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Sample records for experimentally induced cerebral

  1. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  2. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation to induced blood pressure changes in human experimental and clinical sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M

    2016-01-01

    (-1) ; P = 0·91 versus baseline; P = 0·14 versus LPS]. While our findings support the concept that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is enhanced during the very early stages of sepsis, they remain inconclusive with regard to more advanced stages of disease, because thigh-cuff deflation failed to induce...... (Ps...

  3. Experimentally induced cerebral fat embolism with linoleic acid; MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Bae; Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Yong; Lee, Suck Hong; Park, Byeong Rae

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the MRI findings of cerebral fat embolism induced by injecting linoleic acid into ten cats, and pathologic diagnosis. Using a microcatheter, 30μ1 of linoleic acid was injeted into the internal carotid artery of ten cats. MR T2-weighted (T2WI), diffusion-weighted (DWI), and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images(Gd-enhanced T1WI) were obtained after 30 minutes and after 2 hours of embolization. We pathlogically examined endothelial cell damage, cellular change, perivascular abnormality and fat vacuoles, and then determined the correlation between MRI and the pathologic findings. After 30 minutes of embolization, lesions of very high signal intensity were detected by T2WI in six cats, and of slightly high signal intensity in two:in the remaining two, signal intensity was normal. DWI showed lesions of very high intensity in nine animals and of slightly high intensity in one, while Gd-enhanced T1WI showed well-enhanced lesions in nine and a minimally enhanced lesion in one. After 2 hours of embolization, T2WI revealed lesions of very high signal intensity in nine cats, and of slightly high signal intensity in one, while DWI detected lesions of very high signal intensity in all cats. On Gd-enhanced T1WI, lesions in all cats were well enhanced. According to the findings of light microscopic examination, infarcted lesions mainly involved the gray matter, but also some white matter. In the lesions, neurophil matrix edema, neuronal degeneration, perivascular swelling, the widening of extracellular space, extravascular hemorrhage, and fat vacuoles were evident. During the initial two hours following injuction, MR imaging of cerebral fat embolism induced by linoleic acid through the internal carotid artery in cats showed high signal intensity on T2WI and DWI, and clear enhancement on Gd-enhanced T1WI. In cases involving cellular edema, cerebrovascular injury and extracellular space widening, the pathologic evidence suggested the coexistence of

  4. Endogenous IFN-β signaling exerts anti-inflammatory actions in experimentally induced focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inácio, Ana R; Liu, Yawei; Clausen, Bettina H

    2015-01-01

    of infiltrating leukocytes in the brain 2 days after stroke. Concomitantly, in the blood of IFN-βKO mice, we found a higher percentage of total B cells but a similar percentage of mature and activated B cells, collectively indicating a higher proliferation rate. The additional differential regulation......BACKGROUND: Interferon (IFN)-β exerts anti-inflammatory effects, coupled to remarkable neurological improvements in multiple sclerosis, a neuroinflammatory condition of the central nervous system. Analogously, it has been hypothesized that IFN-β, by limiting inflammation, decreases neuronal death...... strength tests, and cerebral infarct volumes were given by lack of neuronal nuclei immunoreactivity. RESULTS: Here, we report alterations in local and systemic inflammation in IFN-β knockout (IFN-βKO) mice over 8 days after induction of focal cerebral ischemia. Notably, IFN-βKO mice showed a higher number...

  5. PPARγ agonists improve survival and neurocognitive outcomes in experimental cerebral malaria and induce neuroprotective pathways in human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Serghides

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is associated with a high mortality rate, and long-term neurocognitive impairment in approximately one third of survivors. Adjunctive therapies that modify the pathophysiological processes involved in CM may improve outcome over anti-malarial therapy alone. PPARγ agonists have been reported to have immunomodulatory effects in a variety of disease models. Here we report that adjunctive therapy with PPARγ agonists improved survival and long-term neurocognitive outcomes in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA experimental model of CM. Compared to anti-malarial therapy alone, PPARγ adjunctive therapy administered to mice at the onset of CM signs, was associated with reduced endothelial activation, and enhanced expression of the anti-oxidant enzymes SOD-1 and catalase and the neurotrophic factors brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in the brains of infected mice. Two months following infection, mice that were treated with anti-malarials alone demonstrated cognitive dysfunction, while mice that received PPARγ adjunctive therapy were completely protected from neurocognitive impairment and from PbA-infection induced brain atrophy. In humans with P. falciparum malaria, PPARγ therapy was associated with reduced endothelial activation and with induction of neuroprotective pathways, such as BDNF. These findings provide insight into mechanisms conferring improved survival and preventing neurocognitive injury in CM, and support the evaluation of PPARγ agonists in human CM.

  6. MR of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaPaz, R.; Steinberg, G.; Rocklage, S.; Glover, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging of cerebral ischemia and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists in an animal model. Forty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent 1-hour transorbital ICA-MCA-ACA occlusion and pretreatment or immediate posttreatment with systemic dextromethorphan (DM, n = 14), dextrorphan (DX, n = 14), or normal saline (NS, n = 16). Serial MR studies (1.5 T) were performed 1--6 hours after occlusion with T1- and T2-weighted spinecho, IVIM (b = 1,352), gradient recalled acquisition in a steady-state, and chemical shift sequences (for magnetic susceptibility, T2* and T2') and DyDTPA-BMA intravenous contrast material (Salutar). Spatial correlation between MR findings, histologic findings (ischemic neuronal damage), and regional cerebral blood flow (microspheres) was done

  7. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

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    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  8. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... This study examines alcohol-induced cerebral cortex damage and the association with oxidative ... alcohol has profound effects on the function ... Chronic use of ..... Alcohol induced brain damage and liver damage in young.

  9. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  10. Significance of local cerebral glucose utilization determined by the autoradiographic (/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method in experimentally induced coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, O.; Kobayashi, M.; Ueno, H.; Ishii, S. (Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-01-01

    Bilateral lesions made in the midbrain reticular formation of the rat produced behavioral akinesia. These animals neither ate nor drank. EEGs of these animals usually showed high voltage slow waves at rest. Slight EEG arousal response was demonstrated by clapping, touching and pinching only in rats with moderate impairment. Concerning the rates of local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) measured by means of the autoradiographic (/sup 14/C) deoxyglucose method, 13 structures exhibited significant reductions in 28 gray structures examined when compared with sham operated rats. Lesions in the midbrain reticular formation resulted in reduction of LCGU in the neocortex, ventral nucleus of the thalamus, subthalamic nucleus, and medial and lateral geniculated bodies, mamillary body, septal nucleus and caudateputamen. Structures which did not show any significant change in LCGU were those related to the paleo and archi-cortices. These findings suggest the existence of two types of ascending activating systems. Administration of 30 mg/kg of pentobarbital reduced LCGU diffusely throughout the brain. When thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) was administered to rats with lesions in the midbrain reticular formation, reversal of the reduction of LCGU was observed in the dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus and the mamillary body. Reversal of LCGU in the dorsomedial nucleus of thalamus was especially significant and its level exceeded the level of the sham control value. This suggests TRH might exert its function through the dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus and mamillary body. When TRH was administered to rats treated with pentobarbital, significant reversal was observed in the following structures: the lateral and ventral nucleus of the thalamus, dentate gyrus, caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, pontine gray matter, and raphe nucleus.

  11. In vivo experimental stroke and in vitro organ culture induce similar changes in vasoconstrictor receptors and intracellular calcium handling in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Waldsee, Roya; Ahnstedt, Hilda

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arteries subjected to different types of experimental stroke upregulate their expression of certain G-protein-coupled vasoconstrictor receptors, a phenomenon that worsens the ischemic brain damage. Upregulation of contractile endothelin B (ET(B)) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT(1B......)) receptors has been demonstrated after subarachnoid hemorrhage and global ischemic stroke, but the situation is less clear after focal ischemic stroke. Changes in smooth muscle calcium handling have been implicated in different vascular diseases but have not hitherto been investigated in cerebral arteries...... and extracellular sources, whereas 5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated contraction was solely dependent on extracellular calcium. Organ culture and stroke increased basal intracellular calcium levels in MCA smooth muscle cells and decreased the expression of inositol triphosphate receptor and transient receptor potential...

  12. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  13. Ultrastructural studies on the blood-brain barrier. Mainly as to changes in the permeability of cerebral capillary walls induced by experimental x-ray irradiation and the effect of glucocorticoid on such changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichitsubo, H [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1977-03-01

    In the present study, an ultrastructural examination was made of the role of capillary endothelial cells of the brain which is one of the constituent factors of the blood-brain barrier. In normal cerebral capillaries, both endothelial cells and the basement membrane were demonstrated to be not crossed by a tracer (horseradish peroxidase) even in 60 minutes after its intravenous administration, thus suggesting the blood-brain barrier effect. Author investigated changes in the permeability of cerebral capillary walls induced by experimental brain irradiation and the effect of glucocorticoid on such changes. On forty-eight hours following an appropriate irradiation a marked brain edema was developed; under such circumstances when the tracer was injected intravenously, on 60 minutes thereafter the tracer was demonstrated to be transferred into the neutral tissue, and this was interpreted as indicating that capillary hyperpermeability was induced. These findings were suggested that the mechanism of capillary hyperpermeability might not be based on the passage of a tight junction of the cells of capillary wall but rather on account of activated active transport via an increased number of pinocytotic vesicles. The mechanism of increase of pinocytotic vesicle appeared to be resulting from a breakdown of the controlling system of pinocytotic vesicle production. However, the existence of this controlling system is still speculative. Pre-and post-irradiation administration of glucocorticoid proved to be effective in the prevention of irradiation-induced hyperpermeability of cerebral capillaries, and to be indicating the possible usefulness of the drug for the maintenance or repair of the aforementioned system.

  14. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose...... and oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...... interference. During baseline conditions CBF was 1.08 +/- 0.25 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1), and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 5.5. Activation was induced by opening the sheltering box for 6 minutes. Activation increased CBF to 1.81 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1). During activation cerebral glucose...

  15. Surgical manipulation compromises leukocyte mobilisation responses and inflammation after experimental cerebral ischaemia in mice

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    Adam eDenes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury results in peripheral inflammatory changes, although the impact of these processes on neuronal death and neuroinflammation is currently unclear. To facilitate the translation of experimental studies to clinical benefit, it is vital to characterize the mechanisms by which acute brain injury induces peripheral inflammatory changes, and how these are affected by surgical manipulation in experimental models. Here we show that in mice, even mild surgical manipulation of extracranial tissues induced marked granulocyte mobilisation (300% and systemic induction of cytokines. However, intracranial changes induced by craniotomy, or subsequent induction of focal cerebral ischaemia were required to induce egress of CXCR2-positive granulocytes from the bone marrow. CXCR2 blockade resulted in reduced mobilisation of granulocytes from the bone marrow, caused an unexpected increase in circulating granulocytes, but failed to effect brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia. We also demonstrate that isoflurane anaesthesia interferes with circulating leukocyte responses, which could contribute to the reported vascular and neuroprotective effects of isoflurane. In addition, no immunosuppression develops in the bone marrow after experimental stroke. Thus, experimental models of cerebral ischaemia are compromised by surgery and anaesthesia in proportion to the severity of surgical stress and overall tissue injury. Understanding the inherent confounding effects of surgical manipulation and development of new models of cerebral ischaemia with minimal surgical intervention could facilitate better understanding of interactions between inflammation and brain injury.

  16. A comparative study on the efficacy of 10% hypertonic saline and equal volume of 20% mannitol in the treatment of experimentally induced cerebral edema in adult rats

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    Fang Ming

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertonic saline and mannitol are commonly used in the treatment of cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP at present. In this connection, 10% hypertonic saline (HS alleviates cerebral edema more effectively than the equal volume of 20% mannitol. However, the exact underlying mechanism for this remains obscure. This study aimed to explore the possible mechanism whereby 10% hypertonic saline can ameliorate cerebral edema more effectively than mannitol. Results Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were subjected to permanent right-sided middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and treated with a continuous intravenous infusion of 10% HS, 20% mannitol or D-[1-3H(N]-mannitol. Brain water content (BWC as analyzed by wet-to-dry ratios in the ischemic hemisphere of SD rats decreased more significantly after 10% HS treatment compared with 20% mannitol. Concentration of serum Na+ and plasma crystal osmotic pressure of the 10% HS group at 2, 6, 12 and 18 h following permanent MCAO increased significantly when compared with 20% mannitol treated group. Moreover, there was negative correlation between the BWC of the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere and concentration of serum Na+, plasma crystal osmotic pressure and difference value of concentration of serum Na+ and concentration of brain Na+ in ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere in the 10% HS group at the various time points after MCAO. A remarkable finding was the progressive accumulation of mannitol in the ischemic brain tissue. Conclusions We conclude that 10% HS is more effective in alleviating cerebral edema than the equal volume of 20% mannitol. This is because 10% HS contributes to establish a higher osmotic gradient across BBB and, furthermore, the progressive accumulation of mannitol in the ischemic brain tissue counteracts its therapeutic efficacy on cerebral edema.

  17. Is chlormethiazole neuroprotective in experimental global cerebral ischemia? A microdialysis and behavioral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaminy, S; Reymann, J M; Heresbach, N; Allain, H; Lechat, P; Bentué-Ferrer, D

    1997-04-01

    Chlormethiazole, an anticonvulsive agent, has been shown to have a possible neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia. In addition, chlormethiazole inhibits methamphetamine-induced release of dopamine, protecting against this neurotransmitter's neurotoxicity. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether, in experimental cerebral ischemia, chlormethiazole administration attenuated the ischemia-induced rise of the extracellular concentration of aminergic neurotransmitters and whether it reduces ischemia-induced deficits in memory and learning. Histology for assessment of ischemic damage was a so included. The four-vessel occlusion rat model was used to induce global cerebral ischemia. Aminergic neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the striatal extracellular fluid obtained by microdialysis were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The drug was administered either IP (50 mg/kg-1) or directly through the dialysis probe (30 microM) 80 min before ischemia. For the behavioral test and histology, the drug was given IP (100 mg/kg-1) 1 h postischemia. The results obtained did not demonstrate any statistically significant evidence that chlormethiazole has an effect on the ischemia-induced rise in extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels. There was also no variation in metabolite levels. Behavioral measures (learning, recall) were not changed appreciably by the treatment. We observed no significant cell protection in the hippocampus (CA1, CA1), striatum, and entorhinal cortex in animals treated with chlormethiazole. We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, chlormethiazole has little or no effect on the neurochemical, neurobehavioral, and histological consequences of global cerebral ischemia.

  18. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  19. Protective effect of estrogen in endothelin-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Glendenning, Michele L.; Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is a powerful endogenous and exogenous neuroprotective agent in animal models of brain injury, including focal cerebral ischemia. Although this protection has been demonstrated in several different treatment and injury paradigms, it has not been demonstrated in focal cerebral ischemia induced by intraparenchymal endothelin-1 injection, a model with many advantages over other models of experimental focal ischemia. Reproductively mature female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized an...

  20. Dynamic change in cerebral microcirculation and focal cerebral metabolism in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin-Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the cerebral metabolism and energy metabolism measurements can be used to assess blood flow of brain cells and to detect cell activity. Changes of rCBF in the cerebral microcirculation and energy metabolism were determined in an experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in 56 large-eared Japanese rabbits about 12 to 16-month old. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to detect the blood supply to brain cells. Internal carotid artery and vein blood samples were used for duplicate blood gas analysis to assess the energy metabolism of brain cells. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging using Tc-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m ECD) as an imaging reagent. The percentage of injected dose per gram of brain tissue was calculated and analyzed. There were positive correlations between the percentage of radionuclide injected per gram of brain tissue and rCBF supply and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (P brain cells after SAH, and also found that deterioration of energy metabolism of brain cells played a significant role in the development of SAH. There are matched reductions in CBF and metabolism. Thus, SPECT imaging could be used as a noninvasive method to detect CBF.

  1. Physical analysis on laser-induced cerebral damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaosen; Liu, Jiangang; Tao, Chunkan; Lan, Xiufeng; Cao, Lingyan; Pan, Weimin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation on cerebral damage of adult SD rats induced by 532nm CW laser was performed. Tissue heat conductive equation was set up based on two-layered structure model. Finite difference algorithm was utilized to numerically simulate the temperature distribution in the brain tissue. Allowing for tissue response to temperature variation, free boundary model was used to discuss tissue thermal coagulation formation in brain. Experimental observations show that thermal coagulation and necrosis can be caused due to laser light absorption. The result of the calculation shows that the process of the thermal coagulation of the given mode comprises two stages: fast and slow. At the first stage, necrosis domain grows fast. Then necrosis domain growth becomes slower because of the competition between the heat diffusion into the surrounding undamaged tissue and the heat dissipation caused by blood perfusion. At the center of coagulation area no neuron was observed and at the transitional zone few nervous cells were seen by microscope. The research can provide reference data for developing clinical therapy of some kind of encephalic diseases by using 532nm laser, and for making cerebral infarction models in animal experiment.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Kyuya; Ohtomo, Hitoshi

    1986-01-01

    In the spectroscopic experiment on excised rat brain (cortex, white matter, hippocampus and thalamus for normal and ischemia-laden brain), T1 and T2 relaxation times and water content were determined. The ischemic insult was induced for 60 min by the method of Pulsinelli followed by 60 min of reperfusion. All of the T1, T2, and water content significantly increased in the ischemic tissue. Gray-white difference was evident in T1 and T1 was linearly correlated with the water content of the tissue. T2 way by far prolonged in the ischemic tissue compared with the increase in the water content, showing greater sensitivity of T2 for detection of ischemia. In the imaging experiment, coronal NMR imaging at 0.5 tesla was performed employing proton density-weighted saturation recovery (TR = 1.6 s, TE = 14 ms), T1-weighted inversion recovery (TR = 1.6 s, TI = 300 ms, TE = 14 ms) and T2-weighted spin echo (TR = 1.6 s, TE = 106 ms) pulse sequences. Spatial resolution of the images was excellent (0.3 - 0.5 mm) and the imaging of a gerbil brain clearly delineated anatomy separating cortex, white matter, hippocampus and thalamus. Hemispheric ischemia of a gerbil brain was detected as early as 30 min after occlusion of the carotid artery in T2-weighted images and the evolution of the lesion was clearly picturized in T1- and T2-weighted images. On the other hand. SR images were far less sensitive. Caluculated T1 and T2 relaxation times by the pixel-to-pixel computation indicated progress of the lesion and excellently correlated with the water content of the tissue (r = 0.892 and 0.744 for T1 and T2, respectively). (J.P.N.)

  3. Effect of Cistanche Desertica Polysaccharides on Learning and Memory Functions and Ultrastructure of Cerebral Neurons in Experimental Aging Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙云; 邓杨梅; 王德俊; 沈春锋; 刘晓梅; 张洪泉

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of Cistanche desertica polysaccharides (CDP) on the learning and memory functions and cerebral ultrastructure in experimental aging mice. Methods: CDP was administrated intragastrically 50 or 100 mg/kg per day for 64 successive days to experimental aging model mice induced by D-galactose, then the learning and memory functions of mice were estimated by step-down test and Y-maze test; organelles of brain tissue and cerebral ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscope and physical strength was determined by swimming test. Results: CDP could obviously enhance the learning and memory functions (P<0.01) and prolong the swimming time (P<0.05), decrease the number of lipofuscin and slow down the degeneration of mitochondria in neurons(P<0.05), and improve the degeneration of cerebral ultra-structure in aging mice. Conclusion: CDP could improve the impaired physiological function and alleviate cerebral morphological change in experimental aging mice.

  4. An experimental study on cerebral paragonimiasis using cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Han, Moon Hee; Shin, Yong Moon; Choo, Sung Wook; Yu, In Kyu; Cho, Seung Yull; Kong, Yoon

    1994-01-01

    It is important to diagnosis paragonimiasis in early active because it can be dared by chemotherapy. However, it is difficult to make a correct diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis in the early active stage, and the radiographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis have been rarely reported. Thus, this experimental study was designed to produce early active cerebral paragonimiasis and to demonstrate radiologic-pathologic correlations. In 8 cats, 7-8 metacercariae of Paragonimus Westermani were directly introduced into brain parenchyma of each cat's after trephination of the skull. In another 16 cats, the juvenile worms and the adult worms that had developed for varying periods (2 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks) in the lunges of another cats were introduced into the brain parenchyma of each cat's with the same procedure described above. Follow -up MR images and chest radiographs were obtained at 2 days, 1 weeks, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after inoculation. The autopsies and histopathological examinations of the cat's brain were undertaken in 22 cats. In 9 cats that were suspected with pulmonary lesion on chest radiograph, the soft tissue radiographs of inflated-fixed lungs were obtained. In one cat with inoculation of adult worm, acute suppurative inflammation of the brain parenchyma was demonstrated. But the other cats with inoculation of adult worm or juvenile worm and the cats with intentional of metacercaris did not reveal any evidence of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. More than half of the introduce metacercariae (5 out of 8 cats) were found in the lung parenchyma, while only 25% (4 out of 16 cats) of the adult worm inoculated cats were. Acute suppurative inflammation suggesting acute stage cerebral paragonimiasis was obtained in one case of adult worm inoculated cat. Most of the inoculated metacercariae and some of the juvenile worms or adult worms were migrated to the lungs

  5. A quantitative brain map of experimental cerebral malaria pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Strangward

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The murine model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM has been utilised extensively in recent years to study the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria (HCM. However, it has been proposed that the aetiologies of ECM and HCM are distinct, and, consequently, no useful mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of HCM can be obtained from studying the ECM model. Therefore, in order to determine the similarities and differences in the pathology of ECM and HCM, we have performed the first spatial and quantitative histopathological assessment of the ECM syndrome. We demonstrate that the accumulation of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs in brain capillaries is a specific feature of ECM that is not observed during mild murine malaria infections. Critically, we show that individual pRBCs appear to occlude murine brain capillaries during ECM. As pRBC-mediated congestion of brain microvessels is a hallmark of HCM, this suggests that the impact of parasite accumulation on cerebral blood flow may ultimately be similar in mice and humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that cerebrovascular CD8+ T-cells appear to co-localise with accumulated pRBCs, an event that corresponds with development of widespread vascular leakage. As in HCM, we show that vascular leakage is not dependent on extensive vascular destruction. Instead, we show that vascular leakage is associated with alterations in transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms. Finally, as in HCM, we observed axonal injury and demyelination in ECM adjacent to diverse vasculopathies. Collectively, our data therefore shows that, despite very different presentation, and apparently distinct mechanisms, of parasite accumulation, there appear to be a number of comparable features of cerebral pathology in mice and in humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Thus, when used appropriately, the ECM model may be useful for studying specific pathological features of HCM.

  6. A quantitative brain map of experimental cerebral malaria pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangward, Patrick; Haley, Michael J; Shaw, Tovah N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Greig, Rachel; Mironov, Aleksandr; de Souza, J Brian; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Craig, Alister G; Milner, Danny A; Allan, Stuart M; Couper, Kevin N

    2017-03-01

    The murine model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) has been utilised extensively in recent years to study the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria (HCM). However, it has been proposed that the aetiologies of ECM and HCM are distinct, and, consequently, no useful mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of HCM can be obtained from studying the ECM model. Therefore, in order to determine the similarities and differences in the pathology of ECM and HCM, we have performed the first spatial and quantitative histopathological assessment of the ECM syndrome. We demonstrate that the accumulation of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs) in brain capillaries is a specific feature of ECM that is not observed during mild murine malaria infections. Critically, we show that individual pRBCs appear to occlude murine brain capillaries during ECM. As pRBC-mediated congestion of brain microvessels is a hallmark of HCM, this suggests that the impact of parasite accumulation on cerebral blood flow may ultimately be similar in mice and humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that cerebrovascular CD8+ T-cells appear to co-localise with accumulated pRBCs, an event that corresponds with development of widespread vascular leakage. As in HCM, we show that vascular leakage is not dependent on extensive vascular destruction. Instead, we show that vascular leakage is associated with alterations in transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms. Finally, as in HCM, we observed axonal injury and demyelination in ECM adjacent to diverse vasculopathies. Collectively, our data therefore shows that, despite very different presentation, and apparently distinct mechanisms, of parasite accumulation, there appear to be a number of comparable features of cerebral pathology in mice and in humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Thus, when used appropriately, the ECM model may be useful for studying specific pathological features of HCM.

  7. Cerebral biochemical abnormalities in experimental maternal phenylketonuria: gangliosides and sialoglycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, Y.H.; Hyde, K.R.; Lin, F.H.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    The present study sought a biochemical explanation for retarded brain development in the heterozygous offspring of the phenylketonuric (PKU) mother. Two rat models of simulated maternal PKU, one induced by p-chloropheylalanine and phenylalanine and the other by phenylacetate, were employed in this investigation. Maternal PKU had no influence on cerebral concentrations of DNA, protein, and cholesterol, which were normal in the 2 d old pup. However, there was a noticeable disruption of the normal ganglioside pattern and a significant reduction of sialoglycoproteins. Concomitant with a delayed drop in the gangliosides Q/sub 1b/ and D 3 , was a slower rise in M 1 and D/sub 1a/. At least 66% of sialoglycoproteins located on SDS-PAGE gel chromatograms, by radioactivity incorporated in vivo from radiolabeled N-acetylmannosamine and by ( 3 H) sialic acid released by neuraminidase from periodate-( 3 H) borohydride labeled glycoproteins, have mobilites of the cell adhesion molecules N-CAM and D-CAM. Whether the reduction of the sialogylcoproteins induced by maternal PKU is mainly in these cell adhesion molecules requires further investigation. Interference with the function of gangliosides and certain sialoglycoproteins during cerebral development may contribute to the brain dysfunction observed in the offspring of PKU mothers not on diet control during pregnancy. 49 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  8. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha......This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized...... electroencephalography-verified generalized seizures....

  9. MRI of experimental focal cerebral ischemia in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerschler, A.; Waldmin, D.; Gille, U.; Leipzig Univ.; Zimmer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: With respect to the specific characteristic of rete mirabile epidurale rostrale in sheep, the aim of this study was to investigate the use of time of flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to observe vascular anatomy and to validate MCA occlusion in a new model of experimental focal cerebral ischemia by permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in sheep (designed to study stroke therapy using autologous stem cells from umbilical cord blood). Furthermore, we wanted to assess the extent and natural time course of ischemic focal brain injury in sheep using functional and morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Method: 13 Merino sheep were examined. In 4 of the animals all, in 5 sheep 1 or 2 MCA branches were occluded and in 1 one case touched (sham operation). 4 controls did not undergo a surgical procedure. 23 MRI sessions were performed in 10 sheep. These sessions included T1, T2, T2 * sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and TOF MRA before and 2 - 46 days after the onset of stroke using a 1.5T clinical MR scanner. Corrosion casts of the cerebral arteries of 3 sheep were prepared and compared to MRA. Results: The MRA visualized the vessel anatomy or occlusion distal to the rete mirabile. Anatomical variants concerning the variant origin of the MCA and inconstant arteria choroidea rostralis and communicans rostralis were revealed. Sheep with occluded left MCA showed space occupying lesions with a drop in ADC values. Depending on the number of preserved MCA branches (0; 1; 2), highly significant (p < 0.001) differences in lesion size (21 ± 5.7; 13; 1.7 ± 1.3 ml) could be found. No indication of ischemia but minimal contusion damage was observed in the sham operated animal. (orig.)

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Valle, Brian William; Hempel, Casper; Staalsoe, Trine

    2016-01-01

    (GLP-1) mimetics have potent neuroprotective effects in animal models of neuropathology associated with ROS/RNS dysfunction. This study investigates the effect of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide against the clinical outcome of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) and Plasmodium falciparum growth....... Furthermore the role of oxidative stress on ECM pathogenesis is evaluated. METHODS: ECM was induced in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57Bl/6j mice. Infected Balb/c (non-cerebral malaria) and uninfected C57Bl/6j mice were included as controls. Mice were treated twice-daily with vehicle or liraglutide (200...... were quantified. RESULTS: The development and progression of ECM was not affected by liraglutide. Indeed, although ROS/RNS were increased in peripheral organs, ROS/RNS generation was not present in the brain. Interestingly, CREB was activated in the ECM brain and may protect against ROS/RNS stress...

  11. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during isoflurane-induced hypotension in patients subjected to surgery for cerebral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J B; Cold, G E; Hansen, E S

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification of the classi......Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification......). Controlled hypotension to an average MAP of 50-55 mm Hg was induced by increasing the dose of isoflurane, and maintained at an inspired concentration of 2.2 +/- 0.2%. This resulted in a significant decrease in CMRO2 (to 1.73 +/- 0.16 ml/100 g min-1), while CBF was unchanged. After the clipping...

  12. Hypercholesterolemia induced cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Garz, Cornelia; Jandke, Solveig; Urlaub, Daniela; Mencl, Stine; Zernecke, Alma; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Carare, Roxana O; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    While hypercholesterolemia plays a causative role for the development of ischemic stroke in large vessels, its significance for cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) remains unclear. We thus aimed to understand the detailed relationship between hypercholesterolemia and CSVD using the well described Ldlr-/- mouse model. We used Ldlr-/- mice (n = 16) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 15) at the age of 6 and 12 months. Ldlr-/- mice develop high plasma cholesterol levels following a high fat diet. We analyzed cerebral capillaries and arterioles for intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, thrombotic vessel occlusions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and microbleeds. We found a significant increase in the number of erythrocyte stases in 6 months old Ldlr-/- mice compared to all other groups (P hypercholesterolemia is related to a thrombotic CSVD phenotype, which is different from hypertension-related CSVD that associates with a hemorrhagic CSVD phenotype. Our data demonstrate a relationship between hypercholesterolemia and the development of CSVD. Ldlr-/- mice appear to be an adequate animal model for research into CSVD.

  13. Dihydralazine induces marked cerebral vasodilation in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H

    1987-01-01

    of dihydralazine was of the same order of magnitude as the effect of 5% CO2 inhalation. These results in normal subjects should be extrapolated to diseased persons only with extreme caution. Still, the very marked and long lasting vasodilation observed suggests that dihydralazine, from a theoretical point of view.......v. xenon-133 technique in seven young, normotensive volunteers before and 15, 60 and 180 min after 6.25 mg i.v. dihydralazine, corresponding approximately to 0.1 mg kg-1 body weight. For comparison the CBF reactivity to inhalation of 5% CO2 in air was investigated. Dihydralazine increased CBF throughout...... the period of study, in median 16, 27 and 23% at the three periods of measurements, respectively. The arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, whereas heart rate increased significantly. During CO2 inhalation, CBF increased on average 29%. Thus, the cerebral vasodilation exerted by a small i.v. dose...

  14. Pathophysiological studies of experimental brain edema and cerebral ischemia using MRI/S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi

    1987-01-01

    Pathophysiological changes in experimental brain edema and cerebral ischemia were examined by the in vivo 1 H- and 31 P-NMR method. Two types of experimental brain edema were induced in rats by cold injury and by triethyltin (TET) intoxication. Experimental cerebral ischemia was induced in rats by the four-vessel occlusion method. During the course of these pathological conditions, the 1 H-MRIs and 31 P-NMR spectra were measured sequentially with a single NMR spectrometer (4.8 tesla, 9 cm bore magnet). In the cold-injury edema, high-intensity lesions were detected in the gray and white matters of the injured hemisphere by means of SE images with a long Te 3 hours after the injury. The intensity reached its maximum 16 to 24 hours after the injury, and then returned to normal 7 days later. These high-intensity lesions indicated an increase in the T2 value in the edematous tissue. There were no changes in the 31 P-NMR spectra during the course of edema formation and absorption. In the TET-induced edema, high-intensity lesions were also detected in the bilateral white matter by means of SE images with a long Te from the 3rd day up to the 7th day during the injection of TET. These high-intensity lesions subsided 42 days after the discontinuance of injecting TET. There were no changes in the 31 P-NMR spectra during the whole course of TET-induced edema. In the cerebral ischemia, no remarkable changes in the MRI were detected in either SE or IR images during the ischemic and recirculated periods. However, dynamic changes in the 31 P-NMR spectra were detected during the course of cerebral ischemia. In the pre-ischemic period, the peaks of the ATP, PCr, phosphodiesters (PDE), Pi, and phosphomonoesters (PME) were detected. After the induction of ischemia, the ATP and PCr peaks decreased, while one Pi peak increased rapidly. (J.P.N.)

  15. Pathophysiological studies of experimental brain edema and cerebral ischemia using MRI/S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, S; Higuchi, T; Horikawa, Y; Tanaka, C; Hirakawa, K

    1987-02-01

    Pathophysiological changes in experimental brain edema and cerebral ischemia were examined by the in vivo /sup 1/H- and /sup 31/P-NMR method. Two types of experimental brain edema were induced in rats by cold injury and by triethyltin (TET) intoxication. Experimental cerebral ischemia was induced in rats by the four-vessel occlusion method. During the course of these pathological conditions, the /sup 1/H-MRIs and /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were measured sequentially with a single NMR spectrometer (4.8 tesla, 9 cm bore magnet). In the cold-injury edema, high-intensity lesions were detected in the gray and white matters of the injured hemisphere by means of SE images with a long Te 3 hours after the injury. The intensity reached its maximum 16 to 24 hours after the injury, and then returned to normal 7 days later. These high-intensity lesions indicated an increase in the T2 value in the edematous tissue. There were no changes in the /sup 31/P-NMR spectra during the course of edema formation and absorption. In the TET-induced edema, high-intensity lesions were also detected in the bilateral white matter by means of SE images with a long Te from the 3rd day up to the 7th day during the injection of TET. These high-intensity lesions subsided 42 days after the discontinuance of injecting TET. There were no changes in the /sup 31/P-NMR spectra during the whole course of TET-induced edema. In the cerebral ischemia, no remarkable changes in the MRI were detected in either SE or IR images during the ischemic and recirculated periods. However, dynamic changes in the /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were detected during the course of cerebral ischemia. In the pre-ischemic period, the peaks of the ATP, PCr, phosphodiesters (PDE), Pi, and phosphomonoesters (PME) were detected. After the induction of ischemia, the ATP and PCr peaks decreased, while one Pi peak increased rapidly.

  16. Proteomic Studies on Human and Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    KAUST Repository

    Moussa, Ehab

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection that results from interrelated pathologies. Despite extensive research efforts, the mechanism of the disease is not completely understood. Clinical studies, postmortem analysis, and animal models have been the main research arenas in CM. In this thesis, shotgun proteomics approach was used to further understand the pathology of human and experimental CM. The mechanism by which CM turns fatal is yet to be identified. A clinical proteomics study was conducted on pooled plasma samples from children with reversible or fatal CM from the Gambia. The results show that depletion of coagulation factors and increased levels of circulating proteasomes are associated with fatal pediatric CM. This data suggests that the ongoing coagulation during CM might be a disseminated intravascular coagulation state that eventually causes depletion of the coagulation factors leading to petechial hemorrhages. In addition, the mechanism(s) by which blood transfusion benefits CM in children was investigated. To that end, the concentration and multimerization pattern of von-willebrand factor, and the concentration of haptoglobin in the plasma of children with CM who received blood transfusions were measured. In addition to clinical studies, experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in mice has been long used as a model for the disease. A shotgun proteomics workflow was optimized to identify the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with ECM.Because of the utmost importance of membrane proteins in the pathology of the disease, sample fractionation and filter aided sample preparation were used to recover them. The proteomic signature of the brains of mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome, mice infected with P. berghei NK56 that developed severe malaria but without neurological signs, and non-infected mice, were compared to identify CM specific proteins. Among the differentially

  17. Protective effect of estrogen in endothelin-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendenning, Michele L; Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Schreihofer, Derek A

    2008-11-14

    Estrogen is a powerful endogenous and exogenous neuroprotective agent in animal models of brain injury, including focal cerebral ischemia. Although this protection has been demonstrated in several different treatment and injury paradigms, it has not been demonstrated in focal cerebral ischemia induced by intraparenchymal endothelin-1 injection, a model with many advantages over other models of experimental focal ischemia. Reproductively mature female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and divided into placebo and estradiol-treated groups. Two weeks later, halothane-anesthetized rats underwent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion by interparenchymal stereotactic injection of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (180pmoles/2microl) near the middle cerebral artery. Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) revealed similar reductions in cerebral blood flow in both groups. Animals were behaviorally evaluated before, and 2 days after, stroke induction, and infarct size was evaluated. In agreement with other models, estrogen treatment significantly reduced infarct size evaluated by both TTC and Fluoro-Jade staining and behavioral deficits associated with stroke. Stroke size was significantly correlated with LDF in both groups, suggesting that cranial perfusion measures can enhance success in this model.

  18. Trigeminal nociception-induced, cerebral Fos expression in the conscious rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ; Meijler, WJ; Korf, J; Kemper, RHA

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about trigeminal nociception-induced cerebral activity and involvement of cerebral structures in pathogenesis of trigeminovascular headaches such as migraine. Neuroimaging has demonstrated cortical, hypothalamic and brainstem activation during the attack and after abolition with

  19. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral......(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1...... abolished by glycopyrrolate (P important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen....

  20. Cerebral radiation necrosis: limits and prospects of experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis is the major CNS hazard of clinical treatment therapy involving delivery of high doses of radiation to the brain. It is generally irreversible and frequently leads to death from brain necrosis. Necrosis has been reported with total doses of 60 Gy, delivered in conventional fractions. Symptoms depend upon the volume of brain irradiated and are frequently those of an intracranial mass and may be present as an area of gliosis or frank necrosis. Possible causes include some direct effect of radiation on glial cells, vascular changes and the action of an immunological mechanism. The weight of evidence suggests that demyelination is important in the early delayed reaction, and that vascular changes gradually become more important in the late delayed reactions, from several months to years after treatment. The advent of sophisticated radiographic technologies such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography have facilitated serial non invasive examination of morphologic or physiologic parameters within the brain after irradiation. Limits and prospects of these technologies are reviewed in experimental animal models of late radiation injuries of the brain, which were carried out in many species ranging from mouse to monkey

  1. Experimental Model of Cerebral Hypoperfusion Produced Memory-learning Deficits, and Modifications in Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilda LEÓN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is a major cause of death, for this reason animal models of cerebral ischemia are widely used to study both the pathophysiology of ischemic phenomenon and the evaluation of possible therapeutic agents with protective or regenerative properties. The objectives of this study were to examine the presence of neuronal damage in different brain areas following the ischemic event, and assess consequences of such activities on the processes of memory and learning. The study group included an experimental group ischemic animals (30 rats with permanent bilateral occlusion of the carotids, and a control group. Was evaluated gene expression and inflammatory ischemic by qPCR techniques 24h post injury, brain tissue morphology in areas of cortex, striatum and hippocampus seven days post injury and processes of memory and learning, 12 days post injury. The morphological studies showed that the procedure induces death of cell populations in cortex, striatum and hippocampus, ischemia modified gfap gene expression and ho, il-6, il-17 and ifn-γ, which can be used as a marker of early ischemic process. Additionally, the ischemic injury caused spatial memory decline. This characterization gives us an experimental model to develop future studies on the pathophysiology of ischemic events and assessing therapeutic strategies. MODELO EXPERIMENTAL DE HIPOPERFUSIÓN CEREBRAL PRODUCE DÉFICIT DE LA MEMORIA Y APRENDIZAJE Y MODIFICACIONES EN LA EXPRESIÓN DE GENES. A escala mundial, la isquemia cerebral constituye una de las principales causas de muerte, por lo que los modelos animales de isquemia cerebral son extensamente usados tanto en el estudio de la pato-fisiología del fenómeno isquémico; como en la evaluación de agentes terapéuticos con posible efecto protector o regenerador.  Los objetivos de este estudio fueron examinar la presencia de daño neuronal en diferentes áreas cerebrales como consecuencia del evento isquémico; así como evaluar

  2. An experimental study on imaging diagnosis of cerebral sparganosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Chong Jai; Chi, Je G; Hong, Sung Tae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ghi Jai [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate early CT and MRI findings of cerebral sparganosis, to correlate the imaging findings with histopathologic findings, and to determine capability of CT and MRI to differentiate live worm from the dead. After scolices of three to four spargana, which were obtained from naturally infected snakes, were introduced into cerebral hemispheres of 21 mongrel cats, sequential brain CT and MRI were performed at the 2nd, 4th, 8th and 12th week, and the imaging findings were analyzed and compared with the histopathologic findings. Spargana were found in 16 sites of 10 cat brains (48%); they were located in basal ganglia (5 cases), periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale (4 cases), subdural (2 cases) or subarachnoid spaces (1 case), and lateral ventricle (2 cases). The larvae were also observed in the contralateral hemisphere (3 cases). The lesions without larvae (presumably tracts) were found in 22 sites of 14 cat brains (67%); they were located in periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale (11 cases), basal ganglia (5 cases), midbrain (3 cases) and frontal lobe (2 cases). The lesions without larvae were also found in the contralateral hemi-sphere (7 cases). On CT, the lesions with larvae showed high density in 75% (9/12) and were enhanced in 38% (3/8) as a nodular pattern. On MRI they showed iso-(7/11) or low signal intensity (4/11) on T1-weighted images, mainly isosignal intensity on proton density-weighted images, and variable signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement of variable shapes was seen in 50% (4/8). The lesions without larvae showed iso-(14/22) or low density (6/22) on CT and were rarely enhanced (2/17). On MRI they mostly showed isosignal intensity on both T1-weighted and proton density-weighted images, and variable signal intensity on T2-weighted images. They were enhanced in 29% (5/17) on contrast-enhanced MRI. Dilatation of ipsilateral ventricle was found in 43% (9

  3. Neurocardiac protection with milrinone for restoring acute cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed ischemic injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Tomoko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Kazumasu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-15

    Acute cerebral hypoperfusion following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is highly related to the pathogenesis of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), but the therapeutic option is poorly available. This study aimed to clarify the effect of milrinone (MIL) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and related outcomes after experimental SAH. Twenty-seven male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either sham surgery (SAH-sham; n=6), SAH induced by endovascular perforation (control; n=10), or SAH followed by cardiac support with intravenous MIL (n=11) performed 1.5-h after SAH induction. CBF, neurobehavioral function, occurrence of DCI were assessed by MR-continuous arterial spin labeling, daily neurological score testing, and diffusion- and T2-weighted MR images on days 1 and 3, respectively. Initial global CBF depression was notable in mice of control and MIL groups as compared to the SAH-sham group (Pprotective agent against EBI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Streptococcus agalactiae impairs cerebral bioenergetics in experimentally infected silver catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Parmeggiani, Belisa S; Santos, Roberto C V; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Moreira, Karen L S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; da Veiga, Marcelo L; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2017-10-01

    It is becoming evident that bacterial infectious diseases affect brain energy metabolism, where alterations of enzymatic complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase (CK) lead to an impairment of cerebral bioenergetics which contribute to disease pathogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS). Based on this evidence, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether alterations in the activity of complex IV of the respiratory chain and CK contribute to impairment of cerebral bioenergetics during Streptococcus agalactiae infection in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen). The activity of complex IV of the respiratory chain in brain increased, while the CK activity decreased in infected animals compared to uninfected animals. Brain histopathology revealed inflammatory demyelination, gliosis of the brain and intercellular edema in infected animals. Based on this evidence, S. agalactiae infection causes an impairment in cerebral bioenergetics through the augmentation of complex IV activity, which may be considered an adaptive response to maintain proper functioning of the electron respiratory chain, as well as to ensure ongoing electron flow through the electron transport chain. Moreover, inhibition of cerebral CK activity contributes to lower availability of ATP, contributing to impairment of cerebral energy homeostasis. In summary, these alterations contribute to disease pathogenesis linked to the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebral scintigraphy in dogs using gallium 67. Value in the investigation of experimental brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffre, J.-F.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of inducing experimental brain tumors in dogs by intracerebral inoculation of Rous sarcoma virus led to the development of an early diagnosis procedure without any danger for the carrier animal. Already widely used in humans, cerebral gammagraphy, used in dogs in the conditions developed, perfectly satisfy the requirements of harmlessness, precision and reliability. Scintiscans are taken 48 hours after injection of two mCi of carrier-free Ga 67 citrate. Profile and front patterns are obtained by means of a gamma camera connected to an on-line data processing system. Thirteen examinations were carried out under general anesthesia. Three dogs exhibiting positive scintiscan patterns revealed at the autopsy tumors ranging in size from a hazelnut to a walnut. The remaining animals gave negative or dubious patterns, and none of them revealed a tumor larger in size than a pea. The results obtained in this study are encouraging, and it is felt that this method can enable valid diagnosis of the presence of cerebral neoplasias in dogs, provided they are sufficiently large [fr

  6. Drug-Induced Hypothermia as Beneficial Treatment before and after Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming F; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypothermia is still unproven as beneficial treatment in human stroke, although in animal models, conditioning the brain with hypothermia has induced tolerance to insults. Here, we delineate the feasibility of drug-induced mild hypothermia in reducing ischemic brain damage when...... conditioning before (preconditioning) and after (postconditioning) experimental stroke. Methods: Hypothermia was induced in rats with a bolus of 6 mg/kg talipexole followed by 20 h continuous talipexole infusion of 6 mg/kg in total. Controls received similar treatment with saline. The core body temperature...... was continuously monitored. In preconditioning, hypothermia was terminated before either reversible occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60 min or global ischemia for 10 min with 2-vessel occlusion and hypotension. In postconditioning, rats experienced 60 min of MCAO before hypothermia was induced...

  7. Subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced upregulation of the 5-HT1B receptor in cerebral arteries in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Hoel, Natalie Løvland; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2003-01-01

    experimental SAH. METHODS: Experimental SAH was induced in rats by using an autologous prechiasmatic injection of arterial blood. Two days later, the middle cerebral artery (MCA), posterior communicating artery (PCoA), and basilar artery (BA) were harvested and examined functionally with the aid of a sensitive...... RNA coding for the 5-HT1B receptor as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. In the PCoA no upregulation of the 5-HT1B receptor was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the receptor phenotype in favor of contractile receptors may well represent the end stage in a sequence of events leading from SAH...... to the actual development of cerebral vasospasm. Insight into the mechanism of upregulation may provide new targets for developing specific treatment against cerebral vasospasm....

  8. Reduced cerebral vascularization in experimental neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas Jc; Fuller, Maria; Saville, Jennifer T; Cox, Timothy M

    2018-01-01

    The glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease, in which a range of neurological manifestations occur, results from a deficiency of acid β-glucocerebrosidase, with subsequent accumulation of β-glucocerebroside, its upstream substrates, and the non-acylated congener β-glucosylsphingosine. However, the mechanisms by which end-organ dysfunction arise are poorly understood. Here, we report strikingly diminished cerebral microvascular density in a murine model of disease, and provide a detailed analysis of the accompanying cerebral glycosphingolipidome in these animals, with marked elevations of β-glucosylsphingosine. Further in vitro studies confirmed a concentration-dependent impairment of endothelial cytokinesis upon exposure to quasi-pathological concentrations of β-glucosylsphingosine. These findings support a premise for pathogenic disruption of cerebral angiogenesis as an end-organ effect, with potential for therapeutic modulation in neuronopathic Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cerebral biochemical pathways in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis: a comparative metabolomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert W Lutz

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including brain disorders, are associated with perturbations of tissue metabolism. However, an often overlooked issue is the impact that inflammations outside the brain may have on brain metabolism. Our main goal was to study similarities and differences between brain metabolite profiles of animals suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and adjuvant arthritis (AA in Lewis rat models. Our principal objective was the determination of molecular protagonists involved in the metabolism underlying these diseases. EAE was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA and spinal-cord homogenate (SC-H, whereas AA was induced by CFA only. Naive rats served as controls (n = 9 for each group. Two weeks after inoculation, animals were sacrificed, and brains were removed and processed for metabolomic analysis by NMR spectroscopy or for immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, both inflammatory diseases caused similar, though not identical, changes in metabolites involved in regulation of brain cell size and membrane production: among the osmolytes, taurine and the neuronal marker, N-acetylaspartate, were decreased, and the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, slightly increased in both inoculated groups compared with controls. Also ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, sources of inflammatory agents, and several glycolytic metabolites were increased in both inoculated groups. By contrast, the amino acids, aspartate and isoleucine, were less concentrated in CFA/SC-H and control vs. CFA rats. Our results suggest that inflammatory brain metabolite profiles may indicate the existence of either cerebral (EAE or extra-cerebral (AA inflammation. These inflammatory processes may act through distinct pathways that converge toward similar brain metabolic profiles. Our findings open new avenues for future studies aimed at demonstrating whether brain metabolic effects provoked by AA are pain/stress-mediated and

  10. Cerebral biochemical pathways in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis: a comparative metabolomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Norbert W; Fernandez, Carla; Pellissier, Jean-François; Cozzone, Patrick J; Béraud, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases, including brain disorders, are associated with perturbations of tissue metabolism. However, an often overlooked issue is the impact that inflammations outside the brain may have on brain metabolism. Our main goal was to study similarities and differences between brain metabolite profiles of animals suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and adjuvant arthritis (AA) in Lewis rat models. Our principal objective was the determination of molecular protagonists involved in the metabolism underlying these diseases. EAE was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and spinal-cord homogenate (SC-H), whereas AA was induced by CFA only. Naive rats served as controls (n = 9 for each group). Two weeks after inoculation, animals were sacrificed, and brains were removed and processed for metabolomic analysis by NMR spectroscopy or for immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, both inflammatory diseases caused similar, though not identical, changes in metabolites involved in regulation of brain cell size and membrane production: among the osmolytes, taurine and the neuronal marker, N-acetylaspartate, were decreased, and the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, slightly increased in both inoculated groups compared with controls. Also ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, sources of inflammatory agents, and several glycolytic metabolites were increased in both inoculated groups. By contrast, the amino acids, aspartate and isoleucine, were less concentrated in CFA/SC-H and control vs. CFA rats. Our results suggest that inflammatory brain metabolite profiles may indicate the existence of either cerebral (EAE) or extra-cerebral (AA) inflammation. These inflammatory processes may act through distinct pathways that converge toward similar brain metabolic profiles. Our findings open new avenues for future studies aimed at demonstrating whether brain metabolic effects provoked by AA are pain/stress-mediated and/or due to the

  11. Functional MRI of CO2 induced increase in cerebral perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of MR gradient echo imaging towards CO2 induced changes in cerebral blood flow was investigated in 10 normal subjects. The subjects were inhaling 5% and 7% CO2 and the experiments were carried out at 1.5 T (n = 6) and 2.0 T (n = 5), allowing a comparison of field strengths....... Additional experiments were carried out using a higher spatial resolution. The largest signal increases were noted in areas corresponding to larger vessels, but significant changes were also conspicuous in deeper cortical and central grey matter. The changes appeared linearly related to the arterial CO2...... tension, within the range of PaCO2 studied. In white matter, the changes were not statistically significant....

  12. Investigation of redox status in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Saxena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging related reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF has been linked with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Experimentally, a condition of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion due to reduced CBF can be induced by permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion, 2VO in rats. Since oxidative stress, leading to neuronal apoptosis and death, is one of the mechanisms, which is thought to play a significant role in chronic degenerative neurological disorders, the present study was planned to assess the ROS status by measuring the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes that might occur during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase were measured in the brain tissue at eight weeks of 2VO induction in rats. Results show significantly elevated levels of GPx, SOD, and catalase enzymes as compared with the control group. It is possible that compensatory rise in antioxidant enzymes occurs in response to increased oxidative stress following ischemic insult.

  13. Endothelin-1-induced focal cerebral ischemia in the growth hormone/IGF-1 deficient Lewis Dwarf rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Mitschelen, Matthew; Toth, Peter; Ashpole, Nicole M; Farley, Julie A; Hodges, Erik L; Warrington, Junie P; Han, Song; Fung, Kar-Ming; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Sonntag, William E

    2014-11-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. Growth hormone (GH) and its anabolic mediator, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, decrease with advancing age and this decline has been shown to promote vascular dysfunction. In addition, lower GH/IGF-1 levels are associated with higher stroke mortality in humans. These results suggest that decreased GH/IGF-1 level is an important factor in increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases. This study was designed to assess whether GH/IGF-1-deficiency influences the outcome of cerebral ischemia. We found that endothelin-1-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in a modest but nonsignificant decrease in cerebral infarct size in GH/IGF-1 deficient dw/dw rats compared with control heterozygous littermates and dw/dw rats with early-life GH treatment. Expression of endothelin receptors and endothelin-1-induced constriction of the middle cerebral arteries were similar in the three experimental groups. Interestingly, dw/dw rats exhibited reduced brain edema and less astrocytic infiltration compared with their heterozygous littermates and this effect was reversed by GH-treatment. Because reactive astrocytes are critical for the regulation of poststroke inflammatory processes, maintenance of the blood-brain barrier and neural repair, further studies are warranted to determine the long-term functional consequences of decreased astrocytic activation in GH/IGF-1 deficient animals after cerebral ischemia. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2014.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolomics After Natural Product Treatment in an Experimental Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tao; Xian, Jia Wen; Leung, Wing Nang; Li, Liang; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an important biofluid for diagnosis of and research on neurological diseases. However, in-depth metabolomic profiling of CSF remains an analytical challenge due to the small volume of samples, particularly in small animal models. In this work, we report the application of a high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) workflow for CSF metabolomics in Gastrodia elata and Uncaria rhynchophylla water extract (GUW)-treated experimental cerebral ischemia model of rat. The GUW is a commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for hypertension and brain disease. This study investigated the amine- and phenol-containing biomarkers in the CSF metabolome. After GUW treatment for 7 days, the neurological deficit score was significantly improved with infarct volume reduction, while the integrity of brain histological structure was preserved. Over 1957 metabolites were quantified in CSF by dansylation LC-MS. The analysis of this comprehensive list of metabolites suggests that metabolites associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and excitotoxicity change during GUW-induced alleviation of ischemic injury. This work is significant in that (1) it shows CIL LC-MS can be used for in-depth profiling of the CSF metabolome in experimental ischemic stroke and (2) identifies several potential molecular targets (that might mediate the central nervous system) and associate with pharmacodynamic effects of some frequently used TCMs.

