along with bone marrow may be a scope of future research in patients with spinal cord injury.

  3. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (Ppain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinal release of tumour necrosis factor activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mediates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, D B; Abdelmoaty, S; Sandor, K; Codeluppi, S; Fitzsimmons, B; Steinauer, J; Hua, X Y; Yaksh, T L; Svensson, C I

    2015-02-01

    Mounting evidence points to individual contributions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway to the induction and maintenance of various pain states. Here we explore the role of spinal TNF and JNK in carrageenan-induced hypersensitivity. As links between TNF and JNK have been demonstrated in vitro, we investigated if TNF regulates spinal JNK activity in vivo. TNF levels in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, spinal TNF gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and TNF protein expression, JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation by western blotting. The role of spinal TNF and JNK in inflammation-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was assessed by injecting the TNF inhibitor etanercept and the JNK inhibitors SP600125 and JIP-1 intrathecally (i.t.). TNF-mediated regulation of JNK activity was examined by assessing the effect of i.t. etanercept on inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. TNF levels were increased in CSF and spinal cord following carrageenan-induced inflammation. While JNK phosphorylation followed the same temporal pattern as TNF, c-jun was only activated at later time points. Intrathecal injection of TNF and JNK inhibitors attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. TNF stimulation induced JNK phosphorylation in cultured spinal astrocytes and blocking the spinal actions of TNF in vivo by i.t. injection of etanercept reduced inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. Here we show that spinal JNK activity is dependent on TNF and that both TNF and the JNK signalling pathways modulate pain-like behaviour induced by peripheral inflammation. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  5. The selective poly(ADP)ribose-polymerase 1 inhibitor INO1001 reduces spinal cord injury during porcine aortic cross-clamping-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Christian; Scheuerle, Angelika; Hauser, Balázs; Schelzig, Hubert; Szabó, Csaba; Radermacher, Peter; Kick, Jochen

    2007-05-01

    It is well-established that poly(ADP)ribose-polymerase (PARP) assumes major importance during ischemic brain damage, and the selective PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 reduced spinal cord damage in murine aortic occlusion-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury. We investigated the effect of the PARP-1 inhibitor INO1001 on aortic-occlusion-related porcine spinal cord injury. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study in an animal laboratory. Ten anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented pigs. Animals underwent 45 min of thoracic aortic cross-clamping after receiving vehicle (n=5) or intravenous INO1001 (n=5, total dose 4 mg/kg administered both before clamping and during reperfusion). During reperfusion continuous intravenous norepinephrine was incrementally adjusted to maintain blood pressure at or above 80% of the preclamping level. Plasma INO1001 levels were analyzed by HPLC. After 4[Symbol: see text]h of reperfusion spinal cord biopsy samples were analyzed for neuronal damage (hematoxyline-eosine and Nissl staining), expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes p21 and p27 (immunohistochemistry), and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling assay). Plasma INO1001 levels were 0.8-2.3 and 0.30-0.76 mM before and after clamping, respectively. While 3-5% of the spinal cord neurons were irreversibly damaged in the INO1001 animals, the neuronal cell injury was three times higher in the control group. Neither p21 and p27 expression nor apoptosis showed any intergroup difference. The selective PARP-1 inhibitor INO1001 markedly reduced aortic occlusion-induced spinal cord injury. Given the close correlation reported in the literature between morphological damage and impaired spinal cord function, INO1001 may improve spinal cord recovery after thoracic aortic cross-clamping.

  6. Evaluation of Avulsion-Induced Neuropathology in Rat Spinal Cords with 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Min Ling

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA leads to dramatic motoneuron death and glial reactions in the corresponding spinal segments at the late stage of injury. To protect spinal motoneurons, assessment of the affected spinal segments should be done at an earlier stage of the injury. In this study, we employed 18F-FDG small-animal PET/CT to assess the severity of BPRA-induced cervical spinal cord injuries. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly treated and divided into three groups: Av+NS (brachial plexus root avulsion (Av treated with normal saline, Av+GM1 (treated with monosialoganglioside, and control. At time points of 3 day (d, 1 week (w, 2 w, 4 w and 8 w post-injury, 18F-FDG micro-PET/CT scans and neuropathology assessments of the injured spinal roots, as well as the spinal cord, were performed. The outcomes of the different treatments were compared. The results showed that BPRA induced local bleeding and typical Wallerian degeneration of the avulsed roots accompanied by 18F-FDG accumulations at the ipsilateral cervical intervertebral foramen. BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the motoneurons correlated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord during the first 2 w post-injury. The GM1 treatment reduced BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and inhibited the de novo nNOS expressions in spinal motoneurons. The GM1 treatment also protected spinal motoneurons from avulsion within the first 4 w post-injury. The data from this study suggest that 18F-FDG PET/CT could be used to assess the severity of BPRA-induced primary and secondary injuries in the spinal cord. Furthermore, GM1 is an effective drug for reducing primary and secondary spinal cord injuries following BPRA.

  7. Experimentally induced Porcine Coccidiosis | Onawunmi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (1977) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Experimentally induced Porcine Coccidiosis. OA Onawunmi. Abstract. No abstract.

  8. Blocking weight-induced spinal cord injury in rats: effects of TRH or naloxone on motor function recovery and spinal cord blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of thyotropin releasing hormone (TRH) or naloxone to reduce the motor function deficit and to improve the spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was investigated in a rat spinal cord compression injury model. Spinal cord injury was induced by compression for 5 min with a load of 35 g on a 2.2 x 5.0 mm sized compression plate causing a transient paraparesis. One group of animals was given TRH, one group naloxone and one group saline alone. Each drug was administered intravenously as a bolus dose of 2 mg/kg 60 min after injury followed by a continuous infusion of 2 mg/kg/h for 4 h. The motor performance was assessed daily on the inclined plant until Day 4, when SCBF was measured with the 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic method. It was found that neither TRH nor naloxone had promoted motor function recovery or affected SCBF 4 days after spinal cord injury. (author)

  9. Role of the spinal Na+/H+ exchanger in formalin-induced nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Godínez-Chaparro, Beatriz; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2011-08-21

    This study assessed the role of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) in the formalin-induced nociception as well as the expression of the NHE isoform 1 (NHE1) in the rat spinal cord by using immunohistochemistry. Rats received a 50μl injection of diluted formalin (0.5%). Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw. Intrathecal administration of the partially selective NHE1 inhibitors DMA, EIPA (0.3-30μM/rat) and the selective NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide (0.03-3μM/rat) significantly increased formalin-induced flinching behavior in a dose-dependent manner during both phases of the test. Immunohistochemical analysis of the rat lumbar spinal cord showed that NHE1 was mainly expressed in the lamina I of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Double immunofluorescence staining showed co-localization of NHE1 with the peptide-rich sensory nerve fiber markers, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, but not with markers of neuronal cell bodies (NeuN), microglia (OX-42) or astroglia (GFAP). Collectively, these pharmacological and anatomical results suggest that spinal NHE1 plays a role in formalin-induced nociception acting as a protective protein extruding H(+). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A new device concept for directly modulating spinal cord pathways: initial in vivo experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flouty, Oliver; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Wilson, Saul; Reddy, Chandan G; Howard, Matthew A III; Jeffery, Nicholas D; Brennan, Timothy J; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Utz, Marcel; Gillies, George T

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel spinal cord (SC) stimulator that is designed to overcome a major shortcoming of existing stimulator devices: their restricted capacity to selectively activate targeted axons within the dorsal columns. This device overcomes that limitation by delivering electrical stimuli directly to the pial surface of the SC. Our goal in testing this device was to measure its ability to physiologically activate the SC and examine its capacity to modulate somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) triggered by peripheral stimulation. In this acute study on adult sheep (n = 7), local field potentials were recorded from a grid placed in the subdural space of the right hemisphere during electrical stimulation of the left tibial nerve and the spinal cord. Large amplitude SSEPs (>200 µV) in response to SC stimulation were consistently obtained at stimulation strengths well below the thresholds inducing neural injury. Moreover, stimulation of the dorsal columns with signals employed routinely by devices in standard clinical use, e.g., 50 Hz, 0.2 ms pulse width, produced long-lasting changes (>4.5 h) in the SSEP patterns produced by subsequent tibial nerve stimulation. The results of these acute experiments demonstrate that this device can be safely secured to the SC surface and effectively activate somatosensory pathways. (paper)

  11. Leuprolide acetate induces structural and functional recovery of injured spinal cord in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Díaz-Galindo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and its synthetic analog leuprolide acetate, a GnRH agonist, have neurotrophic properties. This study was designed to determine whether administration of leuprolide acetate can improve locomotor behavior, gait, micturition reflex, spinal cord morphology and the amount of microglia in the lesion epicenter after spinal cord injury in rats. Rats with spinal cord compression injury were administered leuprolide acetate or saline solution for 5 weeks. At the 5 th week, leuprolide acetate-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery by 38%, had improvement in kinematic gait and exhibited voiding reflex recovery by 60%, as compared with the 1 st week. By contrast, saline solution-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery only by 7%, but voiding reflex did not recover. More importantly, leuprolide acetate treatment reduced microglial immunological reaction and induced a trend towards greater area of white and gray matter in the spinal cord. Therefore, leuprolide acetate has great potential to repair spinal cord injury.

  12. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of patholo...

  13. The effect of spinal manipulation on deep experimental muscle pain in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Søvde, Beate

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation is commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain syndromes. The mechanisms by which HVLA-manipulation might reduce spinal pain are not well understood, but often assumed to relate to the reduction of biomechanical dysfunction. It ...

  14. Alterações vesicais na lesão medular experimental em ratos Urinary bladder changes in experimental spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Meyer

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O trauma raquemedular é uma das lesões traumáticas com maior impacto sobre a sociedade, o que faz com que enormes investimentos sejam feitos em estudos visando sua cura. Para a realização de pesquisas sobre lesão medular, é necessário que se utilize um modelo reprodutível desta lesão. A padronização de um sistema de lesão medular experimental provoca alterações não só no sistema nervoso mas também sistêmicas. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo visa avaliar as alterações vesicais na fase aguda da lesão medular experimental. MÉTODOS Foram utilizados 34 ratos Wistar machos divididos em grupo controle (A e grupo experimento (B. Enquanto os animais do grupo B foram submetidos à laminectomia no nível T9-T10 seguida de lesão medular, os do grupo A (n=4 foram submetidos somente à laminectomia. Os animais do grupo B foram dividos em 6 grupos distintos (n=5 e foram submetidos à eutanásia após 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 horas e 4 dias. RESULTADOS: Verificou-se redução da camada urotelial em todos animais do grupo B, presença de células inflamatórias e congestão vascular principalmente após 8 horas, entre outros achados. CONCLUSÃO: As alterações histológicas na fase aguda da lesão medular evidenciaram importante comprometimento vesical, sendo essa uma alteração sistêmica de relevância em lesados medulares.Spinal cord trauma is one of the lesions with highest socioeconomical impact. To develop research on spinal cord field it is mandatory to use a reproductible model for inducing lesions. Standardized spinal cord injury (SCI promotes changes not only in the nervous system but also systemic changes. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate urinary bladder changes during the acute phase of experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Thirty four Wistar male rats were allocated in 2 groups: controll (A and experiment (B. While animals from group B underwent laminectomy at T9-T10 level followed by SCI, group A underwent only

  15. EFFICACY OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTED INTERBODY SPINAL FUSION

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    Gianfilippo Caggiari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to analyze the influence of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP on bone growth in experimental instrumented interbody spinal fusion (IISF. Methods. 16 adult sheep underwent IISF at L3–L4 level using a cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage with morselized iliac crest cancellous autograft. In 8 animals (Group I this was augmented with PRP, in the remaining 8 (Group II, it was not. Radiographs of the spine were taken preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months, moreover autoptic vertebral samples were obtained and evaluated histologically and by CT scan at 8 months. Results. Histological analysis revealed more evident new bone formation with bony bridge into the cages in Group I than Group II. There were relevant differences between the groups with regard to interbody fusion calculated using trabecular bone score (p<0.05.

  16. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Nakae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  17. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models. PMID:21436995

  18. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost L M Jongen

    Full Text Available Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS, an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level.

  19. Experimentally-induced dissociation impairs visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Chris R; Mersaditabari, Niloufar

    2013-12-01

    Dissociation is a phenomenon common in a number of psychological disorders and has been frequently suggested to impair memory for traumatic events. In this study we explored the effects of dissociation on visual memory. A dissociative state was induced experimentally using a mirror-gazing task and its short-term effects on memory performance were investigated. Sixty healthy individuals took part in the experiment. Induced dissociation impaired visual memory performance relative to a control condition; however, the degree of dissociation was not associated with lower memory scores in the experimental group. The results have theoretical and practical implications for individuals who experience frequent dissociative states such as patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein upregulation in dorsal spinal cord mediates spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Zeng, Jun; Sharp, Kelli; Kim, Donghyun; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2011-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can dramatically impair the quality of life for SCI patients. SCI-induced neuropathic pain can be manifested as both tactile allodynia (a painful sensation to a non-noxious stimulus) and hyperalgesia (an enhanced sensation to a painful stimulus). The mechanisms underlying these pain states are poorly understood. Clinical studies have shown that gabapentin, a drug that binds to the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Ca(v)α2δ-1) proteins is effective in the management of SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Accordingly, we hypothesized that tactile allodynia post SCI is mediated by an upregulation of Ca(v)α2δ-1 in dorsal spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether SCI-induced dysregulation of spinal Ca(v)α2δ-1 plays a contributory role in below-level allodynia development in a rat spinal T9 contusion injury model. We found that Ca(v)α2δ-1 expression levels were significantly increased in L4-6 dorsal, but not ventral, spinal cord of SCI rats that correlated with tactile allodynia development in the hind paw plantar surface. Furthermore, both intrathecal gabapentin treatment and blocking SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 protein upregulation by intrathecal Ca(v)α2δ-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could reverse tactile allodynia in SCI rats. These findings support that SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 upregulation in spinal dorsal horn is a key component in mediating below-level neuropathic pain states, and selectively targeting this pathway may provide effective pain relief for SCI patients. Spinal cord contusion injury caused increased calcium channel Ca(v)α2δ-1 subunit expression in dorsal spinal cord that contributes to neuropathic pain states. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Reihani Kermani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI. Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01 than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42 and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20 (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively. Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001 and the sham-treated group (P<0.001. Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI.

  2. Using visuo-kinetic virtual reality to induce illusory spinal movement: the MoOVi Illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Harvie, Daniel S.; Smith, Ross T.; Hunter, Estin V.; Davis, Miles G.; Sterling, Michele; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2017-01-01

    Background Illusions that alter perception of the body provide novel opportunities to target brain-based contributions to problems such as persistent pain. One example of this, mirror therapy, uses vision to augment perceived movement of a painful limb to treat pain. Since mirrors can’t be used to induce augmented neck or other spinal movement, we aimed to test whether such an illusion could be achieved using virtual reality, in advance of testing its potential therapeutic benefit. We hypothe...

  3. Substance P spinal signaling induces glial activation and nociceptive sensitization after fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Sun, Yuan; Wei, Tzuping; Clark, David J; Kingery, Wade S

    2015-01-01

    Tibia fracture in rodents induces substance P (SP)-dependent keratinocyte activation and inflammatory changes in the hindlimb, similar to those seen in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In animal pain models spinal glial cell activation results in nociceptive sensitization. This study tested the hypothesis that limb fracture triggers afferent C-fiber SP release in the dorsal horn, resulting in chronic glia activation and central sensitization. At 4 weeks after tibia fracture and casting ...

  4. Assessment of the neuroprotective effects of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor huperzine A in an experimental spinal cord trauma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, Veysel; Baran, Oguz; Yuceli, Sahin; Erdogan, Hakan; Altintas, Ozge; Baran, Gozde E; Tasdemiroglu, Erol

    2018-04-01

    Spinal cord injury is nowadays still a challenging disease, and a treatment option aimed at the primary site of injury does not currently exist. Therefore, the management of acute spinal cord injury has recently focused on the reasons behind the aggravation of the initial insult through secondary mechanisms, and the search for pharmacological treatment protocols is generally aimed at reducing and minimizing the neural injury and neurological sequela. The secondary spinal cord injury usually develops following a primary lesion induced by spinal cord contusion and the emergence of apoptotic cells has been found to play an important role in the development of secondary injury. We propose that huperzine A may induce a significant reduction in the number of apoptotic cells because it possesses the ability to protect cells against glutamate, ischemia and staurosporine-induced cytotocity and apoptosis. Huperzine A was administered intraperitoneally to male Wistar Albino rats (220-340 g of body weight) after moderate static clip compression (70 g for 60 s) of the spinal cord at T7 level. Neurological functions were assessed using the Basso-Beattle-Breshanan (BBB) motor rating scale until 3th and 7th days before perfusion, following which the spinal cord was harvested for histopathological examinations and apoptotic cell counts. Histopathological evaluations of the spinal cord of the control, trauma and huperzine A treated groups were evaluated. Control group showed normal neuronal and vascular structures of the spinal cord. However, in both trauma groups 3rd- and 7th-day perfusion showed extensive cavitation and hemorrhage, areas of necrosis and edema in gray matter, and degeneration in motor neurons along with patchy areas of necrotic and apoptotic cells. In the group treated with huperzine A, an increased number of normal cells was observed, along with a lower number of necrotic cells, with a significant reduction in the apoptotic cells (Ptrauma motor performance

  5. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on spinal range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan, Mario; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Budgell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) has been shown to have an effect on spine-related pain, both clinically and in experimentally induced pain. However, it is unclear if it has an immediate noticeable biomechanical effect on spinal motion that can be measured in terms of an increased range of motion...

  6. CCL-1 in the spinal cord contributes to neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, N; Honda, K; Uta, D; Beppu, K; Ushijima, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Nakashima, S; Kido, M A; Imoto, K; Takano, Y; Noda, M

    2013-06-20

    Cytokines such as interleukins are known to be involved in the development of neuropathic pain through activation of neuroglia. However, the role of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, in the nociceptive transmission remains unclear. We found that CCL-1 was upregulated in the spinal dorsal horn after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Therefore, we examined actions of recombinant CCL-1 on behavioural pain score, synaptic transmission, glial cell function and cytokine production in the spinal dorsal horn. Here we show that CCL-1 is one of the key mediators involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of CCL-1 mRNA was mainly detected in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion, and the expression of specific CCL-1 receptor CCR-8 was upregulated in the superficial dorsal horn. Increased expression of CCR-8 was observed not only in neurons but also in microglia and astrocytes in the ipsilateral side. Recombinant CCL-1 injected intrathecally (i.t.) to naive mice induced allodynia, which was prevented by the supplemental addition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. Patch-clamp recordings from spinal cord slices revealed that application of CCL-1 transiently enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). In the long term, i.t. injection of CCL-1 induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit, NR1 and NR2B, in the spinal cord. Injection of CCL-1 also upregulated mRNA level of glial cell markers and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6). The tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation was attenuated by prophylactic and chronic administration of neutralizing antibody against CCL-1 and by knocking down of CCR-8. Our results indicate that CCL-1 is one of the key molecules in pathogenesis, and CCL-1/CCR-8 signaling system can be a potential target for drug development in the treatment for neuropathic pain.

  7. Reactive astrocytes undergo M1 microglia/macrohpages-induced necroptosis in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong; Zhang, Kun; Shan, Lequn; Kuang, Fang; Chen, Kun; Zhu, Keqing; Ma, Heng; Ju, Gong; Wang, Ya-Zhou

    2016-02-03

    A unique feature of the pathological change after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the progressive enlargement of lesion area, which usually results in cavity formation and is accompanied by reactive astrogliosis and chronic inflammation. Reactive astrocytes line the spinal cavity, walling off the lesion core from the normal spinal tissue, and are thought to play multiple important roles in SCI. The contribution of cell death, particularly the apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes during the process of cavitation has been extensively studied. However, how reactive astrocytes are eliminated following SCI remains largely unclear. By immunohistochemistry, in vivo propidium iodide (PI)-labeling and electron microscopic examination, here we reported that in mice, reactive astrocytes died by receptor-interacting protein 3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (RIP3/MLKL) mediated necroptosis, rather than apoptosis or autophagy. Inhibiting receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) or depleting RIP3 not only significantly attenuated astrocyte death but also rescued the neurotrophic function of astrocytes. The astrocytic expression of necroptotic markers followed the polarization of M1 microglia/macrophages after SCI. Depleting M1 microglia/macrophages or transplantation of M1 macrophages could significantly reduce or increase the necroptosis of astrocytes. Further, the inflammatory responsive genes Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) are induced in necroptotic astrocytes. In vitro antagonizing MyD88 in astrocytes could significantly alleviate the M1 microglia/macrophages-induced cell death. Finally, our data showed that in human, necroptotic markers and TLR4/MyD88 were co-expressed in astrocytes of injured, but not normal spinal cord. Taken together, these results reveal that after SCI, reactive astrocytes undergo M1 microglia/macrophages-induced necroptosis, partially through TLR/MyD88 signaling, and suggest that

  8. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Ying Qi-Liang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP, which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker and OX-42 (microglia marker, and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t. also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  9. The SCIentinel study - prospective multicenter study to define the spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) - study protocol and interim feasibility data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections are the leading cause of death in the acute phase following spinal cord injury and qualify as independent risk factor for poor neurological outcome (“disease modifying factor”). The enhanced susceptibility for infections is not stringently explained by the increased risk of aspiration in tetraplegic patients, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, or by high-dose methylprednisolone treatment. Experimental and clinical pilot data suggest that spinal cord injury disrupts the balanced interplay between the central nervous system and the immune system. The primary hypothesis is that the Spinal Cord Injury-induced Immune Depression Syndrome (SCI-IDS) is 'neurogenic’ including deactivation of adaptive and innate immunity with decreased HLA-DR expression on monocytes as a key surrogate parameter. Secondary hypotheses are that the Immune Depression Syndrome is i) injury level- and ii) severity-dependent, iii) triggers transient lymphopenia, and iv) causes qualitative functional leukocyte deficits, which may endure the post-acute phase after spinal cord injury. Methods/Design SCIentinel is a prospective, international, multicenter study aiming to recruit about 118 patients with acute spinal cord injury or control patients with acute vertebral fracture without neurological deficits scheduled for spinal surgery. The assessment points are: i) trauma. Assessment includes infections, concomitant injury, medication and neurological classification using American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) and neurological level. Laboratory analyses comprise haematological profiling, immunophenotyping, including HLA-DR expression on monocytes, cytokines and gene expression of immune modulators. We provide an administrative interim analysis of the recruitment schedule of the trial. Discussion The objectives are to characterize the dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune system after spinal cord injury and to explore its proposed 'neurogenic’ origin

  10. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Zaarour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH. Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine.

  11. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

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    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  12. Spinal cord transection-induced allodynia in rats--behavioral, physiopathological and pharmacological characterization.

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    Saïd M'Dahoma

    Full Text Available In humans, spinal cord lesions induce not only major motor and neurovegetative deficits but also severe neuropathic pain which is mostly resistant to classical analgesics. Better treatments can be expected from precise characterization of underlying physiopathological mechanisms. This led us to thoroughly investigate (i mechanical and thermal sensory alterations, (ii responses to acute treatments with drugs having patent or potential anti-allodynic properties and (iii the spinal/ganglion expression of transcripts encoding markers of neuronal injury, microglia and astrocyte activation in rats that underwent complete spinal cord transection (SCT. SCT was performed at thoracic T8-T9 level under deep isoflurane anaesthesia, and SCT rats were examined for up to two months post surgery. SCT induced a marked hyper-reflexia at hindpaws and strong mechanical and cold allodynia in a limited (6 cm2 cutaneous territory just rostral to the lesion site. At this level, pressure threshold value to trigger nocifensive reactions to locally applied von Frey filaments was 100-fold lower in SCT- versus sham-operated rats. A marked up-regulation of mRNAs encoding ATF3 (neuronal injury and glial activation markers (OX-42, GFAP, P2×4, P2×7, TLR4 was observed in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia at T6-T11 levels from day 2 up to day 60 post surgery. Transcripts encoding the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were also markedly but differentially up-regulated at T6-T11 levels in SCT rats. Acute treatment with ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p., morphine (3-10 mg/kg s.c. and tapentadol (10-20 mg/kg i.p. significantly increased pressure threshold to trigger nocifensive reaction in the von Frey filaments test, whereas amitriptyline, pregabalin, gabapentin and clonazepam were ineffective. Because all SCT rats developed long lasting, reproducible and stable allodynia, which could be alleviated by drugs effective in humans, thoracic cord transection might be a

  13. Oral midodrine for prostaglandin e1 induced priapism in spinal cord injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Jean-Marc; Previnaire, Jean-Gabriel; Mieusset, Roger; Plante, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated midodrine as oral treatment for pharmacologically induced priapism in spinal cord injured patients. From 2004 to 2007 we treated 354 spinal cord injured patients with intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E1 to induce erection. Prolonged erection or priapism occurred in 14 cases (1.3% of intracavernous injections). High blood pressure and bradycardia (autonomic dysreflexia) were noted in 2 tetraplegic cases. Except in 2 patients oral midodrine was used as the only therapeutic approach to this event because of its alpha stimulant properties. All patients returned to the flaccid penile state within 30 to 45 minutes after midodrine administration. Oral midodrine was well tolerated with few side effects and without increasing the incidence of autonomic dysreflexia. At 6 months complete erection could be again induced by intracavernous injection in all treated patients. Midodrine administered orally is a simple and efficient treatment for the priapism induced by intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E1. It could be the first line therapeutic approach before more aggressive procedures.

  14. Radiation induced microvascular damage in the rat spinal cord: cellular and secretory factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Siegal, Tali; Meltzer, A; Shezen, E; Ovadia, Haim

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To investigate the short and long-term effect of radiation on micro vessel permeability, endothelin and nitric oxide production, and cellular profile in the spinal cord of rats and to evaluate the influence of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (r-hMnSOD) on these effects. Materials and Methods: The thoracolumbar spinal cord of Fischer rats was irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. At various times afterwards the rats were killed and the spinal cord was excised. Endothelin and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and microvascular permeability were assayed quantitatively. Astrocytes, microglia, vascular basal membrane and neuro filaments were immunohistochemically evaluated. Results: None of the rats developed signs of neurological dysfunction. Endothelin concentrations in the spinal cord were significantly reduced 18 hours after irradiation and continued to decrease until after 10 days (p=<0.007). After 56 days endothelin concentration returned to normal and then rose to markedly elevated levels at 120 and 180 days (p=<0.002). NOS activity was reduced soon after irradiation and remained very low throughout the period of observation despite the changes in endothelin. Vascular permeability was markedly increased after 18 hours and again after 120 and 180 days. Treatment with r-hMnSOD had no effect on normal vascular permeability but abolished the increase in vascular permeability seen after irradiation. Standard microscopic examination revealed no changes in the irradiated spinal cord. Immunohistochemical stains showed a progressive increase in the number of microglial cells per field after 120 and 180 days (p=<0.0003). An increase in astrocytic cells was seen after 180 days with an earlier short lasting peak after 14 days. No abnormalities were found in blood vessel configuration, density and diameter. Vascular basal membrane and neuro filaments were unchanged throughout the study. Conclusions: Following radiation to the spinal cord there

  15. Glial TNFα in the spinal cord regulates neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application in rats

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    Ouyang Handong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN is one of the most common forms of peripheral neuropathy, affecting about 30% of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The symptoms of HIV-SN are dominated by neuropathic pain. Glia activation in the spinal cord has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. This study will investigate the role of spinal TNFα released from glia in HIV-related neuropathic pain. Results Peripheral gp120 application into the rat sciatic nerve induced mechanical allodynia for more than 7 weeks, and upregulated the expression of spinal TNFα in the mRNA and the protein levels at 2 weeks after gp120 application. Spinal TNFα was colocalized with GFAP (a marker of astrocytes and Iba1 (a marker of microglia in immunostaining, suggesting that glia produce TNFα in the spinal cord in this model. Peripheral gp120 application also increased TNFα in the L4/5 DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of TNFα siRNA or soluble TNF receptor reduced gp120 application-induced mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα in the spinal cord and the DRG are involved in neuropathic pain, following the peripheral HIV gp120 application, and that blockade of the glial product TNFα reverses neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application.

  16. Immobilisation-induced hypercalcemia following spinal cord injury affecting the kidney function in two young native Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linstow, Michael V; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Immobilisation-induced hypercalcemia following SCI affecting the kidney function, is a rare but potentially serious condition. We report immobilisation-induced hypercalcemia affecting the kidney function in two young native Greenlanders with spinal cord injury (SCI). CASE...... PRESENTATIONS: Two 15- and 24-year-old male native Greenlanders, both with traumatic C5 SCI were admitted to our spinal cord unit. They were non-smokers without history of daily alcohol intake pre- or immediately post-injury. No physical demanding activities pre-injury. Due to complaints of nausea/vomiting 10...... the last 20 years our spinal cord unit has only experienced immobilisation-induced hypercalcemia following SCI affecting the kidney function in two young male native Greenlanders. This finding of immobilisation-induced hypercalcemia following SCI affecting the kidney function in two young native...

  17. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. IKK/NF-κB-dependent satellite glia activation induces spinal cord microglia activation and neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Noh, Kyungchul; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that both microglia and satellite glial cell (SGC) activation play causal roles in neuropathic pain development after peripheral nerve injury; however, the activation mechanisms and their contribution to neuropathic pain remain elusive. To address this issue, we generated Ikkβ conditional knockout mice (Cnp-Cre/Ikkβ; cIkkβ) in which IKK/NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory SGC activation was abrogated. In these mice, nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and pain hypersensitivity were significantly attenuated compared to those in control mice. In addition, nerve injury-induced proinflammatory gene expression and macrophage infiltration into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were severely compromised. However, macrophages recruited into the DRG had minimal effects on spinal cord microglia activation, suggesting a causal effect for SGC activation on spinal cord microglia activation. In an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms, we measured Csf1 expression in the DRG, which is implicated in spinal cord microglia activation after nerve injury. In cIkkβ mice, nerve injury-induced Csf1 upregulation was ameliorated indicating that IKK/NF-κΒ-dependent SGC activation induced Csf1 expression in sensory neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that nerve injury-induced SGC activation triggers Csf1 induction in sensory neurons, spinal cord microglia activation, and subsequent central pain sensitization.

  19. Assessing TMS-induced D and I waves with spinal H-reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Niclas; Wiegel, Patrick; Kurz, Alexander; Rothwell, John C; Leukel, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of motor cortex produces a series of descending volleys known as D (direct) and I (indirect) waves. In the present study, we questioned whether spinal H-reflexes can be used to dissect D waves and early and late I waves from TMS. We therefore probed H-reflex facilitation at arrival times of D and I waves at the spinal level and thereby changed TMS parameters that have previously been shown to have selective effects on evoked D and different I waves. We changed TMS intensity and current direction and applied a double-pulse paradigm known as short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Experiments were conducted in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) in the arm and soleus (SOL) in the leg. There were two major findings: 1) in FCR, H-reflex facilitation showed characteristic modulations with altered TMS parameters that correspond to the changes of evoked D and I waves; and 2) H-reflexes in SOL did not, possibly because of increased interference from other spinal circuits. Therefore, the most significant outcome of this study is that in FCR, H-reflexes combined with TMS seem to be a useful technique to dissect TMS-induced D and I waves. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Questions that relate to corticospinal function in pathophysiology and movement control demand sophisticated techniques to provide information about corticospinal mechanisms. We introduce a noninvasive electrophysiological technique that may be useful in describing such mechanisms in more detail by dissecting D and I waves from transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Based on the combination of spinal H-reflexes and TMS in the flexor carpi radialis muscle, the technique was shown to measure selective effects on D and I waves from changing TMS parameters.

  20. Effect of transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium induced bone marrow stromal cells on rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Linjie; Gan, Hongquan; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Yingjie

    2017-08-01

    Spinal cord injury is a serious threat to human health and various techniques have been deployed to ameliorate or cure its effects. Stem cells transplantation is one of the promising methods. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) conditioned medium‑induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on spinal cord injury. Rat spinal cord compression injury animal models were generated, and the rats divided into the following three groups: Group A, (control) Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium‑treated group; group B, normal BMSC‑treated group; group C, OEC conditioned medium‑induced BMSC‑treated group. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks following transplantation for hematoxylin and eosin staining, and fluorescence staining of neurofilament protein, growth associated protein‑43 and neuron‑specific nuclear protein. The cavity area of the spinal cord injury was significantly reduced at 2 and 4 weeks following transplantation in group C, and a significant difference between the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score in group C and groups A and B was observed. Regenerated nerve fibers were observed in groups B and C; however, a greater number of regenerated nerve fibers were observed in group C. BMSCs induced by OEC conditioned medium survived in vivo, significantly reduced the cavity area of spinal cord injury, promoted nerve fiber regeneration following spinal cord injury and facilitated recovery of motor function. The present study demonstrated a novel method to repair spinal cord injury by using induced BMSCs, with satisfactory results.

  1. Effect of transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium induced bone marrow stromal cells on rats with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Linjie; Gan, Hongquan; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a serious threat to human health and various techniques have been deployed to ameliorate or cure its effects. Stem cells transplantation is one of the promising methods. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) conditioned medium-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on spinal cord injury. Rat spinal cord compression injury animal models were generated, and the rats divided into the following three groups: Group A, (control) Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-treated group; group B, normal BMSC-treated group; group C, OEC conditioned medium-induced BMSC-treated group. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks following transplantation for hematoxylin and eosin staining, and fluorescence staining of neurofilament protein, growth associated protein-43 and neuron-specific nuclear protein. The cavity area of the spinal cord injury was significantly reduced at 2 and 4 weeks following transplantation in group C, and a significant difference between the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score in group C and groups A and B was observed. Regenerated nerve fibers were observed in groups B and C; however, a greater number of regenerated nerve fibers were observed in group C. BMSCs induced by OEC conditioned medium survived in vivo, significantly reduced the cavity area of spinal cord injury, promoted nerve fiber regeneration following spinal cord injury and facilitated recovery of motor function. The present study demonstrated a novel method to repair spinal cord injury by using induced BMSCs, with satisfactory results. PMID:28656221

  2. Leukotriene enhances NMDA-induced inward currents in dorsal horn neurons of the rat spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoyuki, Yasukuni; Taniguchi, Wataru; Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Nishio, Naoko; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Noguchi, Koichi

    2015-09-09

    LTB4 is classified as a leukotriene (LT), a group of lipid mediators that are derived from arachidonic acid. It is recognized that leukotrienes are involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including peripheral inflammatory pain. However, little is known about the effects of leukotrienes on the spinal dorsal horn during neuropathic pain. Previously, we reported that there was increased expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) at spinal microglia, and the leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1), a high affinity receptor of LTB4, in spinal neurons in spared nerve injury (SNI) model rats. In the present study, we examined the effects of LTB4 on spinal dorsal horn neurons in both naïve and SNI model rats using patch-clamp methods. Bath application of LTB4 did not change AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) or membrane potentials. However, we found that LTB4 enhanced the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated sEPSCs and significantly increased exogenous NMDA-induced inward currents in SNI model rats. This increase of inward currents could be inhibited by a selective LTB4 antagonist, U75302, as well as a GDP-β-S, a G-protein inhibitor. These results indicate that both increased LTB4 from spinal microglia or increased BLT1 in spinal neurons after peripheral nerve injury can enhance the activity of NMDA receptors through intracellular G-proteins in spinal dorsal horn neurons. Our findings showed that LTB4, which may originate from microglia, can activate BLT1 receptors which are expressed on the membrane of spinal dorsal horn neurons during neuropathic pain. This glia-neuron interaction induces the enhancement of NMDA currents through intracellular G-proteins. The enhancement of NMDA receptor sensitivity of dorsal horn neurons may lead to central sensitization, leading to mechanical pain hypersensitivity.

  3. Spinal cord glia and interleukin-1 do not appear to mediate persistent allodynia induced by intramuscular acidic saline in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Annemarie; Mahoney, John H; Milligan, Erin D; Martin, David; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2006-10-01

    Spinal glial activation and consequent interleukin-1 (IL-1) release are implicated in pain facilitation induced by inflammation/damage to skin and peripheral nerves. It is unclear whether pain facilitation induced at deep tissue sites also depends on these. We investigated whether spinal IL-1 and/or glial activation mediates bilateral allodynia induced by repeated unilateral intramuscular injections of acidic saline to rats. Given the prominent role of spinal IL-1 in various bilateral pain models, we predicted that intrathecal IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) would suppress bilateral allodynia in this model as well. Surprisingly, neither single nor repeated intrathecal injections of IL-1ra affected allodynia, measured by the von Frey test, induced by prior intramuscular acidic saline compared with vehicle-injected controls. In addition, we tested the effect of 2 additional intrathecal manipulations that are broadly efficacious in suppressing glially mediated pain facilitation: (1) a glial metabolic inhibitor (fluorocitrate) and (2) the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Like IL-1ra, fluorocitrate and IL-10 each failed to reverse allodynia. Finally, we observed no significant activation of glial cells, as assessed by immunohistochemistry of glial activation markers, in the lumbar spinal cord in response to intramuscular acidic saline. Taken together, the present data suggest that acidic saline-induced bilateral allodynia is created independently of glial activation. From converging lines of evidence, the current studies suggest that persistent bilateral allodynia induced by repeated intramuscular acidic saline is not mediated by spinal IL-1 and/or spinal glial activation. As such, this might represent the first evidence for pain facilitation occurring in the absence of glial involvement.

  4. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Borax partially prevents neurologic disability and oxidative stress in experimental spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Emine Rabia; Gökce, Emre Cemal; Sönmez, Mehmet Akif; Namuslu, Mehmet; Gökce, Aysun; Bodur, A Said

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential effects of borax on ischemia/reperfusion injury of the rat spinal cord. Twenty-one Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups: sham (no ischemia/reperfusion), ischemia/reperfusion, and borax (ischemia/reperfusion + borax); each group was consist of 7 animals. Infrarenal aortic cross clamp was applied for 30 minutes to generate spinal cord ischemia. Animals were evaluated functionally with the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scoring system and inclined-plane test. The spinal cord tissue samples were harvested to analyze tissue concentrations of nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase activity, xanthine oxidase activity, total antioxidant capacity, and total oxidant status and to perform histopathological examination. At the 72nd hour after ischemia, the borax group had significantly higher Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan and inclined-plane scores than those of ischemia/reperfusion group. Histopathological examination of spinal cord tissues in borax group showed that treatment with borax significantly reduced the degree of spinal cord edema, inflammation, and tissue injury disclosed by light microscopy. Xanthine oxidase activity and total oxidant status levels of the ischemia/reperfusion group were significantly higher than those of the sham and borax groups (P borax group were significantly higher than those of the ischemia/reperfusion group (P borax groups in terms of total antioxidant capacity levels (P > .05). The nitric oxide levels and nitric oxide synthase activity of all groups were similar (P > .05). Borax treatment seems to protect the spinal cord against injury in a rat ischemia/reperfusion model and improve neurological outcome. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Preemptive Intramuscular and Intravenous Ephedrine for Reduction of Spinal Anesthesia Induced Hypotension during Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Manochehrian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Spinal anesthesia offers many advantages for cesarean section delivery. But one of its disadvantages is higher incidence of hypotension. Comparison of preemptive intramuscular and intravenous ephedrine for reduction of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension during cesarean section was the aim of this study.Materials & Methods: This study was a randomized double blind clinical trial. 76 women candidate for elective cesarean section & A.S.A (class I,II after obtaining an informed patients consent were randomly divided in four groups. Group IM50: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia , 50 mg ephedrine IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 2 ml N/S Iv were injected. Group IV20: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 20 mg ephedrine IV were injected. Group IV10: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 10 mg ephedrine IV were injected. Group P: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 2 ml N/S IV were injected (Placebo. In all patients blood pressure and heart rate were measured by Reishter manometer and pulse oximetry device (oxypleth 520 A. after infusion of 500 ml ringer IV, spinal anesthesia was performed in sitting position , using needle number 25 gauge , at L3-L4 or L4-L5 level with 1.5 ml hyperbaric lidocaine 5%. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured every minute for five minutes, also every 5 minutes and after 20 minutes every 10 minutes. Hypotension was defined as decreased blood pressure greather than 25% of baseline blood pressure or systolic blood pressure lower than 90 mmHg , which was treated with 10 mg IV ephedrine . Time and dose of therapeutic ephedrine was recorded. Results: By considering age and baseline blood pressure and heart rate, all patients were similar. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP in IV20 group were

  7. Spinal injection of docosahexaenoic acid attenuates carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain through inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Zhao, L-X; Cao, D-L; Gao, Y-J

    2013-06-25

    Neuroinflammation in the spinal cord plays a critical role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a predominant omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in the central nervous system, is known to modulate inflammatory responses in various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated whether DHA could reduce inflammatory pain and inhibit neuroinflammation in the spinal cord following carrageenan injection in mice. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of DHA at 15min before carrageenan injection blocked carrageenan-induced pain hypersensitivity for more than 6h. In addition, i.t. injection of DHA at 3h after carrageenan transiently reversed carrageenan-induced heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, DHA treatment reduced carrageenan-induced activation of microglia, phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosisfactor-α - TNF-α and interleukin-1β - IL-1β) in the L4-5 spinal cord. In cultured microglial cells, DHA dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phosphorylation of p38, production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL10). p38 inhibitor SB203580 inhibited LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide evidence that DHA has antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain, which may be attributed to, at least partially, suppressing a microglia-mediated inflammatory response through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide attenuates nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and mechanical allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwisung; Choi, Boomin; Lim, Hyoungsub; Min, Hyunjung; Oh, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sunghyun; Cho, Joung Goo; Park, Jong-Sang; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence on the causal role of spinal cord microglia activation in the development of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury suggests that microglial activation inhibitors might be useful analgesics for neuropathic pain. Studies also have shown that polyamidoamine dendrimer may function as a drug delivery vehicle to microglia in the central nervous system. In this regard, we developed polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide, a previously identified microglial activation inhibitor, and tested its analgesic efficacy in a mouse peripheral nerve injury model. Result Polyamidoamine dendrimer was delivered selectively to spinal cord microglia upon intrathecal administration. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibited lipoteichoic acid-induced proinflammatory gene expression in primary glial cells. In addition, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration (intrathecal) inhibited peripheral nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglial activation and the expression of pain-related genes in the spinal cord, including Nox2, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration right after nerve injury almost completely reversed peripheral nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia for up to three days. Meanwhile, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration 1.5 days post injury significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibits spinal cord microglia activation and attenuates neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury, which has therapeutic implications for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  9. Calpain inhibitor attenuates ER stress-induced apoptosis in injured spinal cord after bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Dongling; Song, Xinghui; Chen, Yingying; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) therapy for tissue repair is limited by low survival of cells transplanted in the recipient sites after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we investigated the effects of a calpain inhibitor (MDL28170) on BMSCs survival by a rat model of spinal cord injury in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned medium from hypoxia injured VSC4.1 motor neurons (Hypoxia-CM) were collected to mimic the micro-environment of injured spinal cord. Tunicamycin was also applied to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in BMSCs. The CCK-8 assay, LDH leakage assay and flow cytometer assay demonstrated that MDL28170 could enhance BMSCs survival in response to Hypoxia-CM and tunicamycin. Moreover, MDL28170 significantly enhanced GFP-positive BMSCs survival in vivo after transplantation into the contused spinal cord of SCI rats. The protective effects of MDL28170 on BMSCs survival may inhibit the activation of calpain and the downstream ER stress-induced apoptosis. The present results suggested for the first time that MDL28170 with BMSCs transplant helped to rescue cells in injured spinal cord by modulating the ER stress-induced apoptosis. The calpain inhibitor, MDL28170 may have the promising new strategies for promoting the survival of transplanted BMSCs on cell-based regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A new pattern of spinal-cord demyelination in guinea pigs with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mimicking multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colover, J.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described for producing large demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord in the guinea pig. Guinea pigs were pretreated by immunization with ovalbumin and water-soluble adjuvant (N-acetyl-muramyl L-alanyl D-isoglutamine, MDP) in water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's incomplete adjuvant). They were given a large dose (10 mg) of ovalbumin i.p. one month later. After a few weeks the animals were sensitized with guinea-pig basic protein in Freund's complete adjuvant. Five out of 11 animals developed large, distinctive, sharply demarcated, symmetrical demyelinating lesions within 30 days. These lesions occurred in the dorsal and anterior columns, root entry zones and subpial region of the spinal cord. Histology showed a considerable amount of free lipids. There were also infiltrative lesions of classical experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) of normal severity in the same animals. The demyelinating lesions resembled those seen in multiple sclerosis in their location and extent in the spinal cord and in the presence of free lipids. Control experiments indicated that pretreatment with ovalbumin/MDP and the second injection of ovalbumin was necessary for all the demyelination; moreover guinea pigs immunized with basic protein in Freund's complete adjuvant or Freund's incomplete adjuvant plus MDP without pretreatment only developed classical EAE with minimal or no demyelination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7426390

  11. Early protective effects of iloprost after experimental spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, K; Attar, A; Tuna, H; Sargon, M F; Yüceer, N; Türker, R K; Egemen, N

    2000-01-01

    The potential role of Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostocyclin, in treating spinal cord ischemia was investigated in rabbits subjected to aortic occlusion for 15 minutes. Ten adult rabbits weighing 2-2.5 kg received an intravenous infusion of saline (SF) as a control group and 14 rabbits received an intravenous infusion of Iloprost, 25 microg/kg/h. Iloprost infusion was started immediately after clamping of the aorta and continued 60 minutes thereafter. Cortical somatosensorial evoked potentials (CSEP) were recorded during the pre-ischemic period as a baseline and post-ischemic readings were taken at 15, 30 and 60 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between CSEP of the saline and Iloprost treated groups (p < 0.05). All animals were examined neurologically by using a modification of Tarlov scale and all subjects were then deeply anesthetized and their spinal cords were removed for light and electron microscopic examinations at 24 h after spinal cord ischemia. In order to obtain an accurate comparison of ultrastructural changes between saline treated and Iloprost treated groups, a grading scale was performed. The light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of the Iloprost treated group revealed that there was moderate protection of the myelin and axons and edema was attenuated. Findings of this study suggest that Iloprost exerts a protective effect on spinal cord ischemia. However, further studies are needed to reveal possible mechanisms of protection provided by Iloprost.

