WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimentally deployed dingo

  1. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael H; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2010-05-05

    Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2) = 83.8; P<0.001). Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local response

  2. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Parsons

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo, along with a control (water. If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous, western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area.We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones. Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5. Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2 = 83.8; P<0.001.Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local

  3. Familiarity Breeds Contempt: Kangaroos Persistently Avoid Areas with Experimentally Deployed Dingo Scents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael H.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75±3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0±107.0 g (P0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R2 = 83.8; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been

  4. The (noneffects of lethal population control on the diet of Australian dingoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L Allen

    Full Text Available Top-predators contribute to ecosystem resilience, yet individuals or populations are often subject to lethal control to protect livestock, managed game or humans from predation. Such management actions sometimes attract concern that lethal control might affect top-predator function in ways ultimately detrimental to biodiversity conservation. The primary function of a predator is predation, which is often investigated by assessing their diet. We therefore use data on prey remains found in 4,298 Australian dingo scats systematically collected from three arid sites over a four year period to experimentally assess the effects of repeated broad-scale poison-baiting programs on dingo diet. Indices of dingo dietary diversity and similarity were either identical or near-identical in baited and adjacent unbaited treatment areas in each case, demonstrating no control-induced change to dingo diets. Associated studies on dingoes' movement behaviour and interactions with sympatric mesopredators were similarly unaffected by poison-baiting. These results indicate that mid-sized top-predators with flexible and generalist diets (such as dingoes may be resilient to ongoing and moderate levels of population control without substantial alteration of their diets and other related aspects of their ecological function.

  5. The (non)effects of lethal population control on the diet of Australian dingoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin L; Leung, Luke K-P

    2014-01-01

    Top-predators contribute to ecosystem resilience, yet individuals or populations are often subject to lethal control to protect livestock, managed game or humans from predation. Such management actions sometimes attract concern that lethal control might affect top-predator function in ways ultimately detrimental to biodiversity conservation. The primary function of a predator is predation, which is often investigated by assessing their diet. We therefore use data on prey remains found in 4,298 Australian dingo scats systematically collected from three arid sites over a four year period to experimentally assess the effects of repeated broad-scale poison-baiting programs on dingo diet. Indices of dingo dietary diversity and similarity were either identical or near-identical in baited and adjacent unbaited treatment areas in each case, demonstrating no control-induced change to dingo diets. Associated studies on dingoes' movement behaviour and interactions with sympatric mesopredators were similarly unaffected by poison-baiting. These results indicate that mid-sized top-predators with flexible and generalist diets (such as dingoes) may be resilient to ongoing and moderate levels of population control without substantial alteration of their diets and other related aspects of their ecological function.

  6. Demonising the dingo: How much wild dogma is enough?

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    Mike LETNIC, Mathew S. CROWTHER, Christopher R. DICKMAN, Euan RITCHIE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The roles that top predators play in regulating the structure and function of ecosystems have long been controversial. This is particularly the case when predators pose adverse risks for human life and/or economic interests. The critique of literature on dingoes and their ecological roles in Australia provided by Allen et al. (2011 shows that top predators remain a potentially polarising issue. In opposition to Allen et al. we argue that these widespread patterns of species’ abundances, attributed to the effects of dingoes and evident at scales ranging from the foraging behaviour of individuals through to continental scale patterns of species abundances, constitute strong support for the mesopredator release hypothesis and provide evidence that dingoes benefit biodiversity conservation by inducing community wide trophic cascades. Harnessing the positive ecological effects of dingoes while at the same time minimising their impacts on agriculture is a major socio-political challenge in Australia [Current Zoology 57 (5: 668-670].

  7. Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice T. McNeill

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Top-predators around the world are becoming increasingly intertwined with humans, sometimes causing conflict and increasing safety risks in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes and dingo×domesticdoghybridsarecommoninmanyurbanareas,andposeavarietyofhumanhealth and safety risks. However, data on urban dingo ecology is scant. We GPS-collared 37 dingoes in north-easternAustraliaandcontinuouslymonitoredthemeach30minfor11–394days. Mostdingoes were nocturnal, with an overall mean home range size of 17.47 km2. Overall mean daily distance travelled was 6.86 km/day. At all times dingoes were within 1000 m of houses and buildings. Home ranges appeared to be constrained to patches of suitable vegetation fragments within and around human habitation. These data can be used to reallocate dingo management effort towards mitigating actual conflicts between humans and dingoes in urban areas.

  8. Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Alice T; Leung, Luke K-P; Goullet, Mark S; Gentle, Matthew N; Allen, Benjamin L

    2016-08-16

    Top-predators around the world are becoming increasingly intertwined with humans, sometimes causing conflict and increasing safety risks in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes and dingo×domesticdoghybridsarecommoninmanyurbanareas,andposeavarietyofhumanhealth and safety risks. However, data on urban dingo ecology is scant. We GPS-collared 37 dingoes in north-easternAustraliaandcontinuouslymonitoredthemeach30minfor11-394days. Mostdingoes were nocturnal, with an overall mean home range size of 17.47 km2. Overall mean daily distance travelled was 6.86 km/day. At all times dingoes were within 1000 m of houses and buildings. Home ranges appeared to be constrained to patches of suitable vegetation fragments within and around human habitation. These data can be used to reallocate dingo management effort towards mitigating actual conflicts between humans and dingoes in urban areas.

  9. Could direct killing by larger dingoes have caused the extinction of the thylacine from mainland Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letnic, Mike; Fillios, Melanie; Crowther, Mathew S

    2012-01-01

    Invasive predators can impose strong selection pressure on species that evolved in their absence and drive species to extinction. Interactions between coexisting predators may be particularly strong, as larger predators frequently kill smaller predators and suppress their abundances. Until 3500 years ago the marsupial thylacine was Australia's largest predator. It became extinct from the mainland soon after the arrival of a morphologically convergent placental predator, the dingo, but persisted in the absence of dingoes on the island of Tasmania until the 20th century. As Tasmanian thylacines were larger than dingoes, it has been argued that dingoes were unlikely to have caused the extinction of mainland thylacines because larger predators are rarely killed by smaller predators. By comparing Holocene specimens from the same regions of mainland Australia, we show that dingoes were similarly sized to male thylacines but considerably larger than female thylacines. Female thylacines would have been vulnerable to killing by dingoes. Such killing could have depressed the reproductive output of thylacine populations. Our results support the hypothesis that direct killing by larger dingoes drove thylacines to extinction on mainland Australia. However, attributing the extinction of the thylacine to just one cause is problematic because the arrival of dingoes coincided with another the potential extinction driver, the intensification of the human economy.

  10. Could direct killing by larger dingoes have caused the extinction of the thylacine from mainland Australia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Letnic

    Full Text Available Invasive predators can impose strong selection pressure on species that evolved in their absence and drive species to extinction. Interactions between coexisting predators may be particularly strong, as larger predators frequently kill smaller predators and suppress their abundances. Until 3500 years ago the marsupial thylacine was Australia's largest predator. It became extinct from the mainland soon after the arrival of a morphologically convergent placental predator, the dingo, but persisted in the absence of dingoes on the island of Tasmania until the 20th century. As Tasmanian thylacines were larger than dingoes, it has been argued that dingoes were unlikely to have caused the extinction of mainland thylacines because larger predators are rarely killed by smaller predators. By comparing Holocene specimens from the same regions of mainland Australia, we show that dingoes were similarly sized to male thylacines but considerably larger than female thylacines. Female thylacines would have been vulnerable to killing by dingoes. Such killing could have depressed the reproductive output of thylacine populations. Our results support the hypothesis that direct killing by larger dingoes drove thylacines to extinction on mainland Australia. However, attributing the extinction of the thylacine to just one cause is problematic because the arrival of dingoes coincided with another the potential extinction driver, the intensification of the human economy.

  11. Did dingo control cause the elimination of kowaris through mesopredator release effects? A response to Wallach and O'Neill (2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Mungerannie during the same period. Additionally, the observed rarity of some small mammals on Mungerannie may reflect bottom-up processes, whereby rabbit abundance provides competition for vegetation, reduces it's availability to invertebrates, and supports larger numbers of feral carnivores (increasing the risk of hyperpredation, which all work in concert to cause the localized extinction of some small mammals. These processes are known to occur with or without dingoes in the landscape. Furthermore, the recorded activity of predators and prey alike can change rapidly in response to environmental perturbations, and their presence or absence on sand plots during a once-off survey may merely reflect such stochastic events. Such surveys have a limited ability to infer causal process because there may be multiple alternative explanations for the data (Caughley, 1977; Williams et al., 2002; MacKenzie et al., 2006. Causal processes involving dingoes are best addressed using rigorous experimental techniques (such as BACI experiments where confounding factors can be controlled (Glen et al., 2007. In summary, while ecological data is scant for arid areas and is always welcomed, it is important to use research resources wisely in order to provide scientifically defensible information (Platt, 1964, used ultimately to inform threatened species recovery. While the conclusions of Wallach & O'Neill (2009 align nicely with the mesopredator release hypothesis, their foundations, methods, and interpretation are undermined by misleading contextual information, the poor application of otherwise robust sampling methods, and a lack of discussion on alternative explanations. As such, the study contributes little insight into the effect of dingo control on kowaris. The study sites, methods, and results presented in Wallach & O'Neill (2009 have also been used elsewhere (Wallach et al., 2009a, 2009b, 2010, and these criticisms equally apply to those reports, and others similar to them. Researchers

  12. Assessing predation risk to threatened fauna from their prevalence in predator scats: dingoes and rodents in arid Australia.

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    Benjamin L Allen

    Full Text Available The prevalence of threatened species in predator scats has often been used to gauge the risks that predators pose to threatened species, with the infrequent occurrence of a given species often considered indicative of negligible predation risks. In this study, data from 4087 dingo (Canis lupus dingo and hybrids scats were assessed alongside additional information on predator and prey distribution, dingo control effort and predation rates to evaluate whether or not the observed frequency of threatened species in dingo scats warrants more detailed investigation of dingo predation risks to them. Three small rodents (dusky hopping-mice Notomys fuscus; fawn hopping-mice Notomys cervinus; plains mice Pseudomys australis were the only threatened species detected in <8% of dingo scats from any given site, suggesting that dingoes might not threaten them. However, consideration of dingo control effort revealed that plains mice distribution has largely retracted to the area where dingoes have been most heavily subjected to lethal control. Assessing the hypothetical predation rates of dingoes on dusky hopping-mice revealed that dingo predation alone has the potential to depopulate local hopping-mice populations within a few months. It was concluded that the occurrence of a given prey species in predator scats may be indicative of what the predator ate under the prevailing conditions, but in isolation, such data can have a poor ability to inform predation risk assessments. Some populations of threatened fauna assumed to derive a benefit from the presence of dingoes may instead be susceptible to dingo-induced declines under certain conditions.

  13. Dingoes (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793) continue to be an important reservoir host of Dirofilaria immitis in low density housing areas in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Felicity A; Skerratt, Lee F; Butler, James R A; Johnson, Christopher N; Congdon, Bradley C

    2016-01-15

    Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic nematode responsible for canine and feline cardiopulmonary dirofilariasis and human zoonotic filariosis in both tropical and temperate regions throughout the world. Importantly, this study in the Wet Tropics of Far North Queensland found D. immitis remains at high prevalence (72.7%) in wild dingoes in low density housing areas in Australia. This prevalence is equivalent to the highest levels seen in wild dogs in Australia and represents an ongoing risk to domestic dogs, cats and humans. In contrast, in higher density residential areas prevalence was significantly lower (16.7%, p=0.001). It is possible that chemotherapeutic heartworm (HW) prevention in domestic dogs in these higher density housing areas is helping to control infection in the resident dingo population. Five dingoes killed in council control operations around Atherton, a non-endemic HW region in the Wet Tropics, were all negative for HW likely due to the colder climate of the region restricting transmission of the disease. This survey highlights the importance of dingoes as reservoir hosts of HW disease and that the subsequent risk of infection to companion animals and humans depends on local factors such as housing density, possibly linked to chemotherapeutic HW control in domestic dogs and climate. Our findings show that veterinary clinicians need to ensure that pet owners are aware of HW disease and do not become complacent about HW chemoprohylaxis in areas which support dingo populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. iDINGO - Integrative Differential Network Analysis in Genomics with Shiny Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Caleb A; Ha, Min Jin; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Do, Kim-Anh

    2017-11-29

    Differential network analysis is an important way to understand network rewiring involved in disease progression and development. Building differential networks from multiple `omics data provides insight into the holistic differences of the interactive system under different patient-specific groups. DINGO was developed to infer group-specific dependencies and build differential networks. However, DINGO and other existing tools are limited to analyze data arising from a single platform, and modeling each of the multiple 'omics data independently does not account for the hierarchical structure of the data. We developed the iDINGO R package to estimate group-specific dependencies and make inferences on the integrative differential networks, considering the biological hierarchy among the platforms. A Shiny application has also been developed to facilitate easier analysis and visualization of results, including integrative differential networks and hub gene identification across platforms. R package available on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/iDINGO), Shiny application at https://github.com/MinJinHa/iDINGO. mjha@mdanderson.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Anthropogenic resource subsidies determine space use by Australian arid zone dingoes: an improved resource selection modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Thomas M; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Dickman, Christopher R; Fleming, Peter J S; Howden, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) were introduced to Australia and became feral at least 4,000 years ago. We hypothesized that dingoes, being of domestic origin, would be adaptable to anthropogenic resource subsidies and that their space use would be affected by the dispersion of those resources. We tested this by analyzing Resource Selection Functions (RSFs) developed from GPS fixes (locations) of dingoes in arid central Australia. Using Generalized Linear Mixed-effect Models (GLMMs), we investigated resource relationships for dingoes that had access to abundant food near mine facilities, and for those that did not. From these models, we predicted the probability of dingo occurrence in relation to anthropogenic resource subsidies and other habitat characteristics over ∼ 18,000 km(2). Very small standard errors and subsequent pervasively high P-values of results will become more important as the size of data sets, such as our GPS tracking logs, increases. Therefore, we also investigated methods to minimize the effects of serial and spatio-temporal correlation among samples and unbalanced study designs. Using GLMMs, we accounted for some of the correlation structure of GPS animal tracking data; however, parameter standard errors remained very small and all predictors were highly significant. Consequently, we developed an alternative approach that allowed us to review effect sizes at different spatial scales and determine which predictors were sufficiently ecologically meaningful to include in final RSF models. We determined that the most important predictor for dingo occurrence around mine sites was distance to the refuse facility. Away from mine sites, close proximity to human-provided watering points was predictive of dingo dispersion as were other landscape factors including palaeochannels, rocky rises and elevated drainage depressions. Our models demonstrate that anthropogenically supplemented food and water can alter dingo-resource relationships. The spatial

  16. Anthropogenic resource subsidies determine space use by Australian arid zone dingoes: an improved resource selection modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Newsome

    Full Text Available Dingoes (Canis lupus dingo were introduced to Australia and became feral at least 4,000 years ago. We hypothesized that dingoes, being of domestic origin, would be adaptable to anthropogenic resource subsidies and that their space use would be affected by the dispersion of those resources. We tested this by analyzing Resource Selection Functions (RSFs developed from GPS fixes (locations of dingoes in arid central Australia. Using Generalized Linear Mixed-effect Models (GLMMs, we investigated resource relationships for dingoes that had access to abundant food near mine facilities, and for those that did not. From these models, we predicted the probability of dingo occurrence in relation to anthropogenic resource subsidies and other habitat characteristics over ∼ 18,000 km(2. Very small standard errors and subsequent pervasively high P-values of results will become more important as the size of data sets, such as our GPS tracking logs, increases. Therefore, we also investigated methods to minimize the effects of serial and spatio-temporal correlation among samples and unbalanced study designs. Using GLMMs, we accounted for some of the correlation structure of GPS animal tracking data; however, parameter standard errors remained very small and all predictors were highly significant. Consequently, we developed an alternative approach that allowed us to review effect sizes at different spatial scales and determine which predictors were sufficiently ecologically meaningful to include in final RSF models. We determined that the most important predictor for dingo occurrence around mine sites was distance to the refuse facility. Away from mine sites, close proximity to human-provided watering points was predictive of dingo dispersion as were other landscape factors including palaeochannels, rocky rises and elevated drainage depressions. Our models demonstrate that anthropogenically supplemented food and water can alter dingo-resource relationships. The

  17. Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    McNeill, Alice T.; Luke K. -P. Leung; Mark S. Goullet; Gentle, Matthew N.; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Simple summary Conflicts with dingoes and other wild dogs are becoming increasingly common in and around urban areas of Australia. A lack of basic information about wild dog movement ecology hampers efficient planning and allocation of resources to mitigate human?wild dog conflicts. We captured, collared and released 37 wild dogs in urban areas of north-eastern Australia to investigate their movement ecology. In general, wild dogs occupied small fragments of bushland within an urban matrix, w...

  18. Experimental investigation on stern-boat deployment system and operability for Korean coast guard ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Moon Chan; Lee, Inwon; Kim, Kookhyun; Lee, Jung Kwan; Jung, Kwang Hyo

    2012-12-01

    The stern boat deployment system was investigated to evaluate the capability of launching and recovering rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) via the stern ramp. The main parameters to launch and recover RHIB were tested at the design stage. The combined hydrodynamic effect of the stern wake and the water jet flow made it difficult to maintain the maneuvering and sea-keeping ability of RHIB approaching to the stern ramp. The safe recovery course was proposed to maintain the directional control of RHIB and to reduce the combined hydrodynamic effect in the transom zone. To evaluate the feasibility of RHIB recovery, the stern sill depth was measured in various conditions and the ramp availability time was obtained. Also, the experimental percent time operability (PTO) test was performed by the number of successive launching and recovering operations.

  19. Experimental investigation on stern-boat deployment system and operability for Korean coast guard ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Hwan Chun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The stern boat deployment system was investigated to evaluate the capability of launching and recovering rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB via the stern ramp. The main parameters to launch and recover RHIB were tested at the design stage. The combined hydrodynamic effect of the stern wake and the water jet flow made it difficult to maintain the maneuvering and sea-keeping ability of RHIB approaching to the stern ramp. The safe recovery course was proposed to maintain the directional control of RHIB and to reduce the combined hydrodynamic effect in the transom zone. To evaluate the feasibility of RHIB recovery, the stern sill depth was measured in various conditions and the ramp availability time was obtained. Also, the experimental percent time operability (PTO test was performed by the number of successive launching and recovering operations.

  20. Effects of gape and tooth position on bite force and skull stress in the dingo (Canis lupus dingo using a 3-dimensional finite element approach.

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    Jason Bourke

    Full Text Available Models of the mammalian jaw have predicted that bite force is intimately linked to jaw gape and to tooth position. Despite widespread use, few empirical studies have provided evidence to validate these models in non-human mammals and none have considered the influence of gape angle on the distribution of stress. Here using a multi-property finite element (FE model of Canis lupus dingo, we examined the influence of gape angle and bite point on both bite force and cranial stress. Bite force data in relation to jaw gape and along the tooth row, are in broad agreement with previously reported results. However stress data showed that the skull of C. l. dingo is mechanically suited to withstand stresses at wide gapes; a result that agreed well with previously held views regarding carnivoran evolution. Stress data, combined with bite force information, suggested that there is an optimal bite angle of between 25 degrees and 35 degrees in C. l. dingo. The function of these rather small bite angles remains unclear.

  1. Technical note: Dynamic INtegrated Gap-filling and partitioning for OzFlux (DINGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Jason; McHugh, Ian; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Isaac, Peter; Kljun, Natascha

    2017-03-01

    Standardised, quality-controlled and robust data from flux networks underpin the understanding of ecosystem processes and tools necessary to support the management of natural resources, including water, carbon and nutrients for environmental and production benefits. The Australian regional flux network (OzFlux) currently has 23 active sites and aims to provide a continental-scale national research facility to monitor and assess Australia's terrestrial biosphere and climate for improved predictions. Given the need for standardised and effective data processing of flux data, we have developed a software suite, called the Dynamic INtegrated Gap-filling and partitioning for OzFlux (DINGO), that enables gap-filling and partitioning of the primary fluxes into ecosystem respiration (Fre) and gross primary productivity (GPP) and subsequently provides diagnostics and results. We outline the processing pathways and methodologies that are applied in DINGO (v13) to OzFlux data, including (1) gap-filling of meteorological and other drivers; (2) gap-filling of fluxes using artificial neural networks; (3) the u* threshold determination; (4) partitioning into ecosystem respiration and gross primary productivity; (5) random, model and u* uncertainties; and (6) diagnostic, footprint calculation, summary and results outputs. DINGO was developed for Australian data, but the framework is applicable to any flux data or regional network. Quality data from robust systems like DINGO ensure the utility and uptake of the flux data and facilitates synergies between flux, remote sensing and modelling.

  2. Nonlinear Control for Magnetic Bearings in Deployment Test Rigs : Simulation and Experimental Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpen, J.M.A.; Kerk, B. van der; Klaassens, J.B.; Lazeroms, M.; Kan, S.Y.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper three control schemes for a test set-up of a magnetic bearing system for deployment rigs of solar arrays are described. The air gap of the magnet has to be controlled to a constant value independent of the deployment of the solar array. The deployment of the rig has been modeled as a

  3. Interspecific and geographic variation in the diets of sympatric carnivores: dingoes/wild dogs and red foxes in south-eastern Australia.