  15. Fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles by co-modulating NO/muscarinic signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Keren; Schoknecht, Karl; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon; Soreq, Hermona

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke patients treated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) show improved motor, cognitive and executive functions, but the underlying mechanism(s) are incompletely understood. Here, we report that cerebral arterioles in the rat brain superfused with therapeutically effective doses of the SSRI fluoxetine showed consistent, dose-dependent vasodilatation (by 1.2 to 1.6-fold), suppressible by muscarinic and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) antagonists [atropine, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] but resistant to nicotinic and serotoninergic antagonists (mecamylamine, methylsergide). Fluoxetine administered 10–30 min. following experimental vascular photo-thrombosis increased arterial diameter (1.3–1.6), inducing partial, but lasting reperfusion of the ischaemic brain. In brain endothelial b.End.3 cells, fluoxetine induced rapid muscarinic receptor-dependent increases in intracellular [Ca2+] and promoted albumin- and eNOS-dependent nitric oxide (NO) production and HSP90 interaction. In vitro, fluoxetine suppressed recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE) activity only in the presence of albumin. That fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles suggests co-promotion of endothelial muscarinic and nitric oxide signalling, facilitated by albumin-dependent inhibition of serum AChE. PMID:22697296

  16. Prolonged drug-induced hypothermia in experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Reith, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    In experimental and human stroke, hypothermia is strongly related to a favorable outcome. Previous attempts to manipulate the core temperature in focal cerebral ischemia have been based on mechanical cooling. The purpose of the study is to establish a model for long-term drug-induced hypothermia...... in focal ischemia by pharmacological alteration of the central thermoregulatory set-point. We tested the hypothesis that the dopaminergic agonist Talipexole, which induces hypothermia, reduces infarct size. Body temperature was monitored by a radio-pill-implant. Rats had reversible occlusion of the middle...... that the core body temperature was reduced by 1.7 degrees C for 24 hours after MCAO in rats treated with Talipexole. This treatment induced a significant reduction of infarct volume at 7 days after focal ischemia by 47%. We suggest that the reduction in infarct volume is related to drug-induced hypothermia...

  17. Damaged Neocortical Perineuronal Nets Due to Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Mice, Rats and Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Härtig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the extracellular matrix (ECM, perineuronal nets (PNs are polyanionic, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG-rich coatings of certain neurons, known to be affected in various neural diseases. Although these structures are considered as important parts of the neurovascular unit (NVU, their role during evolution of acute ischemic stroke and subsequent tissue damage is poorly understood and only a few preclinical studies analyzed PNs after acute ischemic stroke. By employing three models of experimental focal cerebral ischemia, this study was focused on histopathological alterations of PNs and concomitant vascular, glial and neuronal changes according to the NVU concept. We analyzed brain tissues obtained 1 day after ischemia onset from: (a mice after filament-based permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO; (b rats subjected to thromboembolic MACO; and (c sheep at 14 days after electrosurgically induced focal cerebral ischemia. Multiple fluorescence labeling was applied to explore simultaneous alterations of NVU and ECM. Serial mouse sections labeled with the net marker Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA displayed largely decomposed and nearly erased PNs in infarcted neocortical areas that were demarcated by up-regulated immunoreactivity for vascular collagen IV (Coll IV. Subsequent semi-quantitative analyses in mice confirmed significantly decreased WFA-staining along the ischemic border zone and a relative decrease in the directly ischemia-affected neocortex. Triple fluorescence labeling throughout the three animal models revealed up-regulated Coll IV and decomposed PNs accompanied by activated astroglia and altered immunoreactivity for parvalbumin, a calcium-binding protein in fast-firing GABAergic neurons which are predominantly surrounded by neocortical PNs. Furthermore, ischemic neocortical areas in rodents simultaneously displayed less intense staining of WFA, aggrecan, the net components neurocan, versican and the

  18. Improvement of cerebral hypometabolism after resection of radiation-induced necrotic lesion in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yae; Hirata, Kenji; Nakayama, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Michiharu; Onodera, Shunsuke; Manabe, Osamu; Shiga, Tohru; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman underwent radiosurgery for a left cerebral hemisphere arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and developed radiation-induced necrosis causing a massive edema in the surrounding brain tissues. Despite various therapies, the edema expanded to the ipsilateral hemisphere and induced neurological symptoms. The radiation-induced necrotic lesion was surgically removed 4 years after radiosurgery. While the preoperative FDG PET revealed severe hypometabolism in the left cerebrum, the necrotomy significantly ameliorated the brain edema, glucose metabolism (postoperative FDG PET), and symptoms. This case indicates that radiation necrosis-induced neurological deficits may be associated with brain edema and hypometabolism, which could be reversed by appropriate necrotomy

  19. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2...

  20. Hemodialysis Induces an Acute Decline in Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder-Bos, Harmke; Vállez García, David; Kuipers, Johanna; Elting, Jan Willem J.; Aries, M.J.H.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Groen, Hendrik; Willemsen, Antoon; van Laar, Peter; Strijkert, Fijanne; Luurtsema, Geert; Slart, Riemer; Westerhuis, Ralf; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gaillard, Carlo A.; Franssen, Casper

    The initiation of hemodialysis is associated with an accelerated decline of cognitive function and an increased incidence of cerebrovascular accidents and white matter lesions. Investigators have hypothesized that the repetitive circulatory stress of hemodialysis induces ischemic cerebral injury,

  1. Hyperacute unilateral contrast-induced parotiditis during cerebral angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song J. Kim, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An uncommon complication of iodinated contrast administration is the development of bilateral sialadenitis. We report a unique case of hyperacute unilateral parotiditis during diagnostic cerebral angiography of the external carotid artery, which mimicked possible iatrogenic vascular event associated with cerebral endovascular procedures. Discussion includes the differential diagnosis, diagnostic studies, and treatments for this unusual condition.

  2. Curcumin Protects Neuron against Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Inflammation through Improving PPAR-Gamma Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun-Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that curcumin had beneficial effect to attenuate cerebral ischemic injury. However, it is unclear how curcumin protects against cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, using rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model, we found that curcumin was a potent PPARγ agonist in that it upregulated PPARγ expression and PPARγ-PPRE binding activity. Administration of curcumin markedly decreased the infarct volume, improved neurological deficits, and reduced neuronal damage of rats. In addition, curcumin suppressed neuroinflammatory response by decreasing inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2, NO, COX-2, and iNOS induced by cerebral ischemia of rats. Furthermore, curcumin suppressed IκB degradation that was caused by cerebral ischemia. The present data also showed that PPARγ interacted with NF-κB-p65 and thus inhibited NF-κB activation. All the above protective effects of curcumin on cerebral ischemic injury were markedly attenuated by GW9662, an inhibitor of PPARγ. Our results as described above suggested that PPARγ induced by curcumin may play a critical role in protecting against brain injury through suppression of inflammatory response. It also highlights the potential of curcumin as a therapeutic agent against cerebral ischemia.

  3. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H; Edwards, Alistair V G; Larsen, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...... was induced in rats that were treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 or vehicle. Neurological outcome was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests. Specific protein expression of large cerebral arteries was analyzed quantitatively with high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry. SAH resulted in a marked...... reduction of neurological scores, which was counteracted by U0126 treatment. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated regulation of 184 proteins after SAH, regulations that were in part prevented by U0126 treatment. Network analysis identified several protein networks including a strong structural network...

  5. CT scan and histological findings in experimental cerebral infarctions in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    Experimental cerebral infarctions were made in sixty-five cats by the transorbital approach. CT scanning was done at various periods after right-middle cerebral artery occlusion, and all cases were studied histopathologically. Cerebral microcirculation was studied by the carbon perfusion method, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction was studied by intravenous fluorescein administration. The iodine content of brain tissue was measured and this value was compared with the findings on CT scan. Experimental cerebral infarction was divided into four stages according to CT scan findings. These are the pre-edema stage, edema stage, edema diminishing stage, and cavity stage. The low density area (LDA) in the edema stage has a mass effect and a spongy appearance is seen histopathologically. LDA in the edema diminishing stage is localized to the extent of the macroscopic infarcted region, and macrophage (so called ''gitter cells'') and capillaries are seen. Fluorescein stain indicating the area of BBB dysfunction shows almost the same extent as the area of disturbed microcirculation indicated by impaired carbon filling. In the edema diminishing stage, there is good carbon filling in the infarcted region, and enlarged capillaries with carbon black inside are seen. The study of iodine content showed that the iodine level is very high in the infarcted region, and the level has good correlation with the number of capillaries. The mechanism of contrast enhancement in the cerebral infarction seems to be well linked to the capillaries with BBB dysfunction. This study indicates that the contrast medium leaks through the capillary wall. (author)

  6. Both functional LTbeta receptor and TNF receptor 2 are required for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonnée Togbe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TNF-related lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha is essential for the development of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM. The pathway involved has been attributed to TNFR2. Here we show a second arm of LTalpha-signaling essential for ECM development through LTbeta-R, receptor of LTalpha1beta2 heterotrimer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LTbetaR deficient mice did not develop the neurological signs seen in PbA induced ECM but died at three weeks with high parasitaemia and severe anemia like LTalphabeta deficient mice. Resistance of LTalphabeta or LTbetaR deficient mice correlated with unaltered cerebral microcirculation and absence of ischemia, as documented by magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, associated with lack of microvascular obstruction, while wild-type mice developed distinct microvascular pathology. Recruitment and activation of perforin(+ CD8(+ T cells, and their ICAM-1 expression were clearly attenuated in the brain of resistant mice. An essential contribution of LIGHT, another LTbetaR ligand, could be excluded, as LIGHT deficient mice rapidly succumbed to ECM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LTbetaR expressed on radioresistant resident stromal, probably endothelial cells, rather than hematopoietic cells, are essential for the development of ECM, as assessed by hematopoietic reconstitution experiment. Therefore, the data suggest that both functional LTbetaR and TNFR2 signaling are required and non-redundant for the development of microvascular pathology resulting in fatal ECM.

  7. Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review

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    Hsiu-Ching Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Does constraint-induced movement therapy improve activity and participation in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy? Does it improve activity and participation more than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint? Is the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Participants: Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with any level of motor disability. Intervention: The experimental group received constraint-induced movement therapy (defined as restraint of the less affected upper limb during supervised activity practice of the more affected upper limb. The control group received no intervention, sham intervention, or the same dose of upper limb therapy. Outcome measures: Measures of upper limb activity and participation were used in the analysis. Results: Constraint-induced movement therapy was more effective than no/sham intervention in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.63, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.06 and participation (SMD 1.21, 95% CI 0.41 to 2.02. However, constraint-induced movement therapy was no better than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint either in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.05, 95% CI –0.21 to 0.32 or participation (SMD –0.02, 95% CI –0.34 to 0.31. The effect of constraint-induced movement therapy was not related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children. Conclusions: This review suggests that constraint-induced movement therapy is more effective than no intervention, but no more effective than the same dose of upper limb practice without restraint. Registration: PROSPERO CRD42015024665. [Chiu H-C, Ada L (2016 Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 130–137

  8. CD8+ T Cells Induce Fatal Brainstem Pathology during Cerebral Malaria via Luminal Antigen-Specific Engagement of Brain Vasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A Swanson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection that results in thousands of deaths each year, mostly in African children. The in vivo mechanisms underlying this fatal condition are not entirely understood. Using the animal model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, we sought mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of CM. Fatal disease was associated with alterations in tight junction proteins, vascular breakdown in the meninges / parenchyma, edema, and ultimately neuronal cell death in the brainstem, which is consistent with cerebral herniation as a cause of death. At the peak of ECM, we revealed using intravital two-photon microscopy that myelomonocytic cells and parasite-specific CD8+ T cells associated primarily with the luminal surface of CNS blood vessels. Myelomonocytic cells participated in the removal of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs from cerebral blood vessels, but were not required for the disease. Interestingly, the majority of disease-inducing parasite-specific CD8+ T cells interacted with the lumen of brain vascular endothelial cells (ECs, where they were observed surveying, dividing, and arresting in a cognate peptide-MHC I dependent manner. These activities were critically dependent on IFN-γ, which was responsible for activating cerebrovascular ECs to upregulate adhesion and antigen-presenting molecules. Importantly, parasite-specific CD8+ T cell interactions with cerebral vessels were impaired in chimeric mice rendered unable to present EC antigens on MHC I, and these mice were in turn resistant to fatal brainstem pathology. Moreover, anti-adhesion molecule (LFA-1 / VLA-4 therapy prevented fatal disease by rapidly displacing luminal CD8+ T cells from cerebrovascular ECs without affecting extravascular T cells. These in vivo data demonstrate that parasite-specific CD8+ T cell-induced fatal vascular breakdown and subsequent neuronal death during ECM is associated with luminal, antigen

  9. Is there any evidence that cerebral protection is beneficial? Experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, S

    2006-04-01

    This article presents the available experimental data from the world literature on the use of cerebral protection devices during carotid artery stenting (CAS). Clinical studies relying on surrogate markers of cerebral embolisation in place of neurological event rate as primary outcome measures are evaluated alongside bench-top and animal studies. These surrogate markers include evaluations of outcomes using procedural transcranial Doppler (TCD) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of brain (DWI). Pathological analyses of debris retrieved from in-vivo analyses of protection devices are also included in this review because although the focus of these studies was primarily clinical, the laboratory data will be preferentially presented and it provides interesting insights. It can be shown that each of the three philosophies of cerebral protection, namely flow arrest (proximal or distal), flow reversal and distal filtration is capable of the entrapment of sizeable debris that would logically threaten devastating stroke if it embolized to the brain. Whilst balloon occlusion significantly reduces the procedural microembolic load (particles less than 60 mm) and flow reversal may be the first means to entirely eliminate it, filters may be associated with increased microembolization. This has been described by some workers as controlled embolization. Certainly, particles smaller than the pore size of currently available filters (60-140 mm) will readily evade capture due to filter periflow and through-flow. There is evidence to suggest that tens of thousands of particles of this size may be released during CAS and there is some evidence that this may be associated with more new white lesions on DWI of brain. The clinical consequences of this controlled embolization however, remain unclear and sophisticated neuropsychometric test batteries may need to be applied at later time points to detect subtle injury that may be compounded by a late inflammatory response

  10. Glycopyrrolate does not influence the visual or motor-induced increase in regional cerebral perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Olesen, Niels D; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine may contribute to the increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during cerebral activation since glycopyrrolate, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholine, abolishes the exercise-induced increase in middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity. We tested the hypothesis that cholinergic...... vasodilatation is important for the increase in rCBF during cerebral activation. The subjects were 11 young healthy males at an age of 24 ± 3 years (mean ± SD). We used arterial spin labeling and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate rCBF with and without...... intravenous glycopyrrolate during a handgrip motor task and visual stimulation. Glycopyrrolate increased heart rate from 56 ± 9 to 114 ± 14 beats/min (mean ± SD; p

  11. Hiperoxia por dos horas produce daño morfológico cerebral luego de asfixia neonatal experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Benavides

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar el efecto de una exposición de dos horas de hiperoxia al 21%, 40% y 100% sobre la morfología cerebral, en un modelo experimental de asfixia neonatal. Diseño: Estudio experimental. Institución: Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú. Material biológico: Ratas albinas Holtzmann. Intervenciones: Ciento veinte ratas albinas Holtzmann de una semana de nacidas (a excepción del grupo control fueron sometidas a asfixia experimental por ligadura de la arteria carótida izquierda y luego expuestas a hipoxia (oxígeno al 8%. Después fueron asignadas aleatoriamente a uno de los siguientes grupos: exposición por dos horas a O2 al 100%, a O2 al 40%, a O2 al 21% y un grupo control (no expuesto a asfixia experimental. El daño cerebral fue evaluado mediante la medición del peso cerebral y el porcentaje del área cerebral con daño microscópico. Principales medidas de resultados: Daño cerebral. Resultados: El peso cerebral promedio fue menor en los animales de los grupos sometidos a hiperoxia experimental (ANOVA; p<0,001. Se presentó daño cerebral microscópico con mayor frecuencia en el grupo sometido a hipoxia experimental que recibió O2 100% por dos horas y con menor frecuencia en el que recibió O2 al 40% (60% versus 43,3%, diferencia que fue estadísticamente significativa (prueba χ²; p<0,001. El grupo sometido a hipoxia experimental que recibió O2 100% tuvo un mayor porcentaje promedio de área cerebral con daño microscópico (18,3%, en comparación con los otros grupos de hipoxia experimental, aunque la diferencia no fue estadísticamente significativa (ANOVA; p=0,123. Conclusiones: La hiperoxia al 100% por dos horas se asoció con menor peso cerebral y mayor daño cerebral en animales de experimentación sometidos a asfixia neonatal experimental.

  12. Astragaloside IV for Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia: Preclinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV (AST-IV is a principal component of Radix Astragali seu Hedysari (Huangqi and exerts potential neuroprotection in experimental ischemic stroke. Here, we systematically assessed the effectiveness and possible mechanisms of AST-IV for experimental acute ischemic stroke. An electronic search in eight databases was conducted from inception to March 2016. The study quality score was evaluated using the CAMARADES. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analyses. Thirteen studies with 244 animals were identified. The study quality score of included studies ranged from 3/10 to 8/10. Eleven studies showed significant effects of AST-IV for ameliorating the neurological function score (P<0.05; seven studies for reducing the infarct volume (P<0.05; and three or two studies for reducing the brain water content and Evans blue leakage (P<0.05, respectively, compared with the control. The mechanisms of AST-IV for ischemic stroke are multiple such as antioxidative/nitration stress reaction, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptosis. In conclusion, the findings of present study indicated that AST-IV could improve neurological deficits and infarct volume and reduce the blood-brain barrier permeability in experimental cerebral ischemia despite some methodological flaws. Thus, AST-IV exerted a possible neuroprotective effect during the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury largely through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptosis properties.

  13. Analysis of cerebral vessels dynamics using experimental data with missed segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, O. N.; Abdurashitov, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Shihalov, G. M.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Physiological signals often contain various bad segments that occur due to artifacts, failures of the recording equipment or varying experimental conditions. The related experimental data need to be preprocessed to avoid such parts of recordings. In the case of few bad segments, they can simply be removed from the signal and its analysis is further performed. However, when there are many extracted segments, the internal structure of the analyzed physiological process may be destroyed, and it is unclear whether such signal can be used in diagnostic-related studies. In this paper we address this problem for the case of cerebral vessels dynamics. We perform analysis of simulated data in order to reveal general features of quantifying scaling features of complex signals with distinct correlation properties and show that the effects of data loss are significantly different for experimental data with long-range correlations and anti-correlations. We conclude that the cerebral vessels dynamics is significantly less sensitive to missed data fragments as compared with signals with anti-correlated statistics.

  14. MRI of experimental focal cerebral ischemia in sheep; MR-Bildgebung eines experimentellen Schlaganfallmodells beim Schaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerschler, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Boltze, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Immunologie und Transfusionsmedizin; Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zelltherapie und Immunologie (Germany); Waldmin, D. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Veterinaer-Anatomisches Inst.; Gille, U. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zelltherapie und Immunologie (Germany); Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Veterinaer-Anatomisches Inst.; Zimmer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: With respect to the specific characteristic of rete mirabile epidurale rostrale in sheep, the aim of this study was to investigate the use of time of flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to observe vascular anatomy and to validate MCA occlusion in a new model of experimental focal cerebral ischemia by permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in sheep (designed to study stroke therapy using autologous stem cells from umbilical cord blood). Furthermore, we wanted to assess the extent and natural time course of ischemic focal brain injury in sheep using functional and morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Method: 13 Merino sheep were examined. In 4 of the animals all, in 5 sheep 1 or 2 MCA branches were occluded and in 1 one case touched (sham operation). 4 controls did not undergo a surgical procedure. 23 MRI sessions were performed in 10 sheep. These sessions included T1, T2, T2{sup *} sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and TOF MRA before and 2 - 46 days after the onset of stroke using a 1.5T clinical MR scanner. Corrosion casts of the cerebral arteries of 3 sheep were prepared and compared to MRA. Results: The MRA visualized the vessel anatomy or occlusion distal to the rete mirabile. Anatomical variants concerning the variant origin of the MCA and inconstant arteria choroidea rostralis and communicans rostralis were revealed. Sheep with occluded left MCA showed space occupying lesions with a drop in ADC values. Depending on the number of preserved MCA branches (0; 1; 2), highly significant (p < 0.001) differences in lesion size (21 {+-} 5.7; 13; 1.7 {+-} 1.3 ml) could be found. No indication of ischemia but minimal contusion damage was observed in the sham operated animal. (orig.)

  15. Asterixis in the leg induced by anterior cerebral artery infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Jang, Hyun-Soon; Roh, Sook Young; Yoo, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Eun Hye; Kim, Byung-Su; Choe, Yeo Reum; Lee, Ko-Eun

    2016-06-01

    Asterixis commonly occurs in a patient with metabolic encephalopathy, whereas focal brain lesions such as thalamus, cerebellum, or frontal area also cause focal or unilateral asterixis in the arms. We report a novel case of asterixis in the leg after unilateral anterior cerebral artery territory infarction. A 76-year-old man was admitted with sudden-onset mild right leg weakness and postural instability due to knee buckling. He was diagnosed with ischemic stroke in the left prefrontal area and cingulated gyrus by brain magnetic imaging. Needle electromyography of the right vastus lateralis muscle while standing showed intermittent periods of EMG silence, consistent with asterixis. There were no abnormal involuntary movements in the upper extremities. This case suggests that gait disturbance or postural instability after structural lesions in the prefrontal area may be directly related to asterixis in the leg, not in the arm associated with postural failure.

  16. Comparison of I-123 IMP cerebral uptake and MR spectroscopy following experimental carotid occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.; Jolesz, F.A.; Polak, J.F.; Kronauge, J.F.; Adams, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Both I-123 IMP scintigraphy and MRI have been suggested as sensitive detectors of changes shortly after acute cerebral infarction. We compared the uptake of N-isopropyl I-123 p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and MR spectroscopy of the brain after internal carotid artery ligation. Thirteen gerbils were lightly anesthetized with ether. After neck dissection, an internal carotid artery was occluded. After 2.8 hours, 100 muCi I-123 IMP was injected intravenously into the 13 experimental animals plus three controls. Seven gerbils remained asymptomatic while six developed hemiparesis. At 3 hours after ligation, the animals were killed. The brains were bisected and T1 and T2 relaxation times were determined for the right and left hemispheres by MR spectroscopy immediately after dissection. I-123 IMP uptake was then determined in the samples. Interhemispheric differences in uptake for I-123 IMP were 0.1 +/- 1.7% (SEM) in the control, 33.5 +/- 10% in the asymptomatic and 54.6 +/- 9.7% in the symptomatic animals. Significant differences were seen with I-123 IMP in 6/7 asymptomatic and 6/6 symptomatic animals. In conclusion, I-123 is more sensitive than T1 or T2 relaxation times for the detection of cerebral perfusion abnormalities. Prolongation in T1 and T2 relaxation times correlates closely with increased brain tissue water content and the development of symptoms, indicators of structural brain damage and probable infarction

  17. Protective Effect Of Bosentan In Experimental Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Ataş

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In cerebral ischemia, there are many factors that start the events leading to cell death. These factors contain free radical production, excitotoxicity, sodium and calcium flow disruption, enzymatic changes, stimulation of the inflamatuar process, the activation of platelets and leukocytes, delayed coagulation, endothelial dysfunction and endothelin (ET release. Bosentan is the competitive antagonist of endothelin receptors; ETA and ETB. The aim of this study is to determine whether the protective effects of bosentan in experimental cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. MATERIAL and METHODS: In this study, after ischemia-reperfusion procedure, bosentan molecule was regularly given to rats for 5 days. The brain tissues of decapitated rats were histopathologically examined. The levels of oxidant and antioxidant were determined in these brain tissues. RESULTS: It was observed that antioxidant levels and histopathological examinations were in rats given bosentan better than control group rats. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, this study has showed that bosentan may be an agent which could reduce negative effects resulting from neuronal death associated with ischemic stroke.

  18. Preliminary findings of cerebral responses on transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation on experimental heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usichenko, Taras; Laqua, René; Leutzow, Bianca; Lotze, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation (TVNS) is a promising complementary method of pain relief. However, the neural networks associated with its analgesic effects are still to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, in a randomized order, with twenty healthy subjects who were exposed to experimental heat pain stimulation applied to the right forearm using a Contact Heat-Evoked Potential Stimulator. While in one session TVNS was administered bilaterally to the concha auriculae with maximal, non-painful intensity, the stimulation device was switched off in the other session (placebo condition). Pain thresholds were measured before and after each session. Heat stimulation elicited fMRI activation in cerebral pain processing regions. Activation magnitude in the secondary somatosensory cortex, posterior insula, anterior cingulate and caudate nucleus was associated with heat stimulation without TVNS. During TVNS, this association was only seen for the right anterior insula. TVNS decreased fMRI signals in the anterior cingulate cortex in comparison with the placebo condition; however, there was no relevant pain reducing effect over the group as a whole. In contrast, TVNS compared to the placebo condition showed an increased activation in the primary motor cortex, contralateral to the site of heat stimulation, and in the right amygdala. In conclusion, in the protocol used here, TVNS specifically modulated the cerebral response to heat pain, without having a direct effect on pain thresholds.

  19. Cerebral impact of prenatal irradiation by 131I: an experimental model of clinical neuroradioembryological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talko, V V; Loganovsky, K M; Drozd, I P; Tukalenko, Ye V; Loganovska, T K; Nechayev, S Yu; Masiuk, S V; Prokhorova, Ye M

    2017-12-01

    Human brain in prenatal period is a most vulnerable to ionizing radiation body structure. Unlike atomic bombings or radiological interventions in healthcare leading at most to external irradiation the intensive internal exposure may occur upon nuclear reactor accidents followed by substantial release and fallout of radioactive 131I. The latter can lead to specific neuroradioembryological effects. To create an experimental model of prenatal cerebral radiation effects of 131I in human and to determine the experimental and clinical neuroradioembryological effects.Study object. The neuroradioembryological effects in Vistar rats exposed to 131I in prenatal period. Nervous system status and mental status in 104 persons exposed to ionizing radiation in utero due to the ChNPP accident and the same in 78 not exposed subjects. Experimental i.e. behavioral techniques, including the spontaneous locomotive, exploratory activity and learning ability assessment, clinical i.e. neuropsychiatric, neuro and psychometric, neuropsychological, neurophys iological methods, both with dosimetric and statistical methods were applied. Intrauterine irradiation of Wistar rats by 131I was simulated on a model of one time oral 27.5 kBq radionu clide administration in the mid gestation period (0.72±0.14 Gy fetal thyroid dose), which provides extrapolation of neuroradioembryological effects in rats to that in humans exposed to intrauterine radiation as a result of the Chornobyl catastrophe. Abnormalities in behavioral reactions and decreased output of conditioned reflex reactions identified in the 10 month old rats suggest a deterioration of cerebral cognition in exposed animals. Specific cog nitive deficit featuring a disharmonic intellectual development through the relatively decreased verbal intelligence versus relative increase of nonverbal one is remained in prenatally exposed persons. This can indicate to dysfunc tion of cortical limbic system with especial involvement of a dominant

  20. Lipid-soluble cigarette smoking particles induce expression of inflammatory and extracellular-matrix-related genes in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, Petter; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    /JNK) and their downstream transcription factors (ATF-2, Elk-1 and c-Jun) were examined. RESULTS: We observed that compared with control (DMSO-treated cerebral arteries), the cerebral arteries treated by DSP exhibited enhanced expression of MMP13 and AT(1) receptors, but not of AT(2) receptors, at both mRNA and protein...... factor ATF-2 and Elk-1. However, ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK activities were markedly expressed in the control (organ culture per se with DMSO), and DSP failed to further enhance the activation of ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK in the cerebral arteries. CONCLUSIONS: DSP induces cerebral vessel inflammation...

  1. Experimentally-induced dissociation impairs visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Chris R; Mersaditabari, Niloufar

    2013-12-01

    Dissociation is a phenomenon common in a number of psychological disorders and has been frequently suggested to impair memory for traumatic events. In this study we explored the effects of dissociation on visual memory. A dissociative state was induced experimentally using a mirror-gazing task and its short-term effects on memory performance were investigated. Sixty healthy individuals took part in the experiment. Induced dissociation impaired visual memory performance relative to a control condition; however, the degree of dissociation was not associated with lower memory scores in the experimental group. The results have theoretical and practical implications for individuals who experience frequent dissociative states such as patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Mediates Parenchymal Arteriole and Posterior Cerebral Artery Remodeling During Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Fisher, Courtney; Downs, Kelsey; Moss, M Elizabeth; Jaffe, Iris Z; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2017-12-01

    The brain is highly susceptible to injury caused by hypertension because the increased blood pressure causes artery remodeling that can limit cerebral perfusion. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism prevents hypertensive cerebral artery remodeling, but the vascular cell types involved have not been defined. In the periphery, the endothelial MR mediates hypertension-induced vascular injury, but cerebral and peripheral arteries are anatomically distinct; thus, these findings cannot be extrapolated to the brain. The parenchymal arterioles determine cerebrovascular resistance. Determining the effects of hypertension and MR signaling on these arterioles could lead to a better understanding of cerebral small vessel disease. We hypothesized that endothelial MR signaling mediates inward cerebral artery remodeling and reduced cerebral perfusion during angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension. The biomechanics of the parenchymal arterioles and posterior cerebral arteries were studied in male C57Bl/6 and endothelial cell-specific MR knockout mice and their appropriate controls using pressure myography. AngII increased plasma aldosterone and decreased cerebral perfusion in C57Bl/6 and MR-intact littermates. Endothelial cell MR deletion improved cerebral perfusion in AngII-treated mice. AngII hypertension resulted in inward hypotrophic remodeling; this was prevented by MR antagonism and endothelial MR deletion. Our studies suggest that endothelial cell MR mediates hypertensive remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation and large pial arteries. AngII-induced inward remodeling of cerebral arteries and arterioles was associated with a reduction in cerebral perfusion that could worsen the outcome of stroke or contribute to vascular dementia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Deficiency of Nox2 prevents angiotensin II-induced inward remodeling in cerebral arterioles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Lung eChan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II is an important determinant of inward remodeling in cerebral arterioles. Many of the vascular effects of angiotensin II are mediated by reactive oxygen species generated from homologues of NADPH oxidase with Nox2 predominating in small arteries and arterioles. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that superoxide generated by Nox2 plays a role in angiotensin II-induced cerebral arteriolar remodeling. We examined Nox2-deficient and wild-type mice in which a pressor or a non-pressor dose of angiotensin II (1000 or 200 ng/kg/day or saline was infused for 4 weeks via osmotic minipumps. Systolic arterial pressure was measured by a tail-cuff method. Pressure and diameter of cerebral arterioles were measured through an open cranial window in anesthetized mice. Cross-sectional area (by histology and superoxide level (by hydroethidine staining of cerebral arterioles were determined ex vivo. The pressor, but not the non-pressor, dose of angiotensin II significantly increased systolic arterial pressure in both wild-type and Nox2-deficient mice. Both doses of angiotensin II increased superoxide levels and significantly reduced external diameter in maximally dilated cerebral arterioles in wild-type mice. Increased superoxide and inward remodeling were prevented in Nox2-deficient mice. Moreover, only the pressor dose of AngII increased cross-sectional area of arteriolar wall in wild-type mice and was prevented in Nox2-deficient mice. In conclusion, superoxide derived from Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase plays an important role in angiotensin II-mediated inward remodeling in cerebral arterioles. This effect appears to be independent of pressure and different from that of hypertrophy.

  4. Dynamic assessment of acute blunt cerebral contusions and lacerations with CT perfusion: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Tao; Quan Guanmin; Liu Huaijun; Gao Guodong; Lei Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of blood perfusion in traumatic cerebral contusion and laceration of experimental model. Methods: Impact-acceleration head traumatic cerebral contusion and laceration models of 40 rabbits were established. CTP was made for all animals at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after head injury. The original images were transferred to workstation for postprocessing. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) of central area, peripheral area of contusion and laceration, and their mirror areas were measured on the section in which lesions were in their maximal area. The CTP parameters among different areas were compared with paired samples t test. The evolvement of CBF, CBV and MTT of cerebral contusion and laceration areas were recorded as well. Then, the histological abnormalities of central and peripheral areas were observed separately by referring to corresponding CTP maps. Results: Experimental models were successfully made in 35 rabbits. Abnormal signal intensity was detected on their T 2 WI and DWI images, which was consistent with brain contusion. For CTP parameters: (1) The CBF of central area of the lesions decreased markedly after trauma and reached its nadir at 12 h. Then the CBF of central area rose slowly from 24 h. The value of CBF of the central area at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 72 h were (27.58±18.70), (20.64±6.50), (23.38± 7.53), (22.14±10.25), (25.08±11.01), (43.08±18.33) and (54.79± 14.63) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 respectively. Whereas the CBF value of the corresponding mirror areas were (62.28±25.46), (60.67±16.19), (67.00±21.34), (74.46±20.11), (66.73±11.68), (81.63± 10.99) and 86.16±10.57) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 respectively. There was significant difference of CBF between the central and the mirror areas (t=4.41, 5.57, 5.47, 6.02, 6.44, 4.81, 10.60 respectively, P 0.05). (2) The CBV of central area of the lesions also decreased obviously after trauma and reached its

  5. Effect of modified constraint induced movement therapy on weight bearing and protective extension in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Gharib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Constraint induced movement therapy is one of the new therapeutic interventions that limits the performance of intact upper limb with increased use of the affected limb. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of modified constraint induced movement therapy on weight bearing & protective extension in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.Methods: 21 hemiplegic children were selected and randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Common Practices of Occupational Therapy applied for 6 weeks in both groups equally and test group received constrain induced movement therapy for three hours every day. Weight-bearing and protective extension was measured based on quality of test skills of upper limbs (QUEST. Data analyzed using appropriated statistical methods. Results: 11 children in the experimental group (7 girls, 4 boys with mean age 47.2 ± 55.5 months and 10 children in the control group (5 girls, 5 boys with mean age 19.2 ± 10.5 months were studied. No significant difference observed before and after six weeks intervention between two groups (P>0.05. There was a significant change before and after six weeks intervention in both subscales (P<0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that modified constraint induced movement therapy may affect weight bearing, but has no effect on the protective extension.

  6. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til [Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen (Germany) and Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Philips Healthcare, X-Ray Pre-Development, Veenpluis 4-6, 5684PC Best (Netherlands); Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  7. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  8. Electroacupuncture pretreatment induces tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia through activation of canonical Notch pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroacupuncture (EA pretreatment can induce the tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully understood. Emerging evidences suggest that canonical Notch signaling may be involved in ischemic brain injury. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that EA pretreatment-induced tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia is mediated by Notch signaling. Results EA pretreatment significantly enhanced Notch1, Notch4 and Jag1 gene transcriptions in the striatum, except Notch1 intracellular domain level, which could be increased evidently by ischemia. After ischemia and reperfusion, Hes1 mRNA and Notch1 intracellular domain level in ischemic striatum in EA pretreatment group were increased and reached the peak at 2 h and 24 h, respectively, which were both earlier than the peak achieved in control group. Intraventricular injection with the γ-secretase inhibitor MW167 attenuated the neuroprotective effect of EA pretreatment. Conclusions EA pretreatment induces the tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia through activation of canonical Notch pathway.

  9. Experimental study of the long-term effects of cephalic irradiation on local cerebral circulation. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, R.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to follow the effects of fractionated cehalic irradiation (average dosee 100 rads) on local cerebral blood circulation. Observations were made on unanaesthetized rabbits in terms of two circulatory responses, one of which is associated with rapid eye movement sleep and the other produced by inhalation of a mixture of air and 5% carbon dioxide. Both responses take the form of a characteristic increase in cerebral flow. The method of measuring variations in local cerebral flow relies on changes in the thermal conduction of cerebral tissue associated with the changes in circulation. Placement of the measuring probes entails fixation of electrodes for deriving the cortical and hippocampal electroencephalographic activity. The prreliminary results refer to two animalswhich were subjected to three andd four cephalic irradiations off 1000 rads, spaced at least a month apart, at a dose rate of 70 rad min -1 . The increase and the rate of increase of cerebral flow during rapid eye movement sleep and COBinhalation proved significantly greater than the reference values from the third month on (after the second irradiation) in the case of one animal and from the sixth month on (after the third irradiation) in the case of the other. The response during rapid eye movement sleep was equal to 140% of the reference amplitude during the two observation periods in the first case, and to 110 and 150% respectively after the third and fourth irradiations in the second case. The CO 2 response was 140% of the reference value during the two observation periods in the first case, and 135% after the third and fourth irradiations in the second case. The functional significance of these changes in cerebral output is analysed in terms of the regulation of cerebral circulation. (author)

  10. Diffuse optical monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in experimental and clinical neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Núñez, Igor D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the brain using diffuse optical methods has progressed rapidly in the recent years. The possibility of studying the cerebral microvasculature in addition to the portability and low cost of these devices, opens a new door in the study of the cerebral pathophysiologies. In this scenario, the study of the cerebral hemodynamics of ischemic patients might allow neurologists to improve the performance of the early medical treatments and therapies used up to date. In this thesis, I ...

  11. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  12. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji [Kure National Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  13. Hypertension-Induced Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Leading to Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yan-Hong; Lyu, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hong; Li, Rui

    2018-03-05

    Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017. We used the keywords of "hypertension", "cerebral small vessel disease", "white matter lesions", "enlarged perivascular spaces", "lacunar infarcts", "cerebral microbleeds", and "cognitive impairment" in the database of PubMed. Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the hypertension-induced pathophysiological changes that occur in CSVD and the correlation between CSVD and cognitive impairment. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that hypertension-related changes (e.g., small vascular lesions, inflammatory reactions, hypoperfusion, oxidative stress, damage to autoregulatory processes and the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) can occur over time in cerebral small vessels, potentially leading to lower cognitive function when blood pressure (BP) control is poor or lacking. Both isolated and co-occurrent CSVD can lead to cognitive deterioration, and this effect may be attributable to a dysfunction in either the cholinergic system or the functionality of cortical and subcortical tracts. We explore the currently available evidence about the hypertensive vasculopathy and inflammatory changes that occur in CSVD. Both are vital prognostic indicators of the development of cognitive impairment. Future studies should be performed to validate the relationship between BP levels and CSVD progression and between the numbers, volumes, and anatomical locations of CSVD and cognitive impairment.

  14. CT perfusion imaging on the disturbance of regional cerebral microcirculation in a pre-infarction period: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Peiyi; Liang Chenyang; Lin Yan; Yuan Fang; Hu Ling

    2003-01-01

    astrocytic foot, which pressed capillary vessel, induced the disturbance of regional cerebral microcirculation, and then aggravated hypoxic ischemic state in regional brain parenchyma. Perfusion CT and its parameters' analysis may play an increasing role to delineate the reversible hypoperfusion areas in pre-infarction period. Analyzing the relationship of rCBF and rCBV is very helpful to know the status of the capillary vessels in regional cerebral hypoperfusion area

  15. Hemin offers neuroprotection through inducing exogenous neuroglobin in focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Zhu, Haiyuan; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inducible effect of hemin on exogenous neuroglobin (Ngb) in focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia in rats. Methods: 125 healthy SD rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham-operation control group, operation group, hemin treatment group, exogenous Ngb treatment group, and hemin and exogenous Ngb joint treatment group. Twenty-four hours after focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia, Ngb expression was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analyses, while the brain water content and infarct volume were examined. Results: Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analyses showed more pronounced Ngb expression in the hemin and exogenous Ngb joint operation group than in the hemin or exogenous Ngb individual treatment groups, thus producing significant differences in brain water content and infarct volume (p exogenous Ngb. PMID:24966924

  16. Impaired cerebral microcirculation induced by ammonium chloride in rats is due to cortical adenosine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Bjerrum, Esben Jannik; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver failure results in hyperammonaemia, impaired regulation of cerebral microcirculation, encephalopathy and death. However, the key mediator that alters cerebral microcirculation remains unidentified. In this study we show that topical ammonium significantly increases periarteriolar......: In patients with liver failure disturbances in the brain function is caused in part by ammonia toxicity. In our project we have studied how ammonia, through adenosine release, affects the blood flow in the brain of rats. In our experimental model we demonstrated that the detrimental effect of ammonia on blood...... flow regulation was counteracted by blocking the adenosine receptors in the brain. With this observation we have identified a novel potential treatment target. If we can confirm our findings in a future clinical study it might help patients suffering from liver failure and the severe condition called...

  17. Upper limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in experimental renovascular hypertension in the baboon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgaard, S; Jones, J V; MacKenzie, E T

    1975-01-01

    The effect of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow was studied by the intracarotid 133Xe clearance method in baboons. The arterial blood pressure was raised in gradual steps with angiotensin. Baboons with renal hypertension of 8-12 weeks duration were studied along with normotensive baboons....... In initially normotensive baboons, cerebral blood flow remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had risen to the range of 140 to 154 mm Hg; thereafter cerebral blood flow increased with each rise in mean arterial blood pressure. In the chronically hypertensive baboons, cerebral blood flow...... remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had been elevated to the range of 155 to 169 mm Hg. Thus, in chronic hypertension it appears that there are adaptive changes in the cerebral circulation which may help to protect the brain from further increases in arterial blood pressure....

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase γ is required for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norinne Lacerda-Queiroz

    Full Text Available Experimental cerebral malaria (ECM is characterized by a strong immune response, with leukocyte recruitment, blood-brain barrier breakdown and hemorrhage in the central nervous system. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ is central in signaling diverse cellular functions. Using PI3Kγ-deficient mice (PI3Kγ-/- and a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor, we investigated the relevance of PI3Kγ for the outcome and the neuroinflammatory process triggered by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection. Infected PI3Kγ-/- mice had greater survival despite similar parasitemia levels in comparison with infected wild type mice. Histopathological analysis demonstrated reduced hemorrhage, leukocyte accumulation and vascular obstruction in the brain of infected PI3Kγ-/- mice. PI3Kγ deficiency also presented lower microglial activation (Iba-1+ reactive microglia and T cell cytotoxicity (Granzyme B expression in the brain. Additionally, on day 6 post-infection, CD3+CD8+ T cells were significantly reduced in the brain of infected PI3Kγ-/- mice when compared to infected wild type mice. Furthermore, expression of CD44 in CD8+ T cell population in the brain tissue and levels of phospho-IkB-α in the whole brain were also markedly lower in infected PI3Kγ-/- mice when compared with infected wild type mice. Finally, AS605240, a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor, significantly delayed lethality in infected wild type mice. In brief, our results indicate a pivotal role for PI3Kγ in the pathogenesis of ECM.

  19. Diet-Induced Ketosis Protects Against Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Ye, Lena; Sharma, Katyayini; Jin, Yongming; Harrison, Matthew M; Caldwell, Tylor; Berthiaume, Jessica M; Luo, Yu; LaManna, Joseph C; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade we have consistently shown that ketosis is neuroprotective against ischemic insults in rats. We reported that diet-induced ketotic rats had a significant reduction in infarct volume when subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and improved survival and recovery after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The neuroprotective mechanisms of ketosis (via ketogenic diet; KG) include (i) ketones are alternate energy substrates that can restore energy balance when glucose metabolism is deficient and (ii) ketones modulate cell-signalling pathways that are cytoprotective. We investigated the effects of diet-induced ketosis following transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice. The correlation between levels of ketosis and hypoxic inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), AKT (also known as protein kinase B or PKB) and 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were determined. Mice were fed with KG diet or standard lab-chow (STD) diet for 4 weeks. For the MCAO group, mice underwent 60 min of MCAO and total brain infarct volumes were evaluated 48 h after reperfusion. In a separate group of mice, brain tissue metabolites, levels of HIF-1α, phosphorylated AKT (pAKT), and AMPK were measured. After feeding a KG diet, levels of blood ketone bodies (beta-hydroxyburyrate, BHB) were increased. There was a proportional decrease in infarct volumes with increased blood BHB levels (KG vs STD; 4.2 ± 0.6 vs 7.8 ± 2.2 mm 3 , mean ± SEM). A positive correlation was also observed with HIF-1α and pAKT relative to blood BHB levels. Our results showed that chronic ketosis can be induced in mice by KG diet and was neuroprotective against focal cerebral ischemia in a concentration dependent manner. Potential mechanisms include upregulation of cytoprotective pathways such as those associated with HIF-1α, pAKT and AMPK.

  20. Peroxynitrite-induced relaxation in isolated canine cerebral arteries and mechanisms of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianfeng; Li Wenyan; Altura, Bella T.; Altura, Burton M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the vascular actions of peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), the product of superoxide and nitric oxide (NO), in isolated canine cerebral arteries and to gain insight into its potential mechanisms of action. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, ONOO - (from 10 -7 to 10 -6 M) was able to reduce the basal tension. In prostaglandin F2α-precontracted canine basilar arterial rings, ONOO - elicited concentration-dependent relaxation at concentrations from 10 -8 to 10 -5 M. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% maximal relaxation (EC 50 ) to ONOO - were 4.06 x 10 -6 and 4.12 x 10 -6 M in intact and denuded rings, respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in relaxation responses were found in ring preparations with or without endothelium (P > 0.05). The presence of either 5 μM methylene blue (MB) or 5 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly inhibited the relaxations induced by ONOO - . Tetraethylammonium chloride (T-2265) significantly decreased the ONOO - -induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. However, ONOO - had no effect on rings precontracted by high KCL (P > 0.05). Addition of low concentrations of calyculin A (50 nM) was able to abolish the ONOO - -induced relaxation. Furthermore, ONOO - significantly inhibited calcium-induced contractions of K + -depolarized canine cerebral rings in a concentration-related manner. Lastly, a variety of pharmacological agents and antagonists including L-NMMA, L-arginine, indomethacin, atropine, naloxone, diphenhydramine, cimetine, glibenclamide, haloperidol, etc., did not influence the relaxant effects of ONOO - on the rings. Our new results suggest that ONOO - -triggered relaxation, on canine cerebral arteries, is mediated by elevation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, membrane hyperpolarization via K+ channel activation, activation of myosin light chain phosphatase activity, and interference with

  1. MFGE8 inhibits inflammasome-induced IL-1β production and limits postischemic cerebral injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, Nicolas; Li, Xuan; Lerouet, Dominique; Van Vré, Emily; Baker, Lauren; Harrison, James; Poittevin, Marine; Masters, Leanne; Nih, Lina; Margaill, Isabelle; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ryffel, Bernhard; Pocard, Marc; Tedgui, Alain; Kubis, Nathalie; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-03-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF 8 (MFGE8) plays important, nonredundant roles in several biological processes, including apoptotic cell clearance, angiogenesis, and adaptive immunity. Several recent studies have reported a potential role for MFGE8 in regulation of the innate immune response; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this role are poorly understood. Here, we show that MFGE8 is an endogenous inhibitor of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production. MFGE8 inhibited necrotic cell-induced and ATP-dependent IL-1β production by macrophages through mediation of integrin β(3) and P2X7 receptor interactions in primed cells. Itgb3 deficiency in macrophages abrogated the inhibitory effect of MFGE8 on ATP-induced IL-1β production. In a setting of postischemic cerebral injury in mice, MFGE8 deficiency was associated with enhanced IL-1β production and larger infarct size; the latter was abolished after treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist. MFGE8 supplementation significantly dampened caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production and reduced infarct size in wild-type mice, but did not limit cerebral necrosis in Il1b-, Itgb3-, or P2rx7-deficient animals. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MFGE8 regulates innate immunity through inhibition of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production.

  2. Photothrombosis-Induced Infarction of the Mouse Cerebral Cortex Is Not Affected by the Nrf2-Activator Sulforaphane

    OpenAIRE

    Porritt, Michelle J.; Andersson, Helene C.; Hou, Linda; Nilsson, Åsa; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos; Nilsson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 or the gene Nfe2l2) and subsequent induction of the phase II antioxidant system has previously been shown to exert neuroprotective action in a transient model of focal cerebral ischemia. However, its ability to attenuate functional and cellular deficits after permanent focal cerebral ischemia is not clear. We assessed the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane in the photothrombotic model of permanent fo...

  3. Effects of Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, on Photochemically Induced Cerebral Infarction in a Rat Hemiplegic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Kamikawa, Yurie

    2013-01-01

    Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533?nm (10?mm diameter), and the rose bengal was injected intra...

  4. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Kabiri; Mahbubeh Setorki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99). Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly hi...

  5. Anti neuroinflammatory effect of Vildagliptin in ischaemia-reperfusion induced cerebral infarction in normal and STZ induced type-II diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleru Purnachander

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the major risk factor for cerebral ischemic stroke. Increased base line levels of oxidative stress in diabetes will lead to cerebral ischemic damage. In pathological conditions such as cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, free radicals cause oxidative stress and inflammation leading to increased injury of brain. Inflammation is one of the major pathological mechanisms involved in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury. Vildagliptin newer anti-diabetic drug of the class DPP-4 inhibitors is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties apart from its antihyperglycemic activity. Therefore the aim of the present study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of Vildagliptin against cerebral infarction induced ischemia reperfusion injury in normal and STZ induced diabetic Wistar rats. Cerebral infarction was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion followed by 4 hr reperfusion. Percent infarction, inflammatory markers such as MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were analysed. Treatment with Vildagliptin for a period of four weeks produced significant reduction in percent cerebral infarct volume. Vildagliptin at 10 mg/kg dose, showed significant reduction in markers like MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in diabetic group when compared to normal group and in contrast significant increase in anti-inflammatory marker like IL-10 levels. Vildagliptin showed significant cerebroprotective effect by antiinflammatory mechanisms.