  12. BAMOS: A recording application for BAsso MOuse scale of locomotion in experimental models of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Alberto; Nieto-Díaz, Manuel; Del Águila, Ángela; Arias, Enrique

    2018-03-02

    Transparency in science is increasingly a hot topic. Scientists are required to show not only results but also evidence of how they have achieved these results. In experimental studies of spinal cord injury, there are a number of standardized tests, such as the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor rating scale for rats and Basso Mouse Scale for mice, which researchers use to study the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury and to evaluate the effects of experimental therapies. Although the standardized data from the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor rating scale and the Basso Mouse Scale are particularly suited for storage and sharing in databases, systems of data acquisition and repositories are still lacking. To the best of our knowledge, both tests are usually conducted manually, with the data being recorded on a paper form, which may be documented with video recordings, before the data is transferred to a spreadsheet for analysis. The data thus obtained is used to compute global scores, which is the information that usually appears in publications, with a wealth of information being omitted. This information may be relevant to understand locomotion deficits or recovery, or even important aspects of the treatment effects. Therefore, this paper presents a mobile application to record and share Basso Mouse Scale tests, meeting the following criteria: i) user-friendly; ii) few hardware requirements (only a smartphone or tablet with a camera running under Android Operating System); and iii) based on open source software such as SQLite, XML, Java, Android Studio and Android SDK. The BAMOS app can be downloaded and installed from the Google Market repository and the app code is available at the GitHub repository. The BAMOS app demonstrates that mobile technology constitutes an opportunity to develop tools for aiding spinal cord injury scientists in recording and sharing experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Minocycline, a microglial inhibitor, blocks spinal CCL2-induced heat hyperalgesia and augmentation of glutamatergic transmission in substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Yu; Chen, Ying-Ling; Li, Allen H; Lu, Juu-Chin; Wang, Hung-Li

    2014-01-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that CCL2 could initiate the hyperalgesia of neuropathic pain by causing central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons and facilitating nociceptive transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which CCL2 enhances spinal pain transmission and causes hyperalgesia remain unknown. The substantia gelatinosa (lamina II) of the spinal dorsal horn plays a critical role in nociceptive transmission. An activated spinal microglia, which is believed to release pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, plays an important role in the development of neuropathic pain, and CCL2 is a key mediator for spinal microglia activation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that spinal CCL2 causes the central sensitization of substantia gelatinosa neurons and enhances spinal nociceptive transmission by activating the spinal microglia and augmenting glutamatergic transmission in lamina II neurons. CCL2 was intrathecally administered to 2-month-old male rats. An intrathecal injection of CCL2 induced heat hyperalgesia, which was assessed using the hot plate test. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings substantia gelatinosa neurons in spinal cord slices were performed to record glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). The hot plate test showed that 1 day after the intrathecal injection of CCL2 (1 μg), the latency of hind-paw withdrawal caused by a heat stimulus was significantly reduced in rats. One day after the intrathecal administration of CCL2, the amplitude of the evoked glutamatergic EPSCs and the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were significantly increased in outer lamina II neurons. Intrathecal co-injection of minocycline, a specific inhibitor of microglial activation, and CCL2 blocked the CCL2-induced reduction in the latency of hind-paw withdrawal and thermal hyperalgesia. Following intrathecal co

  14. Modelo experimental de trauma medular agudo produzido por aparelho estereotáxico modificado Experimental model of acute spinal cord injury produced by modified steriotaxic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B.J. Torres

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 55 ratos machos da espécie Rattus novergicus, variedade Wistar, com o objetivo de propor um modelo experimental de trauma medular produzido por aparelho estereotáxico modificado, capaz de reproduzir clinicamente lesões medulares padronizadas. Após realização de laminectomia dorsal de T13, utilizou-se peso compressivo de 50,5g (25 animais - grupo I ou 70,5g (30 animais - grupo II, durante cinco minutos, comprimindo a medula espinhal. Os animais foram assistidos durante oito dias, por meio de testes comportamentais para avaliar a sensibilidade dolorosa, a capacidade motora, o posicionamento tátil e proprioceptivo e a capacidade de manter-se em plano inclinado. No grupo I, observaram-se déficits neurológicos moderados e transitórios, que variaram entre os animais. No grupo II, foi possível obter um trauma padronizado, caracterizado por paraplegia bilateral e simétrica dos membros posteriores, perda de propriocepção e da sensibilidade dolorosa de todos os animais. A utilização do aparelho estereotáxico desenvolvido permite reproduzir clinicamente trauma medular padronizado em ratos, de maneira simples, econômica e satisfatória, o que poderá proporcionar avanços nas investigações terapêuticas, abrangendo doenças neurodegenerativas, como é o caso do trauma medular agudo.Fifty-five male rats (Rattus novergicus, Wistar variety, were used with the purpose of suggesting an experimental model of spinal cord trauma performed by using a modified stereotaxic equipment capable to reproduce clinically (standardized pattern spinal cord injury. After dorsal laminectomy of T13, a compression was performed with 50.5g (25 animals - group I or 70.5g (30 animals - group II during five minutes on spinal cord. The animals were assisted during eight days by behavioral tests to evaluate painful sensibility, motor capacity, proprioceptive and tactil placing, and stability on inclined plan. In the group I, moderate and transitory

  15. The effect of posterior spinal fixation with bone cement upon vertebral growth in dogs. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, M S; Ok, I Y

    1980-01-01

    In an experimental study the authors tried to clarify the effect on vertebral growth and spinal curvature in dogs following fixation of the posterior elements of the spine at different levels using bone cement. In three separate experimental groups a segment of the dorsal spine, the dorso-lumbar spine or the lumbar spine was securely fixed with bone cement incorporating a radio-opaque wire marker. Growth of the spine was observed with renal X-rays over a six-month period and the following results obtained: 1. Growth in height of the vertebra was not affected by the fixation; 2. The intervertebral disc spaces widened anteriorly and narrowed posteriorly even when fracture of the bone cement occurred; 3. Increasing lordosis developed in all three experimental groups even when a physiological kyphosis was normally present. The greatest increase occurred in the lumbar spine; 4. Fracture of the cement occurred consistently when attempting to secure the dorso-lumbar junction.

  16. Effects of melatonin on spinal cord injury-induced oxidative damage in mice testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X-C; Wang, P; Li, H-W; Wu, Q-B; Zhang, X-Y; Li, B-W; Xiu, R-J

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of melatonin on spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced oxidative damage in testes. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into sham-, SCI- or melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated SCI groups. To induce SCI, a standard weight-drop method that induced a contusion injury at T10 was used. After 1 week, testicular blood flow velocity was measured using the Laser Doppler Line Scanner. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), oxidised glutathione (GSSG) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured in testis homogenates. Microvascular permeability of the testes to Evan's Blue was examined by spectrophotometric and fluorescence microscopic quantitation. The tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in testes were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Melatonin increased the reduced blood flow and decreased SCI-induced permeability of capillaries. MDA levels and MPO activity were elevated in the SCI group compared with shams, which was reversed by melatonin. In contrast, SCI-induced reductions in GSH/GSSG ratio were restored by melatonin. Decreased expression of ZO-1 and occludin was observed, which was attenuated by melatonin. Overall, melatonin treatment protects the testes against oxidative stress damage caused by SCI. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao LU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each: (1 bee-toxin alone group; (2 vehicle (solvent group; (3 low dose (1nmol fluorocitrate group; (4 middle dose (10nmol fluorocitrate group; (5 high dose (50nmol fluorocitrate group. After the measurement of rat paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT and paw volume (PV, the drug or vehicle was administered intrathecally. Twenty minutes later, bee-toxin (0.2mg/50μl was intraplantarly injected into the left hind paw of every rat, and spontaneous flinching reflexes (SFR were observed instantly for 1 hour. Two hours later, PWMT and PV were measured again. Results Intraplantar injection of bee-toxin into one hind paw of rat induced persistent SFR lasting for 1 hour, with PWMT decreased and PV increased in the injected paw. Compared with control group, pretreatment with intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate produced a significant inhibition of bee-toxin-induced persistent SFR (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, decreased the PWMT in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05, but it had no effect on bee-toxin-induced paw edema. Conclusion Activation of spinal glial cells may participate in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain and mechanical hyperalgesia, but not inflammatory response.

  18. Signaling proteins in spinal parenchyma and dorsal root ganglion in rat with spinal injury-induced spasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupcová Skalníková, Helena; Navarro, R.; Marsala, S.; Hrabáková, Rita; Vodička, Petr; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana; Marsala, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2013), s. 41-57 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044; GA TA ČR TA01011466; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : spinal cord trauma * spasticity * hyper-reflexia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.929, year: 2013

  19. Peripheral nerve injury induces trans-synaptic modification of channels, receptors and signal pathways in rat dorsal spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Huang, Fen; Lu, Yin-Jing; Li, Guo-Dong; Bao, Lan; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Xu

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral tissue injury-induced central sensitization may result from the altered biochemical properties of spinal dorsal horn. However, peripheral nerve injury-induced modification of genes in the dorsal horn remains largely unknown. Here we identified strong changes of 14 channels, 25 receptors and 42 signal transduction related molecules in Sprague-Dawley rat dorsal spinal cord 14 days after peripheral axotomy by cDNA microarray. Twenty-nine genes were further confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, Northern blotting, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. These regulated genes included Ca2+ channel alpha1E and alpha2/delta1 subunits, alpha subunits for Na+ channel 1 and 6, Na+ channel beta subunit, AMAP receptor GluR3 and 4, GABAA receptor alpha5 subunit, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha5 and beta2 subunits, PKC alpha, betaI and delta isozymes, JNK1-3, ERK2-3, p38 MAPK and BatK and Lyn tyrosine-protein kinases, indicating that several signal transduction pathways were activated in dorsal spinal cord by peripheral nerve injury. These results demonstrate that peripheral nerve injury causes phenotypic changes in spinal dorsal horn. Increases in Ca2+ channel alpha2/delta1 subunit, GABAA receptor alpha5 subunit, Na+ channels and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in both dorsal spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia indicate their potential roles in neuropathic pain control.

  20. Multiple sites and actions of gabapentin-induced relief of ongoing experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Kirsty; Qu, Chaoling; Navratilova, Edita; Oyarzo, Janice; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; King, Tamara; Dickenson, Anthony H; Porreca, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Gabapentin (GBP) is a first-line therapy for neuropathic pain, but its mechanisms and sites of action remain uncertain. We investigated GBP-induced modulation of neuropathic pain following spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. Intravenous or intrathecal GBP reversed evoked mechanical hypersensitivity and produced conditioned place preference (CPP) and dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) selectively in SNL rats. Spinal GBP also significantly inhibited dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range neuronal responses to a range of evoked stimuli in SNL rats. By contrast, GBP microinjected bilaterally into the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), produced CPP, and elicited NAc DA release selectively in SNL rats but did not reverse tactile allodynia and had marginal effects on wide-dynamic-range neuronal activity. Moreover, blockade of endogenous opioid signaling in the rACC prevented intravenous GBP-induced CPP and NAc DA release but failed to block its inhibition of tactile allodynia. Gabapentin, therefore, can potentially act to produce its pain relieving effects by (a) inhibition of injury-induced spinal neuronal excitability, evoked hypersensitivity, and ongoing pain and (b) selective supraspinal modulation of affective qualities of pain, without alteration of reflexive behaviors. Consistent with previous findings of pain relief from nonopioid analgesics, GBP requires engagement of rACC endogenous opioid circuits and downstream activation of mesolimbic reward circuits reflected in learned pain-motivated behaviors. These findings support the partial separation of sensory and affective dimensions of pain in this experimental model and suggest that modulation of affective-motivational qualities of pain may be the preferential mechanism of GBP's analgesic effects in patients.

  1. MHC-I promotes apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn and contributes to cancer induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiaochu; Shi, Dai; Zhou, Yaqun; Zheng, Hua; Xiang, Hongbing; Tian, Xuebi; Gao, Feng; Manyande, Anne; Cao, Fei; Tian, Yuke; Ye, Dawei

    2016-12-01

    Cancer induced bone pain (CIBP) remains one of the most intractable clinical problems due to poor understanding of its underlying mechanisms. Recent studies demonstrate the decline of inhibitory interneurons, especially GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord, can evoke generation of chronic pain. It has also been reported that neuronal MHC-I expression renders neurons vulnerable to cytotoxic CD8 + T cells and finally lead to neurons apoptosis in a variety neurological disorders. However, whether MHC-I could induce the apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in spinal cord and contribute to the development of CIBP remains unknown. In this study, we investigated roles of MHC-I and underlying mechanisms in CIBP on a rat model. Our results showed that increased MHC-I expression on GABAergic interneurons could deplete GABAergic interneurons by inducing their apoptosis in the spinal dorsal horn of tumor-bearing rats. Pretreatment of MHC-I RNAi-lentivirus could prevent the apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons and therefore alleviated mechanical allodynia induced by tumor cells intratibial injection. Additionally, we also found that CD8 + T cells were colocalized with MHC-I and GABAergic neurons and presented a significant and persistent increase in the spinal cord of tumor-bearing rats. Taken together, these findings indicated that MHC-I could evoke CIBP by promoting apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in the dorsal horn, and this apoptosis was closely related to local CD8 + T cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of modified electrical stimulation-induced leg cycle ergometer training for individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.J.; Pringle, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-controlled electrical stimulation (ES)-induced leg cycle ergometer (ES-LCE) exercise can be beneficial for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), but exercise performance is often insufficient for eliciting continuous gains in cardiopulmonary training adaptations. The first purpose of

  3. Electrical stimulation-induced Gluteal and Hamstring muscle activation can reduce sitting pressure in individuals with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T. W J; De Koning, A.; Legemate, K. J A; Smit, C. A J

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at high risk of developing pressure sores, in part due to high sitting pressures under the buttocks. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of ES-induced activation of the gluteal and hamstring muscles on the sitting pressure in individuals with SCI. METHODS:

  4. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  5. Protective effect of D-003 on experimental spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, D; Arruzazabala, M L; Noa, M; Molina, V; Más, R; Arango, E; Valdés, S; Gonzalez, J E

    2004-01-01

    D-003 is a natural mixture of long chain aliphatic acids isolated and purified from sugar cane wax. It possesses antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects as well as decreases plasma and serum levels of thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)), meanwhile significantly and markedly raises prostacyclin (PgI(2)) levels in rats. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of D-003 on spinal cord injury in rabbits. New Zealand rabbits were treated during 10 days with D-003 (25 and 200 mg kg(-1)) and ASA (2 mg kg(-1)) before spinal cord ischemia. Animals were subjected to 20 min of aortic occlusion and 24h of reperfusion. Clinical symptoms and histopathological changes of spinal cord were observed. The PgI(2) levels in thoracic aorta were quantified by bioassay. D-003 (25 and 200 mg kg(-1)) significantly increased the mean scores reached 4h after reperfusion, although no dose relation was observed. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, no deaths occurred in both sham and D-003 treated groups, meanwhile in positive controls and ASA the mortality rate was 38.5% and 7.69% respectively. In addition, 100% of sham, 69% and 77% of rabbits treated with D-003 at 25 and 200 mg kg(-1), respectively, did not show histopathological changes. By the contrary, 100% of positive control animals showed severe damage and ASA-treated rabbits showed only a partial protection. Animals treated with both doses of D-003 showed PgI(2) levels significantly larger than those of positive and negative controls, an effect dose-related, while ASA 2 mg kg(-1) did not change PgI(2) values. The increase of PgI(2) levels achieved in the D-003 treated animals could be an important mechanism in the protection against the spinal cord ischemia.

  6. Tribology of flexible and sliding spinal implants: Development of experimental and numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Chaves-Jacob, Julien; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Linares, Jean-Marc; Chabrand, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    New fusionless devices are being developed to get over the limits of actual spinal surgical treatment, based on arthrodesis. However, due to their recentness, no standards exist to test and validate those devices, especially concerning the wear. A new tribological first approach to the definition of an in vitro wear protocol to study wear of flexible and sliding spinal devices is presented in this article, and was applied to a new concept. A simplified synthetic spine portion (polyethylene) was developed to reproduce a simple supra-physiological spinal flexion (10° between two vertebrae). The device studied with this protocol was tested in wet environment until 1 million cycles (Mc). We obtained an encouraging estimated wear volume of same order of magnitude compared to similar devices. An associated finite element (FE) numerical model has permitted to access contact information and study the effect of misalignment of one screw. First results could point out how to improve the design and suggest that a vertical misalignment of a screw (under or over-screwing) has more impact than a horizontal one. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 104-111, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of dorsal rhizotomy in spinal cord injury-induced spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Renee M; Morton, Ryan P; Walker, Marion L; Massagli, Teresa L; Browd, Samuel R

    2014-09-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a role in the management of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced spasticity. Spasticity and spasms are common sequelae of SCI in children. Depending on the clinical scenario, treatments may include physical and occupational therapy, oral medications, chemodenervation, and neurosurgical interventions. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is used in the management of spasticity in selected children with cerebral palsy, but, to the authors' knowledge, its use has not been reported in children with SCI. The authors describe the cases of 3 pediatric patients with SCI and associated spasticity treated with SDR. Two of the 3 patients have had significant long-term improvement in their preoperative spasticity. Although the third patient also experienced initial relief, his spasticity quickly returned to its preoperative severity, necessitating additional therapies. Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a place in the treatment of selected children with spasticity due to SCI.

  8. Ameliorating Role of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE Against Methotrexate-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Sciatic Nerve, Spinal Cord and Brain Stem Tissues of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Uzar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Methotrexate (MTX-associated neurotoxicity is an important clinical problem in cancer patients, but the mechanisms of MTX-induced neurotoxicity are not yet known exactly. The aims of this study were (1 to investigate the possible role of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and catalase (CAT in the pathogenesis of MTX-induced neurotoxicity and (2 to determine whether there is a putative protective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE on MTX-induced neurotoxicity in the spinal cord, brainstem and sciatic nerve of rats. METHODS: A total of 19 adult Wistar male rats were divided into three experimental groups. Group I, control group; Group II, MTX-treated group; and Group III, MTX + CAPE-treated group. MTX was administered to the MTX and MTX + CAPE groups intraperitoneally (IP with a single dose of 20 mg/kg on the second day of the experiment. CAPE was administered to the MTX + CAPE group IP with a dose of 10 μmol/kg for 7 days. RESULTS: In the sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissue, CAT and GSH-Px activities were increased in the MTX group in comparison with the control group. CAPE treatment with MTX significantly decreased CAT and GSH-Px activities in the neuronal tissues of rats in comparison with the MTX group. In the spinal cord and brainstem tissues, SOD activity in the MTX group was decreased in comparison with the control group, but in the sciatic nerve, there was no significant difference. In the spinal cord and brainstem of rats, SOD activity was increased in the CAPE + MTX group when compared with the MTX group. The level of MDA was higher in the MTX group than in the control group. CAPE administration with MTX injection caused a significant decrease in MDA level when compared with the MTX group. CONCLUSION: These results reveal that MTX increases oxidative stress in the sciatic nerve, spinal cord and brainstem of rats and that CAPE has a preventive effect on the

  9. Tail nerve electrical stimulation induces body weight-supported stepping in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Huang, Fengfa; Gates, Mary; White, Jason; Holmberg, Eric G

    2010-03-30

    Walking or stepping has been considered the result from the activation of the central pattern generator (CPG). In most patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) the CPG is undamaged. To date, there are no noninvasive approaches for activating the CPG. Recently we developed a noninvasive technique, tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES), which can induce positive hind limb movement of SCI rats. The purpose of this study is to introduce the novel technique and examine the effect of TANES on CPG activation. A 25 mm contusion injury was produced at spinal cord T10 of female, adult Long-Evans rats by using the NYU impactor device. Rats received TANES ( approximately 40 mA at 4 kHz) 7 weeks after injury. During TANES all injured rats demonstrated active body weight-supported stepping of hind limbs with left-right alternation and occasional front-hind coordination, resulting in significant, temporary increase in BBB scores (p<0.01). However, there is no response to TANES from rats with L2 transection, consistent with other reports that the CPG may be located at L1-2. S1 transection negatively implies the key role of TANES in CPG activation. The TANES not only renders paralyzed rats with a technique-induced ability to walk via activating CPG, but also is likely to be used for locomotor training. It has more beneficial effects for physical training over other training paradigms including treadmill training and invasive functional electrical stimulation. Therefore the TANES may have considerable potential for achieving improvement of functional recovery in animal models and a similar method may be suggested for human study. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation-induced changes in the profile of spinal cord serotonin, prostaglandin synthesis, and vascular permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, Tali; Pfeffer, M. Raphael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the profile of biochemical and physiological changes induced in the rat spinal cord by radiation, over a period of 8 months. Methods and Materials: The thoraco-lumbar spinal cords of Fisher rats were irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. The rats were then followed and killed at various times afterward. Serotonin (5-HT) and its major metabolite 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were assayed as well as prostaglandin synthesis. Microvessel permeability was assessed by quantitative evaluation of Evans blue dye extravasation. Results: None of the rats developed neurologic dysfunction, and histologic examination revealed only occasional gliosis in the ventral white matter at 240 days after irradiation. Serotonin levels were unchanged at 2, 14, and 56 days after radiation but increased at 120 and 240 days in the irradiated cord segments when compared to both the nonirradiated thoracic and cervical segments (p 2 (PGE 2 ), thromboxane (TXB 2 ), and prostacyclin [6 keto-PGF1α (6KPGF)] was noted, which returned to normal at 3 days. This was followed after 7 and 14 days by a significant fall off in synthesis of all three prostaglandins. Thereafter, at 28, 56, 120, and 240 days, escalated production of thromboxane followed, while prostacyclin synthesis remained markedly reduced (-88% of control level at 240 days). Up to 7 days after radiation the calculated (TXB 2 (6KPGF)) ratio remained balanced, regardless of the observed abrupt early fluctuations in their rate of synthesis. Later, between 7 and 240 days after radiation, a significant imbalance was present which became more pronounced over time. In the first 24 h after radiation, a 104% increase in microvessel permeability was observed which returned to normal by 3 days. Normal permeability was maintained at 14 and 28 days, but at 120 and 240 days a persistent and significant increase of 98% and 73% respectively above control level was noted. Conclusions: Radiation induces severe impairment in

  11. Neonatal bladder inflammation induces long-term visceral pain and altered responses of spinal neurons in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Babygirija, Reji; Zhang, Jiang; Poe, Michael M; Li, Guanguan; Cook, James M; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2017-03-27

    Painful events early in life have been shown to increase the incidence of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome in adulthood. However, the intrinsic mechanism is not well studied. We previously reported that neonatal bladder inflammation causes chronic visceral hypersensitivity along with molecular disruption of spinal GABAergic system in rats. The present study investigates whether these molecular changes affect the integrative function and responses of bladder-sensitive primary afferent and spinal neurons. Neonatal bladder inflammation was induced by intravesicular injection of zymosan during postnatal (P) days 14-16. In adulthood (P60), the viscero-motor response (VMR) to visceral stimuli was significantly inhibited by intrathecal (i.t) HZ166 (GABA Aα-2 agonist) only in neonatally saline-treated, but not in neonatally zymosan-treated rats. HZ166 significantly inhibited the responses of bladder-responsive lumbosacral (LS) spinal neurons to urinary bladder distension (UBD) and slow infusion (SI) in neonatally saline-treated rats. Similar results were also observed in naïve adult rats where HZ166 produced significant inhibition of bladder-responsive spinal neurons. However, HZ166 did not inhibit responses of UBD-responsive spinal neurons from neonatally zymosan-treated rats. The drug did not attenuate the responses of UBD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferent (PNA) fibers to UBD and SI in either group of rats tested. Immunohistochemical studies showed a significantly lower level of GABA Aα-2 receptor expression in the LS spinal cord of neonatally zymosan-treated rats compared to saline-treated rats. These findings indicate that neonatal bladder inflammation leads to functional and molecular alteration of spinal GABA Aα-2 receptor subtypes, which may result in chronic visceral hyperalgesia in adulthood. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Danggui Sini decoction on neuropathic pain: experimental studies and clinical pharmacological significance of inhibiting glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Qiang, Qiu Hong; Ling, Qian; Yu, Chang Xi; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Suhuan; Yang, Shuyu

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments. Partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Danggui Sini decoction (DSD), an aqueous extract of Angelica sinensis, Ramulus Cinnamomi, and Radix Puerariae, has been used extensively in China to treat inflammatory and ischemic diseases. The current study examined the putative effects of DSD on neuropathic pain. We used two commonly-used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI) and diabetic neuropathy for the study. And we examined effects of DSD on pain response, activation of microglia and astroglia in spinal dorsal horn, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. Consecutive intragastric administration of DSD (25 - 100 mg/kg) for 10 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models, DSD inhibited the over-expression of specific markers for microglia (Iba-1) and astroglia (GFAP) activation in the spinal dorsal horn. DSD also reduced the elevated nuclear NF-κB level and inhibited the up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. DSD can alleviate CCI and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn. The anti-inflammation effect of DSD may be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines expression.
.

  13. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah; Sim, Ju Hee; Won, You Jin [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chang Ho [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Jeonha-dong, Dong-gu, Ulsan 682-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jong Yoon, E-mail: jyyoo@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hea Nam, E-mail: hnhong@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  14. Intrathecal Transplantation of Autologous Adherent Bone Marrow Cells Induces Functional Neurological Recovery in a Canine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Hala; El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Farghali, Haithem A M A; Ismail, Zeinab M K; Zickri, Maha B; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Kishk, Nirmeen A; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in demyelination of surviving axons, loss of oligodendrocytes, and impairment of motor and sensory functions. We have developed a clinical strategy of cell therapy for SCI through the use of autologous bone marrow cells for transplantation to augment remyelination and enhance neurological repair. In a preclinical large mammalian model of SCI, experimental dogs were subjected to a clipping contusion of the spinal cord. Two weeks after the injury, GFP-labeled autologous minimally manipulated adherent bone marrow cells (ABMCs) were transplanted intrathecally to investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous ABMC therapy. The effects of ABMC transplantation in dogs with SCI were determined using functional neurological scoring, and the integration of ABMCs into the injured cords was determined using histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations and electron microscopic analyses of sections from control and transplanted spinal cords. Our data demonstrate the presence of GFP-labeled cells in the injured spinal cord for up to 16 weeks after transplantation in the subacute SCI stage. GFP-labeled cells homed to the site of injury and were detected around white matter tracts and surviving axons. ABMC therapy in the canine SCI model enhanced remyelination and augmented neural regeneration, resulting in improved neurological functions. Therefore, autologous ABMC therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for spinal cord injuries.

  15. Efeito da prednisona em lesão medular aguda experimental em ratos Effect of prednisone on acute experimental spinal cord injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.O. Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 25 ratos (Rattus novergicus submetidos a trauma experimental da medula espinhal, empregando-se aparelho estereotáxico com um peso de 50,5g comprimindo a duramáter durante cinco minutos. Após o trauma, os animais foram divididos em cinco grupos de cinco. O grupo A (controle recebeu placebo oito horas após o trauma; os grupos B, C, D e E receberam prednisona oito, 24, 48 e 120 horas após o trauma, respectivamente. A prednisona foi administrada na dose inicial de 2mg/kg, durante cinco dias, com diminuição progressiva até o 26º dia. Os animais foram avaliados conforme a capacidade motora, posicionamento proprioceptivo, reflexo de localização, plano inclinado e sensibilidade dolorosa. Após 33 dias da cirurgia, foram sacrificados para avaliação histológica das medulas espinhais. Observaram-se degeneração das raízes nervosas, necrose medular, inflamação local e reação glial, sem diferenças entre os grupos. Não houve correlação entre os testes neurológicos. A utilização da prednisona na lesão medular aguda não teve efeito diferenciado com o tempo e não foi prejudicial na recuperação neurológica, mesmo quando utilizada tardiamente.Twent-five rats (Rattus novergicus were submitted to an experimental spinal cord injury by using a 50.5g stereotaxic equipament to apply pressure on the duramater during five minutes. After the spinal cord injury, the animals were randomly distributed into five groups of five animals each: one group received placebo 8 hours after injury and the remaining four groups received prednisone at 8, 24, 48, and 120 hours after injury. Prednisone was applied at 2mg/kg dosage during five days and progressively reduced until the 26th day. Animals were evaluated by motor capacity, proprioceptive positioning, locating reflex, inclined plan, and sensibility to pain. The animals were sacrificed 33 days after surgery for histological study of the spinal cords that revealed degeneration of the

  16. Improvement of spinal contusion model by cotransplanting bone marrow stromal cells and induced BMSCs into oligodendrocytes-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaka, Gholam R; Tiraihi, Taki; Delshad, Alireza; Taheri, Taher; Kazemi, Hadi; Hassoun, Hayder K

    2017-10-01

    Demyelination is a common lesion in spinal cord injury, cell therapy is one of the approaches for replacing the lost oligodendrocytes. In this study, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been transdifferentiated into oligodendrocyte-like cells (OLCs) and used in cytotherapy of contused spinal cords in rats. The BMSCs were collected from the rat long bones, and cultured and characterized by different markers, then they were preinduced with dimethyl sulfoxide followed by retinoic acid, and then the preinduced cells were induced with combination of basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and heregulin, followed by triiodothyronine. The OLCs were transplanted in the contused spinal cords of the rats, combined with undifferentiated BMSCs. Specific markers were used in order to characterize the cells by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The BMSCs showed typical immnuoreactivity to the markers, and the OLCs were immunostained with specific markers. There was an improvement in the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score with reduction in the cavitation in the contused rats treated with OLCs combined with BMSCs. The transplanted cells were detected in the contused spinal cord. The combination of the transdifferentiated BMSCs into OLCs with the undifferentiated BMSCs improved the contused spinal cord.

  17. Combined approaches for the relief of spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-04-01

    The adequate treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced neuropathic pain still remains an unresolved problem. The current medications predominantly used in the SCI-induced neuropathic pain therapy are morphine, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiepileptics, which suggests that psychiatric aspects might be important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is well documented that the modulation of the sensory events is not a unique way for achieving pain relief. In addition, pain patients still express dissatisfaction and complain of unwanted effects of the medications, suggesting that alternative approaches for the treatment of neuropathic pain are essential. In psychiatry, pain relief represents relaxation and a feeling of comfort and satisfaction, which suggests that cognitive and emotional motivations are important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The comorbidity of chronic pain and psychiatric disorders, which is well recognized, suggests that the effective therapeutic relief for neuropathic pain induced by SCI can be achieved in conjunction with the management of the sensory and psychiatric aspects of patient. In this review, we address the feasibility of a combined acupuncture and pharmacotherapy treatment for the relief of neuropathic pain behavior following SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Blockade of NMDA receptors decreased spinal microglia activation in bee venom induced acute inflammatory pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wu, Yongfang; Bai, Zhifeng; Hu, Yuyan; Li, Wenbin

    2017-03-01

    Microglial cells in spinal dorsal horn can be activated by nociceptive stimuli and the activated microglial cells release various cytokines enhancing the nociceptive transmission. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of spinal microglia during nociceptive stimuli have not been well understood. In order to define the role of NMDA receptors in the activation of spinal microglia during nociceptive stimuli, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of blockade of NMDA receptors on the spinal microglial activation induced by acute peripheral inflammatory pain in rats. The acute inflammatory pain was induced by subcutaneous bee venom injection to the plantar surface of hind paw of rats. Spontaneous pain behavior, thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold were rated. The expression of specific microglia marker CD11b/c was assayed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. After bee venom treatment, it was found that rats produced a monophasic nociception characterized by constantly lifting and licking the injected hind paws, decreased thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold; immunohistochemistry displayed microglia with enlarged cell bodies, thickened, extended cellular processes with few ramifications, small spines, and intensive immunostaining; western blot showed upregulated expression level of CD11b/c within the period of hyperalgesia. Prior intrathecal injection of MK-801, a selective antagonist of NMDA receptors, attenuated the pain behaviors and suppressed up-regulation of CD11b/c induced by bee venom. It can be concluded that NMDA receptors take part in the mediation of spinal microglia activation in bee venom induced peripheral inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia in rats.

  19. RAE-1 expression is induced during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is correlated with microglia cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelloul, Mehdi; Popa, Natalia; Pelletier, Florence; Raguénez, Gilda; Boucraut, José

    2016-11-01

    Retinoic acid early induced transcript-1 (RAE-1) glycoproteins are ligands of the activating immune receptor NKG2D. They are known as stress molecules induced in pathological conditions. We previously reported that progenitor cells express RAE-1 in physiological conditions and we described a correlation between RAE-1 expression and cell proliferation. In addition, we showed that Raet1 transcripts are induced in the spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. EAE is a model for multiple sclerosis which is accompanied by microglia proliferation and activation, recruitment of immune cells and neurogenesis. We herein studied the time course expression of the two members of the Raet1 gene family present in C57BL/6 mice, namely Raet1d and Raet1e, in the spinal cord during EAE. We report that Raet1d and Raet1e genes are induced early upon EAE onset and reach a maximal expression at the peak of the pathology. We show that myeloid cells, i.e. macrophages as well as microglia, are cellular sources of Raet1 transcripts. We also demonstrate that only Raet1d expression is induced in microglia, whereas macrophages expressed both Raet1d and Raet1e. Furthermore, we investigated the dynamics of RAE-1 expression in microglia cultures. RAE-1 induction correlated with cell proliferation but not with M1/M2 phenotypic orientation. We finally demonstrate that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a major factor controlling RAE-1 expression in microglia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of methyl prednisolone, dimethyl sulphoxide and naloxone in experimental spinal cord injuries in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zileli, M; Ovül, I; Dalbasti, T

    1988-12-01

    The effects of methyl prednisolone (MPD), dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and naloxone were examined in 38 albino rats after making an impact spinal cord injury on the midthoracic segments with a modified Allen's weight dropping trauma method. Somatosensorial evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded before and 12 h and 14 d after the injury from epidurally inserted electrodes on the parietal cortex with sciatic nerve stimulations. Lower extremity motor functions of the animals were also examined. It may be concluded that in this study model, DMSO has a moderate effect which can be demonstrated clinically and through SEPs. Naloxone has no effect on the clinical outcome but causes reasonable improvement electrophysiologically.

  1. Imaging micro-glial/macrophage activation in spinal cords of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats by Positron Emission Tomography using the mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein radioligand [18F]DPA-714

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abourbeh, Galith; Theze, Benoit; Dubois, Albertine; Tavitian, Bertrand; Boisgard, Raphael; Maroy, Renaud; Brulon, Vincent; Fontyn, Yoann; Dolle, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Activated micro-glia/macrophages play a key role in the immuno-pathogenesis of MS and its corresponding animal models, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Micro-glia activation begins at early stages of the disease and is associated with elevated expression of the 18 kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO). Thus, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of micro-glial activation using TSPO-specific radioligands could be valuable for monitoring disease-associated neuro-inflammatory processes. EAE was induced in rats using a fragment of myelin basic protein, yielding acute clinical disease that reflects extensive spinal cord inflammation. Enhanced TSPO expression in spinal cords of EAE rats versus those of controls was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Biodistribution studies in control and EAE rats were performed using the TSPO radioligand [ 18 F]DPA-714 [N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide]. At 1 h after injection, almost fivefold higher levels of [ 18 F]DPA-714 were measured in spinal cords of EAE rats versus controls. The specific binding of [ 18 F]DPA-714 to TSPO in spinal cords was confirmed in competition studies, using unlabeled (R,S)-PK11195 [(R,S)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl) - isoquinoline-3-carboxamide)] or DPA-714 in excess. MicroPET studies affirm that this differential radioactivity uptake in spinal cords of EAE versus control rats could be detected and quantified. Using [ 18 F]DPA-714, neuro-inflammation in spinal cords of EAE-induced rats could be visualized by PET, offering a sensitive technique for monitoring neuro-inflammatory lesions in the CNS and particularly in the spinal cord. In addition to current MRI protocols, this approach could provide molecular images of neuro-inflammation for detection, monitoring, and research in MS. (authors)

  2. Using visuo-kinetic virtual reality to induce illusory spinal movement: the MoOVi Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Daniel S; Smith, Ross T; Hunter, Estin V; Davis, Miles G; Sterling, Michele; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2017-01-01

    Illusions that alter perception of the body provide novel opportunities to target brain-based contributions to problems such as persistent pain. One example of this, mirror therapy, uses vision to augment perceived movement of a painful limb to treat pain. Since mirrors can't be used to induce augmented neck or other spinal movement, we aimed to test whether such an illusion could be achieved using virtual reality, in advance of testing its potential therapeutic benefit. We hypothesised that perceived head rotation would depend on visually suggested movement. In a within-subjects repeated measures experiment, 24 healthy volunteers performed neck movements to 50 o of rotation, while a virtual reality system delivered corresponding visual feedback that was offset by a factor of 50%-200%-the Motor Offset Visual Illusion (MoOVi)-thus simulating more or less movement than that actually occurring. At 50 o of real-world head rotation, participants pointed in the direction that they perceived they were facing. The discrepancy between actual and perceived direction was measured and compared between conditions. The impact of including multisensory (auditory and visual) feedback, the presence of a virtual body reference, and the use of 360 o immersive virtual reality with and without three-dimensional properties, was also investigated. Perception of head movement was dependent on visual-kinaesthetic feedback ( p  = 0.001, partial eta squared = 0.17). That is, altered visual feedback caused a kinaesthetic drift in the direction of the visually suggested movement. The magnitude of the drift was not moderated by secondary variables such as the addition of illusory auditory feedback, the presence of a virtual body reference, or three-dimensionality of the scene. Virtual reality can be used to augment perceived movement and body position, such that one can perform a small movement, yet perceive a large one. The MoOVi technique tested here has clear potential for assessment and

  3. Radiation-induced changes in the profile of spinal cord serotonin, prostaglandin synthesis, and vascular permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, T.; Pfeffer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the profile of biochemical and physiological changes induced in the rat spinal cord by radiation, over a period of 8 months. The thoraco-lumbar spinal cords of Fisher rats were irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. The rats were then followed and killed at various times afterward. Serotonin (5-HT) and its major metabolite 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were assayed as well as prostaglandin synthesis. Microvessel permeability was assessed by quantitative evaluation of Evans blue dye extravasation. None of the rats developed neurologic dysfunction, and histologic examination revealed only occasional gliosis in the ventral white matter at 240 days after irradiation. Serotonin levels were unchanged at 2, 14, and 56 days after radiation but increased at 120 and 240 days in the irradiated cord segments when compared to both the nonirradiated thoracic and cervical segments (p 2 (PGE 2 ), thromboxane (TXB 2 ), and prostacyclin [6 keto-PGF1α (6KPGF)] was noted, which returned to normal at 3 days. This was followed after 7 and 14 days by a significant fall off in synthesis of all three prostaglandins. Thereafter, at 28, 56, 120, and 240 days, escalated production of thromboxane followed, white prostacyclin synthesis remained markedly reduced (-88% of control level at 240 days). Up to 7 days after radiation the calculated TXB 2 /6KPGF ratio remained balanced, regardless of the observed abrupt early fluctuations in their rate of synthesis. Later, between 7 and 240 days after radiation, a significant imbalance was present which became more pronounced over time. In the first 24 h after radiation, a 104% increase in microvessel permeability was observed which returned to normal by 3 days. 57 refs., 3 figs

  4. Protective effects of minocycline on experimental spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Mustafa; Altas, Murat; Motor, Sedat; Dokuyucu, Recep; Yilmaz, Atilla; Ozgiray, Erkin; Seraslan, Yurdal; Yilmaz, Nebi

    2015-08-01

    The effects of minocycline on neuronal injury after spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited and controversial. Therefore we aimed to investigate the protective effects of minocycline on tissue and on serum concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, tissue total antioxidant and oxidant status (TAS and TOS, respectively), and AST and LDH levels in rats with SCI. This study was performed on 7-8 weeks 38 male Wistar albino rats. The animals were randomly divided into five groups: group 1, Sham (n=8); group 2, SCI (spinal cord injury)/control (n=8); group 3, SCI+minocycline3 (n=7); group 4, SCI+minocycline30 (n=8) and group 5 SCI+minocycline90 (n=7). Blood and tissue samples were analysed for MDA, SOD, GSH-Px, TAS, TOS, AST and LDH levels. The MDA levels were significantly higher in SCI group compared to sham group (pspinal cord injury in rats. Minocycline administration increased antioxidant enzyme levels and improved total antioxidant status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Postural spinal balance defined by net intersegmental moments: Results of a biomechanical approach and experimental errors measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Benjamin; Viehweger, Elke; Moal, Bertrand; Tropiano, Patrick; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Lafage, Virginie; Dumas, Raphael; Fuentes, Stéphane; Bollini, Gérard; Pomero, Vincent

    2015-12-18

    To describe initial results and experimental error measurement of a protocol analyzing Human posture through sagittal intersegmental moments. Postural analysis has been recently improved by development of three-dimensional radiographic imaging systems. However, in various situations such as global sagittal anterior malalignment interpretation of radiographs may not represent the real alignment of the subject. The aim of this study was to present initial results of a 3D biomechanical protocol. This protocol is obtained in a free standing position and characterizes postural balance by measurement of sagittal intersegmental net moments. After elaboration of a specific marker-set, 4 successive recordings were done on two volunteers by three different operators during three sessions in order to evaluate the experimental error measurement. A supplementary acquisition in a "radiographic" posture was also obtained. Once the data acquired, joint center, length, anatomical frame and the center of mass of each body segment was calculated and a mass affected. Sagittal net intersegmental moments were computed in an ascending manner from ground reaction forces at the ankles, knees, hips and the lumbo-sacral and thoraco-lumbar spinal junctions. Cervico-thoracic net intersegmental moment was calculated in a descending manner. Based on average recordings, clinical interpretation of net intersegmental moments (in N.m) showed a dorsal flexion on the ankles (8.6 N.m), a flexion on the knees (7.5 N.m) and an extension on the hips (8.5 N.m). On the spinal junctions, it was flexion moments: 0.34 N.m on the cervico-thoracic; 6.7 N.m on the thoraco-lumbar and 0.65 N.m on the lumbo-sacral. Evaluation of experimental error measurement showed a small inter-trial error (intrinsic variability), with higher inter-session and inter-therapist errors but without important variation between them. For one volunteer the "radiographic" posture was associated to significant changes compared to the free

  6. Antinociception induced by chronic glucocorticoid treatment is correlated to local modulation of spinal neurotransmitter content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Armando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While acute effects of stress on pain are well described, those produced by chronic stress are still a matter of dispute. Previously we demonstrated that chronic unpredictable stress results in antinociception in the tail-flick test, an effect that is mediated by increased levels of corticosteroids. In the present study, we evaluated nociception in rats after chronic treatment with corticosterone (CORT and dexamethasone (DEX in order to discriminate the role of each type of corticosteroid receptors in antinociception. Results Both experimental groups exhibited a pronounced antinociceptive effect after three weeks of treatment when compared to controls (CONT; however, at four weeks the pain threshold in CORT-treated animals returned to basal levels whereas in DEX-treated rats antinociception was maintained. In order to assess if these differences are associated with altered expression of neuropeptides involved in nociceptive transmission we evaluated the density of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, somatostatin (SS and B2-γ-aminobutiric acid receptors (GABAB2 expression in the spinal dorsal horn using light density measurements and stereological techniques. After three weeks of treatment the expression of CGRP in the superficial dorsal horn was significantly decreased in both CORT and DEX groups, while GABAB2 was significantly increased; the levels of SP for both experimental groups remained unchanged at this point. At 4 weeks, CGRP and SP are reduced in DEX-treated animals and GABAB2 unchanged, but all changes were restored to CONT levels in CORT-treated animals. The expression of SS remained unaltered throughout the experimental period. Conclusion These data indicate that corticosteroids modulate nociception since chronic corticosteroid treatment alters the expression of neuropeptides involved in nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord level. As previously observed in some supraspinal areas, the

  7. Intra- and interpersonal consequences of experimentally induced concealment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, T.K.