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    Naomi E Davis

    Full Text Available Dingoes/wild dogs (Canis dingo/familiaris and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes are widespread carnivores in southern Australia and are controlled to reduce predation on domestic livestock and native fauna. We used the occurrence of food items in 5875 dingo/wild dog scats and 11,569 fox scats to evaluate interspecific and geographic differences in the diets of these species within nine regions of Victoria, south-eastern Australia. The nine regions encompass a wide variety of ecosystems. Diet overlap between dingoes/wild dogs and foxes varied among regions, from low to near complete overlap. The diet of foxes was broader than dingoes/wild dogs in all but three regions, with the former usually containing more insects, reptiles and plant material. By contrast, dingoes/wild dogs more regularly consumed larger mammals, supporting the hypothesis that niche partitioning occurs on the basis of mammalian prey size. The key mammalian food items for dingoes/wild dogs across all regions were black wallaby (Wallabia bicolor, brushtail possum species (Trichosurus spp., common wombat (Vombatus ursinus, sambar deer (Rusa unicolor, cattle (Bos taurus and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus. The key mammalian food items for foxes across all regions were European rabbit, sheep (Ovis aries and house mouse (Mus musculus. Foxes consumed 6.1 times the number of individuals of threatened Critical Weight Range native mammal species than did dingoes/wild dogs. The occurrence of intraguild predation was asymmetrical; dingoes/wild dogs consumed greater biomass of the smaller fox. The substantial geographic variation in diet indicates that dingoes/wild dogs and foxes alter their diet in accordance with changing food availability. We provide checklists of taxa recorded in the diets of dingoes/wild dogs and foxes as a resource for managers and researchers wishing to understand the potential impacts of policy and management decisions on dingoes/wild dogs, foxes and the food

  4. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forsyth, David M; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D; Hampton, Jordan O; Woolnough, Andrew P; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    .... We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons...

  5. Experimental investigation on stern-boat deployment system and operability for Korean coast guard ship

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Hwan Chun; Moon Chan Kim; Inwon Lee; Kookhyun Kim; Jung Kwan Lee; Kwang Hyo Jung

    2012-01-01

    The stern boat deployment system was investigated to evaluate the capability of launching and recovering rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) via the stern ramp. The main parameters to launch and recover RHIB were tested at the design stage. The combined hydrodynamic effect of the stern wake and the water jet flow made it difficult to maintain the maneuvering and sea-keeping ability of RHIB approaching to the stern ramp. The safe recovery course was proposed to maintain the directional control o...

  6. Environmental Transitions Recorded by Fluvial Fan Stratigraphy at Dingo Gap and Moonlight Valley, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, L. A.; Gupta, S.; Rubin, D. M.; Schieber, J.; Stack, K.; Lewis, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover investigated a number of sedimentary outcrops across Aeolis Palus. Observations of conglomerates, cross-bedded sandstones, and mudstones suggest that fluvial and lacustrine environments were common. Outcrops that expose cross-sections are particularly helpful for identifying stratigraphic relationships and changes through time. In the vicinity of an outcrop informally named Dingo Gap, the drive strategy shifted from driving on the topographic high areas to the topographic low areas, which resulted in a unique vantage point to observe stratigraphy in cross-section. During Sols 513-541, Curiosity investigated 4 m of stratigraphy exposed at Dingo Gap and Moonlight Valley. The valley walls reveal five distinct sedimentary facies, including 1) a fine-grained evenly laminated facies interpreted as upper plane bed stratification, 2) ripple and dune cross-stratified sandstone facies, interpreted to represent the southward migration of subaqueous bedforms, 3) fully preserved bedform sandstone facies, formed during high rates of deposition, 4) planar-bedded granule-rich sandstone facies, interpreted as sheet flood deposits, and 5) a weakly stratified, poorly-sorted conglomerate facies, interpreted to represent rapid deposition from a high-energy fluvial flow. The conglomerate facies is unlike other conglomerates observed thus far in the mission, on the basis of both texture and chemistry. Analysis of conglomerates reveal that they occur as distinct channel bodies, incised into cross-stratified sandstones. This coarsening upward signature is interpreted to record a prograding fan succession. Channel bodies appear to be time-equivalent, which suggests a major change in the system, likely associated with a drop in base level. The unique viewing geometry offered by Dingo Gap and Moonlight Valley makes it possible to observe these environmental changes.

  7. Size Variation under Domestication: Conservatism in the inner ear shape of wolves, dogs and dingoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Anita V; Lebrun, Renaud; Wilson, Laura A B; Costeur, Loïc; Schmelzle, Thomas; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2017-10-17

    A broad sample of wolves, dingoes, and domesticated dogs of different kinds and time periods was used to identify changes in size and shape of the organs of balance and hearing related to domestication and to evaluate the potential utility of uncovered patterns as markers of domestication. Using geometric morphometrics coupled with non-invasive imaging and three-dimensional reconstructions, we exposed and compared complex structures that remain largely conserved. There is no statistically significant difference in the levels of shape variation between prehistoric and modern dogs. Shape variance is slightly higher for the different components of the inner ear in modern dogs than in wolves, but these differences are not significant. Wolves express a significantly greater level of variance in the angle between the lateral and the posterior canal than domestic dog breeds. Wolves have smaller levels of size variation than dogs. In terms of the shape of the semicircular canals, dingoes reflect the mean shape in the context of variation in the sample. This mirrors the condition of feral forms in other organs, in which there is an incomplete return to the characteristics of the ancestor. In general, morphological diversity or disparity in the inner ear is generated by scaling.

  8. Wild dogma: An examination of recent “evidence” for dingo regulation of invasive mesopredator release in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. ALLEN, Richard M. ENGEMAN, Lee R. ALLEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the role that apex predators play in shaping terrestrial ecosystems and maintaining trophic cascades. In line with the mesopredator release hypothesis, Australian dingoes (Canis lupus dingo and hybrids are assumed by many to regulate the abundance of invasive mesopredators, such as red foxes Vulpes vulpes and feral cats Felis catus, thereby providing indirect benefits to various threatened vertebrates. Several recent papers have claimed to provide evidence for the biodiversity benefits of dingoes in this way. Nevertheless, in this paper we highlight several critical weaknesses in the methodological approaches used in many of these reports, including lack of consideration for seasonal and habitat differences in activity, the complication of simple track-based indices by incorporating difficult-to-meet assumptions, and a reduction in sensitivity for assessing populations by using binary measures rather than potentially continuous measures. Of the 20 studies reviewed, 15 of them (75% contained serious methodological flaws, which may partly explain the inconclusive nature of the literature investigating interactions between invasive Australian predators. We therefore assert that most of the “growing body of evidence” for mesopredator release is merely an inconclusive growing body of literature only. We encourage those interested in studying the ecological roles of dingoes relative to invasive mesopredators and native prey species to account for the factors we identify, and caution the value of studies that have not done so [Current Zoology 57 (5: 568–583, 2011].

  9. Mitochondrial DNA data indicate an introduction through Mainland Southeast Asia for Australian dingoes and Polynesian domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, Mattias C R; Klütsch, Cornelya F C; Boonyaprakob, Ukadej; Wilton, Alan; Tanabe, Yuichi; Savolainen, Peter

    2012-03-07

    In the late stages of the global dispersal of dogs, dingoes appear in the Australian archaeological record 3500 years BP, and dogs were one of three domesticates brought with the colonization of Polynesia, but the introduction routes to this region remain unknown. This also relates to questions about human history, such as to what extent the Polynesian culture was introduced with the Austronesian expansion from Taiwan or adopted en route, and whether pre-Neolithic Australia was culturally influenced by the surrounding Neolithic world. We investigate these questions by mapping the distribution of the mtDNA founder haplotypes for dingoes (A29) and ancient Polynesian dogs (Arc1 and Arc2) in samples across Southern East Asia (n = 424) and Island Southeast Asia (n = 219). All three haplotypes were found in South China, Mainland Southeast Asia and Indonesia but absent in Taiwan and the Philippines, and the mtDNA diversity among dingoes indicates an introduction to Australia 4600-18 300 years BP. These results suggest that Australian dingoes and Polynesian dogs originate from dogs introduced to Indonesia via Mainland Southeast Asia before the Neolithic, and not from Taiwan together with the Austronesian expansion. This underscores the complex origins of Polynesian culture and the isolation from Neolithic influence of the pre-Neolithic Australian culture.

  10. Deployment of a Neo-Hookean membrane: experimental and numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Al-Bahkali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to assess the response of a thin membrane subjected to high-pressure gas loading for inflation. This procedure is applied during the design process of the membrane structure to allow the product to resist high-pressure loading and to further characterize the hyper-elastic material. The simulation in this work considers the standard procedures used in the LS-DYNA software, which applies such assumptions as a uniform airbag pressure and temperature in addition to a more recently developed procedure that takes into account the fluid-structure interaction between the inflation gas source and the hyper-elastic membrane; this approach is referred to as the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE formulation. Until recently, to simulate the inflation of the hyperelastic membrane, a uniform pressure based on a thermodynamic model or experimental test has been applied to the structure as the boundary conditions. To conserve CPU time, this work combines both methods; the fluid structure coupling method is used at an earlier stage in which the fluid is modeled using full hydrodynamic equations, and at the later stage, the uniform pressure procedure is applied, and the fluid mesh and analysis are removed from the computation. Both simulations were compared to test data, indicating satisfactory correlation with the more recently developed procedure, the ALE theory, which showed the greatest accuracy both in terms of graphical and schematic comparison, particularly in the early stages of the inflation process. As a result, the new simulation procedure model can be applied to research on the effects of design changes in the new membrane.

  11. How Does a Carnivore Guild Utilise a Substantial but Unpredictable Anthropogenic Food Source? Scavenging on Hunter-Shot Ungulate Carcasses by Wild Dogs/Dingoes, Red Foxes and Feral Cats in South-Eastern Australia Revealed by Camera Traps: e97937

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David M Forsyth; Luke Woodford; Paul D Moloney; Jordan O Hampton; Andrew P Woolnough; Mark Tucker

    2014-01-01

    .... We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons...

  12. Deployable antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  13. An experimental study on the characteristics of transient deployment of hinged wing actuators within a boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierides, Alexis

    Herein we investigate the flapping wing phenomenon in great detail. A 10cm x 10cm square winglet and a 10cm high, 10cm base isosceles triangular winglet are tested as they transiently deploy from a 0 degree position embedded in the wind tunnel floor, to 90 degrees with respect to the wind tunnel floor and the free stream flow. The two winglets were tested in two flow conditions. The first flow condition was a delta1 = 14cm thick boundary layer, with a free stream velocity of U01=11.03m/s, and a Re1 = 70300. The second flow condition was a delta 2 = 5cm thick boundary layer with a free stream velocity of U02 =10.69m/s, and a Re2 = 68133. Through these experiments we are trying to understand, both qualitatively and quantitatively, how drag is generated, increased beyond the steady state value under dynamic conditions, and then how drag falls back to its normal steady state values, after the transient phenomenon has ended. Our experiments used a novel aerodynamic balance design, developed for the exact purpose of acquiring very accurate low magnitude force measurements with high frequency response. Through this direct measurement method we acquired time-resolved and decoupled measurements of drag and lift that indicated the accurate timing and magnitude of these transient events. The controlling parameters in this transient drag generation phenomenon are the deployment speed and shape of the winglet, the range of deployment and the viscous effect of the boundary layer. The effect of these controlling parameters was then quantified. Load-cell measurements of drag and lift, along with accelerometer measurements of the tangential and radial acceleration, and encoder measurements of angle were taken for every experiment. These dynamic measurements helped us quantify the aerodynamic effects on the moving winglets within the two boundary layers. The following overall conclusions were derived as a result of this study. (1) Faster deployment speed produces higher maximum

  14. Computer simulation of feeding behaviour in the thylacine and dingo as a novel test for convergence and niche overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; Moreno, Karen; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2007-11-22

    The extinct marsupial thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) and placental grey wolf (Canis lupus) are commonly presented as an iconic example of convergence. However, various analyses suggest distinctly different behaviours and specialization towards either relatively small or large prey in the thylacine, bringing the degree of apparent convergence into question. Here we apply a powerful engineering tool, three-dimensional finite element analysis incorporating multiple material properties for bone, to examine mechanical similarity and niche overlap in the thylacine and the wolf subspecies implicated in its extinction from mainland Australia, Canis lupus dingo. Comparisons of stress distributions not only reveal considerable similarity, but also informative differences. The thylacine's mandible performs relatively poorly where only the actions of the jaw muscles are considered, although this must be considered in the light of relatively high bite forces. Stresses are high in the posterior of the thylacine's cranium under loads that simulate struggling prey. We conclude that relative prey size may have been comparable where both species acted as solitary predators, but that the dingo is better adapted to withstand the high extrinsic loads likely to accompany social hunting of relatively large prey. It is probable that there was considerable ecological overlap. As a large mammalian hypercarnivore adapted to taking small-medium sized prey, the thylacine may have been particularly vulnerable to disturbance.

  15. Y chromosome analysis of dingoes and southeast asian village dogs suggests a neolithic continental expansion from Southeast Asia followed by multiple Austronesian dispersals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Benjamin N; Brown, Sarah K; Stephens, Danielle; Pedersen, Niels C; Wu, Jui-Te; Berry, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Dogs originated more than 14,000 BP, but the location(s) where they first arose is uncertain. The earliest archeological evidence of ancient dogs was discovered in Europe and the Middle East, some 5-7 millennia before that from Southeast Asia. However, mitochondrial DNA analyses suggest that most modern dogs derive from Southeast Asia, which has fueled the controversial hypothesis that dog domestication originated in this region despite the lack of supporting archeological evidence. We propose and investigate with Y chromosomes an alternative hypothesis for the proximate origins of dogs from Southeast Asia--a massive Neolithic expansion of dogs from this region that largely replaced more primitive dogs to the west and north. Previous attempts to test matrilineal findings with independent patrilineal markers have lacked the necessary genealogical resolution and mutation rate estimates. Here, we used Y chromosome genotypes, composed of 29 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and 5 single tandem repeats (STRs), from 338 Australian dingoes, New Guinea singing dogs, and village dogs from Island Southeast Asia, along with modern European breed dogs, to estimate the evolutionary mutation rates of Y chromosome STRs based on calibration to the independently known age of the dingo population. Dingoes exhibited a unique haplogroup characterized by a single distinguishing SNP mutation and 14 STR haplotypes. The age of the European haplogroup was estimated to be only 1.7 times older than that of the dingo population, suggesting an origin during the Neolithic rather than the Paleolithic (as predicted by the Southeast Asian origins hypothesis). We hypothesize that isolation of Neolithic dogs from wolves in Southeast Asia was a key step accelerating their phenotypic transformation, enhancing their value in trade and as cargo, and enabling them to rapidly expand and replace more primitive dogs to the West. Our findings also suggest that dingoes could have arrived in Australia

  16. Impact of pharmacy worker training and deployment on access to essential medicines and health outcomes in Malawi: protocol for a cluster quasi-experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinga, Solomon J; Jenny, Alisa M; Larsen-Cooper, Erin; Crawford, Jessica; Matemba, Charles; Stergachis, Andy; Babigumira, Joseph B

    2014-10-11

    Access to essential medicines is core to saving lives and improving health outcomes of people worldwide, particularly in the low- and middle-income countries. Having a trained pharmacy workforce to manage the supply chain and safely dispense medicines is critical to ensuring timely access to quality pharmaceuticals and improving child health outcomes. This study measures the impact of an innovative pharmacy assistant training program in the low-income country of Malawi on access to medicines and health outcomes. We employ a cluster quasi-experimental design with pre-and post-samples and decision analytic modeling to examine access to and the use of medicines for malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea for children less than 5 years of age. Two intervention districts, with newly trained and deployed pharmacy assistants, and two usual care comparison districts, matched on socio-economic, geographic, and health-care utilization indicators, were selected for the study. A baseline household survey was conducted in March 2014, prior to the deployment of pharmacy assistants to the intervention district health centers. Follow-up surveys are planned at 12- and 24-months post-deployment. In addition, interviews are planned with caregivers, and time-motion studies will be conducted with health-care providers at the health centers to estimate costs and resources use. This impact evaluation is designed to provide data on the effects of a novel pharmacy assistant program on pharmaceutical systems performance, and morbidity and mortality for the most common causes of death for children under five. The results of this study should contribute to policy decisions about whether and how to scale up the health systems strengthening workforce development program to have the greatest impact on the supply chain and health outcomes in Malawi.

  17. Information manual for the experimentation of the deployment of optical fibers on public power distribution networks; Notice d'information pour l'experimentation du deploiement de fibres optiques sur les reseaux publics d'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    During the French inter-ministry committee for the national development (CIADT) of July 9, 2001, the government decided to launch a feasibility study about the deployment of telecommunication optical fibers over the whole territory using the electricity transportation grid. The aim is to give access to high-speed Internet to everyone and at a reasonable cost. This manual summarizes the technical, legal and economical results of the study carried out by the working group: 1 - the actors in concern (managers of power transportation and distribution networks, country authorities, managers and users of telecommunication infrastructures, regulatory agencies, financial organizations); 2 - the telecommunication networks on power lines; 3 - the feasibility of the experimentation (relations between the different partners, conditions); 4 - the implementation of the experimentation (useful contacts, contracts); 5 - the experimentation areas. Appendixes. (J.S.)

  18. Deployment psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abel

    breaking fashion, brings into a single compendium the growing body of literatures, since Yerkes's work, which point to the ... [they] reflect on how they have changed”.3 From the outset of this text, there is a very real and palpable sense .... embedded and enmeshed. At times, Deployment psychology appears to ignore the.

  19. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    environment. Zero shift errors  Part replacement after testing  Material damage, including damage to composite fibers and plastic deformation in...of motors or deployment drivers  Loss or redistribution of lubrication Hysteresis errors  Material creep due to time in storage and time in the...measurements can be made with fixed references within the room. The first solution is self -explanatory. The second solution requires regular reference

  20. Assessment of dynamic analyses for deploying space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, D.; Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A selected list of references on the analysis of the deployment concepts for large space truss structures are reviewed. The stability of the deployment process is discussed, and stable methods of deployment mentioned. Analytical and experimental needs to assess feasibility and performance of proposed deployment concepts are outlined.

  1. WING/WORLD: An Open Experimental Toolkit for the Design and Deployment of IEEE 802.11-Based Wireless Mesh Networks Testbeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Miorandi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Mesh Networks represent an interesting instance of light-infrastructure wireless networks. Due to their flexibility and resiliency to network failures, wireless mesh networks are particularly suitable for incremental and rapid deployments of wireless access networks in both metropolitan and rural areas. This paper illustrates the design and development of an open toolkit aimed at supporting the design of different solutions for wireless mesh networking by enabling real evaluation, validation, and demonstration. The resulting testbed is based on off-the-shelf hardware components and open-source software and is focused on IEEE 802.11 commodity devices. The software toolkit is based on an “open” philosophy and aims at providing the scientific community with a tool for effective and reproducible performance analysis of WMNs. The paper describes the architecture of the toolkit, and its core functionalities, as well as its potential evolutions.

  2. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  3. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  4. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  5. Deployment and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deployed parent returns, individual counseling and/or family counseling may help. Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org: Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Helping Children Adjust to a Move A Message to ...

  6. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  7. Effect of deploying community health assistants on appropriate treatment for diarrhoea, malaria and pneumonia: quasi-experimental study in two districts of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemba, Godfrey; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Vosburg, Kathryn Bradford; Prust, Margaret L; Keller, Brett; Worku, Yekoyesew; Zulu, Happy; White, Emily; Hamer, Davidson H

    2016-08-01

    A critical shortage of human resources for health in Zambia remains a great challenge. In response, the Zambian Ministry of Health developed a national community health assistant (CHA) programme, aiming to create a well-trained and motivated community-based health workforce. This study assessed whether CHAs increased treatment rates for diarrhoea, confirmed malaria or pneumonia in the first programme year. This study used a quasi-experimental difference-in-difference design, comparing changes in the catchment areas of health posts with CHAs to those without. Baseline and end line household surveys were conducted to measure the proportion of children under 5 years treated for diarrhoea, malaria or pneumonia in the 2 weeks before the survey and immunisation rates and malaria rapid diagnostic test rates. We surveyed 2330 women with children under five from the intervention area and 2314 from comparison areas at baseline and end line. Treatment for diarrhoea, malaria or pneumonia increased by 18.0% (P < 0.01) and 23.5% (P < 0.01) in the intervention and comparison groups, respectively, but DID analysis was not significant (P = 0.27). The proportion of fully immunised children grew by 7.5% in the intervention, but shrank by 7.5% in the comparison group (DID: 0.14; 95% CI 0.12-0.16, P < 0.01). Although we observed no significant difference between the intervention and comparison groups in the DID estimates for the primary outcome, there were significant increases after one year in treatment for all three diseases in the intervention group from baseline to end line and in the proportion of fully immunised children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil is a proposed technology that will be designed and tested to provide a greatly superior parachute precision delivery system...