  6. Exacerbation of radiation induced meningioma due to hemorrhage after cerebral angiography. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Uesaka, Toshio; Matsukado, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who exhibited acute deterioration in her condition after cerebral angiography for evaluation of a large meningioma. She had undergone surgery and irradiation for a glioma in the right occipital lobe 23 years before this episode. She experienced incapacity at work. On CT and MRI, a large meningioma was detected on the left frontal convexity; this tumor was thought to be radiation-induced. Cerebral angiography was performed to assess the vascularization of the tumor. Her condition began to deteriorate 2.5 h after the cerebral angiography. CT revealed an increase in the mass of the tumor, and a high density area in the tumor. We immediately removed the tumor. Histopathological examinationrevealed the tumor to be a meningothelial meningioma. New hemorrhagic foci were identified in the tumor. In addition, macrophages containing hemosiderin were detected, and some of the tumor vessels exhibited hyaline degeneration. We suspected that angiography triggered bleeding in the meningioma, which was already predisposed to hemorrhage. (author)

  7. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen as mechanisms involved in protection against experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Marcele F; Kayano, Ana Carolina A V; Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Dos-Santos, João Conrado K; Judice, Carla; Blanco, Yara C; Shryock, Nathaniel; Sercundes, Michelle K; Ortolan, Luana S; Francelin, Carolina; Leite, Juliana A; Oliveira, Rafaella; Elias, Rosa M; Câmara, Niels O S; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Albrecht, Letusa; Farias, Alessandro S; Vicente, Cristina P; Werneck, Claudio C; Giorgio, Selma; Verinaud, Liana; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Marinho, Claudio R F; Lalwani, Pritesh; Amino, Rogerio; Aliberti, Julio; Costa, Fabio T M

    2018-03-20

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a multifactorial syndrome involving an exacerbated proinflammatory status, endothelial cell activation, coagulopathy, hypoxia, and accumulation of leukocytes and parasites in the brain microvasculature. Despite significant improvements in malaria control, 15% of mortality is still observed in CM cases, and 25% of survivors develop neurologic sequelae for life-even after appropriate antimalarial therapy. A treatment that ameliorates CM clinical signs, resulting in complete healing, is urgently needed. Previously, we showed a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)-protective effect against experimental CM. Here, we provide molecular evidence that HBO targets brain endothelial cells by decreasing their activation and inhibits parasite and leukocyte accumulation, thus improving cerebral microcirculatory blood flow. HBO treatment increased the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor over hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), an oxygen-sensitive cytosolic receptor, along with decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and kynurenine levels. Moreover, ablation of HIF-1α expression in endothelial cells in mice conferred protection against CM and improved survival. We propose that HBO should be pursued as an adjunctive therapy in CM patients to prolong survival and diminish deleterious proinflammatory reaction. Furthermore, our data support the use of HBO in therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes of non-CM disorders affecting the brain.-Bastos, M. F., Kayano, A. C. A. V., Silva-Filho, J. L., Dos-Santos, J. C. K., Judice, C., Blanco, Y. C., Shryock, N., Sercundes, M. K., Ortolan, L. S., Francelin, C., Leite, J. A., Oliveira, R., Elias, R. M., Câmara, N. O. S., Lopes, S. C. P., Albrecht, L., Farias, A. S., Vicente, C. P., Werneck, C. C., Giorgio, S., Verinaud, L., Epiphanio, S., Marinho, C. R. F., Lalwani, P., Amino, R., Aliberti, J., Costa, F. T. M. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen

  8. Specific Depletion of Ly6Chi Inflammatory Monocytes Prevents Immunopathology in Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Janina M.; Biswas, Aindrila; Djie-Maletz, Andrea; Limmer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Mack, Matthias; Hoerauf, Achim; Dunay, Ildiko Rita

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection of C57BL/6 mice leads to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) that is commonly associated with serious T cell mediated damage. In other parasitic infection models, inflammatory monocytes have been shown to regulate Th1 responses but their role in ECM remains poorly defined, whereas neutrophils are reported to contribute to ECM immune pathology. Making use of the recent development of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb), we depleted in vivo Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes (by anti-CCR2), Ly6G+ neutrophils (by anti-Ly6G) or both cell types (by anti-Gr1) during infection with Ovalbumin-transgenic PbA parasites (PbTg). Notably, the application of anti-Gr1 or anti-CCR2 but not anti-Ly6G antibodies into PbTg-infected mice prevented ECM development. In addition, depletion of Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes but not neutrophils led to decreased IFNγ levels and IFNγ+CD8+ T effector cells in the brain. Importantly, anti-CCR2 mAb injection did not prevent the generation of PbTg-specific T cell responses in the periphery, whereas anti-Gr1 mAb injection strongly diminished T cell frequencies and CTL responses. In conclusion, the specific depletion of Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes attenuated brain inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the CNS, which prevented ECM following Plasmodium infection, pointing out a substantial role of Ly6C+ monocytes in ECM inflammatory processes. PMID:25884830

  9. Doxycycline inhibits experimental cerebral malaria by reducing inflammatory immune reactions and tissue-degrading mediators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E Schmidt

    Full Text Available Malaria ranks among the most important infectious diseases worldwide and affects mostly people living in tropical countries. Mechanisms involved in disease progression are still not fully understood and specific treatments that might interfere with cerebral malaria (CM are limited. Here we show that administration of doxycycline (DOX prevented experimental CM (ECM in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA-infected C57BL/6 wildtype (WT mice in an IL-10-independent manner. DOX-treated mice showed an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB and attenuated brain inflammation. Importantly, if WT mice were infected with a 20-fold increased parasite load, they could be still protected from ECM if they received DOX from day 4-6 post infection, despite similar parasitemia compared to control-infected mice that did not receive DOX and developed ECM. Infiltration of T cells and cytotoxic responses were reduced in brains of DOX-treated mice. Analysis of brain tissue by RNA-array revealed reduced expression of chemokines and tumour necrosis factor (TNF in brains of DOX-treated mice. Furthermore, DOX-administration resulted in brains of the mice in reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 and granzyme B, which are both factors associated with ECM pathology. Systemic interferon gamma production was reduced and activated peripheral T cells accumulated in the spleen in DOX-treated mice. Our results suggest that DOX targeted inflammatory processes in the central nervous system (CNS and prevented ECM by impaired brain access of effector T cells in addition to its anti-parasitic effect, thereby expanding the understanding of molecular events that underlie DOX-mediated therapeutic interventions.

  10. Specific depletion of Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes prevents immunopathology in experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumak, Beatrix; Klocke, Katrin; Kuepper, Janina M; Biswas, Aindrila; Djie-Maletz, Andrea; Limmer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Mack, Matthias; Hoerauf, Achim; Dunay, Ildiko Rita

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection of C57BL/6 mice leads to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) that is commonly associated with serious T cell mediated damage. In other parasitic infection models, inflammatory monocytes have been shown to regulate Th1 responses but their role in ECM remains poorly defined, whereas neutrophils are reported to contribute to ECM immune pathology. Making use of the recent development of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb), we depleted in vivo Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes (by anti-CCR2), Ly6G+ neutrophils (by anti-Ly6G) or both cell types (by anti-Gr1) during infection with Ovalbumin-transgenic PbA parasites (PbTg). Notably, the application of anti-Gr1 or anti-CCR2 but not anti-Ly6G antibodies into PbTg-infected mice prevented ECM development. In addition, depletion of Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes but not neutrophils led to decreased IFNγ levels and IFNγ+CD8+ T effector cells in the brain. Importantly, anti-CCR2 mAb injection did not prevent the generation of PbTg-specific T cell responses in the periphery, whereas anti-Gr1 mAb injection strongly diminished T cell frequencies and CTL responses. In conclusion, the specific depletion of Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes attenuated brain inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the CNS, which prevented ECM following Plasmodium infection, pointing out a substantial role of Ly6C+ monocytes in ECM inflammatory processes.

  11. Doxycycline inhibits experimental cerebral malaria by reducing inflammatory immune reactions and tissue-degrading mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kim E; Kuepper, Janina M; Schumak, Beatrix; Alferink, Judith; Hofmann, Andrea; Howland, Shanshan W; Rénia, Laurent; Limmer, Andreas; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim

    2018-01-01

    Malaria ranks among the most important infectious diseases worldwide and affects mostly people living in tropical countries. Mechanisms involved in disease progression are still not fully understood and specific treatments that might interfere with cerebral malaria (CM) are limited. Here we show that administration of doxycycline (DOX) prevented experimental CM (ECM) in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-infected C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) mice in an IL-10-independent manner. DOX-treated mice showed an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and attenuated brain inflammation. Importantly, if WT mice were infected with a 20-fold increased parasite load, they could be still protected from ECM if they received DOX from day 4-6 post infection, despite similar parasitemia compared to control-infected mice that did not receive DOX and developed ECM. Infiltration of T cells and cytotoxic responses were reduced in brains of DOX-treated mice. Analysis of brain tissue by RNA-array revealed reduced expression of chemokines and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in brains of DOX-treated mice. Furthermore, DOX-administration resulted in brains of the mice in reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and granzyme B, which are both factors associated with ECM pathology. Systemic interferon gamma production was reduced and activated peripheral T cells accumulated in the spleen in DOX-treated mice. Our results suggest that DOX targeted inflammatory processes in the central nervous system (CNS) and prevented ECM by impaired brain access of effector T cells in addition to its anti-parasitic effect, thereby expanding the understanding of molecular events that underlie DOX-mediated therapeutic interventions.

  12. Specific depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes prevents immunopathology in experimental cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Schumak

    Full Text Available Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection of C57BL/6 mice leads to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM that is commonly associated with serious T cell mediated damage. In other parasitic infection models, inflammatory monocytes have been shown to regulate Th1 responses but their role in ECM remains poorly defined, whereas neutrophils are reported to contribute to ECM immune pathology. Making use of the recent development of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb, we depleted in vivo Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes (by anti-CCR2, Ly6G+ neutrophils (by anti-Ly6G or both cell types (by anti-Gr1 during infection with Ovalbumin-transgenic PbA parasites (PbTg. Notably, the application of anti-Gr1 or anti-CCR2 but not anti-Ly6G antibodies into PbTg-infected mice prevented ECM development. In addition, depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes but not neutrophils led to decreased IFNγ levels and IFNγ+CD8+ T effector cells in the brain. Importantly, anti-CCR2 mAb injection did not prevent the generation of PbTg-specific T cell responses in the periphery, whereas anti-Gr1 mAb injection strongly diminished T cell frequencies and CTL responses. In conclusion, the specific depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes attenuated brain inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the CNS, which prevented ECM following Plasmodium infection, pointing out a substantial role of Ly6C+ monocytes in ECM inflammatory processes.

  13. A novel bioactivity of andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury through induction of cerebral endothelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Hsu, Wen-Hsien; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, George; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2013-09-01

    Andrographolide, extracted from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees (Acanthaceae), is a labdane diterpene lactone. It is widely reported to possess anti-inflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) play a crucial role in supporting the integrity and the function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, no data are available concerning the effects of andrographolide in CECs. The aim of this study was to examine the detailed mechanisms of andrographolide on CECs. This study investigated a novel bioactivity of andrographolide on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury. CECs were treated with andrographolide (20-100 µΜ) for the indicated times (0-24 h). After the reactions, cell survival rate and cytotoxicity were tested by the MTT assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test, respectively. Western blotting was used to detect caspase-3 expression. In addition, analysis of cell cycle and apoptosis using PI staining and annexin V-FITC/PI labeling, respectively, was performed by flow cytometry. We also investigated the effect of andrographolide on middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/reperfusion-induced brain injury in a rat model. In the present study, we found that andrographolide (50-100 µΜ) markedly inhibited CEC growth according to an MTT assay and caused CEC damage according to a LDH test. Our data also revealed that andrographolide (50 µM) induced CEC apoptosis and caspase-3 activation as respectively detected by PI/annexin-V double staining and western blotting. Moreover, andrographolide arrested the CEC cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by PI staining. In addition, andrographolide (5 mg/kg) caused deterioration of MCAO/reperfusion-induced brain injury in a rat model. These data suggest that andrographolide may disrupt BBB integrity, thereby deteriorating MCAO/reperfusion-induced brain injury, which are, in part, associated with its capacity to arrest cell-cycle and induce CEC

  14. Britanin Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Inducing the Nrf2 Protective Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guozhen; Zhu, Lili; Yuan, Xing; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Rui; Zhang, Shoude; Cheng, Hao; Shen, Yunheng; An, Huazhang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Honglin; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-10-10

    Oxidative stress is considered the major cause of tissue injury after cerebral ischemia. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway is one of the most important defensive mechanisms against oxidative stresses and has been confirmed as a target for stroke treatment. Thus, we desired to find new Nrf2 activators and test their neuronal protective activity both in vivo and in vitro. The herb-derived compound, Britanin, is a potent inducer of the Nrf2 system. Britanin can induce the expression of protective enzymes and reverse oxygen-glucose deprivation, followed by reperfusion (OGD-R)-induced neuronal injury in primary cortical neurons in vitro. Furthermore, the administration of Britanin significantly ameliorated middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO-R) insult in vivo. We report here the crystal structure of the complex of Britanin and the BTB domain of Keap1. Britanin selectively binds to a conserved cysteine residue, cysteine 151, of Keap1 and inhibits Keap1-mediated ubiquitination of Nrf2, leading to induction of the Nrf2 pathway. Britanin is a potent inducer of Nrf2. The complex crystal structure of Britanin and the BTB domain of Keap1 help clarify the mechanism of Nrf2 induction. Britanin was proven to protect primary cortical neurons against OGD-R-induced injury in an Nrf2-dependant way. Additionally, Britanin had excellent cerebroprotective effect in an MCAO-R model. Our results demonstrate that the natural product Britanin with potent Nrf2-activating and neural protective activities both in vitro and in vivo could be developed into a cerebroprotective therapeutic agent. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 754-768.

  15. Cerebroprotective Actions of Triticum aestivum Linn Powder and Bauhinia purpurea Flower Powder in Surgically Induced Cerebral Infraction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapurna, Akula; Vishala, Thonangi C; Bitra, Veera R; Rapaka, Deepthi; Shaik, Asmath

    2018-01-01

    The prime objective of this study is to evaluate the cerebroprotective actions of Triticum aestivum (wheatgrass) powder and Bauhinia purpurea flower (dev kanchan) powder against the experimentally induced global ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. In the first phase of the studies, 1 h before the surgical procedure, the Wistar rats were orally served with varied doses of wheatgrass powder (5, 10, 30, and 100 μg/kg) and Bauhinia flower powder (30, 100, 200, and 300 μg/kg), respectively. The ischemia was induced by 30-min bilateral carotid artery occlusion in succession to reperfusion for 4 h. It was proved that the wheatgrass powder and Bauhinia flower powder yielded a significant, dose-dependent cerebroprotection in terms of reduction in cerebral infarct size when compared with the control group. Coming to the second phase of the studies, a certain potential dose of 10 μg/kg of wheatgrass and 200 μg/kg of Bauhinia flower powders was selected keeping the protective action in view, and the animals were treated for 15 days. The major findings of the study are that wheatgrass and Bauhinia flower powders significantly augmented the magnitude of the antioxidant enzymes, viz., super oxide dismutase and catalase, and further reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation. The present study clearly showed that the wheatgrass powder and Bauhinia flower powder possess significant antioxidant properties that may act as a key ingredient in various ayurvedic preparations for the treatment of various diseases like cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury. The wheat grass contains high amount of bioflavonoids, alkaloids, SOD etc which are responsible for anti oxidant activity.The Bauhinia purpurea contains glycosides, flavonoids and also plays a major role in DPPH activity which is responsible for anti oxidant activity.The wheat grass (10 mg/kg) and bauhinia (200 mg/kg) significantly(P bauhinia (200 mg/kg) significantly (P <0.0001) reduced the lipid peroxidation (MDA) and increased SOD

  16. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of crocin pretreatment on global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury induced by four vessels occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, Serdar; Gönül, Yücel; Tunay, Kamil; Oruc, Oya Akpinar; Bozkurt, Mehmet Fatih; Karavelioğlu, Ergün; Bağcıoğlu, Erman; Coşkun, Kerem Senol; Celik, Sefa

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is a process in which oxidative and apoptotic mechanisms play a part. Neuroprotective agents to be found could work out well for the efficient and safe minimization of cerebral IR injury. Crocin is a strong antioxidant agent; however the influence of this agent on the experimental cerebral ischemia model has not been studied extensively and thus it is not well-known. The objective of our study was to investigate the antioxidant, antiapoptotic and protective effects of crocin on the global cerebral IR induced by four-vessel occlusion. A total of 30 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were equally and randomly separated into three groups as follows: sham, IR and IR+crocin (40mg/kg/day orally for 10days). 24h after electrocauterization of bilateral vertebral arteries, bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded for 30min and reperfused for 30min. Oxidative stress parameters (TAS, TOS, OSI), haematoxylin and eosin staining, caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) expressions and TUNEL methods were investigated. There was a significant difference between the IR and sham groups by means of OSI level, histopathological scoring, caspase-3, HIF-1α and TUNEL-positive cell parameters. We have also observed that pre-treatment with crocin reduced these parameter levels back to the baseline. The data obtained from the present study suggest that crocin may exert antiapoptotic, antioxidant and protective effects in IR-mediated brain injury induced by four-vessel occlusion. To the best of our knowledge, this would be the first study to be conducted in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Examination of dexamethasone sodium sulfate and hyperbaric oxygenation in experimentally produced cerebral edema. With special reference to their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaya, H; Onodera, H; Watanabe, M; Kamata, K [Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-06-01

    Dexamethasone sodium sulfate and hyperbaric oxygenation were used for experimentally produced cerebral edema for the examination of the water content of the brain and cerebrovascular permeability using /sup 203/Hg as the tracer. Although dexamethasone starts lowering vascular permeability of the edematous brain at one hour after the intravenous injection, a lapse of 24 hours is required until the water content returns to normal. Although hyperbaric oxygenation dose not reduce cerebrovascular permeability, it brings back the water content of the brain to normal immediately after pressurization. Since the combination of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygenation maintains the water content of the brain almost normal throughout the entire process, it is ideal for the treatment of cerebral edema.

  18. A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Ye

    Full Text Available To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients.Fifty eight NPC patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN were recruited in the study. Duplex ultrasonography was used to scan bilateral carotid arterials to evaluate the intima-media thickness (IMT and occurrence of plaque formation. Flow velocities of bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, internal carotid arteries (ICAs and basal artery (BA were estimated through Transcranial Color Doppler (TCD. The results were compared with data from 33 patients who were free from radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis after radiotherapy and 29 healthy individuals.Significant differences in IMT, occurrence of plaques of ICAs and flow velocities of both MCAs and ICAs were found between patients after radiotherapy and healthy individuals (p<0.05. IMT had positive correlation with post radiation interval (p = 0.049. Compared with results from patients without radiation-induced TLN, the mean IMT was significantly thicker in patients with TLN (p<0.001. Plaques were more common in patients with TLN than patients without TLN (p = 0.038. In addition, flow velocities of MCAs and ICAs in patients with TLN were much faster (p<0.001, p<0.001. Among patients with unilateral TLN, flow velocity of MCAs was significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral sides to the lesion (p = 0.001.Thickening of IMT, occurrence of plaque formation and hemodynamic abnormality are more common in patients after radiotherapy, especially in those with TLN, compared with healthy individuals.

  19. Experimental investigation of cavitation induced air release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Karoline

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in cross-sectional areas may lead to pressure drops below a critical value, such that cavitation and air release are provoked in hydraulic systems. Due to a relatively slow dissolution of gas bubbles, the performance of hydraulic systems will be affected on long time scales by the gas phase. Therefore predictions of air production rates are desirable to describe the system characteristics. Existing investigations on generic geometries such as micro-orifice flows show an outgassing process due to hydrodynamic cavitation which takes place on time scales far shorter than diffusion processes. The aim of the present investigation is to find a correlation between global, hydrodynamic flow characteristics and cavitation induced undissolved gas fractions generated behind generic flow constrictions such as an orifice or venturi tube. Experimental investigations are realised in a cavitation channel that enables an independent adjustment of the pressure level upstream and downstream of the orifice. Released air fractions are determined by means of shadowgraphy imaging. First results indicate that an increased cavitation activity leads to a rapid increase in undissolved gas volume only in the choking regime. The frequency distribution of generated gas bubble size seems to depend only indirectly on the cavitation intensity driven by an increase of downstream coalescence events due to a more densely populated bubbly flow.

  20. Experimental investigation of cavitation induced air release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karoline; Pollak, Stefan; Hussong, Jeanette

    Variations in cross-sectional areas may lead to pressure drops below a critical value, such that cavitation and air release are provoked in hydraulic systems. Due to a relatively slow dissolution of gas bubbles, the performance of hydraulic systems will be affected on long time scales by the gas phase. Therefore predictions of air production rates are desirable to describe the system characteristics. Existing investigations on generic geometries such as micro-orifice flows show an outgassing process due to hydrodynamic cavitation which takes place on time scales far shorter than diffusion processes. The aim of the present investigation is to find a correlation between global, hydrodynamic flow characteristics and cavitation induced undissolved gas fractions generated behind generic flow constrictions such as an orifice or venturi tube. Experimental investigations are realised in a cavitation channel that enables an independent adjustment of the pressure level upstream and downstream of the orifice. Released air fractions are determined by means of shadowgraphy imaging. First results indicate that an increased cavitation activity leads to a rapid increase in undissolved gas volume only in the choking regime. The frequency distribution of generated gas bubble size seems to depend only indirectly on the cavitation intensity driven by an increase of downstream coalescence events due to a more densely populated bubbly flow.

  1. The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on rat's cerebral neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yan; Xue Yilong; Luo Yun; Tian Lei; Pan Jingkun; Cui Xin

    2004-01-01

    The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on isolated and cultivated rat's cerebral neural stem cells (NSC) was examined. NSC isolated from two months old rat's brain region like hippocampus and striatum was cultivated in a DMEM/F12 medium containing EGF and bFGF, and was identified with morphological character and nestin immunocytochemistry test. After 24 hours, cultivating the NSC with the BMP4-added medium for 7-8 days, then the microscopical change were observed, ChAT and nestin double-labelling immunocytochemistry test was done. Results showed that about 34% NSC of neuron-like character was observed by microscope in the paper. That ChAT-positive cells coexist with nestin-positive cells was found by immunocytochemistry test. There were 28% ChAT-positive cells and 38% nestin-positive cells in the study. Cholinergic neurons differentiated from NSC could be induced by adding BMP4 to the medium

  2. Indomethacin abolishes cerebral blood flow increase in response to acetazolamide-induced extracellular acidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    by acetazolamide (Az), a drug that induces brain extracellular acidosis, which triggers its effect on CBF. We compared the results to the inhibitory effect of indomethacin on the CBF increase during hypercapnia. Indomethacin but not diclofenac, another potent cyclooxygenase inhibitor, was found to block almost...... completely the CBF increase caused by Az-induced extracellular acidosis or by CO2, but it did not influence the CBF increase produced by sodium nitroprusside or papaverine. The results suggest that indomethacin exerts its action on CO2 reactivity by a nonprostaglandin-mediated mechanism that directly......Indomethacin is known to attenuate quite markedly the increase in CBF during hypercapnia. Hypercapnia is, in all likelihood, mediated by the acid shift at the level of the smooth muscle cells of the cerebral arterioles. We therefore investigated the effect of indomethacin on the CBF increase caused...

  3. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Al

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the glycocalyx, which is important for endothelial integrity, is lost in severe malaria. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, resulting in cerebral malaria, or P. chabaudi AS, resulting in uncomplicated malaria. We visualized the glycocalyx with transmission...... electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested...

  4. Cerebral metabolism in experimental hydrocephalus: an in vivo 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, K. P.; van Eijsden, P.; Vandertop, W. P.; de Graaf, R. A.; Gooskens, R. H.; Tulleken, K. A.; Nicolay, K.

    1999-01-01

    Brain damage in patients with hydrocephalus is caused by mechanical forces and cerebral ischemia. The severity and localization of impaired cerebral blood flow and metabolism are still largely unknown. Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy offers the opportunity to investigate cerebral energy

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Matricaria chamomilla Extract on Motor Dysfunction Induced by Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Moshfegh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Stroke can cause paralysis, muscle weakness, and loss of balance that may affect walking and routine activities. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethyl alcohol extract of Matricaria chamomilla on cerebral ischemia-induced motor dysfunctions in rats. Methods In this experimental study, forty two male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups consisting of control group, sham group, ischemia/reperfusion group and three treatment groups [treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg doses of M. chamomilla extract and undergoing ischemia/reperfusion(I/R]. Motor coordination and balance were evaluated using Rotarod test. Total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde (MDA, and nitric oxide (NO levels of serum and brain were also determined. Results The extract of M. chamomilla significantly improved I/R-induced motor dysfunction. Induction of I/R led to increase serum MDA, while the extract of M, chamomlla significantly reduced it. Administration all doses of M. chamomilla extract to the ischemic rats did not reduce the hippocampus MDA levels (P > 0.05. The extract of M. chamomilla at dose of 200 mg/kg slightly decreased cortex MDA (P > 0.01. It had no significant effects on the total antioxidant capacity of the brain (hippocampus and cortex and serum. Injection of Matricaria chamomilla extract also did not change serum NO level. Conclusions Our findings suggested that the Matricaria chamomilla extract could improve motor dysfunction.

  6. Inorganic Arsenic Induces NRF2-Regulated Antioxidant Defenses in Both Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Li, Wei; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifang; Li, Bing

    2016-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic is reported to induce the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress, which is supposed to be one of the main mechanisms of arsenic-related neurological diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of antioxidant defense systems, up-regulates the expression of target genes to fight against oxidative damages caused by harmful substances, including metals. In the present study, mice were used as a model to investigate the oxidative stress levels and the expressions of NRF2-regulated antioxidant substances in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure intra-gastrically. Our results showed that acute NaAsO2 treatment resulted in decreased total anti-oxidative capacity (T-AOC) and increased maleic dialdehyde production in the nervous system. We also detected rapidly elevation of NRF2 protein levels by enhancement of Nrf2 transcription, especially at 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure group. In the meantime, mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 encoding antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were consistently elevated time- and dose-dependently both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, the presence study demonstrated the activation of NRF2 pathway, an early antioxidant defensive response, in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus upon inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure in vivo. A better knowledge on the roles of NRF2 pathway in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis would be helpful for the strategies on improvement of neurotoxicity related to this metalloid.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow and CSF pressures during Cushing response induced by a supratentorial expanding mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, H.; Zwetnow, N.N.; Moerkrid, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to delineate the critical blood flow pattern during the Cushing response in intracranial hypertension, regional cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres in 12 anesthetized dogs at respiratory arrest caused either by expansion of an epidural supratentorial balloon or by cisternal infusion. Regional cerebrospinal fluid pressures were recorded and the local cerebral perfusion pressure calculated in various cerebrospinal compartments. In the 8 dogs of the balloon expansion group, the systemic arterial pressure was unmanipulated in 4, while it was kept at a constant low level (48 and 70 mm Hg) in 2 dogs and, in another 2 dogs, at a constant high level (150 and 160 mm Hg) induced by infusion of Aramine. At respiratory arrest, regional cerebral blood flow had a stereotyped pattern and was largely independent of the blood pressure level. In contrast, concomitant pressure gradients between the various cerebrospinal compartments varied markedly in the 3 animal groups increasing with higher arterial pressure. Flow decreased by 85-100% supratentorially and by 70-100% in the upper brain stem down to the level of the upper pons, while changes in the lower brain stem were minor, on the average 25%. When intracranial pressure was raised by cisternal infusion in 4 dogs, the supratentorial blood flow pattern at respiratory arrest was appriximately similar to the flow pattern in the balloon inflation group. However, blood flow decreased markedly (74-85%) also in the lower brain stem. The results constitute another argument in favour of the Cushing response in supratentorial expansion being caused by ischemia in the brain stem. The critical ischemic region seems to be located rostrally to the oblongate medulla, probably in the pons. (author)

  8. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael; Looij, Yohan van de; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; Sanden, Boudewijn van der; Farion, Regine; Segebarth, Christoph; Remy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana [INSERM, U836, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean [Institute of Pathology, University of Bern (Switzerland); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: serduc@esrf.fr

    2008-03-07

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p < 0.05) was observed in the irradiated cortex 1 day after exposure to 312 Gy, (2) a 0.7% increase (p < 0.05) in the CWC was measured in the irradiated hemispheres 1 day after exposure to 1000 Gy. The results demonstrate the presence of a minor and transient cellular edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org.

  9. Brain scan in cerebral ischemia. An experimental model in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid embolic method for consistent induction of stroke in the rat is described. Brain scans were performed using a micro-pinhole collimator system, and the value of the model for studies in localization of radiopharmaceuticals in cerebral ischemia is demonstrated

  10. Transient cerebral ischemia induces albumin expression in microglia only in the CA1 region of the gerbil hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Ha; Park, Jin-A; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yang Hee; Kang, Il Jun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2017-07-01

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein, is known to exhibit a neuroprotective effect in animal models of focal and global cerebral ischemia. In the present study, the expression and immunoreactivity of albumin was examined in the hippocampus following 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Albumin immunoreactivity was observed in microglia of the CA1 hippocampal region 2 days post‑ischemic insult, and it was significantly increased at 4 days following ischemia-reperfusion. In addition, at 4 days post‑ischemic insult, albumin‑immunoreactive microglia were abundant in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 region. The present results demonstrated that albumin was newly expressed post‑injury in microglia in the CA1 region, suggesting ischemia‑induced neuronal loss. Albumin expression may therefore be associated with ischemia‑induced delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region following transient cerebral ischemia.

  11. Neural control of locomotion and training-induced plasticity after spinal and cerebral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knikou, Maria

    2010-10-01

    Standing and walking require a plethora of sensorimotor interactions that occur throughout the nervous system. Sensory afferent feedback plays a crucial role in the rhythmical muscle activation pattern, as it affects through spinal reflex circuits the spinal neuronal networks responsible for inducing and maintaining rhythmicity, drives short-term and long-term re-organization of the brain and spinal cord circuits, and contributes to recovery of walking after locomotor training. Therefore, spinal circuits integrating sensory signals are adjustable networks with learning capabilities. In this review, I will synthesize the mechanisms underlying phase-dependent modulation of spinal reflexes in healthy humans as well as those with spinal or cerebral lesions along with findings on afferent regulation of spinal reflexes and central pattern generator in reduced animal preparations. Recovery of walking after locomotor training has been documented in numerous studies but the re-organization of spinal interneuronal and cortical circuits need to be further explored at cellular and physiological levels. For maximizing sensorimotor recovery in people with spinal or cerebral lesions, a multidisciplinary approach (rehabilitation, pharmacology, and electrical stimulation) delivered during various sensorimotor constraints is needed. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral organoids derived from Sandhoff disease-induced pluripotent stem cells exhibit impaired neurodifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, Maria L; Cook, Emily K; Larman, Bridget C; Nugent, Adrienne; Brady, Jacqueline M; Golebiowski, Diane; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Tifft, Cynthia J; Proia, Richard L

    2018-03-01

    Sandhoff disease, one of the GM2 gangliosidoses, is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the absence of β-hexosaminidase A and B activity and the concomitant lysosomal accumulation of its substrate, GM2 ganglioside. It features catastrophic neurodegeneration and death in early childhood. How the lysosomal accumulation of ganglioside might affect the early development of the nervous system is not understood. Recently, cerebral organoids derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have illuminated early developmental events altered by disease processes. To develop an early neurodevelopmental model of Sandhoff disease, we first generated iPS cells from the fibroblasts of an infantile Sandhoff disease patient, then corrected one of the mutant HEXB alleles in those iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing technology, thereby creating isogenic controls. Next, we used the parental Sandhoff disease iPS cells and isogenic HEXB -corrected iPS cell clones to generate cerebral organoids that modeled the first trimester of neurodevelopment. The Sandhoff disease organoids, but not the HEXB -corrected organoids, accumulated GM2 ganglioside and exhibited increased size and cellular proliferation compared with the HEXB -corrected organoids. Whole-transcriptome analysis demonstrated that development was impaired in the Sandhoff disease organoids, suggesting that alterations in neuronal differentiation may occur during early development in the GM2 gangliosidoses.

  13. Krypton laser-induced photothrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion without craniectomy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Hiroshi; Yao, Hiroshi; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances in genetical engineering of the mouse have highlighted the importance of reproducible and less invasive models of cerebral ischemia in mice. In this paper, we developed minimally invasive and reproducible model of distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in mice using krypton (Kr) laser-induced photothrombosis. C57BL/6 or BALB mice (n=8 each) were anesthetized with halothane. The skin was cut, the temporal muscle was retracted, and the right distal MCA was observed through the skull. A Kr laser beam of wavelength 568 nm was focused onto the MCA over the intact skull. Upon laser irradiation, intravenous administration of a rose bengal solution was begun. After 4 min of irradiation, the laser beam was refocused on the MCA just proximal to the first spot, and another 4-min irradiation was performed. Then, the right common carotid artery (CCA) was ligated. Three days later, the brain was removed, and infarct volume was determined. Infarction confined almost solely to the cortical area was produced in each mouse. Mean infarct volume in C57BL/6 mice was 25.2+/-13.7 mm3. The BALB mice group showed significantly larger and more reproducible infarction (44.1+/-5.2 mm3; the coefficient of variation was 12%) than did C57BL/6 mice (P<0.005). Our photothrombosis model of stroke in mice can be performed without craniectomy, and its reproducibility is satisfactory when using BALB mice.

  14. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  15. Acute volume expansion attenuates hyperthermia-induced reductions in cerebral perfusion during simulated hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlader, Zachary J; Seifert, Thomas; Wilson, Thad E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia reduces the capacity to withstand a simulated hemorrhagic challenge, but volume loading preserves this capacity. This study tested the hypotheses that acute volume expansion during hyperthermia increases cerebral perfusion and attenuates reductions in cerebral perfusion during...... infusion while hyperthermic. Primary dependent variables were mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAvmean), serving as an index of cerebral perfusion; mean arterial pressure (MAP); and cardiac output (thermodilution). During baseline, hyperthermia reduced MCAvmean (P = 0.001) by 12 ± 9% relative...

  16. Curcumin Protects Neuron against Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Inflammation through Improving PPAR-Gamma Function

    OpenAIRE

    Zun-Jing Liu; Wei Liu; Lei Liu; Cheng Xiao; Yu Wang; Jing-Song Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that curcumin had beneficial effect to attenuate cerebral ischemic injury. However, it is unclear how curcumin protects against cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, using rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model, we found that curcumin was a potent PPAR ? agonist in that it upregulated PPAR ? expression and PPAR ? -PPRE binding activity. Administration of curcumin markedly dec...

  17. Differential microRNA expression in experimental cerebral and noncerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Assaad, Fatima; Hempel, Casper; Combes, Valéry

    2011-01-01

    berghei ANKA (PbA), which causes cerebral malaria (CM), or Plasmodium berghei K173 (PbK), which causes severe malaria but without cerebral complications, termed non-CM. The differential expression profiles of selected miRNAs (let-7i, miR-27a, miR-150, miR-126, miR-210, and miR-155) were analyzed in mouse...... acute malaria. To investigate the involvement of let-7i, miR-27a, and miR-150 in CM-resistant mice, we assessed the expression levels in gamma interferon knockout (IFN-¿(-/-)) mice on a C57BL/6 genetic background. The expression of let-7i, miR-27a, and miR-150 was unchanged in both wild-type (WT...... a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of severe malaria....

  18. Lysine and arginine reduce the effects of cerebral ischemic insults and inhibit glutamate-induced neuronal activity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kondoh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous administration of arginine was shown to be protective against cerebral ischemic insults via nitric oxide production and possibly via additional mechanisms. The present study aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of oral administration of lysine (a basic amino acid, arginine, and their combination on ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction and hemispheric brain swelling induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats. Magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were performed two days after ischemia induction. In control animals, the major edematous areas were observed in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The volumes associated with cortical edema were significantly reduced by lysine (2.0 g/kg, arginine (0.6 g/kg, or their combined administration (0.6 g/kg each. Protective effects of these amino acids on infarction were comparable to the inhibitory effects on edema formation. Interestingly, these amino acids, even at low dose (0.6 g/kg, were effective to reduce hemispheric brain swelling. Additionally, the effects of in vivo microiontophoretic (juxtaneuronal applications of these amino acids on glutamate-evoked neuronal activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus were investigated in awake rats. Glutamate-induced neuronal activity was robustly inhibited by microiontophoretic applications of lysine or arginine onto neuronal membranes. Taken together, our results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of oral ingestion of lysine and arginine against ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction, especially in the cerebral cortex, and suggest that suppression of glutamate-induced neuronal activity might be the primary mechanism associated with these neuroprotective effects.

  19. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α Promotes Endogenous Adaptive Response in Rat Model of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α, a pivotal regulator of gene expression in response to hypoxia and ischemia, is now considered to regulate both pro-survival and pro-death responses depending on the duration and severity of the stress. We previously showed that chronic global cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH triggered long-lasting accumulation of HIF-1α protein in the hippocampus of rats. However, the role of the stabilized HIF-1α in CCH is obscure. Here, we knock down endogenous HIF-1α to determine whether and how HIF-1α affects the disease processes and phenotypes of CCH. Lentivirus expressing HIF-1α small hairpin RNA was injected into the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ventricles to knock down HIF-1α gene expression in the hippocampus and other brain areas. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusions, known as 2-vessel occlusions (2VOs, were used to induce CCH in rats. Angiogenesis, oxidative stress, histopathological changes of the brain, and cognitive function were tested. Knockdown of HIF-1α prior to 2VO significantly exacerbates the impairment of learning and memory after four weeks of CCH. Mechanically, reduced cerebral angiogenesis, increased oxidative damage, and increased density of astrocytes and microglia in the cortex and some subregions of hippocampus are also shown after four weeks of CCH. Furthermore, HIF-1α knockdown also disrupts upregulation of regulated downstream genes. Our findings suggest that HIF-1α-protects the brain from oxidative stress and inflammation response in the disease process of CCH. Accumulated HIF-1α during CCH mediates endogenous adaptive processes to defend against more severe hypoperfusion injury of the brain, which may provide a therapeutic benefit.

  20. The experimental study of CT-guided hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy for cerebral ischemic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaobo; Jin Zhengyu; Li Mingli; Wang Renzhi; Li Guilin; Kong Yanguo; Wang Jianming; Gao Shan; Guan Hongzhi; Wang Detian; Luo Yufeng

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the feasibility of CT guided hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene therapy for cerebral ischemic diseases. Methods: Human HGF cDNA was ligated to pIRES 2 -EGFP vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into the penumbra tissue with liposome, guided by CT perfusion images. After seven days of transfer with recombinant plasmid, the cut sections of rat brain tissues of the treated and control groups were analyzed including immunohistochemistry, vessel count, cerebral blood flow and infarct volume etc. in order to investigate HGF gene expression and biological effect. Results: Enzymatic digestion and electrophoresis confirmed that HGF fragments had been correctly cloned into the space between the BamH I and Sal I sites of pIRES 2 -EGFP. After 7 days of HGF gene transfection, expression of HGF in transfected neurocytes of treated group was observed with immunohistochemistry. The number of vessels in penumbra tissues transfected with HGF vectors and the CBF measured by perfusion CT all were significantly increased than those of the controls (P 2 -EGFP-HGF complexes can transfect the penumbra tissues and definitely express HGF protein. The HGF gene products can stimulate angiogenesis, promote collateral circulation formation and reduce infarct volume in vivo and therefore is beneficial to the treatment of cerebral ischemia. (authors)

  1. Cerebral venous thrombosis due to cryptogenic organising pneumopathy with antiphospholipid syndrome worsened by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, J; Kuzmanovic, I; Vargas, M I; Momjian-Mayor, I

    2013-07-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has usually been ascribed to prothrombotic conditions, oral contraceptives, pregnancy, malignancy, infection, head injury or mechanical precipitants. The case reported here illustrates two rare causes of CVT observed in the same patient: the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies associated with an asymptomatic cryptogenic organising pneumopathy (COP) which were considered the origin of the venous cerebral thrombosis and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) which was responsible for the worsening of the thrombosis observed a few days after the introduction of treatment. Moreover, we provide here additional positive experience in the treatment of both, CVT and HIT, by fondaparinux with bridging to warfarin given their successful evolution under this anticoagulant option.

  2. High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral venous thrombosis with a blood pool contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuentrup, E.; Wiethoff, A.J.; Parsons, E.C.; Spangenberg, P.; Stracke, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of clot visualization in small sinus and cortical veins with contrast enhanced MRA in a cerebral venous thrombosis animal model using a blood pool contrast agent, Gadofosveset, and high spatial resolution imaging. Material and methods: For induction of cerebral venous thrombosis a recently developed combined interventional and microsurgical model was used. Cerebral sinus and cortical vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs. Two further pigs died during the procedure. Standard structural, time-of-flight- and phase contrast-angiograms were followed by fast time resolved high resolution 3D MRA (4D MRA) and subsequent high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium phase with and without addition of parallel imaging. Visualization of the clots using the different sequences was subjectively compared and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was assessed. Results: In the remaining six animals the procedure and MR-imaging protocol including administration of Gadofosveset was successfully completed. The 3D high resolution MRA in the equilibrium phase without the addition of parallel imaging was superior to all the other applied MR measurement techniques in terms of visualization of the clots. Only applying this sequence bridging vein thromboses were also seen as a small filling defect with a high CNR of >18. Conclusion: Only the non-accelerated high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset allows for high-contrast visualization of very small clots in the cerebral sinus and cortical veins. Statement clinical impact: Detection of cortical vein thrombosis is of high clinical impact. Conventional MRI sequences often fail to visualize the clot. We could demonstrate that, in contrast to conventional sequences, with high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset very small clots in the cerebral sinus and

  3. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysms resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Murad

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral utilizados na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia. Os métodos comparados foram a hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, a hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (GRUPO I e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada a perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (GRUPO II. Foram colhidas amostras seriadas de sangue para análise das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral, aferidas na veia jugular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min, 90 min e 135 min de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstraram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no GRUPO II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20oC with great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (GROUP I or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (GROUP II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaC02 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also made at 45, 90 and 135

  4. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

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    Najmeh Kabiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99. Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly higher than the Sham group, although right hemispheres in all of the treated groups illustrated higher brain water content than the left ones. Brain anti-oxidant capacity elevated in the ischemic rats treated with Kombucha and in the Sham group. Brain and plasma malondialdehyde concentrations significantly decreased in both of the ischemic groups injected with Kombucha. The findings suggest that Kombucha tea could be useful for the prevention of cerebral damage.

  5. Surgical treatment of cerebral ischemia by means of diode laser: first experimental results and comparison with theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, C. D.; Giaquinta, A.; Iofrida, G.; Donato, G.; Signorelli, Fr.; Bellecci, C.; Lo Feudo, T.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the present paper feasibility and potential advantages of using diode laser for surgical treatment of cerebral ischemia and intracranial aneurysms will be evaluated. At this purpose non linear mathematical model was developed and experimentally validated to investigate the effects of the changes in tissue physical properties, in terms of operating time, tensile strength and tissue damage during medical laser application. The numerical simulations have been carried on by a finite-elements based software package (FEMLAB). In vitro results of human saphenous veins of inferior limbs (n=55) after 799 nm diode laser soldering, combined with an indocyanine green-enhanced, will be presented. The simulations results and their comparison with experimental measurements will be reported.

  6. Exercise preconditioning improves behavioral functions following transient cerebral ischemia induced by 4-vessel occlusion (4-VO) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Mahshid; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Taghipour, Zahra; Taghavi, Mohsen; Khodadadi, Hassan; Shamsizadeh, Ali

    2013-12-01

    There is evidence that exercise decreases ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Since behavioral deficits are the main outcome in patients after stroke, our study was designed to investigate whether exercise preconditioning improves the acute behavioral functions and also brain inflammatory injury following cerebral ischemia. Male rats weighing 250-300 g were randomly allocated into five experimental groups. Exercise was performed on a treadmill 30min/day for 3 weeks. Ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion method. Recognition memory was assessed by novel object recognition task (NORT) and step-through passive avoidance task. Sensorimotor function and motor movements were evaluated by adhesive removal test and ledged beam-walking test, respectively. Brain inflammatory injury was evaluated by histological assessment. In NORT, the discrimination ratio was decreased after ischemia (P test, a significant reduction in response latency was observed in the ischemic group. Exercise preconditioning significantly decreased the response latency in the ischemic rats (P test, latency to touch and remove the sticky labels from forepaw was increased following induction of ischemia (all P beam-walking test, the slip ratio was increased following ischemia (P < 0.05).  In the ischemia group, marked neuronal injury in hippocampus was observed. These neuropathological changes were attenuated by exercise preconditioning (P < 0.001). Our results showed that exercise preconditioning improves behavioral functions and maintains more viable cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the ischemic brain.

  7. Regulatory T cells are strong promoters of acute ischemic stroke in mice by inducing dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter; Dreykluft, Angela; Hagedorn, Ina; Göbel, Kerstin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Langhauser, Friederike; Helluy, Xavier; Schwarz, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Mayer, Christian T; Brede, Marc; Varallyay, Csanad; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Magnus, Tim; Meuth, Sven G; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Zernecke, Alma; Sparwasser, Tim; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Wiendl, Heinz

    2013-01-24

    We have recently identified T cells as important mediators of ischemic brain damage, but the contribution of the different T-cell subsets is unclear. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generally regarded as prototypic anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. In the present study, we examined the role of Tregs after experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Selective depletion of Tregs in the DEREG mouse model dramatically reduced infarct size and improved neurologic function 24 hours after stroke and this protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarct development. The specificity of this detrimental Treg effect was confirmed by adoptive transfer experiments in wild-type mice and in Rag1(-/-) mice lacking lymphocytes. Mechanistically, Tregs induced microvascular dysfunction in vivo by increased interaction with the ischemic brain endothelium via the LFA-1/ICAM-1 pathway and platelets and these findings were confirmed in vitro. Ablation of Tregs reduced microvascular thrombus formation and improved cerebral reperfusion on stroke, as revealed by ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging at 17.6 Tesla. In contrast, established immunoregulatory characteristics of Tregs had no functional relevance. We define herein a novel and unexpected role of Tregs in a primary nonimmunologic disease state.

  8. Experimental evaluation of earthquake induced relay chattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.; Shteyngart, S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of relay performance under vibratory environments is discussed in this paper. Single frequency excitation was used for most tests. Limited tests were performed with random multifrequency inputs. The capacity of each relay was established based on a two-millisecond chatter criterion. The experimental techniques are described and the effects of parameters in controlling the relay capacity levels are illustrated with test data. A wide variation of the capacity levels was observed due to the influence of parameters related to the design of the relay and nature of the input motion. 3 refs., 15 figs

  9. Electroacupuncture-Induced Neuroprotection against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats: Role of the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shu Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioural deficits, including memory deficits and motor disorders. Evidence shows that EA significantly promotes recovery of neurological function and thus improves quality of life. Objective. Evidence exists for the involvement of catecholamines in human neuroplasticity. A better understanding of dopaminergic (DAergic modulation in this process will be important. Methods. A total of 72 adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into 6 groups: normal, model, EA, spiperone group, EA + spiperone group, and pergolide. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model was used in all 6 groups except the normal group. A behavioural assessment was conducted at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after MCAO. The percent of brain infarct area was also determined 7 days after MCAO. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43 fluorescence double labeling was performed in the striatum. Results. In this study, we found that EA at Fengchi (GB20 acupoints resulted in marked improvements based on a behavioural assessment. Both TTC staining and GAP-43 immunofluorescence labeling results showed that EA treatment reduced ischemia injury and promoted neuroplasticity compared with the model group. The D2R-selective agonist, pergolide, showed similar results, but these results were reversed by the D2R-selective antagonist, spiperone. We also found that there were more colocalization and expression of GAP-43 and TH in the EA and pergolide groups than those in the other groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that the neuroplasticity induced by EA was mediated by D2 autoreceptors in DAergic neurons.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of scutellarin against hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury via augmentation of antioxidant defense capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Hu, Li-Min; Wang, Shao-Xia; Wang, Yu-Lin; Shi, Fang; Li, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Li-Yuan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2011-12-31

    An increasing number of studies has indicated that hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury is partly mediated via oxidative stress. Recent researches have focused on searching for drug and herbal manipulations to protect against hypoxic-ischemic-induced oxidative cell damage. Scutellarin is a flavonoid derived from the Erigeron breviscapus (vant.) and has been reported to exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, its precise mechanism, particularly its antioxidation mechanism, remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of scutellarin on middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain damage in rats, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced toxicity in primary culture of rat cortical neurons. In vivo, intraperitoneal injections of scutellarin (20 and 60 mg/kg) improved the neurological score and diminished the percentage of brain infarct volume. At the same time, scutellarin significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities and glutathione (GSH) level in ischemic brain tissues, enhancing endogenous antioxidant activity. Moreover, pretreatment of scutellarin (25, 50 and 100 μM) protected neurons against lethal stimuli, decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in OGD-induced primary cortical neurons in vitro. These results suggest that the preventive and therapeutic potential of scutellarin in cerebral injury patients is, at least in part, ascribed to augmentation of cellular antioxidant defense capacity.

  11. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in ischemic postconditioning-induced attenuation of cerebral ischemia-evoked behavioral deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal

    2007-01-01

    The present study has been designed to pharmacologically investigate the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in ischemic postconditioning-induced reversal of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion-induced behavioral dysfunction in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 10 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was employed in the present study to produce ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral injury in mice. Short-term memory was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test. The inclined beam walking test was employed to assess motor incoordination. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produced impaired short-term memory, motor co-ordination and lateral push response. Three episodes of carotid artery occlusion for a period of 10 s and reperfusion of 10 s (ischemic postconditioning) significantly prevented ischemia-reperfusion-induced behavioral deficit measured in terms of loss of short-term memory, motor coordination and lateral push response. Wortmannin (2 mg/kg, iv), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor given 10 min before ischemia attenuated the beneficial effects of ischemic postconditioning. It may be concluded that beneficial effects of ischemic postconditioning on global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion-induced behavioral deficits may involve activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-linked pathway.

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α mediates neuroprotection of hypoxic postconditioning against global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingna; Zhan, Lixuan; Liang, Donghai; Hu, Jiaoyue; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyong; Sun, Weiwen; Liu, Liu; Xu, En

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia administered after transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) has been shown to induce neuroprotection in adult rats, but the underlying mechanisms for this protection are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxic postconditioning (HPC) induces neuroprotection through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that this involves phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) pathways. The expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and cleaved caspase-9 were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. As pharmacologic interventions, the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2), PI3K inhibitor LY294002, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, and MEK inhibitor U0126 were administered before HPC or after tGCI. We found that HPC maintained the higher expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and decreased cleaved caspase-9 levels in CA1 after tGCI. These effects were reversed by 2ME2 administered before HPC, and the neuroprotection of HPC was abolished. LY294002 and SB203580 decreased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF after HPC, whereas U0126 increased HIF-1α and VEGF after tGCI. These findings suggested that HIF-1α exerts neuroprotection induced by HPC against tGCI through VEGF upregulation and cleaved caspase-9 downregulation, and that the PI3K, p38 MAPK, and MEK pathways are involved in the regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  13. Bevacizumab as a treatment option for radiation-induced cerebral necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuschek, Christiane; Boelke, Edwin; Budach, Wilfried [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Nawatny, Jens [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Hoffmann, Thomas K. [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology; Peiper, Matthias; Orth, Klaus [Hospital Essen-Sued, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Gerber, Peter Arne [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Dermatology; Rusnak, Ethelyn [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Anesthesiology; Lammering, Guido [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands). Radiation Oncology

    2011-02-15

    Radiation necrosis of normal CNS tissue represents one of the main risk factors of brain irradiation, occurring more frequently and earlier at higher total doses and higher doses per fraction. At present, it is believed that the necrosis results due to increasing capillary permeability caused by cytokine release leading to extracellular edema. This process is sustained by endothelial dysfunction, tissue hypoxia, and subsequent necrosis. Consequently, blocking the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at an early stage could be an option to reduce the development of radiation necrosis by decreasing the vascular permeability. This might help to reverse the pathological mechanisms, improve the symptoms and prevent further progression. A patient with radiation-induced necrosis was treated with an anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab), in whom neurologic signs and symptoms improved in accordance with a decrease in T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signals. Our case report together with the current literature suggests bevacizumab as a treatment option for patients with symptoms and radiological signs of cerebral necrosis induced by radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion-Induced Swallowing Dysfunction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Asano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid (FA, a phenolic phytochemical, has been reported to exert antioxidative and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of FA against the dysfunction of the swallowing reflex induced by ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries (2VO in rats. In 2VO rats, topical administration of water or citric acid to the pharyngolaryngeal region evoked a diminished number of swallowing events with prolonged latency compared to sham-operated control rats. 2VO rats had an increased level of superoxide anion radical, and decreased dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme levels in the striatum, suggesting that 2VO augmented cerebral oxidative stress and impaired the striatal dopaminergic system. Furthermore, substance P (SP expression in the laryngopharyngeal mucosa, which is believed to be positively regulated by dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, was decreased in 2VO rats. Oral treatment with FA (30 mg/kg for 3 weeks (from one week before 2VO to two weeks after improved the swallowing reflex and maintained levels of striatal dopamine and laryngopharyngeal SP expression in 2VO rats. These results suggest that FA maintains the swallowing reflex by protecting the dopamine-SP system against ischemia-induced oxidative damage in 2VO rats.

  15. Bevacizumab as a treatment option for radiation-induced cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuschek, Christiane; Boelke, Edwin; Budach, Wilfried; Nawatny, Jens; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; Peiper, Matthias; Orth, Klaus; Gerber, Peter Arne; Rusnak, Ethelyn; Lammering, Guido; MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht

    2011-01-01

    Radiation necrosis of normal CNS tissue represents one of the main risk factors of brain irradiation, occurring more frequently and earlier at higher total doses and higher doses per fraction. At present, it is believed that the necrosis results due to increasing capillary permeability caused by cytokine release leading to extracellular edema. This process is sustained by endothelial dysfunction, tissue hypoxia, and subsequent necrosis. Consequently, blocking the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at an early stage could be an option to reduce the development of radiation necrosis by decreasing the vascular permeability. This might help to reverse the pathological mechanisms, improve the symptoms and prevent further progression. A patient with radiation-induced necrosis was treated with an anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab), in whom neurologic signs and symptoms improved in accordance with a decrease in T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signals. Our case report together with the current literature suggests bevacizumab as a treatment option for patients with symptoms and radiological signs of cerebral necrosis induced by radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. Application of wavelet analysis to detect dysfunction in cerebral blood flow autoregulation during experimental hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrin, Valery V; Ivanov, Alexander V; Virus, Edward D; Bulgakova, Polina O; Kubatiev, Aslan A

    2018-04-03

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the use of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals coupled with spectral wavelet analysis to detect endothelial link dysfunction in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in the setting of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Fifty-one rats were assigned to three groups (intact, control, and HHcy) according to the results of biochemical assays of homocysteine level in blood plasma. LDF signals on the rat brain were recorded by LAKK-02 device to measure the microcirculatory blood flow. The laser operating wavelength and output power density were1064 nm and 0.051 W/mm 2 , respectively. A Morlet mother wavelet transform was applied to the measured 8-min LDF signals, and periodic oscillations with five frequency intervals were identified (0.01-0.04 Hz, 0.04-0.15 Hz, 0.15-0.4 Hz, 0.4-2 Hz, and 2-5 Hz) corresponding to endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory, and cardiac origins, respectively. In initial state, the amplitude of the oscillations decreased by 38% (P wavelet analysis may be successfully applied to detect the dysfunction of the endothelial link in cerebral vessel tone and to reveal the pathological shift of lower limit of autoregulation.

  17. Cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass: An experimental porcine study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjaergaard, Benedict; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2018-01-01

    emission tomography (PET) using 15O-labelled water with no pharmacological interventions to maintain the MAP. Methods: Eight pigs (69-71 kg) were connected to normothermic CPB. After 60 minutes (min) with a CPB pump flow of 60 mL/kg/min, the pigs were changed to either 35 mL/kg/min or 47.5 mL/kg/min for 60......Background: Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and/or pump flow during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are the most important factors of cerebral perfusion. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of CPB blood flow on cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by dynamic positron...... min and, thereafter, all the pigs returned to 60 mL/kg/min for another 60 min. The MAP was measured continuously and the CBF was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) during spontaneous circulation and at each CPB pump flow after 30 min of steady state. Results: Two pigs were excluded due...