    2003-01-01

    Secrecy, concealment, and thought supression are assumed to be important aspects of psychopathology. However, most studies address these from an intrapersonal perspective. This study investigates both the intra- as well as the interpersonal consequences of experimentally induced concealment. Two

  8. Activation of RAGE/STAT3 pathway by methylglyoxal contributes to spinal central sensitization and persistent pain induced by bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jia-You; Liu, Cui-Cui; Ouyang, Han-Dong; Ma, Chao; Xie, Man-Xiu; Liu, Meng; Lei, Wan-Long; Ding, Huan-Huan; Wu, Shao-Ling; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2017-10-01

    Bortezomib is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug widely used for multiple myeloma and other nonsolid malignancies. Although bortezomib-induced persistent pain is easily diagnosed in clinic, the pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we studied this issue with use of a rat model of systemic intraperitoneal administration of bortezomib for consecutive 5days. Consisted with our previous study, we found that bortezomib treatment markedly induced mechanical allodynia in rats. Furthermore, we first found that bortezomib treatment significantly induced the upregulation of methylglyoxal in spinal dorsal horn of rats. Spinal local application of methylglyoxal also induced mechanical allodynia and central sensitization in normal rats. Moreover, administration of bortezomib upregulated the expression of receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) in dorsal horn. Importantly, intrathecal injection of metformin, a known scavenger of methylglyoxal, significantly attenuated the upregulation of methylglyoxal and RAGE in dorsal horn, central sensitization and mechanical allodynia induced by bortezomib treatment, and blockage of RAGE also prevented the upregulation of p-STAT3, central sensitization and mechanical allodynia induced by bortezomib treatment. In addition, inhibition of STAT3 activity by S3I-201 attenuated bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia and central sensitization. Local knockdown of STAT3 also ameliorated the mechanical allodynia induced by bortezomib administration. Our results suggest that accumulation of methylglyoxal may activate the RAGE/STAT3 signaling pathway in dorsal horn, and contributes to the spinal central sensitization and persistent pain induced by bortezomib treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of the time-dependent functional and molecular changes in spinal cord degeneration induced by the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and by mechanical compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priestley John V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, an invariably fatal neurological condition involving cortico-spinal degeneration. Mechanical injury can also determine spinal cord degeneration and act as a risk factor for the development of ALS. Results We have performed a comparative ontological analysis of the gene expression profiles of thoracic cord samples from rats carrying the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and from wild-type littermates subjected to mechanical compression of the spinal cord. Common molecular responses and gene expression changes unique to each experimental paradigm were evaluated against the functional development of each animal model. Gene Ontology categories crucial to protein folding, extracellular matrix and axonal formation underwent early activation in both experimental paradigms, but decreased significantly in the spinal cord from animals recovering from injury after 7 days and from the G93A SOD1 mutant rats at end-stage disease. Functional improvement after compression coincided with a massive up-regulation of growth-promoting gene categories including factors involved in angiogenesis and transcription, overcoming the more transitory surge of pro-apoptotic components and cell-cycle genes. The cord from G93A SOD1 mutants showed persistent over-expression of apoptotic and stress molecules with fewer neurorestorative signals, while functional deterioration was ongoing. Conclusion this study illustrates how cytoskeletal protein metabolism is central to trauma and genetically-induced spinal cord degeneration and elucidates the main molecular events accompanying functional recovery or decline in two different animal models of spinal cord degeneration.

  10. Status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Mamoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    A short review is presented on the status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions above 20 MeV based on the EXFOR data base and journals. Experimental data which were obtained in a systematic manner and/or by plural authors are surveyed and tabulated for the nuclear data evaluation and the benchmark test of the evaluated data. (author). 61 refs.

  11. Preload versus coload and vasopressor requirement for the prevention of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension in non-obstetric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.U.; Aqil, M.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of preload and coload for the prevention of Spinal Induced Hypotension (SIH) and vasopressor requirements. Study Design: Randomized trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anesthesia, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from June 2007 - June 2010. Methodology: Sixty patients were randomly divided into preload and coload group of 30 each. Patients with ASA1 - 3, aged 20 - 60 years were included. Patients with history of IHD, COPD, BMI > 30 and surgical procedure TURP were excluded. All patients received crystalloid 10 ml/kg before induction of spinal anesthesia in preload group and at the time of spinal anesthesia in coload group. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded at different time intervals till 45 minutes. Patients received ephedrine 5 mg when systolic blood pressure dropped below 90 mmHg and heart rate was less than 60 beats/minute and/or phenylephrine 50 micrograms when systolic blood pressure dropped below 90 mmHg and heart rate was more than 60 beats/minute. Results: There was no statistically significant difference at different time intervals in heart rate, systolic and mean arterial pressure between the groups. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly different in both groups at 6 - 15 minutes after spinal anesthesia. SIH occurred (21) 70% and (15) 50% in preload and coload groups, respectively (p=0.187). Ephedrine requirement for SIH was significantly high in preload group (p=0.017). Phenylephrine requirement for SIH was high in preload group which was statistically non-significant (p=0.285). Conclusion: Coload group has lower incidence of spinal induced hypotension and significantly less vasopressor requirement than the preload group. (author)

  12. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception.

  13. Estrogen alleviates neuropathic pain induced after spinal cord injury by inhibiting microglia and astrocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Choi, Hae Young; Ju, Bong-Gun; Yune, Tae Young

    2018-04-16

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is developed in about 80% of SCI patients and there is no efficient therapeutic drug to alleviate SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Here we examined the effect of estrogen on SCI-induced neuropathic pain at below-level and its effect on neuroinflammation as underlying mechanisms. Neuropathic pain is developed at late phase after SCI and a single dose of 17β-estradiol (100, 300 μg/kg) were administered to rats with neuropathic pain after SCI through intravenous injection. As results, both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly reduced by 17β-estradiol compared to vehicle control. Both microglia and astrocyte activation in the lamina I and II of L4-5 dorsal horn was also inhibited by 17β-estradiol. In addition, the levels of p-p38MAPK and p-ERK known to be activated in microglia and p-JNK known to be activated in astrocyte were significantly decreased by 17β-estradiol. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators such as Il-1β, Il-6, iNos, and Cox-2 was more attenuated in 17β-estradiol-treated group than in vehicle-treated group. Particularly, we found that the analgesic effect by 17β-estradiol was mediated via estrogen receptors, which are expressed in dorsal horn neurons. These results suggest that 17β-estradiol may attenuate SCI-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting microglia and astrocyte activation followed inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation-induced walking training promotes locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, S-x; Huang, F; Gates, M; Shen, X; Holmberg, E G

    2016-01-01

    Study design: This is a randomized controlled prospective trial with two parallel groups. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES)-induced walking training can improve the locomotor function. Setting: This study was conducted in SCS Research Center in Colorado, USA. Methods: A contusion injury to spinal cord T10 was produced using the New York University impactor device with a 25?-mm height setting in femal...

  15. Early Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy is Associated with Increased Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Duraid; Lin, Erica; Griffin, Russell; Vanlandingham, Sean; Waters, Alicia; Harrigan, Mark; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Early trauma-induced coagulopathy may increase susceptibility to nosocomial infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, the relationship between trauma- induced coagulopathy and the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia in spinal cord injury patients has not been evaluated. We conducted a 5-year retrospective study of 300 spinal cord injury patients admitted to Level 1 trauma center. Standard coagulation studies were evaluated upon arrival, prior to fluid resuscitative efforts, and at 24  h after admission. Based on these studies, three groups of patients were identified: no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy. Ventilator- associated pneumonia was identified utilizing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Since we used the data in the trauma registry and did not have the information on FiO2 and PEEP, we elected to use the VAP terminology and not the VAE sequence. Demographic, injury, and clinical characteristics were compared among no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy groups using chi-square test and ANOVA for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between coagulopathy and both ventilator-associated pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was 54.5% (OR 4.01, 95% CI 1.76-9.15) in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy, compared with the 17.5% in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy. Mortality was significantly higher in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy than in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy (OR 6.14, 95% CI 1.73-21.73).After adjusting for age, race, injury mechanism, Injury Severity Score, base deficit at admission, the number of pRBC units transfused in the first 24  h, and hospital stay, only the association of ventilator

  16. Calcineurin Dysregulation Underlies Spinal Cord Injury-Induced K+Channel Dysfunction in DRG Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, Benjamin M; Muqeem, Tanziyah; Brown, Eric V; Goulão, Miguel; Urban, Mark W; Tymanskyj, Stephen R; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2017-08-23

    Dysfunction of the fast-inactivating Kv3.4 potassium current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons contributes to the hyperexcitability associated with persistent pain induced by spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the underlying mechanism is not known. In light of our previous work demonstrating modulation of the Kv3.4 channel by phosphorylation, we investigated the role of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) using electrophysiological, molecular, and imaging approaches in adult female Sprague Dawley rats. Pharmacological inhibition of CaN in small-diameter DRG neurons slowed repolarization of the somatic action potential (AP) and attenuated the Kv3.4 current. Attenuated Kv3.4 currents also exhibited slowed inactivation. We observed similar effects on the recombinant Kv3.4 channel heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, supporting our findings in DRG neurons. Elucidating the molecular basis of these effects, mutation of four previously characterized serines within the Kv3.4 N-terminal inactivation domain eliminated the effects of CaN inhibition on the Kv3.4 current. SCI similarly induced concurrent Kv3.4 current attenuation and slowing of inactivation. Although there was little change in CaN expression and localization after injury, SCI induced upregulation of the native regulator of CaN 1 (RCAN1) in the DRG at the transcript and protein levels. Consistent with CaN inhibition resulting from RCAN1 upregulation, overexpression of RCAN1 in naive DRG neurons recapitulated the effects of pharmacological CaN inhibition on the Kv3.4 current and the AP. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel regulatory pathway that links CaN, RCAN1, and Kv3.4 in DRG neurons. Dysregulation of this pathway might underlie a peripheral mechanism of pain sensitization induced by SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Pain sensitization associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) involves poorly understood maladaptive modulation of neuronal excitability. Although central mechanisms have

  17. Experimental induced avian E. coli salpingitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Thøfner, Ida; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Several types of Escherichia coli have been associated with extra-intestinal infections in poultry, however, they may vary significantly in their virulence potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the virulence of five strains of E. coli obtained from different disease manifesta......Several types of Escherichia coli have been associated with extra-intestinal infections in poultry, however, they may vary significantly in their virulence potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the virulence of five strains of E. coli obtained from different disease...... manifestations or from the cloacae of a healthy chicken. The virulence potential of the strains were evaluated in an avian experimental model for ascending infections, and experiments were conducted in both layers and broiler breeders. The clinical outcome of infection was highly depending on the challenge......) had a distinct ability to cause disease. Results of the study shows major differences in virulence of different strains of E. coli in ascending infections; however, there was no indication of tissue-specific adaptation, since strains obtained from lesions unrelated to the reproductive system were...

  18. Experimental neuromyopathy induced by thallium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso-Moguel, R; Mendez-Armenta, M; Villeda-Hernandez, J; Rios, C; Galvan-Arzate, S

    1996-01-01

    A histopathological study, with a light microscope, of experimental neuromyopathy produced by thallotoxicosis was undertaken in 40 newborn Wistar rats. Treatment consisted of a single i.p. injection of an aqueous solution of 16 mg kg-1 thallium(I) acetate 1 day after birth. Groups of ten animals were euthanized at either 8 or 50 days of age. Sural nerves, as well as peroneus muscle, were fixed in 10% formaldehyde solution for 15 days and then prepared for histopathological observation. At 8 days of age sural nerves of thallium-treated animals showed a moderate reduction in the large- and medium-sized fibres and several of the myelin sheaths had initial degeneration along the course of the axon. Interstitial oedema was found in both neural and muscular tissues. Distinct features of focal necrosis as well as small haemorrhages were seen in peroneus muscle. At 50 days of age, the lesions were more diffuse. Large and small myelinated fibres were found to be sinuous, fragmented and scanty. Alterations in the large- and medium-sized axons were seen and the myelin sheaths were altered along the course of the axon, suggesting a progressive distal axonopathy. Additionally, muscle fibres had myopathic changes with abnormal central nucleoli and the striated transverse fibres had disappeared in many areas of the sample. Several interstitial foci of muscular necrosis accompanied by phagocytosis and fibrosis were also present.

  19. Experimental carcinogenesis induced by incorporated plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghiso, Yoichi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The carcinogenic effects of an alpha-emitter, {sup 239}Pu, were investigated by animal experiments as focused on both pulmonary tumors after inhalation exposures to insoluble oxide aerosols and tumor spectra induced by injection of soluble citrate. The life-span study using Wistar strain rats exposed to Pu dioxide aerosols has shown differential dose-related responses of malignancies and histopathological phenotypes of lung tumors, suggesting a threshold dose around 1.0 Gy of the lung dose. As abnormality of tumor-related genes could be supposed for the background of pulmonary carcinogenesis, the mutations of p53 tumor suppressor gene were examined by PCR-SSCP analysis using DNA fragments extracted from lung tumors. While mutations were detected in 23 cases (about 28%) among 82 lung tumors, their relations to either malignancies, histological phenotypes, dose, or oncogenesis are not yet to be elucidated. The life-span study using C3H strain mice injected with Pu citrate has shown contrast dose responses between osteosarcomas and lymphoid tumors around 10 Gy of the skeletal dose, and further indicated specific tumor spectra differed from low LET radiation exposures as shown by much more frequency of B cell type leukemic lymphomas and none of myeloid leukemias. (author)

  20. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Spinal motoneuron synaptic plasticity after axotomy in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanon Renata G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytes play a major role in preserving and restoring structural and physiological integrity following injury to the nervous system. After peripheral axotomy, reactive gliosis propagates within adjacent spinal segments, influenced by the local synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. The present work investigated the importance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity in acute and late glial responses after injury and in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression and synaptic plasticity of inputs to lesioned alpha motoneurons. Methods In vivo analyses were carried out using C57BL/6J-iNOS knockout (iNOS-/- and C57BL/6J mice. Glial response after axotomy, glial MHC I expression, and the effects of axotomy on synaptic contacts were measured using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. For this purpose, 2-month-old animals were sacrificed and fixed one or two weeks after unilateral sciatic nerve transection, and spinal cord sections were incubated with antibodies against classical MHC I, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein - an astroglial marker, Iba-1 (an ionized calcium binding adaptor protein and a microglial marker or synaptophysin (a presynaptic terminal marker. Western blotting analysis of MHC I and nNOS expression one week after lesion were also performed. The data were analyzed using a two-tailed Student's t test for parametric data or a two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data. Results A statistical difference was shown with respect to astrogliosis between strains at the different time points studied. Also, MHC I expression by iNOS-/- microglial cells did not increase at one or two weeks after unilateral axotomy. There was a difference in synaptophysin expression reflecting synaptic elimination, in which iNOS-/- mice displayed a decreased number of the inputs to alpha motoneurons, in comparison to that of C57BL/6J. Conclusion The findings herein indicate that i

  2. Using visuo-kinetic virtual reality to induce illusory spinal movement: the MoOVi Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Harvie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Illusions that alter perception of the body provide novel opportunities to target brain-based contributions to problems such as persistent pain. One example of this, mirror therapy, uses vision to augment perceived movement of a painful limb to treat pain. Since mirrors can’t be used to induce augmented neck or other spinal movement, we aimed to test whether such an illusion could be achieved using virtual reality, in advance of testing its potential therapeutic benefit. We hypothesised that perceived head rotation would depend on visually suggested movement. Method In a within-subjects repeated measures experiment, 24 healthy volunteers performed neck movements to 50o of rotation, while a virtual reality system delivered corresponding visual feedback that was offset by a factor of 50%–200%—the Motor Offset Visual Illusion (MoOVi—thus simulating more or less movement than that actually occurring. At 50o of real-world head rotation, participants pointed in the direction that they perceived they were facing. The discrepancy between actual and perceived direction was measured and compared between conditions. The impact of including multisensory (auditory and visual feedback, the presence of a virtual body reference, and the use of 360o immersive virtual reality with and without three-dimensional properties, was also investigated. Results Perception of head movement was dependent on visual-kinaesthetic feedback (p = 0.001, partial eta squared = 0.17. That is, altered visual feedback caused a kinaesthetic drift in the direction of the visually suggested movement. The magnitude of the drift was not moderated by secondary variables such as the addition of illusory auditory feedback, the presence of a virtual body reference, or three-dimensionality of the scene. Discussion Virtual reality can be used to augment perceived movement and body position, such that one can perform a small movement, yet perceive a large one. The Mo

  3. Effects of patterned peripheral nerve stimulation on soleus spinal motor neuron excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, Samuel; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Dileone, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Spinal plasticity is thought to contribute to sensorimotor recovery of limb function in several neurological disorders and can be experimentally induced in animals and humans using different stimulation protocols. In healthy individuals, electrical continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (TBS) of the ...

  4. Spinal astrocyte and microglial activation contributes to rat pain-related behaviors induced by the venom of scorpion Buthus martensi Karch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Tong; Cheng, Ming; Pang, Xue-Yan; Bai, Zhan-Tao; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2009-11-25

    The present study investigated whether spinal astrocyte and microglia were activated in Buthus martensi Karch (BmK) venom-induced rat pain-related behaviors. The results showed that glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity indicative astrocyte activation in bilateral spinal cord started to increase by day 3, peaked at day 7 and gradually reversed at day 14 following intraplantar injection of BmK venom. Western blotting analysis confirmed GFAP expression was up-regulated by BmK venom. In contrast, bilateral spinal increase of OX-42 immunoreactivity indicative of microglial activation began at 4h peaked at day 1 and gradually reversed by days 3 to 7 after the administration of BmK venom. Pretreatment with either intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate or intraperitonial injection of minocycline, and two glial activation inhibitors, suppressed the spontaneous nociceptive responses, and prevented the primary thermal and bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia induced by BmK venom. The post-treatment with fluorocitrate or minocycline could not affect the mechanical hyperalgesia. Moreover, minocycline partially inhibited BmK venom-induced spinal c-Fos expression but lack of effects on BmK venom-induced paw edema. Taken together, the current study demonstrated that spinal astrocyte and microglial activation may contribute to BmK venom-induced rat pain-related behaviors. Thus, spinal glia may represent novel targets for effective treatment of pain syndrome associated with scorpion envenomation.

  5. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats.

  6. Effects of Topical Cova™, Tisseel® and Adcon® Gel Application on the Development of Spinal Peridural Fibrosis: An Experimental Study in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Gurcan, Oktay; Gurcay, Ahmet Gurhan; Onder, Evrim; Kazanci, Burak; Yaman, Mesut Emre; Bavbek, Murad

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal adhesions and fibrosis in the spinal peridural space are the most common causes of post-laminectomy syndrome. Fibrin sealant agents and membrane barriers are commonly used for hemostasis and sealing purposes in spinal surgery. Peridural fibrosis may be a risk of the usage of these topical agents. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of Cova ™, Tisseel® and Adcon ® Gel on the development of spinal peridural fibrosis in the experimental rat model. Thirty-two Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Groups were constituted as group 1; Cova™ group (laminectomy+Cova™), group 2; Tisseel® group (laminectomy+Tisseel®), group 3; Adcon®Gel group (laminectomy + Adcon®Gel), group 4; control group (laminectomy only). Six weeks after laminectomy, spinal columns were removed en bloc between L1 and L4 vertebrae. Peridural fibrosis was evaluated histologically and the results were compared statistically. Statistically significant reduction of peridural fibrosis was achieved in groups 1, 2, and 3 when compared with the control group (p 0.05). Fibrin sealant agent Tisseel® and membrane barrier Cova™ do not enhance peridural fibrosis following laminectomy. Cova™ and Tisseel® may be appropriate for hemostasis and leakage prevention during the spinal surgery and it is safe to leave these materials on the operation surface.

  7. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustai...

  8. Experimental study of dynamic diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord of goats under persistent compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jicun; Liu Huaijun; He Dan; Huang Boyuan; Cui Caixia; Wang Zhihong; Xu Yingjin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in spinal cord of goats with persistent compression injury. Methods: Eighteen goats weighted 20-25 kg were divided into three groups with completely random design: A, B and C. A balloon catheter was inserted into the epidural space at C3-4 level via intervertabral foramen for each goat. The balloon was inflated by injection of variable volumes of saline in group A and B 10 days following operation. The volume of saline was 0.3 ml in group A and 0.2 ml in group B, respectively. The compression sustained for 40 days. Group C served as uncompressed control without injection of saline. The locomotor rating score was applied to each group. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)and fractional anisotropy(FA) values were measured. Histopathological assessments of the compressed spinal cord were performed 50 days following operation with light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. Results: Before operation, the locomotor rating score was 5, the ADC value was (1.23 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the FA value was (0.72 ± 0.05) each group. Of six goats in Group A, the locomotor rating score severely decreased and reached (1.5 ± 0.4)on the 40 th day after compression. The ADC value at compression site decreased soon and reached the minimum (0.75 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 5 th day after compression. Then the ADC value increased gradually, restored normal on the 10 th day or so, then became markedly higher than normal and reached (1.61±0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 40 th day. The FA value at compression site decreased soon, reached (0.54±0.04)on the 1st day, then decreased gradually and reached (0.43± 0.05) on the 40 th day. It appeared high signal intensity on T 2 WI on the 10 th day. In Group B, the locomotor rating score was moderately decreased and reached (3.4 ± 0.5) on the 40 th day. The ADC value at compression site decreased slightly

  9. Involvement of spinal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapy drug characterized by the development of acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. The chronic neuropathy is a dose-limiting toxicity. We previously reported that repeated administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hyperalgesia in the early phase and mechanical allodynia in the late phase in rats. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in rats. Results Repeated administration of oxaliplatin (4 mg/kg, i.p., twice a week caused mechanical allodynia in the fourth week, which was reversed by intrathecal injection of MK-801 (10 nmol and memantine (1 μmol, NMDA receptor antagonists. Similarly, selective NR2B antagonists Ro25-6981 (300 nmol, i.t. and ifenprodil (50 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior. In addition, the expression of NR2B protein and mRNA in the rat spinal cord was increased by oxaliplatin on Day 25 (late phase but not on Day 5 (early phase. Moreover, we examined the involvement of nitric oxide synthase (NOS as a downstream target of NMDA receptor. L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor, and 7-nitroindazole, a neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibitor, significantly suppressed the oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior. The intensity of NADPH diaphorase staining, a histochemical marker for NOS, in the superficial layer of spinal dorsal horn was obviously increased by oxaliplatin, and this increased intensity was reversed by intrathecal injection of Ro25-6981. Conclusion These results indicated that spinal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors are involved in the oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia.

  10. Early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation-induced walking training promotes locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S-X; Huang, F; Gates, M; Shen, X; Holmberg, E G

    2016-11-01

    This is a randomized controlled prospective trial with two parallel groups. The objective of this study was to determine whether early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES)-induced walking training can improve the locomotor function. This study was conducted in SCS Research Center in Colorado, USA. A contusion injury to spinal cord T10 was produced using the New York University impactor device with a 25 -mm height setting in female, adult Long-Evans rats. Injured rats were randomly divided into two groups (n=12 per group). One group was subjected to TANES-induced walking training 2 weeks post injury, and the other group, as control, received no TANES-induced walking training. Restorations of behavior and conduction were assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan open-field rating scale, horizontal ladder rung walking test and electrophysiological test (Hoffmann reflex). Early application of TANES-induced walking training significantly improved the recovery of locomotor function and benefited the restoration of Hoffmann reflex. TANES-induced walking training is a useful method to promote locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury.

  11. Spinal NMDA receptor activation constrains inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation in Charles River Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, K A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2014-10-01

    Reduced spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a unique form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF requires tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) activity within spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus to stabilize early, transient increases in phrenic burst amplitude into long-lasting iPMF. Here we tested the hypothesis that spinal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation constrains long-lasting iPMF in some rat substrains. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized, ventilated Harlan (HSD) and Charles River (CRSD) Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to a 30-min central neural apnea. HSD rats expressed a robust, long-lasting (>60 min) increase in phrenic burst amplitude (i.e., long-lasting iPMF) when respiratory neural activity was restored. By contrast, CRSD rats expressed an attenuated, transient (∼15 min) iPMF. Spinal NMDAR inhibition with DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) before neural apnea or shortly (4 min) prior to the resumption of respiratory neural activity revealed long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats that was phenotypically similar to that in HSD rats. By contrast, APV did not alter iPMF expression in HSD rats. Spinal TNF-α or aPKC inhibition impaired long-lasting iPMF enabled by NMDAR inhibition in CRSD rats, suggesting that similar mechanisms give rise to long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats with NMDAR inhibition as those giving rise to long-lasting iPMF in HSD rats. These results suggest that NMDAR activation can impose constraints on TNF-α-induced aPKC activation after neural apnea, impairing stabilization of transient iPMF into long-lasting iPMF. These data may have important implications for understanding differential responses to reduced respiratory neural activity in a heterogeneous human population. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal tumours in rat - experimental colorectal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perse, M.; Cerar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Animal models of colorectal carcinogenesis represent invaluable research tool for investigating colorectal cancer (CRC). Experimentally induced tumours in laboratory animals provide opportunity for studying certain aspects of tumours that cannot be effectively studied in humans. Significant information on human CRC aetiology or factors influencing it has derived from studies using dimethylhydrazine (DMH) model that is one of the experimental models appreciated for its morphological similarity to human CRC. Today, DMH model represents useful research tool for the studies of colon carcinogens and chemopreventive agents. The review offers insight into morphogenesis and genetic alterations of DMH induced colorectal epithelial tumours in rats. (author)

  13. Ischemic Tolerance of the Brain and Spinal Cord: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Kanda, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Hirashita, Koji; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2017-11-15

    Ischemic tolerance is an endogenous neuroprotective phenomenon induced by sublethal ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), the first discovered form of ischemic tolerance, is widely seen in many species and in various organs including the brain and the spinal cord. Ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord is less familiar among neurosurgeons, although it has been reported from the viewpoint of preventing ischemic spinal cord injury during aortic surgery. It is important for neurosurgeons to have opportunities to see patients with spinal cord ischemia, and to understand ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord as well as the brain. IPC has a strong neuroprotective effect in animal models of ischemia; however, clinical application of IPC for ischemic brain and spinal diseases is difficult because they cannot be predicted. In addition, one drawback of preconditioning stimuli is that they are also capable of producing injury with only minor changes to their intensity or duration. Numerous methods to induce ischemic tolerance have been discovered that vary in their timing and the site at which short-term ischemia occurs. These methods include ischemic postconditioning (IPoC), remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPoC), which has had a great impact on clinical approaches to treatment of ischemic brain and spinal cord injury. Especially RIPerC and RIPoC to induce spinal cord tolerance are considered clinically useful, however the evidence supporting these methods is currently insufficient; further experimental or clinical research in this area is thus necessary.

  14. Perineural pretreatment of bee venom attenuated the development of allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation injured neuropathic pain model; an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Won Uk; Choi, Seong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Lee, So Hee; Lee, Sun Kyung; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Leem, Jeong Gil; Song, Jun Gol; Shin, Jin Woo

    2014-11-04

    Diluted bee venom (BV) is known to have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore assessed whether perineural bee venom pretreatment could attenuate the development of neuropathic pain in the spinal nerve ligation injured animal model. Neuropathic pain was surgically induced in 30 male Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves, with 10 rats each treated with saline and 0.05 and 0.1 mg BV. Behavioral testing for mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia was conducted on postoperative days 3 to 29. Three rats in each group and 9 sham operated rats were sacrificed on day 9, and the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) receptors in the ipsilateral L5 dorsal root ganglion was analyzed. The perineural administration of BV to the spinal nerves attenuated the development of mechanical, thermal, and cold allodynia, and the BV pretreatment reduced the expression of TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPM8 and c - Fos in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion. The current study demonstrates that the perineural pretreatment with diluted bee venom before the induction of spinal nerve ligation significantly suppresses the development of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, this bee venom induced suppression was strongly related with the involvement of transient receptor potential family members.

  15. Experimental synchronization of circuit oscillations induced by common telegraph noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ken; Nakao, Hiroya

    2009-03-01

    Experimental realization and quantitative investigation of common-noise-induced synchronization of limit-cycle oscillations subject to random telegraph signals are performed using an electronic oscillator circuit. Based on our previous formulation [K. Nagai, Phys. Rev. E 71, 036217 (2005)], dynamics of the circuit is described as random-phase mappings between two limit cycles. Lyapunov exponents characterizing the degree of synchronization are estimated from experimentally determined phase maps and compared with linear damping rates of phase differences measured directly. Noisy on-off intermittency of the phase difference as predicted by the theory is also confirmed experimentally.

  16. Time-dependent, bidirectional, anti- and pro-spinal hyper-reflexia and muscle spasticity effect after chronic spinal glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2) oligonucleotide-induced downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamizato, Kota; Marsala, Silvia; Navarro, Michael; Kakinohana, Manabu; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Yoshizumi, Tetsuya; Lukacova, Nadezda; Wancewicz, Ed; Powers, Berit; Mazur, Curt; Marsala, Martin

    2018-03-30

    The loss of local spinal glycine-ergic tone has been postulated as one of the mechanisms contributing to the development of spinal injury-induced spasticity. In our present study using a model of spinal transection-induced muscle spasticity, we characterize the effect of spinally-targeted GlyT2 downregulation once initiated at chronic stages after induction of spasticity in rats. In animals with identified hyper-reflexia, the anti-spasticity effect was studied after intrathecal treatment with: i) glycine, ii) GlyT2 inhibitor (ALX 1393), and iii) GlyT2 antisense oligonucleotide (GlyT2-ASO). Administration of glycine and GlyT2 inhibitor led to significant suppression of spasticity lasting for a minimum of 45-60 min. Treatment with GlyT2-ASO led to progressive suppression of muscle spasticity seen at 2-3 weeks after treatment. Over the subsequent 4-12 weeks, however, the gradual appearance of profound spinal hyper-reflexia was seen. This was presented as spontaneous or slight-tactile stimulus-evoked muscle oscillations in the hind limbs (but not in upper limbs) with individual hyper-reflexive episodes lasting between 3 and 5 min. Chronic hyper-reflexia induced by GlyT2-ASO treatment was effectively blocked by intrathecal glycine. Immunofluorescence staining and Q-PCR analysis of the lumbar spinal cord region showed a significant (>90%) decrease in GlyT2 mRNA and GlyT2 protein. These data demonstrate that spinal GlyT2 downregulation provides only a time-limited therapeutic benefit and that subsequent loss of glycine vesicular synthesis resulting from chronic GlyT2 downregulation near completely eliminates the tonic glycine-ergic activity and is functionally expressed as profound spinal hyper-reflexia. These characteristics also suggest that chronic spinal GlyT2 silencing may be associated with pro-nociceptive activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound v. sham ultrasound for experimentally induced delayed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a double-blind controlled trial, delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was experimentally induced in both bicep muscles of 15 females. Sham US was applied to one bicep (n=15 biceps) and pulsed active US to the other bicep (n=15 biceps) of each participant, 48 and 72 h after induction of DOMS. Primary and ...

  18. Experimental and analytical studies on pedestrian induced footbridge vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Valur; Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Einarsson, Baldvin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from experimental study on human-induced vibrations of three lively footbridges in Reykjavik. The project was funded by the Icelandic Public Roads Administration with two main focus areas; validating the FE-models used at the design stage in terms of dynamic...

  19. Cholescintigraphy in experimentally induced obstructive and parenchymatous jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehre, M.; Biersack, H.J.; Hofmann, S.; Winkler, C.

    1979-01-01

    Animal studies have been performed in 30 dogs in order to obtain information concerning typical patterns of cholescintigraphy in acute obstructive jaundice. In 14 the choledochus was ligated and in 16 galactosamine-hepatitis was induced as an experimental model for parenchymatous jaundice. The results suggest a number of diagnostic criteria in obstructive disease. (Auth.)

  20. Prolonged drug-induced hypothermia in experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Reith, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    In experimental and human stroke, hypothermia is strongly related to a favorable outcome. Previous attempts to manipulate the core temperature in focal cerebral ischemia have been based on mechanical cooling. The purpose of the study is to establish a model for long-term drug-induced hypothermia...

  1. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase synchronization. HAIHONG LI1, WEIQING LIU1,2, QIONGLING DAI1 and JINGHUA XIAO1. 1School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876,. China. 2School of Science, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, ...

  2. Bortezomib induces neuropathic pain through protein kinase C-mediated activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs, including bortezomib, often cause painful peripheral neuropathy, which is a severe dose-limiting adverse effect experienced by many cancer patients. The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) at the spinal cord level are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined whether treatment with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, affects the NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. Systemic treatment with bortezomib in rats did not significantly affect postsynaptic NMDAR currents elicited by puff application of NMDA directly to dorsal horn neurons. Bortezomib treatment markedly increased the baseline frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), which was completely normalized by the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). AP5 also reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation in bortezomib-treated, but not vehicle-treated, rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with chelerythrine fully reversed the increased frequency of miniature EPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in bortezomib-treated rats. Intrathecal injection of AP5 and chelerythrine both profoundly attenuated mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by systemic treatment with bortezomib. In addition, treatment with bortezomib induced striking membrane translocation of PKC-βII, PKC-δ, and PKC-ε in the dorsal root ganglion. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment potentiates nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves via PKC-mediated tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs and PKC at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of milrinone on induced hypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonjung; Kim, Eunsung

    2014-08-01

    Induced hypotension is widely used intraoperatively to reduce blood loss and to improve the surgical field during spinal surgery. To determine the effect of milrinone on induced hypotension during spinal surgery in elderly patients. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Forty patients, 60 to 70 years old, ASA I-II, who underwent elective lumbar fusion surgery. Intraoperative hemodynamics, blood loss, hourly urine output, and grade of surgical field. All patients were randomized to group M or N. The study drug was infused after perivertebral muscle retraction until complete interbody fusion. In group M, 50 μg/kg/min of milrinone was infused over 10 minutes as a loading dose followed by 0.6 μg/kg/min of milrinone as a continuous dose. In group N, an identical volume of normal saline was infused in the same fashion. This study was not funded by commercial or other sponsorship and the authors confirm no conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise. During infusion of the study drug, the systolic and mean blood pressures were maintained within adequate limits of induced hypotension in group M. Intraoperative blood loss was 445.0±226.5 mL in group M and 765.0±339.2 mL in group N (p=.001). Hourly urine output was 1.4±0.6 mL in group M and 0.8±0.2 mL in group N (phypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-03-23

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI.

  5. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  6. Beneficial effect of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors in spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Turnovcová, Karolína; Procházka, Pavel; Onteniente, B.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2015), s. 1781-1797 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12024; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : human induced pluripotent stem cells * neural precursors * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.427, year: 2015

  7. Theophylline-induced respiratory recovery following cervical spinal cord hemisection is augmented by serotonin 2 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2002-11-22

    Cervical spinal cord hemisection leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation of phrenic motoneurons resulting in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated separate therapeutic roles for theophylline, and more recently serotonin (5-HT) as modulators to phrenic nerve motor recovery; mechanisms that likely occur via adenosine A1 and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. The present study was designed to specifically determine if concurrent stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors may enhance motor recovery induced by theophylline alone. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n=7 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection that resulted in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later rats were given systemic theophylline (15 mg/kg, i.v.), resulting in burst recovery in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve. Theophylline-induced recovery was enhanced with the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI; 1.0 mg/kg). DOI-evoked augmentation of theophylline-induced recovery was attenuated following subsequent injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin (2.0 mg/kg). In a separate group, rats were pretreated with ketanserin, which did not prevent subsequent theophylline-induced respiratory recovery. However, pretreatment with ketanserin did prevent DOI-induced augmentation of the theophylline-evoked phrenic nerve burst recovery. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time a positive co-localization of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA and immunoreactivity with phrenic motoneurons of the cervical ventral horns. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that theophylline may induce motor recovery likely at adenosine A1 receptors located at the level of the spinal cord, and the concurrent stimulation of converging 5-HT2 receptors may augment the response.

  8. Suppressive Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Mediation by Spinal α₂-Adrenergic Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiho; Jeon, Changhoon; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jang, Jo Ung; Quan, Fu Shi; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2017-10-31

    Paclitaxel, a chemotherapy drug for solid tumors, induces peripheral painful neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been reported to have potent analgesic effects, which are known to be mediated by activation of spinal α-adrenergic receptor. Here, we investigated the effect of BVA on mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal hyperexcitation induced by paclitaxel. The role of spinal α-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the analgesic effect of BVA was also observed. Administration of paclitaxel (total 8 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) on four alternate days (days 0, 2, 4, and 6) induced significant mechanical hyperalgesic signs, measured using a von Frey filament. BVA (1 mg/kg, ST36) relieved this mechanical hyperalgesia for at least two hours, and suppressed the hyperexcitation in spinal wide dynamic range neurons evoked by press or pinch stimulation. Both melittin (0.5 mg/kg, ST36) and phospholipase A2 (0.12 mg/kg, ST36) were shown to play an important part in this analgesic effect of the BVA, as they significantly attenuated the pain. Intrathecal pretreatment with the α₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist (idazoxan, 50 µg), but not α₁-adrenergic receptor antagonist (prazosin, 30 µg), blocked the analgesic effect of BVA. These results suggest that BVA has potent suppressive effects against paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, which were mediated by spinal α₂-adrenergic receptor.

  9. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex ...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....... was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase...

  10. Atlantic Cod Show a Highly Variable Sensitivity to Electric-Induced Spinal Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, M.; Haan, de D.; Verschueren, B.; Decostere, A.; Puvanendran, V.; Saunders, J.; Polet, H.; Chiers, K.

    2016-01-01

    Pulse trawling is the most promising alternative to conventional beam trawls targeting Sole Solea solea (also known as Solea vulgaris), but due to the electric fields created by electrotrawls spinal injuries are reported in gadoid round fishes such as Atlantic Cod Gadus morhua. This study aimed

  11. Electrophysiological characterization of spinal neurons in different models of diabetes type 1- and type 2-induced neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelert, N; Gorodetskaya, N; Just, S; Doods, H; Corradini, L

    2015-04-16

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a devastating complication of diabetes. The underlying pathogenesis of DPN is still elusive and an effective treatment devoid of side effects presents a challenge. There is evidence that in type-1 and -2 diabetes, metabolic and morphological changes lead to peripheral nerve damage and altered central nociceptive transmission, which may contribute to neuropathic pain symptoms. We characterized the electrophysiological response properties of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in three diabetic models. The streptozotocin (STZ) model was used as a drug-induced model of type-1 diabetes, and the BioBreeding/Worcester (BB/Wor) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat models were used for genetic DPN models. Data were compared to the respective control group (BB/Wor diabetic-resistant, Zucker lean (ZL) and saline-injected Wistar rat). Response properties of WDR neurons to mechanical stimulation and spontaneous activity were assessed. We found abnormal response properties of spinal WDR neurons in all diabetic rats but not controls. Profound differences between models were observed. In BB/Wor diabetic rats evoked responses were increased, while in ZDF rats spontaneous activity was increased and in STZ rats mainly after discharges were increased. The abnormal response properties of neurons might indicate differential pathological, diabetes-induced, changes in spinal neuronal transmission. This study shows for the first time that specific electrophysiological response properties are characteristic for certain models of DPN and that these might reflect the diverse and complex symptomatology of DPN in the clinic. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of magnetic field interactions and radiofrequency-radiation-induced heating of metallic spinal implants in 7 T field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukimura, Itsuko; Murakami, Hideki; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Hirooki; Yamabe, Daisuke; Oikawa, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru

    2017-08-01

    The safety of metallic spinal implants in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using ultrahigh fields has not been established. Hence, we examined whether the displacement forces caused by a static magnetic field and the heating induced by radiofrequency radiation are substantial for spinal implants in a 7 T field. We investigated spinal rods of various lengths and materials, a screw, and a cross-linking bridge in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The displacement forces of the metallic implants in static 7 T and 3 T static magnetic fields were measured and compared. The temperature changes of the implants during 15-min-long fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo image acquisition sequences were measured in the 7 T field. The deflection angles of the metallic spinal materials in the 7 T field were 5.0-21.0° [median: 6.7°], significantly larger than those in the 3 T field (1.0-6.3° [2.2°]). Among the metallic rods, the cobalt-chrome rods had significantly larger deflection angles (17.8-21.0° [19.8°]) than the pure titanium and titanium alloy rods (5.0-7.7° [6.2°]). The temperature changes of the implants, including the cross-linked rods, were 0.7-1.0°C [0.8°C] and 0.6-1.0°C [0.7°C] during the fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo sequences, respectively; these changes were slightly larger than those of the controls (0.4-1.1°C [0.5°C] and 0.3-0.9°C [0.6°C], respectively). All of the metallic spinal implants exhibited small displacement forces and minimal heating, indicating that MRI examinations using 7 T fields may be performed safely on patients with these implants. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:1831-1837, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Inhibition of Spinal Oxidative Stress by Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction Attenuates the Development of Morphine Induced Tolerance and Hyperalgesia in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Lauro

    Full Text Available Citrus Bergamia Risso, commonly known as Bergamot, is a fruit whose Essential Oil and Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction have numerous medicinal properties. It is also an excellent antioxidant and in this study, for the first time, its potential effect on morphine induced tolerance in mice has been investigated. Our studies revealed that development of antinociceptive tolerance to repeated doses of morphine in mice is consistently associated with increased formation of superoxide, malondialdehyde and tyrosine-nitrated proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord such as the enzyme glutamine synthase. Nitration of this protein is intimately linked to inactivation of its biological function and resulting increase of glutamate levels in the spinal cord. Administration of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction (5-50 mg/kg attenuated tolerance development. This effect was accompanied by reduction of superoxide and malondialdehyde production, prevention of GS nitration, re-establishment of its activity and of glutamate levels. Our studies confirmed the main role of free radicals during the cascade of events induced by prolonged morphine treatment and the co-administration of natural derivatives antioxidant such as Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction can be an important therapeutic approach to restore opioids analgesic efficacy.