  9. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  10. Inflatable Wing Deployment Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight experiment conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Wing deployment time is typically on the order of a third of a second, almost faster than the human eye can see. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  11. The Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationships the psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family members child and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic) military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions). This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. PMID:28845345

  12. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  13. Deploying OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Pepple, Ken

    2011-01-01

    OpenStack was created with the audacious goal of being the ubiquitous software choice for building public and private cloud infrastructures. In just over a year, it's become the most talked-about project in open source. This concise book introduces OpenStack's general design and primary software components in detail, and shows you how to start using it to build cloud infrastructures. If you're a developer, technologist, or system administrator familiar with cloud offerings such as Rackspace Cloud or Amazon Web Services, Deploying OpenStack shows you how to obtain and deploy OpenStack softwar

  14. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  15. Deployed Analyst Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    request ............................93 Figure 34. CAA Operations Analysis Division SharePoint Site...................................................98...organization assistance—maintains a SharePoint site (focused on current operations) on Non-secure Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET) to...facilitate deployed ORSA operations and analytical reachback support. Vision. The CAA OA Division Current Operations Team SharePoint site identifies

  16. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  17. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  18. Deployment Pulmonary Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    respiratory pathogens. 114-117 Due to the use of improvised explosive devices and mines in OEF/OIF, Service members are also at risk for blast...121. Litz BT, Keane TM, Fisher L, Marx B, Monacol V. Physical health complaints in combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: A preliminary report... devices (e.g., thermo luminescent dosimeter) as required by occupational specialty of personnel. X X Draw pre-deployment serum specimens. X

  19. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Deployable tensegrity towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  1. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  2. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  3. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Forsyth

    Full Text Available There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor is a large (≥ 150 kg exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and feral cats (Felis catus utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring. We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10% fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources.

  4. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, David M; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D; Hampton, Jordan O; Woolnough, Andrew P; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥ 150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources.

  5. How Does a Carnivore Guild Utilise a Substantial but Unpredictable Anthropogenic Food Source? Scavenging on Hunter-Shot Ungulate Carcasses by Wild Dogs/Dingoes, Red Foxes and Feral Cats in South-Eastern Australia Revealed by Camera Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, David M.; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D.; Hampton, Jordan O.; Woolnough, Andrew P.; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources. PMID:24918425

  6. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  7. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  8. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  9. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  10. Urban Code/ Urban Code Deploy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — COTS databases to support the automation of application deployments through different environments. It keeps track of software deliverables at various stages of SDLC...

  11. Deploying the Mental Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing and an “illumination direction” (for the shading. Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

  12. SDN/NFV orchestration for dynamic deployment of virtual SDN controllers as VNF for multi-tenant optical networks

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Raül; Vilalta, Ricard; Casellas, Ramon; Martínez, Ricardo; Szyrkowiec, T.; Autenrieth, A.; López, Víctor; López, D.

    2015-01-01

    We propose to virtualize the SDN control functions and move them to the cloud. We experimentally evaluate the first SDN/NFV orchestration architecture to dynamically deploy independent SDN controller instances for each deployed virtual optical network.

  13. Deployable Structural Booms for Large Deployable Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a new generation of large, high power deployable solar arrays has been identified as the most significant challenge facing the development of...

  14. Safety Pilot Model Deployment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data were collected during the Safety Pilot Model Deployment (SPMD). The data sets that these entities will provide include basic safety messages (BSM), vehicle...

  15. Deployable Entry-system Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Deployable Entry-system ProjecT (ADEPT) will develop requirements for the ADEPT flight test.  Prior entry systems used high mass thermal protection...

  16. The parenting cycle of deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R; Ross, Abigail

    2012-02-01

    Parents of dependent children comprise approximately 42% of Active Duty and National Guard/Reserve military members serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recent estimates indicate that more than two million children have experienced parental deployment since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This article seeks to characterize the impact of the deployment life cycle on parenting roles among service members and at-home partners/caregivers of dependent children. Specifically, a new conceptual framework is presented for considering the ways in which parenting and co-parenting processes are affected by the demands and transitions inherent in contemporary deployment to a war zone. Although the phase-based emotional cycle of deployment continues to offer an instructive description of the broad challenges faced by military couples, a parenting cycle of deployment model shifts the perspective to the critical and largely ignored processes of parenting in the context of deployment and war, and to the realities faced by parents serving in the U.S. military. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research related to military families are addressed.

  17. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  18. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  19. Using Deduplicating Storage for Efficient Disk Image Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many clouds and network testbeds use disk images to initialize local storage on their compute devices. Large facilities must manage thousands or more images, requiring significant amounts of storage. At the same time, to provide a good user experience, they must be able to deploy those images quickly. Driven by our experience in operating the Emulab site at the University of Utah---a long-lived and heavily-used testbed---we have created a new service for efficiently storing and deploying disk images. This service exploits the redundant data found in similar images, using deduplication to greatly reduce the amount of physical storage required. In addition to space savings, our system is also designed for highly efficient image deployment---it integrates with an existing highly-optimized disk image deployment system, Frisbee, without significantly increasing the time required to distribute and install images. In this paper, we explain the design of our system and discuss the trade-offs we made to strike a balance between efficient storage and fast disk image deployment. We also propose a new chunking algorithm, called AFC, which enables fixed-size chunking for deduplicating allocated disk sectors. Experimental results show that our system reduces storage requirements by up to 3x while imposing only a negligible runtime overhead on the end-to-end disk-deployment process.

  20. Folding, stowage, and deployment of viscoelastic tape springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of the folding, stowage, and deployment behavior of viscoelastic tape springs. Experiments show that during folding the relationship between load and displacement is nonlinear and varies with rate and temperature. In particular, the limit an...

  1. Concentric Tube Robots as Steerable Needles: Achieving Follow-the-Leader Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hunter B; Neimat, Joseph; Webster, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Concentric tube robots can enable new clinical interventions if they are able to pass through soft tissue, deploy along desired paths through open cavities, or travel along winding lumens. These behaviors require the robot to deploy in such a way that the curved shape of its shaft remains unchanged as the tip progresses forward (i.e., "follow-the-leader" deployment). Follow-the-leader deployment is challenging for concentric tube robots due to elastic (and particularly torsional) coupling between the tubes that form the robot. However, as we show in this paper, follow-the-leader deployment is possible, provided that tube precurvatures and deployment sequences are appropriately selected. We begin by defining follow-the-leader deployment and providing conditions that must be satisfied for a concentric tube robot to achieve it. We then examine several useful special cases of follow-the-leader deployment, showing that both circular and helical precurvatures can be employed, and provide an experimental illustration of the helical case. We also explore approximate follow-the-leader behavior and provide a metric for the similarity of a general deployment to a follow-the-leader deployment. Finally, we consider access to the hippocampus in the brain to treat epilepsy, as a motivating clinical example for follow-the-leader deployment.

  2. Deployment of the ATLAS High-Level Triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Anjos, A; Baines, J T M; Beck, H P; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Bosman, M; Burckhart, Doris; Caprini, M; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Ciobotaru, M; Comune, G; Conde, P; Corso-Radu, A; Crone, G; Damazio, D; De Santo, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Di Mattia, A; Dobson, M; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Falciano, S; Ferrari, R; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Garitaonandia, H; George, S; Ghete, V; Goncalo, R; Gorini, B; Gruwé, M; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Joos, M; Kabana, S; Kazarov, A; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Kirk, J; Kolos, S; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootz, A; Lankford, A; Lehmann, G; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Meirosu, C; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Negri, A; Nikitin, N; Nisati, A; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Petersen, J; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Sánchez, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; Seixas, J M; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sloper, J; Sobreira, A; Soloviev, I; Soluk, R A; Stancu, S; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Usai, G; Vandelli, Wainer R; Venda-Pinto, B; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S J; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wiesmann, M; Yasu, Y; Zobernig, G; 14th IEEE - NPSS Real Time Conference 2005 Nuclear Plasma Sciences Society

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS combined test beam in the second half of 2004 saw the first deployment of the ATLAS High-Level Triggers (HLT). The next steps are deployment on the pre-series farms in the experimental area during 2005, commissioning and cosmics tests in 2006 and collisions in 2007. This paper reviews the experience gained in the test beam, describes the current status and discusses the further enhancements to be made. We address issues related to the dataflow, selection algorithms, testing, software distribution, installation and improvements.

  3. High-frequency field-deployable isotope analyzer for hydrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena S.F. Berman; Manish Gupta; Chris Gabrielli; Tina Garland; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    A high-frequency, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer was developed. The instrument was deployed for 4 contiguous weeks in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest Long-term Ecological Research site in western Oregon, where it was used for real-time measurement of the isotope ratios of precipitation and stream water during three large storm events. We were able...

  4. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  5. Its deployment and transportation policies

    OpenAIRE

    YGNACE, JL; UNO, N

    2004-01-01

    Technology has driven the mobility needs of people and has been critical in the movement of goods. The newest wave of transportation technologies is the development and deployment of intelligent transportation systems. For the last 15 years, these systems have been promoted by the private industry and the public sector, mainly departments of transportation. The academia has also been involved as a developers and evaluators of technologies. However, the progress of its implementation has been ...

  6. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    researchers have found that spouses were more likely to seek care for their mental health problems and were less concerned with the stigma of mental...Few Guard members had anticipated the degree of adjustments that would be required: When you have been in a foreign country, coming back is a...Changes in the children while the deployed member is gone can spur conflict, particularly when children make the transition from childhood to adolescence

  7. How Deployments Affect Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Interestingly, some service members welcomed the longer working days as a way to keep themselves busy and distracted from homesickness or thoughts of...want more-frequent communica- tion home. Some members with whom we spoke felt that talking to family while on deploy- ment only increased homesickness ...debt, to save for college , or to buy such items as cars. In this way, the rewards of a hard de- ployment can have long-term effects for military

  8. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  9. A Kirigami shape memory polymer honeycomb concept for deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Robin M.; Chen, Jianguo; Guo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Wenxin; Dobah, Yousef; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Leng, Jinsong; Peng, Hua-Xin

    2017-05-01

    We present a shape memory polymer (SMP) honeycomb with tuneable and shape morphing mechanical characteristics. Kirigami (Origami with cutting allowed) techniques have been used to design and manufacture the honeycomb. The cellular structure described in this work has styrene SMP hinges that create the shape change and the deployment actuation. To create a large volumetric deployment, the Kirigami open honeycomb configuration has been designed by setting an initial three-dimensional re-entrant auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) configuration, while the final honeycomb shape assume a convex (positive Poisson’s ratio) layout. A model was developed to predict the shape change of the structure, and compared to experimental results from a demonstrator honeycomb deployment test.

  10. Artist concept of Drogue Chute Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the drogue chute deployment as the Apollo Command Module returns to earth from a mission to the moon. The droge chutes serve to orient the Command Module properly for main chute deployment.

  11. Hierarchical Orbital Observatory Deployable Shroud (HOODS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large deployable telescopes such as NASA's 9.2m and 16.8m segmented ATLAST systems require commensurately large deployable sunshades for thermal control and to...

  12. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Page Content ... Deployment and Children Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Helping Children Adjust to a Move A ...

  13. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-22

    This document presents the Evaluation Teams plan for conducting the evaluation of the FOT in Washington State. A companion document exists for the evaluation of the Utah deployment. This plan includes the experimental design for testing hypotheses...

  14. Large space deployable antenna systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The design technology is described for manufacturing a 20 m or larger space erectable antenna with high thermal stability, high dynamic stiffness, and minimum stowed size. The selected approach includes a wrap rib design with a cantilever beam basic element and graphite-epoxy composite lenticular cross section ribs. The rib configuration and powered type operated deploying mechanism are described and illustrated. Other features of the parabolic reflector discussed include weight and stowed diameter characteristics, structural dynamics characteristics, orbit thermal aperture limitations, and equivalent element and secondary (on axis) patterns. A block diagram of the multiple beam pattern is also presented.

  15. Big Deployables in Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Bruce; Francis, William; Goff, Jonathan; Cross, Michael; Copel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The concept of utilizing small satellites to perform big mission objectives has grown from a distant idea to a demonstrated reality. One of the challenges in using small-satellite platforms for high-value missions is the packaging of long and large surface-area devices such as antennae, solar arrays and sensor positioning booms. One possible enabling technology is the slit-tube, or a deployable “tape-measure” boom which can be flattened and rolled into a coil achieving a high volumetric packa...

  16. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  17. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  18. Features of the Calculation Deployment Large Transformable Structures of Different Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zimin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress achieved in the design of space transformable structures to ensure a smooth and reliable deployment remains an important task. This type of construction can consist of dozens, hundreds or even thousands of interconnected elements. Deployment transformable space structures in orbit to test their performance in orbital conditions are associated with high material costs. Full deploy: experimental development process transformable structures involve a number of fundamental difficulties: It is impossible to eliminate the influence of gravity and resistance forces conditions. Thus, to calculate deploy of large transformable structures of various configurations is an important stage of their creation. Simulation provides an opportunity to analyze various schemes of deploy, to reveal their advantages and possible disadvantages. For numerical analysis of deploy of such structures is necessary to use modern software modeling of the dynamics of multi-component of mechanical systems such as EULER and Adams. Simulation of deployment space transformable structures was performed taking as example folding flat antenna contours diameter of 5 m and 20 m, foldable spatial calibration reflector diameter of 3 m, deployable antenna reflector truss-type aperture 3×6 m.The results of the calculations represent following characteristics: the time of adoption of the working position structures; form intermediate positions structures during deployment; dependence of opening angles and angular velocities of the design links on the time. The parameters of these calculations can be used as input in the development of structural elements providing deployment. They can also be used to prepare stands for experimental testing of disclosure designs in ground conditions. It should be noted that the theoretical models are the only way to analyze the deployment of such structures for possible emergency situations.

  19. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the C...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  20. Deployable Debris Shields For Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Crews, Jeanne

    1993-01-01

    Multilayer shields made of lightweight sheet materials deployed from proposed Space Station Freedom for additional protection against orbiting debris. Deployment mechanism attached at each location on exterior where extra protection needed. Equipment withdraws layer of material from storage in manner similar to unfurling sail or extending window shade. Number of layers deployed depends on required degree of protection, and could be as large as five.

  1. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  2. Self-Deploying Gossamer Support Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results demonstrated the feasibility of using shape memory polymer composites to deploy, tension and support gossamer antennas. Cornerstone Research Group,...

  3. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  4. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  5. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  6. Deployable System for Crash-Load Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    An externally deployable honeycomb structure is investigated with respect to crash energy management for light aircraft. The new concept utilizes an expandable honeycomb-like structure to absorb impact energy by crushing. Distinguished by flexible hinges between cell wall junctions that enable effortless deployment, the new energy absorber offers most of the desirable features of an external airbag system without the limitations of poor shear stability, system complexity, and timing sensitivity. Like conventional honeycomb, once expanded, the energy absorber is transformed into a crush efficient and stable cellular structure. Other advantages, afforded by the flexible hinge feature, include a variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid deployment methods. Radial deployment is utilized when omnidirectional cushioning is required. Linear deployment offers better efficiency, which is preferred when the impact orientation is known in advance. Several energy absorbers utilizing different deployment modes could also be combined to optimize overall performance and/or improve system reliability as outlined in the paper. Results from a series of component and full scale demonstration tests are presented as well as typical deployment techniques and mechanisms. LS-DYNA analytical simulations of selected tests are also presented.

  7. The purely functional software deployment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolstra, E.

    2006-01-01

    Software deployment is the set of activities related to getting software components to work on the machines of end users. It includes activities such as installation, upgrading, uninstallation, and so on. Many tools have been developed to support deployment, but they all have serious

  8. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  9. Deployable wing model considering structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness for deployment system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Keisuke; Wang, Yinan; Makihara, Kanjuro

    2017-11-01

    In future, wings will be deployed in the span direction during flight. The deployment system improves flight ability and saves storage space in the airplane. For the safe design of the wing, the deployment motion needs to be simulated. In the simulation, the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness should be considered because they may lead to undesirable phenomena such as a residual vibration after the deployment or a flutter during the deployment. In this study, the deployment motion is simulated in the time domain by using a nonlinear folding wing model based on multibody dynamics, absolute nodal coordinate formulation, and two-dimensional aerodynamics with strip theory. We investigate the effect of the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness on the time-domain deployment simulation.

  10. Modeling network technology deployment rates with different network models

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Yoo

    2011-01-01

    To understand the factors that encourage the deployment of a new networking technology, we must be able to model how such technology gets deployed. We investigate how network structure influences deployment with a simple deployment model and different network models through computer simulations. The results indicate that a realistic model of networking technology deployment should take network structure into account.

  11. RadNet Air Quality (Deployable) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet Deployable Monitoring is designed to collect radiological and meteorological information and data asset needed to establish the impact of radiation levels on...

  12. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  13. Field guide to quick deployment thermocouples

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Instructions for quick deployment of thermocouples to measure fire intensity at Kulm Wetland Management District as part of the Fire Intensity Monitoring survey....

  14. Maintenance decision support system deployment guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This is a guide for transportation professionals on why and how to deploy winter Maintenance Decision Support Systems (MDSS). Adverse winter weather can cause traffic delays and crashes. Treating the effects of winter weather can also have impacts on...

  15. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. These...

  16. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's Veritex(TM) materials. These...

  17. Office of Civilian Response Deployment Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The purpose of OCR DTS is to establish, manage and track relevant Civilian Response Corps teams for deployment by sector experience, training, education etc.

  18. Optimizing the Deployment of Public Access Defibrillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Timothy C.Y.; Demirtas, Derya; Kwon, Roy H.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a significant public health issue, and treatment, namely, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, is very time sensitive. Public access defibrillation programs, which deploy automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for bystander use in an emergency, reduce

  19. Extreme Environment Sampling System Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Venus or Comet mission architectures may feature robotic sampling systems comprised of a Sampling Tool and Deployment Mechanism. Since 2005, Honeybee has been...

  20. High Efficiency, Deployable Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrathin, lightweight, flexible, and easily deployable solar cell (SC) capable of specific power greater than 1kW/kg are at an early stage of development for...

  1. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  2. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  3. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    frequented by military families and by emailing announcements to military family life administrators located in all 50 states. Military couples were...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0131 TITLE: Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Knobloch...Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0131 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  4. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  5. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Deployed Military Members 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-10-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N10-P20 Wilson...training literature of new recruits or accessions, the rate of ID and IDA was a significant health risk to these military members . It was surmised...study inform nurses and health care professionals that are involved in the deployment preparation of military members . They should target assessing

  6. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  7. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  8. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  9. A gendered perspective on military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Nilsson, Johanna; Berkel, Laverne

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment, especially in combat or dangerous areas, can have a strong influence on subsequent mental health. This effect may be intensified as a result of the potential stigma that admission of mental health problems indicates weakness. Additional mental health issues exist for female soldiers from the National Guard who are pulled from non-military environments to work under dangerous conditions far from home and traditional social support. Minimal documentation is available about the day-to-day, gendered experiences of deployment for this group of female soldiers. To provide background for appropriate training and support, the aim of this study was to understand better the experiences of military deployment for women in the National Guard. We used content analysis to analyze individual, semi-structured interviews with a sample of 42 women from 7 U.S. National Guard units who were deployed in combat areas. Four general themes emerged about deployment experience: the general environment of stress, heterogeneous job responsibilities, home comes with you, and gendered stress. Military efforts are needed to address gender-specific issues associated with deployment and to develop resilience training that will optimize the mental health of female soldiers.

  10. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, Cristina; Aguilera, Francisco; González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Sandoval, Francisco

    2016-07-07

    In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN), nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i) to achieve good coverage; and (ii) to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  11. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Urdiales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN, nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i to achieve good coverage; and (ii to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  12. A Novel Deployment Scheme Based on Three-Dimensional Coverage Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Ruchuan; Sun, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Coverage pattern and deployment strategy are directly related to the optimum allocation of limited resources for wireless sensor networks, such as energy of nodes, communication bandwidth, and computing power, and quality improvement is largely determined by these for wireless sensor networks. A three-dimensional coverage pattern and deployment scheme are proposed in this paper. Firstly, by analyzing the regular polyhedron models in three-dimensional scene, a coverage pattern based on cuboids is proposed, and then relationship between coverage and sensor nodes' radius is deduced; also the minimum number of sensor nodes to maintain network area's full coverage is calculated. At last, sensor nodes are deployed according to the coverage pattern after the monitor area is subdivided into finite 3D grid. Experimental results show that, compared with traditional random method, sensor nodes number is reduced effectively while coverage rate of monitor area is ensured using our coverage pattern and deterministic deployment scheme. PMID:25045747

  13. Lightweight, Self-Deploying Foam Antenna Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Levin, Steven; Rand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight, deployable antennas for a variety of outer-space and terrestrial applications would be designed and fabricated according to the concept of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures, according to a proposal. Mechanically deployable antennas now in use are heavy, complex, and unreliable, and they utilize packaging volume inefficiently. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would be simple and would deploy themselves without need for any mechanisms and, therefore, would be more reliable. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would also weigh less, could be packaged in smaller volumes, and would cost less, relative to mechanically deployable antennas. The CHEM concept was described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56; and "Solar Heating for Deployment of Foam Structures" (NPO-20961), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 36. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The CHEM concept is one of utilizing opencell foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to make lightweight, reliable, simple, and inexpensive structures that can be alternately (1) compressed and stowed compactly or (2) expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM structure is fabricated at full size from a block of SMP foam in its glassy state [at a temperature below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP]. The structure is heated to the rubbery state of the SMP (that is, to a temperature above Tg) and compacted to a small volume. After compaction, the structure is cooled to the glassy state of the SMP. The compacting force can then be released and the structure remains compact as long as the temperature is kept below Tg. Upon subsequent heating of the structure above Tg, the simultaneous elastic recovery of the foam and its shape-memory effect cause the structure to expand to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the structure can be rigidified by

  14. Engineered spacecraft deployables influenced by nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, David; Wolpert, W. D.