  18. Experimental microangiography for measuring cerebral blood circulation following local cold stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruttmann, G

    1982-01-01

    In 54 female Wistar rats the exposed brain was right-parietally traumatised; cerebral perfusion of two anatomically different brain sections was angiographically imaged and densitometrically evaluated at various instants. The observation period ranged between 1 and 168 hours after the local cold stroke had been applied. Whereas in the telencephal section situated beyond the direct zone of lesion a maximum perfusion difference between the two hemispheres occurred already 1 hour after the animal had been traumatised, a maximum of perfusion difference was observed 6 hours after traumatisation in the diencephalic section situated directly across the site of the cold lesion. Within the first posttraumatic hours the total cerebral perfusion rapidly decreased. The minimum was reached 24 hours after traumatisation. Then it increased again and on the 7th posttraumatic day the perfusion level reached that of the control group. The tendencies of perfusion behaviour differing from one another, which were observed in both hemispheres, followed the course of the total perfusion. The decrease of perfusion occurring during the first hours after traumatisation is provoked by the compressive effect due to the expanding edema. This is principally indicated by the acute hyperperfusion during the first hours to be observed in the telencephalic section. The different velocities at which the hemispheres recover in the diencephalic section must be attributed to metabolic and hypoxic components. The incomplete recovery of perfusion in the injured hemisphere after 7 days may be due to the glial reaction.

  19. Photothrombosis-induced infarction of the mouse cerebral cortex is not affected by the Nrf2-activator sulforaphane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Porritt

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 or the gene Nfe2l2 and subsequent induction of the phase II antioxidant system has previously been shown to exert neuroprotective action in a transient model of focal cerebral ischemia. However, its ability to attenuate functional and cellular deficits after permanent focal cerebral ischemia is not clear. We assessed the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane in the photothrombotic model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Sulforaphane was administered (5 or 50 mg/kg, i.p. after ischemic onset either as a single dose or as daily doses for 3 days. Sulforaphane increased transcription of Nrf2, Hmox1, GCLC and GSTA4 mRNA in the brain confirming activation of the Nrf2 system. Single or repeated administration of sulforaphane had no effect on the infarct volume, nor did it reduce the number of activated glial cells or proliferating cells when analyzed 24 and 72 h after stroke. Motor-function as assessed by beam-walking, cylinder-test, and adhesive test, did not improve after sulforaphane treatment. The results show that sulforaphane treatment initiated after photothrombosis-induced permanent cerebral ischemia does not interfere with key cellular mechanisms underlying tissue damage.

  20. Photothrombosis-induced infarction of the mouse cerebral cortex is not affected by the Nrf2-activator sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, Michelle J; Andersson, Helene C; Hou, Linda; Nilsson, Åsa; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos; Nilsson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 or the gene Nfe2l2) and subsequent induction of the phase II antioxidant system has previously been shown to exert neuroprotective action in a transient model of focal cerebral ischemia. However, its ability to attenuate functional and cellular deficits after permanent focal cerebral ischemia is not clear. We assessed the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane in the photothrombotic model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Sulforaphane was administered (5 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.) after ischemic onset either as a single dose or as daily doses for 3 days. Sulforaphane increased transcription of Nrf2, Hmox1, GCLC and GSTA4 mRNA in the brain confirming activation of the Nrf2 system. Single or repeated administration of sulforaphane had no effect on the infarct volume, nor did it reduce the number of activated glial cells or proliferating cells when analyzed 24 and 72 h after stroke. Motor-function as assessed by beam-walking, cylinder-test, and adhesive test, did not improve after sulforaphane treatment. The results show that sulforaphane treatment initiated after photothrombosis-induced permanent cerebral ischemia does not interfere with key cellular mechanisms underlying tissue damage.

  1. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An ... group of conditions that can result in irreversible blindness. This vision loss can be reduced if glaucoma ...

  2. Intra- and interpersonal consequences of experimentally induced concealment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, T.K.

    2003-01-01

    Secrecy, concealment, and thought supression are assumed to be important aspects of psychopathology. However, most studies address these from an intrapersonal perspective. This study investigates both the intra- as well as the interpersonal consequences of experimentally induced concealment. Two

  3. Migraine can be induced by sildenafil without changes in middle cerebral artery diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Birk, Steffen

    2003-01-01

    -controlled crossover study, in which placebo or sildenafil 100 mg was administered orally on two separate days. Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (V(mca)) was recorded by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and regional cerebral blood flow in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (r...... that this occurs without initial dilatation of the middle cerebral artery. We propose that triggering mechanisms may reside within the perivascular sensory nerve terminals or the brainstem. However, other sites of action may also be possible and future studies are needed to elucidate this. In the clinical use...

  4. Relationship between alternation of cerebral blood flow and formation of brain edema around the hematoma after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jian; Gao Peiyi; Li Xiaoguang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of brain edema formation around the hematoma and the relationship between the formation of brain edema and the changes of regional cerebral blood flow after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats, and to provide experimental basis for the clinical treatment of ICH . Methods: Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into ICH groups and sham-operated groups. ICH was produced by microinjection of 40 ul fresh autologous blood or saline into the right caudatum. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging was performed, and the parameters of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) around the hematoma were calculated respectively. Then the rats were sacrificed, and the water content, sodium, potassium, and calcium concentrations were measured respectively. The correlative study between the water content and rCBF and rCBV were carried out. Results:The gradient of perihematomal hypoperfusion was revealed on CT perfusion maps in ICH groups. The alternation of rCBF around the hematomas were fluctuated, and rCBF reduction was most pronounced at 1 hour afer ICH, then the rCBF gradually returned, reaching the peaks at 6 hours and 24 hours after ICH, respectively. In the meantime, rCBV reduction around the hematoma was most pronounced at 1 hour after ICH. Then the rCBV gradually increased, and reaching the peak at 24 hours. The water contents were gradually increased in the ipsilateral basal ganglia in the animals sacrificed at 6, 24, and 72 hours. The accumulation of water was at its peak at 24 hours, and remained in the animals sacrificed at the 72 hours. The perihemorrhagic water contents correlated significantly with rCBV surrounding hematomas, r=0.372 (one-tailed), P<0.05. Conclusion: The perihemorrhagic brain edema results from the common effects of the blood-brain-barrier disruption, cytotoxic edema, and the accumulation of osmotically active substances. The r

  5. Aquaporin-4 inhibition mediates piroxicam-induced neuroprotection against focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-4(AQP4) is an abundant water channel protein in brain that regulates water transport to maintain homeostasis. Cerebral edema resulting from AQP4 over expression is considered to be one of the major determinants for progressive neuronal insult during cerebral ischemia. Although, both upregulation and downregulation of AQP4 expression is associated with brain pathology, over expression of AQP4 is one of the chief contributors of water imbalance in brain during ischemic pathology. We have found that Piroxicam binds to AQP4 with optimal binding energy value. Thus, we hypothesized that Piroxicam is neuroprotective in the rodent cerebral ischemic model by mitigating cerebral edema via AQP4 regulation. Rats were treated with Piroxicam OR placebo at 30 min prior, 2 h post and 4 h post 60 minutes of MCAO followed by 24 hour reperfusion. Rats were evaluated for neurological deficits and motor function just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, biochemical analysis, RT-PCR and western blot experiments. Piroxicam pretreatment thirty minutes prior to ischemia and four hour post reperfusion afforded neuroprotection as evident through significant reduction in cerebral infarct volume, improvement in motor behavior, neurological deficit and reduction in brain edema. Furthermore, ischemia induced surge in levels of nitrite and malondialdehyde were also found to be significantly reduced in ischemic brain regions in treated animals. This neuroprotection was found to be associated with inhibition of acid mediated rise in intracellular calcium levels and also downregulated AQP4 expression. Findings of the present study provide significant evidence that Piroxicam acts as a potent AQP4 regulator and renders neuroprotection in focal cerebral ischemia. Piroxicam could be clinically exploited for the treatment of brain stroke along with other anti-stroke therapeutics in future.

  6. Chronic hydrocephalus-induced changes in cerebral blood flow: mediation through cardiac effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stephen M; Schenk, Soren; Leichliter, Anna; Leibson, Zack; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Luciano, Mark G

    2006-10-01

    Decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hydrocephalus is believed to be related to increased intracranial pressure (ICP), vascular compression as the result of enlarged ventricles, or impaired metabolic activity. Little attention has been given to the relationship between cardiac function and systemic blood flow in chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using an experimental model of chronic obstructive hydrocephalus developed in our laboratory, we investigated the relationship between the duration and severity of hydrocephalus and cardiac output (CO), CBF, myocardial tissue perfusion (MTP), and peripheral blood flow (PBF). Blood flow measures were obtained using the microsphere injection method under controlled hemodynamic conditions in experimental CH (n=23) and surgical control (n=8) canines at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Cardiac output measures were made using the Swan-Ganz thermodilution method. Intracranial compliance (ICC) via cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bolus removal and infusion, and oxygen delivery in CSF and prefrontal cortex (PFC) were also investigated. We observed an initial surgical effect relating to 30% CO reduction and approximately 50% decrease in CBF, MTP, and PBF in both groups 2 weeks postoperatively, which recovered in control animals but continued to decline further in CH animals at 16 weeks. Cerebral blood flow, which was positively correlated with CO (P=0.028), showed no significant relationship with either CSF volume or pressure. Decreased CBF correlated with oxygen deprivation in PFC (P=0.006). Cardiac output was inversely related with ventriculomegaly (P=0.019), but did not correlate with ICP. Decreased CO corresponded to increased ICC, as measured by CSF infusion (P=0.04). Our results suggest that CH may have more of an influence on CO and CBF in the chronic stage than in the early condition, which was dominated by surgical effect. The cause of this late deterioration of cardiac function in hydrocephalus is uncertain, but may reflect

  7. Status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Mamoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    A short review is presented on the status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions above 20 MeV based on the EXFOR data base and journals. Experimental data which were obtained in a systematic manner and/or by plural authors are surveyed and tabulated for the nuclear data evaluation and the benchmark test of the evaluated data. (author). 61 refs.

  8. Radiotherapy-induced cerebral abnormalities in patients with low-grade glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, TJ; Klein, M; Verstappen, CCP; Bromberg, JEC; Swennen, M; Langendijk, JA; Taphoorn, MJB; Scheltens, P; Slotman, BJ; van der Ploeg, HM; Aaronson, NK; Heimans, JJ

    2002-01-01

    Abnormalities on CT or MRI and neuropsychological performance in patients with low-grade glioma, with (n = 23) or without (n = 16) prior cerebral radiotherapy, were evaluated. Cerebral atrophy was observed in 14 of 23 patients (61%) treated with prior radiotherapy, and in 1 of 16 patients (6%)

  9. Exercise induces cerebral VEGF and angiogenesis via the lactate receptor HCAR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Andersson, Krister A.; Haugen, Oyvind P.

    2017-01-01

    -like cells along intracerebral microvessels. Activation of HCAR1 enhances cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and cerebral angiogenesis. High-intensity interval exercise (5 days weekly for 7 weeks), as well as L-lactate subcutaneous injection that leads to an increase in blood lactate...

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage induces enhanced expression of thromboxane A2 receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Larsen, Carl; Maddahi, Aida

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a pathogenesis that is still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the involvement of thromboxane A(2) receptors (TP) in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia...

  11. Pulmonary emphysema induced by methylphenidate: experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães; Antoniolli, Andréia; Pereira, Daniel Martins; Facco, Gilberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Pazetti, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate is the most widely used drug for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, it has important side effects, such as abdominal pain, insomnia, anorexia and loss of appetite, and also some cases of early severe emphysema after drug abuse have been reported. Our aim was to investigate the development of pulmonary emphysema in rats that were subjected to different doses of methylphenidate. Experimental study carried out at the laboratory of a public university. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (0.9% saline solution); MP 0.8 (methylphenidate, 0.8 mg/kg); MP 1.2 (methylphenidate, 1.2 mg/kg). After 90 days of daily gavage, the animals were sacrificed and lung tissue samples were prepared for analysis on the mean alveolar diameter (Lm). The Lm was greater in MP 0.8 (47.91 ± 3.13; P pulmonary emphysema.

  12. Experimental induced avian E. coli salpingitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Thøfner, Ida; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Several types of Escherichia coli have been associated with extra-intestinal infections in poultry, however, they may vary significantly in their virulence potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the virulence of five strains of E. coli obtained from different disease......) had a distinct ability to cause disease. Results of the study shows major differences in virulence of different strains of E. coli in ascending infections; however, there was no indication of tissue-specific adaptation, since strains obtained from lesions unrelated to the reproductive system were...... fully capable of causing experimental infection. In conclusion, the study provides evidence for the clinical outcome of infection with E. coli in poultry is largely influenced by the specific strain as well as individual host factors....

  13. MR-angiography allows defining severity grades of cerebral vasospasm in an experimental double blood injection subarachnoid hemorrhage model in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Malinova

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has been used for the detection of cerebral vasospasm (VSP related infarction in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (eSAH in rats. Conventional angiography is generally used to visualize VSP, which is an invasive technique with a possible increase in morbidity and mortality. In this study we evaluated the validity of MR-angiography (MRA in detecting VSP and its feasibility to define VSP severity grades after eSAH in rats.SAH was induced using the double-hemorrhage model in 12 rats. In two rats, saline solution was injected instead of blood (sham group. MR was performed on day 1, 2 and on day 5. T1-, T2-, T2*-weighted and time-of-flight MR sequences were applied, which were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists. Vessel narrowing of 25-50% was defined as mild, 50-75% as moderate and >75% as severe VSP.We performed a total of 34 MRAs in 14 rats. In 14 rats, MRA was performed on day 2 and day 5. In six rats MRA was additionally performed on day1 before the blood injection. A good visualization of cerebral vessels was possible in all cases. No VSP was seen in the sham group neither on day 2 nor on day 5. We found vasospasm on day 2 in 7 of the 14 rats (50% whereas all 7 rats had mild and one rat had additionally moderate and severe vasospasm in one vessel, respectively. On day 5 we found vasospasm in 8 of the 14 rats (60% whereas 4 rats had severe vasospasm, 1 rat had moderate vasospasm and 3 rats demonstrated mild vasospasm. In 4 of the 14 rats (30% an ischemic lesion was detected on day 5. Three of these rats had severe vasospasm and one rat had mild vasospasm. Severe vasospasm on day 5 was statistically significant correlated with the occurrence of ischemic lesions (Fisher's Exact test, OR 19.5, p = 0.03.MRA is a noninvasive diagnostic tool, which allows a good visualization of the cerebral vasculature and provides reproducible results concerning the detection of VSP and the differentiation into three severity

  14. Curcumin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiying; Fan, Yanxia; Sun, Hongyu; Chen, Liyan; Man, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the dynamic changes of the growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 153 (GADD153) gene and caspase-12 in the brain tissue of rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury (CIRI) and the impact of curcumin pretreatment. A total of 60 rats were randomly divided into the normal group (N), the sham operation group (S), the dimethyl sulfoxide control group (D) and the curcumin treatment group (C). For group D and C, 12 (T1), 24 (T2) and 72 h (T3) of reperfusion were performed after 2 h ischemia. The expression levels of GADD153 and caspase-12 in the brain tissue were detected and compared among the groups by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence double staining and western blotting. The expression levels of GADD153 and caspase-12 were increased at T1compared with groups N and S, and the expression of caspase-12 peaked at T2 in group D, while GADD153 was increased until T3 in group D. Compared with group D, the expression levels of GADD153 and caspase-12 in group C at T2 and T3 were significantly decreased (P<0.05). Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the pathological process of CIRI. Curcumin may decrease the expression levels of the above two factors, thus exhibiting protective effects against CIRI in rats. PMID:29067098

  15. Murine model of acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by coxsackievirus B4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Peng Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, coxsackievirus B4 (CV-B4 has been continuously isolated and evidence suggests an association with the development of pancreatitis and type I diabetes. In addition, CV-B4 is also associated with myocarditis and severe central nervous system (CNS complications, which remain poorly studied and understood. In the present study, we established an ICR mouse model of CV-B4 infection and examined whether CV-B4 infection resulted in a predisposition to myocarditis and CNS infection. We found high survival in both the treatment and control group, with no significant differences in clinical outcomes observed. However, pathological lesions were evident in both brain and heart tissue of the CV-B4-infected mice. In addition, high viral loads were found in the neural and cardiac tissues as early as 2 d postinfection. Expressions of IFN-γ and IL-6 in sera were significantly higher in CV-B4-infected mice compared to uninfected negative controls, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the development of histopathological lesions. Our murine model successfully reproduced the acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by CV-B4, and may be useful for the evaluation of vaccine candidates and potential antivirals against CV-B4 infection.

  16. 3-Hydroxybutyrate regulates energy metabolism and induces BDNF expression in cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosi, Krisztina; Kim, Sang Woo; Moehl, Keelin; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Cheng, Aiwu; Cutler, Roy; Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2016-12-01

    During fasting and vigorous exercise, a shift of brain cell energy substrate utilization from glucose to the ketone 3-hydroxybutyrate (3OHB) occurs. Studies have shown that 3OHB can protect neurons against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Neurons maintained in the presence of 3OHB exhibited increased oxygen consumption and ATP production, and an elevated NAD + /NADH ratio. We found that 3OHB metabolism increases mitochondrial respiration which drives changes in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cultured cerebral cortical neurons. The mechanism by which 3OHB induces Bdnf gene expression involves generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, and activity of the histone acetyltransferase p300/EP300. Because BDNF plays important roles in synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress resistance, our findings suggest cellular signaling mechanisms by which 3OHB may mediate adaptive responses of neurons to fasting, exercise, and ketogenic diets. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Tetrahydrobiopterin in antenatal brain hypoxia-ischemia-induced motor impairments and cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Shi, Zhongjie; Luo, Kehuan; Thirugnanam, Karthikeyan; Tan, Sidhartha

    2017-10-01

    Antenatal brain hypoxia-ischemia, which occurs in cerebral palsy, is considered a significant cause of motor impairments in children. The mechanisms by which antenatal hypoxia-ischemia causes brain injury and motor deficits still need to be elucidated. Tetrahydrobiopterin is an important enzyme cofactor that is necessary to produce neurotransmitters and to maintain the redox status of the brain. A genetic deficiency of this cofactor from mutations of biosynthetic or recycling enzymes is a well-recognized factor in the development of childhood neurological disorders characterized by motor impairments, developmental delay, and encephalopathy. Experimental hypoxia-ischemia causes a decline in the availability of tetrahydrobiopterin in the immature brain. This decline coincides with the loss of brain function, suggesting this occurrence contributes to neuronal dysfunction and motor impairments. One possible mechanism linking tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency, hypoxia-ischemia, and neuronal injury is oxidative injury. Evidence of the central role of the developmental biology of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to hypoxic ischemic brain injury, especially the development of motor deficits, is discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Experimental carcinogenesis induced by incorporated plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghiso, Yoichi

    1999-01-01

    The carcinogenic effects of an alpha-emitter, 239 Pu, were investigated by animal experiments as focused on both pulmonary tumors after inhalation exposures to insoluble oxide aerosols and tumor spectra induced by injection of soluble citrate. The life-span study using Wistar strain rats exposed to Pu dioxide aerosols has shown differential dose-related responses of malignancies and histopathological phenotypes of lung tumors, suggesting a threshold dose around 1.0 Gy of the lung dose. As abnormality of tumor-related genes could be supposed for the background of pulmonary carcinogenesis, the mutations of p53 tumor suppressor gene were examined by PCR-SSCP analysis using DNA fragments extracted from lung tumors. While mutations were detected in 23 cases (about 28%) among 82 lung tumors, their relations to either malignancies, histological phenotypes, dose, or oncogenesis are not yet to be elucidated. The life-span study using C3H strain mice injected with Pu citrate has shown contrast dose responses between osteosarcomas and lymphoid tumors around 10 Gy of the skeletal dose, and further indicated specific tumor spectra differed from low LET radiation exposures as shown by much more frequency of B cell type leukemic lymphomas and none of myeloid leukemias. (author)

  19. Effects of Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, on Photochemically Induced Cerebral Infarction in a Rat Hemiplegic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ikeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533 nm (10 mm diameter, and the rose bengal was injected intravenously to create an infarction. The edaravone group was injected intraperitoneally with edaravone (3 mg/kg, and the control group was injected with saline. The recovery process of the hemiplegia was evaluated with the 7-step scale of Fenny. The infarcted areas were measured after fixation. The recovery of the paralysis in the edaravone-treated group was significantly earlier than that in the untreated group. Seven days later, both groups were mostly recovered and had scores of 7, and the infarction region was significantly smaller in the edaravone-treated group. Edaravone reduced the infarction area and promoted the functional recovery of hemiparesis from cerebral thrombosis in a rat model. These findings suggest that edaravone treatment would be effective in clinical patients recovering from cerebral infarction.

  20. Effects of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, on photochemically induced cerebral infarction in a rat hemiplegic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Kamikawa, Yurie

    2013-01-01

    Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533 nm (10 mm diameter), and the rose bengal was injected intravenously to create an infarction. The edaravone group was injected intraperitoneally with edaravone (3 mg/kg), and the control group was injected with saline. The recovery process of the hemiplegia was evaluated with the 7-step scale of Fenny. The infarcted areas were measured after fixation. The recovery of the paralysis in the edaravone-treated group was significantly earlier than that in the untreated group. Seven days later, both groups were mostly recovered and had scores of 7, and the infarction region was significantly smaller in the edaravone-treated group. Edaravone reduced the infarction area and promoted the functional recovery of hemiparesis from cerebral thrombosis in a rat model. These findings suggest that edaravone treatment would be effective in clinical patients recovering from cerebral infarction.

  1. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence in rats induces motor impairments and cerebral cortex damage associated with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Santana, Luana Nazaré da Silva; Bezerra, Fernando Romualdo; De Carvalho, Sabrina; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas Andrade; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking is common among adolescents, and this type of ethanol exposure may lead to long-term nervous system damage. In the current study, we evaluated motor performance and tissue alterations in the cerebral cortex of rats subjected to intermittent intoxication with ethanol from adolescence to adulthood. Adolescent male Wistar rats (35 days old) were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) during 55 days by gavage to complete 90 days of age. The open field, inclined plane and the rotarod tests were used to assess the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination performance in adult animals. Following completion of behavioral tests, half of animals were submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of NeuN (marker of neuronal bodies), GFAP (a marker of astrocytes) and Iba1 (microglia marker) in the cerebral cortex while the other half of the animals were subjected to analysis of oxidative stress markers by biochemical assays. Chronic ethanol intoxication in rats from adolescence to adulthood induced significant motor deficits including impaired spontaneous locomotion, coordination and muscle strength. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by marked changes in all cellular populations evaluated as well as increased levels of nitrite and lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate that continuous ethanol intoxication from adolescence to adulthood is able to provide neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative damage to cerebral cortex.

  2. The effect of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine on rats subjected to surgically induced global cerebral ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Abelson, Klas; Koch, Janne

    2010-01-01

    in buprenorphine-treated and untreated animals. A part from a slightly higher hyperthermia immediately after surgery and typical opiate-associated behaviour, the buprenorphine treatment had no apparent adverse effects on the experimental model. In contrast, the analgesic treatment improved the model by minimizing......The effect of perioperatively administered buprenorphine analgesia on rats subjected to surgically induced global ischaemia was assessed. Rats supplied with buprenorphine, mixed in nut paste for voluntary ingestion, displayed significant reductions in postoperative excretions of faecal...

  3. Lycium barbarum Extracts Protect the Brain from Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema in Experimental Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Li, Suk-Yee; Yeung, Chung-Man; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Wong, David; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke is a destructive cerebrovascular disease and a leading cause of death. Yet, no ideal neuroprotective agents are available, leaving prevention an attractive alternative. The extracts from the fruits of Lycium barbarum (LBP), a Chinese anti-aging medicine and food supplement, showed neuroprotective function in the retina when given prophylactically. We aim to evaluate the protective effects of LBP pre-treatment in an experimental stroke model. Methods C57BL/6N male mice were first fed with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 or 10 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. Mice were then subjected to 2-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal method followed by 22-hour reperfusion upon filament removal. Mice were evaluated for neurological deficits just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, immunohistochemical analysis, and Western blot experiments. Evans blue (EB) extravasation was determined to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after MCAO. Results LBP pre-treatment significantly improved neurological deficits as well as decreased infarct size, hemispheric swelling, and water content. Fewer apoptotic cells were identified in LBP-treated brains by TUNEL assay. Reduced EB extravasation, fewer IgG-leaky vessels, and up-regulation of occludin expression were also observed in LBP-treated brains. Moreover, immunoreactivity for aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly decreased in LBP-treated brains. Conclusions Seven-day oral LBP pre-treatment effectively improved neurological deficits, decreased infarct size and cerebral edema as well as protected the brain from BBB disruption, aquaporin-4 up-regulation, and glial activation. The present study suggests that LBP may be used as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke. PMID:22438957

  4. An experimental study on cerebral ischemic penumbra imaging with 99Tcm-HL91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Cansheng; Jiang Ningyi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the biodistribution of 99 Tc m -4,9-diaza-3,3,10,10-tetramethyl dodecan-2,11-dione dioxime (HL91) in rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Methods: Thirty-one MCAO rats were established. Fourteen rats were used to study the biodistribution of 99 Tc m -HL91 and 15 rats were used to study the distribution of 99 Tc m -HL91 in the brain of MCAO model rats. Autoradiographic study of brain was also done in 16 MCAO model rats. Results: The liver and kidney retention were higher than that in other tissues. At 1 h after injection, small intestine retention was also high. But radioactivity in normal brain was low. Retention in target site was higher than that in non-target site. Difference between subgroups of operation and that of pseudo operation was significant (P 99 Tc m -HL91 at the target-ischemic area was shown in the autoradiograph. By using computer-enhanced image analysis, difference between target site and non-target site in the same autoradiograph and the differences between operation subgroups and that of pseudo-subgroups were all significant via Dunnett t-test and One-Way ANOVA. Conclusions: 99 Tc m -HL91 can be avidly taken up by ischemic penumbra and target/non-target ratio is high. 99 Tc m -HL91 is a potential agent for hypoxic tissue imaging, and 99 Tc m -HL91 SPECT is a promising modality in detecting the ischemic penumbra

  5. Hypoperfusion Induced by Preconditioning Treadmill Training in Hyper-Early Reperfusion After Cerebral Ischemia: A Laser Speckle Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhijie; Lu, Hongyang; Yang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Yi; Niu, Wenxiu; Ding, Li; Wang, Guili; Tong, Shanbao; Jia, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning induces neuroprotective effects during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion, which involves the recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of re-established CBF following ischemia and reperfusion are unclear. The present study investigated CBF in hyper-early stage of reperfusion by laser speckle contrast imaging, a full-field high-resolution optical imaging technique. Rats with or without treadmill training were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. CBF in arteries, veins, and capillaries in hyper-early stage of reperfusion (1, 2, and 3 h after reperfusion) and in subacute stage (24 h after reperfusion) were measured. Neurological scoring and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were further applied to determine the neuroprotective effects of exercise preconditioning. In hyper-early stage of reperfusion, CBF in the rats with exercise preconditioning was reduced significantly in arteries and veins, respectively, compared to rats with no exercise preconditioning. Capillary CBF remained stable in the hyper-early stage of reperfusion, though it increased significantly 24 h after reperfusion in the rats with exercise preconditioning. As a neuroprotective strategy, exercise preconditioning reduced the blood perfusion of arteries and veins in the hyper-early stage of reperfusion, which indicated intervention-induced neuroprotective hypoperfusion after reperfusion onset.

  6. Vaccination with IL-6 analogues induces autoantibodies to IL-6 and influences experimentally induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Pia; Jensen, Lene; Andersson, Christina

    2007-01-01

    ; yet they appear healthy and do not exhibit overt clinical or laboratory abnormalities. We induced comparable levels of aAb-IL-6 in different mouse strains by vaccination with immunogenic IL-6 analogues. We observed that the induced aAb-IL-6 protected against collagen-induced arthritis and experimental...

  7. Hemopexin induces neuroprotection in the rat subjected to focal cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Beibei; Cai, Min; Fang, Zongping; Wei, Haidong; Zhu, Fangyun; Li, Guochao; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-01-01

    Background The plasma protein hemopexin (HPX) exhibits the highest binding affinity to free heme. In vitro experiments and gene-knock out technique have suggested that HPX may have a neuroprotective effect. However, the expression of HPX in the brain was not well elucidated and its expression after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was also poorly studied. Furthermore, no in vivo data were available on the effect of HPX given centrally on the prognosis of focal cerebral ischemia. Results I...

  8. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular complications. A case of malignant lymphoma with middle cerebral artery obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Haruko; Koizumi, Nobuhiko; Nihei, Kenji; Taguchi, Nobuyuki [National Children' s Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Haruki

    1982-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma came to complete remission after combined chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate, and whole brain irradiation of 2,400 rad. Two years after diagnosis, he developed hemiparesis. CT scan showed cerebral infarction and hydrocephalus, and angiography revealed obstruction of the left middle cerebral artery. He survived with marked neurological deficits and no relapse of lymphoma. The literature was reviewed concerning complications after radiation to the brain.

  9. On the mechanics of cerebral aneurysms: experimental research and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, D. V.; Kuianova, I. O.; Yunoshev, A. S.; Ovsyannikov, K. S.; Dubovoy, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    This research extends existing experimental data for CA tissues [1, 2] and presents the preliminary results of numerical calculations. Experiments were performed to measure aneurysm wall stiffness and the data obtained was analyzed. To reconstruct the geometry of the CAs, DICOM images of real patients with aneurysms and ITK Snap [3] were used. In addition, numerical calculations were performed in ANSYS (commercial software, License of Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics). The results of these numerical calculations show a high level of agreement with experimental data from previous literature.

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with clitorally induced orgasm in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Kortekaas, Rudie; Kuipers, Rutger; Nieuwenburg, Arie; Pruim, Jan; Reinders, A A T Simone; Holstege, Gert

    2006-12-01

    There is a severe lack of knowledge regarding the brain regions involved in human sexual performance in general, and female orgasm in particular. We used [15O]-H2O positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 12 healthy women during a nonsexual resting state, clitorally induced orgasm, sexual clitoral stimulation (sexual arousal control) and imitation of orgasm (motor output control). Extracerebral markers of sexual performance and orgasm were rectal pressure variability (RPstd) and perceived level of sexual arousal (PSA). Sexual stimulation of the clitoris (compared to rest) significantly increased rCBF in the left secondary and right dorsal primary somatosensory cortex, providing the first account of neocortical processing of sexual clitoral information. In contrast, orgasm was mainly associated with profound rCBF decreases in the neocortex when compared with the control conditions (clitoral stimulation and imitation of orgasm), particularly in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, inferior temporal gyrus and anterior temporal pole. Significant positive correlations were found between RPstd and rCBF in the left deep cerebellar nuclei, and between PSA and rCBF in the ventral midbrain and right caudate nucleus. We propose that decreased blood flow in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex signifies behavioural disinhibition during orgasm in women, and that deactivation of the temporal lobe is directly related to high sexual arousal. In addition, the deep cerebellar nuclei may be involved in orgasm-specific muscle contractions while the involvement of the ventral midbrain and right caudate nucleus suggests a role for dopamine in female sexual arousal and orgasm.

  11. [Cerebral protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  12. The impact of hospital-based and community based models of cerebral palsy rehabilitation: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambi, Jermaine M; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-12-05

    Cerebral palsy requires appropriate on-going rehabilitation intervention which should effectively meet the needs of both children and parents/care-givers. The provision of effective support is a challenge, particularly in resource constrained settings. A quasi-experimental pragmatic research design was used to compare the impact of two models of rehabilitation service delivery currently offered in Harare, Zimbabwe, an outreach-based programme and the other institution-based. Questionnaires were distributed to 46 caregivers of children with cerebral palsy at baseline and after three months. Twenty children received rehabilitation services in a community setting and 26 received services as outpatients at a central hospital. The Gross Motor Function Measurement was used to assess functional change. The burden of care was measured using the Caregiver Strain Index, satisfaction with physiotherapy was assessed using the modified Medrisk satisfaction with physiotherapy services questionnaire and compliance was measured as the proportion met of the scheduled appointments. Children receiving outreach-based treatment were significantly older than children in the institution-based group. Regression analysis revealed that, once age and level of severity were controlled for, children in the outreach-based treatment group improved their motor function 6% more than children receiving institution-based services. There were no differences detected between the groups with regard to caregiver well-being and 51% of the caregivers reported signs consistent with clinical distress/depression. Most caregivers (83%) expressed that they were overwhelmed by the caregiving role and this increased with the chronicity of care. The financial burden of caregiver was predictive of caregiver strain. Caregivers in the outreach-based group reported greater satisfaction with services and were more compliant (p design interventions to alleviate the burden. The study was a pragmatic, quasi-experimental

  13. Effects of beach-chair position and induced hypotension on cerebral oxygen saturation in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Min, Kyeong Tae; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Seung Ho

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the beach-chair position and induced hypotension on regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Twenty-eight patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were enrolled prospectively. After induction of anesthesia, mechanical ventilation was controlled to maintain Paco(2) at 35 to 40 mm Hg. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. After radial artery cannulation, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured at the external auditory meatus level and maintained between 60 and 65 mm Hg. The rSO(2) was measured by use of near-infrared spectroscopy. MAP and rSO(2) were recorded at the following times: before induction (T(0)), immediately after induction (T(1) [baseline]), after beach-chair position (T(2)), immediately after induced hypotension (T(3)), 1 hour after induced hypotension (T(4)), and after supine position at the end of surgery (T(5)). Cerebral desaturation was defined as a reduction in rSO(2) to less than 80% of baseline value for 15 seconds or greater. A total of 27 patients were evaluated until the end of this study. The MAP at T(2) was significantly lower than that at T(1). The MAP values at T(3) and T(4) were significantly lower than those at T(1) and T(2). The rSO(2) at T(2) was significantly lower than that at T(1). Unlike the pattern of change in the MAP, there was no additional decrease in rSO(2) at T(3) and T(4). There were 2 patients who had an episode of cerebral desaturation. The beach-chair position combined with induced hypotension significantly decreases rSO(2) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery under general anesthesia. Level IV, study of nonconsecutive patients without consistently applied reference gold standard. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemopexin induces neuroprotection in the rat subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Beibei; Cai, Min; Fang, Zongping; Wei, Haidong; Zhu, Fangyun; Li, Guochao; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-06-10

    The plasma protein hemopexin (HPX) exhibits the highest binding affinity to free heme. In vitro experiments and gene-knock out technique have suggested that HPX may have a neuroprotective effect. However, the expression of HPX in the brain was not well elucidated and its expression after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was also poorly studied. Furthermore, no in vivo data were available on the effect of HPX given centrally on the prognosis of focal cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we systematically investigated expression of HPX in normal rat brain by immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that HPX was mainly expressed in vascular system and neurons, as well as in a small portion of astrocytes adjacent to the vessels in normal rat brain. Further, we determined the role of HPX in the process of focal cerebral ischemic injury and explored the effects of HPX treatment in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. After 2 h' middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 h' reperfusion, the expression of HPX was increased in the neurons and astrocytes in the penumbra area, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. Intracerebroventricular injection of HPX at the onset of reperfusion dose-dependently reduced the infarct volumes and improved measurements of neurological function of the rat subjected to transient focal cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of HPX sustained for up to 7 days after experiments. Our study provides a new insight into the potential neuroprotective role of HPX as a contributing factor of endogenous protective mechanisms against focal cerebral ischemia injury, and HPX might be developed as a potential agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  15. Sox2-Mediated Conversion of NG2 Glia into Induced Neurons in the Injured Adult Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Heinrich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The adult cerebral cortex lacks the capacity to replace degenerated neurons following traumatic injury. Conversion of nonneuronal cells into induced neurons has been proposed as an innovative strategy toward brain repair. Here, we show that retrovirus-mediated expression of the transcription factors Sox2 and Ascl1, but strikingly also Sox2 alone, can induce the conversion of genetically fate-mapped NG2 glia into induced doublecortin (DCX+ neurons in the adult mouse cerebral cortex following stab wound injury in vivo. In contrast, lentiviral expression of Sox2 in the unlesioned cortex failed to convert oligodendroglial and astroglial cells into DCX+ cells. Neurons induced following injury mature morphologically and some acquire NeuN while losing DCX. Patch-clamp recording of slices containing Sox2- and/or Ascl1-transduced cells revealed that a substantial fraction of these cells receive synaptic inputs from neurons neighboring the injury site. Thus, NG2 glia represent a potential target for reprogramming strategies toward cortical repair.

  16. Effect of certain antioxidants on cerebral ischemia induced in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible roles of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q 10 and rutin in ameliorating the biochemical changes in the brain and serum induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats exposed to whole body gamma radiation. Induction of I/R increased the brain oxidative stress as manifested by a marked increase in its content of MDA accompanied by depletion of its GSH content, and a compensatory elevation in the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. In addition, it caused a significant rise in brain cytosolic activity of LDH and cytosolic Ca 2+ level. Furthermore, I/R provoked a remarkable inflammatory response reflected by the observed significant increment in serum levels of the pro inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-Iβ. Moreover, induction of I/R in fractionally or single irradiated rats resulted in a further increase in brain oxidative stress and cytosolic LDH activity, disturbed brain Ca 2+ homeostasis, as well as an exaggerated inflammatory reaction. Concomitant to radiation, daily administration of each of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q 10 and rutin to irradiated rats before induction of I/R, was effective in alleviating the brain oxidative stress (represented by a decrease in the increment of brain MDA concentration and the restoration of its GSH level). Moreover, each of these antioxidants caused a significant attenuation of the compensatory rise of the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. Antioxidants were, also; able to partially correct the metabolic disturbances induced in brain by I/R and radiation, that correction was reflected by lowering of the cytosolic LDH activity and Ca 2+ level. Administration of each of vitamin E and rutin revealed a potent ant inflammatory action of these antioxidants, while coenzyme-Q 10 had no significant effect on serum levels of TNF-α and IL-Iβ. Finally, the present study justifies the use of antioxidants in hope to alleviate or minimize the various deleterious effects of

  17. Effect of certain antioxidants on cerebral ischemia induced in irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Aziz, E R [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible roles of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q{sub 10} and rutin in ameliorating the biochemical changes in the brain and serum induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats exposed to whole body gamma radiation. Induction of I/R increased the brain oxidative stress as manifested by a marked increase in its content of MDA accompanied by depletion of its GSH content, and a compensatory elevation in the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. In addition, it caused a significant rise in brain cytosolic activity of LDH and cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} level. Furthermore, I/R provoked a remarkable inflammatory response reflected by the observed significant increment in serum levels of the pro inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha} and IL-I{beta}. Moreover, induction of I/R in fractionally or single irradiated rats resulted in a further increase in brain oxidative stress and cytosolic LDH activity, disturbed brain Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, as well as an exaggerated inflammatory reaction. Concomitant to radiation, daily administration of each of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q{sub 10} and rutin to irradiated rats before induction of I/R, was effective in alleviating the brain oxidative stress (represented by a decrease in the increment of brain MDA concentration and the restoration of its GSH level). Moreover, each of these antioxidants caused a significant attenuation of the compensatory rise of the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. Antioxidants were, also; able to partially correct the metabolic disturbances induced in brain by I/R and radiation, that correction was reflected by lowering of the cytosolic LDH activity and Ca{sup 2+} level. Administration of each of vitamin E and rutin revealed a potent ant inflammatory action of these antioxidants, while coenzyme-Q{sub 10} had no significant effect on serum levels of TNF-{alpha} and IL-I{beta}. Finally, the present study justifies the use of antioxidants in hope to alleviate or

  18. Cholescintigraphy in experimentally induced obstructive and parenchymatous jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehre, M.; Biersack, H.J.; Hofmann, S.; Winkler, C.

    1979-01-01

    Animal studies have been performed in 30 dogs in order to obtain information concerning typical patterns of cholescintigraphy in acute obstructive jaundice. In 14 the choledochus was ligated and in 16 galactosamine-hepatitis was induced as an experimental model for parenchymatous jaundice. The results suggest a number of diagnostic criteria in obstructive disease. (Auth.)

  19. Surfactant induced flows in thin liquid films : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinz, D.K.N.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of the experimental work summarized in my thesis is the flow in thin liquid films induced by non-uniformly distributed surfactants. The flow dynamics as a consequence of the deposition of a droplet of an insoluble surfactant onto a thin liquid film covering a solid substrate where

  20. Experimentally Induced Learned Helplessness: How Far Does it Generalize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffin, Keith; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Assessed whether experimentally induced learned helplessness on a cognitive training task generalized to a situationally dissimilar social interaction test task. No significant differences were observed between groups on the subsequent test task, showing that helplessness failed to generalize. (Author/ABB)

  1. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...

  2. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection during surgical approach to the aortic arch aneurysms resection: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudêncio Lopes Espinosa

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available É realizado estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia: hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, à hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (Grupo I e à hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (Grupo II. Foram analisadas amostras seriadas das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral aferidas na veia julgular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min., 90 min. e 135 min. de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no Grupo II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos de isquemia cerebral. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20ºC whith great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (Group I, or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (Group II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaCO2 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also performed 45, 90 and 135 minutes, through animal sacrifice in each

  3. Histogenetic disorders of cerebral cortex induced by in utero exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako; Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the short- and long-term effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cell migration in the developing cerebral cortex of mice and rats, we irradiated them at the middle of cortical histogenesis with either γ-rays or X-rays. We have demonstrated an effect of ionizing radiation on neuronal migration at doses as low as 0.15 Gy together with a changing pattern of expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM. Our findings suggest a possible role of N-CAM in neuronal migration and suggest the presence of a threshold in terms of the effects of small radiation doses on the developing cerebral cortex. In addition, the effects of radiation on neuronal migration during the embryonic stage remained even after birth in that aberrantly placed neurons were noted in the cerebral cortex. However, such derangement was less pronounced in mature animals compared to younger ones. These observations suggest that some modification process including apoptosis might have occurred during the postnatal period. In this review, molecular pathogenesis of neuronal migration disorders will also be discussed, based upon recent experimental as well as molecular genetic studies. (author)

  4. Cerebral Metabolic Changes Related to Oxidative Metabolism in a Model of Bacterial Meningitis Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Michael; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction is prominent in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we hypothesize that the metabolic changes seen after intracisternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in a piglet model of meningitis is compatible...... with mitochondrial dysfunction and resembles the metabolic patterns seen in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Eight pigs received LPS injection in cisterna magna, and four pigs received NaCl in cisterna magna as a control. Biochemical variables related to energy metabolism were monitored by intracerebral...... dysfunction with increasing cerebral LPR due to increased lactate and normal pyruvate, PbtO2, and ICP. The metabolic pattern resembles the one observed in patients with bacterial meningitis. Metabolic monitoring in these patients is feasible to monitor for cerebral metabolic derangements otherwise missed...

  5. Blocking of platelets or intrinsic coagulation pathway-driven thrombosis does not prevent cerebral infarctions induced by photothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Braeuninger, Stefan; Pham, Mirko; Austinat, Madeleine; Nölte, Ingo; Renné, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bendszus, Martin; Stoll, Guido

    2008-04-01

    Models of photochemically-induced thrombosis are widely used in cerebrovascular research. Photothrombotic brain infarctions can be induced by systemic application of photosensitizing dyes followed by focal illumination of the cerebral cortex. Although the ensuing activation of platelets is well established, their contribution for thrombosis and tissue damage has not formally been proved. Infarction to the cerebral cortex was induced in mice by Rose Bengal and a cold light source. To assess the functional role of platelets, animals were platelet-depleted by anti-GPIbalpha antibodies or treated with GPIIb/IIIa-blocking F(ab)(2) fragments. The significance of the plasmatic coagulation cascade was determined by using blood coagulation factor XII (FXII)-deficient mice or heparin. Infarct development and infarct volumes were determined by serial MRI and conventional and electron microscopy. There was no difference in development and final size of photothrombotic infarctions in mice with impaired platelet function. Moreover, deficiency of FXII, which initiates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and is essential for thrombus formation, or blockade of FXa, the key protease during the waterfall cascade of plasmatic coagulation, by heparin likewise did not affect lesion development. Our data demonstrate that platelet activation, factor XII-driven thrombus formation, and plasmatic coagulation pathways downstream of FX are not a prerequisite for ensuing tissue damage in models of photothrombotic vessel injury indicating that other pathomechanisms are involved. We suggest that this widely used model does not depend on platelet- or plasmatic coagulation-derived thrombosis.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and histologic findings of acute and subacute stage of experimental cerebral fat embolism in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong; Rark, Byung Rae; Kim, Sang Sik; Kim, Yong Woo

    2002-01-01

    edema and cellular swelling were mild compared with the control side. Experimental cerebral fat embolism was clearly demonstrated by T2WI and Gd-T1WI images obtained at all time points. The greater part of an embolized lesion showed reversible findings at MR and histologic examination; irreversible focal necrosis was, however, observed in gray and white matter at week 3

  7. Purinergic signaling modulates the cerebral inflammatory response in experimentally infected fish with Streptococcus agalactiae: an attempt to improve the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Carine F; Baldissera, Matheus D; Bottari, Nathiele B; Moreira, Karen L S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; da Veiga, Marcelo L; Santos, Roberto C V; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2018-06-01

    Appropriate control of the immune response is a critical determinant of fish health, and the purinergic cascade has an important role in the immune and inflammatory responses. This cascade regulates the levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine (Ado), molecules involved in physiological or pathological events as inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether purinergic signaling, through the activities of nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ADA), is capable of modulating the cerebral immune and inflammatory responses in silver catfish that is experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Cerebral NTPDase (with ATP as substrate) and 5'-nucleotidase activities increased, while ADA activity decreased in silver catfish that is experimentally infected with S. agalactiae, compared to the control group. Moreover, the cerebral levels of ATP and Ado increased in infected animals compared to the uninfected control group. Brain histopathology in infected animals revealed inflammatory demyelination (the presence of occasional bubbly collections), increased cellular density in the area near to pia-mater and intercellular edema. Based on this evidence, the modulation of the purinergic cascade by the enzymes NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase, and ADA exerts an anti-inflammatory profile due to the regulation of ATP and Ado levels. This suggests involvement of purinergic enzymes on streptococcosis pathogenesis, through regulating cerebral ATP and Ado levels, molecules known to participate in physiological or pathological events as inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, respectively. In summary, the modulation of the cerebral purinergic cascade exerts an anti-inflammatory profile in an attempt to reduce inflammatory damage.

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with clitorally induced orgasm in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Kuipers, Rutger; Nieuwenburg, Arie; Pruim, Jan; Reinders, A. A. T. Simone; Holstege, Gert

    2006-01-01

    There is a severe lack of knowledge regarding the brain regions involved in human sexual performance in general, and female orgasm in particular. We used [(15)O]-H(2)O positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 12 healthy women during a nonsexual resting state,

  9. Neuroendocrine mechanisms of development of experimental hyperandrogen-induced anovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, A G; Sinitsyn, P V; Tarasenko, L V; Polyakova, L I

    2003-10-01

    An experimental model of hyperandrogen-induced anovulatory infertility (s.c. implantation of Silastic capsules containing testosterone into adult female rats) was used to study morphological, hormonal, and biochemical measures characterizing the state of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. Impairments in functional androgen metabolism in the hypothalamus were seen, with decreases in the Luliberin sensitivity of the hypophysis, changes in the structure of estral cycles, and morphological changes in the ovaries; these findings are evidence for neuroendocrine disturbances in the control of ovulation. Flutamide, an experimental antiandrogen, led to partial normalization of the hormonal, biochemical, and morphological characteristics, as well as to recovery of fertility in females with anovulatory infertility.

  10. Experimental identification of pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos; Ricciardelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    combinations of frequencies (0.33-1.07 Hz) and amplitudes 4.5-48 mm). The experimental campaign involved seventy-one male and female human adults and covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed between 4954 individual tests. When walking on a laterally moving surface, motion-induced forces develop also......This paper presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of lateral forces generated by single pedestrians during continuous walking on a treadmill. Two different conditions are investigated; initially the treadmill is fixed and then it is laterally driven in a sinusoidal motion at varying...... and inter-subject variability. It is shown that the motion induced portion of the pedestrian load (on average) inputs energy into the structure in the frequency range (normalised by the average walking frequency) between approximately 0.6 and 1.2. Furthermore, it is shown that the load component in phase...

  11. The effects of "Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy" on fine motor skills in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abootalebi Sh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Constraint-Induced movement therapy (CIMT is a promising treatment for improving upper limb function in adults after stroke and traumatic brain injury. It involves constraint of the less affected limb and intensive practice with the more affected limb. The purpose of this study on children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP was to evaluate the effects of CIMT on upper extremity and to make a comparison with conventional treatment."n"nMethods: I a randomized clinical trial twelve children (seven females, five males; aged between 48 and 72 months with mean±standard deviation of 59.91±9.15mo were randomly assigned in two groups. An intensive occupational therapy program including five hours per day for 21 consecutive days was performed for all of them, while less affected limbs were placed in sling for immobilization. Before and after intervention, upper extremity function, spasticity, and motor neuron excitation were evaluated by means of peabody developmental motor scales, modified Ashworth scale, and H reflex and H/M ratio, respectively."n"nResults: The children who received CIMT did not improved their ability to use their hemiplegic hand significantly more than the children in the control group (p>0

  12. Transformation induced plasticity in maraging steel: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, K.; Kitajima, Y.; Kigami, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2000-01-01

    The deformation behavior of a maraging TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) steel (MAVAL X12) is studied experimentally under a constant load. The existence of the back stress in the axial direction is directly proved by investigating the dilatation curves. Martensite-start lines are given under tensile, compressive and shear stresses. The evolution of TRIP strain and the maximum TRIP strain are determined. The alloy response during isothermal tensile test is explained in terms of influences both by the composite and transformation. (orig.)

  13. Verapamil-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier presenting as a transient right middle cerebral artery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Jonathan; Nelson, Jeffrey; Ray, Abhishek; Hu, Yin

    2017-12-01

    A middle-aged patient presented for elective embolization of an incidentally found right internal carotid aneurysm. An angiogram was performed, during which the left internal carotid artery was visualized to evaluate a second, small aneurysm. During the embolization of the right internal carotid artery aneurysm, a catheter-induced vasospasm was identified that prompted treatment with intra-arterial verapamil. The procedure was uncomplicated; a postoperative rotational flat-panel computed tomography scan was performed on the angiography table that demonstrated right hemisphere contrast staining. The patient developed a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) syndrome after extubation with repeat cerebral angiography negative for occlusion and magnetic resonance imaging negative for stroke. The patient was observed for 48 hours, during which time the patient had slowly improved. At a six-week follow up visit, the patient had fully recovered. We present an interesting case of a verapamil-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and self-limited right MCA syndrome.

  14. Effect of Child Friendly Constraint Induced Movement Therapy on Unimanual and Bimanual Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Sadegh Hosseini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Effectiveness of Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT has been approved in adult persons, while it seems that we need many researches with higher levels of evidences in children. This research aimed to identify the efficacy of CIMT on unimanual and bimanual functions in children with Cerebral Palsy. Materials & Methods: In this interventional study, twenty eight participants were selected that had the inclusion and exclusion criteria and then divided into two groups ofCIMT and control. The intervention was provided on 10 out of 12 consecutive days in CIMT group and another group was received occupational therapy services. Assessment tools which were utilized in the survey were Bruininks-Oseretsky Motor Proficiency Test, Caregiver Functional Use Survey (CFUS, Jebsen-Taylor Test in Hand Function. In order to compare two groups Independent t-test was used and to compare each group from pre-test to post-test paired t-test was utilized. Results: Data showed significant differences between two groups in dexterity, bilateral coordination, bimanual coordination, bimanual function, unimanual function and Caregiver Functional Use Survey (how well & how frequently (P<0.05. Also comparison between pre-test and post-test in each group showed improvement in most of variables in research. Conclusion: protocol of child friendly Constraint Induced Movement Therapywas lead to improvement in either unimanual or bimanual hand functions in children with cerebral palsy.

  15. Ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy does not detect hyperventilation-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Secher, Niels H.; Hirasawa, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) may be important during anaesthesia and several options are available. We evaluated the CerOx monitor that employs ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy to estimate changes in a CBF index (CFI).Methods: Seven...... healthy males (age 21-26 years) hyperventilated and were administered phenylephrine to increase mean arterial pressure by 20-30 mmHg. Frontal lobe tissue oxygenation (ScO2) and CFI were obtained using the CerOx and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAvmean) was determined....... Administration of phenylephrine was not associated with any changes in MCAvmean, ICAf, ECAf, ScO2, SkBF, SskinO2, or CFI.Conclusion: The CerOx was able to detect a stable CBF during administration of phenylephrine. However, during hyperventilation MCAvmean and ICAf decreased while CFI increased, likely due...