  14. Short-term alendronate treatment does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with interbody devices and bone graft after treatment withdrawal: an experimental study on spinal fusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baoding; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Xue, Qingyun; Bünger, Cody

    2013-02-01

    Whether alendronate treatment has a residual effect on bone ingrowth into porous biomaterial in humans or experimental animals after treatment withdrawal is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate bone ingrowth into porous tantalum and carbon fiber interbody implants after discontinuing alendronate treatment in experimental spinal fusion in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into two groups of each 12 pigs. The pigs underwent anterior intervertebral lumbar arthrodeses at L2-3, L4-5 and L6-7. Each level was randomly allocated to one of the three implants: a porous tantalum ring with pedicle screw fixation, a porous tantalum ring or a carbon fiber cage with anterior staple fixation. The central hole of implants was packed with an autograft. Alendronate was given orally for the first 3 months to one of the two groups. The pigs were observed for 6 months postoperatively. Histology and micro-CT scans were done at the endpoint. The spinal fusion rates of each implant showed no differences between two treatment groups. Furthermore, no differences were found between two groups as for bone ingrowth into the central holes of implants and bone-implant interface in each implant, or as for the pores of tantalum implants. Trabecular bone microarchitecture in the central hole of the carbon fiber cage did not differ between two treatment groups. The application of ALN, with a dose equivalent to that given to humans during the first 3 months after surgery, does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with porous tantalum ring and autograft after treatment withdrawal in a porcine ALIF model.

  15. Disuse induced by the spine rectification vest: experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Arruda, Eder João; Silva, Carlos Alberto da

    2014-01-01

    The spine is the main support and movement axis of the locomotor system, and numberless clinical conditions may require that this structure be submitted to functional restriction. Among the non-invasive treatments used in spinal or appendicular skeleton injuries, the immobilization of the spine is used as a rehabilitation strategy. Because of the functional restrictions generated by restraining devices used on the spine, the proposal of this study was to adapt a spinal orthosis on rats, thus ...

  16. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeber, Jan; Konig, Niclas; Trolle, Carl

    2017-01-01

    restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (Meso......MIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along “bridges” formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of Meso......MIM prevented stem cell migration, “bridges” were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting...

  17. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin induces functional Kinin B1 receptor in rat spinal cord microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbot Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxydative stress, which are enhanced by transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 activation. To examine the link between TRPV1 and B1R in inflammatory pain, this study aimed to determine the ability of TRPV1 to regulate microglial B1R expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn, and the underlying mechanism. Methods B1R expression (mRNA, protein and binding sites was measured in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord in response to TRPV1 activation by systemic capsaicin (1-50 mg/kg, s.c in rats pre-treated with TRPV1 antagonists (capsazepine or SB-366791, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, or vehicle. B1R function was assessed using a tail-flick test after intrathecal (i.t. injection of a selective B1R agonist (des-Arg9-BK, and its microglial localization was investigated by confocal microscopy with the selective fluorescent B1R agonist, [Nα-bodipy]-des-Arg9-BK. The effect of i.t. capsaicin (1 μg/site was also investigated. Results Capsaicin (10 to 50 mg/kg, s.c. enhanced time-dependently (0-24h B1R mRNA levels in the lumbar spinal cord; this effect was prevented by capsazepine (10 mg/kg, i.p.; 10 μg/site, i.t. and SB-366791 (1 mg/kg, i.p.; 30 μg/site, i.t.. Increases of B1R mRNA were correlated with IL-1β mRNA levels, and they were significantly less in cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Intrathecal capsaicin (1 μg/site also enhanced B1R mRNA in lumbar spinal cord. NAC (1 g/kg/d × 7 days prevented B1R up-regulation, superoxide anion production and NF-kB activation induced by capsaicin (15 mg/kg. Des-Arg9-BK (9.6 nmol/site, i.t. decreased by 25-30% the nociceptive threshold at 1 min post-injection in capsaicin-treated rats (10-50 mg/kg while it was without effect in control rats. Des-Arg9-BK-induced thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by capsazepine, SB-366791 and by antagonists/inhibitors of B1R (SSR240612, 10 mg/kg, p

  18. Microcirculation alterations in experimentally induced gingivitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masato; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Iimura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to morphologically examine the gingival microvascular network using a microvascular resin cast (MRC) technique, and to investigate how inflammatory disease functionally affects gingival microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We used four beagle dogs with healthy periodontal tissue as experimental animals. To cause periodontal inflammation, dental floss was placed around the cervical neck portions of the right premolars. The unmanipulated left premolars served as controls, and received plaque control every 7 days. After 90 days, gingivitis was induced in the experimental side, while the control side maintained healthy gingiva. To perform morphological examinations, we used an MRC method involving the injection of low-viscosity synthetic resin into the blood vessels, leading to peripheral soft-tissue dissolution and permitting observation of the bone, teeth, and vascular cast. Gingival blood flow was estimated using an LDF meter. The control gingival vasculature showed hairpin-loop-like networks along the tooth surface. The blood vessels had diameters of 20-40 μm and were regularly arranged around the cervical portion. On the other hand, the vasculature in the experimental group was twisted and gathered into spiral forms, with blood vessels that had uneven surfaces and smaller diameters of 8-10 μm. LDF revealed reduced gingival blood flow in the group with experimentally induced gingivitis compared to controls. The actual measurements of gingival blood flow by LDF were in agreement with the alterations that would be expected based on the gingivitis-induced morphological alterations observed with the MRC technique.

  19. A Combination Tissue Engineering Strategy for Schwann Cell-Induced Spinal Cord Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    NUMBER New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd Newark NJ 07102-1824 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...brainstem project throughout the spinal cord and participate in pain modulation and autonomic and motor responses (Lindvall et al., 1983). The...Zhou XH, Ning GZ, Feng SQ, Kong XH, Chen JT, Zheng YF, Ban DX, Liu T, Li H, Wang P. 2012. Transplantation of autologous activated Schwann cells in

  20. Bladder recovery by stem cell based cell therapy in the bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    Full Text Available Bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury (SCI can become problematic and severely impair the quality of life. Preclinical studies of spinal cord injury have largely focused on the recovery of limb function while neglecting to investigate bladder recovery.The present study was performed to investigate and review the effect of stem cell-based cell therapy on bladder recovery in SCI.We conducted a meta-analysis of urodynamic findings of experimental trials that included studies of stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI. Relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (January 1990 - December 2012. Final inclusion was determined by a urodynamic study involving detailed numerical values. Urodynamic parameters for analysis included voiding pressure, residual urine, bladder capacity and non-voiding contraction (NVC. Meta-analysis of the data, including findings from urodynamic studies, was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method.A total of eight studies were included with a sample size of 224 subjects. The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI. After a stem cell-based cell therapy, voiding pressure (-6.35, p <0.00001, I2 = 77%, NVC (-3.58, p <0.00001, I2 = 82%, residual urine (-024, p = 0.004, I2 = 95% showed overall significant improvement. Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%.After stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI, partial bladder recovery including improvement of voiding pressure, NVC, and residual urine was demonstrated. Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

  1. Abbreviated exposure to hypoxia is sufficient to induce CNS dysmyelination, modulate spinal motor neuron composition, and impair motor development in neonatal mice.

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    Jens O Watzlawik

    Full Text Available Neonatal white matter injury (nWMI is an increasingly common cause of cerebral palsy that results predominantly from hypoxic injury to progenitor cells including those of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Existing mouse models of nWMI utilize prolonged periods of hypoxia during the neonatal period, require complex cross-fostering and exhibit poor growth and high mortality rates. Abnormal CNS myelin composition serves as the major explanation for persistent neuro-motor deficits. Here we developed a simplified model of nWMI with low mortality rates and improved growth without cross-fostering. Neonatal mice are exposed to low oxygen from postnatal day (P 3 to P7, which roughly corresponds to the period of human brain development between gestational weeks 32 and 36. CNS hypomyelination is detectable for 2-3 weeks post injury and strongly correlates with levels of body and brain weight loss. Immediately following hypoxia treatment, cell death was evident in multiple brain regions, most notably in superficial and deep cortical layers as well as the subventricular zone progenitor compartment. PDGFαR, Nkx2.2, and Olig2 positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cell were significantly reduced until postnatal day 27. In addition to CNS dysmyelination we identified a novel pathological marker for adult hypoxic animals that strongly correlates with life-long neuro-motor deficits. Mice reared under hypoxia reveal an abnormal spinal neuron composition with increased small and medium diameter axons and decreased large diameter axons in thoracic lateral and anterior funiculi. Differences were particularly pronounced in white matter motor tracts left and right of the anterior median fissure. Our findings suggest that 4 days of exposure to hypoxia are sufficient to induce experimental nWMI in CD1 mice, thus providing a model to test new therapeutics. Pathological hallmarks of this model include early cell death, decreased OPCs and hypomyelination in early postnatal life

  2. Oxytocin-induced antinociception in the spinal cord is mediated by a subpopulation of glutamatergic neurons in lamina I-II which amplify GABAergic inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlichter Rémy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT, secreted in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn by descending axons of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN neurons, produces antinociception and analgesia. The spinal mechanism of OT is, however, still unclear and requires further investigation. We have used patch clamp recording of lamina II neurons in spinal cord slices and immunocytochemistry in order to identify PVN-activated neurons in the superficial layers of the spinal cord and attempted to determine how this neuronal population may lead to OT-mediated antinociception. Results We show that OT released during PVN stimulation specifically activates a subpopulation of lamina II glutamatergic interneurons which are localized in the most superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (lamina I-II. This OT-specific stimulation of glutamatergic neurons allows the recruitment of all GABAergic interneurons in lamina II which produces a generalized elevation of local inhibition, a phenomenon which might explain the reduction of incoming Aδ and C primary afferent-mediated sensory messages. Conclusion Our results obtained in lamina II of the spinal cord provide the first clear evidence of a specific local neuronal network that is activated by OT release to induce antinociception. This OT-specific pathway might represent a novel and interesting therapeutic target for the management of neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

  3. Neuroprotection against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury induced by different ischemic postconditioning methods: roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Ai, Chunyu; Shi, Enyi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Ma, Hong

    2009-12-01

    The authors compared the neuroprotective effects induced by two ischemic postconditioning methods and sought to determine the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this neuroprotection. Spinal cord ischemia was induced in rabbits by occlusion of the infrarenal aorta with a balloon catheter for 25 min. Postconditioning was accomplished by either five cycles of 1-min occlusion and 1-min reperfusion (standard postconditioning) or control of the perfusion pressure between 45 and 55 mmHg at the first 10 min of reperfusion (modified postconditioning). Motor function was assessed with the Tarlov score during a 28-day observation period. Histologic examination of lumbar spinal cords was performed. Expressions of Akt and ERK in the spinal cord were evaluated by Western blot. Compared with the controls, the two postconditioning methods markedly increased Tarlov scores 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after spinal cord ischemia and number of intact motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord. No significant difference in Tarlov scores and number of intact motor neurons was detected between the two postconditioning method groups. The two postconditioning methods enhanced the expressions of phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK in spinal cords. The neuroprotective effects and the increases in phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK were abolished by administration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt inhibitor LY-294002 or ERK inhibitor PD-98059. The two postconditioning methods possess comparable neuroprotective effects on the spinal cord and share a common molecular mechanism, in which phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and ERK pathways play crucial roles.

  4. MRI in the early stage of spinal cord injury: does it have clinical relevance? An experimental study; Hat die MRT in der Fruehphase des spinalen Traumas klinische Relevanz? Eine experimentelle Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannmann, T.T. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Freund, M. [Klinikum Aschaffenburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: An experimental technique for producing a ventral spinal trauma which imitates a slipped intervertebral disc or a fractured vertebra was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging and histology. The results were evaluated with respect to their clinical importance. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 Wistar rats were used for this study. An inflatable angioplasty balloon device was placed dorsally or ventrally to the spinal cord in order to produce a spinal trauma. 30 rats were used to compare neurological pathologies between ventral and dorsal trauma. 30 animals underwent graded ventral spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and the results were compared to histology. Results: Using this technique, the balloon device can be placed ventrally to the spinal cord. The compression time had a direct effect on changes on magnetic resonance images and edema in histology, but a longer compression time did not produce increased bleeding. The T2-weighted MRI scans showed hyperintense changes immediately after spinal compression. Therefore, they are the appropriate way for diagnosing acute spinal injuries. Although the T1-weighted MRI scans did not change after spinal compression, they are important for diagnosing epidural hematomas. (orig.)

  5. Alterations in the neural circuits from peripheral afferents to the spinal cord: possible implications for diabetic polyneuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Zhen eKou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN presents as a wide variety of sensorimotor symptoms and affects approximately 50% of diabetic patients. Changes in the neural circuits may occur in the early stages in diabetes and are implicated in the development of DPN. Therefore, we aimed to detect changes in the expression of isolectin B4 (IB4, the marker for nonpeptidergic unmyelinated fibers and their cell bodies and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, the marker for peptidergic fibers and their cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord of streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats showing alterations in sensory and motor function. We also used cholera toxin B subunit (CTB to show the morphological changes of the myelinated fibers and motor neurons. STZ-induced diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycemia, decreased body weight gain, mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity. In the DRG and spinal dorsal horn, IB4-labeled structures decreased, but both CGRP immunostaining and CTB labeling increased from day 14 to day 28 in diabetic rats. In spinal ventral horn, CTB labeling decreased in motor neurons in diabetic rats. Treatment with intrathecal injection of insulin at the early stages of DPN could alleviate mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity in diabetic rats. The results suggest that the alterations of the neural circuits between spinal nerve and spinal cord via the DRG and ventral root might be involved in DPN.

  6. Structural and molecular alterations of primary afferent fibres in the spinal dorsal horn in vincristine-induced neuropathy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Rivals, Isabelle; M'Dahoma, Saïd; Dubacq, Sophie; Pezet, Sophie; Calvino, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Vincristine is one of the most common anti-cancer drug therapies administered for the treatment of many types of cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the emergence of peripheral neuropathy, resulting in chronic neuropathic pain in many patients. This study sought to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of neuropathic pain by vincristine-induced neurotoxicity. We focused on signs of functional changes and revealed that deep layers of the spinal cord (III-IV) experience increased neuronal activity both in the absence of peripheral stimulation and, as a result of tactile mechanical stimulations. These laminae and superficial laminae I-II were also subject to structural changes as evidenced by an increase in immunoreactivity of Piccolo, a marker of active presynaptic elements. Further investigations performed, using DNA microarray technology, describe a large number of genes differentially expressed in dorsal root ganglions and in the spinal dorsal horn after vincristine treatment. Our study describes an important list of genes differentially regulated by vincristine treatment that will be useful for future studies and brings forward evidence for molecular and anatomical modifications of large diameter sensory neurons terminating in deep dorsal horn laminae, which could participate in the development of tactile allodynia.

  7. Spinal cord homogenates from SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis induce SOD1 aggregation in living cells.

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    Edward Pokrishevsky

    Full Text Available Mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 can confer its misfolding on wild-type SOD1 in living cells; the propagation of misfolding can also be transmitted between cells in vitro. Recent studies identified fluorescently-tagged SOD1G85R as a promiscuous substrate that is highly prone to aggregate by a variety of templates, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we utilized several SOD1-GFP reporter proteins with G37R, G85R, or G93A mutations in SOD1. We observed that human spinal cord homogenates prepared from SOD1 familial ALS (FALS can induce significantly more intracellular reporter protein aggregation than spinal cord homogenates from sporadic ALS, Alzheimer's disease, multiple system atrophy or healthy control individuals. We also determined that the induction of reporter protein aggregation by SOD1-FALS tissue homogenates can be attenuated by incubating the cells with the SOD1 misfolding-specific antibody 3H1, or the small molecule 5-fluorouridine. Our study further implicates SOD1 as the seeding particle responsible for the spread of SOD1-FALS neurodegeneration from its initial onset site(s, and demonstrates two potential therapeutic strategies for SOD1-mediated disease. This work also comprises a medium-throughput cell-based platform of screening potential therapeutics to attenuate propagated aggregation of SOD1.

  8. Anti-allodynic effect of Buja in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy via spinal astrocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokines suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yongjae; Lee, Ji Hwan; Kim, Woojin; Yoon, Sang Hyub; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2017-01-14

    Oxaliplatin, a widely used anticancer drug against metastatic colorectal cancer, can induce acute peripheral neuropathy, which is characterized by cold and mechanical allodynia. Activation of glial cells (e.g. astrocytes and microglia) and increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-1β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Our previous study demonstrated that Gyejigachulbu-Tang (GBT), a herbal complex formula, alleviates oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in rats by suppressing spinal glial activation. However, it remains to be elucidated whether and how Buja (Aconiti Tuber), a major ingredient of GBT, is involved in the efficacy of GBT. Cold and mechanical allodynia induced by an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.) in Sprauge-Dawley rats were evaluated by a tail immersion test in cold water (4 °C) and a von Frey hair test, respectively. Buja (300 mg/kg) was orally administrated for five consecutive days after the oxaliplatin injection. Glial activation in the spinal cord was quantified by immunohistochemical staining using GFAP (for astrocytes) and Iba-1 (for microglia) antibodies. The amount of spinal pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α, were measured by ELISA. Significant behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were observed 3 days after an oxaliplatin injection. Oral administration of Buja significantly alleviated oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia by increasing the tail withdrawal latency to cold stimuli and mechanical threshold. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the activation of astrocytes and microglia and the increase of the IL-1β and TNF-α levels in the spinal cord after an oxaliplatin injection. Administration of Buja suppressed the activation of spinal astrocytes without affecting microglial activation and down-regulated both IL-1β and TNF-α levels in the spinal cord. Our results indicate that Buja has a potent anti-allodynic effect in a rat

  9. Corticostriatal Plastic Changes in Experimental L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ghiglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, alteration of dopamine- (DA- dependent striatal functions and pulsatile stimulation of DA receptors caused by the discontinuous administration of levodopa (L-DOPA lead to a complex cascade of events affecting the postsynaptic striatal neurons that might account for the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. Experimental models of LID have been widely used and extensively characterized in rodents and electrophysiological studies provided remarkable insights into the inner mechanisms underlying L-DOPA-induced corticostriatal plastic changes. Here we provide an overview of recent findings that represent a further step into the comprehension of mechanisms underlying maladaptive changes of basal ganglia functions in response to L-DOPA and associated to development of LID.

  10. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees...... that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation...

  11. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  12. Allopregnanolone suppresses diabetes-induced neuropathic pain and motor deficit through inhibition of GABAA receptor down-regulation in the spinal cord of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Afrazi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Painful diabetic neuropathy is associated with hyperexcitability and hyperactivity of spinal cord neurons. However, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully clarified. Induction of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission imbalance at the spinal cord seems to account for the abnormal neuronal activity in diabetes. Protective properties of neurosteroids have been demonstrated in numerous cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. Materials and Methods: Here, the protective effects of allopregnanolone, a neurosteroid were investigated in an in vivo model of diabetic neuropathy. The tail-flick test was used to assess the nociceptive threshold. Diabetes was induced by injection of 50 mg/kg (IP streptozotocin. Seven weeks after the induction of diabetes, the dorsal half of the lumbar spinal cord was assayed for the expression of γ2 subunit of GABAA receptor using semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results: The data shows that allopregnanolone (5 and 20 mg/kg markedly ameliorated diabetes-induced thermal hyperalgesia and motor deficit. The weights of diabetic rats that received 5 and 20 mg/kg allopregnanolone did not significantly reduce during the time course of study. Furthermore, this neurosteroid could inhibit GABAA receptor down-regulation induced by diabetes in the rat spinal cord. Conclusion: The data revealed that allopregnanolone has preventive effects against hyperglycemic-induced neuropathic pain and motor deficit which are related to the inhibition of GABAA receptor down-regulation.

  13. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MSc Karin J.A. Legemate; MD Christof A. J. Smit; MSc Anja de Koning; PhD Sonja de Groot; MD, PhD Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste; PhD Thomas W.H. Janssen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation

  14. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury : Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christof A. J.; Legemate, Karin J. A.; de Koning, Anja; de Groot, Sonja; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on

  15. Comparison of intraspinal and intrathecal implantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Dec (2015), s. 257 ISSN 1757-6512 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12024 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * human induced pluripotent stem cells * cell therapy * cell application route Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2015

  16. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A.J.; Zwinkels, M.; Van Dijk, T.; De Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W.J.

    Background:Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  17. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Zwinkels, M.; van Dijk, T.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    Background: Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  18. Oxidative stress in immature brain following experimentally-induced seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S39-S48 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0292; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * experimentally-induced seizures * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction * antioxidant defense Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  19. Patterns of experimentally induced pain in pericranial muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Peter Thede; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Nociceptive mechanisms in the craniofacial muscle tissue are poorly understood. The pain pattern in individual pericranial muscles has not been described before. Experimental muscle pain was induced by standardized infusions of 0.2 ml 1 m hypertonic saline into six craniofacial muscles (masseter...... (VAS) and the perceived area of pain was drawn on anatomical maps. The pain areas were measured and the localization determined by a new centre-of-gravity method. The PPTs were lowest on the sternocleidomastoid muscle (anova: P ... into the masseter muscle (anova: P muscles had significantly different patterns of spread and referral of pain according to trigeminally vs...

  20. Experimental identification of pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos; Ricciardelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    combinations of frequencies (0.33-1.07 Hz) and amplitudes 4.5-48 mm). The experimental campaign involved seventy-one male and female human adults and covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed between 4954 individual tests. When walking on a laterally moving surface, motion-induced forces develop also...... with the acceleration of the treadmill depends on the frequency of the movement, such that pedestrians (on average) add to the overall modal mass for low frequency motion and subtract from the overall modal mass at higher frequencies....

  1. Experimental forearm immobilization in humans induces cold and mechanical hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkelsen, Astrid J; Bach, Flemming W; Jensen, Troels S

    2008-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a painful condition of unknown etiology. Clinical and experimental observations suggest that limb immobilization may induce symptoms and signs characteristic of complex regional pain syndrome. This study examined the effect of forearm immobilization on regional sensory and autonomic functions in healthy subjects. Thermal and mechanical sensitivity, skin temperature, and vasoconstrictor responses were measured in 30 healthy subjects before and 0, 3, and 28 days after scaphoid cast immobilization. Fifteen subjects served as nonimmobilized controls. At cast removal, 27 subjects experienced pain at joint movement. Cast immobilization induced cold hyperalgesia in glabrous and hairy skin on the immobilized hand and induced significant skin temperature differences between the control and the immobilized hand at cast removal and after 3 days. Immobilization also reduced pain threshold at skin fold testing at all time points after cast removal. All measures except pain threshold at skin fold testing were normalized after 28 days. Immobilization did not affect thermal detection, heat pain, and pressure pain thresholds; resting skin perfusion; or vasoconstrictor responses induced by mental stress or deep inspirations. Four weeks of forearm immobilization caused transient changes in skin temperature, mechanosensitivity, and thermosensitivity, without alteration in the sympathetically mediated vascular tone.

  2. Immediate effects of chocolate on experimentally induced mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    In this work two hypotheses were tested: (1) that eating a piece of chocolate immediately affects negative, but not positive or neutral mood, and (2) that this effect is due to palatability. Experiment 1 (48 normal-weight and healthy women and men) examined the effects of eating a piece of chocolate and drinking water on negative, positive and neutral mood states induced by film clips. Eating chocolate reduced negative mood compared to drinking water, whereas no or only marginal effects were found on neutral and positive moods. Experiment 2 (113 normal-weight and healthy women and men) compared effects of eating palatable and unpalatable chocolate on negative mood, and examined the duration of chocolate-induced mood change. Negative mood was improved after eating palatable chocolate as compared to unpalatable chocolate or nothing. This effect was short lived, i.e., it disappeared after 3 min. In both experiments, chocolate-induced mood improvement was associated with emotional eating. The present studies demonstrate that eating a small amount of sweet food improves an experimentally induced negative mood state immediately and selectively and that this effect of chocolate is due to palatability. It is hypothesized that immediate mood effects of palatable food contribute to the habit of eating to cope with stress.

  3. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

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    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  4. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  5. The preventive effect of resiniferatoxin on the development of cold hypersensitivity induced by spinal nerve ligation: involvement of TRPM8.

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    Koh, Won Uk; Choi, Seong-Soo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Hye Joo; Ahn, Ho-Soo; Lee, Sun Kyung; Leem, Jeong Gil; Song, Jun Gol; Shin, Jin Woo

    2016-06-21

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is a potent analog of capsaicin and activates transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type (TRPV) 1. In the current study, we investigated the preventive effect of perineural RTX on the development of cold hypersensitivity induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. Furthermore, we examined the association between the expression level of TRPV1, TRP ankyrin type (TRPA) 1 and TRP melastatin type (TRPM) 8 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and cold hypersensitivity after SNL. RTX pretreatment prevented the development of SNL-induced hypersensitivity to mechanical, thermal, and cold stimuli. Western blot analysis 4 weeks after RTX pretreatment showed that RTX pretreatment decreased the protein expression level of SNL-induced TRPM8, but not TRPV1 or TRPA1, in the DRG of SNL rats. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed that up-regulated TRPM8-stained neurons after SNL co-localized with neurofilament 200-positive neurons located in the DRG. Pretreatment with perineural RTX significantly inhibits SNL-induced mechanical, thermal, and cold hypersensitivity. The antinociceptive effect of perineural RTX, especially on cold hypersensitivity, may be related to the suppression of TRPM8 expression in DRG.

  6. Hemodynamic parameters and neurogenic pulmonary edema following spinal cord injury: an experimental model Parâmetros hemodinâmicos e edema pulmonar neurogênico após traumatismo raquimedular: modelo experimental

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    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a serious and always life-threatening complication following several lesions of the central nervous system. We report an experiment with 58 Wistar-Hanover adult male rats. Two groups were formed: control (n=4 and experimental (n=54. The experimental group sustained acute midthoracic spinal cord injury by Fogarty’s balloon-compression technique containing 20µL of saline for 5, 15, 30 or 60 seconds. The rats were anesthetized by intraperitoneal (i.p. sodium pentobarbital (s.p. 60 mg/Kg. The quantitative neurological outcome was presented at 4, 24 and 48 hours from compression to characterize the injury graduation in different groups. Poor outcome occurred with 60 seconds of compression. Six animals died suddenly with pulmonary edema. Using the procedure to investigate the pulmonary edema during 60 seconds of compression, followed by decompression and time-course of 60 seconds, 20 rats were randomly asigned to one of the following groups: control (1, n=4, anesthetized by i.p. s.p., 60 mg/Kg but without compression and experimental (2, n=7, anesthetized by i.p. xylazine 10 mg/Kg and ketamine 75 mg/Kg and (3, n=9, anesthetized by i.p. s.p., 60 mg/Kg. The pulmonary index (100 x wet lung weight / body weight was 0.395 ± 0.018 in control group, rose to 0.499 ± 0.060 in group 2, and was 0.639 ± 0.14 in group 3. Histologic examination of the spinal cord showed parenchymal ruptures and acute hemorrhage. Comparison of the pulmonary index with morphometric evaluation of edema fluid-filled alveoli by light microscopy showed that relevant intra-alveolar edema occurred only for index values above 0.55. The results suggest that the pulmonary edema induced by spinal compression is of neurogenic nature and that the type of anesthesia used might be important for the genesis of lung edema.Edema pulmonar neurogênico é complicação séria e aumenta o risco de vida em pacientes com várias lesões do sistema nervoso central

  7. Experimental neurocysticercosis: absence of IL-4 induces lower encephalitis

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    Hidelberto Matos Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most severe clinical manifestation of cysticercosis. One of the factors responsible for its symptomatology is the host inflammatory response. Therefore the influence of interleukin 4 (IL-4 on the induction of encephalitis in experimental NCC was evaluated. Methods BALB/c (WT and BALB/c (IL-4-KO mice were inoculated intracranially with Taenia crassiceps cysticerci and euthanized at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days later, the encephala removed and histopathologically analyzed. Results The absence of IL-4 induced greater parasitism. In the initial phase of the infection, IL-4-KO showed a lower intensity in the inflammatory infiltration of polimorphonuclear cells in the host-parasite interface and intra-parenquimatous edema. The IL-4-KO animals, in the late phase of the infection, showed lower intensity of ventriculomegaly, encephalitis, and meningitis, and greater survival of the parasites in comparison with the WT animals. Conclusion The absence of IL-4 induced lower inflammatory infiltration, ventriculomegaly and perivasculitis in experimental NCC.

  8. Progesterone prevents nerve injury-induced allodynia and spinal NMDA receptor upregulation in rats.

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    Coronel, María Florencia; Labombarda, Florencia; Roig, Paulina; Villar, Marcelo José; De Nicola, Alejandro Federico; González, Susana Laura

    2011-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain still remains a therapeutic challenge. Recent studies support the notion that progesterone, a neuroactive steroid, may offer a promising perspective in pain modulation. Evaluate the effect of progesterone administration on the development of neuropathic pain-associated allodynia and on the spinal expression of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor subunit 1 (NR1), its phosphorylated form (pNR1), and the gamma isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), all key players in the process of central sensitization, in animals subjected to a sciatic nerve constriction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a sciatic nerve single ligature constriction and treated with daily subcutaneous injections of progesterone (16 mg/kg) or vehicle. The development of hindpaw mechanical and thermal allodynia was assessed using the von Frey and Choi tests, respectively. Twenty two days after injury, the number of neuronal profiles exhibiting NR1, pNR1, or PKCγ immunoreactivity was determined in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Injured animals receiving progesterone did not develop mechanical allodynia and showed a significantly lower number of painful responses to cold stimulation. In correlation with the observed attenuation of pain behaviors, progesterone administration significantly reduced the number of NR1, pNR1, and PKCγ immunoreactive neuronal profiles. Our results show that progesterone prevents allodynia in a rat model of sciatic nerve constriction and reinforce its role as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of melatonin on severe crush spinal cord injury-induced reactive astrocyte and scar formation.

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    Krityakiarana, Warin; Sompup, Kamonrapat; Jongkamonwiwat, Nopporn; Mukda, Sujira; Pinilla, Fernando Gomez; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri

    2016-12-01

    The present work aimed at analyzing the effects of melatonin on scar formation after spinal cord injury (SCI). Upregulation of reactive astrocyte under SCI pathological conditions has been presented in several studies. It has been proved that the crucial factor in triggering this upregulation is proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, scar formation is an important barrier to axonal regeneration through the lesion area. Melatonin plays an important role in reducing inflammation, but its effects on scar formation in the injured spinal cord remain unknown. Hence, we used the model of severe crush injury in mice to investigate the effects of melatonin on scar formation. Mice were randomly separated into four groups; SCI, SCI+Melatonin 1 (single dose), SCI+Melatonin 14 (14 daily doses), and control. Melatonin was administered by intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg) after injury. Immunohistochemical analysis, Western blot, and behavioral evaluation were used to explore the effects of melatonin after SCI for 14 days. The melatonin-treated mice presented higher expression of neuronal markers (P < 0.001). Remarkably, the inflammatory response appeared to be greatly reduced in the SCI+Melatonin 14 group (P < 0.001), which also displayed less scar formation (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that melatonin inhibits scar formation by acting on inflammatory cytokines after SCI. Overall, our results suggest that melatonin is a promising treatment strategy after SCI that deserves further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

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    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  11. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  12. Past Pain Experience and Experimentally induced Pain Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Aude; Plansont, Brigitte; Labrunie, Anaïs; Malauzat, Dominique; Girard, Murielle

    2017-12-01

    Many intercurrent factors may be involved in the modulation of the pain message and its expression, such as the previous experience of pain built along the life. In this study, we aimed to determine whether susceptibility to experimentally induced pain is differentially influenced by the individual previous painful experience in subjects with schizophrenia (SC) major depression (MD), and controls (C). The SC (30), MD (32) and C (30) groups participated in experimental pain tests (application of pressure and induction of ischemia) after a semi-structured interview to make an inventory of the previous painful experiences, and the evaluation of anxiety either with autonomic (heart rate, blood pressure) or psychological (Hospital Anxiety Depression scale HAD) measures, and catastrophism. The reported pain intensities, severities, duration, of the previous pain events, and the number of previous painful events were equivalent in the three groups, except for the number of painful events experimented before the last six months which was lower in the MD group. Experimental pain sensitivity was influenced by the diagnosis, the HAD scores or the number and intensities of previous lived painful events. The lack of a past experience of pain was comparable for the different groups, suggesting that psychiatric disorders do not affect the experience of pain associated with daily life or past events. For each subject, the reported previous experience of pain influences the present feeling of pain.

  13. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Rafael M; Oliveira, Rafael P; Medeiros, Samara R; Gomes-Santos, Ana C; Alves, Andrea C; Loli, Flávia G; Guimarães, Mauro A F; Amaral, Sylvia S; da Cunha, André P; Weiner, Howard L; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M C

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Rafael M.; Oliveira, Rafael P.; Medeiros, Samara R.; Gomes-Santos, Ana C.; Alves, Andrea C.; Loli, Flávia G.; Guimarães, Mauro A.F.; Amaral, Sylvia S.; da Cunha, André P.; Weiner, Howard L.; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. PMID:22939403

  15. Activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase in spinal cord contributes to breast cancer induced bone pain in rats

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    Wang Xiao-Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most frequent pain in patients with metastatic breast and prostate cancer is bone pain, which can be severe and difficult to treat. The mechanisms underlying this pain remain unclear. Here we investigated the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway in the spinal cord in cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP. Results In this study, we used an established rat CIBP model to investigate the possible role of JNK activation in the spinal cord. After intra-tibial inoculation with Walker 256 rat mammary gland carcinoma cells, the rats displayed mechanical allodynia on day 5, which lasted to day 16. The activation of JNK in neurons and astrocytes in the spinal cord was found on day 12 and day 16 after intra-tibial inoculation with carcinoma cells. A single intrathecal injection with JNK inhibitor SP600125 by lumbar puncture attenuated mechanical allodynia on day 12, and repeated intrathecal injection of SP600126 from day 10 to day 14 had a cumulative analgesic effect on CIBP. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that JNK activation in the spinal cord is required in the maintenance of CIBP. Inhibition of the spinal JNK pathway may provide a new therapy for CIBP management.

  16. Interaction of reactive astrocytes with type I collagen induces astrocytic scar formation through the integrin-N-cadherin pathway after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masamitsu; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kumamaru, Hiromi; Yokota, Kazuya; Saito, Takeyuki; Kijima, Ken; Yoshizaki, Shingo; Harimaya, Katsumi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Okada, Seiji

    2017-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury transforms naive astrocytes into reactive astrocytes, which eventually become scar-forming astrocytes that can impair axonal regeneration and functional recovery. This sequential phenotypic change, known as reactive astrogliosis, has long been considered unidirectional and irreversible. However, we report here that reactive astrocytes isolated from injured spinal cord reverted in retrograde to naive astrocytes when transplanted into a naive spinal cord, whereas they formed astrocytic scars when transplanted into injured spinal cord, indicating the environment-dependent plasticity of reactive astrogliosis. We also found that type I collagen was highly expressed in the spinal cord during the scar-forming phase and induced astrocytic scar formation via the integrin-N-cadherin pathway. In a mouse model of spinal cord injury, pharmacological blockade of reactive astrocyte-type I collagen interaction prevented astrocytic scar formation, thereby leading to improved axonal regrowth and better functional outcomes. Our findings reveal environmental cues regulating astrocytic fate decisions, thereby providing a potential therapeutic target for CNS injury.

  17. Randomized controlled trial comparing ondansetron and placebo for the reduction of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension during elective cesarean delivery in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouly, Nabih I; Meligy, Ashraf M

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of prophylactic ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and bradycardia among patients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled patients aged 20-40years scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia between January 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous ondansetron 4mg in 10mL of saline or 10mL of saline. Participants and investigators were masked to group assignments. The primary outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate, measured at baseline, 10-minute intervals to 60minutes, and at 2hours. Per-protocol analyses were performed including patients who delivered under spinal anesthesia. The analyses included 50 patients in each group. Decreases in systolic blood pressure were reduced among patients receiving ondansetron at all time points (P0.05). Among patients who received ondansetron, mean arterial pressure was higher immediately and 30minutes after spinal anesthesia (Pcesarean deliveries under spinal anesthesia. Pan African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR 201601001397193. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

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    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  19. Experimental study of effectiveness of local application of electroneurostimulation, cortexin and methylprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury

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    Tsymbaliuk V.I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The tasks were to investigate the effect of topical electroneurostimulation, cortexin and methy¬lprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury in electrophysiological experiments on laboratory rats. The animals un¬derwent half transection of the spinal cord in the lower-thoracic area to simulate Brown-Sequard’s syndrome. Drugs were administered subdurally once daily in the dose of 0.03 mg for cortexin and 0.7 mg for methylprednisolone during 72 hours. Electrophysiological studies were carried out using standard electrophysiological apparatus. Reliable changes of bioelectric indicators in neuromuscular complex during topical application of electrical stimulation, as well as in administered methylprednisolone, failed to be found. However, local application of cortexin in terms of traumatic spinal cord injury due the antioxidant and neurotrophic effect results in improvement of bioelectrical indicators; this is manifested in reliable (p<0.05 increase of amplitude of the background electromyogram impulses at rest by 33% and increase of spontaneous oscillations frequency by 29.82%.

  20. Pathogenesis of spinal cord involvement induced by lower cervical instability in rheumatoid spondylitis

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    Taniguchi, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Shigeru; Fukuda, Kenji; Kuroki, Tatsuji; Tajima, Naoya (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    To examine prognostic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), plain radiography findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared with histopathological findings in 129 RA patients who had local or neurologic symptoms due to the cervical spine. All patients underwent plain radiography, and subdislocation more than 2 mm towards the anterior and posterior directions on plain radiographs was defined as instability. In predicting induction of instability of the inferior cervical spine and risk for spinal compression, erosion of the vertebral rim, as seen on plain X-rays, and irregular findings of the end-plate of the vertebral body and Gd-enhanced nodules around the intervertebral disk, as seen on MRI, seemed to be important. (N.K.).

  1. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Chronic Pancreatitis-Induced Pain in Rats via Downregulation of HMGB1 and TRL4 Expression in the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye-song; Li, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Li-hua; Kang, Ying; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zi-quan; Wang, Kun; Kaye, Alan David; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a long-standing inflammation of the exocrine pancreas, which typically results in severe and constant abdominal pain. Previous studies on the mechanisms underlying CP-induced pain have primarily focused on the peripheral nociceptive system. A role for a central mechanism in the mediation or modulation of abdominal pain is largely unknown. Tanshinone IIA (TSN IIA), an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Danshen, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of the expression of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a late proinflammatory cytokine. HMGB1 binds and activates toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to induce spinal astrocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine release in neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of TSN IIA on pain responses in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced CP. The roles of central mechanisms in the mediation or modulation of CP were also investigated. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled animal trial. CP was induced in rats by intrapancreatic infusion of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Pancreatic histopathological changes were characterized with semi-quantitative scores. The abdomen nociceptive behaviors were assessed with von Frey filaments. The effects of intraperitoneally administered TSN IIA on CP-induced mechanical allodynia were tested. The spinal protein expression of HMGB1 was determined by western blot. The spinal mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were determined by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. The spinal expression of the HMGB1 receptor TRL4 and the astrocyte activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined by western blot or immunohistological staining after intraperitoneal injection of TSN IIA or intrathecal administration of a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody. TNBS infusion resulted in pancreatic histopathological changes of chronic

  2. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper......-105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...... trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows...

  3. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation...... in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load on the painful structures Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...

  4. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  5. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Huie, J Russell; Crown, Eric D; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Hook, Michelle A; Garraway, Sandra M; Lee, Kuan H; Hoy, Kevin C; Grau, James W

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI.

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced cancers. Experimental and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joveniaux, Alain.

    1978-03-01

    This work attempts to give an idea of radiocarcinogenesis, both experimental and clinical. Experimentally the possibility of radio-induced cancer formation has considerable doctrinal importance since it proves without question the carcinogenetic effect of radiations, and also yields basis information on the essential constants implicated in its occurrence: need for a latency time varying with the animal species and technique used, but quite long in relation to the specific lifetime of each species; importance of a massive irradiation, more conducive to cancerisation as long as it produces no necroses liable to stop the formation of any subsequent neoplasia; finally, rarity of is occurrence. Clinically although the cause and effect relationship between treatment and cancer is sometimes difficult to establish categorically, the fact is that hundreds of particularly disturbing observations remain and from their number often emerges under well-defined circumstances, an undeniable clinical certainty. Most importantly these observation fix the criteria necessary for the possibility of a radioinduced cancer to arise, i.e: the notion of a prior irradiation; the appearance of a cancer in the irradiation area; serious tissue damage in relation with an excessive radiation dose; a long latency period between irradition and appearance of the cancer [fr

  7. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2017-06-01

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Foraminiferal survival after long term experimentally induced anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-06-01

    Anoxia has been successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed on the Northern Adriatic seafloor from 1 week to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerGreen method has been applied. Numerous individuals have been found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths, showing that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulphides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular way. A large difference in standing stock between two cores samples in initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after 1 month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in a core sampled after 2 months of anoxia, to attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulphides, but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  9. The Protective Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation Postconditioning Against Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huixian; Dong, Xiuhua; Jin, Mu; Cheng, Weiping

    2018-01-18

    Delayed paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) remains one of the most severe complications of thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery, for which effective prevention and treatment is still lacking. The current study investigates whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) postconditioning has neuroprotective effects against spinal cord IRI. Ninety-six New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups as follows: a sham group and three experimental groups (C group, 2 Hz group, and 50 Hz group) n = 24/group. Spinal cord ischemia was induced by transient infrarenal aortic balloon occlusion for 28 min, after which rabbits in group C underwent no additional intervention, while rabbits in the other two experimental groups underwent 2 Hz or 50 Hz epidural SCS for 30 min at the onset of reperfusion and then daily until sacrifice. Hind limb neurologic function of rabbits was assessed using Jacob scale. Lumbar spinal cords were harvested immediately after sacrifice for histological examination and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The number of viable α-motor neurons in ventral horn was counted and TUNEL-positive rate of α-motor neurons was calculated. Spinal cord IRI was caused by transient infrarenal aorta occlusion for 28 min. Both 2 Hz and 50 Hz SCS postconditioning had neuroprotective effects, particularly the 2 Hz SCS postconditioning. Comparing to C group and 50 Hz group, rabbits in the 2 Hz group demonstrated better hind limb motor function and a lower rate of TUNEL-positive α-motor neuron after eight hours, one day, three days, and seven days of spinal cord reperfusion. More viable α-motor neurons were preserved after one and three days of spinal cord reperfusion in 2 Hz group rabbits than in C group and 50 Hz group rabbits. SCS postconditioning at 2 Hz protected the spinal cord from IRI. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  10. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  11. Minocycline and fluorocitrate suppress spinal nociceptive signaling in intrathecal IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chun-Sung; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lin, Shinn-Long; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2012-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that intrathecal IL-1β caused thermal hyperalgesia in rats. This study was conducted to examine the effects and cellular mechanisms of glial inhibitors on IL-1β-induced nociception in rats. The effects of minocycline (20 μg), fluorocitrate (1 nmol), and SB203580 (5 μg) on IL-1β (100 ng) treatment in rats were measured by nociceptive behaviors, western blotting of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, cerebrospinal fluid nitric oxide (NO) levels, and immunohistochemical analyses. The results demonstrated that intrathecal IL-1β activated microglia and astrocytes, but not neurons, in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord, as evidenced by morphological changes and increased immunoreactivity, phosphorylated p38 (P-p38) MAPK, and iNOS expression; the activation of microglia and astrocytes peaked at 30 min and lasted for 6 h. The immunoreactivities of microglia and astrocytes were significantly increased at 30 min (6.6- and 2.7-fold, respectively) and 6 h (3.3- and 4.0-fold, respectively) following IL-1β injection, as compared with saline controls at 30 min (all P fluorocitrate, or SB203580 pretreatment suppressed this IL-1β-upregulated P-p38 MAPK mainly in microglia and iNOS mainly in astrocytes; minocycline exhibited the most potent effect. Minocycline and fluorocitrate pretreatment abrogated IL-1β-induced NO release and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. In conclusion, minocycline, fluorocitrate, and SB203580 effectively suppressed the IL-1β-induced central sensitization and hyperalgesia in rats. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spinal cord injury, dendritic spine remodeling, and spinal memory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can persist for months and years after injury. Although many aberrant changes to sensory processing contribute to the development of chronic pain, emerging evidence demonstrates that mechanisms similar to those underlying classical learning and memory can contribute to central sensitization, a phenomenon of amplified responsiveness to stimuli in nociceptive dorsal horn neurons. Notably, dendritic spines have emerged as major players in learning and memory, providing a structural substrate for how the nervous system modifies connections to form and store information. Until now, most information regarding dendritic spines has been obtained from studies in the brain. Recent experimental data in the spinal cord, however, demonstrate that Rac1-regulated dendritic spine remodeling occurs on second-order wide dynamic range neurons and accompanies neuropathic pain after SCI. Thus, SCI-induced synaptic potentiation engages a putative spinal memory mechanism. A compelling, novel possibility for pain research is that a synaptic model of long-term memory storage could explain the persistent nature of neuropathic pain. Such a conceptual bridge between pain and memory could guide the development of more effective strategies for treatment of chronic pain after injury to the nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in the paw skin and spinal cord by targeting NF-κB and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Zarpelon, Ana C; Borghi, Sergio M; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) in superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain. Male Swiss mice were treated with PDTC and stimulated with an intraplantar or intraperitoneal injection of potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Subcutaneous PDTC treatment attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw oedema and leukocyte recruitment (neutrophils and macrophages). Intraplantar injection of superoxide anion activated NF-κB and increased cytokine production (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10) and oxidative stress (nitrite and lipid peroxidation levels) at the primary inflammatory foci and in the spinal cord (L4-L6). PDTC treatment inhibited superoxide anion-induced NF-κB activation, cytokine production and oxidative stress in the paw and spinal cord. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of PDTC successfully inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory response in peripheral foci (paw). These results suggest that peripheral stimulus with superoxide anion activates the local and spinal cord oxidative- and NF-κB-dependent inflammatory nociceptive mechanisms. PDTC targets these events, therefore, inhibiting superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain in mice.