    2009-08-01

    Northrop Grumman has been a leader in the space industry for over 50 years, and in fact was the first in the industry to produce a contractor-built spacecraft. Since the dawn of the Space Age and that Pioneer-1 spacecraft, every sub-system that makes up a spacecraft has grown in capability. One of the most visible changes to a spacecraft that enables these enhanced capabilities is the variety of appendages called deployable systems. These systems include solar arrays, antenna reflectors, telescopes and a current design for a tennis court sized sunshield. While the end product may look very different and perform different functions, all deployable systems share certain common attributes. Among these are: a latch mechanism for the deployable restraining it to the spacecraft for launch, an unlatching or release mechanism once orbit is achieved, an energy storage device or driving mechanism for deployment and a re-latching, or sometimes a repositioning device for orientation of the system during the mission. This paper describes these space-based systems and draws some comparisons with various natural analogs. While it may not be the case that the aerospace engineer is attempting to duplicate natural systems, it is almost certain that spacecraft deployable systems have been influenced by nature.

  15. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  16. Articulated Deployment System for Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, M.; Borst, G.; Grimminck, M.; Robroek, M.; Geuskens, F.

    2015-09-01

    An articulated deployment system is developed for the deployment and pointing of antenna reflectors with a larger diameter and extended focal length. The articulated boom can be folded in several configurations to stow on the spacecraft sidewall. The boom, made of carbon fibre that is configured for a low CTE of better than ±0.3μm/m-K, deploys by means of spring-driven hinges interconnected via synchronisation cables and is controlled by an actuator. When fully deployed the hinges are latched, providing a stiff structure essential for disturbance-free pointing of the antenna. For pointing, the existing ADTM Mk2 gimbal by Airbus Defence and Space UK is used. The arm is mounted (repeatably) to the spacecraft with an adjustable range of ±7mm in all axes for coarse adjustment and mounted (repeatably) to the reflector with fine adjustment range of ±2mm and ±1.5°.The reflector boom has a modular design, which allows a wide range of mission configurations by tuning only a few design parameters such as limb length, deployment angles, and the number of articulations required to stow the boom.

  17. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    behavioral problems in children , a higher risk of divorce , and higher rates of suicide. Not surprisingly, service members and spouses regularly name...applied only to children younger than 11, not to teenagers. Neither teens’ parents nor the youths themselves reported behavioral difficulties. But... preparing for deployment (developing an emergency financial plan or buying life insurance), the higher their parenting satisfaction after deployment

  18. Research on lightweight passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror in the deployable space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peifeng; Li, Chuang; Jing, Nan; Chong, Yaqin; Ren, Guorui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of lightweight passive deployment mechanism based on the tape spring and the shape memory alloy is presented for the secondary mirror of a deployable space telescope. In this passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror, the high elastic potential energy of the folded tape springs is used as driving force when the support structure is extended, and the high stiffness characteristics of the circular arc cross section of the tape spring can be used to achieve structure self-locking after deployment. Then a deployable space telescope combined with lightweight passive deployable mechanism for the secondary mirror is designed for applying to nanosatellite imaging. Furthermore, a lock-release device is designed to achieve the function of locking the folded structure and releasing on orbit by taking advantage of the phase transformation characteristics of shape memory alloy with temperature changing. Finally, the correction method for the deployment error of secondary mirror is discussed. The temperature of the tape springs is controlled respectively to make a required length change. This can achieve the purpose of adjusting the position of the secondary mirror and improve the deployment accuracy.

  19. Simulation of Locking Space Truss Deployments for a Large Deployable Sparse Aperture Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...6 Martin Marietta Box Truss Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Able Deployable Articulated Mast (ADAM...8 3. Martin Marietta Deployable Box Truss Design [2]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4

  20. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  1. Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E E

    1997-10-01

    cause lateral distribution of the water. The large tank that accommodates the sand bed and the necessary plumbing to simulate various well configurations was received. The monitoring equipment and the sensors are currently being installed. The experimental procedures for Phase II experiments are under further investigation and will be initiated upon installation of CATC and assembly of the monitoring system. Due to insufficient operating funds, the large scale experiments will not be done this year. Task No. 1.3: Technical Support - Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for In Situ Formed Barriers (B. Overbey & D. Locke, BDM Federal): The Operating Permit Renewal Request for bench scale operations in the FETC B-17 building was submitted to the FETC Lab Safety Committee for approval on 8/14/97. A review of the revised NEPA documents prepared last year indicates that these documents are still applicable for the current work. The initial design and specifications for the CATC vessel were prepared. Construction of the CATC was initiated in early July, the vessel was received August 15, 1997, and on-site work was completed this quarter.

  2. Development of Norms for the Post-deployment Reintegration Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    perspective. Recognizing the importance of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers...of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers developed the Army Post- Deployment... successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, and attempting to address the gaps and limitations of existing

  3. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges......More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  4. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  5. Techno-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Halldor Matthias

    2007-01-01

    og kombinerer en solid teknisk viden om telenet og tjenester med økonomisk teori og teori for regulering af telekommunikation. På grundlag heraf opstilles en tekno-økonomisk omkostningsmodel, der simulerer kapitaludgifter og ydelser. Som et særligt element i modellen benyttes spilteori til......-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment. It investigates the current market situation of broadband services, where the electricity companies challenge the incumbent telecom operators by extensive deployment of optical fibres to the end users. Very often the old telecom operators have a well-developed infrastructure...

  6. Industrial deployment of system engineering methods

    CERN Document Server

    Romanovsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A formal method is not the main engine of a development process, its contribution is to improve system dependability by motivating formalisation where useful. This book summarizes the results of the DEPLOY research project on engineering methods for dependable systems through the industrial deployment of formal methods in software development. The applications considered were in automotive, aerospace, railway, and enterprise information systems, and microprocessor design.  The project introduced a formal method, Event-B, into several industrial organisations and built on the lessons learned to

  7. Development of bonded joint technology for a rigidizable-inflatable deployable truss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2006-05-01

    Microwave and Synthetic Aperture Radar antenna systems have been developed as instrument systems using truss structures as their primary support and deployment mechanism for over a decade. NASA Langley Research Center has been investigating fabrication, modular assembly, and deployment methods of lightweight rigidizable/inflatable linear truss structures during that time for large spacecraft systems. The primary goal of the research at Langley Research Center is to advance these existing state-of-the-art joining and deployment concepts to achieve prototype system performance in a relevant space environment. During 2005, the development, fabrication, and testing of a 6.7 meter multi-bay, deployable linear truss was conducted at Langley Research Center to demonstrate functional and precision metrics of a rigidizable/inflatable truss structure. The present paper is intended to summarize aspects of bonded joint technology developed for the 6.7 meter deployable linear truss structure while providing a brief overview of the entire truss fabrication, assembly, and deployment methodology. A description of the basic joint design, surface preparation investigations, and experimental joint testing of component joint test articles will be described. Specifically, the performance of two room temperature adhesives were investigated to obtain qualitative data related to tube folding testing and quantitative data related to tensile shear strength testing. It was determined from the testing that a polyurethane-based adhesive best met the rigidizable/inflatable truss project requirements.

  8. An efficient genetic algorithm for maximum coverage deployment in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Yong-Hyuk

    2013-10-01

    Sensor networks have a lot of applications such as battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and industrial diagnostics. Coverage is one of the most important performance metrics for sensor networks since it reflects how well a sensor field is monitored. In this paper, we introduce the maximum coverage deployment problem in wireless sensor networks and analyze the properties of the problem and its solution space. Random deployment is the simplest way to deploy sensor nodes but may cause unbalanced deployment and therefore, we need a more intelligent way for sensor deployment. We found that the phenotype space of the problem is a quotient space of the genotype space in a mathematical view. Based on this property, we propose an efficient genetic algorithm using a novel normalization method. A Monte Carlo method is adopted to design an efficient evaluation function, and its computation time is decreased without loss of solution quality using a method that starts from a small number of random samples and gradually increases the number for subsequent generations. The proposed genetic algorithms could be further improved by combining with a well-designed local search. The performance of the proposed genetic algorithm is shown by a comparative experimental study. When compared with random deployment and existing methods, our genetic algorithm was not only about twice faster, but also showed significant performance improvement in quality.

  9. Auxetic shape memory alloy cellular structures for deployable satellite antennas: design, manufacture and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Maio D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the production development and experimental tests related to an hybrid honeycomb-truss made of shape memory alloy (Ni48Ti46Cu6, and used as a demonstrator for a deployable antenna in deep-space missions. Specific emphasis is placed on the modal analysis techniques used to test the lightweight SMA structure.

  10. Auxetic shape memory alloy cellular structures for deployable satellite antennas: design, manufacture and testing

    OpenAIRE

    Di Maio D.; Toso M.; Coconnier C.; Jacobs S.; Scarpa F.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the production development and experimental tests related to an hybrid honeycomb-truss made of shape memory alloy (Ni48Ti46Cu6), and used as a demonstrator for a deployable antenna in deep-space missions. Specific emphasis is placed on the modal analysis techniques used to test the lightweight SMA structure.

  11. Auxetic shape memory alloy cellular structures for deployable satellite antennas: design, manufacture and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F.; Jacobs, S.; Coconnier, C.; Toso, M.; di Maio, D.

    2010-06-01

    We describe the production development and experimental tests related to an hybrid honeycomb-truss made of shape memory alloy (Ni48Ti46Cu6), and used as a demonstrator for a deployable antenna in deep-space missions. Specific emphasis is placed on the modal analysis techniques used to test the lightweight SMA structure.

  12. Future wind deployment scenarios for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, Jarrad G

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available expansion planning exercise is undertaken. The results of this show that a considerable deployment of wind into the future should be expected where in least-cost scenarios ˜15-25 GW of installed wind capacity by 2030 (˜10-20% of the energy mix), ˜40-60 GW...

  13. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager advanced deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Coupland, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    If you are an experienced Configuration Manager administrator looking to advance your career or get more from your current environment, then this book is ideal for you. Prior experience of deploying and managing a Configuration Manager site would be helpful in following the examples throughout this book.

  14. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development: A Novel Approach. ... Therefore the software engineer has enormous task in engineering functional software that can work and be delivered on time..This paper focuses on how customers' voice can be heard in order to reduce development and ...

  15. Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to Intercept Small Arms and Ammunition ... The present practice of stop and search fails to capture most vehicles conveying sensitive and dangerous security exhibits such as ..... transmitter and responder. Simply put, transponder is an electric device used to.

  16. Design, Implementation and Deployment of PAIRwise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Allan; Almeroth, Kevin; Bimber, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Increased access to the Internet has dramatically increased the sources from which students can deliberately or accidentally copy information. This article discusses our motivation to design, implement, and deploy an Internet based plagiarism detection system, called PAIRwise, to address this growing problem. We give details as to how we detect…

  17. Deploying Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development efforts that ignore IK would end up wasting enormous amounts of resources and might not achieve expected results. The need to deploy IK for sustainable development can be conceptualised when one observes the dynamics and total shift of Africans away from their culture towards western knowledge.

  18. Deployment Strategies and Clustering Protocols Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chérif Diallo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks face significant design challenges due to limited computing and storage capacities and, most importantly, dependence on limited battery power. Energy is a critical resource and is often an important issue to the deployment of sensor applications that claim to be omnipresent in the world of future. Thus optimizing the deployment of sensors becomes a major constraint in the design and implementation of a WSN in order to ensure better network operations. In wireless networking, clustering techniques add scalability, reduce the computation complexity of routing protocols, allow data aggregation and then enhance the network performance. The well-known MaxMin clustering algorithm was previously generalized, corrected and validated. Then, in a previous work we have improved MaxMin by proposing a Single- node Cluster Reduction (SNCR mechanism which eliminates single-node clusters and then improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we show that MaxMin, because of its original pathological case, does not support the grid deployment topology, which is frequently used in WSN architectures. The unreliability feature of the wireless links could have negative impacts on Link Quality Indicator (LQI based clustering protocols. So, in the second part of this paper we show how our distributed Link Quality based d- Clustering Protocol (LQI-DCP has good performance in both stable and high unreliable link environments. Finally, performance evaluation results also show that LQI-DCP fully supports the grid deployment topology and is more energy efficient than MaxMin.

  19. Supporting Children and Families throughout Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    A military deployment is a challenging time for all family members. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they often do not have skills to handle all of the change and uncertainty and are still learning to manage their emotions and behaviors. They do not have a wealth of past experiences to rely on as adults do. They also do not have…

  20. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... product design, development, and manufacture. Traditionally, the house of quality has been used in the automobile industry and other factory environments, but the same challenge of managing design complexity that Quality Function. Deployment tackles in the product industry also plagues the software ...

  1. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  2. ELFms deployment in- and outside CERN CC

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, G

    2004-01-01

    ELFms (http://cern.ch/elfms) stands for Extremely Large Fabric management system, and comprises tools for fabric configuration and installation (Quattor), monitoring (Lemon), and hardware/state management (LEAF). In this talk, I will describe the ELFms modules and overall architecture, as well as the integration/deployment status at CERN-CC and other sites/projects.

  3. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  4. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  5. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study to study military family readiness. This article presents analyses on marital relationships, family environment, psychological and behavioral health, child well-being, and military integration.

  6. Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  7. Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings fully deployed during flight following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Californiaornia. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  8. Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings continue deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  9. NOC Liverpool Unit 117 Glider deployment report for the DEFRA MAREMAP Project, April - May 2012 deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document summarises the extended deployment of a 200 metre depth rated Slocum Electric glider by the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, UK from the 2nd April to 17th May 2012. The deployment was aimed as a pilot study for the use of gliders by environment agencies to monitor marine conservation zones. Lithium expendable batteries were used inside the glider to provide an extended endurance. The glider had a series of science sensors installed to measure physical oceanographic and b...

  10. Drogue parachute deployment dynamics of the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A. K.; Utreja, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental investigations are presented for two deployment concepts of the drogue parachute deployment for the space shuttle solid rocket booster. The analysis represents the motion of three coupled rigid bodies, with one of the bodies having variable mass and moment of inertia. The unfurling process of the parachute from the bag is idealized as the flow of a continuum out of a control surface. The pilot parachute or tethered nose cap is modeled as a flexible pendulum with a nonlinear spring and a moving support. Measured wind tunnel test data compare reasonably well with the theory.

  11. Dynamic sensor deployment for the monitoring of chemical releases in urban environments (DYCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.; Robins, Alan; Rudd, Alison; Wilks, Ashley

    2011-05-01

    We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders to provide a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne chemical threat agents following their release into the environment. We describe the development and experimental results for a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

  12. Optimization of equipment deployment on fire trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowicki Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the problem of deploying firemen’ equipment is discussed in order to achieve the best value of ergonomic indicators for fireman during anti-fire action. The equipment can be deployed on the fore truck in a different ways. We are looking for the best way to do it from the point of view of ergonomics. The multi-criterial optimization problem of equipment location on the vehicle has been formulated. It is linear integer programming problem with three criteria functions. It is able to solve that problem using formal method after some modifications. It is possible to receive several solutions from multi-criterial optimization problem and then evaluate them in a virtual simulation environment. It can then be taken into account a number of additional factors that are important for fireman and ergonomics.

  13. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    of Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 (N = 743), we assessed community reintegration difficulties 2.5 years after home coming (study sample: N = 454). Furthermore, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed before, during, and after deployment. Trajectories of PTSD symptoms...... from a previously published latent growth mixture modeling analysis were used to address whether community reintegration difficulties differ as a result of course and level of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: Between 3.6 and 18.0 % reported to have some, a lot, or extreme difficulties in reintegration domains...... such as interpersonal functioning, productivity, community involvement, and self-care. Mean level of reintegration difficulties differed significantly across six PTSD symptom trajectories (range 6.35-36.00); with more symptomatic trajectories experiencing greater community reintegration difficulties. CONCLUSIONS...

  14. PEP Deployment and Bandwidth Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younghusband, Charles; Slade, Peter; Weaver, Jeff

    This paper will discuss current deployment scenarios for Performance Enhancement Proxies (PEP) technologies in broadband satellite access systems from the perspective of one PEP technology provider. Recent improvements such as DVB-S2 can provide substantial gains at the link layer. In order to achieve further efficiency gains, the satellite industry is now forced to look elsewhere - namely other layers in the data communications network stack. Satellite terminal manufacturers are now moving beyond basic TCP acceleration techniques to more comprehensive optimization techniques that incorporate advances in data compression and flexibility for more deployment scenarios. Some of the advances for PEP technology are in part due to CPU and memory technology advances, resulting in increasingly affordable access to computing power, allowing PEP manufacturers deliver substantial performance and bandwidth savings gains.

  15. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  16. Changing Family Roles - Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    on the impact of technology-based communication during deployment on later psychological distress and role functioning. PROGRESS TO DATE...higher levels of warmth and lower levels of agonism also reported lower levels of externalizing behavior in their children. When at-home partners...reported their children’s relationship changed over the course of the study, so did their reports of externalizing behavior in their children. 15. SUBJECT

  17. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.; Nelin, C. J.; Britt, E. J.; Klein, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems.

  18. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  19. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  20. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  1. iFlorida model deployment final evaluation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This document is the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Surface Transportation Security and Reliability Information System Model Deployment, or iFlorida Model Deployment. This report discusses findings in the following areas: ITS ...

  2. Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an affordable and ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable Roll-Out Boom technology that provides affordability and...

  3. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  4. Optimized Node Deployment Algorithm and Parameter Investigation in a Mobile Sensor Network for Robotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongxin Tang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile sensor networks are an important part of modern robotics systems and are widely used in robotics applications. Therefore, sensor deployment is a key issue in current robotics systems research. Since it is one of the most popular deployment methods, in recent years the virtual force algorithm has been studied in detail by many scientists. In this paper, we focus on the virtual force algorithm and present a corresponding parameter investigation for mobile sensor deployment. We introduce an optimized virtual force algorithm based on the exchange force, in which a new shielding rule grounded in Delaunay triangulation is adopted. The algorithm employs a new performance metric called ‘pair-correlation diversion', designed to evaluate the uniformity and topology of the sensor distribution. We also discuss the implementation of the algorithm's computation and analyse the influence of experimental parameters on the algorithm. Our results indicate that the area ratio, φs, and the exchange force constant, G, influence the final performance of the sensor deployment in terms of the coverage rate, the convergence time and topology uniformity. Using simulations, we were able to verify the effectiveness of our algorithm and we obtained an optimal region for the (φs, G-parameter space which, in the future, could be utilized as an aid for experiments in robotic sensor deployment.

  5. Shape memory polymer composite and its application in deployable hinge for space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Wang, Xiaohua; Lan, Xin; Lv, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    This paper is concerned about the basic properties of deployment for shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) and its application in deployable hinge for space structure. Shape-memory polymers (SMP) are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. One of another advantage, compared with other traditional material hinge, the SMPC carpenter type hinge is that it will not produce a large shock when it spring into the deployed position. There are several kinds of shape memory polymer composite (fiber reinforced, powder reinforced, etc,). Epoxy SMPs, carbon fibre fabric reinforced SMPC was introduced in this work. In order to investigate the basic performances of SMPC hinge, the experimental methods are used as follows: dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), three point bending test and the radio of shape recovery. In the end, the structure of the carpenter type hinge is introduced. The carpenter type hinge is one mechanism that has the advantage of high-reliability of the deployment; light weighted, and low cost. This SMPC carpenter type hinge performs good deployment performances during numerous thermomechanical cycles. So the potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.

  6. Evaluation of a Multimedia Intervention for Children and Families Facing Multiple Military Deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flittner O'Grady, Allison; Thomaseo Burton, E; Chawla, Neelu; Topp, David; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Repeated military deployments have been a common experience for many military families in the past 15 years. While there has been an increase in research and intervention focused on the effects on families of military deployments, much of this work has not focused specifically on the particular needs of young children. Talk, Listen, Connect: Multiple Deployments (TLC-II MD), a multimedia kit designed for home use, is among the first interventions directed toward young children. Created by Sesame Workshop and using popular Sesame Street characters, TLC-II MD was designed to support and equip families with young children with skills to address challenges associated with multiple deployments. This study utilized a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of TLC-II MD relative to a control condition using a Sesame Workshop multimedia kit not tailored to military families. Parents in both groups reported that children enjoyed the video overall and watched it repeatedly. Also in both groups, caregivers' depressive symptoms and children's aggressive behaviors declined significantly over time. Caregivers in the test group reported significantly larger increases in comfort discussing the deployment with their child and stronger perceptions that the DVD helped children to cope. Thus, the resilience-oriented materials were helpful to both groups, but those tailored to military families were significantly more likely to be perceived as helpful. Findings offer evidence regarding the ability of multimedia self-administered interventions to assist military families.

  7. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H; Friedman, Esther M; Trail, Thomas E; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationshipsthe psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family memberschild and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic)military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions).This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

  8. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    attended the Safe and Healthy Kids Fair and the National Employment Disability Awareness event. Recruitment Strategies for Phase 1 Recruitment... psychosocial needs of OEF/OIF families with very young children throughout the deployment lifecycle during the pre-deployment and deployment phases. Aim

  9. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study...