  16. Nanofibrillar scaffolds induce preferential activation of Rho GTPases in cerebral cortical astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Khan, Adeel A; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I; Meiners, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral cortical astrocyte responses to polyamide nanofibrillar scaffolds versus poly-L-lysine (PLL)-functionalized planar glass, unfunctionalized planar Aclar coverslips, and PLL-functionalized planar Aclar surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The physical properties of the cell culture environments were evaluated using contact angle and surface roughness measurements and compared. Astrocyte morphological responses, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation, and stellation were imaged using atomic force microscopy and phalloidin staining for F-actin. Activation of the corresponding Rho GTPase regulators was investigated using immunolabeling with Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar scaffolds showed a unique response that included stellation, cell–cell interactions by stellate processes, and evidence of depression of RhoA. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family, with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. PMID:22915841

  17. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition in cerebral cortex of immature rats following homocysteic acid-induced seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Ješina, Pavel; Drahota, Zdeněk; Lisý, Václav; Haugvicová, Renata; Vojtíšková, Alena; Houštěk, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 204, č. 2 (2007), s. 597-609 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/06/1261; GA MŠk 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cerebral cortex * homocysteic acid * free radical scavenger Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2007

  18. CT measurement of indomethacin-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes in the newborn piglet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Derek W.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2003-05-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a common condition among preterm infants, increases the risk of intraventricular hemorrhage, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and death in afflicted individuals. Current clinical treatment of PDA relies on use of the drug indomethacin to close the ductus arteriosus. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of indomethacin on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral mean transit time (MTT) in newborn piglets using computed tomography (CT) perfusion. Twenty newborn piglets divided by age into two groups, less than 12 hours of age (n = 10) and greater than 12 hours of age (n = 10) were studied. Five piglets in each group received indomethacin treatment (0.2 mg/kg infused over 30 min) while remaining piglets served as controls. No significant changes in CBF were observed in control groups. In both indomethacin treated groups, average CBF decreased 32.3% and 34.3% (P > 0.05) below baseline immediately post infusion in piglets less than and greater than 12 hours of age respectively. Piglets less than 12hours of age treated with indomethacin also exhibited a delayed increase in CBF, maximum average increase of 41.7% (P > 0.05) above baseline at 210 min post infusion, a response not observed in the corresponding group of piglets greater than 12 hours of age. The observed age dependent response may be due to functional/anatomical closure of the PDA.

  19. Creatine kinase activity in dogs with experimentally induced acute inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrinka Zapryanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute inflammation on total creatine kinase (CK activity in dogs. In these animals, CK is an enzyme found predominantly in skeletal muscle and significantly elevated serum activity is largely associated with muscle damage. Plasma increases in dogs are associated with cell membrane leakage and will therefore be seen in any condition associated with muscular inflammation. The study was induced in 15 mongrel male dogs (n=9 in experimental group and n=6 in control group at the age of two years and body weight 12-15 kg. The inflammation was reproduced by inoculation of 2 ml turpentine oil subcutaneously in lumbar region. The plasma activity of creatine kinase was evaluated at 0, 6, 24, 48, 72 hours after inoculation and on days 7, 14 and 21 by a kit from Hospitex Diagnostics. In the experimental group, the plasma concentrations of the CK-activity were increased at the 48th hour (97.48±6.92 U/L and remained significantly higher (p<0.05 at the 72 hour (97.43±2.93 U/L compared to the control group (77.08±5.27 U/L. The results of this study suggest that the evaluation of creatine kinase in dogs with experimentally induced acute inflammation has a limited diagnostic value. It was observed that the creatine kinase activity is slightly affected by the experimentally induced acute inflammation in dogs.

  20. Microcirculation alterations in experimentally induced gingivitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masato; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Iimura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to morphologically examine the gingival microvascular network using a microvascular resin cast (MRC) technique, and to investigate how inflammatory disease functionally affects gingival microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We used four beagle dogs with healthy periodontal tissue as experimental animals. To cause periodontal inflammation, dental floss was placed around the cervical neck portions of the right premolars. The unmanipulated left premolars served as controls, and received plaque control every 7 days. After 90 days, gingivitis was induced in the experimental side, while the control side maintained healthy gingiva. To perform morphological examinations, we used an MRC method involving the injection of low-viscosity synthetic resin into the blood vessels, leading to peripheral soft-tissue dissolution and permitting observation of the bone, teeth, and vascular cast. Gingival blood flow was estimated using an LDF meter. The control gingival vasculature showed hairpin-loop-like networks along the tooth surface. The blood vessels had diameters of 20-40 μm and were regularly arranged around the cervical portion. On the other hand, the vasculature in the experimental group was twisted and gathered into spiral forms, with blood vessels that had uneven surfaces and smaller diameters of 8-10 μm. LDF revealed reduced gingival blood flow in the group with experimentally induced gingivitis compared to controls. The actual measurements of gingival blood flow by LDF were in agreement with the alterations that would be expected based on the gingivitis-induced morphological alterations observed with the MRC technique.

  1. Sevoflurane postconditioning against cerebral ischemic neuronal injury is abolished in diet-induced obesity: role of brain mitochondrial KATP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zecheng; Chen, Yunbo; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Yi; Fang, Xuedong; Xu, Jingwei

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is associated with increased infarct volumes and adverse outcomes following ischemic stroke. However, its effect on anesthetic postconditioning‑induced neuroprotection has not been investigated. The present study examined the effect of sevoflurane postconditioning on focal ischemic brain injury in diet‑induced obesity. Sprague‑Dawley rats were fed a high‑fat diet (HF; 45% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to develop obesity syndrome. Rats fed a low‑fat diet (LF; 10% kcal as fat) served as controls. The HF or LF‑fed rats were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia for 60 min, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Postconditioning was performed by exposure to sevoflurane for 15 min immediately at the onset of reperfusion. The involvement of the mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channel was analyzed by the administration of a selective inhibitor of 5‑hydroxydecanoate (5‑HD) prior to sevoflurane postconditioning or by administration of diazoxide (DZX), a mitoKATP channel opener, instead of sevoflurane. The cerebral infarct volume, neurological score and motor coordination were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. The HF‑fed rats had larger infarct volumes, and lower neurological scores than the LF‑fed rats and also failed to respond to neuroprotection by sevoflurane or DZX. By contrast, sevoflurane and DZX reduced the infarct volumes and improved the neurological scores and motor coordination in the LF‑fed rats. Pretreatment with 5‑HD inhibited sevoflurane‑induced neuroprotection in the LF‑fed rats, whereas it had no effect in the HF‑fed rats. Molecular studies demonstrated that the expression of Kir6.2, a significant mitoKATP channel component, was reduced in the brains of the HF‑fed rats compared with the LF‑fed rats. The results of this study indicate that diet‑induced obesity eliminates the ability of anesthetic sevoflurane postconditioning to protect the brain against cerebral ischemic neuronal injury, most likely due to an impaired brain

  2. Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on cerebral blood flow and cerebral vasomotor reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiorri, Floriana; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Gilio, Francesca; Giacomelli, Elena; Frasca, Vittorio; Cambieri, Chiara; Ceccanti, Marco; Di Piero, Vittorio; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether intermittent theta burst stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics, we investigated changes induced by intermittent theta burst stimulation on the middle cerebral artery cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in healthy participants. The middle cerebral artery flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity were monitored by continuous transcranial Doppler sonography. Changes in cortical excitability were tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 11 healthy participants, before and immediately after delivering intermittent theta burst stimulation, we tested cortical excitability measured by the resting motor threshold and motor evoked potential amplitude over the stimulated hemisphere and vasomotor reactivity to CO(2) bilaterally. The blood flow velocity was monitored in both middle cerebral arteries throughout the experimental session. In a separate session, we tested the effects of sham stimulation under the same experimental conditions. Whereas the resting motor threshold remained unchanged before and after stimulation, motor evoked potential amplitudes increased significantly (P = .04). During and after stimulation, middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities also remained bilaterally unchanged, whereas vasomotor reactivity to CO(2) increased bilaterally (P = .04). The sham stimulation left all variables unchanged. The expected intermittent theta burst stimulation-induced changes in cortical excitability were not accompanied by changes in cerebral blood flow velocities; however, the bilateral increased vasomotor reactivity suggests that intermittent theta burst stimulation influences the cerebral microcirculation, possibly involving subcortical structures. These findings provide useful information on hemodynamic phenomena accompanying intermittent theta burst stimulation, which should be considered in research aimed at developing this noninvasive, low-intensity stimulation technique for safe

  3. A Terapia por contensão induzida no desempenho ocupacional de crianças com paralisia cerebral / Intervention by contraint- induced movement therapy on the occupational performance of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra da Silva Fonseca

    2018-04-01

    constraint-induced movement therapy which is the immobilization of  theirnot affected upper limb and an intensive training of their affected end in children with hemiplegic CP. It is a quasi-experimental, before and after, non-blinded and non-randomized study. A Teenager Motor Activity Log (TMAL, a Pediatric Arm Function Test (PAFT and an Inventory of New Motor Activities Program (INMAP were used to analyze the functional performance of the participants before and after the treatment. The study sample included two children with hemiplegic CP. The TMAL evaluation showed a better frequency and quality of the movements performed with the affected limb in both interventions. In the same way, the PAFT evaluation showed an increase in unilateral and bilateral tasks when they used their affected limb with no need for commands. The INMAP showed some improvement of reaching, effective pinching and gripping standards mainly. The results showed that after the intervention, there was a significant increase in the functional performance of the children’s motor activities. Therefore, it is believed that this type of intervention provides a rehabilitation to obtain a greater autonomy and independence in daily activities.Keywords: Functional Performance; Cerebral Palsy; Rehabilitation; Occupational therapy.

  4. Attenuation by methyl mercury and mercuric sulfide of pentobarbital induced hypnotic tolerance in mice through inhibition of ATPase activities and nitric oxide production in cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Huang, Zih-Ning; Yu, Hsun-Hsin; Chang, Liang-Hao [College of Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Institute of Biotechnology, Tainan (China); Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn [College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei (China)

    2008-06-15

    This study is aimed at exploring the possible mechanism of hypnosis-enhancing effect of HgS or cinnabar (a traditional Chinese medicine containing more than 95% HgS) in mice treated with pentobarbital. We also examined whether the effect of HgS is different from that of the well-known methyl mercury (MeHg). After a short period (7 days) of oral administration to mice, a nontoxic dose (0.1 g/kg) of HgS not only significantly enhanced pentobarbital-induced hypnosis but also attenuated tolerance induction; while a higher dose (1 g/kg) of HgS or cinnabar exerted an almost irreversible enhancing effect on pentobarbital-hypnosis similar to that of MeHg (2 mg/kg) tested, which was still effective even after 10 or 35 days cessation of administration. To study comparatively the effects of different mercury forms from oral administration of MeHg and HgS on membrane ATPase activities of experimental mice, analysis of the Hg content in the cerebral cortex revealed that correlated with the decrease of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities. Furthermore, NO levels of blood but not that of cerebral cortex were also decreased by mercuric compounds. Although pentobarbital alone enhanced cytochrome p450-2C9 in time dependent manner, all of mercurial compounds tested had no such effect. All of these findings indicated that the mercurial compounds including cinnabar, HgS and MeHg exert a long-lasting enhancing hypnotic activity without affecting pentobarbital metabolism, which provides evidence-based sedative effect of cinnabar used in Chinese traditional medicine for more than 2,000 years. The nontoxic HgS dosing (0.1 g/kg/day) for consecutive 7 days is perhaps useful for delaying or preventing pentobarbital-tolerance. (orig.)

  5. Experimental study of ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, F.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    In the environment, the presence of ions from natural radioactivity may increase the rate of new particle formation through ion-induced nucleation. A thermal diffusion cloud chamber (TDCC) has been built to experimentally study ion-induced nucleation where the ions are produced by gaseous radioactive sources. The critical supersaturation values and nucleation rates for methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol vapors on ions produced within the volume of the chamber by alpha decay of 222 Rn have been measured quantitatively at various radioactivity concentrations and supersaturations. The presence of ion tracks and the effect of an external electric field were also investigated. The alpha tracks and ion-induced nucleation formed by 222 Rn decay become visible at the critical supersaturation that is below the value needed for homogeneous nucleation. At this supersaturation, the nucleation rates increase substantially with increasing 222 Rn at low activity concentrations, but attain limiting values at higher concentrations. The experimental results indicate that the ionization by radon decay will promote ion-cluster formation and lower the free energy barriers. The formation of visible droplets is strongly dependent on the supersaturation. This study also confirms that the external electric field has a significant effect on the observed rates of nucleation

  6. Machine Induced Experimental Background Conditions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Levinsen, Yngve Inntjore; Stapnes, Steinar

    2012-09-19

    The Large Hadron Collider set a new energy record for particle accelerators in late 2009, breaking the previous record held by Tevatron of 2 TeV collision energy. The LHC today operates at a collision energy of 7 TeV. With higher beam energy and intensity, measures have to be taken to ensure optimal experimental conditions and safety of the machine and detectors. Machine induced experimental background can severely reduce the quality of experimental triggers and track reconstruction. In a worst case, the radiation levels can be damaging for some of the subdetectors. The LHC is a particular challenge in this regard due to the vastly different operating conditions of the different experiments. The nominal luminosity varies by four orders of magnitude. The unprecedented stored beam energy and the amount of superconducting elements can make it challenging to protect the accelerator itself as well. In this work we have simulated and measured the machine induced background originating from various sources: the beam...

  7. Panax ginseng extract attenuates neuronal injury and cognitive deficits in rats with vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-De Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a slow-growing perennial plant. Panax ginseng extract has numerous biological activities, including antitumor, anti-inflammatory and antistress activities. Panax ginseng extract also has a cognition-enhancing effect in rats with alcohol-induced memory impairment. In this study, we partially occluded the bilateral carotid arteries in the rat to induce chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, a well-known model of vascular dementia. The rats were then intragastrically administered 50 or 100 mg/kg Panax ginseng extract. Morris water maze and balance beam tests were used to evaluate memory deficits and motor function, respectively. Protein quantity was used to evaluate cholinergic neurons. Immunofluorescence staining was used to assess the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells. Western blot assay was used to evaluate protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, Bcl-2 and Bax. Treatment with Panax ginseng extract for 8 weeks significantly improved behavioral function and increased neuronal density and VEGF and bFGF protein expression in the hippocampal CA3 area. Furthermore, Panax ginseng extract reduced the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive cells, and it decreased apoptosis by upregulating Bcl-2 and downregulating Bax protein expression. The effect of Panax ginseng extract was dose-dependent and similar to that of nimodipine, a commonly used drug for the treatment of vascular dementia. These findings suggest that Panax ginseng extract is neuroprotective against vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, and therefore might have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating the disease.

  8. Statin therapy exacerbates alcohol-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakova, Maria N; Bisen, Shivantika; Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Statins constitute the most commonly prescribed drugs to decrease cholesterol (CLR). CLR is an important modulator of alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). Using rats on a high CLR diet (2% CLR) we set to determine whether atorvastatin administration (10mg/kg daily for 18-23weeks) modified AICAC. Middle cerebral arteries were pressurized in vitro at 60mmHg and AICAC was evoked by 50mM ethanol, that is within the range of blood alcohol detected in humans following moderate-to-heavy drinking. AICAC was evident in high CLR+atorvastatin group but not in high CLR diet+placebo. Statin exacerbation of AICAC persisted in de-endothelialized arteries, and was blunted by CLR enrichment in vitro. Fluorescence imaging of filipin-stained arteries showed that atorvastatin decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) CLR when compared to placebo, this difference being reduced by CLR enrichment in vitro. Voltage- and calcium-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) are known VSM targets of ethanol, with their beta1 subunit being necessary for ethanol-induced channel inhibition and resulting AICAC. Ethanol-induced BK inhibition in excised membrane patches from freshly isolated myocytes was exacerbated in the high CLR diet+atorvastatin group when compared to high CLR diet+placebo. Unexpectedly, atorvastatin decreased the amount and function of BK beta1 subunit as documented by immunofluorescence imaging and functional patch-clamp studies. Atorvastatin exacerbation of ethanol-induced BK inhibition disappeared upon artery CLR enrichment in vitro. Our study demonstrates for the first time statin's ability to exacerbate the vascular effect of a widely consumed drug of abuse, this exacerbation being driven by statin modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in the VSM via CLR-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Green tea polyphenols alleviate early BBB damage during experimental focal cerebral ischemia through regulating tight junctions and PKCalpha signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobai; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Ping; Yu, Bo; Liu, Yunhui; Xue, Yixue

    2013-07-21

    It has been supposed that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) have neuroprotective effects on brain damage after brain ischemia in animal experiments. Little is known regarding GTPs' protective effects against the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after ischemic stroke. We investigated the effects of GTPs on the expression of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1, and the corresponding cellular mechanisms involved in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 0, 30, 60, and 120 min. GTPs (400 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered by intragastric gavage twice a day for 30 days prior to MCAO. At different time points, the expression of claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, and PKCα signaling pathway in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were evaluated. GTPs reduced BBB permeability at 60 min and 120 min after ischemia as compared with the vehicle group. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that GTPs could reverse the opening of tight junction (TJ) barrier at 60 min and 120 min after MACO. The decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were significantly prevented by treatment with GTPs at the same time points after ischemia in rats. Furthermore, GTPs could attenuate the increase in the expression levels of PKCα mRNA and protein caused by cerebral ischemia. These results demonstrate that GTPs may act as a potential neuroprotective agent against BBB damage at the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia through the regulation of TJ and PKCα signaling.

  10. Serial neuroradiological studies in focal cerebritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, S.; Mochizuki, H.; Kuru, Y.; Miwa, H.; Kondo, T.; Mori, H.; Mizuno, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We report serial neuroradiological studies in a patient with focal cerebritis in the head of the left caudate nucleus. On the day after the onset of symptoms, CT showed an ill-defined low density lesion. The lack of contrast enhancement appeared to be the most important finding for differentiating focal cerebritis from an encapsulated brain abscess or a tumour. MRI two days later revealed the centre of the lesion to be of slightly low intensity on T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR) images and very low intensity on T2-weighted spin echo images, which appeared to correspond to the early cerebritis stage of experimentally induced cerebritis and brain abscess. Ten days after the onset of symptoms, CT revealed a thin ring of enhancement in the head of the caudate nucleus, and a similar small ring was seen in the hypothalamus 16 days after the onset, corresponding to the late cerebritis stage. MRI nine days later revealed ill-defined high signal lesions within the involved area on the T1-weighted IR images. To our knowledge, this is the first published MRI documentation of the early cerebritis stage developing into an encapsulated brain abscess. The mechanisms underlying of these radiographic changes are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Corticostriatal Plastic Changes in Experimental L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ghiglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, alteration of dopamine- (DA- dependent striatal functions and pulsatile stimulation of DA receptors caused by the discontinuous administration of levodopa (L-DOPA lead to a complex cascade of events affecting the postsynaptic striatal neurons that might account for the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. Experimental models of LID have been widely used and extensively characterized in rodents and electrophysiological studies provided remarkable insights into the inner mechanisms underlying L-DOPA-induced corticostriatal plastic changes. Here we provide an overview of recent findings that represent a further step into the comprehension of mechanisms underlying maladaptive changes of basal ganglia functions in response to L-DOPA and associated to development of LID.

  12. Immediate effects of chocolate on experimentally induced mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    In this work two hypotheses were tested: (1) that eating a piece of chocolate immediately affects negative, but not positive or neutral mood, and (2) that this effect is due to palatability. Experiment 1 (48 normal-weight and healthy women and men) examined the effects of eating a piece of chocolate and drinking water on negative, positive and neutral mood states induced by film clips. Eating chocolate reduced negative mood compared to drinking water, whereas no or only marginal effects were found on neutral and positive moods. Experiment 2 (113 normal-weight and healthy women and men) compared effects of eating palatable and unpalatable chocolate on negative mood, and examined the duration of chocolate-induced mood change. Negative mood was improved after eating palatable chocolate as compared to unpalatable chocolate or nothing. This effect was short lived, i.e., it disappeared after 3 min. In both experiments, chocolate-induced mood improvement was associated with emotional eating. The present studies demonstrate that eating a small amount of sweet food improves an experimentally induced negative mood state immediately and selectively and that this effect of chocolate is due to palatability. It is hypothesized that immediate mood effects of palatable food contribute to the habit of eating to cope with stress.

  13. Oxidative stress in immature brain following experimentally-induced seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S39-S48 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0292; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * experimentally-induced seizures * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction * antioxidant defense Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  14. Patterns of experimentally induced pain in pericranial muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Peter Thede; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    into the masseter muscle (anova: P pain areas (anova: P cervically innervated muscles had significantly different patterns of spread and referral of pain according to trigeminally vs....... cervically innervated dermatomes (P pain patterns and pain sensitivity in different craniofacial muscles in healthy volunteers, which may be of importance for further research on different craniofacial pain conditions.......Nociceptive mechanisms in the craniofacial muscle tissue are poorly understood. The pain pattern in individual pericranial muscles has not been described before. Experimental muscle pain was induced by standardized infusions of 0.2 ml 1 m hypertonic saline into six craniofacial muscles (masseter...

  15. THYROID HORMONE TREATED ASTROCYTES INDUCE MATURATION OF CEREBRAL CORTICAL NEURONS THROUGH MODULATION OF PROTEOGLYCAN LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romulo Sperduto Dezonne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper brain neuronal circuitry formation and synapse development is dependent on specific cues, either genetic or epigenetic, provided by the surrounding neural environment. Within these signals, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 play crucial role in several steps of brain morphogenesis including proliferation of progenitor cells, neuronal differentiation, maturation, migration, and synapse formation. The lack of thyroid hormones during childhood is associated with several impair neuronal connections, cognitive deficits, and mental disorders. Many of the thyroid hormones effects are mediated by astrocytes, although the mechanisms underlying these events are still unknown. In this work, we investigated the effect of 3, 5, 3’-triiodothyronine-treated (T3-treated astrocytes on cerebral cortex neuronal differentiation. Culture of neural progenitors from embryonic cerebral cortex mice onto T3-treated astrocyte monolayers yielded an increment in neuronal population, followed by enhancement of neuronal maturation, arborization and neurite outgrowth. In addition, real time PCR assays revealed an increase in the levels of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, Glypican 1 (GPC-1 and Syndecans 3 e 4 (SDC-3 e SDC-4, followed by a decrease in the levels of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, Versican. Disruption of glycosaminoglycan chains by chondroitinase AC or heparanase III completely abolished the effects of T3-treated astrocytes on neuronal morphogenesis. Our work provides evidence that astrocytes are key mediators of T3 actions on cerebral cortex neuronal development and identified potential molecules and pathways involved in neurite extension; which might eventually contribute to a better understanding of axonal regeneration, synapse formation and neuronal circuitry recover.

  16. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  17. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  18. Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous anticonvulsant but not a mediator of the increase in cerebral blood flow accompanying bicuculline-induced seizures in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Theard, M A; Pelligrino, D A

    1994-01-01

    ) is NO an endogenous anticonvulsant or proconvulsant substance? and (2) is the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increase accompanying bicuculline (BC)-induced seizures mediated by NO? The experiments were performed in 300-400-g Wistar rats anesthetized with 0.6% halothane and 70% N2O/30% O2. CBF was measured using...

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition in patient with acute leukaemia: unusual involvement of caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aprile, P.; Tarantino, A.; Carella, A. [Division of Neuroradiology, Policlinico, Univ. of Bari (Italy); Santoro, N. [Inst. of Paediatric Clinic I, Policlinico, University of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    We report a 13-year-old girl with leukaemia and Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition. MRI showed unusual bilateral lesions of the caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex, as well as typical lesions surrounding the third ventricle and aqueduct. After intravenous thiamine, the patient improved, and the abnormalities on MRI disappeared. (orig.)

  20. Effects of calcium antagonists on isolated bovine cerebral arteries: inhibition of constriction and calcium-45 uptake induced by potassium or serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, W.W.; Harakal, C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which organic calcium channel blockers inhibit cerebral vasoconstriction. Isolated bovine middle cerebral arteries were cut into rings to measure contractility or into strips to measure radioactive calcium ( 45 Ca) influx and efflux. Calcium channel blockers (10(-5) M verapamil or 3.3 X 10(-7) M nifedipine) and calcium-deficient solutions all produced near-maximal inhibition of both potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction. In calcium-deficient solutions containing potassium or serotonin, verapamil and nifedipine each blocked subsequent calcium-induced constriction in a competitive manner. Potassium and serotonin significantly increased 45 Ca uptake into cerebral artery strips during 5 minutes of 45 Ca loading; for potassium 45 Ca uptake increased from 62 to 188 nmol/g, and for serotonin from 65 to 102 nmol/g. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal 45 Ca uptake but significantly blocked the increase in 45 Ca uptake induced by potassium or serotonin. Potassium, and to a lesser extent serotonin, each induced a brief increase in the rate of 45 Ca efflux into calcium-deficient solutions. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal or potassium-stimulated 45 Ca efflux. The results demonstrate that verapamil and nifedipine block 45 Ca uptake through both potential-operated (potassium) and receptor-operated (serotonin) channels in bovine middle cerebral arteries

  1. Motor learning curve and long-term effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink-van Nistelrooij, Y.A. van; Aarts, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal

  2. Beta-amyloid-induced cholinergic denervation correlates with enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex: Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade : Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Mahony, S.; Harkany, T.; Ábrahám, I.; Jong, G.I. de; Varga, J.L.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Nyakas, C.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Leonard, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Ample experimental evidence indicates that acute beta-amyloid infusion into the nucleus basalis of rats elicits abrupt degeneration of the magnocellular cholinergic neurons projecting to the cerebral cortex, In fact, involvement of a permanent Ca2+ overload, partially via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)

  3. Hypoxia compounds exercise-induced free radical formation in humans; partitioning contributions from the cerebral and femoral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Rasmussen, Peter; Evans, Kevin A

    2018-01-01

    This study examined to what extent the human cerebral and femoral circulation contribute to free radical formation during basal and exercise-induced responses to hypoxia. Healthy participants (5♂, 5♀) were randomly assigned single-blinded to normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (10% O2) trials...... hypoxia (P free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation subsequent to inadequate antioxidant defense. This was pronounced during exercise across the femoral circulation in proportion to the increase in local O2 uptake (r = -0.397 to -0.459, P = 0.037 to 0...... with measurements taken at rest and 30min after cycling at 70% of maximal power output in hypoxia and equivalent relative and absolute intensities in normoxia. Blood was sampled from the brachial artery (a), internal jugular and femoral veins (v) for non-enzymatic antioxidants (HPLC), ascorbate radical (A...

  4. Electrical modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in order to augment cerebral blood flow : a protocol for an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michiel J.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated by several mechanisms. Neurogenic control has been a matter of debate, even though several publications reported the effects of changes in sympathetic tone on CBF. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal-cord stimulation have been

  5. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements

  6. Time-related sex differences in cerebral hypoperfusion-induced brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojlović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the model of cerebral hypoperfusion in rats has been a matter of many investigations over the years, the exact intracellular and biochemical mechanisms that lead to neuron loss and memory decline have not been clearly identified. In the current study, we examined whether cerebral hypoperfusion causes changes in hippocampal protein expression of apoptotic markers in the synaptosomal fraction and neurodegeneration in a time-dependent and sex-specific manner. Adult male and female Wistar rats were divided into two main groups, controls that underwent sham operation, and animals subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries. Both male and female rats were killed 3, 7 or 90 days following the insult. The obtained results indicate that the peak of processes that lead to apoptosis occured on postoperative day 7 and that they were more prominent in males, indicating that neuroprotective effects of certain substances (planned for future experiments, should be tested at this time point. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173044 i br. 41014

  7. Experimentally induced cam impingement in the sheep hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenrock, Klaus A; Fiechter, Ruth; Tannast, Moritz; Mamisch, Tallal C; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Sheep hips have a natural non-spherical femoral head similar to a cam-type deformity in human beings. By performing an intertrochanteric varus osteotomy, cam-type femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) during flexion can be created. We tested the hypotheses that macroscopic lesions of the articular cartilage and an increased Mankin score (MS) can be reproduced by an experimentally induced cam-type FAI in this ovine in vivo model. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the MS increases with longer ambulatory periods. Sixteen sheep underwent unilateral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy of the hip with the non-operated hip as a control. Four sheep were sacrificed after 14, 22, 30, and 38-weeks postoperatively. We evaluated macroscopic chondrolabral alterations, and recorded the MS, based on histochemical staining, for each ambulatory period. A significantly higher prevalence of macroscopic chondrolabral lesions was found in the impingement zone of the operated hips. The MS was significantly higher in the acetabular/femoral cartilage of the operated hips. Furthermore, these scores increased as the length of the ambulatory period increased. Cam-type FAI can be induced in an ovine in vivo model. Localized chondrolabral degeneration of the hip, similar to that seen in humans (Tannast et al., Clin Orthop Relat Res 2008; 466: 273-280; Beck et al., J Bone Joint Surg Br 2005; 87: 1012-1018), can be reproduced. This experimental sheep model can be used to study cam-type FAI. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Naijil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  9. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase C gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T Peeyush; Antony, Sherin; Gireesh, G; George, Naijil; Paulose, C S

    2010-05-31

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, B(max) showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  10. Progesterone induces neuroprotection following reperfusion-promoted mitochondrial dysfunction after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-06-01

    Organelle damage and increases in mitochondrial permeabilization are key events in the development of cerebral ischemic tissue injury because they cause both modifications in ATP turnover and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. Early restoration of blood flow and improvement of mitochondrial function might reverse the situation and help in recovery following an onset of stroke. Mitochondria and related bioenergetic processes can be effectively used as pharmacological targets. Progesterone (P4), one of the promising neurosteroids, has been found to be neuroprotective in various models of neurological diseases, through a number of mechanisms. This influenced us to investigate the possible role of P4 in the mitochondria-mediated neuroprotective mechanism in an ischemic stroke model of rat. In this study, we have shown the positive effect of P4 administration on behavioral deficits and mitochondrial health in an ischemic stroke injury model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). After induction of tMCAO, the rats received an initial intraperitoneal injection of P4 (8 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at 1 h post-occlusion followed by subcutaneous injections at 6, 12 and 18 h. Behavioral assessment for functional deficits included grip strength, motor coordination and gait analysis. Findings revealed a significant improvement with P4 treatment in tMCAO animals. Staining of isolated brain slices from P4-treated rats with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) showed a reduction in the infarct area in comparison to the vehicle group, indicating the presence of an increased number of viable mitochondria. P4 treatment was also able to attenuate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as block the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), in the tMCAO injury model. In addition, it was also able to ameliorate the altered mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration ratio in the ischemic animals, thereby suggesting that P4 has

  11. Evaluation of therapeutically induced hypertension in patients with delayed cerebral vasospasm by xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1992-08-01

    Serial cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement were made with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography in 20 patients with angiographically confirmed reputerd intracranial aneurysms, before and during induced hypertension with continuous infusion of dopamine. All patients showed angiogaphic vasospasm during their course. Twelve patients without symptomatic vasospasm (Group 1) had the lowest hemispheric CBF on the craniotomy side of 31.6[+-]6.8 ml/100 gm/min on days 4-9 (control value, 40.1[+-]2.0 ml/100 gm/min), while the other eight patients with symptomatic vasopsasm (Group 2) had the lowest hemispheric CBF on the craniotomy side of 25.0[+-]7.6 ml/100 gm/min on days 10-14. The critical hemispheric CBF inducing neurological deficits was about 20 ml/ 100 gm/min in Group 2. Dysautoregulation was usually present in Groups 1 and 2, but therapeutically induced hypertension could reverse the delayed neurological deficits, it begun early at the stage of delayed vasospasm. (author).

  12. Benfotiamine alleviates diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative damage independent of advanced glycation end-product, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shan; Ren, Jun

    2006-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus leads to thiamine deficiency and multiple organ damage including diabetic neuropathy. This study was designed to examine the effect of benfotiamine, a lipophilic derivative of thiamine, on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced cerebral oxidative stress. Adult male FVB mice were made diabetic with a single injection of STZ (200 mg/kg, i.p.). Fourteen days later, control and diabetic (fasting blood glucose >13.9 mM) mice received benfotiamine (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days. Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) assay and protein carbonyl formation, respectively. Pro-oxidative or pro-inflammatory factors including advanced glycation end-product (AGE), tissue factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Four weeks STZ treatment led to hyperglycemia, enhanced cerebral oxidative stress (reduced GSH/GSSG ratio), elevated TNF-alpha and AGE levels without changes in protein carbonyl or tissue factor. Benfotiamine alleviated diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress without affecting levels of AGE, protein carbonyl, tissue factor and TNF-alpha. Collectively, our results indicated benfotiamine may antagonize diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress through a mechanism unrelated to AGE, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

  13. Cerebral malformation induced by prenatal X-irradiation: an autoradiographic and Golgi study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, I.; Xumetra, A.; Santamaria, J. (Neuropatologia, Depto. Anatomia Patologica, C.S. ' Principes de Espana' , Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain))

    1984-01-01

    Brain malformations are produced after X-irradiation at different post-conceptional ages in the rat. Malformed cortical patterns result from abnormal organisation and capricious orientation of the neurons, while a radical migratory pattern of neuroblasts outwards to the cerebral cortex is preserved in animals irradiated on the fourteenth, sixteenth or eighteenth days of gestation. Migratory disturbances are restricted to the large subcortical ectopic masses found in rats irradiated on the fourteenth gestational day and to pyramidal ectopic nodules in the hippocampus in rats irradiated on the sixteenth gestational day. Subcortical ectopic masses develop from ectopic germinal rosettes and are formed by several types of cortical neuron distributed in a stereotyped pattern. The presence of large numbers of intrinsic, afferent and efferent connections are indicative of integrative functions of the subcortical masses.

  14. Cerebral malformation induced by prenatal X-irradiation: an autoradiographic and Golgi study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, I.; Xumetra, A.; Santamaria, J.

    1984-01-01

    Brain malformations are produced after X-irradiation at different post-conceptional ages in the rat. Malformed cortical patterns result from abnormal organisation and capricious orientation of the neurons, while a radical migratory pattern of neuroblasts outwards to the cerebral cortex is preserved in animals irradiated on the fourteenth, sixteenth or eighteenth days of gestation. Migratory disturbances are restricted to the large subcortical ectopic masses found in rats irradiated on the fourteenth gestational day and to pyramidal ectopic nodules in the hippocampus in rats irradiated on the sixteenth gestational day. Subcortical ectopic masses develop from ectopic germinal rosettes and are formed by several types of cortical neuron distributed in a stereotyped pattern. The presence of large numbers of intrinsic, afferent and efferent connections are indicative of integrative functions of the subcortical masses. (author)

  15. Androgen-induced cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in a young body builder: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi Amir

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is an infrequent disease with a variety of causes. Pregnancy, puerperium, contraceptive pills and intracranial infections are the most common causes. The patient may present with headache, focal neurological deficits and seizures. The clinical outcome is highly variable and treatment with heparin is advised. Case presentation The patient is a 22 year old male who presented with headache, repeated vomiting and papilledema. He was a bodybuilder doing exercise since 5 years ago, who had used nandrolone decaonoate 25 milligrams intramuscularly during the previous 5 months. Brain MRI and MRV showed superior sagital and transverse sinus thrombosis and extensive investigations did not reveal any known cause. Conclusions We suggested that androgen was the predisposing factor in our patient. Androgens may increase coagulation factors or platelet activity and cause arterial or venous thrombosis. As athletes may hide using androgens it should be considered as a predisposing factor for thrombotic events in such patients.

  16. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  17. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  18. Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous anticonvulsant but not a mediator of the increase in cerebral blood flow accompanying bicuculline-induced seizures in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Theard, M A; Pelligrino, D A

    1994-01-01

    Neurons synthesize NO, which may act as a retrograde messenger, involved in either potentiating or depressing neuronal excitability. NO may also play a role in the cerebral vasodilatory response to increased neuronal activity (i.e., seizures). In this study, two questions were asked: (1) is NO an......Neurons synthesize NO, which may act as a retrograde messenger, involved in either potentiating or depressing neuronal excitability. NO may also play a role in the cerebral vasodilatory response to increased neuronal activity (i.e., seizures). In this study, two questions were asked: (1......) is NO an endogenous anticonvulsant or proconvulsant substance? and (2) is the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increase accompanying bicuculline (BC)-induced seizures mediated by NO? The experiments were performed in 300-400-g Wistar rats anesthetized with 0.6% halothane and 70% N2O/30% O2. CBF was measured using...

  19. (−-Epigallocatechin gallate inhibits endotoxin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jieliang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background (−-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is a major polyphenol component of green tea that has antioxidant activities. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces inflammatory cytokine production and impairs blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity. We examined the effect of EGCG on LPS-induced expression of the inflammatory cytokines in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMECs and BBB permeability. Methods The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR and ELISA. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM in hCMECs were examined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Monocytes that adhered to LPS-stimulated endothelial cells were measured by monocyte adhesion assay. Tight junctional factors were detected by qRT-PCR (Claudin 5 and Occludin and immunofluorescence staining (Claudin 5 and ZO-1. The permeability of the hCMEC monolayer was determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry of transmembrane fluorescin and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER. NF-kB activation was measured by luciferase assay. Results EGCG significantly suppressed the LPS-induced expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in hCMECs. EGCG also inhibited the expression of MCP-1/CCL2, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Functional analysis showed that EGCG induced the expression of tight junction proteins (Occludin and Claudin-5 in hCMECs. Investigation of the mechanism showed that EGCG had the ability to inhibit LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, 67-kD laminin receptor was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of EGCG. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that LPS induced inflammatory cytokine production in hCMECs, which could be attenuated by EGCG. These data indicate that EGCG has a therapeutic potential for endotoxin-mediated endothelial inflammation.

  20. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect.

  1. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper......-105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...... trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows...

  2. Changes in cerebral [18F]-FDG uptake induced by acute alcohol administration in a rat model of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gispert, Juan D; Figueiras, Francisca P; Vengeliene, Valentina; Herance, José R; Rojas, Santiago; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    Several [ 18 F]-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) studies in alcoholics have consistently reported decreases in overall brain glucose metabolism at rest and following acute alcohol administration. However, changes in cerebral glucose utilization associated with the transition to addiction are not well understood and require longitudinal translational imaging studies in animal models of alcoholism. Here, we studied brain glucose uptake in alcohol drinking rats in order to provide convergent evidence to what has previously been reported in human studies. Brain glucose metabolism was measured by [ 18 F]-FDG microPET imaging in different male Wistar rat groups: short-term drinking (three months), long-term drinking (twelve months) and alcohol-naïve. Global and regional cerebral glucose uptake was measured at rest and following acute alcohol administration. We showed that alcohol significantly reduced the whole-brain glucose metabolism. This effect was most pronounced in the parietal cortex and cerebellum. Alcohol-induced decreases in brain [ 18 F]-FDG uptake was most apparent in alcohol-naïve rats, less intense in short-term drinkers and absent in long-term drinkers. The latter finding indicates the occurrence of tolerance to the intoxicating effects of alcohol in long-term drinking individuals. In contrast, some regions, like the ventral striatum and entorhinal cortex, showed enhanced metabolic activity, an effect that did not undergo tolerance during long-term alcohol consumption. Our findings are comparable to those described in human studies using the same methodology. We conclude that [ 18 F]-FDG PET studies in rat models of alcoholism provide good translation and can be used for future longitudinal studies investigating alterations in brain function during different stages of the addiction cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adrenergic-induced enhancement of brain barrier system permeability to small nonelectrolytes: choroid plexus versus cerebral capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, V.A.; Johanson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute hypertension induced by adrenergic agents opens up the blood-CSF barrier (choroid plexus) to nonelectrolyte and protein tracers. Sprague-Dawley adult rats anesthetized with ketamine were given an intravenous bolus of either epinephrine (10 micrograms/kg), phenylephrine (100 micrograms/kg), isoproterenol (10 micrograms/kg), or D,L-amphetamine (2 mg/kg). Tracers were injected simultaneously with test agents, and the animals killed 10 min later. Epinephrine raised MABP by 57 mm Hg, to a peak pressure of 160 mm Hg; and it increased the volume of distribution (Vd) of urea, mannitol, and 125 I-bovine serum albumin in CSF by 1.5-, 2.7-, and 30-fold, respectively. There was enhanced uptake by lateral and fourth ventricle choroid plexuses, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla, and thalamus. Phenylephrine also elevated MABP to 160 mm Hg, but it increased permeation of tracers into CSF (and several brain regions) to a lesser extent than epinephrine, attributable to protective vasoconstriction associated with alpha-agonist activity. Ratio analysis of Vd data provides evidence that augmented permeation of nonelectrolyte tracers in acute hypertension occurs predominantly by diffusion rather than vesicular transport. It is postulated that elevated MABP distends the central cores of choroid plexus villi and cerebral capillaries, with resultant stretching and opening of tight junctions in both barrier systems; with less hindrance to diffusion, urea and mannitol are cleared at rates closer to free diffusion. Neither isoproterenol (decreased MABP by 40 mm Hg) nor amphetamine (did not alter MABP) significantly opened the choroid plexus or blood-brain barrier to tracers

  4. Foraminiferal survival after long term experimentally induced anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-06-01

    Anoxia has been successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed on the Northern Adriatic seafloor from 1 week to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerGreen method has been applied. Numerous individuals have been found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths, showing that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulphides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular way. A large difference in standing stock between two cores samples in initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after 1 month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in a core sampled after 2 months of anoxia, to attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulphides, but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  5. Ionizing radiation-induced cancers. Experimental and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joveniaux, Alain.

    1978-03-01

    This work attempts to give an idea of radiocarcinogenesis, both experimental and clinical. Experimentally the possibility of radio-induced cancer formation has considerable doctrinal importance since it proves without question the carcinogenetic effect of radiations, and also yields basis information on the essential constants implicated in its occurrence: need for a latency time varying with the animal species and technique used, but quite long in relation to the specific lifetime of each species; importance of a massive irradiation, more conducive to cancerisation as long as it produces no necroses liable to stop the formation of any subsequent neoplasia; finally, rarity of is occurrence. Clinically although the cause and effect relationship between treatment and cancer is sometimes difficult to establish categorically, the fact is that hundreds of particularly disturbing observations remain and from their number often emerges under well-defined circumstances, an undeniable clinical certainty. Most importantly these observation fix the criteria necessary for the possibility of a radioinduced cancer to arise, i.e: the notion of a prior irradiation; the appearance of a cancer in the irradiation area; serious tissue damage in relation with an excessive radiation dose; a long latency period between irradition and appearance of the cancer [fr

  6. Ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanisms and experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindhasamy, Kanimozhi; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Robert, Beualah Mary; Nagarajan, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a very prominent environmental toxic agent. UVR has been implicated in the initiation and progression of photocarcinogenesis. UVR exposure elicits numerous cellular and molecular events which include the generation of inflammatory mediators, DNA damage, epigenetic modifications, and oxidative damages mediated activation of signaling pathways. UVR-initiated signal transduction pathways are believed to be responsible for tumor promotion effects. UVR-induced carcinogenic mechanism has been well studied using various animal and cellular models. Human skin-derived dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes served as excellent cellular model systems for the understanding of UVR-mediated carcinogenic events. Apart from this, scientists developed reconstituted three-dimensional normal human skin equivalent models for the study of UVR signaling pathways. Moreover, hairless mice such as SKH-1, devoid of Hr gene, served as a valuable model for experimental carcinogenesis. Scientists have also used transgenic mice and dorsal portion shaved Swiss albino mice for UVR carcinogenesis studies. In this review, we have discussed the current progress in the study on ultraviolet B (UVB)-mediated carcinogenesis and outlined appropriate experimental models for both ultraviolet A- and UVB-mediated carcinogenesis. (author)

  7. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2017-06-01

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The effects of MEK1/2 inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [Division of Experimental Vascular Research, Institute of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University (Sweden); Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi' an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Yong-Xiao [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi' an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: 13572512207@163.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Cai, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi' an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars [Division of Experimental Vascular Research, Institute of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University (Sweden)

    2016-08-01

    Cigarette smoking, a major stroke risk factor, upregulates endothelin receptors in cerebral arteries. The present study examined the effects of MEK1/2 pathway inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation. Rats were exposed to the secondhand smoke (SHS) for 8 weeks followed by intraperitoneal injection of MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 for another 4 weeks. The urine cotinine levels were assessed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Contractile responses of isolated cerebral arteries were recorded by a sensitive wire myograph. The mRNA and protein expression levels of receptor and MEK/ERK1/2 pathway molecules were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Cerebral artery receptor localization was determined with immunohistochemistry. The results showed the urine cotinine levels from SHS exposure group were significantly higher than those from the fresh group. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 significantly reduced SHS exposure-increased ET{sub A} receptor mRNA and protein levels as well as contractile responses mediated by ET{sub A} receptors. The immunoreactivity of increased ET{sub A} receptor expression was primarily cytoplasmic in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, ET{sub B} receptor was noted in endothelial cells. However, the SHS-induced decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation was unchanged after U0126 treatment. Furthermore, SHS increased the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 protein in cerebral arteries. By using U0126 could inhibit the phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein but not MEK1/2. Taken together, our data show that treatment with MEK1/2 pathway inhibitor offsets SHS exposure-induced ET{sub A} receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. - Highlights: • Cigarette smoke exposure induces ET{sub A} receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. • U0126 can alleviate the receptor upregulation. • The mechanism relies on MEK/ERK1/2 pathway activation. • We may provide a new target for the

  9. The effects of MEK1/2 inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Yong-Xiao; Li, Wei; Cai, Yan; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, a major stroke risk factor, upregulates endothelin receptors in cerebral arteries. The present study examined the effects of MEK1/2 pathway inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation. Rats were exposed to the secondhand smoke (SHS) for 8 weeks followed by intraperitoneal injection of MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 for another 4 weeks. The urine cotinine levels were assessed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Contractile responses of isolated cerebral arteries were recorded by a sensitive wire myograph. The mRNA and protein expression levels of receptor and MEK/ERK1/2 pathway molecules were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Cerebral artery receptor localization was determined with immunohistochemistry. The results showed the urine cotinine levels from SHS exposure group were significantly higher than those from the fresh group. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 significantly reduced SHS exposure-increased ET A receptor mRNA and protein levels as well as contractile responses mediated by ET A receptors. The immunoreactivity of increased ET A receptor expression was primarily cytoplasmic in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, ET B receptor was noted in endothelial cells. However, the SHS-induced decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation was unchanged after U0126 treatment. Furthermore, SHS increased the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 protein in cerebral arteries. By using U0126 could inhibit the phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein but not MEK1/2. Taken together, our data show that treatment with MEK1/2 pathway inhibitor offsets SHS exposure-induced ET A receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. - Highlights: • Cigarette smoke exposure induces ET A receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. • U0126 can alleviate the receptor upregulation. • The mechanism relies on MEK/ERK1/2 pathway activation. • We may provide a new target for the treatment of SHS

  10. Black Rice (Oryza sativa L., Poaceae) Extract Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Nyoung; Kim, Jae-Cheon; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Iqbal Hossain; Kim, Joo Youn; Yang, Ji Seon; Yoon, Shin Hee; Yoon, Kee Dong; Kim, Seong Yun

    2018-04-01

    Rice is the most commonly consumed grain in the world. Black rice has been suggested to contain various bioactive compounds including anthocyanin antioxidants. There is currently little information about the nutritional benefits of black rice on brain pathology. Here, we investigated the effects of black rice ( Oryza sativa L ., Poaceae) extract (BRE) on the hippocampal neuronal damage induced by ischemic insult. BRE (300 mg/kg) was orally administered to adult male C57BL/6 mice once a day for 21 days. Bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) was performed for 23 min on the 8th day of BRE or vehicle administration. Histological analyses conducted on the 22nd day of BRE or vehicle administration revealed that administering BRE profoundly attenuated neuronal cell death, inhibited reactive astrogliosis, and prevented loss of glutathione peroxidase expression in the hippocampus when compared to vehicle treatment. In addition, BRE considerably ameliorated BCCAO-induced memory impairment on the Morris water maze test from the 15th day to the 22nd day of BRE or vehicle administration. These results indicate that chronic administration of BRE is potentially beneficial in cerebral ischemia.

  11. Striatal dopamine transporter, regional cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization in MPTP-induced parkinson disease mice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yunchao; Wu Chunying; Xiang Jingde; Lin Xiangtong; Zhu Huiqing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the variation of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), glucose utilization as well as the neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons induced by neurotoxin 1-methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-dropyridine (MPTP). Methods: Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were given a total dose of 0-80 mg/kg MPTP intraperitoneally. Ten days later the mice were sacrificed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive cell count- ing in substantia nigra using SP immunohistochemistry. Vivo autoradiography was employed to measure striatal do- pamine transporter (DAT) loss, rCBF and glucose utilization in striatum and thalamus. Results: The extents of DAT depletion and TH-immunopositive cell loss were positively correlated (r=0.998, P O.2), while glucose utilization was only slightly reduced in caudate/putamen and thalamus by 3.0% and 5.4% in 80 mg/kg MPTP-treated mice (P<0.05). Conclusion: Significant dose-dependent relationship was in presence of MPTP induced dopaminergic neurons loss, changes of rCBF in caudate/putamen and thalamus were not significant, while the glucose utilization was slightly decreased in higher dose group. (authors)

  12. Cerebroprotective Effect of Moringa oleifera against Focal Ischemic Stroke Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woranan Kirisattayakul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg−1 was orally given to male Wistar rats (300–350 g once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction by positron emission tomography: theoretical study and experimental evidence of cerebral blood flow measurement with the C15O2 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinling, M.

    1983-01-01

    The method of the continuous inhalation technique of oxygen-15 labelled CO 2 coupled with positron emission tomography for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (C.B.F.) is described. An indirect experimental verification that this technique allowed the measurement of C.B.F. has been carried out in baboons by showing the expected change in the measured parameter with variations in the PaCO 2 . A critical investigation of the C 15 O 2 model was performed. The amount of tracer present in the cerebral vascular pool has a negligible effect on C.B.F. value. The use of a mean brain-blood partition coefficient of water instead of that specific to gray or to white matter is commented upon, and its influence on the final C.B.F. value is studied. Lastly, the problem of the limited diffusion of water across the blood-brain-barrier is discussed. The study of the combined effects of gray-white mixing and limited wates extraction of the C.B.F. value shows that the C 15 O 2 technique tends to understimate real C.B.F., and that this error is more severe with high flows and even gray white mixing. These limitations do not depart from the possibility to estimate in the same brain locus not only C.B.F. but oxygen utilization as well by the consecutive inhalation of C 15 O 2 and 15 O 2 . The advantages of this possibility has already been shown in a number of clinical studies [fr

  14. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  15. Exercise enhanced functional recovery and expression of GDNF after photochemically induced cerebral infarction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Kamikawa, Yurie; Yoshida, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Exercise has been considered to affect the functional recovery from central nervous damage. Neurotrophic factors have various effects on brain damage. However, the effects of exercise for expression of GDNF on functional recovery with brain damage are not well known. We investigated the difference in functional recovery between non-exercise and beam-walking exercise groups, and the expression of GDNF in both groups after photochemical infarction. Adult male Wistar rats (N = 64) were used. Animals were divided into two groups: non-exercise (N = 35), and beam-walking exercise (N = 29). All rats underwent surgical photochemical infarction. The rats of the beam-walking group were trained every day to walk on a narrow beam after a one-day recovery period and those of the non-exercise group were left to follow a natural course. Animals were evaluated for hind limb function every day using a beam-walking task with an elevated narrow beam. The number of GDNF-like immunoreactive cells in the temporal cortex surrounding the lesion was counted 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after the infarction. Functional recovery of the beam-walking exercise group was significantly earlier than that of the non-exercise group. At 3 days after infarction, the number of GDNF-positive cells in the temporal cortex surrounding the infarction was significantly increased in the beam-walking exercise group compared with that in the non-exercise group. In the exercise group, motor function was remarkably recovered with the increased expression of GDNF-like immunoreactive cells. Our results suggested that a rehabilitative approach increased the expression of GDNF and facilitated functional recovery from cerebral infarction.

  16. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagesh, Vijaya; Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water ( ), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ perpendicular ) and parallel (λ parallel ) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , λ parallel , λ -perpendicular increased linearly and significantly with time (p -perpendicular had increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, and λ parallel had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ perpendicular and λ parallel were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ perpendicular and λ parallel was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury

  17. Organoselenium compounds prevent hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins induced by the neurotoxic agent diphenyl ditelluride in cerebral cortex of young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, M.B.; Funchal, C.; Zeni, G.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Pessoa-Pureur, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigated the protective ability of the selenium compounds ebselen and diphenyl diselenide against the effect of diphenyl ditelluride on the in vitro incorporation of 32 P into intermediate filament (IF) proteins from slices of cerebral cortex of 17-day-old rats. We observed that ditelluride in the concentrations of 1, 15 and 50 μM induced hyperphosphorylation of the high-salt Triton insoluble neurofilament subunits (NF-M and NF-L), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, without altering the immunocontent of these proteins. Concerning the selenium compounds, diselenide (1, 15 and 50 μM) did not induce alteration of the in vitro phosphorylation of the IF proteins. Otherwise, ebselen induced an altered in vitro phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal proteins in a dose-dependent manner. At intermediate concentrations (15 and 30 μM) it increased the in vitro phosphorylation even though, at low (5 μM) or high (50 and 100 μM) concentrations this compound was ineffective in altering the activity of the cytoskeletal-associated phosphorylating system. In addition, 15 μM diselenide and 5 μM ebselen, presented a protective effect against the action of ditelluride, on the phosphorylation of the proteins studied. Considering that hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins is associated with neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration, it is probable that the effects of ditelluride could be related to the remarkable neurotoxicity of this organic form of tellurium. Furthermore the neuroprotective action of selenium compounds against tellurium effects could be a promising route to be exploited for a possible treatment of organic tellurium poisoning

  18. Experimental chaotic quantification in bistable vortex induced vibration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, B. H.; Tjahjowidodo, T.