  14. A new pattern of spinal-cord demyelination in guinea pigs with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mimicking multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Colover, J.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described for producing large demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord in the guinea pig. Guinea pigs were pretreated by immunization with ovalbumin and water-soluble adjuvant (N-acetyl-muramyl L-alanyl D-isoglutamine, MDP) in water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's incomplete adjuvant). They were given a large dose (10 mg) of ovalbumin i.p. one month later. After a few weeks the animals were sensitized with guinea-pig basic protein in Freund's complete adjuvant. Five out of 11 animals...

  15. Age-Related Features of Reactive Catecholamine Shifts in the Spinal Cord in Acute Somatic Pain: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ovsyannikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the age-related features of an adrenergic response of the central nervous system to acute somatic pain (ASP.Subjects and methods: The spinal cord (SC levels of adrenaline (A, noradrenaline (NA, and dopamine (DA were studied in albino male rats of five age groups: 1 neonatal (2—4-day rats; 2 17—18-day rats that began to see; 3 monthly rats; 4 sexually mature (3—4 month ones; and 5 old ones aged over 2 years. ASP was reproduced by electrodermal stimulation of the rat tail; the levels of catecholamines (CA were measured by spectrofluorimetric microassay.Results. During postnatal ontogenesis, the rats were found to have a phase pattern of physiological changes in the spinal concentrations of CA: a decrease in their high neonatal levels (due to DA by the time the animals began to see; their progressive increase by prepuberty (due to NA and in sexually maturity (due to A and DA, and a reduction in all CA fractions in old rats. ASP was attended by a rise in the SC concentration of CA in the neonatal animals and by clearly-cut reactive shifts in all fractions in the old ones. With A and DA increases, the SC concentrations of NA halved in the rats that began to see and had ASP; the amount of CA remained unchanged as compared with the controls. In prepubertal and sexually mature male rats, there was a reduction in the spinal CA pool, but due to different components: to A and NA in 35-day rats and to A and DA in 3-month ones.Conclusion. Age-related changes in the pattern of a spinal CA response in rats with ASP show a ontogenetic trend in the development of adrenal responsiveness from the immature generalized forms of an early postnatal period to the definitive differentiated economic reactions of the hypo-to-normergic type and then to the hyperergic destructive reactions of old age. 

  16. Experimental spinal cord repair (by means of direct connection of the above-the-lesion CNS with PNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, G A; Brunelli, G R; Mattiuzzo, V

    1997-01-01

    There are no medical or surgical treatments able to repair traumatic paraplegia. Experiments done by connecting the above-the-lesion with the below-the-lesion cord by means of PNS grafts have always failed. The grafts are reinhabited by regrowing axons of the first motoneurons which however are not able to progress into the distal spinal cord. At the present state of knowledge no surgical treatment can cure paraplegia. Thousands of researchers are working all over the world in many different types of research ranging from molecular biology to embriology, and from biochemistry to pharmacology and surgery. None of these experiments have proved to be practically effective.

  17. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Spine surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Images Scoliosis Spinal ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  19. A pneumatic phantom for mimicking respiration-induced artifacts in spinal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tillieux, Philippe; Topfer, Ryan; Foias, Alexandru; Leroux, Iris; El Maâchi, Imanne; Leblond, Hugues; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2018-01-01

    To design a phantom capable of mimicking human respiration to serve as a testing platform for correction of the static and time-evolving magnetic field distortions typically encountered in MRI of the spinal cord. An inflation system to mimic the air variation of the human lungs was constructed. The inflation system was linked to a phantom containing synthetic lungs and an ex vivo human spine. The relationship between air pressure and phantom lung volume was evaluated via imaging experiment. The geometric distortion (pseudo-displacement) caused by the B0 inhomogeneities was measured on echo planar imaging slices for different air volumes. Linear and quadratic relations linking air pressure to phantom lung volume were observed with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. Air distribution was uneven across the synthetic lungs, exhibiting a left-to-right lung volume ratio of up to 5/4. The pseudo-displacement artifact of the spine caused by the air-filled lungs was observed. The proposed phantom can reproduce the lung volume variation of human respiration and thus can serve as a reliable testing platform for the correction of the associated time-varying B 0 field distortions. Details of the construction and code for the inflation system microcontroller are available for download as open source. Magn Reson Med 79:600-605, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Discrimination of Motor Imagery-Induced EEG Patterns in Patients with Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pfurtscheller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EEG-based discrimination between different motor imagery states has been subject of a number of studies in healthy subjects. We investigated the EEG of 15 patients with complete spinal cord injury during imagined right hand, left hand, and feet movements. In detail we studied pair-wise discrimination functions between the 3 types of motor imagery. The following classification accuracies (mean ± SD were obtained: left versus right hand 65.03% ± 8.52, left hand versus feet 68.19% ± 11.08, and right hand versus feet 65.05% ± 9.25. In 5 out of 8 paralegic patients, the discrimination accuracy was greater than 70% but in only 1 out of 7 tetraplagic patients. The present findings provide evidence that in the majority of paraplegic patients an EEG-based BCI could achieve satisfied results. In tetraplegic patients, however, it is expected that extensive training-sessions are necessary to achieve a good BCI performance at least in some subjects.

  1. Time-Dependent Increases in Protease Activities for Neuronal Apoptosis in Spinal Cords of Lewis Rats During Development of Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arabinda; Guyton, M. Kelly; Matzelle, Denise D.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by axonal demyelination and neurodegeneration, the latter having been inadequately explored in the MS animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The purpose of this study was to examine the time-dependent correlation between increased calpain and caspase activities and neurodegeneration in spinal cord tissues from Lewis rats with acute EAE. An increase in TUNEL-positive neurons and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in EAE spinal cords suggested that neuronal death was a result of apoptosis on days 8–10 following induction of EAE. Increases in calpain expression in EAE correlated with activation of pro-apoptotic proteases, leading to apoptotic cell death beginning on day 8 of EAE, which occurred before the appearance of visible clinical symptoms. Increases in calcineurin expression and decreases in phospho-Bad (p-Bad) suggested Bad activation in apoptosis during acute EAE. Increases in the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and activation of caspase-9 showed the involvement of mitochondria in apoptosis. Further, caspase-8 activation suggested induction of the death receptor–mediated pathway for apoptosis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to caspase-3 activation was also observed, indicating that multiple apoptotic pathways were activated following EAE induction. In contrast, cell death was mostly a result of necrosis on the later day (day 11), when EAE entered a severe stage. From these findings, we conclude that increases in calpain and caspase activities play crucial roles in neuronal apoptosis during the development of acute EAE. PMID:18521931

  2. Pazopanib-Induced Hepatotoxicity in an Experimental Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Bulent; Yılmaz, Guldal Esendagli; Armagan, Berkan; Afsar, Baris; Demirci, Umut; Gulbahar, Ozlem; Gumusay, Ozge; Bilgetekin, Irem; Ozet, Ahmet; Uner, Aytug

    2018-01-01

    Pazopanib is an effective treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Besides classical adverse events of this drug class, hepatotoxicity has been described as a frequent side effect. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pazopanib on the liver in an experimental rat model. Sixteen Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups: experimental toxicity was induced with pazopanib (10 mg/kg) administered for 28 days (group 2) or 56 days (group 3) orally by gavage. Group 1 (control group) received only distilled water. Rats in groups 2 and 3 were sacrificed after the collection of blood and tissue samples on the 28th and 56th days, respectively. We found significant differences in bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, triglyceride, very-low-density lipoprotein, and iron values (p 0.050). All rats in the control group had normal histological features; however, none of the rats in groups 2 and 3 showed normal histology. In group 2, we observed mild sinusoidal dilatation, congestion, enlarged Kupffer cells, accumulation of yellow-brown-black pigment in the Kupffer cells and the accumulation of hemosiderin with Prussian blue reaction in the hepatocytes. In group 3, the findings mentioned above were more prominent, and besides these findings focal acinar transformation and macrovesicular steatosis were also observed. In group 3, mild inflammation within the portal areas was observed consisting of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils. This study is the first that reports the biochemical and histopathological evaluation of pazopanib-related hepatic toxicity. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Pathogenesis of rhinitis in rats with experimentally induced hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyigor, Hulya; Basak, Sema; Kozaci, Didem; Culhaci, Nil; Dost, Turhan; Ulutas, Pinar

    2012-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is accepted as one of the hormonal factors leading to non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal obstruction and runny nose due to an increase in submucosal connective tissue and mucous gland hypertrophy are the prominent symptoms in hypothyroidism-induced rhinitis at humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the biochemical and histopathological changes in the nasal mucosa of the rats with thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism and to compare them with those of a control group. A total of 60 adult male Wistar Albino rats were included in the study. The rats constituting the test and the control groups were randomly divided into 3 subgroups (T1-3 and C 1-3). While the rats in the test group underwent thyroidectomy, in the control group the incision was sutured without any interventions after exposure of thyroid tissues of the rats. The nasal and paranasal sinus regions of all the rats were carefully dissected and tissue samples were obtained for pathological examinations. In the rats in T1, T2, and T3, the decrease in serum glucuronic acid levels before and after thyroidectomy was statistically significant (p = 0.001, p = 0.003, and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the test and the control groups was statistically significant in terms of inflammation at the end of 12 weeks (p = 0.002). An increase in acid mucopolysaccharidase production due to TSH has been suggested to cause congestion in tissues. Although our study supports the data in the literature up to date, we consider that further clinical and experimental studies are necessary for this verification.

  4. Exercise-induced motor improvement after complete spinal cord transection and its relation to expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and presynaptic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulejczak Dorota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been postulated that exercise-induced activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF may account for improvement of stepping ability in animals after complete spinal cord transection. As we have shown previously, treadmill locomotor exercise leads to up-regulation of BDNF protein and mRNA in the entire neuronal network of intact spinal cord. The questions arise: (i how the treadmill locomotor training, supplemented with tail stimulation, affects the expression of molecular correlates of synaptic plasticity in spinal rats, and (ii if a response is related to BDNF protein level and distribution. We investigated the effect of training in rats spinalized at low thoracic segments on the level and distribution of BDNF immunoreactivity (IR in ventral quadrants of the lumbar segments, in conjunction with markers of presynaptic terminals, synaptophysin and synaptic zinc. Results Training improved hindlimb stepping in spinal animals evaluated with modified Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale. Grades of spinal trained animals ranged between 5 and 11, whereas those of spinal were between 2 and 4. Functional improvement was associated with changes in presynaptic markers and BDNF distribution. Six weeks after transection, synaptophysin IR was reduced by 18% around the large neurons of lamina IX and training elevated its expression by over 30%. The level of synaptic zinc staining in the ventral horn was unaltered, whereas in ventral funiculi it was decreased by 26% postlesion and tended to normalize after the training. Overall BDNF IR levels in the ventral horn, which were higher by 22% postlesion, were unchanged after the training. However, training modified distribution of BDNF in the processes with its predominance in the longer and thicker ones. It also caused selective up-regulation of BDNF in two classes of cells (soma ranging between 100-400 μm2 and over 1000 μm2 of the ventrolateral and laterodorsal motor nuclei

  5. Effects of gabapentin on muscle spasticity and both induced as well as spontaneous autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Rabchevsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that the neuropathic pain medication, gabapentin (GBP; Neurontin, significantly attenuated both noxious colorectal distension (CRD-induced autonomic dysreflexia (AD and tail pinch-induced spasticity compared to saline-treated cohorts 2-3 weeks after complete high thoracic (T4 spinal cord injury (SCI. Here we employed long-term blood pressure telemetry to test, firstly, the efficacy of daily versus acute GBP treatment in modulating AD and tail spasticity in response to noxious stimuli at 2 and 3 weeks post-injury. Secondly, we determined whether daily GBP alters baseline cardiovascular parameters, as well as spontaneous AD events detected using a novel algorithm based on blood pressure telemetry data. At both 14 and 21 days after SCI, irrespective of daily treatment, acute GBP given 1 hr prior to stimulus significantly attenuated CRD-induced AD and pinch-evoked tail spasticity; conversely, acute saline had no such effects. Moreover, daily GBP did not alter 24 hr mean arterial pressure (MAP or heart rate values compared to saline treatment, nor did it reduce the incidence of spontaneous AD events compared to saline over the three week assessment period. Power spectral density analysis of the MAP signals demonstrated relative power losses in mid frequency ranges (0.2-0.8 Hz for all injured animals relative to low frequency MAP power (0.02-0.08 Hz. However, there was no significant difference between groups over time post-injury; hence, GBP had no effect on the persistent loss of MAP fluctuations in the mid frequency range after injury. In summary, the mechanism(s by which acute GBP treatment mitigate aberrant somatosensory and cardiophysiological responses to noxious stimuli after SCI remain unclear. Nevertheless, with further refinements in defining the dynamics associated with AD events, such as eliminating requisite concomitant bradycardia, the objective repeatability of automatic detection of hypertensive crises provides a

  6. Polioencefalomalacia experimental induzida por amprólio em ovinos Experimentally amprolium-induced polioencephalomalacia in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Para estabelecer um modelo experimental para o estudo da etiologia, patologia e patogênese da polioencefalomalacia em ruminantes, a condição foi induzida em cinco ovinos pela administração oral de amprólio nas doses diárias de 500 e 1.000mg/kg de peso animal, respectivamente por 28-59 dias e 13-39 dias. Todos os ovinos morreram ou foram eutanasiados in extremis após um curso clínico de 3-7 dias. Os sinais clínicos incluíam depressão, incoordenação, midríase, bruxismo, cegueira e decúbito com opistótono e movimentos de pedalagem. Salivação excessiva e posição de cavalete foi observada em um ovino e mioclonias em um outro. Os principais achados de necropsia restringiam-se ao sistema nervoso central e incluíam tumefação do encéfalo com achatamento dos giros telencefálicos e hemorragias nos lobos parietal e occipital do telencéfalo; as hemorragias ocorriam também nas áreas submeníngeas da medula espinhal e do mesencéfalo. Histologicamente, havia necrose segmentar laminar de neurônios (neurônios vermelhos associada a edema, tumefação de células endoteliais, hemorragias e infiltração por macrófagos espumosos (células gitter. Essas alterações eram mais marcadas nos lobos frontal, parietal e occipital do telencéfalo e havia uma demarcação abrupta entre as lesões e o neurópilo normal adjacente. Adicionalmente, lesões semelhantes, mas menos acentuadas, eram observadas no mesencéfalo, tálamo e hipocampo. Levando em consideração a reproducibilidade regular dos aspectos da polioencefalomalacia em ovinos pela administração de amprólio, esse modelo pode ser útil para o estudo da doença.In order to establish an experimental model for the study of the etiology, pathology, and pathogenesis of polioencephalomalacia in ruminants, the condition was induced in five sheep by oral administration of amprolium at daily doses of 500 and 1,000mg per kg of body weight respectively for 28-59 days and for 13-39 days

  7. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christof A. J. Smit, MD; Karin J. A. Legemate, MSc; Anja de Koning, MSc; Sonja de Groot, PhD; Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste, MD, PhD; Thomas W. J. Janssen, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on interface pressure distribution in sitting individuals with SCI and study the usability of a newly developed electrode garment (ES shorts). Ten individuals with SCI participated in this study, in which t...

  8. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  9. Spinal NGF Restores Opioid Sensitivity in Neuropathic Rats: Possible Role of NGF as a Regulator of CCK-Induced Anti-Opioid Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Cahill

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The breadth of peripheral effects produced by nerve growth factor (NGF in nociceptive processing has been well documented. However, less is known about the functional significance of central NGF in nociceptive transmission. The effect of NGF on the nervous system is dependent on the developmental stage. During the prenatal developmental period, NGF is critical for survival of nociceptors; in the postnatal period it regulates the expression of nociceptor phenotype, and in the adult it contributes to pain following an inflammatory insult. The implications for central NGF in the expression and regulation of spinal neuropeptides that are involved in pain mechanisms are reviewed. Knowledge has been gained by studies using peripheral nerve injury models that cause a deprivation of central NGF. These models also give rise to the development of pain syndromes, which encompass spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia, routinely referred to as neuropathic pain. These models provide an approach for examining the contribution of central NGF to nociceptive transmission. Chronic pain emanating from a nerve injury is typically refractory to traditional analgesics such as opioids. Recent evidence suggests that supplementation of spinal NGF restores morphine-induced antinociception in an animal model of neuropathic pain. This effect appears to be mediated by alterations in spinal levels of cholecystokinin. The authors hypothesize that NGF is critical in maintaining neurochemical homeostasis in the spinal cord of nociceptive neurons, and that supplementation may be beneficial in restoring and/or maintaining opioid analgesia in chronic pain conditions resulting from traumatic nerve injury.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits opioid withdrawal-induced pain sensitization in rats by down-regulation of spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Bian, Jin-Song

    2014-09-01

    Hyperalgesia often occurs in opioid-induced withdrawal syndrome. In the present study, we found that three hourly injections of DAMGO (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) followed by naloxone administration at the fourth hour significantly decreased rat paw nociceptive threshold, indicating the induction of withdrawal hyperalgesia. Application of NaHS (a hydrogen sulfide donor) together with each injection of DAMGO attenuated naloxone-precipitated withdrawal hyperalgesia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that NaHS significantly reversed the gene and protein expression of up-regulated spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in naloxone-treated animals. NaHS also inhibited naloxone-induced cAMP rebound and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in rat spinal cord. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, NaHS inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production and adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Moreover, NaHS pre-treatment suppressed naloxone-stimulated activation of protein kinase C (PKC) α, Raf-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in rat spinal cord. Our data suggest that H2S prevents the development of opioid withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia via suppression of synthesis of CGRP in spine through inhibition of AC/cAMP and PKC/Raf-1/ERK pathways.

  11. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS. Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress.

  12. Remote-controlled eradication of astrogliosis in spinal cord injury via electromagnetically-induced dexamethasone release from "smart" nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen; Borgens, Richard Ben

    2015-08-10

    We describe a system to deliver drugs to selected tissues continuously, if required, for weeks. Drugs can be released remotely inside the small animals using pre-implanted, novel vertically aligned electromagnetically-sensitive polypyrrole nanowires (PpyNWs). Approximately 1-2mm(2) dexamethasone (DEX) doped PpyNWs was lifted on a single drop of sterile water by surface tension, and deposited onto a spinal cord lesion in glial fibrillary acidic protein-luc transgenic mice (GFAP-luc mice). Overexpression of GFAP is an indicator of astrogliosis/neuroinflammation in CNS injury. The corticosteroid DEX, a powerful ameliorator of inflammation, was released from the polymer by external application of an electromagnetic field for 2h/day for a week. The GFAP signal, revealed by bioluminescent imaging in the living animal, was significantly reduced in treated animals. At 1week, GFAP was at the edge of detection, and in some experimental animals, completely eradicated. We conclude that the administration of drugs can be controlled locally and non-invasively, opening the door to many other known therapies, such as the cases that dexamethasone cannot be safely applied systemically in large concentrations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Chronic prenatal stress epigenetically modifies spinal cord BDNF expression to induce sex specific visceral hypersensitivity in offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H.; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with abdomen pain as one of the primary symptoms. The etiology of IBS remains unknown. Epidemiological studies found that a subset of these patients have a history of adverse early-life events. We tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal stress (CPS) epigenetically enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord to aggravate colon sensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) differentially in male and female offspring. Methods We used heterotypic intermittent chronic stress (HeICS) protocols in pregnant dams from E11 until delivery. Results CPS induced significant visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) to CRD in male and female offspring. A second exposure to HeICS in adult offspring exacerbated VHS greater in female offspring that persisted longer than in male offspring. CPS upregulated BDNF expression in the lumbar-sacral dorsal horn that correlated with the exacerbation of VHS in female, but not in male offspring. The upregulation of BDNF was due to a significant increase in RNA Pol II binding, histone H3 acetylation and significant decrease in histone deacetylase 1 association with the core promoter of BDNF in female offspring. Other chronic prenatal and neonatal stress protocols were less effective than HeICS. Conclusion & Inferences The development of visceral hypersensitivity, which contributes to the symptom of intermittent abdominal pain, is a two-step process, chronic in utero stress followed by chronic stress in adult-life. This two-step process induces aggravated and persistent colon hypersensitivity in female than in male offspring. Our preclinical model explains several clinical features in IBS patients. PMID:24588943

  15. Experimental glomerulonephritis induced by hydrocarbon exposure: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravnskov Uffe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much epidemiological evidence suggests that hydrocarbon exposure may induce glomerulonephritis and worsen its course in many patients. The mechanisms are unknown, however, no specific microscopic pattern has been identified, and it has also been argued that hydrocarbon exposure causes tubular damage mainly. Studying experimental animals may best answer these questions, and as no systematic review of glomerulonephritis produced experimentally by hydrocarbon exposure has been performed previously, I found it relevant to search for and analyse such studies. Methods Animal experiments having mimicked human glomerulonephritis by hydrocarbon exposure were sought on Medline and Toxnet Results Twenty-six experiments using thirteen different hydrocarbons were identified. Several human subtypes were observed including IgA nephritis, mesangial, proliferative and extracapillary glomerulonephritis, focal and focal-segmental sclerosis, minimal change nephropathy, anti-GBM and anti-TBM nephritis, and glomerulonephritis associated with peiarteritis nodosa. Glomerular proteinuria was seen in 10/12 experiments that included urine analyses, and renal failure in 5/8 experiments that included measurements of glomerular function. All experiments resulted in various degrees of tubular damage as well. In most studies, where the animals were examined at different times during or after the exposure, the renal microscopic and functional changes were seen immediately, whereas deposits of complement and immunoglobulins appeared late in the course, if at all. Conclusion These experiments are in accord with epidemiological evidence that hydrocarbon exposure may cause glomerulonephritis and worsen renal function. Probable mechanisms include an induction of autologous antibodies and a disturbance of normal immunological functions. Also, tubular damage may increase postglomerular resistance, resulting in a glomerular deposition of macromolecules. In most

  16. TENS attenuates repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain following experimentally induced muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovsky-Arnold, Tsipora; Wideman, Timothy H; Larivière, Christian; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2013-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain (RISP) could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain. This study also assessed the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on RISP. The relation between the index of RISP and psychological factors such as catastrophizing and fear of pain was also explored. The sample consisted of 56 healthy (35 women, 21 men) participants who underwent 2 testing sessions, separated by 24 hours. In the first session, musculoskeletal pain was induced with a delayed-onset muscle soreness protocol. During the second session, participants were randomly assigned to the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or placebo condition and were asked to rate their pain as they lifted a series of 18 weighted canisters. An index of RISP was derived as the change in pain ratings across repeated lifts. Approximately 25% of participants showed evidence of RISP. Results also revealed that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuated the RISP effect. Psychological measures (fear of pain, catastrophizing) were not significantly correlated with the index of RISP, but the index of RISP was significantly correlated with a measure of physical tolerance. Discussion addresses the clinical implications of the findings as well as the potential mechanisms underlying RISP. This study showed that RISP could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain with delayed-onset muscle soreness. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation led to a significant reduction in RISP. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of autologous neurogenically-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of paraplegic dogs without nociception due to spinal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besalti, Omer; Aktas, Zeynep; Can, Pinar; Akpinar, Eylul; Elcin, Ayse Eser; Elcin, Yasar Murat

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of percutaneous transplanted autologous neurogenically-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (NIBM-MSCs) in paraplegic dogs without deep pain perception (DPP) secondary to external spinal trauma. Thirteen client owned dogs that had failed in improvement neurologically at least 42 days after conservative management, decompression and decompression-stabilization were included in the study. Each dog received two doses of autologous 5.0 × 10 6 NIBM-MSCs suspension, which were positive to 2',3'-Cyclic-nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), as well as to Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and beta III tubulin. The cells were injected into the spinal cord through the hemilaminectomy or laminectomy defects percutaneously with 21 days interval for 2 times. The results were evaluated using Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale (TSCIS), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) at the admission time, cell transplantation procedures and during 2, 5, 7 and 12th months after the second cell transplantation. Improvement after cell transplantation in gait, nociception, proprioception, SEP and MEP results was observed in just 2 cases, and only gait score improvement was seen in 6 cases, and no improvement was recorded in 5 cases. All progresses were observed until 2nd month after the second cell transplantation, however, there was no improvement after this period. In conclusion, percutaneous transplantation of autologous NIBM-MSCs is a promising candidate modality for cases with spinal cord injury after spinal trauma and poor prognosis.

  18. Colloids versus crystalloids in the prevention of hypotension induced by spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés Melchor, J; Espinosa, Á; Martínez Hurtado, E; Casans Francés, R; Navarro Pérez, R; Abad Gurumeta, A; Calvo Vecino, J M

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section is high. To determine the effects of colloids and crystalloids in the incidence of hypotension induced by spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section, an attempt was made to define which type of fluid and what total volume should be administered. Following the PRISMA methodology a systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out. A systematic Medline/PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search was made to identify trials where women were scheduled for elective cesarean section with spinal anesthesia and volume loading (preload or co-load). The primary outcome was the incidence of hypotension. Stratification into subgroups was made for the primary outcome according to the type of colloid administered, differentiating those studies employing new generation colloids (HES 6% 130/0.4) from those not using such colloids, based on the volume of colloid administered and the combination of a vasopressor. The secondary outcome was the incidence of intraoperative nausea and vomiting. Two-hundred and twenty-seven controlled clinical trials were analyzed; eleven randomized clinical trials including 990 patients were included. A significative decrease of incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia was observed with the use of colloids compared to crystalloids (RR [95% CI] 0.70 [0.53-0.92], P=0.01). However, there was no difference between crystalloid and colloid in the risk of intraoperative nausea and vomiting (RR [95% CI] 0.75 [0.41-1.38]; P=0.33). This meta-analysis shows colloid administration to significantly reduce the incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section compared with of crystalloid use.

  19. Cancer-induced bone pain sequentially activates the ERK/MAPK pathway in different cell types in the rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrates that, after nerve injury, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK activation in the spinal cord-initially in neurons, then microglia, and finally astrocytes. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK contributes to nociceptive responses following inflammation and/or nerve injury. However, the role of spinal cells and the ERK/MAPK pathway in cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP remains poorly understood. The present study analyzed activation of spinal cells and the ERK/MAPK pathway in a rat model of bone cancer pain. Results A Sprague Dawley rat model of bone cancer pain was established and the model was evaluated by a series of tests. Moreover, fluorocitrate (reversible glial metabolic inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor was administered intrathecally. Western blots and double immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression and location of phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK. Our studies on pain behavior show that the time between day 6 and day 18 is a reasonable period ("time window" as the remaining stages to investigate bone cancer pain mechanisms and to research analgesic drugs. Double-labeling immunofluorescence revealed that p-ERK was sequentially expressed in neurons, microglia, and astrocytes in the L4-5 superficial spinal cord following inoculation of Walker 256 cells. Phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB increased in the spinal cord of CIBP rats, which was attenuated by intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate or U0126. Conclusions The ERK inhibitors could have a useful role in CIBP management, because the same target is expressed in various cells at different times.

  20. Cancer-induced bone pain sequentially activates the ERK/MAPK pathway in different cell types in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-na; Yao, Ming; Yang, Jian-ping; Peng, Jun; Peng, Yan; Li, Cai-fang; Zhang, Yan-bing; Ji, Fu-hai; Cheng, Hao; Xu, Qi-nian; Wang, Xiu-yun; Zuo, Jian-ling

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrates that, after nerve injury, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the spinal cord-initially in neurons, then microglia, and finally astrocytes. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK) contributes to nociceptive responses following inflammation and/or nerve injury. However, the role of spinal cells and the ERK/MAPK pathway in cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) remains poorly understood. The present study analyzed activation of spinal cells and the ERK/MAPK pathway in a rat model of bone cancer pain. A Sprague Dawley rat model of bone cancer pain was established and the model was evaluated by a series of tests. Moreover, fluorocitrate (reversible glial metabolic inhibitor) and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor) was administered intrathecally. Western blots and double immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression and location of phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK). Our studies on pain behavior show that the time between day 6 and day 18 is a reasonable period ("time window" as the remaining stages) to investigate bone cancer pain mechanisms and to research analgesic drugs. Double-labeling immunofluorescence revealed that p-ERK was sequentially expressed in neurons, microglia, and astrocytes in the L4-5 superficial spinal cord following inoculation of Walker 256 cells. Phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) increased in the spinal cord of CIBP rats, which was attenuated by intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate or U0126. The ERK inhibitors could have a useful role in CIBP management, because the same target is expressed in various cells at different times.

  1. Anticoccidial effect of mananoligosacharide against experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Naila; Faheem, Hassan; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Qureshi, Muhammad Subhan; Alhidary, Ibrahim A; Abudabos, Alaeldein M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find the effect of mananoligosacharide (MOS) in comparison with amprolium hydrochloride on performance and integrity of gut in experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler. A total of 300, day-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) was randomly allocated to four treatments. Each group was further divided into five replicates of 15 birds each. Group A was kept as control; group B was contaminated with Eimeria tenella, while groups C and D were infected with E. tenella and treated with MOS (0.8 g/kg feed) and anticoccidial drug, amprolium hydrochloride (12 g/100 l water), respectively. The results showed that weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly higher (P coccidiosis during 5th, 7th, 10th, and 12th day post infection (dpi). Furthermore, the OPG was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in infected groups treated with MOS and amprolium at the studied periods (5, 7, and 10 dpi). At 12 dpi, the infected group treated with MOS showed significantly lower OPG compared to the other groups suggesting the effectiveness of MOS in comparison to amprolium. The result of pinpoint hemorrhages, thickness of cecal wall, bloody fecal contents, and mucoid contents in the cecum were significant highly (P < 0.05) in birds fed with infected oocytes. It was also noted that the differences were not significant in these parameters between amprolium and MOS-treated birds showing the effectiveness of the prebiotic agent. It was concluded from the results of the present study that MOS improved growth performance and reversed the lesions of E. tenella.

  2. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  3. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Yao LU; Jian-xiu WANG; Zhi-guo YAO; Hui-sheng CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each): (1) bee-toxin alone group; (2) vehicle (solvent) group; (3) low dose (1nmol) fluorocitrate group; (4) middle dose (10nmol) fluorocitrate group; (5) high dose (50nmol) fluorocitrate group. After the...

  4. A3 adenosine receptor agonist prevents the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by modulating spinal glial-restricted redox-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Kali; Esposito, Emanuela; Doyle, Timothy; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Tosh, Dillip K; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Salvemini, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy accompanied by chronic neuropathic pain is the major dose-limiting toxicity of several anticancer agents including the taxane paclitaxel (Taxol). A critical mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain is the increased production of peroxynitrite in spinal cord generated in response to activation of the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase. Peroxynitrite in turn contributes to the development of neuropathic pain by modulating several redox-dependent events in spinal cord. We recently reported that activation of the Gi/Gq-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) with selective A3AR agonists (ie, IB-MECA) blocked the development of chemotherapy induced-neuropathic pain evoked by distinct agents, including paclitaxel, without interfering with anticancer effects. The mechanism or mechanisms of action underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be explored. We now demonstrate that IB-MECA attenuates the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activation of spinal NADPH oxidase and two downstream redox-dependent systems. The first relies on inhibition of the redox-sensitive transcription factor (NFκB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (ERK and p38) resulting in decreased production of neuroexcitatory/proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and increased formation of the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory IL-10. The second involves inhibition of redox-mediated posttranslational tyrosine nitration and modification (inactivation) of glia-restricted proteins known to play key roles in regulating synaptic glutamate homeostasis: the glutamate transporter GLT-1 and glutamine synthetase. Our results unravel a mechanistic link into biomolecular signaling pathways employed by A3AR activation in neuropathic pain while providing the foundation to consider use of A3AR agonists as therapeutic agents in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2014

  5. An increase in spinal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) enhances NMDA-induced pain via phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit in mice: involvement of the sigma-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Hyoung-Sig; Kang, Suk-Yun; Moon, Ji-Young; Song, Sunok; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2010-11-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that an increase in the spinal neurosteroid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) facilitates nociception via the activation of sigma-1 receptors and/or the allosteric inhibition GABA(A) receptors. Several lines of evidence have suggested that DHEAS positively modulates N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity within the central nervous system. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the activation of sigma-1 receptors increases NMDA receptor activity. Since NMDA receptors play a key role in the enhancement of pain perception, the present study was designed to determine whether spinally administered DHEAS modulates NMDA receptor-mediated nociceptive activity and whether this effect is mediated by sigma-1 or GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal (i.t.) DHEAS was found to significantly potentiate i.t. NMDA-induced spontaneous pain behaviors. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that i.t. DHEAS also increased protein kinase C (PKC)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit NR1 (pNR1), which was used as a marker of NMDA receptor sensitization. The sigma-1 receptor antagonist, BD-1047, but not the GABA(A) receptor agonist, muscimol, dose-dependently suppressed DHEAS's facilitatory effect on NMDA-induced nociception and pNR1 expression. In addition, pretreatment with either a PKC or PKA blocker significantly reduced the facilitatory effect of DHEAS on NMDA-induced nociception. Conversely the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline did not affect NMDA-induced pain behavior or pNR1 expression. The results of this study suggest that the DHEAS-induced enhancement of NMDA-mediated nociception is dependent on an increase in PKC- and PKA-dependent pNR1. Moreover, this effect of DHEAS on NMDA receptor activity is mediated by the activation of spinal sigma-1 receptors and not through the inhibition of GABA(A) receptors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  7. Glial-glial and glial-neuronal interfaces in radiation-induced, glia-depleted spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Sims, T.J. [Arkansas Univ., Little Rock, AR (United States). Medical Center

    1997-01-01

    This review summarises some of the major findings derived from studies using the model of a glia-depleted environment developed and characterised in this laboratory. Glial depletion is achieved by exposure of the immature rodent spinal cord to x-radiation which markedly reduces both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte populations and severely impairs myelination. This glia-depleted, hypomylinated state presents a unique opportunity to examine aspects of spinal cord maturation in the absence of a normal glial population. An associated sequela within 2-3 wk following irradiation is the appearance of Schwann cells in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord. Characteristics of these intraspinal Schwann cells, their patterns of myelination or ensheathment, and their interrelations with the few remaining central glia have been examined. A later sequela is the development of Schwann cells in the ventral aspect of the spinal cord where they occur predominantly in the grey matter. (author).

  8. Glial-glial and glial-neuronal interfaces in radiation-induced, glia-depleted spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Sims, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This review summarises some of the major findings derived from studies using the model of a glia-depleted environment developed and characterised in this laboratory. Glial depletion is achieved by exposure of the immature rodent spinal cord to x-radiation which markedly reduces both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte populations and severely impairs myelination. This glia-depleted, hypomylinated state presents a unique opportunity to examine aspects of spinal cord maturation in the absence of a normal glial population. An associated sequela within 2-3 wk following irradiation is the appearance of Schwann cells in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord. Characteristics of these intraspinal Schwann cells, their patterns of myelination or ensheathment, and their interrelations with the few remaining central glia have been examined. A later sequela is the development of Schwann cells in the ventral aspect of the spinal cord where they occur predominantly in the grey matter. (author)

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuates CFA-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits spinal ERK1/2-COX-2 pathway activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun-Fan; Liang, Yi; Du, Jun-Ying; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2013-06-15

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacologic treatment for pain relief. In previous animal studies, TENS effectively alleviated Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)- or carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. Although TENS is known to produce analgesia via opioid activation in the brain and at the spinal level, few reports have investigated the signal transduction pathways mediated by TENS. Prior studies have verified the importance of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in acute and persistent inflammatory pains. Here, by using CFA rat model, we tested the efficacy of TENS on inhibiting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and of its downstream cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) at spinal level. Rats were randomly divided into control, model and TENS groups, and injected subcutaneously with 100 μl CFA or saline in the plantar surface of right hind paw. Rats in the TENS group were treated with TENS (constant aquare wave, 2 Hz and 100 Hz alternating frequencies, intensities ranging from 1 to 2 mA, lasting for 30 min each time) at 5 h and 24 h after injection. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were measured with dynamic plantar aesthesiometer at 3d before modeling and 5 h, 6 h, and 25 h after CFA injection. The ipsilateral sides of the lumbar spinal cord dosral horns were harvested for detecting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and COX-2 by western blot analysis and qPCR, and PGE2 by ELISA. CFA-induced periphery inflammation decreased PWTs and increased paw volume of rats. TENS treatment significantly alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia caused by CFA. However, no anti-inflammatory effect of TENS was observed. Expression of p-ERK1/2 protein and COX-2 mRNA was significantly up-regualted at 5 h and 6 h after CFA injection, while COX-2 and PGE2 protein level only increased at 6 h after modeling. Furthermore, the high expression of p-ERK1

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Induces Inflammation and Predicts Spinal Progression in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Vidya; Ciccia, Francesco; Zeng, Fanxing; Sari, Ismail; Guggino, Guiliana; Muralitharan, Janogini; Gracey, Eric; Haroon, Nigil

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients who met the modified New York criteria for AS were recruited for the study. Healthy volunteers, rheumatoid arthritis patients, and osteoarthritis patients were included as controls. Based on the annual rate of increase in modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS), AS patients were classified as progressors or nonprogressors. MIF levels in serum and synovial fluid were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Predictors of AS progression were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis of ileal tissue was performed to identify MIF-producing cells. Flow cytometry was used to identify MIF-producing subsets, expression patterns of the MIF receptor (CD74), and MIF-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production in the peripheral blood. MIF-induced mineralization of osteoblast cells (SaOS-2) was analyzed by alizarin red S staining, and Western blotting was used to quantify active β-catenin levels. Baseline serum MIF levels were significantly elevated in AS patients compared to healthy controls and were found to independently predict AS progression. MIF levels were higher in the synovial fluid of AS patients, and MIF-producing macrophages and Paneth cells were enriched in their gut. MIF induced TNF production in monocytes, activated β-catenin in osteoblasts, and promoted the mineralization of osteoblasts. Our findings indicate an unexplored pathogenic role of MIF in AS and a link between inflammation and new bone formation. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Serotonin 2A and 2B receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation: differential requirement for spinal NADPH oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Vinit, S.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) facilitates phrenic motor output by a mechanism that requires spinal serotonin (type 2) receptor activation, NADPH oxidase activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Episodic spinal serotonin (5-HT) receptor activation alone, without changes in oxygenation, is sufficient to elicit NADPH oxidase-dependent phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Here we investigated: 1) whether serotonin 2A and/or 2B (5-HT2a/b) receptors are expressed in identified phren...

  12. Limonene reduces hyperalgesia induced by gp120 and cytokines by modulation of IL-1 β and protein expression in spinal cord of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Ana Claudia; Morato, Priscila Neder; Dos Santos Barbosa, Marcelo; Croda, Julio; Sampson, Jared; Kong, Xiangpeng; Konkiewitz, Elisabete Castelon; Ziff, Edward B; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the antihyperalgesic effects of limonene in mice that received intrathecal injection of gp120. Male Swiss mice received gp120, IL-1β or TNF-α intrathecally or sterile saline as a control. A mechanical sensitivity test was performed at 2 and 3h after the injection. Spinal cord and blood samples were isolated for protein quantification. Intrathecal administration of gp120 increased mechanical sensitivity measured with an electronic Von Frey apparatus, at 2 and 3h after the injections. Limonene administered orally prior to gp120 administration significantly decreased this mechanical sensitivity at 3h after the gp120 injection. In addition, intrathecal injection of gp120 increased IL-1β and IL-10 in serum, and limonene prevented the ability of gp120 to increase these cytokines. Limonene also inhibited TNF-α and IL-1β-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Western blot assay demonstrated limonene was capable of increasing SOD expression in the cytoplasm of cells from spinal cord at 4h after intrathecal IL-1β injection. These results demonstrate that gp120 causes mechanical hyperalgesia and a peripheral increase in IL-1β and IL-10, and that prior administration of limonene inhibits these changes. Also limonene modulates the activation of SOD expression in the spinal cord after spinal IL-1β application. The ability of limonene to inhibit the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by gp120, TNF-α and IL-1β emphasizes the anti-inflammatory action of limonene, specifically its ability to inhibit cytokine production and its consequences. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial metabolism, inhibits the up-regulation of NOS expression, activity and NO production in the spinal cord induced by formalin test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Cai; Chen, Wei-Na; Li, Shu-Qin; Cai, Jin-Song; Li, Wen-Bin; Xian, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Qing-Jun

    2009-02-01

    Previous experiments have suggested that nitric oxide plays an important role in nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In order to explore the involvement of glia in the NO-mediated nociceptive transmission, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluorocitrate (FC), an inhibitor of glial metabolism, on NOS expression and activity and NO production in the spinal cord during the process of peripheral inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia induced by formalin test in rats. Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into sham, formalin, formalin + normal saline (NS), and formalin + FC groups. The NOS expression, NOS activity and NO production was detected by NADPH-d histochemistry staining, NOS and NO assay kit, respectively. It was found that formalin test significantly up-regulated NOS expression and activity and NO production in the laminae I-II of the dorsal horn and the grey matter around the central canal in the lumbar spinal cord at 1 h after the formalin test. Selective inhibition of glia metabolism with intrathecal administration of FC (1 nmol) significantly inhibited the up-regulation in NOS expression and activity and NO production normally induced by the formalin test, which was represented with decreases in the number and density of the NADPH-d positive cells in the dorsal horn and grey matter around the central canal, and decrease in density of NADPH-d positive neuropil in the dorsal horn in formalin + FC group compared with formalin group. The results suggested that glia may be involved in the NO-mediated nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord.