  10. Internet-based Spousal Communication during Deployment: Does it Increase Post-deployment Marital Satisfaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren N. Ponder

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the question: Is a service member’s post-deployment marital satisfaction correlated with frequency and mode of communication during deployment? This study used an anonymous exploratory design with a sample of 119 Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF or Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF married veterans. Service members who communicated daily during deployment with their spouses had higher marital satisfaction scores than those who communicated less than once per week. Additionally, participants who used US mail had the highest marital satisfaction scores compared to telephone and internet-based communication. This study expands the overwhelmingly qualitative current literature to include quantitative analysis of this topic. This study also depicts the veterans’ experiences since many of the previous studies of this topic used samples of spouses.

  11. Formal evaluation of the ADVANCE targeted deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricks, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research; Belella, P.A. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Koppelman, F.S.; Schofer, J.L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). McCormick School of Engineering; Sen, A.K. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Urban Transportation Center

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) advanced traveler information system (ATIS) demonstration project in northeastern Illinois was re-scoped in late 1994 from its originally-planned deployment of 3,000--5,000 in-vehicle navigation units to a so-called ``targeted`` deployment in which up to 75 vehicles were equipped with devices enabling them to receive real-time traffic information. These devices included (1) global positioning system (GPS) transmitters/receivers that enabled the vehicles while in the ADVANCE study area to serve as dynamic traffic probes as well as recipients of location data; and (2) navigation units that employed a comprehensive map data base and average (static) link travel times by time of day, stored on CD-ROM, which together computed efficient (least duration) routes between any origin and destination in the northwest portion of the Chicago metropolitan area. Experiments were designed to dispatch these equipped vehicles along links at headways or frequencies comparable to what would have been observed had full deployment actually occurred. Thus, within the limitations of this controlled environment, valuative experiments were conducted to assess the quality of several of the key sub-systems of ADVANCE in the context of structured performance hypotheses. Focused on-road tests began on June 1 and continued through December 14, 1995, followed by a period of data evaluation, documentation of results, and development of conclusions about the findings and usefulness of the project. This paper describes the tests, discusses development of the overall evaluation plan and the evaluation management concept which guided them, and reports on issuses and results of data analysis known at time of writing.

  12. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team.

  13. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Teacher Education. 13 7. Participants and Other Collaborating Organizations Individuals who Have Worked on the Project Name Role Person...service members back into family life after deployment can be extremely challenging for military couples. Understanding the factors that contribute to the...10 6. Products …………………………………………………………………………….….…………………..………………….. 10 7. Participants and Other Collaborating Organizations

  14. ROBODEXS; Multi-robot Deployment & Extraction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    These ranged from a scissor lift underbelly “robot elevator”, to a side-mounted clamshell box, to a rear-mounted scoop that was developed in theater...damage to the robot during lifting and increases the risk of injury to the Soldier. ROBODEXS has been designed to automatically deploy and extract...actuator to clamp the robot to the tray and then lift it to a vertical stowed position over the stroke of the actuator (Figure 3, right). When the actuator

  15. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin deploying the EASEP on surface of moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed deploying the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the Moon. Here, he is deploying the Passive Seismic Experiments Package (PSEP). Already deployed is the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR-3), which can be seen to the left and further in the background. In the center background is the Lunar Module (LM). A flag of the United States is deployed near the LM. In the far left background is the deployed black and white lunar surface television camera. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with the 70mm lunar surface camera.

  16. NOC turbulence glider deployment report for the Liverpool Bay Coastal Observatory, June 2011 deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P; Mclaughlin, D.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the NOC Liverpool turbulence glider deployment that occurred between Tuesday 28th June and Monday 4th July 2011 is provided in this document. The general objective of the deployment was to hold the glider on station at a nominal GPS location of 53o 48”N, -4o 00”W to provide a series of glider based turbulence probe and CTD data profiles. These profiles were initiated when the glider reached a nominal depth of 40 metres and continued until the glider approached the sea surface....

  17. SMUD Community Renewable Energy Deployment Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sison-Lebrilla, Elaine [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Tiangco, Valentino [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lemes, Marco [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ave, Kathleen [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    This report summarizes the completion of four renewable energy installations supported by California Energy Commission (CEC) grant number CEC Grant PIR-11-005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement, DE-EE0003070, and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CRED) program. The funding from the DOE, combined with funding from the CEC, supported the construction of a solar power system, biogas generation from waste systems, and anaerobic digestion systems at dairy facilities, all for electricity generation and delivery to SMUD’s distribution system. The deployment of CRED projects shows that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be successfully implemented under favorable economic conditions and business models and through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, the projects also demonstrate that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be readily implemented through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region.

  18. Expert Oracle SQL optimization, deployment, and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Hasler, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Expert Oracle SQL: Optimization, Deployment, and Statistics is about optimizing individual SQL statements, especially on production database systems. This Oracle-specific book begins by assuming you have already identified a particular SQL statement and are considering taking steps to improve its performance. The book describes a systematic process by which to diagnose a problem statement, identify a fix, and to implement that fix safely in a production system. You'll learn not only to improve performance when it is too slow, but also to stabilize performance when it is too variable. You'll learn about system statistics and how the Cost-Based Optimizer uses them to determine a suitable execution plan for a given statement. That knowledge provides the foundation from which to identify the root cause, and to stabilize and improve performance. Next after identifying a problem and the underlying root cause is to put in place a solution. Expert Oracle SQL: Optimization, Deployment, and Statistics explains how to ...

  19. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  20. Testing the Deployment Repeatability of a Precision Deployable Boom Prototype for the Proposed SWOT Karin Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Waldman, Jeff; Hughes, Richard; Peterson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled to launch in 2020, would provide critical information about Earth's oceans, ocean circulation, fresh water storage, and river discharge. The mission concept calls for a dual-antenna Ka-band radar interferometer instrument, known as KaRIn, that would map the height of water globally along two 50 km wide swaths. The KaRIn antennas, which would be separated by 10 meters on either side of the spacecraft, would need to be precisely deployable in order to meet demanding pointing requirements. Consequently, an effort was undertaken to design build and prototype a precision deployable Mast for the KaRIn instrument. Each mast was 4.5-m long with a required dilitation stability of 2.5 microns over 3 minutes. It required a minimum first mode of 7 Hz. Deployment repeatability was less than +/- 7 arcsec in all three rotation directions. Overall mass could not exceed 41.5 Kg including any actuators and thermal blanketing. This set of requirements meant the boom had to be three times lighter and two orders of magnitude more precise than the existing state of the art for deployable booms.

  1. Deployment and post-deployment experiences in OEF/OIF veterans: relationship to gray matter volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L Aupperle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combat-related PTSD has been associated with reduced gray matter volume in regions of the prefrontal and temporal cortex, hippocampus, insula, and amygdala. However, the relationship between gray matter volume and specific deployment and post-deployment experiences has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate how such experiences may contribute to structural brain changes for combat veterans. METHODS: Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans (N = 32 completed magnetic resonance imaging, the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and Clinical Administered PTSD Scale. Voxel-wise Huber robust multiple regressions were used to quantify the relationship between gray matter volume and deployment experiences (combat experiences, military social support and post-deployment symptoms (PTSD, alcohol use. RESULTS: There was an interaction between severity of combat experiences and military social support for orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume. Specifically, individuals with more orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume reported less combat experiences and higher unit support. Individuals with more severe PTSD symptoms showed reduced gray matter volume within a large temporal region (inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: The identified association between unit support and orbitofrontal gyrus volume supports two potential resilience mechanisms to be delineated with future longitudinal studies. First, individuals with larger orbitofrontal gyrus may engage in greater quality of social interactions and thus experience combat as less stressful. Second, individuals who experience greater unit support may preserve a larger orbitofrontal gyrus, serving to "protect" them from aversive consequences of combat.

  2. Deployment of ITS: A Summary of the 2010 National Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Stephen Reed [ORNL; Trombly, Jeff [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-08-01

    This report presents summary results of the 2010 ITS Deployment Tracking survey, the most recent survey conducted by the ITS Deployment Tracking Project. The U.S. Department of Transportation and its member agencies, including the Research and Innovative Technology Administration, have pursued a research and development agenda, the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Program, designed to integrate the latest in information technologies to improve the safety, mobility, and reliability of surface transportation modes. Within metropolitan areas, implementation of these advanced technologies has been accomplished by a variety of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies as well as the private sector. In order to measure the rate of ITS deployment within the nation s largest metropolitan areas, the ITS Deployment Tracking Project has conducted a nationwide survey of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies nearly every year since 1997. The results presented in this report are intended to be a summary of the entire database from the 2010 survey. Access to the complete survey results and previous national surveys are available on-line at http://www.itsdeployment.its.dot.gov. The website also provides access to survey results in the form of downloadable reports, including a survey summary for each survey type and fact sheets. Nearly 1,600 surveys were distributed to state and local transportation agencies in 2010. A total of seven (7) survey types were distributed including: Freeway Management, Arterial Management, Transit Management, Transportation Management Center (TMC), Electronic Toll Collection (ETC), Public Safety Law Enforcement, and Public Safety Fire/Rescue. Among other things, the data collection results indicate that ITS has moved from being experimental to mainstream and interest in continuing investments in ITS continues to be very strong. When asked about future deployment plans, one-third to three

  3. Easily Integrable Platform for the Deployment of a Remote Laboratory for Microcontrollers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio San-Cristobal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote laboratories are the natural solution in order to perform real experimentation under e-learning tools. Nevertheless these tools are the result of the research developed by the universities to cover their own needs without having in consideration the deployment of this technology by other institutions. This paper presents a hw prototype for a Remote Lab for microcontrollers that tries to solve these problems contributing new possibilities from the commercial and professional point of view.

  4. Local deformation method for measuring element tension in space deployable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the local deformation method to determine the tension of cord and thin membrane elements in space deployable structure as antenna reflector. Possible measuring instrument model, analytical and numerical solutions and experimental results are presented. The boundary effects on measurement results of metallic mesh reflector surface tension are estimated. The study case depicting non-uniform reflector surface tension is considered.

  5. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates for...... - First evidence relying on administrative records of measures of mental health service use - Significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use.......In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates...... for the non-deployed eligible men, and our results hold to various robustness checks. Our administrative records provide objective measures of mental health service use in the form of psychiatric diagnoses and purchase of mental health-related medication. The very rich data makes it possible to control...

  6. Finding Their Way Back In: Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messecar, Deborah C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe deployed National Guard members' and their families' perceptions of their experience with family reintegration, and the causes and conditions of challenges reintegration presents after deployment. A total of 26 National Guard members and 19 family members participated in individual (n = 22), couples (n = 6), or focus group (n = 17) interviews. In-depth interviews were used to assess needs and maximize input from military families regarding deployment-related experiences and reintegration issues. Qualitative coding and analysis of data were completed using NVivo. Finding their way back in is the key process that the military members must complete to successfully reestablish their desired social connections with the family and reclaim their place within the family. Several conditions shape the degree of challenges with reintegration that veterans and their family will encounter. These include preparation for deployment, length and type of deployment, communication during deployment, and finally, awareness of how deployment changes the military member and the family. Support resources dedicated to providing National Guard members and their families with assistance in preparing for deployments and educating them about the importance of communication during deployment should be maintained and expanded. Broader educational efforts that increase awareness of what to expect regarding how deployment changes the military member and the family are needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Perceived effect of deployment on families of UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandi, G; Greenberg, N; Fear, N T; Jones, N

    2017-10-01

    In the UK, little is known about the perceived effects of deployment, on military families, from military personnel in theatre. To investigate military personnel's perceptions of the impact of deployment on intimate relationships and children. Deployed service personnel who were in a relationship, and who had children, completed a survey while deployed on combat operations. Data were taken from four mental health surveys carried out in Iraq in 2009 and Afghanistan in 2010, 2011 and 2014. Among 4265 participants, after adjusting for military and social-demographic covariates, perceiving that deployment had a negative impact on intimate relationships and children was associated with psychological distress, and traumatic stress symptoms. Military personnel who reported being in danger of being injured or killed during deployment, were more likely to report a perceived negative effect of deployment on their intimate relationships. Reservists were less likely to report a perceived negative impact of deployment on their children compared with regulars. Military personnel who themselves planned to separate from their partner were more likely to report psychological distress, and stressors at home. Perceived insufficient support from the Ministry of Defence was associated with poor mental health, and holding a junior rank. Deployed UK military personnel with symptoms of psychological distress, who experienced stressors at home, were especially likely to perceive that their family were inadequately supported by the military. Those planning to separate from their partner were at increased risk of suffering with mental health problems while deployed.

  8. Understanding the elevated suicide risk of female soldiers during deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, A. E.; Gilman, S. E.; Rosellini, A. J.; Stein, M. B.; Bromet, E. J.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Little, R. J. A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Ursano, R. J.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Kessler, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) has found that the proportional elevation in the US Army enlisted soldier suicide rate during deployment (compared with the never-deployed or previously deployed) is significantly higher among women than men, raising the possibility of gender differences in the adverse psychological effects of deployment. Method Person-month survival models based on a consolidated administrative database for active duty enlisted Regular Army soldiers in 2004–2009 (n = 975 057) were used to characterize the gender × deployment interaction predicting suicide. Four explanatory hypotheses were explored involving the proportion of females in each soldier’s occupation, the proportion of same-gender soldiers in each soldier’s unit, whether the soldier reported sexual assault victimization in the previous 12 months, and the soldier’s pre-deployment history of treated mental/behavioral disorders. Results The suicide rate of currently deployed women (14.0/100 000 person-years) was 3.1–3.5 times the rates of other (i.e. never-deployed/previously deployed) women. The suicide rate of currently deployed men (22.6/100 000 person-years) was 0.9–1.2 times the rates of other men. The adjusted (for time trends, sociodemographics, and Army career variables) female:male odds ratio comparing the suicide rates of currently deployed v. other women v. men was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1–6.8), became 2.4 after excluding soldiers with Direct Combat Arms occupations, and remained elevated (in the range 1.9–2.8) after adjusting for the hypothesized explanatory variables. Conclusions These results are valuable in excluding otherwise plausible hypotheses for the elevated suicide rate of deployed women and point to the importance of expanding future research on the psychological challenges of deployment for women. PMID:25359554

  9. Stochastic Optimization for Nuclear Facility Deployment Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ross Daniel

    Single-use, low-enriched uranium oxide fuel, consumed through several cycles in a light-water reactor (LWR) before being disposed, has become the dominant source of commercial-scale nuclear electric generation in the United States and throughout the world. However, it is not without its drawbacks and is not the only potential nuclear fuel cycle available. Numerous alternative fuel cycles have been proposed at various times which, through the use of different reactor and recycling technologies, offer to counteract many of the perceived shortcomings with regards to waste management, resource utilization, and proliferation resistance. However, due to the varying maturity levels of these technologies, the complicated material flow feedback interactions their use would require, and the large capital investments in the current technology, one should not deploy these advanced designs without first investigating the potential costs and benefits of so doing. As the interactions among these systems can be complicated, and the ways in which they may be deployed are many, the application of automated numerical optimization to the simulation of the fuel cycle could potentially be of great benefit to researchers and interested policy planners. To investigate the potential of these methods, a computational program has been developed that applies a parallel, multi-objective simulated annealing algorithm to a computational optimization problem defined by a library of relevant objective functions applied to the Ver ifiable Fuel Cycle Simulati on Model (VISION, developed at the Idaho National Laboratory). The VISION model, when given a specified fuel cycle deployment scenario, computes the numbers and types of, and construction, operation, and utilization schedules for, the nuclear facilities required to meet a predetermined electric power demand function. Additionally, it calculates the location and composition of the nuclear fuels within the fuel cycle, from initial mining through

  10. Scientific data management challenges, technology and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotem, Doron

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with the volume, complexity, and diversity of data currently being generated by scientific experiments and simulations often causes scientists to waste productive time. Scientific Data Management: Challenges, Technology, and Deployment describes cutting-edge technologies and solutions for managing and analyzing vast amounts of data, helping scientists focus on their scientific goals. The book begins with coverage of efficient storage systems, discussing how to write and read large volumes of data without slowing the simulation, analysis, or visualization processes. It then focuses on the efficient data movement and management of storage spaces and explores emerging database systems for scientific data. The book also addresses how to best organize data for analysis purposes, how to effectively conduct searches over large datasets, how to successfully automate multistep scientific process workflows, and how to automatically collect metadata and lineage information. This book provides a comprehensive u...

  11. OpenFlow Deployment and Concept Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Hegr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terms such as SDN and OpenFlow (OF are often used in the research and development of data networks. This paper deals with the analysis of the current state of OpenFlow protocol deployment options as it is the only real representative protocol that enables the implementation of Software Defined Networking outside an academic world. There is introduced an insight into the current state of the OpenFlow specification development at various levels is introduced. The possible limitations associated with this concept in conjunction with the latest version (1.3 of the specification published by ONF are also presented. In the conclusion there presented a demonstrative security application addressing the lack of IPv6 support in real network devices since most of today's switches and controllers support only OF v1.0.

  12. Reconfigurability Function Deployment in Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian BRAD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the forthcoming highly dynamic and complex business environment high-speed and cost-effective development of software applications for targeting a precise, unique and momentary set of requirements (no more-no less associated to a customized business case will bring sig-nificant benefits both for producers and users. This requires a life cycle change-oriented ap-proach in software development. In this respect, designing software with intrinsic evolutionary resources for reconfiguration represents the sound approach. A methodology for concurrent deployment of reconfigurability characteristics in software applications is introduced in this paper. Its potential is exemplified in a case study dealing with web-based software tools to support systematic product innovation projects.

  13. Integrated personal health and care services deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villalba, E.; Casas, I.; Abadie, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The deployment and adoption of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in Europe has been slow and fragmented. There have been many initiatives and projects of this kind in different European regions, many of which have not gone beyond the pilot stage. We investigated the necessary...... conditions for mainstreaming these services into care provision. Methods: We conducted a qualitative analysis of 27 Telehealth, Telecare and Integrated Personal Health System projects, implemented across 20 regions in eight European countries. The analysis was based on Suter’s ten key principles...... of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in European regions has increased. Further research will reveal the weight of each facilitator and which combinations of facilitators lead to rapid adoption....

  14. Modeling thermal burns due to airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, G N; Sidhu, H S

    2005-12-01

    Automotive airbags are now a widely accepted safety measure designed to reduce morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents. Their usage is increasing with multiple airbags (driver, passenger and side curtain) being fitted to many vehicles. However the deployment of airbags has been identified as causing injuries in some instances including minor burns. There are three mechanisms for thermal burns due to an airbag; contact with the hot expelled gases from the airbag, contact with the hot airbag itself and melting of clothing from either of these contacts. A mathematical model is used here to predict the likelihood and severity of the first two types of burns. It is shown that direct contact with high temperature exhaust gases venting from the airbag can indeed lead to burns and that burns from contacting the hot airbag material are possible but far less likely to occur.

  15. Airbag deployment-related eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koisaari, Tapio; Leivo, Tiina; Sahraravand, Ahmad; Haavisto, Anna-Kaisa; Sulander, Pekka; Tervo, Timo M T

    2017-07-04

    We studied the correlation between airbag deployment and eye injuries using 2 different data sets. The registry of the Finnish Road Accident (FRA) Investigation Teams was analyzed to study severe head- and eyewear-related injuries. All fatal passenger car or van accidents that occurred during the years 2009-2012 (4 years) were included (n = 734). Cases in which the driver's front airbag was deployed were subjected to analysis (n = 409). To determine the proportion of minor, potentially airbag-related eye injuries, the results were compared to the data for all new eye injury patients (n = 1,151) recorded at the Emergency Clinic of the Helsinki University Eye Hospital (HUEH) during one year, from May 1, 2011, to April 30, 2012. In the FRA data set, the unbelted drivers showed a significantly higher risk of death (odds ratio [OR] = 5.89, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.33-10.9, P = 2.6E-12) or of sustaining head injuries (OR = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.59-3.97, P = 3.8E-5). Only 4 of the 1,151 HUEH patients were involved in a passenger car accident. In one of the crashes, the airbag operated, and the belted driver received 2 sutured eye lid wounds and showed conjunctival sugillation. No permanent eye injuries were recorded during the follow-up. The calculated annual airbag-related eye injury incidence was less than 1/1,000,000 people, 4/100,000 accidents, and 4/10,000 injured occupants. Airbag-related eye injuries occurred very rarely in car accidents in cases where the occupant survived and the restraint system was appropriately used. Spectacle use did not appear to increase the risk of eye injury in restrained occupants.

  16. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Sanmartin, Juan; Pelaez, Jesus; Ruiz, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    This Final Report covers the following main topics: 1) Brief Description of ProSEDS; 2) Mission Analysis; 3) Dynamics Reference Mission; 4) Dynamics Stability; 5) Deployment Control; 6) Updated System Performance; 7) Updated Mission Analysis; 8) Updated Dynamics Reference Mission; 9) Updated Deployment Control Profiles and Simulations; 10) Updated Reference Mission; 11) Evaluation of Power Delivered by the Tether; 12) Deployment Control Profile Ref. #78 and Simulations; 13) Kalman Filters for Mission Estimation; 14) Analysis/Estimation of Deployment Flight Data; 15) Comparison of ED Tethers and Electrical Thrusters; 16) Dynamics Analysis for Mission Starting at a Lower Altitude; 17) Deployment Performance at a Lower Altitude; 18) Satellite Orbit after a Tether Cut; 19) Deployment with Shorter Dyneema Tether Length; 20) Interactive Software for ED Tethers.