    2017-02-01

    The study of energy harvesting by means of vortex induced vibration systems has been initiated a few years ago and it is considered to be potential as a low water current energy source. The energy harvester is realized by exposing an elastically supported blunt structure under water flow. However, it is realized that the system will only perform at a limited operating range (water flow) that is attributed to the resonance phenomenon that occurs only at a frequency that corresponds to the fluid flow. An introduction of nonlinear elements seems to be a prominent solution to overcome the problem. Among many nonlinear elements, a bistable spring is known to be able to improve the harvested power by a vortex induced vibrations (VIV) based energy converter at the low velocity water flows. However, it is also observed that chaotic vibrations will occur at different operating ranges that will erratically diminish the harvested power and cause a difficulty in controlling the system that is due to the unpredictability in motions of the VIV structure. In order to design a bistable VIV energy converter with improved harvested power and minimum negative effect of chaotic vibrations, the bifurcation map of the system for varying governing parameters is highly on demand. In this study, chaotic vibrations of a VIV energy converter enhanced by a bistable stiffness element are quantified in a wide range of the governing parameters, i.e. damping and bistable gap. Chaotic vibrations of the bistable VIV energy converter are simulated by utilization of a wake oscillator model and quantified based on the calculation of the Lyapunov exponent. Ultimately, a series of experiments of the system in a water tunnel, facilitated by a computer-based force-feedback testing platform, is carried out to validate the existence of chaotic responses. The main challenge in dealing with experimental data is in distinguishing chaotic response from noise-contaminated periodic responses as noise will smear

  19. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  20. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis induces microglial activation in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Larry; Done, Joseph D; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is unknown and factors including the host's immune response and the nervous system have been attributed to the development of CP/CPPS. We previously demonstrated that mast cells and chemokines such as CCL2 and CCL3 play an important role in mediating prostatitis. Here, we examined the role of neuroinflammation and microglia in the CNS in the development of chronic pelvic pain. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was induced using a subcutaneous injection of rat prostate antigen. Sacral spinal cord tissue (segments S14-S5) was isolated and utilized for immunofluorescence or QRT-PCR analysis. Tactile allodynia was measured at baseline and at various points during EAP using Von Frey fibers as a function for pelvic pain. EAP mice were treated with minocycline after 30 days of prostatitis to test the efficacy of microglial inhibition on pelvic pain. Prostatitis induced the expansion and activation of microglia and the development of inflammation in the spinal cord as determined by increased expression levels of CCL3, IL-1β, Iba1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Microglial activation in mice with prostatitis resulted in increased expression of P2X4R and elevated levels of BDNF, two molecular markers associated with chronic pain. Pharmacological inhibition of microglia alleviated pain in mice with prostatitis and resulted in decreased expression of IL-1β, P2X4R, and BDNF. Our data show that prostatitis leads to inflammation in the spinal cord and the activation and expansion of microglia, mechanisms that may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pelvic pain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy for Cerebral Ischemia: an Evidence-Based Review of Clinical and Animal Studies on Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Ye, Yang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. As a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture has been shown to be effective in promoting recovery after stroke. In this article, we review the clinical and experimental studies that demonstrated the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment for cerebral ischemia. Clinical studies indicated that acupuncture activated relevant brain regions, modulated cerebral blood flow and related molecules in stroke patients. Evidence from laboratory indicated that acupuncture regulates cerebral blood flow and metabolism after the interrupt of blood supply. Acupuncture regulates multiple molecules and signaling pathways that lead to excitoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, neurons death and survival. Acupuncture also promotes neurogenesis, angiogenesis as well as neuroplasticity after ischemic damage. The evidence provided from clinical and laboratory suggests that acupuncture induces multi-level regulation via complex mechanisms and a single factor may not be enough to explain the beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia.

  2. Experimental microangiography for measuring cerebral blood circulation following local cold stroke. Experimentelle Mikroangiographie der zerebralen Durchblutung nach lokalem Kaeltetrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruttmann, G

    1982-01-01

    In 54 female Wistar rats the exposed brain was right-parietally traumatised; cerebral perfusion of two anatomically different brain sections was angiographically imaged and densitometrically evaluated at various instants. The observation period ranged between 1 and 168 hours after the local cold stroke had been applied. Whereas in the telencephal section situated beyond the direct zone of lesion a maximum perfusion difference between the two hemispheres occurred already 1 hour after the animal had been traumatised, a maximum of perfusion difference was observed 6 hours after traumatisation in the diencephalic section situated directly across the site of the cold lesion. Within the first posttraumatic hours the total cerebral perfusion rapidly decreased. The minimum was reached 24 hours after traumatisation. Then it increased again and on the 7th posttraumatic day the perfusion level reached that of the control group. The tendencies of perfusion behaviour differing from one another, which were observed in both hemispheres, followed the course of the total perfusion. The decrease of perfusion occurring during the first hours after traumatisation is provoked by the compressive effect due to the expanding edema. This is principally indicated by the acute hyperperfusion during the first hours to be observed in the telencephalic section. The different velocities at which the hemispheres recover in the diencephalic section must be attributed to metabolic and hypoxic components. The incomplete recovery of perfusion in the injured hemisphere after 7 days may be due to the glial reaction.

  3. Tetramethylpyrazine analogue CXC195 protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis through PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Wei, Xinbing; Hou, Yunfeng; Liu, Xiaoqian; Li, Senpeng; Sun, Baozhu; Liu, Xinyong; Liu, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    CXC195 showed strongest protective effects among the ligustrazine derivatives in cells and prevented apoptosis induced by H2O2 injury. We recently demonstrated that CXC195 protected against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by its antioxidant activity. However, whether the anti-apoptotic action of CXC195 is involved in cerebral I/R injury is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of CXC195 in apoptotic processes induced by cerebral I/R and the possible signaling pathways. Male Wistar rats were submitted to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2h, followed by 24h reperfusion. CXC195 was injected intraperitoneally at 2h and 12h after the onset of ischemia. The number of apoptotic cells was measured by TUNEL assay, apoptosis-related protein cleaved caspase-3, Bcl-2, Bax and the phosphorylation levels of Akt and GSK3β in ischemic penumbra were assayed by western blot. The results showed that administration of CXC195 at the doses of 3mg/kg and 10mg/kg significantly inhibited the apoptosis by decreasing the number of apoptotic cells, decreasing the level of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, and increasing the level of Bcl-2 in rats subjected to I/R injury. Simultaneously, CXC195 treatment markedly increased the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β. Blockade of PI3K activity by wortmannin, dramatically abolished its anti-apoptotic effect and lowered both Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation levels. Our study firstly demonstrated that CXC195 protected against cerebral I/R injury by reducing apoptosis in vivo and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

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    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  5. [Intelligence and creativity changes induced by pathological growth of space-occupying cerebral lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfil'ev, A M; Razumnikova, O M; Stupak, V V

    2013-01-01

    Creativity and intelligence changes depending on tumor localization in frontal or parietal cortex before surgical procedure in 24 patients in comparison with control group are studied. Brain damage-induced intelligence impairment and a decrease of fluency, flexibility of figural divergent thinking, and originality of verbal one without specificity of tumor localization were found. Intelligence decrease was more presented while performing of figural tasks and least of all in verbal ones. The left prefrontal brain damage induced a decrease of all components of intelligence and a trend to a decrease of verbal creativity and figural fluency. The right parietal brain lesion was more associated with a decline of divergent thinking originality.

  6. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models

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    Mariana A. Antunes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.Diversos estímulos podem ser utilizados para reproduzir características histológicas e funcionais do enfisema humano, uma das principais causas de incapacidade e morte. Uma vez que a fumaça de cigarro é a principal causa de enfisema em humanos, estudos experimentais têm tentado reproduzir esta situação. No entanto, esse é um método dispendioso e complicado para a indução do enfisema e, alternativas mais simples e eficazes, têm sido pesquisadas. Entre essas abordagens, enzimas elastolíticas vêm sendo amplamente utilizadas para reproduzir algumas das características do enfisema humano, tais como: aumento dos espaços a

  7. Confabulation versus experimentally induced false memories in Korsakoff patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2010-09-01

    The present study focuses on both the clinical symptom of confabulation and experimentally induced false memories in patients suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome. Despite the vast amount of case studies of confabulating patients and studies investigating false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the nature of Korsakoff patients' confabulatory behaviour and its association with DRM false memories have been rarely examined. Hence, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate confabulatory responses in a large sample of chronic Korsakoff patients and matched controls by means of the Dalla Barba Confabulation Battery. Second, the association between (provoked) confabulation and the patients' DRM false recognition performance was investigated. Korsakoff patients mainly confabulated in response to questions about episodic memory and questions to which the answer was unknown. A positive association was obtained between confabulation and the tendency to accept unstudied distractor words as being old in the DRM paradigm. On the other hand, there was a negative association between confabulation and false recognition of critical lures. The latter could be attributed to the importance of strategic retrieval at delayed memory testing.

  8. The use of EEG to measure cerebral changes during computer-based motion-sickness-inducing tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychacz, Christopher; Viirre, Erik; Wing, Shawn

    2005-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a stressor commonly attributed with causing serious navigational and performance errors. The distinct nature of MS suggests this state may have distinct neural markers distinguishable from other states known to affect performance (e.g., stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, high workload). This pilot study used new high-resolution electro-encephalograph (EEG) technologies to identify distinct neuronal activation changes that occur during MS. Brain EEG activity was monitored while subjects performed a ball-tracking task and viewed stimuli on a projection screen intended to induce motion sickness/spatial disorientation. Results show the presence of EEG spectral changes in all subjects who developed motion sickness when compared to baseline levels. These changes included: 1) low frequency (1 to 10 Hz) changes that may reflect oculomotor movements rather than intra-cerebral sources; 2) increased spectral power across all frequencies (attributable to increased scalp conductivity related to sweating), 3) local increases of power spectra in the 20-50 Hz range (likely attributable to external muscles on the skull) and; 4) a central posterior (occipital) independent component that shows suppression of a 20 Hz peak in the MS condition when compared to baseline. Further research is necessary to refine neural markers, characterize their origin and physiology, to distinguish between motion sickness and other states and to enable markers to be used for operator state monitoring and the designing of interventions for motion sickness.

  9. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Derek; Zhang, Rui, E-mail: rzhang@marybird.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70810 (United States); Sanders, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70810 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN) can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV) and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis.

  10. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Freund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT. Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Grapevine Leaf Extracts against Oxidative Stress Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus and Cerebellum of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Wohlenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become increasingly important to study the beneficial properties of derivatives of grapes and grapevine. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant activity of Vitis labrusca leaf extracts, comparing conventional and organic grapevines, in different brain areas of rats. We used male Wistar rats treated with grapevine leaf extracts for a period of 14 days, and on the 15th day, we administered in half of the rats, mineral oil and the other half, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The animals were euthanized by decapitation and the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were removed to assess oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS were unchanged. However, CCl4 induced oxidative damage to proteins in all tissues studied, and this injury was prevented by both extracts. Superoxide dismutase (SOD activity was increased by CCl4 in the cerebral cortex and decreased in other tissues. However, CCl4 increased catalase (CAT activity in the cerebellum and decreased it in the cerebral cortex. The SOD/CAT ratio was restored in the cerebellum by both extracts and only in the cerebral cortex by the organic extract.

  12. Cerebral microangiopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  13. Mechanical injury induces brain endothelial-derived microvesicle release: Implications for cerebral vascular injury during traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Andrews

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and mechanotransduction. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs, such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury. Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 hrs post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing

  14. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  15. Chronic cobalt-induced epilepsy: noradrenaline ionophoresis and adrenoceptor binding studies in the rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregman, B.; Le Saux, F.; Maurin, Y.; Trottier, S.; Chauvel, P.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies indicate that brain noradrenaline (NA) depletion facilitates the occurrence of epileptogenic syndromes in various animal models. In cobalt-induced epilepsy in the rat, seizure activity is associated with a cortical NA denervation. In order to search for cortical adrenoceptor modifications, inonophoretic studies and adrenoceptor binding assays were performed. At the period of maximal seizure activity, there was a significant supersensitivity of cortial neurons to the ionophoretic application of NA. An increase in the density of β-adrenoceptor binding sites was observed. No modification in α 1 - and α 2 -adrenoceptor binding sites was found. This suggests that in cobalt-induced epilepsy there is a denervation supersensitivity which rests on a selective involvement of β-adrenoceptors. (Author)

  16. Biphasic functional regulation in hippocampus of rat with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced by permanent occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery.

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    Jihye Bang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced by permanent occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery (BCCAO in rats has been commonly used for the study of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Despite the apparent cognitive dysfunction in rats with BCCAO, the molecular markers or pathways involved in the pathological alternation have not been clearly identified. METHODS: Temporal changes (sham, 21, 35, 45, 55 and 70 days in gene expression in the hippocampus of rats after BCCAO were measured using time-course microarray analysis. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway analyses were performed to identify the functional involvement of temporally regulated genes in BCCAO. RESULTS: Two major gene expression patterns were observed in the hippocampus of rats after BCCAO. One pattern, which was composed of 341 early up-regulated genes after the surgical procedure, was dominantly involved in immune-related biological functions (false discovery rate [FDR]<0.01. Another pattern composed of 182 temporally delayed down-regulated genes was involved in sensory perception such as olfactory and cognition functions (FDR<0.01. In addition to the two gene expression patterns, the temporal change of GO and the pathway activities using all differentially expressed genes also confirmed that an immune response was the main early change, whereas sensory functions were delayed responses. Moreover, we identified FADD and SOCS3 as possible core genes in the sensory function loss process using text-based mining and interaction network analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The biphasic regulatory mechanism first reported here could provide molecular evidence of BCCAO-induced impaired memory in rats as well as mechanism of the development of vascular dementia.

  17. Forced treadmill exercise can induce stress and increase neuronal damage in a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia

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    Martina Svensson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is known to be a beneficial factor by increasing the cellular stress tolerance. In ischemic stroke, physical exercise is suggested to both limit the brain injury and facilitate behavioral recovery. In this study we investigated the effect of physical exercise on brain damage following global cerebral ischemia in mice. We aimed to study the effects of 4.5 weeks of forced treadmill running prior to ischemia on neuronal damage, neuroinflammation and its effect on general stress by measuring corticosterone in feces. We subjected C57bl/6 mice (n = 63 to either treadmill running or a sedentary program prior to induction of global ischemia. Anxious, depressive, and cognitive behaviors were analyzed. Stress levels were analyzed using a corticosterone ELISA. Inflammatory and neurological outcomes were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, multiplex electrochemoluminescence ELISA and Western blot. To our surprise, we found that forced treadmill running induced a stress response, with increased anxiety in the Open Field test and increased levels of corticosterone. In accordance, mice subjected to forced exercise prior to ischemia developed larger neuronal damage in the hippocampus and showed higher cytokine levels in the brain and blood compared to non-exercised mice. The extent of neuronal damage correlated with increased corticosterone levels. To compare forced treadmill with voluntary wheel running, we used a different set of mice that exercised freely on running wheels. These mice did not show any anxiety or increased corticosterone levels. Altogether, our results indicate that exercise pre-conditioning may not be beneficial if the animals are forced to run as it can induce a detrimental stress response.

  18. The Effects of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Acute Subcortical Cerebral Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Changshen; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yizhao; Hou, Weijia; Liu, Shoufeng; Gao, Chunlin; Wang, Chen; Mo, Lidong; Wu, Jialing

    2017-01-01

    Background: Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) promotes upper extremity recovery post stroke, however, it is difficult to implement clinically due to its high resource demand and safety of the restraint. Therefore, we propose that modified CIMT (mCIMT) be used to treat individuals with acute subcortical infarction. Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of mCIMT in patients with acute subcortical infarction, and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the effect. ...

  19. Differential effects of gaseous versus injectable anesthetics on changes in regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by l-DOPA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpisidis, Zisis; Öberg, Carl M; Maslava, Natallia; Cenci, M Angela; Lundblad, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of brain activity requires the use of anesthesia. In this study, we have compared the effects of two widely used anesthetics, inhaled isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine cocktail, on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Specific tracers were used to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF - [ 14 C]-iodoantipyrine) and regional cerebral metabolic rate (rCMR - [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose) with a highly sensitive autoradiographic method. The two types of anesthetics had quite distinct effects on l-DOPA-induced changes in rCBF and rCMR. Isoflurane did not affect either the absolute rCBF values or the increases in rCBF in the basal ganglia after l-DOPA administration. On the contrary, rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine showed lower absolute rCBF values, and the rCBF increases induced by l-DOPA were masked. We developed a novel improved model to calculate rCMR, and found lower metabolic activities in rats anesthetized with isoflurane compared to animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Both anesthetics prevented changes in rCMR upon l-DOPA administration. Pharmacological challenges in isoflurane-anesthetized rats indicated that drugs mimicking the actions of ketamine/xylazine on adrenergic or glutamate receptors reproduced distinct effects of the injectable anesthetics on rCBF and rCMR. Our results highlight the importance of anesthesia in studies of cerebral flow and metabolism, and provide novel insights into mechanisms mediating abnormal neurovascular responses to l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Study of neuron-protective effect and mechanism of neuregulin1β against cerebral ischemia reperfusion-induced injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y Q; Zhang, R; Teng, L; Li, H Y; Guo, Y L

    2017-07-18

    Objective: Thecurrent study is to explore the neuron-protective mechanism of neuregulin1β (NRG1β) in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R) through inhibiting the c-Jun phosphorylation. Methods: After 24 h of MCAO/R (referring to Longa's method), neurobehavioral function was measured by modified neurological severity score (mNSS) test; the cerebral infarction volume was detected by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining; the blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability was measured by Evans Blue (EB); the neuron morphology of brain tissue was observed by Nissl stain; the ultra-structures of the neurons were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); the apoptotic neurons were counted by in situ cell death detection kit colocalized with NeuN; the expressions of phospho-c-Jun was determined by immunofluorescent labeling and Western blot analysis. Results: Compared with the sham-operation rats, the rats receiving MCAO/R showed increased mNSS (9.7±1.2), cerebral infarction volume (41.4±3.0)%, permeability of BBB, deformation of neurons, ischemia-induced apoptosis (0.63±0.04), and enhanced expression of phospho-c-Jun protein (0.90±0.07) (all P <0.05). Our data indicated that NRG1β attenuated neurologic deficits (6.4±0.9), decreased the cerebral infarction volume (10.4±0.5), reduced EB extravasation (1.55±0.13) and the deformation of neurons, protected the ultra-structure of neurons, blocked ischemia-induced apoptosis (0.23±0.02), through down-regulated phospho-c-Jun expression (0.40±0.03) in MCAO/R rats ( P <0.05). Conclusion: NRG1β exerts neuron-protective effects against ischemia reperfusion-induced injury in rats through inhibiting the c-Jun phosphorylation.

  1. Measurement of cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling 3T magnetic resonance imaging--an experimental and theoretical investigation of feasibility.

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    Wen-Chau Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study was aimed to experimentally and numerically investigate the feasibility of measuring cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at a relatively fine resolution to mitigate partial volume effect from gray matter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Research Ethics Committee approved this study. On a clinical 3T MR system, ten healthy volunteers (5 females, 5 males, age = 28 ± 3 years were scanned after providing written informed consent. PCASL imaging was performed with varied combinations of labeling duration (τ = 1000, 1500, 2000, and 2500 ms and post-labeling delay (PLD = 1000, 1400, 1800, and 2200 ms, at a spatial resolution (1.56 x 1.56 x 5 mm(3 finer than commonly used (3.5 x 3.5 mm(2, 5-8 mm in thickness. Computer simulations were performed to calculate the achievable perfusion-weighted signal-to-noise ratio at varied τ, PLD, and transit delay. RESULTS: Based on experimental and numerical data, the optimal τ and PLD were found to be 2000 ms and 1500-1800 ms, respectively, yielding adequate SNR (~2 to support perfusion measurement in the majority (~60% of white matter. The measurement variability was about 9% in a one-week interval. The measured white matter perfusion and perfusion ratio of gray matter to white matter were 15.8-27.5 ml/100ml/min and 1.8-4.0, respectively, depending on spatial resolution as well as the amount of deep white matter included. CONCLUSION: PCASL 3T MRI is able to measure perfusion in the majority of cerebral white matter at an adequate signal-to-noise ratio by using appropriate tagging duration and post-labeling delay. Although pixel-wise comparison may not be possible, region-of-interest based flow quantification is feasible.

  2. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  3. The pharmacological modulation of thrombin-induced cerebral thromboembolism in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. R.; Paul, W.; Crook, P.; Butler, K. D.; Page, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracarotid (i.c.) administration of thrombin induced a marked accumulation of 111indium-labelled platelets and 125I-labelled fibrinogen within the cranial vasculature of anaesthetized rabbits. 2. Thrombin (100 iu kg-1, i.c.) - induced platelet accumulation was completely abolished by pretreatment with desulphatohirudin (CGP 39393; 1 mg kg-1 i.c., 1 min prior to thrombin). Administration of CGP 39393 1 or 20 min after thrombin produced a significant reduction in platelet accumulation. 3. Intravenous (i.v.) administration of the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist BN 52021 (10 mg kg-1) 5 min prior to thrombin (100 iu kg-1, i.c.) had no effect on platelet accumulation. 4. An inhibitor of NO biosynthesis, L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 mg kg-1, i.c.), had no significant effect on the cranial platelet accumulation response to thrombin (10 iu kg-1, i.c.) when administered 5 min prior to thrombin. 5. Defibrotide (32 or 64 mg kg-1 bolus i.c. followed by 32 or 64 mg kg-1 h-1, i.c., infusion for 45 min) treatment begun 20 min after thrombin (100 iu kg-1, i.c.) did not significantly modify the cranial platelet accumulation response. 6. Cranial platelet accumulation induced by thrombin (100 iu kg-1, i.c.) was significantly reversed by the fibrinolytic drugs urokinase (20 iu kg-1, i.c., infusion for 45 min), anisoylated plasminogen streptokinase activator complex (APSAC) (200 micrograms kg-1, i.v. bolus) or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 100 micrograms kg-1, i.c. bolus followed by 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1, i.c., infusion for 45 min) administered 20 min after thrombin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504722

  4. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  5. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imms Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental or bimanual occupational therapy group (control. Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following

  6. Nocebo-induced modulation of cerebral itch processing - An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sand, Missanga F; Menz, Mareike M; Sprenger, Christian; Büchel, Christian

    2018-02-01

    It has been shown repeatedly that perceiving itch-related pictures or listening to a lecture on itch can enhance itch sensation and scratching behaviour (Niemeier and Gieler, 2000; Holle et al., 2012; Lloyd et al., 2013), indicating that itch is strongly influenced by expectations. Using fMRI, we investigated the neural correlates of the itch-related nocebo effect in healthy male and female human subjects. Itch sensation on the left forearm was induced by cutaneous histamine application and thermally modulated, with cooling leading to higher itch. Nocebo-induced aggravation of histaminergic itch was achieved by ostensibly treating volunteers with "transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)" about which subjects were instructed that it would increase itch. During a conditioning phase subjects indeed experienced stronger itch due to slightly altered cooling and histamine concentrations, but attributed it to the alleged "TENS stimulation". Importantly, in the subsequent test phase where no "TENS" or electrical stimulation was applied, volunteers significantly reported stronger itch during the nocebo as compared to the control condition. Comparing BOLD responses during nocebo in contrast to control, we observed increased activity in contralateral (right) rolandic operculum. Opercular involvement was repeatedly reported in studies related to the expectation of stimulus intensification and might thus represent an early area integrating expectation information with somatosensory information. Finally, functional coupling between the insula and the periaqueductal gray (PAG) was enhanced specifically in the nocebo condition. This cortex-PAG interaction indicates that context-dependent top-down modulation during itch might represent a shared mechanism with other modalities such as pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α upregulation in microglia following hypoxia protects against ischemia-induced cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Weiyi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lei; Xie, Caijun; Zhu, Dongan; Peng, Zizhuang; Chen, Jiehan

    2014-10-01

    Activated microglia were considered to be the toxic inflammatory mediators that induce neuron degeneration after brain ischemia. Hypoxia can enhance the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in microglia and cause microglial activation. However, intermittent hypoxia has been reported recently to be capable of protecting the body from myocardial ischemia. We established a high-altitude environment as the hypoxic condition in this study. The hypoxic condition displayed a neuroprotective effect after brain ischemia, and mice exposed to this condition presented better neurological performance and smaller infarct size. At the same time, a high level of HIF-1α, low level of isoform of nitric oxide synthase, and a reduction in microglial activation were also seen in ischemic focus of hypoxic mice. However, this neuroprotective effect could be blocked by 2-methoxyestradiol, the HIF-1α inhibitor. Our finding suggested that HIF-1α expression was involved in microglial activation in vitro and was regulated by oxygen supply. The microglia were inactivated by re-exposure to hypoxia, which might be due to overexpression of HIF-1α. These results indicated that hypoxic conditions can be exploited to achieve maximum neuroprotection after brain ischemia. This mechanism possibly lies in microglial inactivation through regulation of the expression of HIF-1α.

  8. Pressure modulation algorithm to separate cerebral hemodynamic signals from extracerebral artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Ko, Tiffany S; Busch, David R; Abramson, Kenneth; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Mesquita, Rickson C; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H; Kung, David K; Yodh, Arjun G

    2015-07-01

    We introduce and validate a pressure measurement paradigm that reduces extracerebral contamination from superficial tissues in optical monitoring of cerebral blood flow with diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). The scheme determines subject-specific contributions of extracerebral and cerebral tissues to the DCS signal by utilizing probe pressure modulation to induce variations in extracerebral blood flow. For analysis, the head is modeled as a two-layer medium and is probed with long and short source-detector separations. Then a combination of pressure modulation and a modified Beer-Lambert law for flow enables experimenters to linearly relate differential DCS signals to cerebral and extracerebral blood flow variation without a priori anatomical information. We demonstrate the algorithm's ability to isolate cerebral blood flow during a finger-tapping task and during graded scalp ischemia in healthy adults. Finally, we adapt the pressure modulation algorithm to ameliorate extracerebral contamination in monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume by near-infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Pressure passive cerebral blood flow and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in experimental fetal asphyxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, H C; Lassen, N A; Tweed, W A

    1979-01-01

    reaching CBF values up to 6 times normal at normal MABP of about 60 to 70 mmHg, and severe ischemia reaching CBF values close to zero in large cortical areas at MABP of 30 mmHg. CVP remained essentially unchanged at 10--15 mmHg. The severe and prolonged asphyxia rendered the blood-brain barrier leaky......Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied in non-exteriorized near-term sheep fetuses using the radioactive microsphere technique. By partially occluding the umbilical vessels for a period of 1--1 1/2 hours a progressive and severe asphyxia with a final arterial pH of 6.90 was achieved. Varying...... the mean arterial blood pressure in the fetuses by blood withdrawal or infusion in this state, CBF was measured at different perfusion pressures (mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) minus central venous pressure (CVP)). A passive flow/pressure relationship--loss of autoregulation--was found, with hyperemia...

  10. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin3 (SIRT3 is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH.

  11. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, O.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, F.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  12. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA; whereas in AHA probable vasodilatation mediated by hypoxia/hypercapnia is more crucial for the post-arousal hemodynamics. The differences between changes of cerebral hemodynamics and HR may indicate different pathological mechanisms behind these two sleep disorder events.

  13. Protective effect of glycyrrhizin, a direct HMGB1 inhibitor, on focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Gong

    Full Text Available AIM: Glycyrrhizin (GL has been reported to protect against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R-induced injury by inhibiting the cytokine activity of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. In the present study, the protective effects of GL against I/R injury, as well as the related molecular mechanisms, were investigated in rat brains. METHODS: Focal cerebral I/R injury was induced by intraluminal filamentous occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA in Male Sprague-Dawley rats. GL alone or GL and rHMGB1 were administered intravenously at the time of reperfusion. Serum levels of HMGB1 and inflammatory mediators were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Histopathological examination, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and western blotting analyses were performed to investigate the protective and anti-apoptotic effects and related molecular mechanisms of GL against I/R injury in rat brains. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with GL significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the accompanying neurological deficits in locomotor function. The release of HMGB1 from the cerebral cortex into the serum was inhibited by GL administration. Moreover, pre-treatment with GL alleviated apoptotic injury resulting from cerebral I/R through the inhibition of cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activity. The expression levels of inflammation- and oxidative stress-related molecules including TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6, which were over-expressed in I/R, were decreased by GL. P38 and P-JNK signalling were involved in this process. All of the protective effects of GL could be reversed by rHMGB1 administration. CONCLUSIONS: GL has a protective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat brains through the inhibition of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptotic injury by antagonising the cytokine activity of HMGB1.

  14. Flight-induced inhibition of the cerebral median peptidergic neurosecretory system in Locusta migratoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederen, J.H.; van Etten, E.W.; Biegstraaten, A.I.; Terlou, M.; Vullings, H.G.; Jansen, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    This study discusses the effects of a 1-hr period of flight on the peptidergic pars intercerebralis (PI)-corpus cardiacum storage part (CCS) system in male Locusta migratoria, particularly the effect on material in this system stained by a histochemical method for peptidergic neurosecretory material (NSM) or labeled by in vivo incorporation of radioactive amino acid molecules. By use of an automatic image analysis system a number of parameters of the stained or radioactively labeled substances were measured to quantify the flight-induced effects and to get information on the manner in which the neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI and their axonal endings in the CCS accommodate changing amounts of NSM. The CCS of flown locusts contained distinctly more stained and radioactively labeled substances than the CCS of unflown locusts. A tendency to similar differences was observed in the cluster of neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI. The results indicate that 1 hr flight inhibited the release of NSM by the PI-CCS system. After the onset of reduced release activity by flight, some NSM continued to be synthesized and transported from the PI to the CCS, gradually filling up and expanding the entire PI-CCS system, the NSM at the same time becoming more and more densely packed. It is concluded that the peptidergic PI-CCS system is not actively involved in the control of flight metabolism or flight behavior

  15. The Effects of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Acute Subcortical Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changshen; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yizhao; Hou, Weijia; Liu, Shoufeng; Gao, Chunlin; Wang, Chen; Mo, Lidong; Wu, Jialing

    2017-01-01

    Background : Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) promotes upper extremity recovery post stroke, however, it is difficult to implement clinically due to its high resource demand and safety of the restraint. Therefore, we propose that modified CIMT (mCIMT) be used to treat individuals with acute subcortical infarction. Objective : To evaluate the therapeutic effects of mCIMT in patients with acute subcortical infarction, and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the effect. Methods : The role of mCIMT was investigated in 26 individuals experiencing subcortical infarction in the preceding 14 days. Patients were randomly assigned to either mCIMT or standard therapy. mCIMT group was treated daily for 3 h over 10 consecutive working days, using a mitt on the unaffected arm for up to 30% of waking hours. The control group was treated with an equal dose of occupational therapy and physical therapy. During the 3-month follow-up, the motor functions of the affected limb were assessed by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and Motor Activity Log (MAL). Altered cortical excitability was assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Results : Treatment significantly improved the movement in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. The mean WMF score was significantly higher in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. Further, the appearance of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were significantly higher in the mCIMT group compared with the baseline data. A significant change in ipsilesional silent period (SP) occurred in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. However, we found no difference between two groups in motor function or electrophysiological parameters after 3 months of follow-up. Conclusions : mCIMT resulted in significant functional changes in timed movement immediately following treatment in patients with acute subcortical infarction. Further, early mCIMT improved ipsilesional cortical excitability. However, no long

  16. The Effects of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Acute Subcortical Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshen Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT promotes upper extremity recovery post stroke, however, it is difficult to implement clinically due to its high resource demand and safety of the restraint. Therefore, we propose that modified CIMT (mCIMT be used to treat individuals with acute subcortical infarction.Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of mCIMT in patients with acute subcortical infarction, and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the effect.Methods: The role of mCIMT was investigated in 26 individuals experiencing subcortical infarction in the preceding 14 days. Patients were randomly assigned to either mCIMT or standard therapy. mCIMT group was treated daily for 3 h over 10 consecutive working days, using a mitt on the unaffected arm for up to 30% of waking hours. The control group was treated with an equal dose of occupational therapy and physical therapy. During the 3-month follow-up, the motor functions of the affected limb were assessed by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and Motor Activity Log (MAL. Altered cortical excitability was assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS.Results: Treatment significantly improved the movement in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. The mean WMF score was significantly higher in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. Further, the appearance of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs were significantly higher in the mCIMT group compared with the baseline data. A significant change in ipsilesional silent period (SP occurred in the mCIMT group compared with the control group. However, we found no difference between two groups in motor function or electrophysiological parameters after 3 months of follow-up.Conclusions: mCIMT resulted in significant functional changes in timed movement immediately following treatment in patients with acute subcortical infarction. Further, early mCIMT improved ipsilesional cortical excitability. However, no long

  17. Visually induced nausea causes characteristic changes in cerebral, autonomic and endocrine function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Ban, Vin F; Coen, Steven J; Sanger, Gareth J; Barker, Gareth J; Gresty, Michael A; Giampietro, Vincent P; Williams, Steven C; Webb, Dominic L; Hellström, Per M; Andrews, Paul L R; Aziz, Qasim

    2015-03-01

    An integrated understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in the genesis of nausea remains lacking. We aimed to describe the psychophysiological changes accompanying visually induced motion sickness, using a motion video, hypothesizing that differences would be evident between subjects who developed nausea in comparison to those who did not. A motion, or a control, stimulus was presented to 98 healthy subjects in a randomized crossover design. Validated questionnaires and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for the assessment of anxiety and nausea. Autonomic and electrogastrographic activity were measured at baseline and continuously thereafter. Plasma vasopressin and ghrelin were measured in response to the motion video. Subjects were stratified into quartiles based on VAS nausea scores, with the upper and lower quartiles considered to be nausea sensitive and resistant, respectively. Twenty-eight subjects were exposed to the motion video during functional neuroimaging. During the motion video, nausea-sensitive subjects had lower normogastria/tachygastria ratio and cardiac vagal tone but higher cardiac sympathetic index in comparison to the control video. Furthermore, nausea-sensitive subjects had decreased plasma ghrelin and demonstrated increased activity of the left anterior cingulate cortex. Nausea VAS scores correlated positively with plasma vasopressin and left inferior frontal and middle occipital gyri activity and correlated negatively with plasma ghrelin and brain activity in the right cerebellar tonsil, declive, culmen, lingual gyrus and cuneus. This study demonstrates that the subjective sensation of nausea is associated with objective changes in autonomic, endocrine and brain networks, and thus identifies potential objective biomarkers and targets for therapeutic interventions. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  18. Experimental study of icariin on vascular dementia in rats induced by 2-VO method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-xiaXU; QinWU; Jing-shanSHI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of icariin (ICA) on the learning and memory of ischemic vascular dementia (VD) model of rats,and explore the protective mechanisms. METHODS: ICA was administered to the VD model rats induced by a permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotids arteries(2-VO method) and by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I10-R 10-110 method). Morris water maze was used to examine the abilities of spatial learning and memory of VD model rats. The activity of SOD, level of

  19. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishou Xu

    Full Text Available To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction.In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23, or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23. Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05. Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in improving muscle recruitment

  20. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during cardiopulmonary bypass with special reference to effects of hypotension induced by prostacyclin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddersen, K.; Aren, C.; Nilsson, N.J.; Radegran, K.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were studied in 43 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass. Twenty-five patients received prostacyclin infusion, 50 ng per kilogram of body weight per minute, during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and 18 patients served as a control group. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by intraarterially injected xenon 133 and a single scintillation detector. Oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, glucose, and lactate were measured in arterial and cerebral venous blood. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased during hypothermia and prostacyclin infusion to less than 30 mm Hg. The regional CBF was, on average, 22 (standard deviation [SD] 4) ml/100 gm/min before CPB. It increased in the control group during hypothermia to 34 (SD 12) ml/100 gm/min, but decreased in the prostacyclin group to 15 (SD 5) ml/100 gm/min. It increased during rewarming in the prostacyclin group. After CPB, regional CBF was about 40 ml/100 gm/min in both groups. The cerebral arteriovenous oxygen pressure difference decreased more in the control group than in the prostacyclin group during hypothermia. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen decreased in both groups from approximately 2 ml/100 gm/min to about 1 ml/100 gm/min during hypothermia, increased again during rewarming, and after CPB was at the levels measured before bypass in both groups. There was no difference between the groups in regard to glucose and lactate metabolism

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies of bombardment induced surface morphology changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Williams, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In this review results of experimental and theoretical studies of solid surface morphology changes due to ion bombardment are discussed. An attempt is undertaken to classify the observed specific features of a structure, generated by ion bombardment [ru

  2. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA) : a randomized single- blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, C. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Slooter, A. J. C.

    RationaleDelayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article

  3. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA): a randomized single-blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, C. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Slooter, A. J. C.; Algra, Ale; Beute, Gus N.; Coert, Bert A.; Dankbaar, Jan-Willem; Dippel, Diederik; Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Gathier, Celine S.; Horn, Janneke; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Kesecioglu, Jozef; van Kooten, Fop; van der Lugt, Aad; Muller, Marcella C. A.; Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W.; van der Pol, Bram; Regli, Luca; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Roks, Gerwin; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verweij, Bon H.

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article describes

  4. Cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  5. Rapid Induction of Cerebral Organoids From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Chemically Defined Hydrogel and Defined Cell Culture Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Beth A; Brekke, John H; Vegoe, Amanda L; Ulrich, Connor B; Haider, Kerri T; Subramaniam, Sandhya; Venhuizen, Scott L; Eide, Cindy R; Orchard, Paul J; Chen, Weili; Wang, Qi; Pelaez, Francisco; Scott, Carolyn M; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Keirstead, Susan A; Dutton, James R; Tolar, Jakub; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue organoids are a promising technology that may accelerate development of the societal and NIH mandate for precision medicine. Here we describe a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids (cOrgs) from human pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. By using no additional neural induction components, cOrgs appeared on the hydrogel surface within 10-14 days, and under static culture conditions, they attained sizes up to 3 mm in greatest dimension by day 28. Histologically, the organoids showed neural rosette and neural tube-like structures and evidence of early corticogenesis. Immunostaining and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated protein and gene expression representative of forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain development. Physiologic studies showed responses to glutamate and depolarization in many cells, consistent with neural behavior. The method of cerebral organoid generation described here facilitates access to this technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. Tissue organoids are a promising technology with many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical screens and development of in vitro disease models, particularly for human polygenic conditions where animal models are insufficient. This work describes a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. This method, by virtue of its simplicity and use of defined materials, greatly facilitates access to cerebral organoid technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Effects of buprenorphine and meloxicam analgesia on induced cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6 male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we...... investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects...

  7. Experimental and analytical studies on pedestrian induced footbridge vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Valur; Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Einarsson, Baldvin

    2007-01-01

    characteristics and to measure the response of the bridges to human induced excitation such as walking, running and jumping. Two of the bridges were a part of a design competition related to the realignment of an existing highway in the city centre of Reykjavik in 2005. The bridges have similar cross sections...... modes corresponding to the measured values. The models were subsequently used to calculate the predicted acceleration according to the preliminary version of the Eurocode (ENV 1992-2: Concrete bridges) using time-history analysis with a moving load as representative for a single pedestrian. The load...... models describing human-induced vibrations on structures in current literature and standards are explained, both for a single person walking or running and crowd loading. The measured vertical acceleration induced by single pedestrians was compared against the predictions and it was found that all...

  8. Activation of the basolateral amygdala induces long-term enhancement of specific memory representations in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Candice M; McGaugh, James L; Weinberger, Norman M

    2013-03-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) modulates memory, particularly for arousing or emotional events, during post-training periods of consolidation. It strengthens memories whose substrates in part or whole are stored remotely, in structures such as the hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. However, the mechanisms by which the BLA influences distant memory traces are unknown, largely because of the need for identifiable target mnemonic representations. Associative tuning plasticity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) constitutes a well-characterized candidate specific memory substrate that is ubiquitous across species, tasks and motivational states. When tone predicts reinforcement, the tuning of cells in A1 shifts toward or to the signal frequency within its tonotopic map, producing an over-representation of behaviorally important sounds. Tuning shifts have the cardinal attributes of forms of memory, including associativity, specificity, rapid induction, consolidation and long-term retention and are therefore likely memory representations. We hypothesized that the BLA strengthens memories by increasing their cortical representations. We recorded multiple unit activity from A1 of rats that received a single discrimination training session in which two tones (2.0 s) separated by 1.25 octaves were either paired with brief electrical stimulation (400 ms) of the BLA (CS+) or not (CS-). Frequency response areas generated by presenting a matrix of test tones (0.5-53.82 kHz, 0-70 dB) were obtained before training and daily for 3 weeks post-training. Tuning both at threshold and above threshold shifted predominantly toward the CS+ beginning on day 1. Tuning shifts were maintained for the entire 3 weeks. Absolute threshold and bandwidth decreased, producing less enduring increases in sensitivity and selectivity. BLA-induced tuning shifts were associative, highly specific and long-lasting. We propose that the BLA strengthens memory for important experiences by increasing the

  9. Repair of experimental plaque-induced periodontal disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoukry, M; Ben Ali, L; Abdel Naby, M; Soliman, A

    2007-09-01

    Forty mongrel dogs were used in this study for induction of periodontal disease by placing subgingival silk ligatures affecting maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth during a 12-month period. Experimental premolar teeth received monthly clinical, radiographic, and histometric/pathologic assessments. The results demonstrated significant increases in scores and values of periodontal disease parameters associated with variable degrees of alveolar bone loss. The experimental maxillary premolar teeth exhibited more severe and rapid rates of periodontal disease compared with mandibular premolar teeth. Histometric analysis showed significant reduction in free and attached gingiva of the experimental teeth. Histopathological examination of buccolingual sections from experimental premolar teeth showed the presence of rete pegs within the sulcular epithelium with acanthosis and erosive changes, widening of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone resorption. Various methods for periodontal repair were studied in 194 experimental premolar teeth exhibiting different degrees of periodontal disease. The treatment plan comprised non-surgical (teeth scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene) and surgical methods (closed gingival curettage, modified Widman flap, and reconstructive surgery using autogenous bone marrow graft and canine amniotic membrane). The initial non-surgical treatment resulted in a periodontal recovery rate of 37.6% and was found effective for treatment of early periodontal disease based on resolution of gingivitis and reduction of periodontal probing depths. Surgical treatment by closed gingival curettage to eliminate the diseased pocket lining resulted in a recovery rate of 48.8% and proved effective in substantially reducing deep periodontal pockets. Open root planing following flap elevation resulted in a recovery rate of 85.4% and was effective for deep and refractory periodontal pockets. Autogenous bone graft implantation combined with canine amniotic

  10. Comparative study of the effects of experimentally induced hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in some brain regions in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bakry, A M; El-Gareib, A W; Ahmed, R G

    2010-08-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a crucial role in the development and physiological functioning of different body organs especially the brain. Therefore, the objective of this study was to show the histopathological effects of the different thyroid states on some brain regions (cerebrum and cerebellum) and the skeletal features of their newborns during the postnatal development from the 1st to 3rd week. The female white albino rats were allocated into 3 groups as follows: the experimental hypothyroidism group is induced by 0.02% methimazole (MMI) (w/v) in drinking water, while the experimental hyperthyroidism group is performed by exogenous T4 [from 50 to 200microg/kg body weight intragastric administration beside adding 0.002% T4 (w/v) to the drinking water] from the gestation day 1 to lactation day 21 and control group which received tap water. As well, both maternal hypo- and hyperthyroidism caused some malformation and developmental defects in the cerebellar and cerebral cortex of their newborns along the duration of the experiment. These degenerative symptoms became more prominent and widely spread at the 3rd postnatal week. Concomitantly, there were some degeneration, deformation and severe growth retardation in neurons of these regions in both treated groups throughout the experimental period. Moreover, the skeletal features of these newborns were accelerated in hyperthyroid group while these maturations were delayed partially in hypothyroid ones during the examined periods. These alterations, on both treated groups, were age and dose dependent. Thus, further studies need to be done to emphasize this concept. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The relationship between the apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging, anoxic depolarization, and glutamate efflux during experimental cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N G; Zilkha, E; Houseman, J; Symms, M R; Obrenovitch, T P; Williams, S R

    2000-01-01

    A reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to occur early after cerebrovascular occlusion. This change may be a useful indicator of brain tissue adversely affected by inadequate blood supply. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that loss of membrane ion homeostasis and depolarization can occur simultaneously with the drop in ADC. Also investigated was whether elevation of extracellular glutamate ([GLU]e) would occur before ADC changes. High-speed MRI of the trace of the diffusion tensor (15-second time resolution) was combined with simultaneous recording of the extracellular direct current (DC) potential and on-line [GLU]e from the striatum of the anesthetized rat. After a control period, data were acquired during remote middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion, and cardiac arrest-induced global ischemia. After either focal or global ischemia, the ADC was reduced by 10 to 25% before anoxic depolarization occurred. After either insult, the time for half the maximum change in ADC was significantly shorter than the corresponding DC potential parameter (P potential and did not peak until much later after either ischemic insult. This study demonstrates that ADC changes can occur before membrane depolarization and that high [GLU]e has no involvement in the early rapid ADC decrease.

  12. Radiographic evaluation of experimentally induced nephrosis in goats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; Pandey, N. N.; Singh, G. R.; Setia, H. C. [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar (India)

    1995-06-15

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) with pneumoperitoneum (PP) was undertaken in normal and induced nephrotic goats. In normal goats, the technique provided visualization of both the kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter and urinary bladder at 10 min post-administration of sodium iothalamate (70%). In mercuric chloride- and oxytetracycline-induced nephrosis in goats, the urinary tract could not be visualized even 60 min post-administration of dye indicating sever failure of renal excretory function. However, in gentamicin-abused goats, renal excretory function was not significantly altered owing to a very mild renal damage. It was concluded that IVP with PP could be a dependable diagnostic test for varied degree of renal insufficiency in ruminants.

  13. Radiographic evaluation of experimentally induced nephrosis in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Pandey, N.N.; Singh, G.R.; Setia, H.C.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) with pneumoperitoneum (PP) was undertaken in normal and induced nephrotic goats. In normal goats, the technique provided visualization of both the kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter and urinary bladder at 10 min post-administration of sodium iothalamate (70%). In mercuric chloride- and oxytetracycline-induced nephrosis in goats, the urinary tract could not be visualized even 60 min post-administration of dye indicating sever failure of renal excretory function. However, in gentamicin-abused goats, renal excretory function was not significantly altered owing to a very mild renal damage. It was concluded that IVP with PP could be a dependable diagnostic test for varied degree of renal insufficiency in ruminants

  14. An experimental facility for microwave induced plasma processing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, D.S.; Ramachandran, K.; Bhide, A.L.; Venkatramani, N.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave induced plasma processing offers many advantages over conventional processes. However this technology is in the development stage. This report gives a detailed information about a microwave plasma processing facility (2.45 GHz, 700 W) set up in the Laser and Plasma Technology Division. The equipment details and the results obtained on deposition of diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films and surface modification of polymer PET (polyethylene terephthalate) using this facility are given in this report. (author)

  15. Experimental study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ryan T.

    Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Imaging (TAI) is a noninvasive hybrid modality which improves contrast by using thermoelastic wave generation induced by microwave absorption. Ultrasonography is widely used in medical practice as a low-cost alternative and supplement to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although ultrasonography has relatively high image resolution (depending on the ultrasonic wavelength at diagnostic frequencies), it suffers from low image contrast of soft tissues. In this work samples are irradiated with sub-microsecond electromagnetic pulses inducing acoustic waves in the sample that are then detected with an unfocused transducer. The advantage of this hybrid modality is the ability to take advantage of the microwave absorption coefficients which provide high contrast in tissue samples. This in combination with the superior spatial resolution of ultrasound waves is important to providing a low-cost alternative to MRI and early breast cancer detection methods. This work describes the implementation of a thermoacoustic experiment using a 5 kW peak power microwave source.

  16. Host response in bovine mastitis experimentally induced with Staphylococcus chromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Pyörälä, S

    2009-02-16

    An experimental infection model was developed to study host response to intramammary infection in cows caused by Staphylococcus chromogenes. CNS intramammary infections have become very common in modern dairy herds, and they can remain persistent in the mammary gland. More information would be needed about the pathophysiology of CNS mastitis, and an experimental mastitis model is a means for this research. Six primiparous Holstein-Friesian cows were challenged with S. chromogenes 4 weeks after calving. One udder quarter of each cow was inoculated with 2.1 x 10(6)cfu of S. chromogenes. All cows became infected and clinical signs were mild. Milk production of the challenged quarter decreased on average by 16.3% during 7 days post-challenge. Cows eliminated bacteria in a few days, except for one cow which developed persistent mastitis. Milk indicators of inflammation, SCC and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) returned to normal within a week. Milk NAGase activity increased moderately, which reflects minor tissue damage in the udder. Concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and milk amyloid A (MAA) were both elevated at 12h PC. MAA was affected by the milking times, and was at its highest before the morning milking. In our experimental model, systemic acute phase protein response with SAA occurred as an on-off type reaction. In conclusion, this experimental model could be used to study host response in CNS mastitis caused by the main CNS species and also for comparison of the host response in a mild intramammary infection and in more severe mastitis models.

  17. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection through the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Menghan; Nan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Boai

    2018-05-01

    Along with their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been reported to have neuroprotective function in both in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conducted this study in order to uncover the he neuroprotective effect of the lipophilic statin pitavastatin (PTV) and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms using primary cultured cerebral neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The primary cultured cerebral neurons were randomly assigned into four groups: the control group, the pitavastatin treatment group, the OGD group and the OGD + pitavastatin treatment group. The pitavastatin's concentration were set as follows: 1μM, 15μM, 30μM. After 3 hours OGD treatment, we use MTT method to assessment cell viability, immunofluorescence to observe neuron morphology and western blot method analysis the BDNF, TrkB. PTV at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM elevated the survival rate of cortical neurons exposed to OGD, whereas 30 μM PTV did not show such an effect. Moreover, PTV promoted neuronal dendrite growth at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM. Increased expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were observed in both of the following two scenarios: when neurons were treated with PTV for 48 hours and when PTV was added after the OGD procedure. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation this neuroprotection induced by PTV involves the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

  18. Punica granatum L. Juice Attenuates Experimental Cerebral Vasospasm in the Rabbit Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model: A Basilar Artery Morphometric Study and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Demirci, Adnan; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Bayram, Pinar; Dilli, Alper; Gokce, Emre Cemal; Yaman, Onur; Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Alagoz, Fatih; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2017-03-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice on the rabbit basilar artery in an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. Methods  Eighteen adult male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: a control group ( n  = 6), SAH group ( n  = 6), and SAH + treatment group ( n  = 6). Basilar artery diameter was measured with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in all groups at the beginning of the study. Experimental SAH was created by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna. In the treatment group, the subjects were administered a daily dose of 30 ml/kg pomegranate juice via gastric gavage for 4 days after the SAH. The SAH group and SAH + treatment group underwent cerebral MRA after 72 hours. After a neurologic score assessment, all the animals were killed. The wall thickness and lumen area of the basilar artery were measured histometrically in all groups, and the apoptotic cell percentage in the artery was identified. The mean diameter of the basilar artery during MRA was measured. Results  Pomegranate improved neurologic functions compared with the SAH group ( p   0.05). The apoptotic cell rate in the SAH + treatment group was significantly lower than in the SAH group ( p   0.05). Discussion  Pomegranate was shown to have a vasospasm- attenuating effect on the basilar artery in the rabbit SAH model for the first time in our study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental tests of induced spatial incoherence using short laser wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Grun, J.; Herbst, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a laser beam smoothing technique called induced spatial incoherence (ISI), which can produce the highly uniform focal profiles required for direct-drive laser fusion. Uniform well-controlled focal profiles are required to obtain the highly symmetric pellet implosions needed for high-energy gain. In recent experiments, the authors' tested the effects of ISI on high-power laser-target interaction. With short laser wavelength, the coupling physics dramatically improved over that obtained with an ordinary laser beam

  1. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Shock induced response of structural systems analytical and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    This contribution refers to the behaviour of reinforced concrete structures impacted by deformable missiles. The difference with hard missile impact problems, about which generally more knowledge exists, are point out. Structural response effects beyond the immediate contact face vicinity, beyond the local load introduction zone - i.e. effects of punching shear, of bending, of vibration transmission etc. - are emphasized. Two- and three-dimensional analytical approaches verified by experimental evaluations are discussed, and typical phenomena of the behaviour of reinforced concrete structures subjected to impact loads are demonstrated. (Author) [pt

  3. Cardioprotective effect of mumie (shilajit) on experimentally induced myocardial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukar, Siyavash; Najafipour, Hamid; Dabiri, Shahriar; Sheibani, Mohammad; Sharokhi, Nader

    2014-09-01

    This study assessed the effects of mumie (shilajit) pre-treatment, a traditional drug which is well known in the ancient medicine of both east and west, on cardiac performance of rats subjected to myocardial injury. Animals were divided into control, M250, and M500 (received mumie at dosages of 250 and 500 mg/kg/day, orally for 7 days, respectively) main groups each consisting of two subgroups-with and without heart injury. On the 6th and 7th days, isoproterenol (ISO) (85 mg/kg i.p.) was injected (s.c.) to half of the animal subgroups to induce myocardial damage. On the 8th day, after hemodynamic parameter recordings, hearts were removed for further evaluation. Mumie pre-treatment had no significant effects on hemodynamic and cardiac indices of normal animals. When the cardiac injury was induced, mumie maintained the ±dp/dt maximum, attenuated the serum cardiac troponin I, and reduced the severity of cardiac lesions. Despite the mild positive effects of mumie on total antioxidant capacity and lipid proxidation index, no significant difference was observed among animal groups. The findings suggest the prominent cardioprotective effect of mumie against destructive effects of ISO. It seems that other mechanisms than reinforcements of antioxidant system are involved in this beneficial effect.