  14. Novel Effects of Traditional Wooden Toothbrush on Bowel Motility Symptoms in Spinal Cord Injury Patients; Findings from a Pilot Quasi-experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Feizi, Awat; Heidari, Zahra; Tabibian, Seyed Reza; Shaabani, Pooria; Iraj, Bijan; Adibi, Payman; Varzaneh, Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional wooden toothbrush usage on most severe constipation, which usually occurs in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. In a quasi-experimental study, 61 SCI patients were selected who had injuries in different spinal levels (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar), and severe constipation from one defection in a few days to 3 weeks. They were recommended to use traditional wooden toothbrush for 5 min twice a day, after breakfast and dinner, over a 6 weeks period. Two proper standard scales, called neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD), and "Constipation Assessment Scale (CAS)," were used for evaluating the changes in patients' gastrointestinal (GI) habits during the period of using the wooden toothbrush. Through these scales (NBD and CAS), the therapeutic effects of traditional wooden toothbrush usage on the severity of constipation before and after intervention were measured. The mean of NBD and CAS scores were reduced significantly, from 8.95 ± 0.78 and 3.34 ± 0.28; respectively, to 3.03 ± 0.57 and 1.74 ± 0.25, after 6 weeks using traditional wooden toothbrush ( P toothbrush lead to the improvement of bowel and defecation problems in SCI patients. Yet more studies, particularly randomized control clinical trials are needed to investigate the effect of using wooden toothbrush on other GI reflexes. In addition, if some clinical trials are devised to study the effects of wooden toothbrush on both conscious and unconscious patients in ICU, best results are expected to be found on keeping their mouth and teeth hygiene, as well as, getting rid of their constipations.

  15. The Biochemical, Histopathological and Clinical Comparison of the Neuroprotective Effects of Subcutaneous Adalimumab and Intravenous Methylprednisolone in an Experimental Compressive Spinal Cord Trauma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Erdem, Yavuz; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Sertbas, Idris; Karatay, Eylem; Kul, Halil; Guvenc, Yahya; Koksal, Ismet; Menekse, Guner; Alagoz, Fatih; Kertmen, Huseyin Hayri; Caydere, Muzaffer

    To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of adalimumab in an experimental spinal cord injury model and compare them with those of the widely-used methylprednisolone. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 as the sham, trauma, adalimumab, methylprednisolone, and adalimumab+methylprednisolone groups. Only laminectomy was performed in the sham group. Laminectomy and trauma was performed to the trauma group but no treatment was given. A single dose of 40 mg/kg subcutaneous adalimumab was administered after the laminectomy and trauma to group 3. A single dose of intravenous 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone was administered right after laminectomy and trauma to group 4. Single doses of 40 mg/kg adalimumab and 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone were administered together after laminectomy and trauma to group 5. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels were measured and sections were obtained for histopathological study at the end of the 7 th day. MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in serum were significantly decreased in the adalimumab group with clinical and histopathological improvement not less than the methylprednisolone group. The serum MDA levels were similar when the two drugs were given together or separately but there was a statistically quite significant decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels with concurrent use. Statistically significantly better results were obtained on histopathological evaluation with the use of both drugs together. This study revealed that adalimumab is as effective as methylprednisolone in compressive spinal cord injury in rats.

  16. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, O.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, F.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  17. Vinpocetine reduces carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice by inhibiting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation in the paw and spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji W Ruiz-Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases, as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels.

  18. Pharmacological properties of S1RA, a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist that inhibits neuropathic pain and activity-induced spinal sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L; Zamanillo, D; Nadal, X; Sánchez-Arroyos, R; Rivera-Arconada, I; Dordal, A; Montero, A; Muro, A; Bura, A; Segalés, C; Laloya, M; Hernández, E; Portillo-Salido, E; Escriche, M; Codony, X; Encina, G; Burgueño, J; Merlos, M; Baeyens, J M; Giraldo, J; López-García, J A; Maldonado, R; Plata-Salamán, C R; Vela, J M

    2012-08-01

    The sigma-1 (σ(1) ) receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone that has been involved in pain, but there is limited understanding of the actions associated with its pharmacological modulation. Indeed, the selectivity and pharmacological properties of σ(1) receptor ligands used as pharmacological tools are unclear and the demonstration that σ(1) receptor antagonists have efficacy in reversing central sensitization-related pain sensitivity is still missing. The pharmacological properties of a novel σ(1) receptor antagonist (S1RA) were first characterized. S1RA was then used to investigate the effect of pharmacological antagonism of σ(1) receptors on in vivo nociception in sensitizing conditions and on in vitro spinal cord sensitization in mice. Drug levels and autoradiographic, ex vivo binding for σ(1) receptor occupancy were measured to substantiate behavioural data. Formalin-induced nociception (both phases), capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and sciatic nerve injury-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were dose-dependently inhibited by systemic administration of S1RA. Occupancy of σ(1) receptors in the CNS was significantly correlated with the antinociceptive effects. No pharmacodynamic tolerance to the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect developed following repeated administration of S1RA to nerve-injured mice. As a mechanistic correlate, electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that pharmacological antagonism of σ(1) receptors attenuated the wind-up responses in spinal cords sensitized by repetitive nociceptive stimulation. These findings contribute to evidence identifying the σ(1) receptor as a modulator of activity-induced spinal sensitization and pain hypersensitivity, and suggest σ(1) receptor antagonists as potential novel treatments for neuropathic pain. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Indirect Measurement of Regional Axon Diameter in Excised Mouse Spinal Cord with Q-space Imaging: Simulation and Experimental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Henry H.; Wright, Alex C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Souza, Andre; Schwartz, Eric D.; Hwang, Scott N.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2008-01-01

    Q-space imaging (QSI), a diffusion MRI technique, can provide quantitative tissue architecture information at cellular dimensions not amenable by conventional diffusion MRI. By exploiting regularities in molecular diffusion barriers, QSI can estimate the average barrier spacing such as the mean axon diameter in white matter (WM). In this work, we performed ex vivo QSI on cervical spinal cord sections from healthy C57BL/6 mice at 400MHz using a custom-designed uniaxial 50T/m gradient probe delivering a 0.6 µm displacement resolution capable of measuring axon diameters on the scale of 1 µm. After generating QSI-derived axon diameter maps, diameters were calculated using histology from seven WM tracts (dorsal corticospinal, gracilis, cuneatus, rubrospinal, spinothalamic, reticulospinal, and vestibulospinal tracts) each with different axon diameters. We found QSI-derived diameters from regions drawn in the seven WM tracts (1.1 to 2.1 µm) to be highly correlated (r2 = 0.95) with those calculated from histology (0.8 to 1.8 µm). The QSI-derived values overestimated those obtained by histology by approximately 20%, which is likely due to the presence of extra-cellular signal. Finally, simulations on images of synthetic circular axons and axons from histology suggest that QSI-derived diameters are informative despite diameter and axon shape variation and the presence of intra-cellular and extra-cellular signal. QSI may be able to quantify nondestructively changes in WM axon architecture due to pathology or injury at the cellular level. PMID:18342541

  20. Upregulation of calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit in dorsal horn contributes to spinal cord injury-induced tactile allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuyama, Kazuki; Tachibana, Toshiya; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Okubo, Masamichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2018-01-31

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results not only in motor paralysis but also in the emergence of neuropathic pain (NeuP), both of which can impair the quality of life for patients with SCI. In the clinical field, it is well known that pregabalin, which binds to the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 (α 2 δ-1) subunit has therapeutic effects on NeuP after SCI. A previous study has demonstrated that SCI increased α 2 δ-1 in the L4-L6 dorsal spinal cord of SCI rats by Western blot analysis and that the increase of α 2 δ-1 was correlated with tactile allodynia of the hind paw. However, the detailed feature of an increase in α 2 δ-1 protein in the spinal dorsal horn and the mechanism of pregabalin effect on SCI-induced NeuP have not been fully examined. This study aimed to examine the detailed distribution of α 2 δ-1 expression in the lumbar spinal cord after thoracic SCI in rats and the correlation of the therapeutic effect of pregabalin in SCI rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent thoracic (T10) spinal cord contusion injury using the IH impactor device. Spinal cord injury rats received pregabalin (30 mg/kg) once a day for 2 weeks over a 4-week period after SCI. The mechanical threshold in the rat hind paw was measured over 4 weeks. Alpha-2-delta-1 expression in the lumbar spinal cord and in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry. A significant reduction of the withdrawal threshold of mechanical stimuli to the hind paw was observed for 2 weeks and continued at least 4 weeks after SCI. In the control rats, expression of α 2 δ-1 immunoreactivity was detected mainly in laminae I and II in the lumbar dorsal horn. Thoracic SCI significantly increased α 2 δ-1 immunoreactivity in laminae I and II in the lumbar dorsal horn 4 weeks after SCI; however, thoracic SCI did not affect the expression of α 2 δ-1 mRNA in the L4 and L5 DRGs. Meanwhile, the signal intensity of α 2

  1. Variance of spinal osteoporosis induced by dexamethasone and methylprednisolone and its associated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Liang, De; Jiang, Xiaobing; Tang, Jingjing; Cui, Jianchao; Wei, Qiushi; Zhang, Shuncong; Yao, Zhensong; Shen, Gengyang; Lin, Shunxin

    2015-10-01

    significance. The expression of bone formation marker Runx2 was significantly down-regulated at M3 in DEXA group compared with MP, CON and BL groups, while the expression of Col1a1 was significantly up-regulated and biglycan, LRP-5, OPG were significantly down-regulated in GCs intervention groups compared with CON and BL groups. There were no statistical differences in MMP9, Cathepsin K, Sclerostin among CON, MP and DEXA groups. These results indicate that dexamethasone, the long-acting glucocorticoid, generates more serious osteoporosis of rat lumbar spine than methylprednisolone, which is relatively short-acting glucocorticoid. The discrepancy between the two GCs inducing osteoporosis may be mainly caused by a decrease in bone formation. RUNX2 and Col1a1 may be the two of critical genes inducing the discrepant impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined delivery of chondroitinase ABC and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuroepithelial cells promote tissue repair in an animal model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führmann, Tobias; Anandakumaran, Priya N; Payne, Samantha L; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Varga, Balazs V; Nagy, Andras; Tator, Charles; Shoichet, Molly S

    2018-02-02

    The lack of tissue regeneration after traumatic spinal cord injury in animal models is largely attributed to the local inhibitory microenvironment. To overcome this inhibitory environment while promoting tissue regeneration, we investigated the combined delivery of chondroitinase ABC (chABC) with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs). ChABC was delivered to the injured spinal cord at the site of injury by affinity release from a crosslinked methylcellulose (MC) hydrogel by injection into the intrathecal space. NESCs were distributed in a hydrogel comprised of hyaluronan and MC and injected into the spinal cord tissue both rostral and caudal to the site of injury. Cell transplantation led to reduced cavity formation, but did not improve motor function. While few surviving cells were found 2 weeks post injury, the majority of live cells were neurons, with only few astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and progenitor cells. At 9 weeks post injury, there were more progenitor cells and a more even distribution of cell types compared to those at 2 weeks post injury, suggesting preferential survival and differentiation. Interestingly, animals that received cells and chABC had more neurons than animals that received cells alone, suggesting that chABC influenced the injury environment such that neuronal differentiation or survival was favoured.

  3. Experimentally induced helper dispersal in colonially breeding cooperative cichlids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heg, D.; Heg-Bachar, Z.; Brouwer, L.; Taborsky, M.

    2008-01-01

    The 'benefits of philopatry' hypothesis states that helpers in cooperatively breeding species derive higher benefits from remaining home, instead of dispersing and attempting to breed independently. We tested experimentally whether dispersal options influence dispersal propensity in the

  4. Pathogenesis of spinal cord injury induced edema and neuropathic pain: expression of multiple isoforms of wnk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mostafa M; Lee, HyunKyung; Clark, Zach; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Nacht, Carrie; Patel, Kush; Liu, Lisa; Joslin, Jiliian; Kintner, Douglus; Resnick, Daniel K

    2014-07-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a common occurrence following spinal cord injury (SCI). Identification of specific molecular pathways that are involved in pain syndromes has become a major priority in current SCI research. We have investigated the role of a cation-dependent chloride transporter, Cl-regulatory protein Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) 1 (NKCC1), phosphorylation profile of NKCC1 and its specific involvement in neuropathic pain following contusion SCI (cSCI) using a rat model. Administration of the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide (BU) increases the mean hindpaw withdrawal latency time (WLT), thermal hyperalgesia (TH) following cSCI. These results demonstrate implication of NKCC1 co-transporter and BUin SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The with-no-lysine (K)-1 (WNK1) kinase has been shown to be an important regulator of NKCC1 phosphorylation in many systems, including nocioception. Mutations in a neuronal-specific exon of WNK1 (HSN2) was identified in patients that have hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSANII) also implicates WNK1 in nocioception, such that these patients have loss of perception to pain, touch and heat. In our ongoing research we proposed two studies utilizing our contusion SCI (cSCI) NP model of rat. Study 1 aimed at NKCC1 expression and activity is up-regulated following cSCI in the early edema and chronic neuropathic pain phases. Study 2 aimed at identifying the expression profile of alternatively spliced WNK1 isoforms in animals exhibiting thermal hyperalgesia (TH) following cSCI. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (275-300 g) following laminectomy received cSCI at T9 with the NYU impactor-device II by dropping 10 g weight from the height of 12.5 mm. Control rats obtained laminectomy but no impaction. Following injury, functional recovery was assessed by BBB locomotor scores on day 1, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 42 and development of thermal hyperalgesia on day 21, 28, 35, and 42 day of injury by monitoring hind paw withdraw latency time (WLT) in seconds compared with

  5. Protracted, relapsing and demyelinating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in DA rats immunized with syngeneic spinal cord and incomplete Freund's adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, J C; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Storch, M

    1995-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a model for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, MS is a chronic, relapsing and demyelinating disease, whereas EAE in rats is typically a brief and monophasic disorder showing little demyelination. We demonstrate here that DA rats develop severe...

  6. Salmon and human thrombin differentially regulate radicular pain, glial-induced inflammation and spinal neuronal excitability through protease-activated receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenell R Smith

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a major problem with common causes including disc herniation and spondylosis that compress the spinal nerve roots. Cervical nerve root compression in the rat produces sustained behavioral hypersensitivity, due in part to the early upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the sustained hyperexcitability of neurons in the spinal cord and degeneration in the injured nerve root. Through its activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, mammalian thrombin can enhance pain and inflammation; yet at lower concentrations it is also capable of transiently attenuating pain which suggests that PAR1 activation rate may affect pain maintenance. Interestingly, salmon-derived fibrin, which contains salmon thrombin, attenuates nerve root-induced pain and inflammation, but the mechanisms of action leading to its analgesia are unknown. This study evaluates the effects of salmon thrombin on nerve root-mediated pain, axonal degeneration in the root, spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and inflammation compared to its human counterpart in the context of their enzymatic capabilities towards coagulation substrates and PAR1. Salmon thrombin significantly reduces behavioral sensitivity, preserves neuronal myelination, reduces macrophage infiltration in the injured nerve root and significantly decreases spinal neuronal hyperexcitability after painful root compression in the rat; whereas human thrombin has no effect. Unlike salmon thrombin, human thrombin upregulates the transcription of IL-1β and TNF-α and the secretion of IL-6 by cortical cultures. Salmon and human thrombins cleave human fibrinogen-derived peptides and form clots with fibrinogen with similar enzymatic activities, but salmon thrombin retains a higher enzymatic activity towards coagulation substrates in the presence of antithrombin III and hirudin compared to human thrombin. Conversely, salmon thrombin activates a PAR1-derived peptide more weakly than human thrombin. These

  7. ZL006 protects spinal cord neurons against ischemia-induced oxidative stress through AMPK-PGC-1α-Sirt3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Wang, Yun-Mei; Zhang, Yan-Jun; He, Xi-Jing; Ma, Tao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Min

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) induces a range of cellular and molecular cascades, including activation of glutamate receptors and downstream signaling. Post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) links neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors to form a ternary complex in the CNS. This molecular complex-mediated cytotoxicity has been implicated in brain ischemia, but its role in SCI has not been determined. The goal of the study was to investigate the potential protective effects of ZL006, a small-molecule inhibitor of the PSD-95/nNOS interaction, in an in vitro SCI model induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that ZL006 reduced OGD-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, neuronal apoptosis and loss of cell viability. This protection was accompanied by the preservation of mitochondrial function, as evidenced by reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, attenuated mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, and enhanced ATP generation. In addition, ZL006 stimulated mitochondrial enzyme activities and SOD2 deacetylation in a Sirt3-dependent manner. The results of western blot analysis showed that ZL006 increased the activation of AMPK-PGC-1α-Sirt3 pathway, and the beneficial effects of ZL006 was partially abolished by AMPK inhibitor and PGC-1α knockdown. Therefore, our present data showed that, by the AMPK-PGC-1α-Sirt3 pathway, ZL006 protects spinal cord neurons against ischemia through reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress to prevent apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [[Durable persistence of a biocompatible foreign body in a vertebral channel in open penetrating trauma of a spinal cord: clinico-experimental and pathomorphological peculiarities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbalyuk, V I; Medvedyev, V V; Semenova, V M; Grydina, N Ya; Yaminskyi, Yu Ya; Senchyk, Yu Yu; Draguntsova, N G; Rybachuk, O A; Dychko, S M; Petriv, T I

    2016-08-01

    Simulation model of open penetrating wound of a spinal cord (SC) with its durable com- pression by biocompatible foreign body, was tasted. Experimental animals - mature male rats (inbred line, descendent from a Wistar breed); the trauma simulation model - a left- sided transsection of the SC half on the Txi level; experimental groups: the main (a SC trau- ma + homotopic implantation of microporous hydrogel fragment - foreign body [n=10]), groups of comparison (the SC trauma [n=16]; the SC trauma + homotopic implantation of chemically identical analogue of hydrogel - NeuroGelTM [n=20]). A SC compression by a foreign body worsens the regeneration process course essentially: during first 2 mo the function index of a hind ipsilateral extremity in experimental animals of the main group was the lowest in the experiment - (1.30 ? 0.94) points in accordance to BBB scale, during 3 - 4 mo - the function index had enhanced trustworthy - up to (2.35 ? 0.95) points in accor- dance to BBB scale, what is connected with lowering of a local pressure on a SC tissue due to change of the foreign body form and volume. In 24 weeks the function index of hind ipsi- lateral extremity had constituted (8.45 ? 0.92) points - while application of NeuroGeTM and (2.35 ? 0.95) points - of the foreign body; the tissue processes in the implants localization zone had differed essentially. The tasted simulation model reproduces satisfactory a mechanical component of the foreign body impact on a SC tissue. The SC compression reduction, even in a late follow-up period, had improved the conditions and results of recenerative process essentially.

  9. Blockade of peripheral and spinal Na+/H+ exchanger increases formalin-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Araiza-Saldaña, Claudia I; Vidal-Cantú, Guadalupe C; Miguel Jiménez-Andrade, Juan; Murbartián, Janet; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2012-09-26

    The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) is involved in the regulation of intracellular pH and volume by mediating the electroneutral transport of H(+) against an influx of Na(+) ions. Since NHE1 regulates pH in neurons and astrocytes and it is expressed in nociceptive nerve fibers, it is likely that NHE may modulate neuronal excitability and pain transmission. The purpose of this study was to assess the participation of peripheral and spinal NHE in the secondary allodynia/hyperalgesia induced by formalin. In addition, we determined whether formalin injection modifies the expression of NHE1 in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and dorsal spinal cord. Subcutaneous injection of 0.5% formalin into the dorsal surface of the hind paw produced acute nociceptive behaviors (flinching and licking/lifting) followed by long-lasting bilateral secondary mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia. Peripheral and intrathecal pre-treatment (-10min) with selective NHE inhibitors 5-(N,N-dimethyl)amiloride hydrochloride (DMA, 0.3-30μM), 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA, 0.3-30μM) and [1-(quinolin-5-yl)-5-cyclopropyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbonyl] guanidine dihydrochloride (zoniporide, 0.03-3μM) significantly increased 0.5% formalin-induced bilateral long-lasting secondary allodynia/hyperalgesia. Contrariwise, local peripheral or intrathecal post-treatment (day 6 postinjection) with these NHE inhibitors did not affect formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors. Formalin injection reduced NHE1 expression in ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horns from day 1 to 12. In addition, formalin diminished NHE1 protein expression in DRG at day 12. These results suggest that NHE1 plays a role in pain processing at peripheral and spinal levels in formalin-induced long-lasting nociceptive behaviors. Additionally, these results suggest that proteins involved in pH regulation could be targets for the development of new analgesic drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Plateau potentials in alpha‐motoneurones induced by intravenous injection of L‐dopa and clonidine in the spinal cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conway, B. A.; Hultborn, H.; Kiehn, O.

    1988-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from lumbar alpha‐motoneurones in unanaesthetized decerebrate acute spinal cats. The response of motoneurones to direct current pulse injection or synaptic excitation was investigated following intravenous injection of L‐beta‐3,4‐dihydroxyphenylalanine (L....... It is demonstrated that plateau potentials in the motoneurones contribute to the late long‐lasting reflexes observed in L‐DOPA‐treated spinal cats. 7. It is concluded that L‐DOPA (and clonidine) change the response properties of the motoneurones in an analogous way to 5‐hydroxy‐DL‐tryptophan (5‐HTP...

  12. Contagious equine metritis: clinical description of experimentally induced infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, R E; Sahu, S P; Dardiri, A H; Wilder, F W

    1978-08-15

    Contagious equine metritis was reproduced experimentally in 6 pony mares. The disease was characterized by rapidly developing cervicitis and by varying amounts of exudate. The exudate, apparent as early as 48 hours after inoculation, drained from the cervix as a tenacious, mucopurulent discharge for several days, then rapidly disappeared. In all mares, the clinical disease cleared within several weeks of inoculation, without treatment.

  13. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dynamics of two uncoupled distinct Chua circuits driven by a common direct current voltage is explored experimentally. It was found that, with increasing current intensity, the dominant frequencies of these two Chua circuits will first vary at different speeds, approach an identical value for a certain current intensity and ...

  14. Reversal of experimental varicocele-induced testicular toxicity by L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    testicular volumes, caudal epididymal sperm characteristics, testicular histology and serum hormone levels were evaluated. Results showed that the testes of the rats that were given vitamin C post experimental varicocele had better physiological, biochemical and histological profiles than those of the untreated animals.

  15. The location of regions in guinea pig and bovine myelin basic proteins which induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenson, R E; Levine, S; Sowindki, R

    1975-02-01

    Myelin basic proteins and peptides derived from them by limited cleavage with pepsin were tested for their ability to induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats. The encephalitogenicity of the weakly active bovine protein was found to be associated with both halves of the molecule, peptides (1-88) and (89-169). Of the four smaller derivates of peptide (1-88), peptides (1-36), (43-88), (1-42), and (37-88), only the last two were active. This demonstrated that the overlap region consisting of residues 37-42 (sequence Asp-Ser-Leu-Gly-Arg-Phe) constitutes an encephalitogenic determinant. Of the two smaller derivatives of peptide (89-169), peptides (111-169) and (89-152), only the last was active. This indicated that the second encephalitogenic determinant begins between residues 88 and 111 and ends before residue 153. This region contains the sequence Leu-Ser-Leu-Ser-Arg-Phe (residues 108-113), which is strikingly similar to that of the first encephalitogenic determinant. Studies involving the extremely encephalitogenic guinea pig protein demonstrated that virtually all of the activity was recovered in the peptides corresponding to bovine peptides (37-88) and (43-88). These peptides, but not those comprising the remainder of the protein, were active in inhibiting the passive transfer of EAE with lymph node cells from donors immunized with guinea pig spinal cord.

  16. Influence of physical restraint on the onset of experimentally induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of intermittent repeated physical restraint on the onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) was in-vestigated in this study. The study compared the onset of DM in mice dosed with streptozotocin (STZ), a DM-inducing drug, with immediate subsequent exposure to either physical restraint stress or non- exposure to the stress.

  17. Pharmacokinetic changes of halofantrine in experimentally-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was hypothesized in this study that alterations in plasma lipoprotein profile and disturbed gastrointestinal motility as observed in diabetes mellitus may influence the disposition of halofantrine (HF), a highly lipophilic antimalarial drug. Therefore, using a rat model of diabetes mellitus induced by administration of alloxan ...

  18. Repair of experimental plaque-induced periodontal disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoukry, M; Ben Ali, L; Abdel Naby, M; Soliman, A

    2007-09-01

    Forty mongrel dogs were used in this study for induction of periodontal disease by placing subgingival silk ligatures affecting maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth during a 12-month period. Experimental premolar teeth received monthly clinical, radiographic, and histometric/pathologic assessments. The results demonstrated significant increases in scores and values of periodontal disease parameters associated with variable degrees of alveolar bone loss. The experimental maxillary premolar teeth exhibited more severe and rapid rates of periodontal disease compared with mandibular premolar teeth. Histometric analysis showed significant reduction in free and attached gingiva of the experimental teeth. Histopathological examination of buccolingual sections from experimental premolar teeth showed the presence of rete pegs within the sulcular epithelium with acanthosis and erosive changes, widening of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone resorption. Various methods for periodontal repair were studied in 194 experimental premolar teeth exhibiting different degrees of periodontal disease. The treatment plan comprised non-surgical (teeth scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene) and surgical methods (closed gingival curettage, modified Widman flap, and reconstructive surgery using autogenous bone marrow graft and canine amniotic membrane). The initial non-surgical treatment resulted in a periodontal recovery rate of 37.6% and was found effective for treatment of early periodontal disease based on resolution of gingivitis and reduction of periodontal probing depths. Surgical treatment by closed gingival curettage to eliminate the diseased pocket lining resulted in a recovery rate of 48.8% and proved effective in substantially reducing deep periodontal pockets. Open root planing following flap elevation resulted in a recovery rate of 85.4% and was effective for deep and refractory periodontal pockets. Autogenous bone graft implantation combined with canine amniotic

  19. Participation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in experimental neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chacur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to a neuropathic pain state that results from central sensitization. This phenomenom is mediated by NMDA receptors and may involve the production of nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we investigated the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS in the spinal cord of 3-month-old male, Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection (SNT. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L3-L5 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve. SNT resulted in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms confirmed by evaluating mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall and Selitto test and allodynia (von Frey hair test. Control animals did not present any alteration (sham-animals. The selective inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (0.2 and 2 µg in 50 µL, blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by SNT. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that nNOS was increased (48% by day 30 in the lumbar spinal cord after SNT. This increase was observed near the central canal (Rexed’s lamina X and also in lamina I-IV of the dorsal horn. Real-time PCR results indicated an increase of nNOS mRNA detected from 1 to 30 days after SNT, with the highest increase observed 1 day after injury (1469%. Immunoblotting confirmed the increase of nNOS in the spinal cord between 1 and 15 days post-lesion (20%, reaching the greatest increase (60% 30 days after surgery. The present findings demonstrate an increase of nNOS after peripheral nerve injury that may contribute to the increase of NO production observed after peripheral neuropathy.

  20. 17beta-estradiol rescues spinal motoneurons from AMPA-induced toxicity: a role for glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platania, Paola; Seminara, Giovanna; Aronica, Eleonora; Troost, Dirk; Vincenza Catania, Maria; Angela Sortino, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The ability of astrocytes to mediate 17beta-estradiol neuroprotection of spinal motoneurons challenged with AMPA has been evaluated in a co-culture system in which pure motoneurons were pulsed with 20 microM AMPA and then transferred onto an astrocyte layer pretreated for 24 h with 10 nM

  1. Modulation of melanocortin- induced changes in spinal nociception by µ-opioid receptor agonist and antagonist in neuropathic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Starowitcz, K.; Przewlocki, R.; Przewlocka, B.

    2002-01-01

    Co-localization of opioid and melanocortin receptor expression, especially at the spinal cord level in the dorsal horn and in the gray matter surrounding the central canal led to the suggestion that melanocortins might play a role in nociceptive processes. In the present studies, we aimed to

  2. IN-VITRO NMR MICRO IMAGING OF THE SPINAL-CORD OF CHRONIC RELAPSING EAE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANENS, D; VANDERLINDEN, A; GERRITS, PO; SGRAVENMADE, EJ

    1994-01-01

    Chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (Cr-EAE) was induced in Lewis rats with an emulsion of guinea pig spinal cord tissue in complete Freund's adjuvant enriched with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 RA. The sensitized rats developed Cr-EAE showing two to three relapses during the

  3. The Effect of Intrathecal Administration of Muscimol on Modulation of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Resulting from Spinal Cord Injury; an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Hosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuropathic pain can be very difficult to treat and it is one of the important medical challenging about pain treatments. Muscimol as a new agonist of gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAA have been introduced for pain management. Thus, the present study was performed to evaluate the pain alleviating effect of intrathecal injection of different doses of muscimol as GABAA receptor agonist in spinal cord injury (SCI model of neuropathic pain. Methods: In the present experimental study male Wistar rats were treated by muscimol 0.01, 0.1 or 1 µg/10ul, intrathecally (i.t. three weeks after induction of spinal cord injury using compression injury model. Neuropathic pain symptoms were assessed at before treatment, 15 minutes, one hour and three hours after muscimol administration. The time of peak effect and optimum dosage was assessed by repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance, respectively. Results: Muscimol with the dose of 0.01 µg in 15 minutes caused to improve the thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.6; p<0.001, mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 7.8; p<0.001, cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.96; p<0.001, and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 15.7; p<0.001. The effect of doses of 0.1 µg and 1 µg were also significant. In addition, the efficacy of different doses of muscimol didn't have difference on thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.52; p= 0.24, mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.3; p= -0.75, cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.8; p= -0.56, and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.75; p= 0.86. Conclusion: The finding of the present study revealed that using muscimol with doses of 0.01µg, 0.1µg, and 1 µg reduces the symptoms of neuropathic pain. Also the effect of GABAA agonist is short term and its effectiveness gradually decreases by time.

  4. Studying respiratory rhythm generation in a developing bird: hatching a new experimental model using the classic in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparatio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincen-Brown, Michael A.; Whitesitt, Kaitlyn C.; Quick, Forrest G.; Pilarski, Jason Q.

    2015-01-01

    It has been more than thirty years since the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation was first presented as a method to study automatic breathing behaviors in the neonatal rat. This straightforward preparation has led to an incredible burst of information about the location and coordination of several spontaneously active microcircuits that form the ventrolateral respiratory network of the brainstem. Despite these advances, our knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate central breathing behaviors is still incomplete. Investigations into the nature of spontaneous breathing rhythmicity have almost exclusively focused on mammals, and there is a need for comparative experimental models to evaluate several unresolved issues from a different perspective. With this in mind, we sought to develop a new avian in vitro model with the long term goal to better understand questions associated with the ontogeny of respiratory rhythm generation, neuroplasticity, and whether multiple, independent oscillators drive the major phases of breathing. The fact that birds develop in ovo provides unparalleled access to central neuronal networks throughout the prenatal period—from embryo to hatchling—that are free from confounding interactions with mother. Previous studies using in vitro avian models have been strictly limited to the early embryonic period. Consequently, the details and even the presence of brainstem derived breathing-related rhythmogenesis in birds have never been described. In the present study, we used the altricial zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and show robust spontaneous motor outflow through cranial motor nerve IX, which is first detectable on embryonic day four and continues through prenatal and early postnatal development without interruption. We also show that brainstem oscillations change dramatically over the course of prenatal development, sometimes within hours, which suggests rapid maturational modifications in growth and connectivity. We propose

  5. Experimental analysis of recombination and neutralization of radiation-induced charges, using isochronal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quittard, O.; Brisset, C.; Joffre, F.; Oudea, C.; Saigne, F.; Dusseau, L.; Fesquet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-01-01

    The experimental analysis described in this paper made use of the isochronal principle to carry out qualitative and quantitative studies of both aspects of the RICN mechanism (radiation-induced charge neutralization) : recombination and compensation. (authors)

  6. Host response in bovine mastitis experimentally induced with Staphylococcus chromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Pyörälä, S

    2009-02-16

    An experimental infection model was developed to study host response to intramammary infection in cows caused by Staphylococcus chromogenes. CNS intramammary infections have become very common in modern dairy herds, and they can remain persistent in the mammary gland. More information would be needed about the pathophysiology of CNS mastitis, and an experimental mastitis model is a means for this research. Six primiparous Holstein-Friesian cows were challenged with S. chromogenes 4 weeks after calving. One udder quarter of each cow was inoculated with 2.1 x 10(6)cfu of S. chromogenes. All cows became infected and clinical signs were mild. Milk production of the challenged quarter decreased on average by 16.3% during 7 days post-challenge. Cows eliminated bacteria in a few days, except for one cow which developed persistent mastitis. Milk indicators of inflammation, SCC and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) returned to normal within a week. Milk NAGase activity increased moderately, which reflects minor tissue damage in the udder. Concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and milk amyloid A (MAA) were both elevated at 12h PC. MAA was affected by the milking times, and was at its highest before the morning milking. In our experimental model, systemic acute phase protein response with SAA occurred as an on-off type reaction. In conclusion, this experimental model could be used to study host response in CNS mastitis caused by the main CNS species and also for comparison of the host response in a mild intramammary infection and in more severe mastitis models.

  7. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  8. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ... by bacteria or fungal organisms. Spinal infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. ...

  10. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... images of the back and spinal canal A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the spine to ... trigger or worsen pain and disability such as lifting heavy objects or walking long distances. Talk to ...

  11. Ferulic Acid Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Inducing Hypoxia to Inhibit microRNA-590 and Elevate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenjie; Wang, Shengyun; Li, Wenfang; Yuan, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the leading cause of paralysis, disability and even death in severe cases, and neural stem cells (NSCs) transplant has been employed for repairing SCI. Ferulic acid (FA) is able to promote neurogenesis in various stem cell therapies. We aimed to investigate the effect of FA on NSC transplant therapy, and the underlying mechanism, in improving functional recovery in SCI rat model. A rat model of SCI was established, which then received transplant of NSCs with or without FA pre-treatment. Functional recovery of the SCI rats was then evaluated, in terms of spinal cord water content, myeloperoxidase activity and behavioral assessments. Effect of FA in inducing hypoxia in NSCs was also assessed, followed by identifying the hypoxic regulated microRNA and the subsequent target gene. Transplant of FA pre-treated NSCs improved functional recovery of SCI rats to a more significant extent than NSCs without FA pre-treatment. The beneficial effects of FA in repairing SCI was mediated by inducing hypoxia in NSCs, which in turn inhibited microRNA-590 to elevate vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Our findings support the clinical potential of FA in improving efficacy of NSC transplant therapy for treatment of SCI.

  12. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  13. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  14. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  15. [Experimental approach to the gene therapy of motor neuron disease with the use of genes hypoxia-inducible factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, Sh M; Barykova, Iu A; Shmarov, M M; Tarantul, V Z; Barskov, I V; Kucherianu, V G; Brylev, L V; Logunov, D Iu; Tutykhina, I L; Bocharov, E V; Zakharova, M N; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Illarioshkin, S N

    2014-05-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and the brain. Several angiogenic and neurogenic growth factors, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenin (ANG), insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and others, have been shown to promote survival of the spinal motor neurons during ischemia. We constructed recombinant vectors using human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) carrying the VEGF, ANG or IGF genes under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. As a model for MND, we employed a transgenic mice strain, B6SJL-Tg (SOD1*G93A)d11 Gur/J that develops a progressive degeneration of the spinal motor neurons caused by the expression of a mutated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene SOD1. Delivery of the therapeutic genes to the spinal motor neurons was done using the effect of the retrograde axonal transport after multiple injections of the Ad5-VEGF, Ad5-ANG and Ad5-IGF vectors and their combinations into the limbs and back muscles of the SOD1(G93A) mice. Viral transgene expression in the spinal cord motor neurons was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and RT-RCR. We assessed the neurological status, motor activity and lifespan of experimental and control animal groups. We discovered that SOD1(G93A) mice injected with the Ad5-VEGF + Ad5-ANG combination showed a 2-3 week delay in manifestation of the disease, higher motor activity at the advanced stages of the disease, and at least a 10% increase in the lifespan compared to the control and other experimental groups. These results support the safety and therapeutic efficacy of the tested recombinant treatment. We propose that the developed experimental MND treatment based on viral delivery of VEGF + ANG can be used as a basis for gene therapy drug development and testing in the preclinical and clinical trials of the MND.

  16. Ovine keratoconjunctivitis experimentally induced by instillation of Mycoplasma conjunctivae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Laak, E A; Schreuder, B E; Kimman, T G; Houwers, D J

    1988-10-01

    Five sheep, free from Mycoplasma conjunctivae and ocular Chlamydia infection, were experimentally inoculated with M. conjunctivae and five more sheep were exposed to the infection by contact. Keratoconjunctivitis developed in all ten sheep. As in natural outbreaks of infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), clinical signs were generally moderate and transient, and recurred in some sheep. M. conjunctivae was detected throughout the 53-day observation period. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination of three sheep. Moraxella ovis, found in six of the ten sheep before the start of the experiment, appeared to play no etiologic role in the development of IKC.

  17. Appraisal of experimental and commercial Marek's disease vaccines to induce bursal and thymic atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, several experimental Marek’s disease (MD) vaccines were developed that appear to protect equally or better than the best commercial vaccines. However, some of the experimental vaccines were reported to induce transient bursal and thymic atrophies. We will report on two promising experiment...

  18. P2Y12 receptor-mediated activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway contribute to cancer-induced bone pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mingjuan Liu,1 Ming Yao,1,2 Hanqi Wang,1 Longsheng Xu,1 Ying Zheng,1 Bing Huang,1 Huadong Ni,1 Shijie Xu,1 Xuyan Zhou,1 Qingquan Lian2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The First Hospital of Jiaxing, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jiaxing University, Jiaxing, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP is one of the most challenging clinical problems due to a lack of understanding the mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of microglial G-protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R and proinflammatory cytokine production play an important role in neuropathic pain generation and maintenance. However, whether P2Y12R is involved in CIBP remains unknown.Methods: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P2Y12R in CIBP and its molecular mechanisms. Using the bone cancer model inoculated with Walker 256 tumor cells into the left tibia of Sprague Dawley rat, we blocked spinal P2Y12R through intrathecal administration of its selective antagonist MRS2395 (400 pmol/µL, 15 µL.Results: We found that not only the ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1-positive microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord but also mechanical allodynia was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, it decreased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK and the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6, whereas it increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α.Conclusion: Taken together, our present results suggest that microglial P2Y12R in the spinal cord may contribute to CIBP by the activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway, thus identifying a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CIBP. Keywords: P2Y12 receptor, cancer-induced bone pain, p38MAPK pathway, cytokines

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  2. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin in experimentally induced hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornicescu, Corina; Boşca, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Yacoob, Sumaya; Stan, Nora; Filip, Adriana; Şovrea, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (MEL) is an endogenous neurohormone with many biological functions, including a powerful antioxidant effect. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MEL protects the brain tissue from the oxidative stress induced by hypobaric hypoxia (HH) in vivo. This study was performed on Wistar rats randomly assigned in four groups, according to the pressure conditions and treatment: Group 1: normoxia and placebo; Group 2: HH and placebo; Group 3: normoxia and MEL; and Group 4: HH and MEL. The following aspects were evaluated: cognitive function (space reference and memory), oxidative stress parameters - serum and brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels -, and brain tissue macroscopic and microscopic morphological changes. Exposure to oxidative stress results in cognitive dysfunctions and biochemical alterations: significant increase of MDA and reduction of GSH in both serum and brain tissue. The most important morphological changes were observed in Group 2: increased cellularity, loss of pericellular haloes, shrunken neurons with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic, pyknotic or absent nuclei; reactive gliosis, edema and blood-brain barrier alterations could also be observed in some areas. MEL treatment significantly diminished all these effects. Our results suggest that melatonin is a neuroprotective antioxidant both in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia that can prevent and counteract the deleterious effects of oxidative stress (neuronal death, reactive astrogliosis, memory impairment and cognitive dysfunctions). Dietary supplements containing melatonin might be useful neuroprotective agents for the therapy of hypoxia-induced consequences.

  3. An experimental investigation of proton-induced phenomena in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulders, J.J.L.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis proton-induced phenomena in krypton gas are described. The considered reactions of protons on krypton are both nuclear and atomic. The nuclear conversion processes mainly result in the production of several Rb radioisotopes, such as 81 Rb that is used in 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator systems for medical diagnostics. The irradiation of krypton gas (natural composition) with protons of about 26 MeV can be used for the routine production of 81 Rb from the direct production reaction 82 Kr(p,2n) 81 Rb and from the indirect reaction 82 Kr(p,2n)sup(81m)Rb → 81 Rb. To determine the scattering of protons in krypton gas targets a quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed. Proton profiles have been determined from the proton-induced activity distribution on a copper foil. For the on-line detection of produced Rb radioisotopes several optical detection techniques were investigated. (Auth.)

  4. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted.

  5. Experimental gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in the sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fartashvand Majid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the nephrotoxic effects of gentamicin in adult male sheep, and to identify the earliest signs of toxicity and the extent of clinical and biochemical changes. Twenty clinically healthy yearling male Iranian fattailed sheep were injected with gentamicin sulfate at a daily dose of 80 mg/kg for 9-10 d when nephrotoxicosis was induced. Blood samples were collected weekly before and after induction of nephrotoxicosis. Gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity was characterised by increased creatinine and urea levels in serum, electrolyte imbalances, occurrence of albuminuria, and renal dysfunction. Significant elevation in respiratory and heart rates were observed one week after treatment (P < 0.05. There was a noticeable increase in water consumption, lethargy, and loss of appetite in treated sheep. There were significant correlations between serum creatinine and potassium (P = 0.004, r = 0.759, sodium (P = 0.017, r = 0.501, and urea (P = 0.021, r = 0.617 levels. Additionally, significant negative correlations between serum total protein and albumin and creatinine (P = 0.023, r = -0.484 and urea (P = 0.036, r = -0.381 were found. At necropsy, the kidneys were pale, swollen, and wet on the cut surface, especially perirenal tissues and ureters were oedematous. These findings confirmed the previous reports in other species.

  6. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  7. Antinociceptive synergistic effect of spinal mGluR2/3 antagonist and glial cells inhibitor on peripheral inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Juan; Feng, Yupeng; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Li, Huili

    2009-05-29

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 2/3 is distributed in neurons and glial cells in many regions of the nervous system, but its role in nociceptive processing is unclear. In this study, we examined the mRNA expressions of mGluR2 and mGluR3, by real-time RT-PCR, in the spinal cord. We further investigated the possible involvement of mGluR2/3 and mechanisms underlying peripheral inflammatory pain induced by subcutaneous complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection. We demonstrate that compared to the controls, the mRNA expression levels of mGluR2 and mGluR3 were significantly higher 4h after CFA injection. Functionally, blocking mGluR2/3 by their antagonist (2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S, 2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid (LY341495) alleviated the CFA-induced mechanical allodynia and the inhibitory effects were reversed by mGluR2/3 agonist (2R, 4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate ((2R, 4R)-APDC). In addition, a glial metabolism inhibitor dl-fluorocitric acid barium salt (fluorocitric acid) also inhibited the CFA-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Remarkably, simultaneous inhibition of mGluR2/3 and glial metabolism had synergistic effects. The co-administration of LY341495 and fluorocitric acid with minimal dosages produced significant more inhibition than the additive effects by the individual inhibitor alone. In summary, our data suggest that spinal mGluR2/3 contributes to the generation of mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral inflammation. We also suggest that involvement of mGluR2/3 in the communication between glial cells and neurons takes part in the processing of nociceptive information.

  8. Experimentation and numerical modeling of forging induced bending (FIB) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the final shape using numerical modeling has been a top priority in the field of sheet and bulk forming. Better shape prediction is the result of a better estimation of the physical stress and strain state. For experimental and numerical investigations of such estimations, simple benchmark processes are used. In this paper a benchmark process involving forging (flattening) of sheet metal between punch and die with negative clearance is proposed. The introduced material flow results in bending. Easy measurability of the angle of this bend makes this process suitable for validation purpose. Physical experiments are performed to characterize this bending angle due to flattening. Furthermore a numerical model is developed to capture this phenomenon. The main focus of this paper is the validation of the numerical model in terms of accurate prediction of the physical results.