  17. Early identification of posttraumatic stress following military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Statnikov, Alexander; Andersen, Søren B

    2015-01-01

    by application of machine learning (ML) methods. METHODS: ML feature selection and prediction algorithms were applied to a prospective cohort of 561 Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 to identify unique risk indicators and forecast long-term posttraumatic stress responses. RESULTS: Robust pre......BACKGROUND: Pre-deployment identification of soldiers at risk for long-term posttraumatic stress psychopathology after home coming is important to guide decisions about deployment. Early post-deployment identification can direct early interventions to those in need and thereby prevents...... the development of chronic psychopathology. Both hold significant public health benefits given large numbers of deployed soldiers, but has so far not been achieved. Here, we aim to assess the potential for pre- and early post-deployment prediction of resilience or posttraumatic stress development in soldiers...

  18. Scalable Contents Delivery System with Dynamic Server Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuko Kamiya; Toshihiko Shimokawa; Fuminori Tanizaki; Norihiko Yoshida

    2010-01-01

    On providing broadband contents, to provide enough network bandwidth is an important. Existing Contents Delivery Network has mainly focused on increasing network bandwidth statically. Therefore, it is not flexible. In this paper, we propose Soarin, a novel contents delivery system to increase network bandwidth dynamically by deploying delivery servers in a wide area. Moreover Soarin can use various server deployment policy to deploy delivery servers, it can decide which server is suitable for...

  19. Design and deployment of secure, robust, and resilient SDN Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Scott-Hayward, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The scale of the Software-Defined Network (SDN) Controller design problem has become apparent with the expansion of SDN deployments. Initial SDN deployments were small-scale, single controller environments for research and usecase testing. Today, enterprise deployments requiring multiple controllers are gathering momentum e.g. Google’s backbone network, Microsoft’s public cloud, and NTT’s edge gateway. Third-party applications are also becoming available e.g. HP SDN App Store. The increase in...

  20. Flight qualification of mortar-actuated parachute deployment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief discussion outlines background of mortar use in parachute deployment systems. A description of the system operation is presented. Effects of the environment on performance are discussed as well as the instrumentation needed to assess this performance. Power unit qualification and lot qualification for shear pins and cartridges is delineated. Functional mortar system tests are described. Finally, bridle deployment and parachute deployment are discussed.

  1. Missile launch pad: an unusual consequence of airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnie, Davies; Emecheta, Ikechukwu E; Kevin, Hancock

    2011-02-17

    Vehicle airbags significantly reduce vehicle occupant injuries and fatalities in road accidents. However, a number of injuries are recognised as being directly attributable to airbag deployment. The majority of these are blunt injuries due to the high force of airbag deployment and include ocular injuries, burns, chest trauma and, rarely, fatalities. The authors describe a case of mixed blunt ocular and penetrating facial trauma as a result of airbag deployment.

  2. Deployment of the National Transparent Optical Network around the San Francisco Bay Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCammon, K.; Haigh, R.; Armstrong, G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    We report on the deployment and initial operation of the National Transparent Optical Network, an experimental WDM network testbed around the San Francisco Bay Area, during the Optical Fiber Conference (OFC`96) held in San Jose, CA. The deployment aspects of the physical plant, optical and SONET layers are examined along with a discussion of broadband applications which utilized the network during the OFC`96 demonstration. The network features dense WDM technology, transparent optical routing technology using acousto- optic tunable filter based switches, and network modules with add/drop, multicast, and wavelength translation capabilities. The physical layer consisted of over 300 km of Sprint and Pacific Bell conventional single mode fiber which was amplified with I I optical amplifiers deployed in pre-amp, post-amp, and line amp configurations. An out-of-band control network provided datacom channels from remote equipment sites to the SONET network manager deployed at the San Jose Convention Center for the conference. Data transport over five wavelengths was achieved in the 1550 nm window using a variety of signal formats including analog and digital signal transmission on different wavelengths on the same fiber. The network operated throughout the week of OFC`96 and is still in operation today.

  3. Method of Geometric Connected Disk Cover Problem for UAV realy network deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of the effective connectivity of a large number of mobile combat units in the future aeronautic swarm operation, this paper proposes an idea of using UAV(Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to build, and studies the deployment of the network. User coverage and network connectivity are important for a relay network planning which are studied separately in traditional ways. In order to effectively combine these two factors while the network’s survivability is taken into account. Firstly, the concept of node aggregation degree is proposed. Secondly, a performance evaluation parameter for UAV relay network is proposed based on node aggregation degree, then analyzes the lack of deterministic deployment and presents one a PSO (VFA-PSO deployment algorithm based on virtual force. Finally, compared with the existing algorithms, the validity and stability of the algorithm are verified. The experimental results show that the VFA-PSO algorithm can effectively improve the network coverage and the survivability of the network under the premise of ensuring the network connectivity, and has better deployment effect.

  4. Deployment of vendor capabilities and competences throughout the outsourcing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Christoffersen, Mads; Mefford, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    utilization of different portfolios of competences (balanced, unit-dominant, and versatile) and capabilities (permanent and temporary) which need to be deployed in the right combination (deployment strategy) adequate for the stage of the industry dynamics in which vendors operate. The research also indicated...... their deployment strategies to new, more dynamic and volatile environments. The paper proposes three different deployment strategies for three different operational contexts. Originality/value - In contrast with the existing static approach towards studying vendor's capabilities in outsourcing, the paper...

  5. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  6. Deployment Testing of the De-Orbit Sail Flight Hardware

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrandt, Martin; Meyer, Sebastian; Zander, Martin; Hühne, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the results of the deployment testing of the De-Orbit Sail flight hardware, a drag sail for de-orbiting applications, performed by DLR. It addresses in particular the deployment tests of the fullscale sail subsystem and deployment force tests performed on the boom deployment module. For the fullscale sail testing a gravity compensation device is used which is described in detail. It allows observations of the in-plane interaction of the booms with the sail membrane and the...

  7. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currier, Aileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Jacquelynne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ma, Ookie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Kirby, Brendan [Consultant

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  8. Multiobjective Shape Optimization for Deployment and Adjustment Properties of Cable-Net of Deployable Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on structural features of cable-net of deployable antenna, a multiobjective shape optimization method is proposed to help to engineer antenna’s cable-net structure that has better deployment and adjustment properties. In this method, the multiobjective optimum mathematical model is built with lower nodes’ locations of cable-net as variables, the average stress ratio of cable elements and strain energy as objectives, and surface precision and natural frequency of cable-net as constraints. Sequential quadratic programming method is used to solve this nonlinear mathematical model in conditions with different weighting coefficients, and the results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method and model.

  9. Six policy actions for accelerated deployment of renewable energy. READy Renewable Energy Action on Deployment. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    The READy book presents a kaleidoscope of policy options that have proven to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy technologies, based on experiences around the world at the local and national levels. Lessons learned from successful cases are distilled into six essential action points. Together these categories of policy actions compose the ACTION Star, a guide for taking action now while preparing for growth over the long term.

  10. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  11. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2014 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arterburn, George K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report is a summary of key Technology Deployment activities and achievements for 2014, including intellectual property, granted copyrights, royalties, license agreements, CRADAs, WFOs and Technology-Based Economic Development. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In our multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational instiutitons throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically

  12. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  13. Association of military deployment of a parent or spouse and changes in dependent use of health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mary Jo; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Ritter, Grant; Perloff, Jennifer; Williams, Thomas V; Jeffery, Diana D; Tompkins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    U.S. Armed Forces members and spouses report increased stress associated with combat deployment. It is unknown, however, whether these deployment stressors lead to increased dependent medication use and health care utilization. To determine whether the deployment of Army active duty members (sponsors) is associated with changes in dependent health care utilization. A quasi-experimental, pre-post study of health care patterns of more than 55,000 nonpregnant spouses and 137,000 children of deployed sponsors and a comparison group of dependents. Changes in dependent total utilization in the military health system, and separately in military-provided and purchased care services in the year following the sponsors' deployment month for office visit services (generalist, specialist); emergency department visits; institutional stays; psychotropic medication (any, antidepressant, antianxiety, antistimulant classes). Sponsor deployment was associated with net increased use of specialist office visits (relative percent change 4.2% spouses; 8.8% children), antidepressants (6.7% spouses; 17.2% children), and antianxiety medications (14.2% spouses; 10.0% children; PDeployment was consistently associated with increased use of purchased care services, partially, or fully offset by decreased use of military treatment facilities. These results suggest that emotional or behavioral issues are contributing to increased specialist visits and reliance on medications during sponsors' deployments. A shift to receipt of services from civilian settings raises questions about coordination of care when families temporarily relocate, family preferences, and military provider capacity during deployment phases. Findings have important implications for the military health system and community providers who serve military families, especially those with children.

  14. Transportation Deployment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    Automakers, commercial fleet operators, component manufacturers, and government agencies all turn to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to help put more green vehicles on the road. The lab’s independent analysis and evaluation pinpoint fuel-efficient and low-emission strategies to support economic and operational goals, while breaking down barriers to widespread adoption. Customized assessment of existing equipment and practices, energy-saving alternatives, operational considerations, and marketplace realities factor in the multitude of variables needed to ensure meaningful performance, financial, and environmental benefits. NREL provides integrated, unbiased, 360-degree sustainable transportation deployment expertise encompassing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and related infrastructure. Hands-on support comes from technical experts experienced in advanced vehicle technologies, fleet operations, and field data collection coupled with extensive modeling and analysis capabilities. The lab’s research team works closely with automakers and vehicle equipment manufacturers to test, analyze, develop, and evaluate high-performance fuel-efficient technologies that meet marketplace needs.

  15. Deploying Renewables -- principles for effective policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-29

    Renewable energy can play a fundamental role in tackling climate change, environmental degradation and energy security. As these challenges have become ever more pressing, governments and markets are seeking innovative solutions. Yet, what are the key factors that will determine the success of renewable energy policies? How can current policies be improved to encourage greater deployment of renewables? What impact can more effective policies have on renewables' share in the future global energy mix and how soon? This publication addresses these questions. Responding to the Gleneagles G8 call for a clean and secure energy future, it highlights key policy tools to fast-track renewables into the mainstream. This analysis illustrates good practices by applying the combined metrics of effectiveness and efficiency to renewable energy policies in the electricity, heating and transport sectors. It highlights significant barriers to accelerating renewables penetration, and argues that the great potential of renewables can be exploited much more rapidly and to a much larger extent if good practices are adopted. Carefully designed policy frameworks, customised to support technologies at differing stages of maturity, will deliver a strong portfolio of renewable energy technologies. The document provides recommendations on key principles for policy design as a template for decision makers.

  16. Methods for deploying ultra-clean detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Alexis

    2008-04-01

    Next-generation underground experiments, such as searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, will perform high-sensitivity measurements that require extremely low backgrounds. The Majo-ra-na Collaboration ootnotetextF.T. Avignone III (2007) arXiv:0711.4808v1 proposes such an experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay using an array of germanium crystals enriched in ^76Ge. The design of the Majo-ra-na experiment must minimize backgrounds while meeting criteria for electrical signal quality, structural integrity, and thermal cooling characteristics. Recent work has addressed detector deployment in ultra low-background environments. Advances have been made in fabrication of radiologically pure copper parts. Prototype designs for detector support structures reduce backgrounds by minimizing component mass and making use of ultra-pure materials. This talk will describe the design and use of cryostat test-stands to investigate the performance of prototype designs for detector strings. While Majo-ra-na uses germanium detectors, the design considerations and progress made by the collaboration are applicable to other detector technologies and fields of research.

  17. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  18. Innovative Defense Acquisition Concept Deployer Equipment Bundle (DEB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    METHODOLOGY This project reviewed a substantial amount of literature , to include applicable concept plans, memorandums, cost benefit analyses, organizational...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT INNOVATIVE DEFENSE ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER...ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER EQUIPMENT BUNDLE (DEB) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Frederic Albesa, Isaac J. Ortman, and Stephen F. Kirouac 7

  19. 78 FR 77550 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... is extending the application period for the Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants... questions, please contact Adam Sleeter, Attorney Advisor, FHWA Office of the Chief Counsel, (202) 366-8839...

  20. Dengue Virus Exposures Among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Elisabeth M.; Martinez, Luis J.; Jarman, Richard G.; Lyons, Arthur G.; Eckels, Kenneth H.; De La Barrera, Rafael A.; Thomas, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish–American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel. PMID:28193746

  1. Longitudinal measures of hostility in deployed military personnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Lieke; Rademaker, Arthur; Vermetten, Eric; Geuze, Elbert; Kleber, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069316929

    2015-01-01

    Increases in anger and hostility are commonly found after military deployment. However, it is unknown how anger and hostility develop over time, and which veterans are more at risk for developing these complaints. Data of 745 veterans one month before deployment to Afghanistan and one, six, twelve

  2. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usability of a radiology workstation after deployment in a hospital. Significance In radiology, it is difficult to perform valid pre-deployment usability evaluations due to the heterogeneity of the user group, the complexity of the radiological workflow, and the complexity

  3. The Impact of Deployment on U.S. Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Sean C.; Malatras, Jennifer Weil; Israel, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent articles have explored the effects of military deployment on U.S. service members' mental health outcomes. Although increased attention has also begun to focus on the effects of deployment on military families, providing a conceptualization for the mechanisms of this process can help organize existing information and inform future…

  4. Educators Supporting Families in Times of Crisis: Military Reserve Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Judy; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    With the large number of National Guard members and reservists being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, public educators find themselves endeavoring to support the emotional and academic needs of military children and their families. Military children may exhibit behavioral and emotional difficulties during these deployments. Educator awareness of…

  5. Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Nielsen PE, Deering SH. Effects of deployment on depression screening scores in pregnancy at an Army military treatment facility. Obstet Gynecol 2010;116...children and pediatricians. Curr Opin Pediatr 1994;6:525–529. Address correspondence to: Cynthia A. LeardMann, MPH Department of Deployment Health

  6. Release and deployment at Planon: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Jansen (Remy); G.C. Ballintijn (Gerco); S. Brinkkemper

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis case study report describes the research results of a case study at Planon into the processes of development, release, and deployment. The research was done to document the release and deployment processes at Planon, to uncover strengths and weaknesses in these processes, and to

  7. Release and Deployment at Planon: A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.R.L.; Ballintijn, G.; Brinkkemper, S.

    2005-01-01

    This case study report describes the research results of a case study at Planon into the processes of development, release, and deployment. The research was done to document the release and deployment processes at Planon, to uncover strengths and weaknesses in these processes, and to compare

  8. Accommodating Thickness in Origami-Based Deployable Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.; Lang, Robert J.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Trease, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to create deployment systems with a large ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter. Deployment from a compact form to a final flat state can be achieved through origami-inspired folding of panels. There are many models capable of this motion when folded in a material with negligible thickness; however, when the application requires the folding of thick, rigid panels, attention must be paid to the effect of material thickness not only on the final folded state, but also during the folding motion (i.e., the panels must not be required to flex to attain the final folded form). The objective is to develop new methods for deployment from a compact folded form to a large circular array (or other final form). This paper describes a mathematical model for modifying the pattern to accommodate material thickness in the context of the design, modeling, and testing of a deployable system inspired by an origami six-sided flasher model. The model is demonstrated in hardware as a 1/20th scale prototype of a deployable solar array for space applications. The resulting prototype has a ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter of 9.2 (or 1.25 m deployed outer diameter to 0.136 m stowed outer diameter).

  9. Dengue Virus Exposures Among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Elisabeth M; Martinez, Luis J; Jarman, Richard G; Lyons, Arthur G; Eckels, Kenneth H; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    AbstractDengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish-American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel.

  10. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction. PMID:26958207

  11. Military deployment and reintegration: a systematic review of child coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Utu, Cindy F; DeSocio, Janiece E

    2015-02-01

    Child coping with parent military deployment and family reintegration. A systematic review of research literature was conducted to examine the effects of deployment and family reintegration on children in military families. A search of CINAHL, PubMed, Psyc-INFO, and SocINDEX databases was performed using the terms "military family," "military child," "child coping," "deployment," and "reintegration." The search was limited to publications between 2001 and 2014 to focus on the effects of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND). Twenty-seven research reports met inclusion criteria. Three themes were extracted: A child's coping is influenced by (a) the child's age and development, (b) the mental health and coping of the non-deployed parent during deployment, and the mental health of both parents during family reintegration, and (c) the pre-existing resilience/vulnerability, cumulative risks, and resources of the child and family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction.

  13. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    -powered base stations is a promising cost-effective solution to considerably enhance user experience. In such a network topology, which is denoted as heterogeneous deployment, the macro layer is expected to provide wider coverage but lower average data speeds whereas small cells are targeted at extending...... network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...

  14. The effects of military deployment on early child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dana R; Ee, Juliana; Berry-Cabán, Cristobal S; Hoedebecke, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this observational, point prevalence study is to determine if parental deployment affects the cognitive, social and emotional development of preschool age children in the military family. Demographic information was collected and an age-appropriate Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) and Ages and Stages Social-Emotional Inventory (ASQ:SE) were administered. The primary outcome measure was the failure rates on the developmental instruments. We identified 151 parents of eligible children; 95 children had a parent that deployed during their lifetime. We found a significant difference in ASQ-3 failure rates for children in the deployed group compared to those in the nondeployed group. Children of deployed parents were at least twice as often to fail the ASQ-3 or ASQ:SE developmental screen compared to children whose parents did not deploy. 30.5% of children in the deployed group failed the ASQ-3 screen while 12.5% of children who did not have a deployed parent failed (P=.009). On the ASQ:SE developmental screen, 16.8% of children who had a parent deploy failed versus 5.4% of children who did not have a parent deploy (P=.031). This study suggests that parental deployment is related to adverse risk for developmental delays in children in military families. The psychological burden on military children could be life-long or require significant resources to address. These adverse outcomes could be possibly mitigated by early detection of developmental delay and firm attention to aggressive screening techniques in military communities.

  15. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Kong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available [-5]One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft’s real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach.

  16. The quality and testing PH-SFT infrastructure for the external LHC software packages deployment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; MENDEZ LORENZO, Patricia; MATO VILA, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The PH-SFT group is responsible for the build, test, and deployment of the set of external software packages used by the LHC experiments. This set includes ca. 170 packages including Grid packages and Montecarlo generators provided for different versions. A complete build structure has been established to guarantee the quality of the packages provided by the group. This structure includes an experimental build and three daily nightly builds, each of them dedicated to a specific ROOT version including v6.02, v6.04, and the master. While the former build is dedicated to the test of new packages, versions and dependencies (basically SFT internal used), the three latter ones are the responsible for the deployment to AFS of the set of stable and well tested packages requested by the LHC experiments so they can apply their own builds on top. In all cases, a c...

  17. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiwei; Hu, Tianjiang; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-06-19

    [-5]One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft's real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV) against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach.

  18. Special Testing for Modules Deployed in Hot Use Environments - Are We Doing This in a Low-Cost Way?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repins, Ingrid; Jordan, Dirk; Bosco, Nick; Flueckiger, Chris

    2016-09-12

    The proposed new IEC standard will address the test temperature requirements in IEC 61215 (module design), IEC 61730 (module safety), IEC 62790 (junction box safety) and IEC 62852 (connectors), and will provide guidelines to modify temperature limits in four existing standards to better describe module performance in hotter climates. This workshop includes four presentations: Special Testing for Modules Deployed in Hot Use Environments - Are We Doing This in a Low-Cost Way?, Experimental Evidence, Why the highest temperatures are the most stressful to PV modules during thermal cycling, and Safety Aspects for Modules Deployed in Hot Use Environments.

  19. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2013 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2014-01-01

    available to the INL’s Office of Technology Deployment. However, the accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  20. The psychosocial effects of deployment on military children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flake, Eric M; Davis, Beth Ellen; Johnson, Patti L; Middleton, Laura S

    2009-08-01

    The impact of the Global War on Terror on two million U.S. military children remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to describe the psychosocial profile of school age children during parental deployment utilizing standardized psychosocial health and stress measures, and to identify predictors of children at "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity during wartime deployment. Army spouses with a deployed service member and a child aged 5-12 years completed a deployment packet consisting of demographic and psychosocial questions. The psychosocial health measures included the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC), the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form and the Perceived Stress Scale-4. Overall, 32% of respondents exceeded the PSC cut off score for their child, indicating "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity and 42% reported "high risk" stress on the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parenting stress significantly predicted an increase in child psychosocial morbidity (odds ratio 7.41, confidence interval 2.9-19.0, p military support reported less child psychosocial morbidity (odds ratio 0.32, confidence interval 0.13-0.77, p military rank, child gender, child age, and race or ethnic background did not reach statistical significance. Families in this study experiencing deployment identified one-third of military children at "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity. The most significant predictor of child psychosocial functioning during wartime deployment was parenting stress. Military, family and community supports help mitigate family stress during periods of deployment.