  4. An experimental investigation of proton-induced phenomena in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulders, J.J.L.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis proton-induced phenomena in krypton gas are described. The considered reactions of protons on krypton are both nuclear and atomic. The nuclear conversion processes mainly result in the production of several Rb radioisotopes, such as 81 Rb that is used in 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator systems for medical diagnostics. The irradiation of krypton gas (natural composition) with protons of about 26 MeV can be used for the routine production of 81 Rb from the direct production reaction 82 Kr(p,2n) 81 Rb and from the indirect reaction 82 Kr(p,2n)sup(81m)Rb → 81 Rb. To determine the scattering of protons in krypton gas targets a quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed. Proton profiles have been determined from the proton-induced activity distribution on a copper foil. For the on-line detection of produced Rb radioisotopes several optical detection techniques were investigated. (Auth.)

  5. Tobacco experimental model to induce urinary bladder neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Colli Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop an experimental model of exposure to tobacco burning (cigarette products to assess the effects of its chronic use in relation to cancers of the bladder. METHODS: the animals were chronically exposed to the burning tobacco products in a semi-open chamber to simulate smoking. Thirty young Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one with 20 animals simulating smoking for six months, and ten not exposed control animals for the same period. After exposure by inhalation of cigarette smoke, animals were euthanized and subjected to histopathological study of the bladder wall. RESULTS: no tumor was found but mild and non significant alterations. The studies of hemo-oximetry (carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin and the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 confirm that the animals were exposed to high concentrations of tobacco smoke and its derivatives. CONCLUSION: no bladder mucosal neoplasia was found in the pathological study of animals. The developed experimental models were highly efficient, practical and easy to use and can be used in other similar studies to determine the harmful effects caused by smoking.

  6. Numerical-experimental assessment of roughness-induced metal-polymer interface failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeck, van J.; Schreurs, P.J.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical–experimental method is presented to study the initiation and growth of interface damage in polymer–steel interfaces subjected to deformation-induced steel surface roughening. The experimentally determined displacement field of an evolving steel surface is applied to a numerical model

  7. Cerebral palsy in adult patients: constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To determine if the original protocol of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT, is adequate to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb (AUL in patients with Cerebral Palsy (CP in adulthood. Method The study included 10 patients diagnosed with CP hemiparesis had attended the adult protocol CIMT, from January/August 2009/2014. Results Average age 24.6 (SD 9.44; MAL average pretreatment How Often (HO = 0.72 and How Well (HW = 0.68 and post-treatment HO = 3.77 and HW = 3.60 (p ≤ 0.001 and pretreatment WMFT average = 21.03 and post-treatment average = 18.91 (p = 0.350. Conclusion The constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse learn of the AUL in adult patients with CP.

  8. Alleviating effects of morin against experimentally-induced diabetic osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuohashish Hatem M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant flavonoids are emerging as potent therapeutic drugs effective against a wide range of aging diseases particularly bone metabolic disorders. Morin (3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, a member of flavonols, is an important bioactive compound by interacting with nucleic acids, enzymes and protein. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of morin on diabetic osteopenia in rats. Methods Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic model was used by considering 300 mg/dl fasting glucose level as diabetic. Morin (15 and 30 mg/kg was treated for five consecutive weeks to diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, insulin, deoxypyridinoline cross links (DPD, osteocalcin (OC, bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP, telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS and reduced glutathione (GSH were estimated. Femoral bones were taken for micro CT scan to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD and other morphometric parameters. Results Significant bone loss was documented as the level of bone turnover parameters including DPD, OC, BALP and CTX were increased in serum of diabetic rats. Morin treatment significantly attenuated these elevated levels. Bone micro-CT scan of diabetic rats showed a significant impairment in trabecular bone microarchitecture, density and other morphometric parameters. These impairments were significantly ameliorated by morin administration. Serum levels of glucose, TBARS, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly elevated, while the level of insulin and GSH was decreased in diabetic rats. These serum changes in diabetic rats were bring back to normal values after 5 weeks morin treatment. Conclusion These findings revealed the protective effect of morin against diabetic induced osteopenia. We believed that this effect is through its both the anti

  9. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyngeraa, T. S.; Pedersen, L. M.; Mantoni, T.; Belhage, B.; Rasmussen, L. S.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Pott, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA)

  10. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the cerebral ischemic injury-induced increase in levels of GFAP and of caspases-3 and -8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Bondy, S C; Jian, L; Wen, P; Yang, F; Luo, H; Li, W; Zhou, Jun

    2015-03-12

    Tanshinone IIA (TSA) is a lipid soluble agent derived from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen). This plant is a traditional Chinese herb, which has been used widely in China especially for enhancing circulation. However mechanisms underlying its efficacy remain poorly understood. The present study was designed to illuminate events that may underlie the apparently neuroprotective effects of TSA following ischemic insult. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to transient focal cerebral ischemia by use of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model. They were then randomly divided into a sham-operated control group, and cerebral ischemia/reperfusion groups receiving a two-hour occlusion. Further subsets of groups received the same durations of occlusion or were sham-operated but then received daily i.p. injections of high or low doses of TSA, for seven or 15days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed lesions in the entorhinal cortex of both rats subject to ischemia and to a lesser extent to those receiving TSA after surgery. Levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), caspase-3 and caspase-8, were quantified by both immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. TSA treatment after middle cerebral artery occlusion, markedly reduced infarct size, and reduced the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8. These changes were considered protective and were generally proportional to the dose of TSA used. These results suggest that TSA may effect neuroprotection by way of reduction of the extent of cell inflammation and death within affected regions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. QUANTITATIVE CHANGES IN REGIONAL CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW INDUCED BY COLD, HEAT AND ISCHEMIC PAIN: A CONTINUOUS ARTERIAL SPIN LABELING STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Michael A.; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Ness, Timothy; Deutsch, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of arterial spin labeling methods, has allowed measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantitatively and to show the pattern of cerebral activity associated with any state such as a sustained pain state or changes due to a neurotropic drug. Methods We studied the differential effects of three pain conditions in ten healthy subjects on a 3T scanner during resting baseline, heat, cold and ischemic pain using continuous arterial spin labeling. Results Cold pain showed the greatest absolute rCBF increases in left anterior cingulate cortex, left amygdala, left angular gyrus, and Brodmann Area 6, and a significant rCBF decrease in the cerebellum. Changes in rCBF were characteristic of the type of pain condition: cold and heat pain showed increases, while the ischemic condition showed a reduction in mean absolute gray matter flow compared to rest. An association of subjects’ pain tolerance and cerebral blood flow was noted. Conclusions The observation that quantitative rCBF changes are characteristic of the pain task employed and that there is a consistent rCBF change in Brodman area 6, an area responsible for the integration of a motor response to pain, should provide extremely useful information in the quest to develop an imaging biomarker of pain. Conceivably, response in BA6 may serve as an objective measure of analgesic efficacy. PMID:22913924

  12. Quantitative changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by cold, heat and ischemic pain: a continuous arterial spin labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Michael A; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Ness, Timothy; Deutsch, Georg

    2012-10-01

    The development of arterial spin labeling methods has allowed measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantitatively and to show the pattern of cerebral activity associated with any state such as a sustained pain state or changes due to a neurotropic drug. The authors studied the differential effects of three pain conditions in 10 healthy subjects on a 3 Tesla scanner during resting baseline, heat, cold, and ischemic pain using continuous arterial spin labeling. Cold pain showed the greatest absolute rCBF increases in left anterior cingulate cortex, left amygdala, left angular gyrus, and Brodmann area 6, and a significant rCBF decrease in the cerebellum. Changes in rCBF were characteristic of the type of pain condition: cold and heat pain showed increases, whereas the ischemic condition showed a reduction in mean absolute gray matter flow compared with rest. An association of subjects' pain tolerance and cerebral blood flow was noted. The observation that quantitative rCBF changes are characteristic of the pain task used and that there is a consistent rCBF change in Brodman area 6, an area responsible for the integration of a motor response to pain, should provide extremely useful information in the quest to develop an imaging biomarker of pain. Conceivably, response in BA6 may serve as an objective measure of analgesic efficacy.

  13. Induction profile of MANF/ARMET by cerebral ischemia and its implication for neuron protection

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Lian-Cheng; Wang, Fa-Cai; Liang, Yan; Cha, Da-Qin; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Shen, Yu-Jun; Wang, Hai-Ping; Fang, Shengyun; Shen, Yu-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia-induced accumulation of unfolded proteins in vulnerable neurons triggers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arginine-rich, mutated in early stage tumors (ARMET) is an ER stress-inducible protein and upregulated in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. The purposes of this study were to investigate the characteristics and implications of ARMET expression induced by focal cerebral ischemia. Focal cerebral ischemia in rats was induced by right middle cerebral artery occlusion w...

  14. Cerebral blood flow abnormalities induced by transient hypothyroidism after thyroidectomy. Analysis by Tc-99m-HMPAO and SPM96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nishii, Ryuichi; Ishida, Yasushi; Fujita, Seigo; Futami, Shigemi; Kodama, Takao; Tamura, Shozo; Kawai, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    The current study is an investigation of alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) distribution in patients with transient hypothyroidism after thyroidectomy. In addition, the effects of thyroxine treatment on rCBF changes were studied. Noninvasive rCBF measurements using 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT were performed on 24 post-thyroidectomy patients who were in a hypothyroidic state. The measurements were conducted before 131 I therapy and after thyroid hormone (thyroxine) replacement. We used adjusted rCBF images (normalization of global CBF for each subject to 50 ml/100 g/min with proportional scaling) to compare these data with age-matched normal control groups (n=15) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 96. We also compared the absolute rCBF value of hypothyroidic patients with those of normal control groups. In addition, the association between rCBF alteration and the severity of depression was also analyzed. Finally, the effect of thyroid hormone replacement on rCBF was investigated individually using the Jack-knife test, in which patient data were compared with those from healthy volunteers. According to the result of this test, all cases were categorized into three subgroups, namely, improved, unchanged group and normal. To prove the reversibility of rCBF alteration after thyroid hormone replacement, a group comparison test between the normal controls and the improved group was done before and after thyroid hormone replacement. Similarly a group comparison test between the unchanged group and normal controls was also performed. In the hypothyroidic condition, there was a significant decrease in the posterior part of the bilateral parietal lobes and in part of the bilateral occipital lobes, including the cuneus. These decreased rCBF areas extended to the bilateral prefrontal cortices as deterioration became more profound. On individual analysis, 16 of 24 patients (66.7%) demonstrated rCBF reduction, while 8 patient did not show significant rCBF change

  15. The role of regional nerve block anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy: an experimental comparison with previous series with the use of general anesthesia and barbiturates for cerebral protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrifoglio, G; Agus, G B; Bonalumi, F; Costantini, A; Carlesi, R

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on a consecutive series of 60 cases divided into two groups given carotid endarterectomy (C.E.) for atherosclerotic disease. In the first group general anesthesia and barbiturate cerebral protection were employed; in group two, loco-regional anesthesia. Indications and risk factors were similar in the two groups; the surgical procedure was identical. The differences in the results are reported and factors contributing to cerebral protection or reduction in the risk of stroke are analyzed. The analysis indicates that loco-regional anesthesia for C.E. is a reliable method for detecting cerebral ischemia and guaranteeing cerebral protection by means of a temporary shunt when strictly necessary.

  16. La atorvastatina protege las neuronas gabérgicas y dopaminérgicas del sistema nigroestriatal en un modelo experimental de isquemia cerebral focal transitoria en ratas

    OpenAIRE

    Sabogal, Angélica María; Arango, César Augusto; Cardona, Gloria Patricia; Céspedes, Ángel Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral ischemia is the third leading cause of death and the primary cause of permanent disability worldwide. Atorvastatin is a promising drug with neuroprotective effects that may be useful for the treatment of stroke. However, the effects of atorvastatin on specific neuronal populations within the nigrostriatal system following cerebral ischemia are unknown. Objective: To evaluate the effects of atorvastatin on dopaminergic and GABAergic neuronal populations in exofocal brain...

  17. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH distinguishes alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Uhlirova, Hana; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating cerebral energy metabolism at microscopic resolution is important for comprehensively understanding healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. Here, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo in Sprague Dawley rats utilizing minimally-invasive 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements enable distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. Ostensibly, these components indicate different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in glycolytic and oxidative metabolism. Classification models were developed with the experimental data and used to predict the metabolic impairments induced during separate experiments involving bicuculline-induced seizures. The models consistently predicted that prolonged focal seizure activity results in impaired activity in the electron transport chain, likely the consequence of inadequate oxygen supply. 2P-FLIM observations of cerebral NADH will help advance our understanding of cerebral energetics at a microscopic scale. Such knowledge will aid in our evaluation of healthy and diseased cerebral physiology and guide diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that target cerebral energetics.

  18. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-07-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone.

  20. Experimental photoimmunology: immunologic ramifications of UV-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daynes, R.A.; Bernhard, E.J.; Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of animal model systems to investigate the sequence of events which lead to the induction and progression of skin tumors following chronic ultraviolet light (UVL) exposure has clearly shown that the direct mutagenic effects of UVL is only one of the components involved in this process. In spite of the fact that overt carcinogenesis is only one of the many effects produced by UV light, most hypotheses as to the mechanism by which UVL can cause the mutations necessary to achieve the transformed phenotype have focused on the direct effects of UVL on DNA and the generation of carcinogenic compounds. Investigations during the last 5 yr, however, have clearly demonstrated that immunologic factors are also critically important in the pathogenesis of UV-induced skin cancers. A complete understanding of UV-carcinogenesis must therefore consider the mechanisms which allow the transformed cell to evade immunologic rejection by the host in addition to those aspects which deal with conversion of a normal cell to a cancer cell. It is the object of this review to provide both a historical account of the work which established the immunologic consequences of chronic UVL exposure and the results of recent experiments designed to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms by which UVL affects the immunologic apparatus. In addition, a hypothetical model is presented to explain the sequence of events which ultimately lead to the emergence of the suppressor T-cells which regulate antitumor immune responses

  1. Electrical stimulation induces propagated colonic contractions in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aellen, S; Wiesel, P H; Gardaz, J-P; Schlageter, V; Bertschi, M; Virag, N; Givel, J-C

    2009-02-01

    Direct colonic electrical stimulation may prove to be a treatment option for specific motility disorders such as chronic constipation. The aim of this study was to provoke colonic contractions using electrical stimulation delivered from a battery-operated device. Electrodes were inserted into the caecal seromuscular layer of eight anaesthetized pigs. Contractions were induced by a neurostimulator (Medtronic 3625). Caecal motility was measured simultaneously by video image analysis, manometry and a technique assessing colonic transit. Caecal contractions were generated using 8-10 V amplitude, 1000 micros pulse width, 120 Hz frequency for 10-30 s, with an intensity of 7-15 mA. The maximal contraction strength was observed after 20-25 s. Electrical stimulation was followed by a relaxation phase of 1.5-2 min during which contractions propagated orally and aborally over at least 10 cm. Spontaneous and stimulated caecal motility values were significantly different for both intraluminal pressure (mean(s.d.) 332(124) and 463(187) mmHg respectively; P < 0.001, 42 experiments) and movement of contents (1.6(0.9) and 3.9(2.8) mm; P < 0.001, 40 experiments). Electrical stimulation modulated caecal motility, and provoked localized and propagated colonic contractions.

  2. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Moriyama, L T; Bagnato, V S

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed. (review)

  3. TOLERANCE TIME OF EXPERIMENTAL THERMAL PAIN (COLD INDUCED) IN VOLUNTEERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, V N; Wilkhoo, N S; Jain, A K

    1998-10-01

    Perception of thermal pain (cold induced) was studied in 106 volunteers from troops and civilians deployed in J & K. Thermal stimulus devised was "holding ice". Tolerance time of holding ice was taken to be a measure of thermal sensitivity, volunteers were classified based on their native areas, addiction habits and socio-economic status, out of 106 volunteers, 81 could & 25 could not hold ice over 10 min. Sixteen out of 40 from coastline States and 9 out of 66 from non-coast line States failed to hold ice over 10 min. In "below average" "average" and "high average" socio-economic groups, three out of 27, 19 out of 73 and 03 out of 6 failed to hold ice over 10 min respectively. Fifteen out of 64 from "addiction habit group" and 10 out of 42 from "no addiction habit group" failed to hold ice over 10 min. Statistically no classification used in the study revealed significant difference in "tolerance times" of volunteers except the one based on coastline and non-coastline States.

  4. Experimentally induced metamorphosis in axolotls reduces regenerative rate and fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Adrian C.; Michonneau, François; Smith, Matthew D.; Pasch, Bret; Maden, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While most tetrapods are unable to regenerate severed body parts, amphibians display a remarkable ability to regenerate an array of structures. Frogs can regenerate appendages as larva, but they lose this ability around metamorphosis. In contrast, salamanders regenerate appendages as larva, juveniles, and adults. However, the extent to which fundamental traits (e.g., metamorphosis, body size, aging, etc.) restrict regenerative ability remains contentious. Here we utilize the ability of normally paedomorphic adult axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to undergo induced metamorphosis by thyroxine exposure to test how metamorphosis and body size affects regeneration in age‐matched paedomorphic and metamorphic individuals. We show that body size does not affect regeneration in adult axolotls, but metamorphosis causes a twofold reduction in regeneration rate, and lead to carpal and digit malformations. Furthermore, we find evidence that metamorphic blastemal cells may take longer to traverse the cell cycle and display a lower proliferative rate. This study identifies the axolotl as a powerful system to study how metamorphosis restricts regeneration independently of developmental stage, body size, and age; and more broadly how metamorphosis affects tissue‐specific changes. PMID:27499857

  5. Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Bone Loss in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rhys D; Shultz, Sandy R; Sun, Mujun; Romano, Tania; van der Poel, Chris; Wright, David K; Wark, John D; O'Brien, Terence J; Grills, Brian L; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the influence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on bone homeostasis; however, pathophysiological mechanisms involved in TBI have potential to be detrimental to bone. The current study assessed the effect of experimental TBI in rats on the quantity and quality of two different weight-bearing bones, the femur and humerus. Rats were randomly assigned into either sham or lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) groups. Open-field testing to assess locomotion was conducted at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury, with the rats killed at 1 and 12 weeks post-injury. Bones were analyzed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), histomorphometric analysis, and three-point bending. pQCT analysis revealed that at 1 and 12 weeks post-injury, the distal metaphyseal region of femora from FPI rats had reduced cortical content (10% decrease at 1 week, 8% decrease at 12 weeks; p in trabecular bone volume ratio at 1 week post-injury and a 27% reduction at 12 weeks post-injury in FPI rats compared to sham (p in bone quantity and mechanical properties of the femoral midshaft between sham and TBI animals. There were no differences in locomotor outcomes, which suggested that post-TBI changes in bone were not attributed to immobility. Taken together, these findings indicate that this rat model of TBI was detrimental to bone and suggests a link between TBI and altered bone remodeling.

  6. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  7. Sumoylation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ameliorates failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation in experimental brain death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Y H Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1, Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase.We conclude that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM ameliorates brain stem

  8. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  9. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Tatar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antibiotics are frequently used for the treatment of rhinosinusitis. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of development of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in the treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Methods: Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was composed by five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde were determined. Results: In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. Conclusion: The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  10. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by experimental childhood meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barichello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of environmental enrichment (EE on memory, cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the brain of adult rats subjected to experimental pneumococcal meningitis during infancy. Methods: On postnatal day 11, the animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension intracisternally at 1 × 106 CFU/mL and remained with their mothers until age 21 days. Animals were divided into the following groups: control, control + EE, meningitis, and meningitis + EE. EE began at 21 days and continued until 60 days of age (adulthood. EE consisted of a large cage with three floors, ramps, running wheels, and objects of different shapes and textures. At 60 days, animals were randomized and subjected to habituation to the open-field task and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. After the tasks, the hippocampus and CSF were isolated for analysis. Results: The meningitis group showed no difference in performance between training and test sessions of the open-field task, suggesting habituation memory impairment; in the meningitis + EE group, performance was significantly different, showing preservation of habituation memory. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there were no differences in behavior between training and test sessions in the meningitis group, showing aversive memory impairment; conversely, differences were observed in the meningitis + EE group, demonstrating aversive memory preservation. In the two meningitis groups, IL-4, IL-10, and BDNF levels were increased in the hippocampus, and BDNF levels in the CSF. Conclusions: The data presented suggest that EE, a non-invasive therapy, enables recovery from memory deficits caused by neonatal meningitis.

  11. Immune Cells and Molecular Networks in Experimentally Induced Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, E; Gaudin, A; Bienvenu, G; Amiaud, J; Farges, J C; Cuturi, M C; Moreau, A; Alliot-Licht, B

    2016-02-01

    Dental pulp is a dynamic tissue able to resist external irritation during tooth decay by using immunocompetent cells involved in innate and adaptive responses. To better understand the immune response of pulp toward gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed biological mediators and immunocompetent cells in rat incisor pulp experimentally inflamed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline solution (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Untreated teeth were used as control. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine ligands, growth factors, and enzymes were evaluated at the transcript level, and the recruitment of the different leukocytes in pulp was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis after 3 h, 9 h, and 3 d post-PBS or post-LPS treatment. After 3 d, injured rat incisors showed pulp wound healing and production of reparative dentin in both LPS and PBS conditions, testifying to the reversible pulpitis status of this model. IL6, IL1-β, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, MMP9, and iNOS gene expression were significantly upregulated after 3 h of LPS stimulation as compared with PBS. The immunoregulatory cytokine IL10 was also upregulated after 3 h, suggesting that LPS stimulates not only inflammation but also immunoregulation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed a significant, rapid, and transient increase in leukocyte levels 9 h after PBS and LPS stimulation. The quantity of dendritic cells was significantly upregulated with LPS versus PBS. Interestingly, we identified a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-enriched cell population in noninjured rodent incisor dental pulp. The percentage of this population, known to regulate immune response, was higher 9 h after inflammation triggered with PBS and LPS as compared with the control. Taken together, these data offer a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of dental pulp immunity that may be elicited by gram-negative bacteria. © International & American

  12. Cerebral vascular control and metabolism in heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced...

  13. Experimental model to induce obesity in rats Modelo experimental para induzir obesidade em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Von Diemen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of obesity is multifactorial and is becoming a problem of public health, due to its increased prevalence and the consequent repercussion of its comorbidities on the health of the population. The great similarity and homology between the genomes of rodents and humans make these animal models a major tool to study conditions affecting humans, which can be simulated in rats. Obesity can be induced in animals by neuroendocrine, dietary or genetic changes. The most widely used models to induce obesity in rats are a lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH by administering monosodium glutamate or a direct electrical lesion, ovariectomy, feeding on hypercaloric diets and genetic manipulation for obesity.A obesidade tem etiologia multifatorial e está se tornando um problema de saúde pública devido ao aumento da sua prevalência e a conseqüente repercusão das suas comorbidades na saúde da população. A grande similaridade e homologia entre os genomas dos roedores e dos humanos tornam esses modelos animais uma importante ferramenta para o estudo de condições que afetam os humanos e que podem ser simuladas em ratos. A obesidade pode ser induzida em animais com alterações neuroendócrinas, dietéticas ou genéticas. Os modelos mais utilizados para indução de obesidade em ratos são lesão do núcleo hipotalâmico venteromedial (VMH através da administração de glutamato monossódico ou lesão elétrica direta, ooforectomia, alimentação com dietas hipercalóricas e manipulação genética para obesidade.

  14. Fluoxetine ameliorates cognitive impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via down-regulation of HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Lu, Yun; Chen, Cheng; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes cognitive impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), could play a neuroprotective role against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion injury and to clarify underlying mechanisms of its efficacy. Rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). Two weeks later, rats were treated with 30 mg/kg fluoxetine (intragastric injection, i.g.) for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and novel objects recognition (NOR) test. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein levels. Our results showed that fluoxetine treatment significantly improved the cognitive impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced inhibitory of LTP. Furthermore, 2VO caused an up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2) surface expressions in the hippocampal CA1 area and fluoxetine also effectively recovered the disorder of HCN2 surface expressions, which may be a possible mechanism that fluoxetine treatment ameliorates cognitive impairments in rats with CCH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF PLAY THERAPY AND CHILD FRIENDLY CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOMEMENT THERAPY TO IMPROVE HAND FUNCTION IN SPASTIC HEMIPLEGIC CEREBRAL PALSY CHILDREN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjuman Nahar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral Palsy (CP is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by nonprogressive lesion in the developing brain. The early central nervous system (CNS damage results in chronic physical disabilities and often includes sensory impairments. In addition CP is often associated with epilepsy and abnormalities of speech, vision, and intellect; it is the selective vulnerability of the brains motor systems that defines the disorder. Child friendly CIMT involves intensive targeted practice with the involved extremity coordination above and beyond their unilateral impairments. Ply Therapy is designed for active involvement of child in performing various tasks. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy and play therapy to improve hand function in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy children. Methods: A sample of 30 patients was divided in two groups, each group having 15 children. Convenient sampling was done on the basis of base line assessment and diagnosis of their condition. Duration of the study was 3 months and data collection started at day 0 and at the end of 90 days. Children in group A wore a bivalve plaster cast on the non-involved upper extremity from shoulder to finger tips for the entire time during the session lasting for 2 hours and the plaster cast was removed at the end of the session. B group consists of 15 subjects who received play therapy. The treatment program was conducted individually and adjusted to current needs and abilities of each of the patients. Outcomes: Box and Block test, QOM scale and AOU scale. Results: It was found that there is an improvement in the hand function on application of child friendly CIMT in the patients with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy which was found significant using the Mann-Whitney U test (p≤0.005. Conclusion: In this study it has been found that the use of Child friendly CIMT and PLAY THERAPY produces significant improvement in hand

  16. The phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil has no effect on cerebral blood flow or blood velocity, but nevertheless induces headache in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Jacobsen, Torsten Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important hemodynamic regulators in many tissues. Glyceryl trinitrate markedly dilates large cerebral arteries and increases cGMP. Here, the authors study the effect of sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase 5 on cerebral hemodynamics...... of cerebral arterial dilatation, sildenafil caused significantly more headache than placebo. The present results show that sildenafil 100 mg does not dilate cerebral or extracerebral arteries but nevertheless causes headache, which may be attributed to nonvascular mechanisms....

  17. Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy combined with Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: how are improvements in arm-hand use established?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, P.B.M.; Jongerius, P.H.; Geerdink-van Nistelrooij, Y.A. van; Limbeek, J. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial indicated that modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy followed by Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) is an effective intervention to improve spontaneous use of the affected upper limb in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The present study

  18. Pathological and MRI study on experimental heroin-induced brain damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Yu; Kong Xiangquan; Xu Haibo; Liu Dingxi; Yuan Ren; Yu Qun; Xiong Yin; Deng Xianbo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological characteristics of the heroin-induced brain damage in rats, and to assess the diagnostic value of MRI. Methods: A total of 40 adult Wistar rats were studied, 32 rats were used for injecting heroin as heroin group and 8 were used for injecting saline as control group. The heroin dependent rat model was established by administering heroin (ip) in the ascending dosage schedule (0.5 mg/kg), three times a day (at 8:00, 12:00, and 18:00). The control group was established by the same way by injection with saline. The withdrawal scores were evaluated with imp roved criterion in order to estimate the degree of addiction after administering naloxone. Based on the rat model of heroin dependence, the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established by the same way with increasing heroin dosage everyday. Two groups were examined by using MRI, light microscope, and electron microscope, respectively in different heroin accumulated dosage (918, 1580, 2686, 3064, 4336, and 4336 mg/kg withdrawal after 2 weeks). Results: There was statistically significant difference (t=9.737, P<0.01) of the withdrawal scores between the heroin dependent group and the saline group (23.0 ± 4.4 and 1.4 ± 0.5, respectively). It suggested that the heroin dependent rat model be established successfully. In different accumulated dosage ( from 1580 mg/kg to 4336 mg/kg), there were degeneration and death of nerve cells in cerebrum and cerebellum of heroin intoxicated rats, and it suggested that the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established successfully. The light microscope and electron microscope features of heroin-induced brain damage in rats included: (1) The nerve cells of cerebral cortex degenerated and died. According to the heroin accumulated dosage, there were statistically significant difference of the nerve cell deaths between 4336 mg/kg group and 1580 mg/kg group or control group (P=0.024 and P=0.032, respectively); (2) The main

  19. Resting State and Diffusion Neuroimaging Predictors of Clinical Improvements Following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Fehlings, Darcy; Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Switzer, Lauren; Campbell, Craig; Menon, Ravi S

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to identify neuroimaging predictors of clinical improvements following constraint-induced movement therapy. Resting state functional magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging data was acquired in 7 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired at baseline and 1 month later following a 3-week constraint therapy regimen. A more negative baseline laterality index characterizing an atypical unilateral sensorimotor resting state network significantly correlated with an improvement in the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure score (r = -0.81, P = .03). A more unilateral network with decreased activity in the affected hemisphere was associated with greater improvements in clinical scores. Higher mean diffusivity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule of the affect tract correlated significantly with improvements in the Jebsen-Taylor score (r = -0.83, P = .02). Children with more compromised networks and tracts improved the most following constraint therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Genistein attenuates brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia through up-regulation of ERK activity in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiquan; Wei, Haidong; Cai, Min; Lu, Yan; Hou, Wugang; Yang, Qianzi; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-01-01

    Stroke has severe consequences in postmenopausal women. As replacement therapy of estrogen have various adverse effects and the undermined outcomes. Genistein, a natural phytoestrogen, has been suggested to be a potential neuroprotective agent for such stroke patients. However, the role of genistein and its underlying mechanism in ovariectomized mice has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, ovariectomized mice were treated with genistein (10 mg/kg) or vehicle daily for two weeks before developing transient cerebral ischemia (middle cerebral artery occlusion). The neurological manifestation was evaluated, and infarct volumes were demonstrated by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 24 h after reperfusion. In addition, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cellular apoptosis was evaluated in the ischemic penumbra. We found that treatment with genistein reduced infarct volumes, improved neurological outcomes and attenuated cellular apoptosis at 24 h after reperfusion. ERK1/2 showed increased phosphorylation by genistein treatment after reperfusion, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished this protective effect of genistein in terms of infarct volumes, neurological scores and cellular apoptosis. Our findings indicate that treatment with genistein can reduce the severity of subsequent stroke episodes, and that this beneficial function is associated with ERK activation.

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Melatonin Against PCBs Induced Behavioural, Molecular and Histological Changes in Cerebral Cortex of Adult Male Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavithra, S; Selvakumar, K; Sundareswaran, L; Arunakaran, J

    2017-02-01

    There is ample evidence stating Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as neurotoxins. In the current study, we have analyzed the behavioural impact of PCBs exposure in adult rats and assessed the simultaneous effect of antioxidant melatonin against the PCBs action. The rats were grouped into four and treated intraperitoneally with vehicle, PCBs, PCBs + melatonin and melatonin alone for 30 days, respectively. After the treatment period the rats were tested for locomotor activity and anxiety behaviour analysis. We confirmed the neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex by molecular and histological analysis. Our data indicates that there is impairment in locomotor activity and behaviour of PCBs treated rats compared to control. The simultaneous melatonin treated rat shows increased motor coordination and less anxiety like behaviour compared to PCBs treated rats. Molecular and histological analysis supports that, the impaired motor coordination in PCBs treated rats is due to neurodegeneration in motor cortex region. The results proved that melatonin treatment improved the motor co-ordination and reduced anxiety behaviour, prevented neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex of PCBs-exposed adult male rats.

  2. In Premature Newborns Intraventricular Hemorrhage Causes Cerebral Vasospasm and Associated Neurodisability via Heme-Induced Inflammasome-Mediated Interleukin-1 Production and Nitric Oxide Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eisenhut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIntraventricular hemorrhage (IVH occurs in 60–70% of neonates weighing 500–750 g and 10–20% of those weighing 1,000–1,500 g. All forms of IVH have been associated with neurocognitive deficits. Both subarachnoid and IVHs have been associated with delayed vasospasm leading to neurological deficits. Pathways linking hemoglobin release from blood clots to vasospasm include heme-induced activation of inflammasomes releasing interleukin-1 (IL-1 that can cause calcium dependent and independent vasospasm. Free hemoglobin is a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO. Depletion of NO, a potent endogenous vasodilator, has been associated with features of vasospasm.HypothesisIn premature newborns, IVH causes cerebral vasospasm and associated neurodisability via heme-induced increased inflammasome-mediated IL-1 production and NO depletion.Confirmation of hypothesis and implicationsThis hypothesis could be confirmed in the IVH animal model with visualization of any associated vasospasm by angiography and in newborns with IVH by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and correlation with cerebrospinal fluid IL-1 and NO metabolite levels. Confirmation of the role of heme in activation of inflammasomes causing IL-1 production and NO binding could be achieved by measuring the effect of heme scavenging interventions on IL-1 levels and levels of NO metabolites. In addition to removal of the accumulated blood of an IVH by drainage, irrigation, and fibrinolytic therapy intrathecal application of vasodilators and heme scavenging agents like haptoglobin and haemopexin and systemic treatment with inhibitors of inflammasomes like telmisartan could be used to prevent and treat cerebral vasospasm, and thus reduce the risk of associated brain injury in premature neonates.

  3. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  4. Tramadol Induced Adrenal Insufficiency: Histological, Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural, and Biochemical Genetic Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelaleem, Shereen Abdelhakim; Hassan, Osama A.; Ahmed, Rasha F.; Zenhom, Nagwa M.; Rifaai, Rehab A.; El-Tahawy, Nashwa F.

    2017-01-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting analgesic. It is the most consumed narcotic drug that is prescribed in the world. Tramadol abuse has dramatically increased in Egypt. Long term use of tramadol can induce endocrinopathy. So, the aim of this study was to analyze the adrenal insufficiency induced by long term use of tramadol in experimental animals and also to assess its withdrawal effects through histopathological and biochemical genetic study. Forty male albino rats were used in this ...

  5. Comparative experimental study of cancer induced by ionizing radiations or by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Animal experiments have contributed to specify a number of parameters used in setting human safety limits for ionizing radiation. In the same way, comparisons have been made between cancers induced in man and in animals in well-defined conditions. In order to use the same experimental data for chemical carcinogens, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis should be the same, i.e. additivity of responses instead of synergy of effects, which requires the development of a new experimental method [fr

  6. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clanet, M

    1987-06-18

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/), oxygen extraction (EO/sub 2/) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO/sub 2/ and often a decrease in CMRO/sub 2/, whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO/sub 2/, EO/sub 2/ and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis.

  7. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clanet, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction (EO 2 ) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO 2 and often a decrease in CMRO 2 , whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO 2 , EO 2 and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis [fr

  8. Nutrient Induced Type 2 and Chemical Induced Type 1 Experimental Diabetes Differently Modulate Gastric GLP-1 Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO by high-energy (HE diet and by streptozotocin (STZ in Sprague Dawly (SD rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis.

  9. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA): a randomized single-blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, C S; van den Bergh, W M; Slooter, A J C

    2014-04-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article describes the design of the HIMALAIA trial (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA), designed to assess the effectiveness of induced hypertension on neurological outcome in patients with DCI after SAH. To investigate whether induced hypertension improves the functional outcome in patients with delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. The HIMALAIA trial is a multicenter, singe-blinded, randomized controlled trial in patients with DCI after a recent SAH. Eligible patients will be randomized to either induced hypertension (n = 120) or to no induced hypertension (n = 120). In selected centers, the efficacy of induced hypertension in augmenting cerebral blood flow will be measured by means of cerebral perfusion computerized tomography scanning. Follow-up assessments will be performed at 3 and 12 months after randomization by trial nurses who are blinded to the treatment allocation and management. We will include patients during five years. The primary outcome is the proportion of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with delayed cerebral ischemia with poor outcome three-months after randomization, defined as a modified Rankin scale of more than 3. Secondary outcome measures are related to treatment failure, functional outcome, adverse events, and cerebral hemodynamics. The HIMALAIA trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT01613235. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  10. Cowhage-induced itch as an experimental model for pruritus. A comparative study with histamine-induced itch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is the prototypical pruritogen used in experimental itch induction. However, in most chronic pruritic diseases, itch is not predominantly mediated by histamine. Cowhage-induced itch, on the other hand, seems more characteristic of itch occurring in chronic pruritic diseases.We tested the validity of cowhage as an itch-inducing agent by contrasting it with the classical itch inducer, histamine, in healthy subjects and atopic dermatitis (AD patients. We also investigated whether there was a cumulative effect when both agents were combined.Fifteen healthy individuals and fifteen AD patients were recruited. Experimental itch induction was performed in eczema-free areas on the volar aspects of the forearm, using different itch inducers: histamine, cowhage and their combination thereof. Itch intensity was assessed continuously for 5.5 minutes after stimulus application using a computer-assisted visual analogue scale (COVAS.In both healthy and AD subjects, the mean and peak intensity of itch were higher after the application of cowhage compared to histamine, and were higher after the combined application of cowhage and histamine, compared to histamine alone (p<0.0001 in all cases. Itch intensity ratings were not significantly different between healthy and AD subjects for the same itch inducer used; however AD subjects exhibited a prolonged itch response in comparison to healthy subjects (p<0.001.Cowhage induced a more intense itch sensation compared to histamine. Cowhage was the dominant factor in itch perception when both pathways were stimulated in the same time. Cowhage-induced itch is a suitable model for the study of itch in AD and other chronic pruritic diseases, and it can serve as a new model for testing antipruritic drugs in humans.

  11. Dialysis Disequilibrium Syndrome-Induced Cerebral Edema in a Patient with Uremia Following Hemodialysis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Heung Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a metabolic complication that can be caused by rapid removal of plasma urea during hemodialysis. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome can lead to osmotic demyelinating syndrome. This case report describes one case of encephalopathy accompanied by dialysis disequilibrium syndrome with imaging findings acquired immediately after hemodialysis in a 55-year-old woman with chronic renal failure. The patient was observed to present repetitive seizures and sudden deterioration of consciousness immediately after hemodialysis. Shortly after the onset of symptoms, the patient underwent a CT scan. The imaging findings of the CT scan reveal symmetrical diffuse white matter edema of bilateral cerebral hemispheres that extends to the pons along the internal capsule. A follow-up MRI taken two years later shows that reversible changes without damage have occurred in the lesions. The patient can thus be seen to present symptoms characteristically associated with dialysis disequilibrium syndrome, while brain imaging reveals dif-fuse reversible brain edema.

  12. The SPECT study on the regional cerebral blood flow of heroin addicts during cue-induced heroin craving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengqing; Liu Qinglong; Wang Yuhua; Wang Jinmin; Wang Shuo; Zhao Geyuan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the character of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of heroin addicts during the exposure to the heroin-related cues. Methods: Twenty-five heroin dependent individuals undergoing detoxification for more than one month were enrolled in the present study. All subjects were exposed to the heroin-related cues for 15 min. The rCBF was measured in these patients before and after exposure to heroin-related cues. Result: The rCBF in the frontal, temporal cortex and amygdala was significantly increased during the exposure to heroin-related cues. Conclusion: The findings indicate that drug-related cues play a critical role in the relapse of drug dependence; and the frontal, temporal cortex and amygdala are involved in the relapsing process

  13. Rodent stroke induced by photochemical occlusion of proximal middle cerebral artery: Evolution monitored with MR imaging and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Jin, Lixin; Yu Jie; Wang Huaijun; Marchal, Guy; Ni Yicheng

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To longitudinally investigate stroke in rats after photothrombotic occlusion of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: Forty-two rats were subjected to photochemical MCA occlusion and MRI at 1.5 T, and sacrificed in seven groups (n = 6 each) at the following time points: 1, 3, 6 and 12 h, and at day 1, 3 and 9. T2-weighted (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map was performed in all rats. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging (CE-T1WI) was compared to intravital staining with Evans blue in one group for assessing blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. The brain was stained histochemically with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) and processed for pathological assessment. The evolutional changes of relative lesion volume, signal intensity (SI), and the BBB integrity on MRI with corresponding histopathology were evaluated. Results: The ischemic lesion volume reached a maximum around 12 h to day 1 as visualized successively by DWI, ADC map and T2WI, implicating the evolving pathology from cytotoxic edema through vasogenic edema to tissue death. The ADC of brain infarction underwent a significant reversion after 12 h, reflecting the colliquative necrosis. On CE-T1WI, BBB leakage peaked at 6 h and at day 3 with a transitional partial recovery around 24 h. The infarct volume on T2WI, DWI and ADC map matched well with that on TTC staining at 12 h and at day 1 (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The evolution of the present photothrombotic stroke model in rats could be characterized by MRI. The obtained information may help longitudinal studies of cerebral ischemia and anti-stroke agents using the same model

  14. Experimental Study on Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Vortex-Induced Vibrations and Wake-Induced Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigid circular cylinder with two piezoelectric beams attached on has been tested through vortex-induced vibrations (VIV and wake-induced vibrations (WIV by installing a big cylinder fixed upstream, in order to study the influence of the different flow-induced vibrations (FIV types. The VIV test shows that the output voltage increases with the increases of load resistance; an optimal load resistance exists for the maximum output power. The WIV test shows that the vibration of the small cylinder is controlled by the vortex frequency of the large one. There is an optimal gap of the cylinders that can obtain the maximum output voltage and power. For a same energy harvesting device, WIV has higher power generation capacity; then the piezoelectric output characteristics can be effectively improved.

  15. Regular voluntary exercise cures stress-induced impairment of cognitive function and cell proliferation accompanied by increases in cerebral IGF-1 and GST activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sanae; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohta, Shigeo; Ohno, Makoto; Mikami, Toshio

    2010-08-25

    Chronic stress impairs cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis. This impairment is attributed to increases in oxidative stress, which result in the accumulation of lipid peroxide. On the other hand, voluntary exercise enhances cognitive function, hippocampal neurogenesis, and antioxidant capacity in normal animals. However, the effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive function, neurogenesis, and antioxidants in stressed mice are unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether voluntary exercise cures stress-induced impairment of cognitive function accompanied by improvement of hippocampal neurogenesis and increases in antioxidant capacity. Stressed mice were exposed to chronic restraint stress (CRS), which consisted of 12h immobilization daily and feeding in a small cage, for 8 weeks. Exercised mice were allowed free access to a running wheel during their exposure to CRS. At the 6th week, cognitive function was examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Daily voluntary exercise restored stress-induced impairment of cognitive function and the hippocampal cell proliferation of newborn cells but not cell survival. Voluntary exercise increased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) protein and mRNA expression in the cerebral cortex and liver, respectively. In addition, CRS resulted in a significant increase in the number of 4-hydrosynonenal (4-HNE)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus; whereas, voluntary exercise inhibited it and enhanced glutathione s-transferases (GST) activity in the brain. These findings suggest that voluntary exercise attenuated the stress-induced impairment of cognitive function accompanied by improvement of cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus. This exercise-induced improvement was attributed to exercise-induced enhancement of IGF-1 protein and GST activity in the brain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions for intermediate-energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yamano, Naoki; Fukahori, Tokio

    1998-11-01

    The present status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to total reaction cross section, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section, double-differential particle production cross section, isotope production cross section, and activation cross section. (author)

  17. Experimental headache in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1995-01-01

    The need for valid human experimental models of headache is obvious. Several compounds have been proposed as headache-inducing agents, but only the nitroglycerin (NTG) model has been validated. In healthy subjects, intravenous infusions of the nitric oxide (NO) donor NTG induce a dose......-dependent headache and dilatation of the temporal, radial and middle cerebral artery. NTG-induced headache, although less intense, resembles migraine in pain characteristics, but the accompanying symptoms are rarely present. Cephalic large arteries are dilated during migraine headache as well as during NTG headache....... N-acetylcysteine enhances the formation of NO and potentiates NTG-induced headache, whereas mepyramine, a H1-antagonist capable of blocking histamine-induced headache, has no effect. Thus, the headache is dependent on NO or other steps in the NO cascade. The model is useful for pharmacological...

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Shock-Induced Reactions in Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Jeffrey J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohl, Ian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knepper, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farrow, Darcie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tappan, Alexander S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this work, shock-induced reactions in high explosives and their chemical mechanisms were investigated using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Experimentally, ultrafast shock interrogation (USI, an ultrafast interferometry technique) and ultrafast absorption spectroscopy were used to interrogate shock compression and initiation of reaction on the picosecond timescale. The experiments yielded important new data that appear to indicate reaction of high explosives on the timescale of tens of picoseconds in response to shock compression, potentially setting new upper limits on the timescale of reaction. Theoretically, chemical mechanisms of shock-induced reactions were investigated using density functional theory. The calculations generated important insights regarding the ability of several hypothesized mechanisms to account for shock-induced reactions in explosive materials. The results of this work constitute significant advances in our understanding of the fundamental chemical reaction mechanisms that control explosive sensitivity and initiation of detonation.

  19. 17-AAG post-treatment ameliorates memory impairment and hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death induced by transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiong; Yang, Fei; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Rongrong; Xing, Xiangfeng; Qin, Xinyue

    2015-06-12

    Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in global cerebral ischemia (GCI). The 72-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) has been reported to be involved in the inflammatory response of many central nervous system diseases. Preclinical findings implicate that 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an anticancer drug in clinical, provide neuroprotection actions in a rat model of traumatic brain injury, and the beneficial effects of 17-AAG were specifically due to up-regulation of Hsp70. However, no experiments have tested whether 17-AAG has beneficial or harmful effects in the setting of GCI. The present study was designed to determine the hypothesis that administration of 17-AAG could attenuate cerebral infarction and improve neuronal survival, thereby ameliorating memory impairment in a rat model of GCI. Furthermore, to test whether any neuroprotective effect of 17-AAG was associated with inflammatory response and neuronal autophagy, we examined the expression of multiplex inflammatory cytokine levels as well as autophagy-associate protein in hippocampal CA1 of rat brain. Our results showed that post-GCI administration of 17-AAG significantly protected rats against GCI induced brain injury, and 17-AAG is also an effective antagonist of the inflammatory response and thereby ameliorates hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death. We therefore believe that the present study provides novel clues in understanding the mechanisms by which 17-AAG exerts its neuroprotective activity in GCI. All data reveal that 17-AAG might be a potential neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xue Dong

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke.Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger's test were obtained to detect publication bias.We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate.This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA.

  1. Nrdp1 Increases Ischemia Induced Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons and Pheochromocytoma Cells Apoptosis Via Downregulation of HIF-1α Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for degradation and regulates cell growth, apoptosis and oxidative stress in various cell types. We have previously shown that Nrdp1 is implicated in ischemic cardiomyocyte death. In this study, we investigated the change of Nrdp1 expression in ischemic neurons and its role in ischemic neuronal injury. Primary rat cerebral cortical neurons and pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells were infected with adenoviral constructs expressing Nrdp1 gene or its siRNA before exposing to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD treatment. Our data showed that Nrdp1 was upregulated in ischemic brain tissue 3 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and in OGD-treated neurons. Of note, Nrdp1 overexpression by Ad-Nrdp1 enhanced OGD-induced neuron apoptosis, while knockdown of Nrdp1 with siRNA attenuated this effect, implicating a role of Nrdp1 in ischemic neuron injury. Moreover, Nrdp1 upregulation is accompanied by increased protein ubiquitylation and decreased protein levels of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8 in OGD-treated neurons, which led to a suppressed interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and subsequently a reduction in HIF-1α protein accumulation in neurons under OGD conditions. In conclusion, our data support an important role of Nrdp1 upregulation in ischemic neuronal death, and suppressing the interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and consequently the hypoxic adaptive response of neurons may account for this detrimental effect.

  2. Differential effects of experimental and cold-induced hyperthyroidism on factors inducing rat liver oxidative damage

    OpenAIRE

    Venditti, Paola; Pamplona Gras, Reinald; Ayala, Victoria; Rosa, R. de; Caldarone, G.; Di Meo, S.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid hormone-induced increase in metabolic rates is often associated with increased oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of iodothyronines to liver oxidative stress in the functional hyperthyroidism elicited by cold, using as models cold-exposed and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T-3)- or thyroxine (T-4)-treated rats. The hyperthyroid state was always associated with increases in both oxidative capacity and oxidative damage of the tissue. The most ex...

  3. Protective effects of ebselen on sodium-selenite-induced experimental cataract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Orhan; Güler, Mete; Kaya, Mehmet Kaan; Deniz, Nurettin; Üstündağ, Bilal

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether ebselen has a protective effect or antioxidative potential in a sodium-selenite-induced experimental cataract model. Fırat University, Elazığ, Turkey. Experimental study. Twenty-one Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into a control group, a sodium-selenite-induced-cataract group, and an ebselen-treated group; each group contained 7 rat pups. Rats in the control group received dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) intraperitoneally only and rats in the sodium-selenite-induced-cataract group received 30 nmol/g body weight sodium selenite subcutaneously and DMSO intraperitoneally 10 days postpartum. Rats in the ebselen group received 30 nmol/g body weight sodium selenite subcutaneously 10 days postpartum and were treated with 5 mg/kg body weight ebselen once a day for 4 consecutive days. Cataract development was assessed weekly for 3 weeks by slitlamp examination and graded using a scale. Reduced glutathione (GSH), total nitrite, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in lens supernatants were measured at the end of 3 weeks. In the control group, all lenses were clear. In the ebselen-treated group, the mean cataract stage was significantly lower than in the sodium-selenite-induced-cataract group (P = .022). The GSH levels were significantly lower in the sodium-selenite-induced-cataract group than in the control and ebselen groups (P ebselen group than in the sodium-selenite-induced-cataract group (P ebselen group (P = .001). Ebselen had a protective effect on cataract development in a sodium-selenite-induced experimental model. The protective effect of ebselen appears to be due to inhibition of oxidative stress. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of preferred music genre selection versus preferred song selection on experimentally induced anxiety levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Darcy DeLoach

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences of experimentally induced anxiety levels reached by subjects listening to no music (n = 30), subjects listening to music selected by the experimenter from the subject's preferred genre or artist listed as relaxing (n = 30), and subjects listening to a specific song they listed as relaxing (n = 30). Subjects consisted of 90 individuals, male and female, randomly assigned to one of the three groups mentioned above. Subjects in either music group filled out a questionnaire prior to participating in the study indicating their preference of music used for relaxation purposes. Subjects in Experimental Group 1 marked their preferred genres and/or artists, and Experimental Group 2 marked specific songs used for relaxation purposes. While the experimenter hypothesized subjects in Experimental Group 2 would show less anxiety than both the control group and Experimental Group 1, there were no significant differences found between the 2 music groups in anxiety levels reached. However, there was a statistically significant difference between the no music control group and both music groups in the anxiety level reached by subjects. Subjects listening to music, both songs chosen by the experimenter and subject selected songs, showed significantly less anxiety than subjects not listening to music.

  5. ''Ecstasy''-induced changes of cerebral glucose metabolism and their correlation to acute psychopathology. A 18-FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckenberger, M.; Sabri, O.; Arning, C.; Zimny, M.; Zeggel, T.; Wagenknecht, G.; Kaiser, H.J.; Buell, U.; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E.; Sass, H.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute effects of the 'Ecstasy' analogue MDE (3,4-methylene dioxyethamphetamine) on cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers and to correlate neurometabolism with acute psychopathology. In a radomized double-blind trial, 15 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) 110-120 min after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n=7) or placebo (n=8). Two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, constant cognitive stimulation was started and maintained for 32 min using a word repetition paradigm to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral glucose uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using T1-weighted 3D flash magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), followed by manual regionalization into 108 regions of interest and PET/MRI overlay. After absolute quantification of rMR-Glu and normalization to global metabolism, normalized rMRGlu under MDE was compared to placebo using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Acute psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and rMRGlu was correlated to PANSS scores according to Spearman. MDE subjects showed significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: left frontal posterior (-7.1%, P<0.05) and right prefrontal superior (-4.6%, P<0.05). On the other hand, rMR-Glu was significantly increased in the bilateral cerebellum (right: +10.1%, P<0.05; left: +7.6%, P<0.05) and in the right putamen (+6.2%, P<0.05). There were positive correlations between rMRGlu in the middle right cingulate and grandiosity (r=0.87; P<0.05), both the right amygadala (r=0.90, P<0.01) and the left posterior cingulate (r=0.90, P<0.01) to difficulties in abstract thinking, and the right frontal inferior (r=0.85, P<0.05), right anterior cingulate (r=0.93, P<0.01), and left anterior cingulate (r=0.85, P<0.05) to attentional deficits. A negative

  6. Cerebral oxygenation is reduced during hyperthermic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Volianitis, S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension (P(mito)O(2)) is elevated during moderate exercise, while it is reduced when exercise becomes strenuous, reflecting an elevated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)) combined with hyperventilation-induced attenuation of cerebral blood flo...