  9. Alleviating effects of morin against experimentally-induced diabetic osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuohashish Hatem M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant flavonoids are emerging as potent therapeutic drugs effective against a wide range of aging diseases particularly bone metabolic disorders. Morin (3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, a member of flavonols, is an important bioactive compound by interacting with nucleic acids, enzymes and protein. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of morin on diabetic osteopenia in rats. Methods Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic model was used by considering 300 mg/dl fasting glucose level as diabetic. Morin (15 and 30 mg/kg was treated for five consecutive weeks to diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, insulin, deoxypyridinoline cross links (DPD, osteocalcin (OC, bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP, telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS and reduced glutathione (GSH were estimated. Femoral bones were taken for micro CT scan to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD and other morphometric parameters. Results Significant bone loss was documented as the level of bone turnover parameters including DPD, OC, BALP and CTX were increased in serum of diabetic rats. Morin treatment significantly attenuated these elevated levels. Bone micro-CT scan of diabetic rats showed a significant impairment in trabecular bone microarchitecture, density and other morphometric parameters. These impairments were significantly ameliorated by morin administration. Serum levels of glucose, TBARS, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly elevated, while the level of insulin and GSH was decreased in diabetic rats. These serum changes in diabetic rats were bring back to normal values after 5 weeks morin treatment. Conclusion These findings revealed the protective effect of morin against diabetic induced osteopenia. We believed that this effect is through its both the anti

  10. TRPV1 receptors contribute to mediate paclitaxel-induced c-Fos expression in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalynovska, Nataliia; Adámek, Pavel; Paleček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2017), s. 549-532 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11138S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15279; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : c-Fos * paclitaxel * TRPV1 * neuropathy * spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  11. Spinal peroxynitrite contributes to remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia via enhancement of divalent metal transporter 1 without iron-responsive element-mediated iron accumulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Rui-Chen; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Nan; Wang, Hai-Yun; Xie, Ke-Liang; Yu, Yong-Hao; Wang, Guo-Lin

    2015-04-01

    Hyperalgesia is one of the negative consequences following intraoperative analgesia with remifentanil. Peroxynitrite is a critical determinant in nociceptive process. Peroxynitrite inactivates iron-sulfur cluster that results in mitochondrial dysfunction and the release of iron, leading to mitochondrial iron accumulation. Iron accumulation mediated by divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) plays a key role in N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity. This study aims to determine whether peroxynitrite contributes to remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia via DMT1-mediated iron accumulation. Behavior testing was performed in rat model at different time points. Three-nitrotyrosine, nitrated manganese superoxide dismutase, and DMT1 with/without iron-responsive element [DMT1(+)IRE and DMT1(-)IRE] in spinal cord were detected by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Spinal iron concentration was measured using the Perl stain and atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Hydrogen-rich saline imparting selectivity for peroxynitrite decomposition and iron chelator was applied in mechanistic study on the roles of peroxynitrite and iron, as well as the prevention of hyperalgesia. Remifentanil induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia at postoperative 48 h. Compared with control, there were higher levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (mean ± SD, hyperalgesia vs. control, 1.22 ± 0.18 vs. 0.25 ± 0.05, n = 4), nitrated manganese superoxide dismutase (1.01 ± 0.1 vs. 0.19 ± 0.03, n = 4), DMT1(-)IRE (1.42 ± 0.19 vs. 0.33 ± 0.06, n = 4), and iron concentration (12.87 ± 1.14 vs. 5.26 ± 0.61 μg/g, n = 6) in remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia, while DMT1(+)IRE was unaffected. Eliminating peroxynitrite with hydrogen-rich saline protected against hyperalgesia and attenuated DMT1(-)IRE overexpression and iron accumulation. Iron chelator prevented hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Our study identifies that spinal peroxynitrite activates DMT1(-)IRE, leading to abnormal iron

  12. Effects of kinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists on overactive urinary bladder syndrome induced by spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner, Stefânia; Andrade, Edinéia L; Martini, Alessandra C; Bento, Allisson F; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Koepp, Janice; Calixto, João B

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Kinin B1 and B2 receptors have been implicated in physiological and pathological conditions of the urinary bladder. However, their role in overactive urinary bladder (OAB) syndrome following spinal cord injury (SCI) remains elusive. Experimental Approach We investigated the role of kinin B1 and B2 receptors in OAB after SCI in rats. Key Results SCI was associated with a marked inflammatory response and functional changes in the urinary bladder. SCI resulted in an up-regulation of B1 receptor mRNA in the urinary bladder, dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord, as well as in B1 protein in the urinary bladder and B1 and B2 receptor protein in spinal cord. Interestingly, both B1 and B2 protein expression were similarly distributed in detrusor muscle and urothelium of animals with SCI. In vitro stimulation of urinary bladder with the selective B1 or B2 agonist elicited a higher concentration-response curve in the SCI urinary bladder than in naive or sham urinary bladders. Cystometry revealed that treatment of SCI animals with the B2 selective antagonist icatibant reduced the amplitude and number of non-voiding contractions (NVCs). The B1 antagonist des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin reduced the number of NVCs while the non-peptide B1 antagonist SSR240612 reduced the number of NVCs, the urinary bladder capacity and increased the voiding efficiency and voided volume. Conclusions and Implications Taken together, these data show the important roles of B1 and B2 receptors in OAB following SCI in rats and suggest that blockade of these receptors could be a potential therapeutic target for controlling OAB. PMID:22862305

  13. Peripheral inflammation induces tumor necrosis factor dependent AMPA receptor trafficking and Akt phosphorylation in spinal cord in addition to pain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong Il; Svensson, Camilla I; Koehrn, Fred J; Bhuskute, Aditi; Sorkin, Linda S

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, intraplantar carrageenan induced increased mechanical allodynia, phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and GluR1 ser 845 (PKA site) as well as GluR1, but not GluR2 movement into neuronal membranes. This change in membrane GluR1/GluR2 ratio is indicative of Ca(2+) permeable AMPA receptor insertion. Pain behavior was reduced and biochemical changes blocked by spinal pretreatment, but not post-treatment, with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist, Etanercept (100microg). Pain behavior was also reduced by spinal inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K) (wortmannin; 1 and 5microg) and LY294002; 50 and 100microg) and Akt (Akt inhibitor IV; 3microg). Phosphorylated Akt was found exclusively in neurons in grey matter and in oligodendrocytes in white matter. Interestingly, this increase was seen first in superficial dorsal horn and alpha-motor neurons (peak 45min) and later (peak 2h post-injection) in deep dorsal horn neurons. Akt and GluR1 phosphorylation, AMPA receptor trafficking and mechanical allodynia were all TNF dependent. Whether phosphorylation of Akt and of GluR1 are in series or in parallel or upstream of pain behavior remains to be determined. Certainly, TNF-mediated GluR1 trafficking appears to play a major role in inflammatory pain and TNF-mediated effects such as these could represent a path by which glia contribute to neuronal sensitization (spinal LTP) and pathological pain. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Motor neuron derivation from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells: experimental approaches and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Irene; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Frattini, Emanuele; Corti, Stefania

    2014-07-14

    Motor neurons are cells located in specific areas of the central nervous system, such as brain cortex (upper motor neurons), brain stem, and spinal cord (lower motor neurons), which maintain control over voluntary actions. Motor neurons are affected primarily by a wide spectrum of neurological disorders, generally indicated as motor neuron diseases (MNDs): these disorders share symptoms related to muscular atrophy and paralysis leading to death. No effective treatments are currently available. Stem cell-derived motor neurons represent a promising research tool in disease modeling, drug screening, and development of therapeutic approaches for MNDs and spinal cord injuries. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells - human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) - toward specific lineages is the first crucial step in order to extensively employ these cells in early human development investigation and potential clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated from patients' own somatic cells (for example, fibroblasts) by reprogramming them with specific factors. They can be considered embryonic stem cell-like cells, which express stem cell markers and have the ability to give rise to all three germ layers, bypassing the ethical concerns. Thus, hiPSCs constitute an appealing alternative source of motor neurons. These motor neurons might be a great research tool, creating a model for investigating the cellular and molecular interactions underlying early human brain development and pathologies during neurodegeneration. Patient-specific iPSCs may also provide the premises for autologous cell replacement therapies without related risks of immune rejection. Here, we review the most recent reported methods by which hESCs or iPSCs can be differentiated toward functional motor neurons with an overview on the potential clinical applications.

  15. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  17. Bone cancer induces a unique central sensitization through synaptic changes in a wide area of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yoshikazu; Furue, Hidemasa; Kawamata, Tomoyuki; Uta, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Jun; Furuse, Shingo; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Imoto, Keiji; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2010-07-05

    Chronic bone cancer pain is thought to be partly due to central sensitization. Although murine models of bone cancer pain revealed significant neurochemical changes in the spinal cord, it is not known whether this produces functional alterations in spinal sensory synaptic transmission. In this study, we examined excitatory synaptic responses evoked in substantia gelatinosa (SG, lamina II) neurons in spinal cord slices of adult mice bearing bone cancer, using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording techniques. Mice at 14 to 21 days after sarcoma implantation into the femur exhibited hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli applied to the skin of the ipsilateral hind paw, as well as showing spontaneous and movement evoked pain-related behaviors. SG neurons exhibited spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The amplitudes of spontaneous EPSCs were significantly larger in cancer-bearing than control mice without any changes in passive membrane properties of SG neurons. In the presence of TTX, the amplitude of miniature EPSCs in SG neurons was increased in cancer-bearing mice and this was observed for cells sampled across a wide range of lumbar segmental levels. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated EPSCs evoked by focal stimulation were also enhanced in cancer-bearing mice. Dorsal root stimulation elicited mono- and/or polysynaptic EPSCs that were caused by the activation of Adelta and/or C afferent fibers in SG neurons from both groups of animals. The number of cells receiving monosynaptic inputs from Adelta and C fibers was not different between the two groups. However, the amplitude of the monosynaptic C fiber-evoked EPSCs and the number of SG neurons receiving polysynaptic inputs from Adelta and C fibers were increased in cancer-bearing mice. These results show that spinal synaptic transmission mediated through Adelta and C fibers is enhanced in the SG across a wide area of

  18. Bone cancer induces a unique central sensitization through synaptic changes in a wide area of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Daisuke

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic bone cancer pain is thought to be partly due to central sensitization. Although murine models of bone cancer pain revealed significant neurochemical changes in the spinal cord, it is not known whether this produces functional alterations in spinal sensory synaptic transmission. In this study, we examined excitatory synaptic responses evoked in substantia gelatinosa (SG, lamina II neurons in spinal cord slices of adult mice bearing bone cancer, using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording techniques. Results Mice at 14 to 21 days after sarcoma implantation into the femur exhibited hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli applied to the skin of the ipsilateral hind paw, as well as showing spontaneous and movement evoked pain-related behaviors. SG neurons exhibited spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. The amplitudes of spontaneous EPSCs were significantly larger in cancer-bearing than control mice without any changes in passive membrane properties of SG neurons. In the presence of TTX, the amplitude of miniature EPSCs in SG neurons was increased in cancer-bearing mice and this was observed for cells sampled across a wide range of lumbar segmental levels. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA receptor- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs evoked by focal stimulation were also enhanced in cancer-bearing mice. Dorsal root stimulation elicited mono- and/or polysynaptic EPSCs that were caused by the activation of Aδ and/or C afferent fibers in SG neurons from both groups of animals. The number of cells receiving monosynaptic inputs from Aδ and C fibers was not different between the two groups. However, the amplitude of the monosynaptic C fiber-evoked EPSCs and the number of SG neurons receiving polysynaptic inputs from Aδ and C fibers were increased in cancer-bearing mice. Conclusions These results show that spinal synaptic transmission mediated through Aδ and C fibers is

  19. Experimental photoimmunology: immunologic ramifications of UV-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daynes, R.A.; Bernhard, E.J.; Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of animal model systems to investigate the sequence of events which lead to the induction and progression of skin tumors following chronic ultraviolet light (UVL) exposure has clearly shown that the direct mutagenic effects of UVL is only one of the components involved in this process. In spite of the fact that overt carcinogenesis is only one of the many effects produced by UV light, most hypotheses as to the mechanism by which UVL can cause the mutations necessary to achieve the transformed phenotype have focused on the direct effects of UVL on DNA and the generation of carcinogenic compounds. Investigations during the last 5 yr, however, have clearly demonstrated that immunologic factors are also critically important in the pathogenesis of UV-induced skin cancers. A complete understanding of UV-carcinogenesis must therefore consider the mechanisms which allow the transformed cell to evade immunologic rejection by the host in addition to those aspects which deal with conversion of a normal cell to a cancer cell. It is the object of this review to provide both a historical account of the work which established the immunologic consequences of chronic UVL exposure and the results of recent experiments designed to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms by which UVL affects the immunologic apparatus. In addition, a hypothetical model is presented to explain the sequence of events which ultimately lead to the emergence of the suppressor T-cells which regulate antitumor immune responses

  20. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-07-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone.

  1. Electrical stimulation induces propagated colonic contractions in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aellen, S; Wiesel, P H; Gardaz, J-P; Schlageter, V; Bertschi, M; Virag, N; Givel, J-C

    2009-02-01

    Direct colonic electrical stimulation may prove to be a treatment option for specific motility disorders such as chronic constipation. The aim of this study was to provoke colonic contractions using electrical stimulation delivered from a battery-operated device. Electrodes were inserted into the caecal seromuscular layer of eight anaesthetized pigs. Contractions were induced by a neurostimulator (Medtronic 3625). Caecal motility was measured simultaneously by video image analysis, manometry and a technique assessing colonic transit. Caecal contractions were generated using 8-10 V amplitude, 1000 micros pulse width, 120 Hz frequency for 10-30 s, with an intensity of 7-15 mA. The maximal contraction strength was observed after 20-25 s. Electrical stimulation was followed by a relaxation phase of 1.5-2 min during which contractions propagated orally and aborally over at least 10 cm. Spontaneous and stimulated caecal motility values were significantly different for both intraluminal pressure (mean(s.d.) 332(124) and 463(187) mmHg respectively; P < 0.001, 42 experiments) and movement of contents (1.6(0.9) and 3.9(2.8) mm; P < 0.001, 40 experiments). Electrical stimulation modulated caecal motility, and provoked localized and propagated colonic contractions.

  2. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Moriyama, L T; Bagnato, V S

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed. (review)

  3. Light touch induces ERK activation in superficial dorsal horn neurons after inflammation: involvement of spinal astrocytes and JNK signaling in touch-evoked central sensitization and mechanical allodynia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in spinal cord neurons could serve as a marker for sensitization of dorsal horn neurons in persistent pain. ERK is normally activated by high-threshold noxious stimuli. We investigated how low-threshold mechanical stimuli could activate ERK after complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation. Unilateral injection of CFA induced ipsilateral heat hyperalgesia and bilateral mechanical allodynia. CFA-induced ERK activation in ipsilateral dorsal horn neurons declined after 2 days. Interestingly, low threshold mechanical stimulation given by light touch either on the inflamed paw or the contralateral non-inflamed paw dramatically increased ERK phosphorylation (pERK) in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to touch stimulation. Notably, light touch induced pERK mainly in superficial neurons in laminae I-IIo. Intrathecal administration of the astroglial toxin L-α-aminoadipate (L-α-AA) on post-CFA day 2 reversed CFA-induced bilateral mechanical allodynia but not heat hyperalgesia. Furthermore, L-α-AA, the glial inhibitor fluorocitrate, and a peptide inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) all reduced light touch-evoked ERK activation ipsilateral to touch. Collectively, these data suggest that (a) ERK can be activated in superficial dorsal horn neurons by low threshold mechanical stimulation under pathological condition and (b) ERK activation by light touch is associated with mechanical allodynia and requires an astrocyte network. PMID:20722971

  4. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  5. Immune Cells and Molecular Networks in Experimentally Induced Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, E; Gaudin, A; Bienvenu, G; Amiaud, J; Farges, J C; Cuturi, M C; Moreau, A; Alliot-Licht, B

    2016-02-01

    Dental pulp is a dynamic tissue able to resist external irritation during tooth decay by using immunocompetent cells involved in innate and adaptive responses. To better understand the immune response of pulp toward gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed biological mediators and immunocompetent cells in rat incisor pulp experimentally inflamed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline solution (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Untreated teeth were used as control. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine ligands, growth factors, and enzymes were evaluated at the transcript level, and the recruitment of the different leukocytes in pulp was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis after 3 h, 9 h, and 3 d post-PBS or post-LPS treatment. After 3 d, injured rat incisors showed pulp wound healing and production of reparative dentin in both LPS and PBS conditions, testifying to the reversible pulpitis status of this model. IL6, IL1-β, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, MMP9, and iNOS gene expression were significantly upregulated after 3 h of LPS stimulation as compared with PBS. The immunoregulatory cytokine IL10 was also upregulated after 3 h, suggesting that LPS stimulates not only inflammation but also immunoregulation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed a significant, rapid, and transient increase in leukocyte levels 9 h after PBS and LPS stimulation. The quantity of dendritic cells was significantly upregulated with LPS versus PBS. Interestingly, we identified a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-enriched cell population in noninjured rodent incisor dental pulp. The percentage of this population, known to regulate immune response, was higher 9 h after inflammation triggered with PBS and LPS as compared with the control. Taken together, these data offer a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of dental pulp immunity that may be elicited by gram-negative bacteria. © International & American

  6. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by experimental childhood meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Fagundes, Glauco D; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Dagostin, Caroline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Vilela, Márcia C; Comim, Clarissa M; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, João; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of environmental enrichment (EE) on memory, cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain of adult rats subjected to experimental pneumococcal meningitis during infancy. On postnatal day 11, the animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension intracisternally at 1 × 10(6) CFU/mL and remained with their mothers until age 21 days. Animals were divided into the following groups: control, control + EE, meningitis, and meningitis + EE. EE began at 21 days and continued until 60 days of age (adulthood). EE consisted of a large cage with three floors, ramps, running wheels, and objects of different shapes and textures. At 60 days, animals were randomized and subjected to habituation to the open-field task and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. After the tasks, the hippocampus and CSF were isolated for analysis. The meningitis group showed no difference in performance between training and test sessions of the open-field task, suggesting habituation memory impairment; in the meningitis + EE group, performance was significantly different, showing preservation of habituation memory. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there were no differences in behavior between training and test sessions in the meningitis group, showing aversive memory impairment; conversely, differences were observed in the meningitis + EE group, demonstrating aversive memory preservation. In the two meningitis groups, IL-4, IL-10, and BDNF levels were increased in the hippocampus, and BDNF levels in the CSF. The data presented suggest that EE, a non-invasive therapy, enables recovery from memory deficits caused by neonatal meningitis.

  7. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Tatar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antibiotics are frequently used for the treatment of rhinosinusitis. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of development of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in the treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Methods: Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was composed by five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde were determined. Results: In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. Conclusion: The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  8. Increased serum IL-6 level time-dependently regulates hyperalgesia and spinal mu opioid receptor expression during CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekieh, E; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, H; Maghsoudi, N; Alani, B; Zardooz, H

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is known to cause pro- and anti-inflammatory effects during different stages of inflammation. Recent therapeutic investigations have focused on treatment of various inflammatory disorders with anti-cytokine substances. As a result, the aim of this study was to further elucidate the influence of IL-6 in hyperalgesia and edema during different stages of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis (AA) in male Wistar rats. AA was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of CFA into the rats' hindpaw. Anti-IL-6 was administered either daily or weekly during the 21 days of study. Spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) expression was detected by Western blotting. Daily and weekly treatment with an anti-IL-6 antibody significantly decreased paw edema in the AA group compared to the AA control group. Additionally, daily and weekly anti-IL-6 administration significantly reduced hyperalgesia on day 7 in the AA group compared to the AA control group; however, there were significant increases in hyperalgesia in the antibody-treated group on days 14 and 21 compared to the AA control group. IL-6 antibody-induced increases in hyperalgesia on the 14 th and 21 st days after CFA injection correlated with a time-dependent, significant reduction in spinal mOR expression during anti-IL-6 treatment. Our study confirmed the important time-dependent relationship between serum IL-6 levels and hyperalgesia during AA. These results suggest that the stages of inflammation in AA must be considered for anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory interventions via anti-IL-6 antibody treatment.

  9. Upregulation of adrenomedullin in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia in the early phase of CFA-induced inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yanguo; Liu, Yushan; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Fournier, Alain; Quirion, Rémi

    2009-11-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pronociceptive mediator [28]. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of AM in a model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain. Injection of CFA, but not of saline, in the unilateral hindpaw produced an increase in the expression of AM-like immunoreactivity (AM-IR) in laminae I-II of the spinal cord as well as in small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at 48 h. The content of AM in DRG on the side ipsilateral to CFA injection started to increase at 4 h and remained at high levels at 24 and 48 h. The selective antagonist of AM receptors, AM(22-52), administered intrathecally (i.t.) 24 h after CFA injection inhibited inflammation-associated hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner (2, 5 and 10 nmol). Impressively, this anti-hyperalgesic effect lasted for at least 24 h. I.t. administration of AM(22-52) (10 nmol) also reversed CFA-induced increase in AM-IR in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG. Furthermore, blockade of AM receptors abolished CFA-induced changes in the expression and content of CGRP-like immunoreactivity in these regions. Taken together, our results suggest that the upregulation of AM in DRG neurons contributes to the development of inflammatory pain, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by enhancing the expression and release of CGRP. Blocking AM receptor downstream signaling effects using antagonists has the potential of relieving pain following the induction of inflammation.

  10. Studying respiratory rhythm generation in a developing bird: Hatching a new experimental model using the classic in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincen-Brown, Michael A; Whitesitt, Kaitlyn C; Quick, Forrest G; Pilarski, Jason Q

    2016-04-01

    It has been more than thirty years since the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation was first presented as a method to study automatic breathing behaviors in the neonatal rat. This straightforward preparation has led to an incredible burst of information about the location and coordination of several spontaneously active microcircuits that form the ventrolateral respiratory network of the brainstem. Despite these advances, our knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate central breathing behaviors is still incomplete. Investigations into the nature of spontaneous breathing rhythmicity have almost exclusively focused on mammals, and there is a need for comparative experimental models to evaluate several unresolved issues from a different perspective. With this in mind, we sought to develop a new avian in vitro model with the long term goal to better understand questions associated with the ontogeny of respiratory rhythm generation, neuroplasticity, and whether multiple, independent oscillators drive the major phases of breathing. The fact that birds develop in ovo provides unparalleled access to central neuronal networks throughout the prenatal period - from embryo to hatchling - that are free from confounding interactions with mother. Previous studies using in vitro avian models have been strictly limited to the early embryonic period. Consequently, the details and even the presence of brainstem derived breathing-related rhythmogenesis in birds have never been described. In the present study, we used the altricial zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and show robust spontaneous motor outflow through cranial motor nerve IX, which is first detectable on embryonic day four and continues through prenatal and early postnatal development without interruption. We also show that brainstem oscillations change dramatically over the course of prenatal development, sometimes within hours, which suggests rapid maturational modifications in growth and connectivity. We propose

  11. Cytotoxicity induced by carbon nanotubes in experimental malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano-Feinholz S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Samuel Romano-Feinholz,1,* Alelí Salazar-Ramiro,2,* Emilio Muñoz-Sandoval,3 Roxana Magaña-Maldonado,2 Norma Hernández Pedro,4 Edgar Rangel López,5 Alberto González Aguilar,1 Aurora Sánchez García,6 Julio Sotelo,2 Verónica Pérez de la Cruz,7 Benjamín Pineda2 1Division of Neurosurgery, 2Neuroimmunology and Neuro-oncology Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery (NINN, Mexico City, 3Division of Advanced Materials, IPICYT, San Luis Potosí, 4Experimental Oncology Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, 5Excitatory Aminoacids Laboratory, 6Pathology Laboratory, 7Neurochemistry Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery (NINN, Mexico City, Mexico *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Despite multiple advances in the diagnosis of brain tumors, there is no effective treatment for glioblastoma. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, which were previously used as a diagnostic and drug delivery tool, have now been explored as a possible therapy against neoplasms. However, although the toxicity profile of nanotubes is dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of specific particles, there are no studies exploring how the effectivity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs is affected by different methods of production. In this study, we characterize the structure and biocompatibility of four different types of MWCNTs in rat astrocytes and in RG2 glioma cells as well as the induction of cell lysis and possible additive effect of the combination of MWCNTs with temozolomide. We used undoped MWCNTs (labeled simply as MWCNTs and nitrogen-doped MWCNTs (labeled as N-MWCNTs. The average diameter of both pristine MWCNTs and pristine N-MWCNTs was ~22 and ~35 nm, respectively. In vitro and in vivo results suggested that these CNTs can be used as adjuvant therapy along with the standard treatment to increase the survival of rats implanted with malignant glioma. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, glioblastoma therapy

  12. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  13. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  14. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrózková, Petra; Špicarová, Diana; Paleček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2016), č. článku e0163991. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11138S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15279; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : PAR2 * TRP * neuropathy * spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  15. Prevention of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in the elderly: i.m. methoxamine or combined hetastarch and crystalloid.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buggy, D J

    2012-02-03

    We have compared two methods of reducing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia in elderly patients, 6% hetastarch and crystalloid or methoxamine 10 mg i.m., in terms of haemodynamic stability and requirements for additional vasopressors. Sixty-two patients (aged 60-97 yr) undergoing surgical fixation of fractured neck of femur were allocated randomly to receive 6% hetastarch (Hespan) 500 ml followed by Hartmann\\'s solution 500 ml (group HS, n = 32) or a bolus injection of methoxamine 10 mg i.m. (group MX, n = 30), 10 min before induction of spinal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 2.25-3.0 ml. Arterial pressure was measured non-invasively by an oscillotonometer at 2-min intervals from 0 to 40 min and at 5-min intervals thereafter. Methoxamine 2 mg i.v. was given if systolic arterial pressure (SAP) decreased to < 100 mm Hg. Hypotension was defined as a 25% decrease from baseline SAP or mean arterial pressure (MAP). Patient data, sensory level and blood loss were similar in the two groups. SAP and MAP increased initially from baseline until induction of spinal anaesthesia and then decreased for 30 min in both groups, but remained higher in group MX (P < 0.05). Heart rate (HR) decreased from baseline in group MX (P < 0.05) and was less than in group HS at all times from 2 to 60 min (P < 0.01). The incidence of SAP hypotension (47% vs 75%; P = 0.03, odds ratio (OR) = 3.43) and MAP hypotension (47% vs 67%; P = 0.09, OR = 2.51) was less in group MX than in group HS. Requirements for rescue methoxamine i.v. (27% vs 53%, P = 0.04, OR = 3.11) was less in group MX than in group HS but the dose of rescue methoxamine given (mean 6.3 (95% confidence intervals 3.0-9.6) vs 8.9 (5.6-12.2) mg) and time to onset of hypotension (20.7 (14.5-26.7) vs 17.3 (11.4-23.1) min) were similar in groups MX and HS, respectively. We conclude that methoxamine 10 mg i.m., given 10 min before induction of spinal anaesthesia in normovolaemic elderly patients, reduced subsequent SAP and

  16. The NA(v)1.7 blocker protoxin II reduces burn injury-induced spinal nociceptive processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torres-Pérez, J. V.; Adámek, Pavel; Paleček, Jiří; Vizcaychipi, M.; Nagy, I.; Varga, A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2018), s. 75-84 ISSN 0946-2716 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11138S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15279; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : pain * p-ERK1/2 * primary sensory neuron * p-S10H3 * spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.686, year: 2016

  17. Effect of Sechium edule on chemical induced kidney damage in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayeed Mohammed Firdous Mumtaz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of leaves of Sechium edule was evaluated for its protective activity against gentamicin, potassium dichromate-induced nephrotoxicity and streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in experimental animals. In these three conditions, the extract of S. edule (200 mg/kg has significantly (p<0.001 decreased the level of blood urea, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and also significantly (p<0.001 increased the serum levels of total protein. The serum uric acid level was also significantly (p<0.001 decrease in diabetic mice treated with the extract (200 mg/kg. The extract also improves the histology of the kidney. The results indicate that aqueous extract of leaves of S. edule has possessed protective effect against gentamicin- and potassium dichromate-induced nephrotoxicity and streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in experimental animals.

  18. Does electron and proton therapy reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer after spinal irradiation for childhood medulloblastoma? A comparative treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu; Zackrisson, Bjoern; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Johansson, Lennart; Karlsson, Mikael; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Gagliardi, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this treatment planning comparison study was to explore different spinal irradiation techniques with respect to the risk of late side-effects, particularly radiation-induced cancer. The radiotherapy techniques compared were conventional photon therapy, intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT), conventional electron therapy, intensity/energy modulated electron therapy (IMET) and proton therapy (IMPT). CT images for radiotherapy use from five children, median age 8 and diagnosed with medulloblastoma, were selected for this study. Target volumes and organs at risk were defined in 3-D. Treatment plans using conventional photon therapy, IMXT, conventional electron therapy, IMET and IMPT were set up. The probability of normal tissue complication (NTCP) and the risk of cancer induction were calculated using models with parameters-sets taken from published data for the general population; dose data were taken from dose volume histograms (DVH). Similar dose distributions in the targets were achieved with all techniques but the absorbed doses in the organs-at-risk varied significantly between the different techniques. The NTCP models based on available data predicted very low probabilities for side-effects in all cases. However, the effective mean doses outside the target volumes, and thus the predicted risk of cancer induction, varied significantly between the techniques. The highest lifetime risk of secondary cancers was estimated for IMXT (30%). The lowest risk was found with IMPT (4%). The risks associated with conventional photon therapy, electron therapy and IMET were 20%, 21% and 15%, respectively. This model study shows that spinal irradiation of young children with photon and electron techniques results in a substantial risk of radiation-induced secondary cancers. Multiple beam IMXT seems to be associated with a particularly high risk of secondary cancer induction. To minimise this risk, IMPT should be the treatment of choice. If proton therapy is not

  19. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  20. Prediction of hypotension during spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section by altered heart rate variability induced by postural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, K; Yoshimura, N; Tanabe, K; Kito, K; Nagase, K; Iida, H

    2017-02-01

    Maternal hypotension is a common complication during cesarean section performed under spinal anesthesia. Changes in maternal heart rate with postural changes or values of heart rate variability have been reported to predict hypotension. Therefore, we hypothesized that changes in heart rate variability due to postural changes can predict hypotension. A total of 45 women scheduled to undergo cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. A postural change test was performed the day before cesarean section. The ratio of the power of low and high frequency components contributing to heart rate variability was assessed in the order of supine, left lateral, and supine. Patients who exhibited a ⩾two-fold increase in the low-to-high frequency ratio when moving to supine from the lateral position were assigned to the postural change test-positive group. According to the findings of the postural change test, patients were assigned to the positive (n=22) and negative (n=23) groups, respectively. Hypotension occurred in 35/45 patients, of whom 21 (60%) were in the positive group and 14 (40%) were in the negative group. The incidence of hypotension was greater in the positive group (Pcesarean section. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Seizures induced by fluoroacetic acid and fluorocitric acid may involve chelation of divalent cations in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornfeldt, C S; Larson, A A

    1990-04-25

    Fluoroacetic and fluorocitric acid toxicity is often characterized by seizures, however the mechanism of this activity is unknown. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of fluorocitrate in mice resulted in seizures after an average latency of 15 s, while intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection produced seizures after 36.5 min, and required higher doses to achieve this effect. This indicates the probable site of fluoroacetate and fluorocitrate neurotoxicity is the spinal cord. To mimic citrate accumulation, characteristic of fluoroacetate and fluorocitrate poisoning, citric acid was injected i.t. and also found to produce seizures. The structurally unrelated compounds EDTA, EGTA, glutamic acid and lactic acid also produced seizures identical to fluorocitrate. The ability of these compounds to chelate Ca2+ correlates well with their ability to cause seizures when administered i.t. and coadministration of calcium greatly attenuated the neurotoxicity of these compounds as well as fluoroacetate and fluorocitrate. In contrast, Ca2+ was unable to inhibit seizures elicited by strychnine, suggesting calcium's ability to inhibit chelators of divalent cations is not due to a general anticonvulsant effect. These results suggest that changes in Ca2+ concentration in the spinal cord may be responsible for some forms of seizure activity.

  2. Tramadol Induced Adrenal Insufficiency: Histological, Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural, and Biochemical Genetic Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelaleem, Shereen Abdelhakim; Hassan, Osama A.; Ahmed, Rasha F.; Zenhom, Nagwa M.; Rifaai, Rehab A.; El-Tahawy, Nashwa F.

    2017-01-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting analgesic. It is the most consumed narcotic drug that is prescribed in the world. Tramadol abuse has dramatically increased in Egypt. Long term use of tramadol can induce endocrinopathy. So, the aim of this study was to analyze the adrenal insufficiency induced by long term use of tramadol in experimental animals and also to assess its withdrawal effects through histopathological and biochemical genetic study. Forty male albino rats were used in this ...

  3. Effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy and functional bimanual training on upper extremity function and daily activities in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (m-CIMT) and functional bimanual training, when applied to a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury, on upper extremity function and daily activities. [Subject and Methods] One patient, diagnosed with C4 incomplete spinal cord injury, underwent physical therapy with constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 hours and task-oriented bimanual training for 1 hour, per day. This combined 4-hour session was performed five times a week, for 3 weeks, totaling 15 sessions. Upper extremity function was measured using the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Box & Block Test (BBT). Additionally, Spinal Cord Independence Measure Version III (SCIM-III) and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess functional outcomes. [Results] Mobility of the hand and overall function of upper extremities were enhanced following intervention. Moreover, the subject's quality of life and ability to carry out daily activities also improved. [Conclusion] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual training was effective in enhancing upper extremity function and performance of daily routines in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury. Further studies, recruiting multiple subjects, should focus on m-CIMT using diverse methods, performed during the course of daily activities.

  4. Differential activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in spinal cord in a model of bee venom-induced inflammation and hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Kimiko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Honeybee's sting on human skin can induce ongoing pain, hyperalgesia and inflammation. Injection of bee venom (BV into the intraplantar surface of the rat hindpaw induces an early onset of spontaneous pain followed by a lasting thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in the affected paw. The underlying mechanisms of BV-induced thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity are, however, poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in the generation of BV-induced pain hypersensitivity. Results We found that BV injection resulted in a quick activation of p38, predominantly in the L4/L5 spinal dorsal horn ipsilateral to the inflammation from 1 hr to 7 d post-injection. Phosphorylated p38 (p-p38 was expressed in both neurons and microglia, but not in astrocytes. Intrathecal administration of the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, prevented BV-induced thermal hypersensitivity from 1 hr to 3 d, but had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity. Activated ERK1/2 was observed exclusively in neurons in the L4/L5 dorsal horn from 2 min to 1 d, peaking at 2 min after BV injection. Intrathecal administration of the MEK inhibitor, U0126, prevented both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity from 1 hr to 2 d. p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 were expressed in neurons in distinct regions of the L4/L5 dorsal horn; p-ERK1/2 was mainly in lamina I, while p-p38 was mainly in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Conclusion The results indicate that differential activation of p38 and ERK1/2 in the dorsal horn may contribute to the generation and development of BV-induced pain hypersensitivity by different mechanisms.

  5. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive pathways as a novel target for pain therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xian-Guo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long-term potentiation (LTP in nociceptive spinal pathways shares several features with hyperalgesia and has been proposed to be a cellular mechanism of pain amplification in acute and chronic pain states. Spinal LTP is typically induced by noxious input and has therefore been hypothesized to contribute to acute postoperative pain and to forms of chronic pain that develop from an initial painful event, peripheral inflammation or neuropathy. Under this assumption, preventing LTP induction may help to prevent the development of exaggerated postoperative pain and reversing established LTP may help to treat patients who have an LTP component to their chronic pain. Spinal LTP is also induced by abrupt opioid withdrawal, making it a possible mechanism of some forms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Here, we give an overview of targets for preventing LTP induction and modifying established LTP as identified in animal studies. We discuss which of the various symptoms of human experimental and clinical pain may be manifestations of spinal LTP, review the pharmacology of these possible human LTP manifestations and compare it to the pharmacology of spinal LTP in rodents.

  6. Effects of Preoperative Serotonin-Receptor-Antagonist Administration in Spinal Anesthesia-Induced Hypotension: A Randomized, Double-blind Comparison Study of Ramosetron and Ondansetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Eun-Su; Lee, Gwan-Woo; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of spinal anesthesia (SA) include arterial hypotension and bradycardia. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 type 3 serotonin receptor antagonists in SA-induced adverse effects. Specifically, we assessed whether ramosetron was more effective than ondansetron in reducing SA-induced decreases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). A total of 117 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and receiving SA were intravenously administered 0.3 mg of ramosetron (n = 39, group R), 4 mg of ondansetron (n = 39, group O4), or 8 mg of ondansetron (n = 39, group O8). Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean BP (MBP), HR, and the lowest SBP, DBP, MBP, and HR values were measured preoperatively (baseline) and intraoperatively. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, the need for rescue antiemetics, the amount of patient-controlled analgesia consumption, and pain score in the first 48 hours after surgery were determined. Baseline values did not significantly differ among the 3 groups. After SA, SBP, DBP, MBP, and HR were lower than their baseline values in all 3 groups. The differences between the baseline and the lowest values were significantly less in group R than in groups O4 and O8 with respect to SBP (P controlled analgesia consumption, or pain score. The administration of ramosetron (0.3 mg) significantly attenuated the SA-induced decrease in BP compared with 4 or 8 mg of ondansetron and HR compared with 4 mg of ondansetron.

  7. Histometric assessment of the effect of diabetes mellitus on experimentally induced periodontitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepelassi, Eudoxie; Xynogala, Ioanna; Perrea, Despina; Agrogiannis, George; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Vrotsos, Ioannis

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this interventional animal study was to assess histologically the effect of experimental diabetes in rats with experimental periodontitis in terms of alveolar bone loss and the effect of experimental periodontitis on glucose levels in diabetes. Forty-seven Wistar rats were studied: 12 healthy controls (C), 10 with experimental diabetes (D), 12 with experimental diabetes and experimental periodontitis (DP) and 13 with experimental periodontitis (P). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection and periodontitis was induced at the right second maxillary molar by ligation. Serum glucose levels were measured at specific time points. Sixty-one days after ligation, the rats were sacrificed. Histometric analysis assessed alveolar crest level. For ligated groups, alveolar bone loss was expressed as the difference in alveolar crest level between right and left maxillary molars. Diabetes alone did not statistically significantly affect alveolar crest level. The combination of diabetes and periodontitis caused greater alveolar bone loss (946.1 +/- 719.9 microm) than periodontitis alone (639.7 +/- 294.2 microm); however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Periodontitis did not significantly increase glucose levels in diabetic rats. The average glucose levels were 545.4 (499 - 563) and 504.5 (445 - 560) mg/dL for diabetic and diabetic ligated rats, respectively. Within its limits, this study demonstrated that the severity of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis was not significantly aggravated by diabetes and the serum glucose levels in diabetes were not affected by periodontitis.

  8. Cowhage-induced itch as an experimental model for pruritus. A comparative study with histamine-induced itch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is the prototypical pruritogen used in experimental itch induction. However, in most chronic pruritic diseases, itch is not predominantly mediated by histamine. Cowhage-induced itch, on the other hand, seems more characteristic of itch occurring in chronic pruritic diseases.We tested the validity of cowhage as an itch-inducing agent by contrasting it with the classical itch inducer, histamine, in healthy subjects and atopic dermatitis (AD patients. We also investigated whether there was a cumulative effect when both agents were combined.Fifteen healthy individuals and fifteen AD patients were recruited. Experimental itch induction was performed in eczema-free areas on the volar aspects of the forearm, using different itch inducers: histamine, cowhage and their combination thereof. Itch intensity was assessed continuously for 5.5 minutes after stimulus application using a computer-assisted visual analogue scale (COVAS.In both healthy and AD subjects, the mean and peak intensity of itch were higher after the application of cowhage compared to histamine, and were higher after the combined application of cowhage and histamine, compared to histamine alone (p<0.0001 in all cases. Itch intensity ratings were not significantly different between healthy and AD subjects for the same itch inducer used; however AD subjects exhibited a prolonged itch response in comparison to healthy subjects (p<0.001.Cowhage induced a more intense itch sensation compared to histamine. Cowhage was the dominant factor in itch perception when both pathways were stimulated in the same time. Cowhage-induced itch is a suitable model for the study of itch in AD and other chronic pruritic diseases, and it can serve as a new model for testing antipruritic drugs in humans.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of wave-induced backfilling beneath submarine pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Ahmad, Joseph; Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of complementary experimental and numerical studies involving wave-induced backfilling of current-generated scour holes beneath submarine pipelines. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a wave-plus-current flume, utilizing Laser Doppler Anemometry to measure...

  10. Experimental colitis in rats induces low-grade endotoxinemia without hepatobiliary abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H. S.; Maas, M. A.; Bosma, A.; van Ketel, R. J.; Speelman, P.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    In three experimental models in rats, surgical construction of a self-filling blind loop (SFBL), trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNB) -induced colitis, and the combination of SFBL and TNB, the hypothesis was studied that intestine-derived endotoxins play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary

  11. Astrocytes and microglia express inducible nitric oxide synthase in mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Hardin-Pouzet, H; Verge, G

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), may play a role in inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). We show upregulation of iNOS mRNA in CNS of SJL/J mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Using antibodies against mouse i...

  12. Effect of ES products from Anisakis (Nematoda: Anisakidae) on experimentally induced colitis in adult zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Simon; Kania, Per Walter; Holm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    with helminth-derived substances have supported this notion, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study therefore dissects to what extent a series of immune-related genes are modulated in zebrafish with experimentally induced colitis following exposure to excretory-secretory (ES) products isolated...

  13. Physical and Clinical Pathological Findings Associated with Experimentally Induced Rupture of the Equine Urinary Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Genetzky, Roger M.; Hagemoser, Wayne A.

    1985-01-01

    Two mature horses were examined for changes in laboratory and physical findings after experimentally induced bladder rupture. The postrupture laboratory diagnostic changes, which provide valuable information for a correct diagnosis are described. Hematology, serum and peritoneal fluid sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, creatinine, urea nitrogen, albumin and peritoneal fluid components were measured and evaluated versus time. Hyponatremia and hyperkalemia occurred, as well as increased c...

  14. Status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions for intermediate-energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yamano, Naoki; Fukahori, Tokio

    1998-11-01

    The present status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to total reaction cross section, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section, double-differential particle production cross section, isotope production cross section, and activation cross section. (author)

  15. Autologous bone marrow-derived cell therapy combined with physical therapy induces functional improvement in chronic spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Gabr, Hala; Awad, Mohamed Reda; Ghannam, Osama; Barakat, Yousef; Farghali, Haithem A M A; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Ewes, Ibrahim; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2014-04-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) cause sensory loss and motor paralysis. They are normally treated with physical therapy, but most patients fail to recover due to limited neural regeneration. Here we describe a strategy in which treatment with autologous adherent bone marrow cells is combined with physical therapy to improve motor and sensory functions in early stage chronic SCI patients. In a phase I/II controlled single-blind clinical trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00816803), 70 chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients with injury durations of at least 12 months were treated with either intrathecal injection(s) of autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy or with physical therapy alone. Patients were evaluated with clinical and neurological examinations using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), electrophysiological somatosensory-evoked potential, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and functional independence measurements. Chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients (15 AIS A and 35 AIS B) treated with autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy showed functional improvements over patients in the control group (10 AIS A and 10 AIS B) treated with physical therapy alone, and there were no long-term cell therapy-related side effects. At 18 months posttreatment, 23 of the 50 cell therapy-treated cases (46%) showed sustained functional improvement. Compared to those patients with cervical injuries, a higher rate of functional improvement was achieved in thoracic SCI patients with shorter durations of injury and smaller cord lesions. Therefore, when combined with physical therapy, autologous adherent bone marrow cell therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for patients with chronic SCI of traumatic origin. Randomized controlled multicenter trials are warranted.