  1. Systematic review: deployment length and the mental health of diplomats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R; Williams, R; Kemp, V; Patel, D; Greenberg, N

    2015-01-01

    While there has been considerable research into the psychosocial consequences of tour length for military personnel, this subject has not been studied in other occupational groups who also deploy staff to high-threat areas. To carry out a comprehensive review of relevant published literature to inform diplomatic organizations that deploy staff in high-threat postings (HTPs). We searched appropriate scientific databases for studies relevant to deployment length, mental health and well-being for diplomats. A systematic review related to military personnel was found and used as the foundation for the literature review. Other relevant papers identified by the search have also been included. The majority of identified papers had examined military personnel. Results suggested that longer deployments were associated with poorer mental health including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and alcohol problems and this was most likely to be a function of increased exposure to potentially traumatic events. Exceeding a threshold of 6-12 months within a 3 year period, for military personnel, appeared to elevate the risk of psychosocial problems. Furthermore, diplomats deploying on their first HTP, and those whose tour length is altered after deployment, could be especially vulnerable. While further research of this topic is required, this review provides an evidence-based insight into the increased risks of developing mental health problems when deployed to HTPs. This information is relevant to generating policies, which may reduce the impacts of adverse psychosocial effects on diplomatic staff and their families. © Crown copyright 2014.

  2. The effect of motor vehicle airbag deployment on tooth surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, A; James, H; Higgins, D; Kaidonis, J; Anderson, R W G

    2009-12-01

    Motor vehicle airbag technology is directed at the reduction of injury to drivers and passengers however a number of researchers have reported cases of injuries caused by airbags. Injuries to tooth surfaces, particularly tooth wear following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, have never been studied. A review of the literature and clinical experience does not suggest tooth enamel abrasion to be a likely outcome following airbag deployment. This in vitro pilot study was conducted to assess the effect on tooth surfaces following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, and in particular to attempt to reproduce the injuries claimed in a case report published in the Journal of Forensic Odonto- Stomatology in December 2007. A sample of extracted upper anterior teeth (n = 20) were analyzed using unaided visual observation, photographic and microscopic observation pre- and post- airbag deployment. Teeth were mounted on a fabricated head form (similar to those used in crash test dummies) using dental putty. The tests were performed using a modified airbag test rig with airbags deployed in 5 different positions relative to the head, with respect to distance and angulations. The result of the tests showed no changes to the teeth with unaided observation, macro photography or under the microscope. Tooth wear patterns described in the case report were not observed. Although accurate reproduction of an in vivo situation is not possible, this study has given some insight into the effects of motor vehicle airbag deployment, and suggests that significant tooth wear is an unlikely outcome from airbag deployment.

  3. Prevention is the key to maintaining gynecologic health during deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trego, Lori L

    2012-03-01

    Researchers have indicated that since Operation Desert Storm, the majority of gynecologic problems exhibited during deployment are from vaginal and urinary tract infections and menstrual disorders. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of military women's health issues during military operations and summarize current knowledge and recommendations to promote their gynecologic health needs while deployed. Military women would benefit from predeployment health-promotion programs that focus on preventive measures to enhance gynecologic health while deployed. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  4. Coming home revisited: family life and military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Smith, Donald G

    2012-07-01

    The war in Iraq and Afghanistan has involved the deployment of hundreds of thousands of American soldiers, many of whom are married and have children. The experience of one military family living through a deployment in Iraq in 2011 is discussed and interpreted in light of Parse's humanbecoming family model. The model provides a useful way for nurses, and others, to understand families, in a way that honors their values and struggles in an everchanging and unpredictable world. Included is a brief discussion on how communication technologies are changing the experience of military deployment for families.

  5. CONTINUOUS DEPLOYMENT WORKFLOW : Case Lego Mindstorms EV3

    OpenAIRE

    Alatalo, Janne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was created for N4S@JAMK project. The N4S@JAMK project is part of Need4Speed program run by DIGILE. The assignment for this thesis had two focuses: to create a continuous deployment chain that would deploy software to a Lego Mindstorms EV3 device, and to study ways to unit test the software of EV3 device on a normal computer. The continuous deployment chain was implemented using GitLab, Jenkins programs and Fabric python framework. Lego Mindstorms EV3 device had a third party ...

  6. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  7. Air Embolism During TEVAR: Carbon Dioxide Flushing Decreases the Amount of Gas Released from Thoracic Stent-Grafts During Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlffs, Fiona; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Saleptsis, Vasilis; Diener, Holger; Debus, E Sebastian; Kölbel, Tilo

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the amount of gas released from Zenith thoracic stent-grafts using standard saline flushing vs the carbon dioxide flushing technique. In an experimental bench setting, 20 thoracic stent-grafts were separated into 2 groups of 10 endografts. One group of grafts was flushed with 60 mL saline and the other group was flushed with carbon dioxide for 5 minutes followed by 60 mL saline. All grafts were deployed into a water-filled container with a curved plastic pipe; the deployment was recorded and released gas was measured using a calibrated setup. Gas was released from all grafts in both study groups during endograft deployment. The average amount of released gas per graft was significantly lower in the study group with carbon dioxide flushing (0.79 vs 0.51 mL, p=0.005). Thoracic endografts release significant amounts of air during deployment if flushed according to the instructions for use. Application of carbon dioxide for the flushing of thoracic stent-grafts prior to standard saline flush significantly reduces the amount of gas released during deployment. The additional use of carbon dioxide should be considered as a standard flush technique for aortic stent-grafts, especially in those implanted in proximal aortic segments, to reduce the risk of air embolism and stroke.

  8. Multi-Purpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altius Space Machines and MSNW LLC propose the development of a cubesat-scale Multipurpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS), to provide cubesats...

  9. Beyond Continuous Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Continuous Deployment Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahin, Mojtaba; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Zahedi, Mansooreh

    2017-01-01

    Context: A growing number of software organizations have been adopting Continuous DElivery (CDE) and Continuous Deployment (CD) practices. Researchers have started investing significant efforts in studying different aspects of CDE and CD. Many studies refer to CDE (i.e., where an application...... of interviewing 21 software practitioners, followed by a survey with 98 respondents. Results: Our study reveals 11 confounding factors that limit or demotivate software organizations to push changes automatically and continuously to production. The most important ones are "lack of automated (user) acceptance test......", "manual quality check", "deployment as business decision", "insufficient level of automated test coverage", and "highly bureaucratic deployment process". Conclusion: Our findings highlight several areas for future research and provide suggestions for practitioners to streamline deployment process....

  10. Pre-Positioning Deployment System for Small Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ansay, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    .... A transporter deploys to and releases the assembly proximate to the desired location. Once the assembly has fallen a safe distance after release, spring bands of the assembly are released by the action of lanyards of the transporter...

  11. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels, cylinders and other...

  12. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ADEPT Project is developing a mechanically deployable low-ballistic coefficient aeroshell entry system to perform entry descent landing (EDL) functions for...

  14. Accelerating the deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Mott

    2011-02-15

    Offshore wind energy and ocean energy (i.e. wave and tidal) are at different stages of technology development and deployment, and, as such, they require different approaches for successful deployment. However, regardless of their deployment stage, these technologies may face common hurdles in their way to market competitiveness. IEA-RETD has completed a study with the overall objective to assist policy makers and project developers in a better understanding of these barriers and the specifics of offshore renewable energy and to give them practical guidelines. These include an offshore energy deployment framework, substantiated by evidence-based analyses, and recommendations for future policies design, including best practices for allocation of seafloor rights.

  15. Astronaut-Deployable Geophysical and Environmental Monitoring Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, S. D.; Bleacher, J. E.; Smith, M. D.; Khayat, A.; Conrad, P.

    2017-06-01

    Geophysical and environmental monitoring stations could be deployed by astronauts exploring Mars to create a broad network that would collect high-value scientific information while also enhancing astronaut safety.

  16. The effects of military deployment on early child development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Dana R; Ee, Juliana; Berry-Cabán, Cristobal S; Hoedebecke, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this observational, point prevalence study is to determine if parental deployment affects the cognitive, social and emotional development of preschool age children in the military family...

  17. Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DSS's innovative Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom will provide revolutionary performance when compared to conventional state-of-the-art...

  18. An Outrigger Component for a Deployable Occulter System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Roccor, LLC, propose the development of a highly novel and structurally efficient outrigger strut design feature that efficiently integrates with a large deployable...

  19. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy

    2017-05-08

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  20. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  1. An Outrigger Component for a Deployable Occulter System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II, Roccor proposes to build upon the results of Phase I to increase the technology readiness level (TRL) of the NASA JPL deployable external occulter. An...

  2. Learning, Deployment and R and D-induced Technological Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wene, Clas-Otto

    2005-11-21

    To celebrate its 50th anniversary, ECN gathered a group of 30 high-level energy experts to discuss climate change mitigation strategies and their implications for energy technology development. This summary reports the main findings of the international scientific symposium. It also gives an account of the principal lessons learned, and formulates recommendations for energy innovation policy-making in the European Union. In this presentation the focus is on two questions on R and D choices and deployment strategies: Balance Government R and D and Deployment?; and Efficient Deployment Strategies? The reflections are based on experience curves: Relations between R and D and Deployment made for the purpose to bring new, clean technologies to the markets; Useful concepts and distinctions to address the two questions.

  3. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc, proposes an SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane mechanism to switch...

  4. University of Tennessee deploys force10 switch for CERN work

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1/2 page)

  5. Design and Testing of CPAS Main Deployment Bag Energy Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    During the developmental testing program for CPAS (Capsule Parachute Assembly System), the parachute system for the NASA Orion Crew Module, simulation revealed that high loads may be experienced by the pilot risers during the most devere deployment conditions. As the role of the pilot parachutes is to deploy the main parachutes, these high loads introduced the possibility of main deployment failure. In order to mitigate these high loads, a set of energy modulators was incorporated between the pilot riser and the main deployment bag. An extensive developmental program was implemented to ensure the adequacy of these energy modulators. After initial design comparisons, the energy modulator design was validated through slow-speed joint tests as well as through high-speed bungee tests. This paper documents the design, development, and results of multiple tests completed on the final design.

  6. EOP CRITTERCAM Deployments on French Frigate Shoals monk seals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRITTERCAMs, were deployed on a 42 monk seals at French Frigate Shoals Hawaii. Sixty nine hours of video comprised of 3192 recording segments collected at...

  7. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical folding theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels and cylinders. The...

  8. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  9. Creating a Comprehensive Solar Water Heating Deployment Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-08-18

    This report details the results of a research conducted in 1998 and 1999 and outlines a marketing deployment plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry.

  10. Novel Heat Flow Probe Design and Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel method for deploying heat flow sensors/heaters in a hole and also a novel approach to subsurface access using a percussive method. The...

  11. Water Quality Vocabulary Development and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, B. A.; Yu, J.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Semantic descriptions of observed properties and associated units of measure are fundamental to understanding of environmental observations, including groundwater, surface water and marine water quality. Semantic descriptions can be captured in machine-readable ontologies and vocabularies, thus providing support for the annotation of observation values from the disparate data sources with appropriate and accurate metadata, which is critical for achieving semantic interoperability. However, current stand-alone water quality vocabularies provide limited support for cross-system comparisons or data fusion. To enhance semantic interoperability, the alignment of water-quality properties with definitions of chemical entities and units of measure in existing widely-used vocabularies is required. Modern ontologies and vocabularies are expressed, organized and deployed using Semantic Web technologies. We developed an ontology for observed properties (i.e. a model for expressing appropriate controlled vocabularies) which extends the NASA/TopQuadrant QUDT ontology for Unit and QuantityKind with two additional classes and two properties (see accompanying paper by Cox, Simons and Yu). We use our ontology to populate the Water Quality vocabulary with a set of individuals of each of the four key classes (and their subclasses), and add appropriate relationships between these individuals. This ontology is aligned with other relevant stand-alone Water Quality vocabularies and domain ontologies. Developing the Water Quality vocabulary involved two main steps. First, the Water Quality vocabulary was populated with individuals of the ObservedProperty class, which was determined from a census of existing datasets and services. Each ObservedProperty individual relates to other individuals of Unit and QuantityKind (taken from QUDT where possible), and to IdentifiedObject individuals. As a large fraction of observed water quality data are classified by the chemical substance involved, the

  12. The Effects of Multiple Deployments on Army Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Deep Communication. Communication between the war zone and the homefront has evolved from postal letters to email to cell phones to Skype webcam ... adults and children.16 A second dependent variable was the overall ability of Army adolescents to cope with repeated deployments. This measure...concerning the effects of deployments. We cannot predict how these children will negotiate the often difficult transition to adult - hood. Nor do we

  13. Changing Family Roles-Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    MacDermid Wadsworth chaired the annual meeting for her discipline, the National Council on Family Relations . The theme she chose was Conflict, Violence ... family roles during deployment cycles, and b) on the impact of technology-based communication during deployment on later psychological distress and...during predeployment. Paper presented at the 2015 National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  Marini

  14. Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -2 9 Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu re s...Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation Haley P. Bell and Jay Rowland Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development...evaluation of selected saw technologies , tools, and methodologies for improving the efficiency of sawing around damaged pavement associated with crater

  15. NOC turbulence glider deployment report for the OSMOSIS Project

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.; McLaughlin, D.

    2011-01-01

    This document summarises the three deployments of the NOC Liverpool Teledyne Webb Research Slocum glider fitted with an external Rockland Scientific International micro-Rider turbulence probe during September 2011. The general aim of these glider deployments was to generate underwater turbulence and glider based CTD measurements for comparison with other sensor systems. This information will be used for evaluation of the performance of other measurement systems that are required for the Ocean...

  16. University of Cambridge deploys Procket Networks' PRO/8801

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Procket Networks, a provider of high performance Internet Protocol (IP) technology and products has announced that the University of Cambridge has deployed the PRO/8801(TM) router into its research network to develop industry-leading deep packet inspection applications. The major application for this deployment is to identify and understand new traffic patterns created by large scale scientific computations and downloads such as the GRID (1 page).

  17. One False Move: Training Deployers in Cross-Cultural Negotiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-28

    There is now a focus on cultural and national identity. Assimilation is frowned upon. “This basic competition of cultural norms resulted in a...AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY ONE FALSE MOVE: TRAINING DEPLOYERS IN CROSS- CULTURAL NEGOTIATIONS by...Air Force Deborah Lee James directed that members of the Air Force be trained in cross- cultural negotiation skills before deploying. The next step

  18. Potential biomedical and commercial applications of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) self-deployable foam structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold

    2004-02-01

    A cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) foam structure is one of the most recent results of the quest for simple, reliable and low-cost expandable space structures. The CHEM technology utilizes shape memory polymers in open cellular (foam) structure or sandwich structures made of shape memory polymer foam cores and polymeric composite skins. It takes advantage of the polymer"s heat activated shape memory in addition to the foam"s elastic recovery to deploy a compacted structure. The glass transition temperature Tg is tailored to rigidize the structure in the fully deployed configuration. Previous experimental and analytical results were very encouraging and indicated that the CHEM foam technology can perform robustly in space as well as in the Earth environment. CHEM structures are described here and their major advantages are identified over other expandable/deployable structures. Although the space community is the original major beneficiary, a number of potential applications are also anticipated for the "earth environment". CHEM developers strongly believe that this technology has great promise for a host of commercial and bio-medical applications. Some of these potential and already investigated CHEM applications are described in this paper.

  19. Lessons learned on solar powered wireless sensor network deployments in urban, desert environments

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Ahmad H.

    2015-05-01

    The successful deployment of a large scale solar powered wireless sensor network in an urban, desert environment is a very complex task. Specific cities of such environments cause a variety of operational problems, ranging from hardware faults to operational challenges, for instance due to the high variability of solar energy availability. Even a seemingly functional sensor network created in the lab does not guarantee reliable long term operation, which is absolutely necessary given the cost and difficulty of accessing sensor nodes in urban environments. As part of a larger traffic flow wireless sensor network project, we conducted several deployments in the last two years to evaluate the long-term performance of solar-powered urban wireless sensor networks in a desert area. In this article, we share our experiences in all domains of sensor network operations, from the conception of hardware to post-deployment analysis, including operational constraints that directly impact the software that can be run. We illustrate these experiences using numerous experimental results, and present multiple unexpected operational problems as well as some possible solutions to address them. We also show that current technology is far from meeting all operational constraints for these demanding applications, in which sensor networks are to operate for years to become economically appealing.

  20. A Study on Earth Re-entry Capsules with Deployable Aerobrakes for Recoverable Microgravity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carandente, Valerio; Savino, Raffaele; D'Oriano, Vera; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2015-06-01

    Deployable aerobrakes for Earth re-entry capsules may offer many advantages in the near future, including the opportunity to recover on Earth scientific payloads from the Space with reduced risks and costs with respect to conventional systems. Such capsules can be accommodated in the selected launcher in folded configuration optimizing the available volume and, when planned by the mission profile, the aerobrake can be deployed in order to increase the surface exposed to the hypersonic flow and therefore to reduce the ballistic parameter. This can offer as main advantage the opportunity to perform an aerodynamic de-orbit of the system without the need of a dedicated propulsive subsystem and an atmospheric re-entry with reduced aerothermal and mechanical loads making possible the use of relatively lightweight and cheap thermal protection system materials. To ensure the recovery of the capsule, the deployable surface can be modulated to obtain the aerodynamic control of the de-orbit trajectory in order to correctly target the capsule towards the selected landing site for post-flight analyses and operations. The main objective of the work is to present a number of feasible mission profiles for orbital platforms to/from Low Earth Orbit aimed in particular at scientific experiments in microgravity conditions. In addition, a suborbital scenario for a technological demonstrator, useful to experimentally verify the system applicability before the design of orbital missions, is also presented and discussed.

  1. Impact of different cloud deployments on real-time video applications for mobile video cloud users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif A.; Wang, Qi; Luo, Chunbo; Wang, Xinheng; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The latest trend to access mobile cloud services through wireless network connectivity has amplified globally among both entrepreneurs and home end users. Although existing public cloud service vendors such as Google, Microsoft Azure etc. are providing on-demand cloud services with affordable cost for mobile users, there are still a number of challenges to achieve high-quality mobile cloud based video applications, especially due to the bandwidth-constrained and errorprone mobile network connectivity, which is the communication bottleneck for end-to-end video delivery. In addition, existing accessible clouds networking architectures are different in term of their implementation, services, resources, storage, pricing, support and so on, and these differences have varied impact on the performance of cloud-based real-time video applications. Nevertheless, these challenges and impacts have not been thoroughly investigated in the literature. In our previous work, we have implemented a mobile cloud network model that integrates localized and decentralized cloudlets (mini-clouds) and wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we deploy a real-time framework consisting of various existing Internet cloud networking architectures (Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure and Eucalyptus Cloud) and a cloudlet based on Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud over wireless mesh networking technology for mobile cloud end users. It is noted that the increasing trend to access real-time video streaming over HTTP/HTTPS is gaining popularity among both research and industrial communities to leverage the existing web services and HTTP infrastructure in the Internet. To study the performance under different deployments using different public and private cloud service providers, we employ real-time video streaming over the HTTP/HTTPS standard, and conduct experimental evaluation and in-depth comparative analysis of the impact of different deployments on the quality of service for mobile video cloud users. Empirical

  2. 78 FR 775 - Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Hunt Valley, MD; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division...

  3. 78 FR 12359 - Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including Workers in the Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division in... of Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division, including...

  4. Cognitive ability and risk of post-traumatic stress disorder after military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars R; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Vedtofte, Mia S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Studies of the association between pre-deployment cognitive ability and post-deployment post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have shown mixed results. Aims: To study the influence of pre-deployment cognitive ability on PTSD symptoms 6-8 months post-deployment in a large population...... while controlling for pre-deployment education and deployment-related variables. Method: Study linking prospective pre-deployment conscription board data with post-deployment self-reported data in 9695 Danish Army personnel deployed to different war zones in 1997-2013. The association between pre......-deployment cognitive ability and post-deployment PTSD was investigated using repeated-measure logistic regression models. Two models with cognitive ability score as the main exposure variable were created (model 1 and model 2). Model 1 was only adjusted for pre-deployment variables, while model 2 was adjusted for both...

  5. Applications of Dynamic Deployment of Services in Industrial Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Gonçalo; Barata, José; Jammes, François; Colombo, Armando W.

    Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a de facto paradigm for business and enterprise integration. SOA is expanding into several domains of application envisioning a unified solution suitable across all different layers of an enterprise infrastructure. The application of SOA based on open web standards can significantly enhance the interoperability and openness of those devices. By embedding a dynamical deployment service even into small field de- vices, it would be either possible to allow machine builders to place built- in services and still allow the integrator to deploy on-the-run the services that best fit his current application. This approach allows the developer to keep his own preferred development language, but still deliver a SOA- compliant application. A dynamic deployment service is envisaged as a fundamental framework to support more complex applications, reducing deployment delays, while increasing overall system agility. As use-case scenario, a dynamic deployment service was implemented over DPWS and WS-Management specifications allowing designing and programming an automation application using IEC61131 languages, and deploying these components as web services into devices.

  6. A Bayesian Framework for Reliability Analysis of Spacecraft Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis; Kaminsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a two stage sequential Bayesian framework for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This process was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the Optical Telescope Element. Initially, detailed studies of NASA deployment history, "heritage information", were conducted, extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. This information was then coupled to a non-informative prior and a binomial likelihood function to create a posterior distribution for deployments of various subsystems uSing Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling. Select distributions were then coupled to a subsequent analysis, using test data and anomaly occurrences on successive ground test deployments of scale model test articles of JWST hardware, to update the NASA heritage data. This allowed for a realistic prediction for the reliability of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, within this two stage Bayesian framework.