  7. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between dopamine D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats. Methods: Hemi-Parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, apomorphine (Apo) which could induce the successful model rat to rotate toward the intact side was used to select the rat models, 125 I-IBZM in vivo autoradiography and 99 Tc m -HMPAO regional cerebral biodistribution analysis were used to study D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD was used to measure striatum DA and its metabolite content . Results: the lesioned side striatum DA and its metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) 3,4-dihyroxy-phenylacetic acid (DOPAC) reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated group, striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 +- 0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-Parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (P 0.05). Conclusions: the 6-OH-DA lesioned side DA content decreased significantly and thus induced a compensative up-regulation of striatum D 2 receptor binding sites in hemi-Parkinsonism rats, which show good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Comparing with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-Parkinsonism

  8. Changes in the regional cerebral blood flow after drug-induced blood-pressure reduction in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kiyoshi; Sato, Naoya; Konno, Hiromu; Iwabuchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Kanaya, Haruyuki.

    1993-01-01

    In patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages, changes in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after drug-induced blood-pressure reduction were examined by means of subtraction SPECT. The subjects were 38 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages; 22 were putaminal hemorrhages (mean age, 56.8 years; mean hematoma volume, 18.4 cc), while 16 were thalamic hemorrhages (mean age, 61.9 years; mean hematoma volume, 7.8 cc). The rCBF was measured by means of SPECT (Tomomatic 64) with 133 Xe inhalation. Trimethaphan (an autonomic ganglion blocker) and diltiazem hydrochloride (a calcium antagonist) were used for the reduction of the blood pressure. The results were as follows: In the acute stage, the mean CBF was reduced when the blood pressure fell by more than 20% in both the putaminal hemorrhages and the thalamic hemorrhages. A similar tendency was observed in the subacute stage, except that a greater reduction in the blood pressure was needed to induce mean CBF reduction. The subtraction of rCBF maps before and after hypotension treatment shows a reduction of the rCBF in the lateral region of hematoma and the contralateral hemisphere. (author)

  9. Bushen Huoxue Attenuates Diabetes-Induced Cognitive Impairment by Improvement of Cerebral Microcirculation: Involvement of RhoA/ROCK/moesin and Src Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM is closely correlated with cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative disease. Bushen Huoxue (BSHX is a compound Chinese medicine used clinically to treat diabetes-induced cognitive impairment. However, its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, KKAy mice, a genetic model of type 2 diabetes with obesity and insulin resistant hyperglycemia, received a daily administration of BSHX for 12 weeks. Blood glucose was measured every 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, BSHX treatment significantly ameliorated the T2DM related insults, including the increased blood glucose, the impaired spatial memory, decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF, occurrence of albumin leakage, leukocyte adhesion and opening capillary rarefaction. Meanwhile, the downregulation of the tight junction proteins (TJ claudin-5, occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1 and JAM-1 between endothelial cells, amyloid-β (Aβ accumulation in hippocampus, increased AGEs and RAGE, and expression of RhoA/ROCK/moesin signaling pathway and phosphorylation of Src kinase in KKAy mice were significantly protected by BSHX treatment. These results indicate that the protective effect of BSHX on T2DM-induced cognitive impairment involves regulation of RhoA/ROCK1/moesin signaling pathway and phosphorylation of Src kinase.

  10. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  11. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  12. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  13. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, Pgingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  14. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor

  15. Microbiological profile and calprotectin expression in naturally occurring and experimentally induced gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Roberto; Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the microbiological profile and the calprotectin expression in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in spontaneous and experimentally induced gingival inflammation. Thirty-seven periodontally healthy subjects were evaluated in real life conditions (N-O gingivitis) as well as after 21 days of experimental gingivitis trial (E-I gingivitis). During the experimental gingivitis trial, in one maxillary quadrant (test quadrant), gingival inflammation was induced by oral hygiene abstention, while in the contralateral (control) quadrant, oral hygiene was routinely continued. The results of the study showed that (1) the microbiological profile of quadrants where gingival inflammation was experimentally induced (i.e., E-I test quadrants) differed significantly from that of either quadrants where gingival inflammation was controlled by proper plaque control (i.e., E-I control quadrants) or quadrants with N-O gingivitis, and (2) GCF calprotectin was significantly higher at E-I test quadrants compared to either E-I control quadrants or quadrants with N-O gingivitis. A positive intrasubject correlation was found between GCF concentration of calprotectin at sites presenting N-O and E-I gingivitis. N-O and E-I gingivitis showed a different microbiological profile of the subgingival environment. GCF calprotectin is a reliable marker of gingival inflammation, and its concentration in N-O gingivitis is correlated with its expression in E-I gingivitis. The modality of plaque accumulation seems to affect the subgingival microbiological profile associated with a gingivitis condition. Calprotectin levels in GCF may be regarded as a promising marker of the individual susceptibility to develop gingival inflammation in response to experimentally induced plaque accumulation.

  16. Activity and milk compositional changes following experimentally induced Streptococcus uberis bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, H J; Sorter, D E; Hogan, J S

    2015-02-01

    Milk constituents and physical activity of cows experimentally infected with Streptococcus uberis mastitis were compared with those of uninfected cows. Twelve late-lactation Holsteins cows were paired based on milk production and parity. One cow in each pair was experimentally infected in the right front mammary gland with Strep. uberis. The remaining cow in each pair served as an uninfected control. Real-time analyses of milk constituents provided fat, protein, and lactose percentages at each milking. Pedometers were placed on the left front leg of all cows and activity was measured. Intramammary infections with Strep. uberis reduced milk yield in experimental cows by approximately 1.6kg/d in the first week after challenge compared with control cows. Lactose percentage in milk was reduced on d 3, 4, 5, and 6 after challenge in treatment cows compared with controls. Percentages of fat and protein in milk did not differ between infected and uninfected cows the week after infections were induced. Total steps per day were reduced and minutes resting per day were increased the week after experimental challenge in infected cows compared with control cows. The number of resting bouts did not differ between infected and uninfected cows. Changes in percentage of lactose in milk and animal activity caused by experimentally induced Strep. uberis mastitis were detected by the automated milk analyzer and pedometer systems. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dominguez

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined.We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO.Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease.

  18. Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of experimentally induced arthritis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatter, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the hind paws of rats was performed at 1.5 Tesla before and during the course of an experimentally-induced inflammatory arthritis. Arthritis was induced by daily subcutaneous administration of 6-sulfanilamidoindazole, an antibacterial sulfa known to produce an acute, self-limited arthritis and periarthritis in the hind paws of rats. Phosphorus-31 spectra obtained after the development of clinical arthritis showed a significant (p 31 P MRS may permit evaluation of the severity of an inflammatory arthritis with greater accuracy than the bony changes definable by plain roentgenograms. (orig.)

  19. Anti-glaucoma potential of Heliotropium indicum Linn in experimentally-induced glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Ramkissoon, Paul; Owusu-Afriyie, Osei

    2015-01-01

    Background Heliotropium indicum is used as a traditional remedy for hypertension in Ghana. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-glaucoma potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of H. indicum to manage experimentally-induced glaucoma. Methods The percentage change in intraocular pressure (IOP), after inducing acute glaucoma (15 mLkg?1 of 5?% dextrose, i.v.), in New Zealand White rabbits pretreated with Heliotropium indicum aqueous extract (HIE) (30?300 mgkg?1), acetazolamide (5 mg...

  20. Functional magnetic resonances imaging of psychological functions with experimentally induced emotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodd, W.; Schneider, F.; Klose, U.; Naegele, T.

    1995-01-01

    In this study a T 2 * FLASH sequence (TR 240 ms, TE 60 ms, slice thickness 4 mm, α=40 , matrix 64x128) was used to investigate changes in signal intensity within the temporal lobe and the amygdala during experimentally induced emotions. Visual stimuli of happy [sad] facial portraits were presented to volunteers to induce changes in the subjects' mood while lying in the tomograph. In agreement with a previous PET study, a significant increase in signal intensity in the left amygdala was found during induction of a sad mood, while no comparable effect was visible during induction of a happy mood. (orig.) [de

  1. Enterprise stenting for intracranial aneurysm treatment induces dynamic and reversible age-dependent stenosis in cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bulang; Safain, Mina G; Malek, Adel M

    2015-04-01

    Although intracranial stenting has been associated with in-stent stenosis, the vascular response of cerebral vessels to the deployment of the Enterprise vascular reconstruction device is poorly defined. To evaluate the change in parent vessel caliber that ensues after Enterprise stent placement. Seventy-seven patients with 88 aneurysms were treated using Enterprise stent-assisted coil embolization and underwent high-resolution three-dimensional rotational angiography followed by three-dimensional edge-detection filtering to remove windowing-dependence measurement artifact. Orthogonal diameters and cross-sectional areas (CSAs) were measured proximal and distal on either side of the leading stent edge (points A, B), trailing stent edge (points D, E), and at mid-stent (point C). Enterprise stent deployment caused an instant increase in the parent artery CSA by 8.98% at D, which was followed 4-6 months later by significant in-stent stenosis (15.78% at A, 27.24% at B, 10.68% at C, 32.12% at D, and 28.28% at E) in the stented artery. This time-dependent phenomenon showed resolution which was complete by 12-24 months after treatment. This target vessel stenosis showed significant age dependence with greater response in the young. No flow-limiting stenosis requiring treatment was observed in this series. Use of the Enterprise stent is associated with a significant dynamic and spontaneously resolvable age-dependent in-stent stenosis. Further study is warranted on the clinical impact, if any, of this occurrence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Voluntary suppression of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation mitigates the reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Ikebe, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-15

    Hyperthermia during prolonged exercise leads to hyperventilation, which can reduce arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 ) and, in turn, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thermoregulatory response. We investigated 1) whether humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise and 2) the effects of voluntary breathing control on PaCO2 , CBF, sweating, and skin blood flow. Twelve male subjects performed two exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C, 50% relative humidity) for up to 60 min. Throughout the exercise, subjects breathed normally (normal-breathing trial) or they tried to control their minute ventilation (respiratory frequency was timed with a metronome, and target tidal volumes were displayed on a monitor) to the level reached after 5 min of exercise (controlled-breathing trial). Plotting ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses against esophageal temperature (Tes) showed that minute ventilation increased linearly with rising Tes during normal breathing, whereas controlled breathing attenuated the increased ventilation (increase in minute ventilation from the onset of controlled breathing: 7.4 vs. 1.6 l/min at +1.1°C Tes; P flow velocity (MCAV) with rising Tes, but controlled breathing attenuated those reductions (estimated PaCO2 -3.4 vs. -0.8 mmHg; MCAV -10.4 vs. -3.9 cm/s at +1.1°C Tes; P = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively). Controlled breathing had no significant effect on chest sweating or forearm vascular conductance (P = 0.67 and 0.91, respectively). Our results indicate that humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise, and this suppression mitigates changes in PaCO2 and CBF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  4. Ethanol induces cell-cycle activity and reduces stem cell diversity to alter both regenerative capacity and differentiation potential of cerebral cortical neuroepithelial precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingling Joseph D

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fetal cortical neuroepithelium is a mosaic of distinct progenitor populations that elaborate diverse cellular fates. Ethanol induces apoptosis and interferes with the survival of differentiating neurons. However, we know little about ethanol's effects on neuronal progenitors. We therefore exposed neurosphere cultures from fetal rat cerebral cortex, to varying ethanol concentrations, to examine the impact of ethanol on stem cell fate. Results Ethanol promoted cell cycle progression, increased neurosphere number and increased diversity in neurosphere size, without inducing apoptosis. Unlike controls, dissociated cortical progenitors exposed to ethanol exhibited morphological evidence for asymmetric cell division, and cells derived from ethanol pre-treated neurospheres exhibited decreased proliferation capacity. Ethanol significantly reduced the numbers of cells expressing the stem cell markers CD117, CD133, Sca-1 and ABCG2, without decreasing nestin expression. Furthermore, ethanol-induced neurosphere proliferation was not accompanied by a commensurate increase in telomerase activity. Finally, cells derived from ethanol-pretreated neurospheres exhibited decreased differentiation in response to retinoic acid. Conclusion The reduction in stem cell number along with a transient ethanol-driven increase in cell proliferation, suggests that ethanol promotes stem to blast cell maturation, ultimately depleting the reserve proliferation capacity of neuroepithelial cells. However, the lack of a concomitant change in telomerase activity suggests that neuroepithelial maturation is accompanied by an increased potential for genomic instability. Finally, the cellular phenotype that emerges from ethanol pre-treated, stem cell depleted neurospheres is refractory to additional differentiation stimuli, suggesting that ethanol exposure ablates or delays subsequent neuronal differentiation.

  5. Deficiency of superoxide dismutase promotes cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dayal

    Full Text Available There is an emerging consensus that hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral vascular disease and that homocysteine-lowering therapy protects from ischemic stroke. However, the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia produces abnormalities of cerebral vascular structure and function remain largely undefined. Our objective in this study was to define the mechanistic role of superoxide in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced cerebral vascular dysfunction and hypertrophy. Unlike previous studies, our experimental design included a genetic approach to alter superoxide levels by using superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-deficient mice fed a high methionine/low folate diet to produce hyperhomocysteinemia. In wild-type mice, the hyperhomocysteinemic diet caused elevated superoxide levels and impaired responses to endothelium-dependent vasodilators in cerebral arterioles, and SOD1 deficiency compounded the severity of these effects. The cross-sectional area of the pial arteriolar wall was markedly increased in mice with SOD1 deficiency, and the hyperhomocysteinemic diet sensitized SOD1-deficient mice to this hypertrophic effect. Analysis of individual components of the vascular wall demonstrated a significant increase in the content of smooth muscle and elastin. We conclude that superoxide is a key driver of both cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vasomotor dysfunction in this model of dietary hyperhomocysteinemia. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia promotes cerebral vascular disease and ischemic stroke.

  6. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation

  7. Trust and Cheating in Sri Lanka: The Role of Experimentally-Induced Emotions about Tsunam

    OpenAIRE

    Pierluigi Conzo

    2014-01-01

    Through a field experiment in Sri Lanka I analyze the role of experimentally-induced memories of 2004 tsunami on behavior in a trust game in which personal notions of cheating are elicited. Microfinance borrowers were randomly assigned to a treatment (control) group consisting in watching a video about the calamity before (after) playing. Trust game participants were asked how much to receive (return) in order not to (make the counterpart) feel cheated; in a survey they selected whether the v...

  8. Changes in thermal nociceptive responses in dairy cows following experimentally induced Esherichia coli mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditte B.; Fogsgaard, Katrine; Røntved, Christine Maria

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is a high incidence disease in dairy cows. The acute stage is considered painful and inflammation can lead to hyperalgesia and thereby contribute to decreased welfare. The aim of this study was to examine changes in nociceptive responses toward cutaneous nociceptive laser stimulation (NLS......) in dairy cows with experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis, and correlate behavioral changes in nociceptive responses to clinical and paraclinical variables....

  9. Experimentally induced spermatophore production and immune responses reveal a trade-off in crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Angela M. Kerr; Susan N. Gershman; Scott K. Sakaluk

    2010-01-01

    The energetic demands of the immune system and reproduction are often high and can lead to trade-offs between these 2 life-history traits. In decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus, much of a male's reproductive effort is devoted to calling, and to the synthesis of a spermatophylax, a large, gelatinous, non--sperm-containing mass forming part of the spermatophore and consumed by the female after mating. We employed a reciprocal design in which we experimentally induced an immune response in...

  10. Experimental realization of an on-chip all-optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianfan; Sandhu, Sunil; Povinelli, Michelle L; Shakya, Jagat; Fan, Shanhui; Lipson, Michal

    2006-03-31

    We provide the first experimental observation of structure tuning of the electromagnetically induced transparency-like spectrum in integrated on-chip optical resonator systems. The system consists of coupled silicon ring resonators with 10 microm diameter on silicon, where the coherent interference between the two coupled resonators is tuned. We measured a transparency-resonance mode with a quality factor of 11,800.

  11. Cerebrovascular endothelin-1 hyper-reactivity is associated with transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 activation and delayed cerebral hypoperfusion after forebrain ischaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, S E; Andersen, X E D R; Hansen, R H

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: Experimental forebrain ischaemia was induced in Wistar male rats by a two-vessel occlusion model, and the cerebral blood flow was measured by magnetic resonance imaging two days after reperfusion. In vitro vasoreactivity studies, immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR were performed on cerebral...... in the vascular smooth muscle cells was enhanced and correlated with decreased cerebral blood flow two days after forebrain ischaemia. Furthermore, under conditions when voltage-dependent calcium channels were inhibited, endothelin-1-induced cerebrovascular contraction was enhanced and this enhancement...... was presumably mediated by Ca(2+) influx via upregulated transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrates that endothelin-1-mediated influx of extracellular Ca(2+) activates transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells...

  12. Attenuated flow‐induced dilatation of middle cerebral arteries is related to increased vascular oxidative stress in rats on a short‐term high salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosic, Anita; Jukic, Ivana; Stupin, Ana; Mihalj, Martina; Mihaljevic, Zrinka; Novak, Sanja; Vukovic, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Key points Recent studies have shown that high salt (HS) intake leads to endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in different vascular beds in both animal and human models, due to increased oxidative stress.The objective of this study was to assess vascular response to flow‐induced dilatation (FID) and to elucidate the role of vascular oxidative stress/antioxidative capacity in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) of HS‐fed rats in vitro.The novelty of this study is in demonstrating impaired flow‐induced dilatation of MCAs and down‐regulation of vascular antioxidant genes with HS intake, leading to increased levels of oxidative stress in blood vessels and peripheral lymph organs, which together contribute to impaired FID.In addition, results show increased oxidative stress in leukocytes of peripheral lymph organs, suggesting the occurrence of inflammatory processes due to HS intake.Recirculation of leukocytes might additionally increase vascular oxidative stress in vivo. Abstract The aim of this study was to determine flow‐induced dilatation (FID) and the role of oxidative stress/antioxidative capacity in isolated, pressurized middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) of high salt (HS)‐fed rats. Healthy male Sprague‐Dawley rats (11 weeks old) were fed low salt (0.4% NaCl; LS group) or high salt (4% NaCl; HS group) diets for 1 week. Reactivity of MCAs in response to stepwise increases in pressure gradient (Δ10–Δ100 mmHg) was determined in the absence or presence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic TEMPOL and/or the nitric oxide synthases (NOS) inhibitor N ω‐nitro‐l‐arginine methyl ester (l‐name). mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, NAPDH‐oxidase components, inducible (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthases (eNOS) were determined by quantitative real‐time PCR. Blood pressure (BP), antioxidant enzymes activity, oxidative stress in peripheral leukocytes, lipid peroxidation products and the antioxidant capacity of plasma

  13. Differential effects of experimental and cold-induced hyperthyroidism on factors inducing rat liver oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, P; Pamplona, R; Ayala, V; De Rosa, R; Caldarone, G; Di Meo, S

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid hormone-induced increase in metabolic rates is often associated with increased oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of iodothyronines to liver oxidative stress in the functional hyperthyroidism elicited by cold, using as models cold-exposed and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3)- or thyroxine (T4)-treated rats. The hyperthyroid state was always associated with increases in both oxidative capacity and oxidative damage of the tissue. The most extensive damage to lipids and proteins was found in T3-treated and cold-exposed rats, respectively. Increase in oxygen reactive species released by mitochondria and microsomes was found to contribute to tissue oxidative damage, whereas the determination of single antioxidants did not provide information about the possible contribution of a reduced effectiveness of the antioxidant defence system. Indeed, liver oxidative damage in hyperthyroid rats was scarcely related to levels of the liposoluble antioxidants and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Conversely, other biochemical changes, such as the degree of fatty acid unsaturation and hemoprotein content, appeared to predispose hepatic tissue to oxidative damage associated with oxidative challenge elicited by hyperthyroid state. As a whole, our results confirm the idea that T3 plays a key role in metabolic changes and oxidative damage found in cold liver. However, only data concerning changes in glutathione peroxidase activity and mitochondrial protein content favour the idea that dissimilarities in effects of cold exposure and T3 treatment could depend on differences in serum levels of T4.

  14. Acute pulmonary injury induced by experimental muscle trauma Lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por trauma muscular experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Andréa da Silva Carvalho Sombra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an easily reproducible model of acute lung injury due to experimental muscle trauma in healthy rats. METHODS: Eighteen adult Wistar rats were randomized in 3 groups (n=6: G-1- control, G-2 - saline+trauma and G-3 - dexamethasone+trauma. Groups G-1 and G-2 were treated with saline 2,0ml i.p; G-3 rats were treated with dexamethasone (DE (2 mg/kg body weight i.p.. Saline and DE were applied 2h before trauma and 12h later. Trauma was induced in G-2 and G-3 anesthetized (tribromoethanol 97% 100 ml/kg i.p. rats by sharp section of anterior thigh muscles just above the knee, preserving major vessels and nerves. Tissue samples (lung were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO assay and histopathological evaluation. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours after muscle injury there was a significant increase in lung neutrophil infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and edema, all reversed by dexamethasone in G-3. CONCLUSION: Trauma by severance of thigh muscles in healthy rats is a simple and efficient model to induce distant lung lesions.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo facilmente reprodutível de lesão pulmonar aguda decorrente de trauma muscular experimental em ratos sadios. MÉTODOS: Dezoito ratos Wistar adultos foram randomizados em 3 grupos (n=6: G-1-controle, G-2 - trauma+salina e G-3 - trauma+dexametasona. Grupos G-1 e G-2 foram tratados com salina 2,0 ml ip, G-3 ratos foram tratados com dexametasona (DE (2 mg/kg peso corporal ip. Salina e DE foram aplicadas 2h antes e 12h depois do trauma. Trauma foi induzido em ratos G-2 e G-3 anestesiados (tribromoetanol 97% de 100 ml/kg, i.p. por secção da musculatura anterior da coxa logo acima da articulação do joelho, preservando os grandes vasos e nervos. Amostras de tecido (pulmão foram coletadas para avaliação da mieloperoxidase (MPO, e exames histopatológicos. RESULTADOS: Vinte e quatro horas após a indução da lesão muscular houve um aumento significativo na infiltração de neutr

  15. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The relevance of cytokines in the radiation-induced lung reaction. Experimental basis and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, C.E.; Ruebe, C.; Rodemann, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Methods: published data on radiation-induced cytokine expression from experimental and clinical studies are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the major pro-inflammatory cytokines in the radiation response of the lung include tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) appears to be of particular importance in the development of lung fibrosis. First approaches with radioprotective agents and gene therapy to modify radiation-induced cytokine expression have been investigated for prevention of late effects of irradiation lung damage in animal experiments. Preliminary data of clinical studies suggest that elevated plasma TGF-β-levels during radiotherapy may predict the development of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. The biological impacts of endogenous radiation-induced cytokine production by tumor cells in respect of tumor behavior, potential damage to normal tissue, and clinical status of the host still need to be determined more precisely. (orig.)

  17. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-01-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased. - Highlights: ► Experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood were γ-irradiated at two dose rates. ► Changes induced by γ-irradiation were evaluated by vibrational spectroscopy. ► Minor spectral variations of painted layer were observed. ► Raw sienna FTIR spectra showed little changes of egg yolk and lipids at higher dose rate. ► Gamma irradiation is recommended for disinfection of painted wooden artifacts.

  18. Role of GluR2 expression in AMPA-induced toxicity in cultured murine cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jette Bisgaard; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Timmermann, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    of the Mg(2+) block of the NMDA receptor on AMPA-R stimulation. The involvement of Ca(2+) influx through AMPA-R was also examined. The number of neurons possessing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R increased during culture development, concurrently with an increasing susceptibility for AMPA-induced toxicity during...

  19. Ethanol activation of protein kinase A regulates GABA-A receptor subunit expression in the cerebral cortex and contributes to ethanol-induced hypnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep eKumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are implicated in neuronal cell functions such as modulation of ion channel function, trafficking and synaptic excitability. Both protein kinase C (PKC and A (PKA are involved in regulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A receptors through phosphorylation. However, the role of PKA in regulating GABA-A receptors following acute ethanol exposure is not known. The present study investigated the role of PKA in ethanol effects on GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression in the P2 synaptosomal fraction of the rat cerebral cortex. Additionally, GABA-related behaviors were also examined. Rats were administered ethanol (2.0 – 3.5 g/kg or saline and PKC, PKA and GABA-A receptor α1 subunit levels were measured by Western blot analysis. Ethanol (3.5 g/kg transiently increased GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression and PKA RIIβ subunit expression at similar time points whereas PKA RIIα was increased at later time points. In contrast, PKC isoform expression remained unchanged. Notably, the moderate ethanol dose (2.0g/kg had no effect on GABA-A α1 subunit levels although PKA RIIα and RIIβ were increased at 10 and 60 minutes, when PKC isozymes are also known to be elevated. To determine if PKA activation was responsible for the ethanol-induced elevation of GABA-A α1 subunits, the PKA antagonist H89 was administered to rats prior to ethanol exposure. H89 administration prevented ethanol-induced increases in GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression. Moreover, increasing PKA activity intracerebroventricularly with Sp-cAMP prior to a hypnotic dose of ethanol increased ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex duration. This effect appears to be mediated in part by GABA-A receptors as increasing PKA activity also increased the duration of muscimol-induced loss of righting reflex. Overall these data suggest that PKA mediates ethanol-induced GABA-A receptor expression and contributes to ethanol behavioral effects involving GABA-A receptors.

  20. Experimentally induced mastitis and metritis modulate soy bean derived isoflavone biotransformation in diary cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Zieba, I; Woclawek-Potocka, I; Piskula, M K; Piotrowska-Tomala, K K; Boruszewska, D; Bah, M M; Siemieniuch, M J; Skarzynski, D J

    2011-12-01

    The present study compared the changes in isoflavone (daidzein and genistein) and their metabolite (equol and para-ethyl-phenol) concentrations in the blood plasma of cows with induced mastitis and metritis after feeding with soy bean. Sixteen cows were divided into four groups: control for mastitis group, cows with induced mastitis group, control for metritis group, and cows with induced metritis group. All cows were fed a single dose of 2.5 kg of soy bean and then blood samples were taken from the jugular vein for 8 h at predetermined intervals. The concentrations of soy bean-derived isoflavones and their active metabolites were measured in the blood plasma on HPLC system. β-Glucuronidase activity in the blood plasma of cows was measured by fluorometric method. In the blood plasma of cows with induced mastitis and metritis, we found considerably higher concentrations and time-dependent increase in isoflavone metabolites (equol and para-ethyl-phenol) with reference to cyclic cows (P < 0.05). Moreover, we noticed significant decrease of genistein in the blood plasma of the cows with induced metritis compared with control cows (P < 0.05). In addition, in the blood plasma of the cows with induced metritis, we found an increase in β-glucuronidase activity compared with control cows (P < 0.05). In conclusion, health status of the females influenced the concentrations of isoflavone metabolites in the blood plasma of the cows. Experimentally induced mastitis and metritis increased isoflavone absorption, biotransformation and metabolism. Therefore, we suggest that cows with induced mastitis and metritis are more exposed to active isoflavone metabolite actions than healthy cows. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Regulation of microRNAs miR-30a and miR-143 in cerebral vasculature after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Holt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of translation and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, and suggested as possible prognostic biomarkers. Our aim was to identify miRNAs that are differentially regulated in cerebral...... arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), using a rat injection model of SAH and a qPCR-based screen of 728 rat miRNAs. Additionally, serum was analyzed for a possible spill-over to the circulation of regulated miRNAs from the vessel walls. RESULTS: We identified 482 different miRNAs expressed...

  2. La atorvastatina protege las neuronas gabérgicas y dopaminérgicas del sistema nigroestriatal en un modelo experimental de isquemia cerebral focal transitoria en ratas

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica María Sabogal; Cesar Augusto Arango; Gloria Patricia Cardona; Ángel Enrique Céspedes

    2014-01-01

    Introducción. La isquemia cerebral es la tercera causa de muerte y la primera de discapacidad permanente en el mundo. La atorvastatina es un fármaco neuroprotector prometedor para el tratamiento de la apoplejía; sin embargo, su acción sobre las poblaciones neuronales del sistema nigroestriatal después de la isquemia aún se desconoce. Objetivo. Evaluar el efecto de la atorvastatina sobre poblaciones gabérgicas y dopaminérgicas en regiones exofocales en un modelo de oclusión transitoria de ...

  3. The role of periodontal ASIC3 in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiya; Long, Hu; Ma, Wenqiang; Liao, Lina; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Shan, Di; Huang, Renhuan; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the roles of Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the experimental group (40g, n = 30) and the sham group (0g, n = 30). Closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary incisor and molars to achieve experimental tooth movement. Rat grimace scale (RGS) scores were assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the placement of the springs. ASIC3 immunostaining was performed and the expression levels of ASIC3 were measured through integrated optical density/area in Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Moreover, 18 rats were divided into APETx2 group (n = 6), amiloride group (n = 6), and vehicle group (n = 6), and RGS scores were obtained compared among them to verify the roles of ASIC3 in orofacial pain following tooth movement. ASIC3 expression levels became significantly higher in the experimental group than in sham group on 1, 3, and 5 days and became similar on 7 and 14 days. Pain levels (RGS scores) increased in both groups and were significantly higher in the experimental group on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days and were similar on 14 days. Periodontal ASIC3 expression levels were correlated with orofacial pain levels following experimental tooth movement. Periodontal administrations of ASIC3 antagonists (APETx2 and amiloride) could alleviate pain. This study needs to be better evidenced by RNA interference of ASIC3 in periodontal tissues in rats following experimental tooth movement. Moreover, we hope further studies would concentrate on the pain perception of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3 -/- ) mice. Our results suggest that periodontal ASIC3 plays an important role in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  5. Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Decotion induced protective autophagy against the injury of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via MAPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Ran; Wang, Jun-Song; Zhang, Chao; Song, Xing-Fang; Tian, Na; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2013-08-26

    Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Decotion (HLJDD, Hwangryun-Hae-Dok-Decotion in Japan), an ancient antipyretic and detoxifying traditional Chinese medicine formula, was reported to have protective effect on ischemic stroke. To investigate the therapeutic effect of HLJDD on ischemic stroke and explore its mode of action. A model of ischemic stroke in the rat was established after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. Rats were assigned randomly to groups of control, sham, transient ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and three treatment groups by HLJDD at 2.5, 5.0, 10.0mg/kg. The neurological deficit, the cerebral infarct size, morphology abnormality, biochemical parameters were examined, and the levels of relevant proteins were determined by immunoblotting analysis to evaluate the protective effects of HLJDD on ischemic stroke and explore the underlying mechanism. Compared with I/R group, HLJDD significantly ameliorated neurological deficit and histopathology changes, decreased infarct area, and restored the levels of biochemical indicators including nitric oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). HLJDD also notably elevated the levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), Beclin-1, and other autophagy related genes (Atgs), promoted the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), protein kinase B (Akt), 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase (PDK1), and inhibited the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases (JNK), p38, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). HLJDD showed neuroprotective effects on ischemic stroke, at least in part to the induced protective autophagy via the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals. This Akt-independent protective autophagy is favorable in the treatment of stroke, avoiding unfavorable side

  6. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testylier, Guy; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 μg/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N 2 O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures

  7. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I in cerebral cortex of immature rats following seizures induced by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ješina, P.; Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Drahota, Zdeněk; Haugvicová, Renata; Lisá, Věra; Pecinová, Alena; Houštěk, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 31, Suppl.1 (2008), s. 60-60 ISSN 0141-8955. [Annual Symposium of the Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism . 02.09.2008-05.09.2008, Lisboa] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * immature rats * homocysteic acid-induced seizures * mitochondrial complex I inhibition Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  8. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98 vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68 vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18 vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99 vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  9. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Electron microscopic study of spontaneous and experimentally induced leukemia in IRC mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, S.; Ranadive, K.J.; Dmochowski, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spontaneous, serially transplanted, and experimentally induced leukemias of ICRC mice were studied by electron microscopy in an attempt to detect the presence of virus particles, if any, and to observe the influence of chemical and hormonal treatment on the presence of these virus particles. The first series of experiments included spontaneous, serially transplanted, and radiation-induced leukemia. The paucity of type C virus particles was quite conspicuous in spontaneous leukemia. Serially transplanted and radiation-accelerated leukemic lesions showed the presence of some type C and intracisternal type A particles. Found in two of these leukemic lesions (thymus and lymphosarcoma), in addition to type C virus particles, were budding and some mature type B virus particles, and numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles. ''Viropexis'' of type B virus particles has been observed in the lymphosarcoma and in a leukemic thymus gland. The second series of experiments included leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice with 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA), pituitary transplants, and ovarian hormones (estradiol and estradiol-progesterone). In ovariectomized ICRC mice, leukemic lesions induced by MCA or pituitary transplants, or by MCA and pituitary transplants, showed type C virus particles and, in most cases, intracisternal type A particles. In leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice by MCA and estradiol, numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles were observed but no type C virus particles

  11. Effects of fisetin on hyperhomocysteinemia-induced experimental endothelial dysfunction and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanth Kumar, Boyina; Arun Reddy, Ravula; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Dinesh Kumar, B; Diwan, Prakash V

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of fisetin (FST) on hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-induced experimental endothelial dysfunction (ED) and vascular dementia (VaD) in rats. Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups: control, vehicle control, l-methionine, FST (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg, p.o.), FST-per se (25 mg/kg, p.o.), and donepezil (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.). l-Methionine administration (1.7 g/kg, p.o.) for 32 days induced HHcy. ED and VaD induced by HHcy were determined by vascular reactivity measurements, behavioral analysis using Morris water maze and Y-maze, along with a biochemical and histological evaluation of thoracic aorta and brain tissues. Administration of l-methionine developed behavioral deficits; triggered brain lipid peroxidation (LPO); compromised brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE); and reduced the levels of brain superoxide dismutase (SOD), brain catalase (CAT), brain reduced glutathione (GSH), and serum nitrite; and increased serum homocysteine and cholesterol levels. These effects were accompanied by decreased vascular NO bioavailability, marked intimal thickening of the aorta, and multiple necrotic foci in brain cortex. HHcy-induced alterations in the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH, AChE, LPO, behavioral deficits, ED, and histological aberrations were significantly attenuated by treatment with fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that fisetin exerts endothelial and neuroprotective effects against HHcy-induced ED and VaD.

  12. Recombinant human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit induces chronic experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, V A; Lambert, E H; Leiby, K R; Okarma, T B; Talib, S

    1991-04-01

    A synthetic gene encoding the 210 N-terminal residues of the alpha-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of human skeletal muscle was cloned into an inducible expression plasmid to produce a fusion protein in high yield in Escherichia coli. Like native human AChR, the recombinant human alpha 1-210 protein induced AChR-binding, AChR-modulating, and AChR-blocking autoantibodies in rats when injected once intradermally as an emulsion in CFA, with Bordetella pertussis vaccine as supplementary adjuvant. The minimum dose of recombinant protein required to induce biochemical signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) with 100% incidence was 2.2 micrograms. With 6.6 to 22 micrograms, serum levels of autoantibodies were persistent, and clinically apparent EAMG lasted more than a month. Clinical, electrophysiological, and biochemical indices of EAMG induced by doses of 66 micrograms or more were more uniformly severe and persistent, with 33% fatality. Rats receiving a control extract of E. coli containing plasmid without the alpha 1-210 codon insert, with adjuvants, did not develop autoantibodies or signs of EAMG. This highly reproducible new model of EAMG induced by a recombinant human autoantigen should be valuable for testing Ag-specific immunotherapeutic strategies that might be applicable to treating acquired myasthenia gravis in humans.

  13. Pattern differences in experimental fevers induced by endotoxin, endogenous pyrogen, and prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, A; Nakamori, T; Watanabe, T; Ono, T; Murakami, N

    1988-04-01

    To distinguish pattern differences in experimentally induced fevers, we investigated febrile responses induced by intravenous (IV), intracerebroventricular (ICV), and intra-preoptic/anterior hypothalamic (POA) administration of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), endogenous pyrogen (EP), human recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1), and prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha (PGE2 and PGF2 alpha). Intravenous LPS, EP, or IL-1 in high concentrations caused biphasic fever. In low concentrations, they induced only the first phase of fever. Latency to onset and time to first peak of fever induced by IV injection of LPS or EP were almost the same as those after ICV or POA injection of PGE2. Fever induced by ICV or POA administration of LPS, EP, IL-1, or PGF2 alpha had a long latency to onset and a prolonged time course. There were significant differences among the latencies to fever onset exhibited by groups that received ICV or POA injections of LPS, EP, or PGF2 alpha and by groups given IV injections of LPS or EP and ICV or POA injections of PGE2. Present observations indicate different patterns of fever produced by several kinds of pyrogens when given by various routes. These results permit us to consider the possibility that there are several mediators or multiprocesses underlying the pathogenesis of fever.

  14. [NRH2 induces cell apoptosis of cerebral tissues around hematomas after intracerebral hemorrhage through up-regulating proNGF, sortilin and p75NTR expressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiqing; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Di

    2015-04-01

    between ≤ 6 hours group and control group. In comparison with control group and ≤ 6 hours group, the expression levels of NRH2 and sortilin mRNAs and proteins and Bax expression started to increase in 6-24 hours, reached the peak in 24-72 hours, and then stayed a higher level after 72 hours, whereas there were no significant differences in the above indicators between ≤ 6 hours group and control group. There was no obvious change in Bcl-2 expression level between ≤ 6 hours group and control group. The level of Bcl-2 decreased in all groups of intracerebral hemorrhage for over 6 hours, and reached the nadir in 24-72 hours. Astrocytes transfected with NRH2 siRNA displayed a significant decrease in proNGF, sortilin and p75NTR protein levels as compared with scramble siRNA or blank control groups. The expression of NRH2 would increase in the cerebral tissues around hematomas after intracerebral hemorrhage. NRH2 might enhance the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 by promoting the expressions of proNGF, sortilin and p75NTR, thereby inducing brain cell apoptosis.

  15. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced impairment of Aβ clearance requires HB-EGF-dependent sequential activation of HIF1α and MMP9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Raza, Waseem; Pandey, Rukmani; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2016-11-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) manifests Alzheimer's Disease (AD) neuropathology, marked by increased amyloid beta (Aβ). Besides, hypoxia stimulates Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) mRNA expression in the hippocampus. However, involvement of HB-EGF in CCH-induced Aβ pathology remains unidentified. Here, using Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion mouse model, we explored the mechanism of HB-EGF regulated Aβ induction in CCH. We found that HB-EGF inhibition suppressed, while exogenous-HB-EGF triggered hippocampal Aβ, proving HB-EGF-dependent Aβ increase. We also detected that HB-EGF affected the expression of primary Aβ transporters, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1), indicating impaired Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). An HB-EGF-dependent loss in BBB integrity supported impaired Aβ clearance. The effect of HB-EGF on Amyloid Precursor Protein pathway was relatively insignificant, suggesting a lesser effect on Aβ generation. Delving into BBB disruption mechanism demonstrated HB-EGF-mediated stimulation of Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP9), which affected BBB via HB-EGF-ectodomain shedding and epidermal growth factor receptor activation. Examining the intersection of HB-EGF-regulated pathway and hypoxia revealed HB-EGF-dependent increase in transcription factor, Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF1α). Further, via binding to hypoxia-responsive elements in MMP9 gene, HIF1α stimulated MMP9 expression, and therefore appeared as a prominent intermediary in HB-EGF-induced BBB damage. Overall, our study reveals the essential role of HB-EGF in triggering CCH-mediated Aβ accumulation. The proposed mechanism involves an HB-EGF-dependent HIF1α increase, generating MMP9 that stimulates soluble-HB-EGF/EGFR-induced BBB disintegration. Consequently, CCH-mediated hippocampal RAGE and LRP-1 deregulation together with BBB damage impair Aβ transport and clearance

  16. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid induces antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cuevas, J; Navarro-Partida, J; Marquez-Aguirre, A L; Bueno-Topete, M R; Beas-Zarate, C; Armendáriz-Borunda, J

    2011-01-01

    Experimental liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) is associated with oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. This work was focused on elucidating the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in this model of hepatotoxicity. Wistar male rats were treated with CCl(4) and EDTA (60, 120, or 240 mg/kg). Morphometric analyses were carried out in Masson's stained liver sections to determine fibrosis index. Coagulation tests prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were also determined. Gene expression for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), alpha1(I) procollagen gene (alpha1 Col I), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was monitored by real-time PCR. Antioxidant effect of EDTA was measured by its effects on lipid peroxidation; biological activity of ceruloplasmin (Cp), SOD, and catalase (Cat) were analyzed by zymography assays. Animals with CCl(4)-hepatic injury that received EDTA showed a decrement in fibrosis (20%) and lipid peroxidation (22%). The mRNA expression for TNF-alpha (55%), TGF-beta1 (50%), IL-6 (52%), and alpha1 Col I (60%) was also decreased. This group of animals showed increased Cp (62%) and SOD (25%) biological activities. Coagulation blood tests, Cat activity, and gene expression for SOD were not modified by EDTA treatment. This study demonstrates that EDTA treatment induces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreases lipid peroxidation, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis in experimental liver fibrosis induced by CCl(4).

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Deficiency Attenuates Experimental Colitis-Induced Adipose Tissue Lipolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Nutrient deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating energy balance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is an important endocrine metabolic regulator with emerging beneficial roles in lipid homeostasis. We investigated the impact of FGF21 in experimental colitis-induced epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT lipolysis. Methods. Mice were given 2.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS ad libitum for 7 days to induce colitis. The role of FGF21 was investigated using antibody neutralization or knockout (KO mice. Lipolysis index and adipose lipolytic enzymes were determined. In addition, 3T3-L1 cells were pretreated with IL-6, followed by recombinant human FGF21 (rhFGF21 treatment; lipolysis was assessed. Results. DSS markedly decreased eWAT/body weight ratio and increased serum concentrations of free fatty acid (FFA and glycerol, indicating increased adipose tissue lipolysis. eWAT intracellular lipolytic enzyme expression/activation was significantly increased. These alterations were significantly attenuated in FGF21 KO mice and by circulating FGF21 neutralization. Moreover, DSS treatment markedly increased serum IL-6 and FGF21 levels. IL-6 pretreatment was necessary for the stimulatory effect of FGF21 on adipose lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that experimental colitis induces eWAT lipolysis via an IL-6/FGF21-mediated signaling pathway.

  19. Possible antidepressant effects of vanillin against experimentally induced chronic mild stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M. Abo-youssef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vanillin is a flavoring agent widely used in food and beverages such as chocolates and dairy products and it is also used to mask unpleasant tastes in medicine. It has been reported to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties. The current study was designed to investigate the protective effects of vanillin against experimentally induced stress in rats. Briefly rats were subdivided into four groups. Three groups were subjected to chronic mild stress and the fourth group served as normal control group. One week before induction of stress drugs or saline was administered daily and continued for another nine weeks. At the end of the experimental period behavioral tests including sucrose preference test, forced swim test and elevated plus maze test were assessed. In addition, brain biochemical parameters including MDA, GSH, NO and serotonin were determined. Vanillin succeeded to restore the behavioral and biochemical changes associated with stress. It significantly increased sucrose consumption in sucrose preference test and time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze test as compared to stress control group. It also reduced immobility time in forced swim test and time spent in closed arm in elevated plus maze test. Additionally, it significantly decreased brain MDA and NO levels and significantly increased brain GSH and Serotonin levels compared to stress control group. It could be concluded that vanillin showed beneficial protective effects against experimentally induced stress in rats.

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis for magnetically induced vibrations of conducting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Miura, H.; Isono, A.

    1993-01-01

    The coupling effect between the electromagnetic field and mechanical response of a conducting structure is of importance in magnetic fusion devices as tokamak machine. The electromagnetically induced motion of the structure due to the Lorentz force induces additional eddy currents and further modifies the dynamic characteristics of the system. This paper is concerned with numerical modeling of the dynamic field-structure interaction and its verification by experimental tests. Here, a finite element numerical model for mechanical deformation and a wiregrid numerical model for eddy currents are employed for non-ferrous and elastic conductors. A computer code has been developed for 3-D thin shell structure. Experimental tests for the code verification were carried out by using a rectangular thin copper plate. Three kinds of the plate supporting systems, i.e., a cantilever system, a fixed both ends system and a simply supported ends system were investigated. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental results was obtained. Therefore, the computer code developed here is available for analyzing the electromagnetomechanical behavior of the plasma facing components of the tokamak device. (author)

  1. Numerical and experimental evaluation of residual strains induced by pulsed laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touvrey, C.; Bruyere, V.; Namy, P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the residual strains induced by different welding processes during the assembly of two Ti6Al4V thin sheets. Several welding configurations and two means (pulsed laser and continuous one) are tested. The first part of the study intends to experimentally quantify strains induced by laser-matter interaction when one of the plates can freely bend. In this configuration the residual stresses are minimum, and consequently the strains measurement constitute a good indicator of the mechanical evolution. The displacements are in-situ reported thanks to a mechanical sensor. The second part of the study is dedicated to the numerical modeling of the processes. Unfortunately, the model is not completely predictive and appears to be oversimplified to describe the measured distortion. As it appears difficult to model the laser-matter interaction (especially in the case of many impacts recovering), we have adopted an equivalent approach to simulate the thermal evolution within the work pieces. An optimization procedure has been developed to determine an equivalent thermal flux, which leads to a melted zone shape in good agreement with experimental evaluations. The thermo-mechanical problem is computed by means of the finite elements software COMSOL Multiphysics. The results are compared to experimental data (displacement measurements) throughout the complete simulation. We plan to apply the complete model for more complex geometries, involving the generation of residual stresses. (authors)

  2. Gene expression in cerebral ischemia: a new approach for neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Mónica; Arenillas, Juan

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is one of the strongest stimuli for gene induction in the brain. Hundreds of genes have been found to be induced by brain ischemia. Many genes are involved in neurodestructive functions such as excitotoxicity, inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis. However, cerebral ischemia is also a powerful reformatting and reprogramming stimulus for the brain through neuroprotective gene expression. Several genes may participate in both cellular responses. Thus, isolation of candidate genes for neuroprotection strategies and interpretation of expression changes have been proven difficult. Nevertheless, many studies are being carried out to improve the knowledge of the gene activation and protein expression following ischemic stroke, as well as in the development of new therapies that modify biochemical, molecular and genetic changes underlying cerebral ischemia. Owing to the complexity of the process involving numerous critical genes expressed differentially in time, space and concentration, ongoing therapeutic efforts should be based on multiple interventions at different levels. By modification of the acute gene expression induced by ischemia or the apoptotic gene program, gene therapy is a promising treatment but is still in a very experimental phase. Some hurdles will have to be overcome before these therapies can be introduced into human clinical stroke trials. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of the self-inducing turbine aeration capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achouri, Ryma; Dhaouadi, Hatem; Mhiri, Hatem; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical and experimental study of k L a coefficient of a self-inducing turbine. • Validation of experimental results. • Numerical study of k L a variation with the variation of impeller submersion and blade inclination. • Numerical study of the flow field and hydrodynamic parameters. - Abstract: Self-inducing turbines are a model of mixers that ensure the aeration of a fluid field without using a sparger and a surface aerator. Nevertheless, this type of turbines remain quite complicated in terms of behavior of the fluid within the tank, and its actual aeration capacity varies depending on the type of turbine used. The studied turbine is self-inducing and made of three blades and each blade contains five holes. In this work, we evaluated experimentally – using the technique of dynamic oxygenation and deoxygenating – the aeration capacity of our impeller by calculating the volumetric mass transfer coefficient k L a for various submergences and various inclination angles of the blade. This work was then validated by a numerical modeling using the commercial code Fluent, and the flow within the tank as well as the evolution of the hydrodynamic parameters was also studied. The simulation is steady state with a VOF multiphase model and the realizable k–ε turbulence model. We finally concluded that k L a decreases with the increase of the inclination angle and with the increase of the submergence of our turbine. We could also study the hydrodynamic parameters of the flow such as the power number, the aeration number and the shear rate

  4. True Triaxial Experimental Study of Rockbursts Induced By Ramp and Cyclic Dynamic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guoshao; Hu, Lihua; Feng, Xiating; Yan, Liubin; Zhang, Gangliang; Yan, Sizhou; Zhao, Bin; Yan, Zhaofu

    2018-04-01

    A modified rockburst testing system was utilized to reproduce rockbursts induced by ramp and cyclic dynamic disturbances with a low-intermediate strain rate of 2 × 10-3-5 × 10-3 s-1 in the laboratory. The experimental results show that both the ramp and cyclic dynamic disturbances play a significant role in inducing rockbursts. In the tests of rockbursts induced by a ramp dynamic disturbance, as the static stress before the dynamic disturbance increases, both the strength of specimens and the kinetic energy of the ejected fragments first increase and then decrease. In the tests of rockbursts induced by a cyclic dynamic disturbance, there exists a rockburst threshold of the static stress and the dynamic disturbance amplitude, and the kinetic energy of the ejected fragments first increases and then decreases as the cyclic dynamic disturbance frequency increases. The main differences between rockbursts induced by ramp dynamic disturbances and those induced by cyclic dynamic disturbances are as follows: the rockburst development process of the former is characterized by an impact failure feature, while that of the latter is characterized by a fatigue failure feature; the damage evolution curve of the specimen of the former has a leap-developing form with a significant catastrophic feature, while that of the latter has an inverted S-shape with a remarkable fatigue damage characteristic; the energy mechanism of the former involves the ramp dynamic disturbance giving extra elastic strain energy to rocks, while that of the latter involves the cyclic dynamic disturbance decreasing the ultimate energy storage capacity of rocks.

  5. Experimental study of stress-induced localized transformation plastic zones in tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Q.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, W.; Qing, X.; Xu, X.; Dai, F.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-induced martensitic transformation plastic zones in ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics (Ce-TZP), under loading conditions of uniaxial tension, compression, and three-point bending, are studied by experiments. The transformed monoclinic phase volume fraction distribution and the corresponding plastic strain distribution and the surface morphology (surface uplift) are measured by means of moire interferometry, Raman microprobe spectroscopy, and the surface measurement system. The experimental results from the above three kinds of specimens and methods consistently show that the stress-induced transformation at room temperature of the above specimen is not uniform within the transformation zone and that the plastic deformation is concentrated in some narrow band; i.e., macroscopic plastic flow localization proceeds during the initial stage of plastic deformation. Flow localization phenomena are all observed in uniaxial tension, compression, and three-point bending specimens. Some implications of the flow localization to the constitutive modeling and toughening of transforming thermoelastic polycrystalline ceramics are explored

  6. Nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodents have been widely used in the production of cerebral ischemia models. However, successful therapies have been proven on experimental rodent stroke model, and they have often failed to be effective when tested clinically. Therefore, nonhuman primates were recommended as the ideal alternatives, owing to their similarities with the human cerebrovascular system, brain metabolism, grey to white matter ratio and even their rich behavioral repertoire. The present review is a thorough summary of ten methods that establish nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia; electrocoagulation, endothelin-1-induced occlusion, microvascular clip occlusion, autologous blood clot embolization, balloon inflation, microcatheter embolization, coil embolization, surgical suture embolization, suture, and photochemical induction methods. This review addresses the advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as precautions for each model, compared nonhuman primates with rodents, different species of nonhuman primates and different modeling methods. Finally it discusses various factors that need to be considered when modelling and the method of evaluation after modelling. These are critical for understanding their respective strengths and weaknesses and underlie the selection of the optimum model.

  7. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tramadol Induced Adrenal Insufficiency: Histological, Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural, and Biochemical Genetic Experimental Study

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    Shereen Abdelhakim Abdelaleem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting analgesic. It is the most consumed narcotic drug that is prescribed in the world. Tramadol abuse has dramatically increased in Egypt. Long term use of tramadol can induce endocrinopathy. So, the aim of this study was to analyze the adrenal insufficiency induced by long term use of tramadol in experimental animals and also to assess its withdrawal effects through histopathological and biochemical genetic study. Forty male albino rats were used in this study. The rats were divided into 4 groups (control group, tramadol-treated group, and withdrawal groups. Tramadol was given to albino rats at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight for 3 months and after withdrawal periods (7–15 days rats were sacrificed. Long term use of tramadol induced severe histopathological changes in adrenal glands. Tramadol decreased the levels of serum cortisol and DHEAS hormones. In addition, it increased the level of adrenal MDA and decreased the genetic expression of glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase in adrenal gland tissues. All these changes started to return to normal after withdrawal of tramadol. Thus, it was confirmed that long term use of tramadol can induce severe adrenal insufficiency.

  9. Tramadol Induced Adrenal Insufficiency: Histological, Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural, and Biochemical Genetic Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaleem, Shereen Abdelhakim; Hassan, Osama A; Ahmed, Rasha F; Zenhom, Nagwa M; Rifaai, Rehab A; El-Tahawy, Nashwa F

    2017-01-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting analgesic. It is the most consumed narcotic drug that is prescribed in the world. Tramadol abuse has dramatically increased in Egypt. Long term use of tramadol can induce endocrinopathy. So, the aim of this study was to analyze the adrenal insufficiency induced by long term use of tramadol in experimental animals and also to assess its withdrawal effects through histopathological and biochemical genetic study. Forty male albino rats were used in this study. The rats