  16. Chitosan scaffolds induce human dental pulp stem cells to neural differentiation: potential roles for spinal cord injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lu, Xiaohui; Feng, Guijuan; Gu, Zhifeng; Sun, Yuyu; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Lu, Yuanzhou; Chen, Jiajia; Xu, Lingfeng; Feng, Xingmei; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based transplantation strategies hold great potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Chitosan scaffolds have therapeutic benefits for spinal cord regeneration. Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are abundant available stem cells with low immunological incompatibility and can be considered for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of chitosan scaffolds in the neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro and to assess the supportive effects of chitosan scaffolds in an animal model of SCI. DPSCs were incubated with chitosan scaffolds. Cell viability and the secretion of neurotrophic factors were analyzed. DPSCs incubated with chitosan scaffolds were treated with neural differentiation medium for 14 days and then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed by Western blot and reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. Our study revealed a higher cell viability and neural differentiation in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. Compared with the control group, the levels of BDNF, GDNF, b-NGF, and NT-3 were significantly increased in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs combined with chitosan scaffolds. Transplantation of DPSCs together with chitosan scaffolds into an SCI rat model resulted in the marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Thus, chitosan scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and provided a conducive and favorable microenvironment for the survival and neural differentiation of DPSCs. Transplantation of DPSCs might therefore be a suitable candidate for treating SCI and other neuronal degenerative diseases.

  17. Experimental Study on Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Vortex-Induced Vibrations and Wake-Induced Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigid circular cylinder with two piezoelectric beams attached on has been tested through vortex-induced vibrations (VIV and wake-induced vibrations (WIV by installing a big cylinder fixed upstream, in order to study the influence of the different flow-induced vibrations (FIV types. The VIV test shows that the output voltage increases with the increases of load resistance; an optimal load resistance exists for the maximum output power. The WIV test shows that the vibration of the small cylinder is controlled by the vortex frequency of the large one. There is an optimal gap of the cylinders that can obtain the maximum output voltage and power. For a same energy harvesting device, WIV has higher power generation capacity; then the piezoelectric output characteristics can be effectively improved.

  18. MicroRNA-9 controls apoptosis of neurons by targeting monocyte chemotactic protein-induced protein 1 expression in rat acute spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; An, Bao-Yan; Xi, Xiao-Bing; Li, Zhong-Wei; Li, Fei-Yue

    2016-03-01

    For the purpose of an early identification of intervention targets for acute spinal cord injury (ASCI), we investigated the changes in expression levels of microRNA-9 (miR-9) and MCPIP1 in rat ASCI model. A total of 108 healthy rats were randomly divided into non-ASCI group (n=18) and five ASCI groups, 6h, 12h, 24h, 3 days and 7 days, representing the experimental time points following ASCI (n=18 per group). Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was used to assess the ASCI damage, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) were employed for the detection of miR-9 and MCPIP1 mRNA expression. HE staining results showed normal neuronal morphology in the non-ASCI group, but spinal cord tissue at 6h after ASCI showed developing neuronal necrosis. Acute inflammatory response was evident at 12h and 24h, with immune cells infiltrating into the gray matter. Vascular permeability increased and the nerve cells in gray-white matter exhibited extensive damage and necrosis at 24h and 7 days after ASCI. MiR-9 expression in ASCI tissue was significantly lower than that in normal spinal cord tissue. Statistical analysis showed a significant decrease in miR-9 expression in all the ASCI groups, compared to the non-ASCI group. Results from real-time PCR analysis revealed that MCPIP1 expression in all the ASCI groups was significantly higher than the non-ASCI group, and MCPIP1 expressions gradually increased with times at 6h-24h after ASCI. ISH revealed the following results after ASCI (1) miR-9 and MCPIP1 mRNA expression mainly distributed in ventral horn motor neurons, (2) miR-9 expression was high at 7 day after ASCI and (3) in the non-ASCI group, MCPIP1 expression was high at 6h, 12h, 24h and 3 days. MCPIP1 is significantly up-regulated after ASCI. The negative relationship between MCPIP1 and miR-9 suggest that MCPIP1 mRNA could be a target of miR-9 during ASCI. Thus, miR-9 is a marker for apoptosis in neurons, and an excellent therapeutic target for

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Shock-Induced Reactions in Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Jeffrey J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohl, Ian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knepper, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farrow, Darcie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tappan, Alexander S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this work, shock-induced reactions in high explosives and their chemical mechanisms were investigated using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Experimentally, ultrafast shock interrogation (USI, an ultrafast interferometry technique) and ultrafast absorption spectroscopy were used to interrogate shock compression and initiation of reaction on the picosecond timescale. The experiments yielded important new data that appear to indicate reaction of high explosives on the timescale of tens of picoseconds in response to shock compression, potentially setting new upper limits on the timescale of reaction. Theoretically, chemical mechanisms of shock-induced reactions were investigated using density functional theory. The calculations generated important insights regarding the ability of several hypothesized mechanisms to account for shock-induced reactions in explosive materials. The results of this work constitute significant advances in our understanding of the fundamental chemical reaction mechanisms that control explosive sensitivity and initiation of detonation.

  20. Histamine H4receptor agonist-induced relief from painful peripheral neuropathy is mediated by inhibition of spinal neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Lucarini, Laura; Durante, Mariaconcetta; Ghelardini, Carla; Masini, Emanuela; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is under-treated, with a detrimental effect on quality of life, partly because of low treatment efficacy, but also because pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To clarify the pathobiology of neuropathic pain, we studied the contribution of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in a model of peripheral neuropathy. We also assessed an innovative treatment for neuropathic pain by investigating the effects of histamine H 4 receptor ligands in this model. A peripheral mononeuropathy was induced in mice, by spared nerve injury (SNI). Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by spectrophotometry. The mechanical (von Frey test) and thermal (plantar test) nociceptive thresholds were evaluated. SNI mice showed increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß and TNF-α, decreased antioxidant enzyme Mn-containing SOD (MnSOD), increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, and of PARP, nuclear enzyme activated upon DNA damage. Intrathecal administration of VUF 8430 (H 4 receptor agonist) reversed the mechanical and thermal allodynia and was associated with decreased expression of IL-1ß, TNF-α, 8-OHdG and PARP and with restoration of MnSOD activity in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve. These effects were prevented by JNJ 10191584 (H 4 receptor antagonist). In the SNI mouse model of neuropathic pain, neuronal H 4 receptor stimulation counteracts hyperalgesia and reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve. Targeting both oxidative stress and pro-neuroinflammatory pathways through H 4 receptor-mediated mechanisms could have promising therapeutic potential for neuropathic pain management. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Intervention of electroacupuncture on spinal p38 MAPK/ATF-2/VR-1 pathway in treating inflammatory pain induced by CFA in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian-Qiao; Du, Jun-Ying; Liang, Yi; Fang, Jun-Fan

    2013-03-22

    Previous studies have demonstrated that p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain. Electroacupuncture (EA) can suppress the inflammatory pain. However, the relationship between EA effect and p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway in inflammatory pain remains poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that p38 MAPK/ATF-2/VR-1 and/or p38 MAPK/ATF-2/COX-2 signal transduction pathway should be activated by inflammatory pain in CFA-injected model. Meanwhile, EA may inhibit the activation of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway. The present study aims to investigate that anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of EA and its intervention on the p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway in a rat model of inflammatory pain. EA had a pronounced anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect on CFA-induced chronic inflammatory pain in rats. EA could quickly raise CFA-rat's paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and maintain good and long analgesic effect, while it subdued the ankle swelling of CFA rats only at postinjection day 14. EA could down-regulate the protein expressions of p-p38 MAPK and p-ATF-2, reduced the numbers of p-p38 MAPK-IR cells and p-ATF-2-IR cells in spinal dorsal horn in CFA rats, inhibited the expressions of both protein and mRNA of VR-1, but had no effect on the COX-2 mRNA expression. The present study indicates that inhibiting the activation of spinal p38 MAPK/ATF-2/VR-1 pathway may be one of the main mechanisms via central signal transduction pathway in the process of anti-inflammatory pain by EA in CFA rats.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  3. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SMA: Frequently Asked Questions What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy? Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular ... future trials in SMA. What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD)? SMARD and SMA are ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  8. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  14. The effect of preferred music genre selection versus preferred song selection on experimentally induced anxiety levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Darcy DeLoach

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences of experimentally induced anxiety levels reached by subjects listening to no music (n = 30), subjects listening to music selected by the experimenter from the subject's preferred genre or artist listed as relaxing (n = 30), and subjects listening to a specific song they listed as relaxing (n = 30). Subjects consisted of 90 individuals, male and female, randomly assigned to one of the three groups mentioned above. Subjects in either music group filled out a questionnaire prior to participating in the study indicating their preference of music used for relaxation purposes. Subjects in Experimental Group 1 marked their preferred genres and/or artists, and Experimental Group 2 marked specific songs used for relaxation purposes. While the experimenter hypothesized subjects in Experimental Group 2 would show less anxiety than both the control group and Experimental Group 1, there were no significant differences found between the 2 music groups in anxiety levels reached. However, there was a statistically significant difference between the no music control group and both music groups in the anxiety level reached by subjects. Subjects listening to music, both songs chosen by the experimenter and subject selected songs, showed significantly less anxiety than subjects not listening to music.

  15. Effect of lidocaine on spinal cord lipid peroxide levels after acute spinal cord trauma in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, A.S.; Özer, F.; Pamir, N.; Emerk, K.

    1991-01-01

    A standard spinal cord trauma was performed on control and lidocaine-treated (5 mg/kg. i.p.) rats. Spinal cord lipid peroxide levels in the lidocaine-trcaled group were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant difference was observed in plasma lipid peroxide levels. Our results suggest a protective role of lidocaine against lipid peroxidation after experimental spinal cord trauma in rats.

  16. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  17. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gelatin Nanostructured Lipid Carriers Incorporating Nerve Growth Factor Inhibit Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Improve Recovery in Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Si-Pin; Wang, Zhou-Guang; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wu, Jiang; Shi, Hong-Xue; Ye, Li-Bing; Wu, Fen-Zan; Cheng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Yu; He, Songbin; Wei, Xiaojie; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Li, Xiao-Kun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Clinical translation of growth factor therapies faces multiple challenges; the most significant one is the short half-life of the naked protein. Gelatin nanostructured lipid carriers (GNLs) had previously been used to encapsulate the basic fibroblast growth factor to enhance the functional recovery in hemiparkinsonian rats. In this research, we comparatively study the enhanced therapy between nerve growth factor (NGF) loaded GNLs (NGF-GNLs) and NGF only in spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of NGF-GNLs and NGF only were tested by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotion scale, inclined plane test, and footprint analysis. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent staining were further performed to identify the expression of ER stress-related proteins, neuron-specific marker neuronal nuclei (NeuN), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). Correlated downstream signals Akt/GSK-3β and ERK1/2 were also analyzed with or without inhibitors. Results showed that NGF-GNLs, compared to NGF only, enhanced the neuroprotection effect in SCI rats. The ER stress-induced apoptosis response proteins CHOP, GRP78 and caspase-12 inhibited by NGF-GNL treatment were more obvious. Meanwhile, NGF-GNLs in the recovery of SCI are related to the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell death via the activation of downstream signals PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β and ERK1/2.

  19. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tengvall

    Full Text Available Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA. Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII to antigen presenting cells (APCs induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases.

  20. Spinal cord injury induced arrest in estrous cycle of rats is ameliorated by S-nitrosoglutathione: novel therapeutic agent to treat amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugavel, Anandakumar; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Chou, Peter C-te; Singh, Inderjit

    2012-01-01

    Amenorrhea following spinal cord injury (SCI) has been well documented. There has been little research on the underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutics. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of GSNO in ameliorating SCI-induced amenorrhea through affecting the expression of CX43, NFkB, and ERβ protein. SCI was induced in female SD rats at the T9-T10 level. Estrous stage was determined by vaginal smear. GSNO (50 µg/kg body weight) was gavage fed daily. Animals were sacrificed on day 7 and 14 post SCI. Ovaries were fixed for histological and biochemical studies. Expression levels of ERβ, CX-43, and NFkB were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. GSNO hastens resumption of the estrous cycle following SCI-induced transient arrest. Resumption of estrous cycle was hastened by GSNO. Atretic and degenerating follicles seen in the ovary of SCI rats on day 14 post-SCI were decreased in GSNO treated animals. The increased CX43 expression observed with SCI ovary was decreased by GSNO. ERβ expression decreased significantly on day 7 and 14 post-SCI and was restored with GSNO treatment. Following SCI, NFkB expression was increased in the ovarian follicles and the expression was reduced with GSNO administration. The number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated uridine triphosphate (UTP) nick end labeling positive follicular and luteal cells was increased after SCI. GSNO-treated animals had significantly fewer apoptotic cells in the ovary. SCI-induced amenorrhea is accompanied by an increase in CX43 expression and a decrease in ERβ expression. SCI animals treated with GSNO resumed the estrous cycle significantly earlier. These results indicate a potential therapeutic value for GSNO in treating amenorrhea among SCI patients. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, C A J; Zwinkels, M; van Dijk, T; de Groot, S; Stolwijk-Swuste, J M; Janssen, T W J

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation may improve pressure distribution by changing the shape of the buttocks while sitting and also increase BF and %SO2. To compare acute effects of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation with pressure relief movements (PRMs) on IT pressure, BF and %SO2. Twelve men with SCI performed PRMs - push-ups, bending forward and leaning sideward - and received surface ES (87±19 mA) to the gluteal and hamstring muscles while sitting in their wheelchair. Ischial tuberosities pressure was measured using a pressure mapping system; (sub)cutaneous BF and %SO2 were measured using reflection spectroscopy and laser Doppler, respectively. Compared with rest (156±26 mm Hg), IT pressure was significantly lower during all other conditions (push-ups 19±44; bending forward 56±33; leaning sideward 44±38; ES 67±45 mm Hg). For the whole group, all PRMs significantly augmented BF (+39 to -96%) and %SO2 (+6.0 to -7.9%-point), whereas ES-induced muscle activation did only for peak BF. In all, 63% of the participants showed an increased BF (average 52%) with ES. PRMs acutely reduced IT pressure and improved oxygenation and BF in SCI. The currently used ES method cannot replace PRMs, but it may be used additionally. ES-induced muscle activation is not as effective for acute pressure relief, but the frequency of stimulation is much higher than the performance of PRMs and can therefore be more effective in the long term.

  2. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough.

  3. Ischemic conditioning protects from axoglial alterations of the optic pathway induced by experimental diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Diego C; Pasquini, Laura A; Dorfman, Damián; Aldana Marcos, Hernán J; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. Visual function disorders have been demonstrated in diabetics even before the onset of retinopathy. At early stages of experimental diabetes, axoglial alterations occur at the distal portion of the optic nerve. Although ischemic conditioning can protect neurons and synaptic terminals against ischemic damage, there is no information on its ability to protect axons. We analyzed the effect of ischemic conditioning on the early axoglial alterations in the distal portion of the optic nerve induced by experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 5 min; this maneuver started 3 days after streptozotocin injection and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. The application of ischemia pulses prevented a deficit in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, as well as an increase in astrocyte reactivity, ultraestructural myelin alterations, and altered morphology of oligodendrocyte lineage in the optic nerve distal portion at early stages of experimental diabetes. Ischemia tolerance prevented a significant decrease of retinal glutamine synthetase activity induced by diabetes. These results suggest that early vision loss in diabetes could be abated by ischemic conditioning which preserved axonal function and structure.

  4. Ischemic conditioning protects from axoglial alterations of the optic pathway induced by experimental diabetes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego C Fernandez

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. Visual function disorders have been demonstrated in diabetics even before the onset of retinopathy. At early stages of experimental diabetes, axoglial alterations occur at the distal portion of the optic nerve. Although ischemic conditioning can protect neurons and synaptic terminals against ischemic damage, there is no information on its ability to protect axons. We analyzed the effect of ischemic conditioning on the early axoglial alterations in the distal portion of the optic nerve induced by experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 5 min; this maneuver started 3 days after streptozotocin injection and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. The application of ischemia pulses prevented a deficit in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, as well as an increase in astrocyte reactivity, ultraestructural myelin alterations, and altered morphology of oligodendrocyte lineage in the optic nerve distal portion at early stages of experimental diabetes. Ischemia tolerance prevented a significant decrease of retinal glutamine synthetase activity induced by diabetes. These results suggest that early vision loss in diabetes could be abated by ischemic conditioning which preserved axonal function and structure.

  5. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, Pgingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  6. Microbiological profile and calprotectin expression in naturally occurring and experimentally induced gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Roberto; Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the microbiological profile and the calprotectin expression in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in spontaneous and experimentally induced gingival inflammation. Thirty-seven periodontally healthy subjects were evaluated in real life conditions (N-O gingivitis) as well as after 21 days of experimental gingivitis trial (E-I gingivitis). During the experimental gingivitis trial, in one maxillary quadrant (test quadrant), gingival inflammation was induced by oral hygiene abstention, while in the contralateral (control) quadrant, oral hygiene was routinely continued. The results of the study showed that (1) the microbiological profile of quadrants where gingival inflammation was experimentally induced (i.e., E-I test quadrants) differed significantly from that of either quadrants where gingival inflammation was controlled by proper plaque control (i.e., E-I control quadrants) or quadrants with N-O gingivitis, and (2) GCF calprotectin was significantly higher at E-I test quadrants compared to either E-I control quadrants or quadrants with N-O gingivitis. A positive intrasubject correlation was found between GCF concentration of calprotectin at sites presenting N-O and E-I gingivitis. N-O and E-I gingivitis showed a different microbiological profile of the subgingival environment. GCF calprotectin is a reliable marker of gingival inflammation, and its concentration in N-O gingivitis is correlated with its expression in E-I gingivitis. The modality of plaque accumulation seems to affect the subgingival microbiological profile associated with a gingivitis condition. Calprotectin levels in GCF may be regarded as a promising marker of the individual susceptibility to develop gingival inflammation in response to experimentally induced plaque accumulation.

  7. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  8. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dominguez

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined.We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO.Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease.

  9. Experimental research on recombinant human endostatin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing QIN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the recombinant human endostatin (rh-ES-induced cardiotoxicity in rats and its mechanism. Methods Twenty four female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (6 each. Rats in low, moderate and high dose group received rh-ES with a dosage of 3, 6 and 12mg/(kg·d, respectively, by intraperitoneal injection, and rats in control group received the same amount of normal saline alone. Half of rats in each group were sacrificed by spinal dislocation after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of the treatment. Pathomorphologic and ultrastructural changes in rat's myocardial tissue were evaluated by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. Microvessel density (MVD in myocardial tissue was measured by immunohistochemically marking endothelial cell with CD34. Results No pathomorphologic and ultrastrucural changes were found under light microscope and transmission electron microscope in the low dose and moderate dose groups, but cardiomyocyte damage were found in the high dose group. TUNEL assay revealed more apoptotic cells in high and moderate (only 8 weeks dose groups than in control group (P=0.033, P=0.000, and the apoptosis index was highest in the high dose group at 8 weeks. In addition, compared with the control group, MVD significantly increased in high dose groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks (P<0.05. Conclusions rh-ES induces the cardiotoxicity in rats, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis is involved in the pathological course of cardiac toxicity. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.01.02

  10. Shedding light on restoring respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren J Alilain

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following SCI - including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental spinal cord injury. We also discuss how such light induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function.

  11. Effects of electrical stimulation-induced gluteal versus gluteal and hamstring muscles activation on sitting pressure distribution in persons with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, C A J; Haverkamp, G L G; de Groot, S; Stolwijk-Swuste, J M; Janssen, T W J

    2012-08-01

    Ten participants underwent two electrical stimulation (ES) protocols applied using a custom-made electrode garment with built-in electrodes. Interface pressure was measured using a force-sensitive area. In one protocol, both the gluteal and hamstring (g+h) muscles were activated, in the other gluteal (g) muscles only. To study and compare the effects of electrically induced activation of g+h muscles versus g muscles only on sitting pressure distribution in individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Ischial tuberosities interface pressure (ITs pressure) and pressure gradient. In all participants, both protocols of g and g+h ES-induced activation caused a significant decrease in IT pressure. IT pressure after g+h muscles activation was reduced significantly by 34.5% compared with rest pressure, whereas a significant reduction of 10.2% after activation of g muscles only was found. Pressure gradient reduced significantly only after stimulation of g+h muscles (49.3%). g+h muscles activation showed a decrease in pressure relief (Δ IT) over time compared with g muscles only. Both protocols of surface ES-induced of g and g+h activation gave pressure relief from the ITs. Activation of both g+h muscles in SCI resulted in better IT pressure reduction in sitting individuals with a SCI than activation of g muscles only. ES might be a promising method in preventing pressure ulcers (PUs) on the ITs in people with SCI. Further research needs to show which pressure reduction is sufficient in preventing PUs.

  12. Maternal and anaesthesia-related risk factors and incidence of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in elective caesarean section: A multinomial logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atousa Fakherpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although spinal anaesthesia (SA is nowadays the preferred anaesthesia technique for caesarean section (CS, it is associated with considerable haemodynamic effects, such as maternal hypotension. This study aimed to evaluate a wide range of variables (related to parturient and anaesthesia techniques associated with the incidence of different degrees of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 511 mother–infant pairs, in which the mother underwent elective CS under SA. The data were collected through preset proforma containing three parts related to the parturient, anaesthetic techniques and a table for recording maternal blood pressure. It was hypothesized that some maternal (such as age and anaesthesia-related risk factors (such as block height were associated with occurance of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Results: The incidence of mild, moderate and severe hypotension was 20%, 35% and 40%, respectively. Eventually, ten risk factors were found to be associated with hypotension, including age >35 years, body mass index ≥25 kg/m2, 11–20 kg weight gain, gravidity ≥4, history of hypotension, baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP 100 beats/min in maternal modelling, fluid preloading ≥1000 ml, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block height >T4in anaesthesia-related modelling (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Age, body mass index, weight gain, gravidity, history of hypotension, baseline SBP and heart rate, fluid preloading, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block hieght were the main risk factors identified in the study for SA-induced hypotension during CS.

  13. Trust and Cheating in Sri Lanka: The Role of Experimentally-Induced Emotions about Tsunam

    OpenAIRE

    Pierluigi Conzo

    2014-01-01

    Through a field experiment in Sri Lanka I analyze the role of experimentally-induced memories of 2004 tsunami on behavior in a trust game in which personal notions of cheating are elicited. Microfinance borrowers were randomly assigned to a treatment (control) group consisting in watching a video about the calamity before (after) playing. Trust game participants were asked how much to receive (return) in order not to (make the counterpart) feel cheated; in a survey they selected whether the v...

  14. Experimental study of corrosion-induced degradation of reinforced concrete elements

    OpenAIRE

    LOUKIL, Olfa; Adelaide, Lucas; Bouteiller, Véronique; Quiertant, Marc; Chaussadent, Thierry; Ragueneau, Frédéric; Bourbon, Xavier; Trenty, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of damage for reinforced concrete structures. Iron oxides produced during the corrosion process can induce concrete cracking, loss of adhesion at the steel-concrete interface, loss of reinforcing bar cross-section and even spalling of the concrete cover. In the presented research, the durability problems related to the corrosion of the reinforcement are investigated by combining experimental and numerical studies. However, this paper particul...

  15. Experimental study of the deuteron-induced activation reactions on yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.S.; Baba, M.; Hagiwara, M.; Tarkanyi, F.; Ditroi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The aim is accumulation of experimental data and establishment of a consistent database of the Y+d reactions in the frame of systematic investigation of particle-induced nuclear reactions on metals for the production of radioisotopes. The model calculations were performed by TALYS code to make a comparison with the experiment. The thick target integral yields were also deduced from the measured cross-sections for different possible practical applications

  16. Neuropsychological consequences of experimentally-induced anxiety on working memory performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dunger, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Many theories addressing the complex anxiety-cognition interaction are built upon the notion that working memory is vulnerable to the effects of anxiety. However, most research has utilised studies of trait anxiety which does not allow direct inferences to be made between affect and cognitive performance, or exclude confounds such as pre-existing individual differences. As a result, a systematic review was undertaken to explore the neuropsychological consequences of experimentally-induced sta...

  17. Analysis of the heating process in experimental laser-induced thrombosis of microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrishchev, Nikolai N.; Mikhailova, Irene

    1996-12-01

    Experimental laser thrombosis is induced in rat mesenteric microvessels. Temperature increase within irradiated microvessels was calculated on the basis of relatively simple heat transfer model and appeared to be near 50 degrees C above the initial value. This temperature increase decay practically to initial level during the period between two subsequent laser impulses. It is stated that the zone of endothelium thermal damage is less than thrombus length along the vessel wall.

  18. Dynamic Pain Phenotypes are Associated with Spinal Cord Stimulation-Induced Reduction in Pain: A Repeated Measures Observational Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Buenaver, Luis F; Raja, Srinivasa N; Kiley, Kasey B; Swedberg, Lauren J; Wacnik, Paul W; Cohen, Steven P; Erdek, Michael A; Williams, Kayode A; Christo, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become a widely used treatment option for a variety of pain conditions. Substantial variability exists in the degree of benefit obtained from SCS and patient selection is a topic of expanding interest and importance. However, few studies have examined the potential benefits of dynamic quantitative sensory testing (QST) to develop objective measures of SCS outcomes or as a predictive tool to help patient selection. Psychological characteristics have been shown to play an important role in shaping individual differences in the pain experience and may aid in predicting responses to SCS. Static laboratory pain-induction measures have also been examined in their capacity for predicting SCS outcomes. The current study evaluated clinical, psychological and laboratory pain measures at baseline, during trial SCS lead placement, as well as 1 month and 3 months following permanent SCS implantation in chronic pain patients who received SCS treatment. Several QST measures were conducted, with specific focus on examination of dynamic models (central sensitization and conditioned pain modulation [CPM]) and their association with pain outcomes 3 months post SCS implantation. Results suggest few changes in QST over time. However, central sensitization and CPM at baseline were significantly associated with clinical pain at 3 months following SCS implantation, controlling for psycho/behavioral factors and pain at baseline. Specifically, enhanced central sensitization and reduced CPM were associated with less self-reported pain 3 months following SCS implantation. These findings suggest a potentially important role for dynamic pain assessment in individuals undergoing SCS, and hint at potential mechanisms through which SCS may impart its benefit. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Intraoperative TTE inferior vena cava monitoring in elderly orthopaedic patients with cardiac disease and spinal-induced hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Manikis, Dimitrios; Papadimos, Thomas; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Panou, Fotios

    2017-10-01

    Objective To address the role of transthoracic echocardiography in inferior vena cava (IVC) monitoring in the management of haemodynamically unstable elderly patients subjected to lower limb orthopaedic surgery under spinal anesthesia. Possible implications in the postoperative care unit (PACU) length of stay (LOS) are investigated. Methods 41 elderly patients with cardiac diseases were recruited. Patients experiencing intraoperative haemodynamic instability (diastolic blood pressure ≤ 60 mmHg) were divided into two groups according to right atrial pressure (RAP), (RAP < 5 mmHg and RAP between 5 and 10 mmHg) as measured by inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVCCI). Haemodynamic instability was treated with normal saline infused at a constant rate supplemented by phenylephrine (PHE) infusions titrated to normal blood pressure values. Intraoperatively comparisons of peak PHE infusion rates and all episodes of hypotension, including in the PACU, were recorded among groups. The patients' PACU LOS and associated factors were assessed. Results The intraoperative peak PHE infusion rate and the incidence of haemodynamic instability in the postoperative period were significantly higher in patients with RAP < 5 mmHg. The total PHE consumption was also higher in patients with RAP < 5 mmHg postoperatively. The primary risk factor for a prolonged stay in PACU, as determined by multiple regression analysis was RAP. Conclusions Patients with high dynamic collapsibility of the IVC may require aggressive treatment to restore their haemodynamic status. Additionally, intraoperative levels of RAP, as measured by IVCCI, can act as a predictor for increased LOS in the PACU.

  20. Acute pulmonary injury induced by experimental muscle trauma Lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por trauma muscular experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Andréa da Silva Carvalho Sombra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an easily reproducible model of acute lung injury due to experimental muscle trauma in healthy rats. METHODS: Eighteen adult Wistar rats were randomized in 3 groups (n=6: G-1- control, G-2 - saline+trauma and G-3 - dexamethasone+trauma. Groups G-1 and G-2 were treated with saline 2,0ml i.p; G-3 rats were treated with dexamethasone (DE (2 mg/kg body weight i.p.. Saline and DE were applied 2h before trauma and 12h later. Trauma was induced in G-2 and G-3 anesthetized (tribromoethanol 97% 100 ml/kg i.p. rats by sharp section of anterior thigh muscles just above the knee, preserving major vessels and nerves. Tissue samples (lung were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO assay and histopathological evaluation. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours after muscle injury there was a significant increase in lung neutrophil infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and edema, all reversed by dexamethasone in G-3. CONCLUSION: Trauma by severance of thigh muscles in healthy rats is a simple and efficient model to induce distant lung lesions.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo facilmente reprodutível de lesão pulmonar aguda decorrente de trauma muscular experimental em ratos sadios. MÉTODOS: Dezoito ratos Wistar adultos foram randomizados em 3 grupos (n=6: G-1-controle, G-2 - trauma+salina e G-3 - trauma+dexametasona. Grupos G-1 e G-2 foram tratados com salina 2,0 ml ip, G-3 ratos foram tratados com dexametasona (DE (2 mg/kg peso corporal ip. Salina e DE foram aplicadas 2h antes e 12h depois do trauma. Trauma foi induzido em ratos G-2 e G-3 anestesiados (tribromoetanol 97% de 100 ml/kg, i.p. por secção da musculatura anterior da coxa logo acima da articulação do joelho, preservando os grandes vasos e nervos. Amostras de tecido (pulmão foram coletadas para avaliação da mieloperoxidase (MPO, e exames histopatológicos. RESULTADOS: Vinte e quatro horas após a indução da lesão muscular houve um aumento significativo na infiltração de neutr

  1. Experimental pathology of local tissue damage induced by Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra; Chaves, Fernando; Díaz, Cecilia; Escalante, Teresa

    2009-12-01

    Envenomations by Bothrops asper are often associated with complex and severe local pathological manifestations, including edema, blistering, dermonecrosis, myonecrosis and hemorrhage. The pathogenesis of these alterations has been investigated at the experimental level. These effects are mostly the consequence of the direct action of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and myotoxic phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s). SVMPs induce hemorrhage, blistering, dermonecrosis and general extracellular matrix degradation, whereas PLA(2)s induce myonecrosis and also affect lymphatic vessels. In addition, the prominent vascular alterations leading to hemorrhage and edema may contribute to ischemia and further tissue necrosis. The mechanisms of action of SVMPs and PLA(2)s are discussed in detail in this review. Venom-induced tissue damage plays also a role in promoting bacterial infection. A prominent inflammatory reaction develops as a consequence of these local pathological alterations, with the synthesis and release of abundant mediators, resulting in edema and pain. However, whether inflammatory cells and mediators contribute to further tissue damage is not clear at present. Muscle tissue regeneration after venom-induced pathological effects is often impaired, thus resulting in permanent tissue loss and dysfunction. SVMP-induced microvessel damage is likely to be responsible of this poor regenerative outcome. Antivenoms are only partially effective in the neutralization of B. asper-induced local effects, and the search for novel toxin inhibitors represents a potential avenue for improving the treatment of this serious aspect of snakebite envenomation.

  2. Experimental investigation of laser-induced bubble dynamics near elastic/soft material in distilled water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, S; Yamamoto, Y [Graduate Student, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Ota, M; Maeno, K, E-mail: maeno@faculty.chiba-u.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    This study deals with an experimental investigation of the dynamics of laser-induced single bubble near the rigid material plate and near the elastic/soft material plate in the distilled water at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was focused into the distilled water to make plasma and single bubble. The bubble repeated expanding and shrinking motion several times, and then collapsed. This behavior occurred on the sub-millisecond timescale. The solid wall near the bubble makes an asymmetric flow field. Many experiments on the behavior of laser-induced bubble near the rigid material have been reported. The bubble near the solid wall moves toward the rigid wall during its shrinking and rebounding process. The behavior of laser-induced bubble near the soft material, however, has not been well clarified. The soft material such as body tissue can deform and influence the behavior of the laser-induced bubble. Since the high peak power laser has been applied in the field of bioengineering and medical treatment, it is of great importance to clarify the effect of the soft material near the laser-induced cavitation bubble. In this research the behavior of laser-induced bubble near the elastic/soft material was visualized with schlieren method and investigated.

  3. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-01-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased. - Highlights: ► Experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood were γ-irradiated at two dose rates. ► Changes induced by γ-irradiation were evaluated by vibrational spectroscopy. ► Minor spectral variations of painted layer were observed. ► Raw sienna FTIR spectra showed little changes of egg yolk and lipids at higher dose rate. ► Gamma irradiation is recommended for disinfection of painted wooden artifacts.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord ... by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  7. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Hybrid equation/agent-based model of ischemia-induced hyperemia and pressure ulcer formation predicts greater propensity to ulcerate in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Solovyev

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are costly and life-threatening complications for people with spinal cord injury (SCI. People with SCI also exhibit differential blood flow properties in non-ulcerated skin. We hypothesized that a computer simulation of the pressure ulcer formation process, informed by data regarding skin blood flow and reactive hyperemia in response to pressure, could provide insights into the pathogenesis and effective treatment of post-SCI pressure ulcers. Agent-Based Models (ABM are useful in settings such as pressure ulcers, in which spatial realism is important. Ordinary Differential Equation-based (ODE models are useful when modeling physiological phenomena such as reactive hyperemia. Accordingly, we constructed a hybrid model that combines ODEs related to blood flow along with an ABM of skin injury, inflammation, and ulcer formation. The relationship between pressure and the course of ulcer formation, as well as several other important characteristic patterns of pressure ulcer formation, was demonstrated in this model. The ODE portion of this model was calibrated to data related to blood flow following experimental pressure responses in non-injured human subjects or to data from people with SCI. This model predicted a higher propensity to form ulcers in response to pressure in people with SCI vs. non-injured control subjects, and thus may serve as novel diagnostic platform for post-SCI ulcer formation.

  9. Reduction in spinal-induced hypotension with ondansetron in parturients undergoing caesarean section: a double-blind randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, T; SenDasgupta, C; Goswami, A; Hazra, A

    2012-01-01

    Subarachnoid block is the preferred method of anaesthesia for caesarean section, but is associated with hypotension and bradycardia, which may be deleterious to both parturient and baby. Animal studies suggest that in the presence of decreased blood volume, 5-HT may be an important factor inducing the Bezold Jarisch reflex via 5-HT3 receptors located in intracardiac vagal nerve endings. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ondansetron, as a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, on the haemodynamic response following subarachnoid block in parturients undergoing elective caesarean section. Fifty-two parturients scheduled for elective caesarean section were randomly allocated into two groups. Before induction of spinal anaesthesia Group O (n=26) received intravenous ondansetron 4 mg; Group S (n=26) received normal saline. Blood pressure, heart rate and vasopressor requirements were assessed. Decreases in mean arterial pressure were significantly lower in Group O than Group S from 14 min until 35 min. Patients in Group O required significantly less vasopressor (P=0.009) and had significantly lower incidences of nausea and vomiting (P=0.049). Ondansetron 4 mg, given intravenously 5 min before subarachnoid block reduced hypotension and vasopressor use in parturients undergoing elective caesarean section. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  11. Inhibition of GADD34, the stress-inducible regulatory subunit of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, does not enhance functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Saraswat Ohri

    Full Text Available Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR is a hallmark of various pathological diseases and/or traumatic injuries. Restoration of ER homeostasis can contribute to improvement in the functional outcome of these diseases. Using genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PERK-CHOP arm of the ERSR, we recently demonstrated improvements in hindlimb locomotion after spinal cord injury (SCI and implicated oligodendrocyte survival as a potential mechanism. Here, we investigated the contribution of stress-inducible PPP1R15A/GADD34, an ERSR signaling effector downstream of CHOP that dephosphorylates eIF2α, in the pathogenesis of SCI. We show that although genetic ablation of GADD34 protects oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs against ER stress-mediated cell death in vitro and results in differential ERSR attenuation in vivo after SCI, there is no improvement in hindlimb locomotor function. Guanabenz, a FDA approved antihypertensive drug, was recently shown to reduce the burden of misfolded proteins in the ER by directly targeting GADD34. Guanabenz protected OPCs from ER stress-mediated cell death in vitro and attenuated the ERSR in vivo after SCI. However, guanabenz administration failed to rescue the locomotor deficits after SCI. These data suggest that deletion of GADD34 alone is not sufficient to improve functional recovery after SCI.

  12. An experimental model for the transplantation of fetal central nervous system cells to the injured spinal cord in rats Modelo experimental de transplante de células do sistema nervoso central fetal para lesão de medula espinal em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de Barros Filho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traumatic spinal cord injury is one of the most disabling conditions occurring in man and thus stimulates a strong interest in its histopathological, biochemical, and functional changes, primarily as we search for preventive and therapeutic methods. PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model for transplantation of cells from the fetal rat central nervous system to the site of an injured spinal cord of an adult rat in which the transplanted cells survive and become integrated. This experimental model will facilitate investigations of factors that promote regeneration and functional recovery after spinal cord trauma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifteen adult Wistar rats underwent laminectomy, and an spinal cord lesion was made with microdissection. Fetal spinal cord tissue was then transplanted to the site of the injury. The rats were monitored over a 48-hour period, and then their vertebral column was completely removed for histological analysis. RESULTS: In 60% of transplanted rats, the fetal tissue at the injured site remained viable in the site of the lesion.INTRODUÇÃO: A lesão traumática da medula espinal consiste numa das mais incapacitantes lesões que o ser humano pode sofrer e tem despertado grande interesse no conhecimento das alterações histopatológicas, bioquímicas, funcionais e principalmente na busca de métodos de prevenção e tratamento. OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo experimental de transplante de células do sistema nervoso fetal de ratos para o sítio de lesão medular de ratos adultos que permitisse sua sobrevivência e integração para possibilitar protocolos de pesquisa para identificar outros fatores de regeneração e recuperação funcional pós trauma raquimedular. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 15 ratos adultos que foram submetidos a laminectomia e lesão de 5mm de hemimelula realizada com auxílio de microscópio óptico. Os ratos tiveram seu sítio de lesão medular transplantado com células do

  13. Stem Cells in Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael A; Haudenschild, Dominik R; Wegner, Adam M; Klineberg, Eric O

    2017-12-01

    Review of literature. This review of literature investigates the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in spinal fusion, highlights potential uses in the development of bone grafts, and discusses limitations based on both preclinical and clinical models. A review of literature was conducted looking at current studies using stem cells for augmentation of spinal fusion in both animal and human models. Eleven preclinical studies were found that used various animal models. Average fusion rates across studies were 59.8% for autograft and 73.7% for stem cell-based grafts. Outcomes included manual palpation and stressing of the fusion, radiography, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and histological analysis. Fifteen clinical studies, 7 prospective and 8 retrospective, were found. Fusion rates ranged from 60% to 100%, averaging 87.1% in experimental groups and 87.2% in autograft control groups. It appears that there is minimal clinical difference between commercially available stem cells and bone marrow aspirates indicating that MSCs may be a good choice in a patient with poor marrow quality. Overcoming morbidity and limitations of autograft for spinal fusion, remains a significant problem for spinal surgeons and further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of stem cells in augmenting spinal fusion.

  14. An analysis of plasticity in the rat respiratory system following cervical spinal cord injury and the application of nanotechnology to induce or enhance recovery of diaphragm function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janelle

    Second cervical segment spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) results in ipsilateral hemidiaphragm paralysis. However, the intact latent crossed phrenic pathway can restore function spontaneously over time or immediately following drug administration. WGA bound fluorochromes were administered to identify nuclei associated with diaphragm function in both the acute and chronic C2Hx models. WGA is unique in that it undergoes receptor mediated endocytosis and is transsynaptically transported across select physiologically active synapses. Comparison of labeling in the acutely injured to the chronically injured rat provided an anatomical map of spinal and supraspinal injury induced synaptic plasticity. The plasticity occurs over time in the chronic C2Hx model in an effort to adapt to the loss of hemidiaphragm function. Utilizing the selectivity of WGA, a nanoconjugate was developed to target drug delivery to nuclei involved in diaphragm function post C2Hx in an effort to restore lost function. Theophylline was selected due to its established history as a respiratory stimulant. Theophylline was attached to gold nanoparticles by a transient bond designed to degrade intracellularly. The gold nanoparticles were then permanently attached to WGA-HRP. Following intradiaphragmatic injection, the WGA portion was identified in the ipsilateral phrenic nuclei and bilaterally in the rVRGs. The location of WGA should reflect the location of the AuNP since the peptide bond between them is permanent. The effectiveness of the nanoconjugate was verified with EMG analysis of the diaphragm and recordings from the phrenic nerves. All doses administered in the acute C2Hx model resulted in resorted hemidiaphragm and phrenic nerve activity. A dose of 0.14mg/kg had a significantly higher percent recovery on day 3, whereas 0.03mg/kg was significantly higher on day 14. The change in most effective dose over time is likely due to the availability or concentration of the drug and location of drug release

  15. P2Y13 receptor-mediated rapid increase in intracellular calcium induced by ADP in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junwei; Wang, Gaoxia; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunmei; Tian, Hong; Liu, Aidong; Jin, Huan; Luo, Xiaomei; Chen, Yuanshou

    2014-11-01

    P2Y receptors have been implicated in the calcium mobilization by the response to neuroexcitatory substances in neurons and astrocytes, but little is known about P2Y receptors in microglia cells. In the present study, the effects of ADP on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia were detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluo-4/AM as a calcium fluorescence indicator that could monitor real-time alterations of [Ca(2+)]i. Here we show that ADP (0.01-100 μM) causes a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)]i with a dose-dependent manner in cultured microglia. The action of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i was significantly blocked by MRS2211 (a selective P2Y13 receptor antagonist), but was unaffected by MRS2179 (a selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist) or MRS2395 (a selective P2Y12 receptor antagonist), which suggest that P2Y13 receptor may be responsible for ADP-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization in cultured microglia. P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response can be obviously inhibited by BAPTA-AM and U-73122, respectively. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca(2+) (by EGTA) also can obvious suppress the Ca(2+) mobilization. These results means both intracellular calcium and extracellular calcium are potentially important mechanisms in P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization. However, P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) response was not impaired after CdCl2 and verapamil administration, which suggest that voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels may be not related with P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response. In addition, Ca(2+) mobilization induced by ADP was abolished by different store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCs) blocker, 2-APB (50 μM) and SKF-96365 (1 mM), respectively. These observations suggest that the activation of P2Y13 receptor might be involved in the effect of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia. Furthermore, our results raise a possibility that P2Y13 receptor activation causes Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) store, which leads to the

  16. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  17. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  18. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98 vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68 vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18 vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99 vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  19. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  20. Electron microscopic study of spontaneous and experimentally induced leukemia in IRC mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, S.; Ranadive, K.J.; Dmochowski, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spontaneous, serially transplanted, and experimentally induced leukemias of ICRC mice were studied by electron microscopy in an attempt to detect the presence of virus particles, if any, and to observe the influence of chemical and hormonal treatment on the presence of these virus particles. The first series of experiments included spontaneous, serially transplanted, and radiation-induced leukemia. The paucity of type C virus particles was quite conspicuous in spontaneous leukemia. Serially transplanted and radiation-accelerated leukemic lesions showed the presence of some type C and intracisternal type A particles. Found in two of these leukemic lesions (thymus and lymphosarcoma), in addition to type C virus particles, were budding and some mature type B virus particles, and numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles. ''Viropexis'' of type B virus particles has been observed in the lymphosarcoma and in a leukemic thymus gland. The second series of experiments included leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice with 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA), pituitary transplants, and ovarian hormones (estradiol and estradiol-progesterone). In ovariectomized ICRC mice, leukemic lesions induced by MCA or pituitary transplants, or by MCA and pituitary transplants, showed type C virus particles and, in most cases, intracisternal type A particles. In leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice by MCA and estradiol, numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles were observed but no type C virus particles

  1. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had sp