  7. Renal lithiasis: addressing the risks of austere desert deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, J Steven; Forrest, Kelly

    2006-06-01

    Renal lithiasis affects approximately 5% of the general population, with higher risks for men and increasing risks with increasing age. The forward deployment of the Air Force into austere desert environments with integration of the active duty, Reserves, and Guard presents increasing risks to mission accomplishment with the increased risk of developing renal lithiasis. This paper describes seven cases of presumed renal lithiasis in a deployed desert setting in Air Force personnel on flying status. Their status and the location of the base acted as a focus for a review of the literature on kidney stone causation, prevention, diagnosis, and management. A review of the literature revealed that current military recommendations to hydrate in the field may not be sufficient for the primary prevention of kidney stones. Beverage choice may prove more useful for prevention. Situations precipitating voluntary dehydration need to be prevented. Although there are superior ways to diagnose renal lithiasis, in the deployed setting patient history and physical examination are usually the only available means. Ultrasound is a viable diagnostic option for use in the deployed setting based on its portability, affordability, and ease of use. Additions to the standard management of renal lithiasis, such as subcutaneous Lidocaine and heat may have value in the deployed setting if the supply of narcotics is limited. In the deployed setting, hydration choices, the addition of portable ultrasound to the diagnostic process, and pain management with nontraditional therapies need to be explored.

  8. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandeker, Christopher; French, Claire; Birtles, Catherine; Wessely, S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: During deployments, Service wives have to adapt to being alone and taking sole responsibility for their families and house-holds whilst dealing with the additional stress about whether their loved ones will return...

  9. Telephone Support During Overseas Deployment for Military Spouses Formerly: Telephone Support During Deployment for OEF/OIF Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    perspective kind of like that book What to Expect When You Are Expecting, it was just kind of a walk through for the deployment.” Although skills...support group sessions. Information and skills were highlighted in each recorded didactic presentation that included slides. Education participants...of like that book What to Expect When You Are Expecting, it was just kind of a walk through for the deployment.” Although skills for themselves

  10. After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools: 1-Year Outcomes of an Evidence-Based Parenting Program for Military Families Following Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Zamir, Osnat

    2017-09-15

    Despite significant stressors facing military families over the past 15 years of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, no parenting programs adapted or developed for military families with school-aged children have been rigorously tested. We present outcome data from the first randomized controlled trial of a behavioral parent training program for families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. In the present study, 336 primarily National Guard and Reserve families with 4-12-year-old children were recruited from a Midwestern state. At least one parent in each family had deployed to the recent conflicts: Operations Iraqi or Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND). Families were randomized to a group-based parenting program (After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT)) or web and print resources-as-usual. Using a social interaction learning framework, we hypothesized an indirect effects model: that the intervention would improve parenting, which, in turn, would be associated with improvements in child outcomes. Applying intent-to-treat analyses, we examined the program's effect on observed parenting, and children's adjustment at 12-months post baseline. Controlling for demographic (marital status, length, child gender), deployment variables (number of deployments), and baseline values, families randomized to the ADAPT intervention showed significantly improved observed parenting compared to those in the comparison group. Observed parenting, in turn, was associated with significant improvements in child adjustment. These findings present the first evidence for the effectiveness of a parenting program for deployed military families with school-aged children.

  11. Structural Design and Simulation of Passive Low Gravity Compensation for the Deployable Arm in the Device of Drilling and Collecting Lunar Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important constituent part of the sampling device for lunar soil drilling, the deployable arm can help transfer the samples and avoid stretching. According to the ground experimental research requirements for deployable arm, this paper proposed a low-gravity compensation method of passive cam counter weight by establishing a Lagrangian dynamics model of deployable arm. It is emphasized on designing the profile curve of cam mechanism and the mechanical structure of cam component. By using ADAMS software, this paper conducted kinematics analogue simulation and obtained the kinematic parameters of deployable arm under the environmental conditions of the lunar surface and of the ground surface. The comparison of the analogue results has verified the necessity and reasonability of this compensation method. At last, this paper reached the conclusions and proposed measures to improve the compensation device. This paper can offer certain technical reference for the ground experiment of the sampling mechanism used for lunar drilling and the engineering implementation.

  12. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Van Ooijen, Peter M A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the number, nature and severity of usability issues radiologists encounter while using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice, and to assess how well the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation generalize to clinical practice. The usability evaluation consisted of semi-structured interviews and observations of twelve users using the workstation during their daily work. Usability issues and positive usability findings were documented. Each issue was given a severity rating and its root cause was determined. Results were compared to the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of the same workstation. Ninety-two usability issues were identified, ranging from issues that cause minor frustration or delay, to issues that cause significant delays, prevent users from completing tasks, or even pose a potential threat to patient safety. The results of the pre-deployment usability evaluation had limited generalizability to clinical practice. This study showed that radiologists encountered a large number and a wide variety of usability issues when using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice. This underlines the need for effective usability engineering in radiology. Given the limitations of pre-deployment usability evaluation in radiology, which were confirmed by our finding that the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation had limited generalizability to clinical practice, it is vital that radiology workstation vendors devote significant resources to usability engineering efforts before deployment of their workstation, and to continue these efforts after the workstation is deployed in a hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Green light for deployment of ESA's Mars Express radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    ESA's decision to deploy MARSIS follows eight months of intensive computer simulations and technical investigations on both sides of the Atlantic. These were to assess possible harmful boom configurations during deployment and to determine any effects on the spacecraft and its scientific instruments. The three radar booms of MARSIS were initially to have been deployed in April 2004, towards the end of the Mars Express instrument commissioning phase. They consist of a pair of 20-metre hollow cylinders, each 2.5 centimetres in diameter, and a 7-metre boom. No satisfactory ground test of deployment in flight conditions was possible, so that verification of the booms' performance had to rely on computer simulation. Just prior to their scheduled release, improved computer simulations carried out by the manufacturer, Astro Aerospace (California), revealed the possibility of a whiplash effect before they locked in their final outstretched positions, so that they might hit the spacecraft. Following advice from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which contributed the boom system to the Italian-led MARSIS radar instrument, and the Mars Express science team, ESA put an immediate hold on deployment until a complete understanding of the dynamics was obtained. JPL led a comprehensive investigation, including simulations, theoretical studies and tests on representative booms, the latter to assess potential aging of the boom material. European experts, from ESA and the former spacecraft prime contractor, Astrium SAS, France, worked closely with JPL throughout the entire investigation. An independent engineering review board, composed of ESA and industry experts, met in January to evaluate the findings and advise on ‘if and when’ to proceed with deployment. The ESA review board, at its final meeting on 25 January, recommended deployment of the MARSIS booms. The rationale for the decision was based on the results of the analyses, which showed the possible impact scenarios

  14. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Audrey

    application had established the network traffic flow to the sink. The same scenario was repeated using a power-based IDS to compare it against the proposed model. To identify a clusterhead's ability to host monitoring agents after the temperature sensing application terminated, the deployed IDS utilized the communication history and other network factors in order to rank the nodes. Similarly, using the node's communication history, the deployed power-based IDS ranked nodes based on their remaining power. For each individual scenario, and after the IDS application was deployed, the temperature sensing application was run for a second time. This time, to monitor the temperature sensing agents as the data flowed towards the sink, the network traffic was rerouted through the new intrusion detection clusterheads. Consequently, if the clusterheads were shared, the re-routing step was not preformed. Experimental results in this research demonstrated the effectiveness of applying a robust deployment metric to improve upon the energy efficiency of a deployed application in a multi-application WSN. It was found that in the scenarios with the intrusion detection application that utilized the proposed model resulted in more remaining energy than in the scenarios that implemented the power-based IDS. The algorithm especially had a positive impact on the small, dense, and more homogeneous networks. This finding was reinforced by the smaller percentage of new clusterheads that was selected. Essentially, the energy cost of the route to the sink was reduced because the network traffic was rerouted through fewer new clusterheads. Additionally, it was found that the intrusion detection topology that used the proposed approach formed smaller and more connected sets of clusterheads than the power-based IDS. As a consequence, this proposed approach essentially achieved the research objective for enhancing energy use in a multi-application WSN.

  15. Modelling of Spacecraft Dynamics at Deployment of Large Elastic Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Khoroshilov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach to the modelling of the deployment dynamics of a flexible multi-body system with the time dependent configurations is demonstrated in the frame of the study the dynamics of a spacecraft with the gyro-gravitational system of stabilization. Primarily the gravitational stabilizer that is made as a pantograph structure is in a compact form. The deployment of a flexible pantograph structure is performed after placing the spacecraft into orbit and completion of the preliminary damping by a special jet-propelled system, and after uncaging the gyros. After its deployment, the pantograph turns into an elongated structure that serves as a gravitational stabilizer and carrier of solar batteries. The objective of the study is the creation of the generalized mathematical model and the conducting of the computational modelling of the spacecraft dynamics. The equations of motion are derived with the use of the Eulerian-LaGrangian formalism and symbolic computing. Numerical simulations of the typical operational mode of the system are conducted taking into account various control profiles for the deployment. Numerical results indicate that the system used for attitude stabilization ensures the shape of the deployed design and prescribed accuracy of the orientation.

  16. Deployment-Related Insomnia in Military Personnel and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramoweth, Adam D.

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder that greatly impacts military personnel, especially those deployed in support of combat efforts. Deployment-related stressors like combat exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) irregular sleep-wake schedules, and adjustment to the return home all contribute to insomnia. However, insomnia can also exacerbate the deployment experience and is a risk factor for traumatic stress reactions such as PTSD, depression, and suicide. Military personnel with mTBI are significantly impacted by insomnia; the majority experience sleep disruption and this can impede recovery and rehabilitation. As more service members return home from deployment, treatment is vital to reduce the impact of insomnia. Preliminary outcome data, showing positive results for reduction of sleep disruption, has been found with treatments such as combined cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) and imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT), preference-based interventions, as well as efforts to broadly disseminate CBTI. The recent literature on the impact and treatment of deployment-related insomnia is reviewed. PMID:24005883

  17. Post-deployment family violence among UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jamie; Jones, Margaret; Somaini, Greta; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-12-19

    Research into violence among military personnel has not differentiated between stranger- and family-directed violence. While military factors (combat exposure and post-deployment mental health problems) are risk factors for general violence, there has been limited research on their impact on violence within the family environment. This study aims to compare the prevalence of family-directed and stranger-directed violence among a deployed sample of UK military personnel and to explore risk factors associated with both family- and stranger-directed violence. This study utilised data from a large cohort study which collected information by questionnaire from a representative sample of randomly selected deployed UK military personnel (n = 6711). The prevalence of family violence immediately following return from deployment was 3.6% and 7.8% for stranger violence. Family violence was significantly associated with having left service, while stranger violence was associated with younger age, male gender, being single, having a history of antisocial behaviour as well as having left service. Deployment in a combat role was significantly associated with both family and stranger violence after adjustment for confounders [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.92 (1.25-2.94), p = 0.003 and aOR = 1.77 (1.31-2.40), p military personnel. Further research using a validated measurement tool for family violence would improve comparability with other research.

  18. Standardization of transportation classes for object-oriented deployment simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Howard, D. L.; Jackson, J.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.; Van Groningen, C. N.

    1999-07-30

    Many recent efforts to integrate transportation and deployment simulations, although beneficial, have lacked a feature vital for seamless integration: a common data class representation. It is an objective of the Department of Defense (DoD) to standardize all classes used in object-oriented deployment simulations by developing a standard class attribute representation and behavior for all deployment simulations that rely on an underlying class representation. The Extensive Hierarchy and Object Representation for Transportation Simulations (EXHORT) is a collection of three hierarchies that together will constitute a standard and consistent class attribute representation and behavior that could be used directly by a large set of deployment simulations. The first hierarchy is the Transportation Class Hierarchy (TCH), which describes a significant portion of the defense transportation system; the other two deal with infrastructure and resource classes. EXHORT will allow deployment simulations to use the same set of underlying class data, ensure transparent exchanges, reduce the effort needed to integrate simulations, and permit a detailed analysis of the defense transportation system. This paper describes EXHORT's first hierarchy, the TCH, and provides a rationale for why it is a helpful tool for modeling major portions of the defense transportation system.

  19. Variations in the modal characteristics of a telescopically deploying beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Anthony K.

    1994-01-01

    The equations of motion for a two-segment deploying telescopic beam are derived through application of Lagrange's equation. The outer tube of the beam is fixed at one end and the inner tube slides freely relative to the fixed segment. The resulting nonlinear, non-autonomous set of equations is linearized and simplified to the standard Euler-Bernoulli partial differential equations for an elastic beam by freezing the deployment process at various stages of deployment, and examining the small amplitude and natural modes of vibration of the resulting configuration. Application of the natural boundary conditions and compatibility of motion relations for the two segments in their common region of overlap leads to a transcendental characteristic equation in the frequency parameter Beta(L). Numerical solution of the equation for the characteristic roots determines the modal frequencies, and the corresponding mode shapes are obtained from the general solution of the Euler-Bernoulli equation tailored to the natural boundary conditions. Sample results of modal frequencies and shapes are presented for various stages of deployment and discussed. It is shown that for all intermediate stages of deployment (between 0 and 100 percent) the spectral distribution is drastically altered by the appearance of regions of very closely spaced modal frequencies. The sources of this modal agglomeration are explored.

  20. Biomarkers of post-deployment resilience among military service members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista B. Highland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of PTSD after military deployment is influenced by a combination of biopsychosocial risk and resilience factors. In particular, physiological factors may mark risk for symptom progression or resiliency. Research in civilian populations suggests elevated catecholamines after trauma are associated with PTSD months following the trauma. However, less is known regarding physiological markers of PTSD resilience among post-deployment service members (SM. We therefore assessed whether catecholamines obtained shortly after deployment were associated with combat-related PTSD symptoms three months later. Eighty-seven SMs completed the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV and blood draws within two months after return from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan (“Time 1” or “T1” and three months later (“Time 2” or “T2”. Linear regression analyses demonstrated that lower norepinephrine at T1 was associated with lower PTSD symptoms at T2. In particular, T1 norepinephrine was positively associated with T2 symptom intensity and avoidance symptoms. The present findings represent a biologically-informed method of assessing PTSD resilience after deployment, which may aid clinicians in providing tailored treatments for those in the greatest need. Further research is needed to validate these findings and incorporate physiological measures within an assessment battery.

  1. SAViNE: social network analysis - inspired content delivery network deployment and experimentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leivadeas, Aris; Papagianni, Chrysa; Papavassiliou, Symeon

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, the content delivery network (CDN) market has been witnessing globally an increase in the development of cloud-based CDNs, as they constitute a viable and cost-effective alternative to traditional commercial CDNs...

  2. SAViNE: social network analysis - inspired content delivery network deployment and experimentation: Doc 1011

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aris Leivadeas; Chrysa Papagianni; Symeon Papavassiliou

    2014-01-01

      Over the last years, the content delivery network (CDN) market has been witnessing globally an increase in the development of cloud-based CDNs, as they constitute a viable and cost-effective alternative to traditional commercial CDNs...

  3. Shape memory self-deployable structures for solar sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Tan, Seng; Willis, Paul; Pryor, Mark

    2008-12-01

    A cold-hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures technology is one of the most recent results of the quest for simple, reliable and low-cost self-deployable structures. The CHEM technology utilizes shape-memory polymers in open-cell foam structures or sandwich structures made of shape-memory-polymer foam cores and polymeric laminated-composite skins. It takes advantage of a polymer's shape memory and the corresponding internal elastic recovery forces to self-deploy a compacted structure. This paper describes these structures and their major advantages over other expandable and deployable structures presently used. Previous preliminary investigations and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of certain CHEM structures for space applications. Further improvements in CHEM technology and structure design widen potential space applications, including advanced solar sail structural concepts that are revealed and described in this paper.

  4. Chapter 6 impact of deployment on military families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agazio, Janice; Goodman, Petra; Padden, Diane L

    2014-01-01

    To date, approximately 300,000 families including 700,000 children have been affected by the increased and repeated number of deployments in support of the Global War on Terror in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of these deployments on family members of active duty and reserve/guard personnel. A search of literature across the years of military conflicts reveals waves of studies emerging after World War II, the Vietnam conflict, Desert Storm/Shield, and now the most recent wars. Study designs most frequently include qualitative exploratory, survey methods, and program evaluations. The field is limited by small scale projects, service- and facility-specific samples, and knowledge extracted from related topics. More research is needed to achieve a more comprehensive understanding across the trajectory of the deployment experience for both service personnel and family members as well as long-term outcomes.

  5. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  6. Fetal intracranial injuries following motor vehicle accidents with airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Harada, Atsuko; Sato, Takashi; Kurabayashi, Takumi

    2014-02-01

    The effects of airbag deployment in motor vehicle accidents (MVA) on the fetus are poorly understood. A 22-year-old woman at 24 weeks of gestation collided with a telephone pole while driving. She was restrained and an airbag deployed. Although she had no major injuries, she experienced decreased fetal movements. Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring revealed loss of variability without any evidence of abruptio placentae, and 4 days later, the variability spontaneously recovered. Two weeks after the MVA, ultrasonography showed unilateral ventricular dilatation suggestive of fetal brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed subdural hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic lesions, interpreted as indirect (hypoxic-ischemic) and direct (hemorrhagic) intracranial injuries. After MVA with airbag deployment, FHR monitoring can show a transient loss of variability, which may precede the appearance of fetal brain injury. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. A highly optimized grid deployment: the metagenomic analysis example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Gabriel; Blanquer, Ignacio; Hernández, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Computational resources and computationally expensive processes are two topics that are not growing at the same ratio. The availability of large amounts of computing resources in Grid infrastructures does not mean that efficiency is not an important issue. It is necessary to analyze the whole process to improve partitioning and submission schemas, especially in the most critical experiments. This is the case of metagenomic analysis, and this text shows the work done in order to optimize a Grid deployment, which has led to a reduction of the response time and the failure rates. Metagenomic studies aim at processing samples of multiple specimens to extract the genes and proteins that belong to the different species. In many cases, the sequencing of the DNA of many microorganisms is hindered by the impossibility of growing significant samples of isolated specimens. Many bacteria cannot survive alone, and require the interaction with other organisms. In such cases, the information of the DNA available belongs to different kinds of organisms. One important stage in Metagenomic analysis consists on the extraction of fragments followed by the comparison and analysis of their function stage. By the comparison to existing chains, whose function is well known, fragments can be classified. This process is computationally intensive and requires of several iterations of alignment and phylogeny classification steps. Source samples reach several millions of sequences, which could reach up to thousands of nucleotides each. These sequences are compared to a selected part of the "Non-redundant" database which only implies the information from eukaryotic species. From this first analysis, a refining process is performed and alignment analysis is restarted from the results. This process implies several CPU years. The article describes and analyzes the difficulties to fragment, automate and check the above operations in current Grid production environments. This environment has been

  8. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain: a study among danish soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn; Guldager, Bernadette

    2014-04-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study was a questionnaire-based cohort study among 1,931 Danish soldiers deployed to Iraq. Of the 680 respondents, 175 (26%) reported LBP. The population of respondents was adjusted for potential nonresponse bias. The associations between LBP and explanatory variables were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression models. Older age (p = 0.016), support from leaders (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69, p = 0.019), psychological stress (OR = 1.71, p = 0.009), awkward working positions (OR = 1.98, p = 0.001), and working in depots or storehouses (OR = 2.60, p = 0.041) were found to be associated with LBP after adjustment of all other variables. Combat and exposure to work, sport, or traffic accidents were not associated with LBP in this study, which was attributed to the characteristics of the actual mission. Preventive measures should include predeployment preparation of leaders to cope with LBP and other musculoskeletal trouble among their subordinates and involve medical personnel, especially deployed physiotherapists, by giving advice to soldiers of different military occupational specialties on how to optimize ergonomics at work. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  10. Requirements-Driven Deployment: Customizing the Requirements Model for the Host Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Raian; Dalpiaz, Fabiano; Giorgini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Deployment is a main development phase which configures a software to be ready for use in a certain environment. The ultimate goal of deployment is to enable users to achieve their requirements while using the deployed software. However, requirements are not uniform and differ between deployment

  11. Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    This document summarizes key efforts and projects that are part of the DOE/NREL Integrated Deployment effort to integrated energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in cities, states, island locations, and communities around the world. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing an aggressive, scalable, and replicable strategy to accelerate market adoption of clean energy solutions to power homes, businesses, and vehicles. Using the comprehensive Integrated Deployment approach developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), DOE partners with communities, cities, states, federal agencies, and territories to identify and implement a variety of efficiency and renewable energy technology solutions.

  12. Low-cost tubular antenna deployer for WISP-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A new tubular boom deployment mechanism has been designed, built, and flown as part of the second Waves In Space Program (WISP-2) through Cornell University. For this program, two booms were needed to form a dipole antenna but existing units were found to be too complicated and costly. A low-cost alternative was developed which combined flight-proven tubular boom technology with a new support and deployment mechanism. The simplicity of this new design was a major factor in providing a highly reliable and cost-effective system.

  13. Identification of a supplier network through Quality Function Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Preben Sander; Holmen, Elsebeth

    1994-01-01

    During 1993-94 the authors followed a product development process in a Danish Butter Cookie company. The process was structured according to the Quality Function Deployment technique House of Quality. Customer attributes were derived from a discus a diabetics end-user focus group. During a series...... of meetings the production manager and the marketing manager transformed attributes into characteristics and constructed Houses of Quality for a sugar-free cookie. As expected, most product characteristics were deployed to potential suppliers. In this way the company identified the departments and firms...

  14. Using Quality Function Deployment to Improve Reference Services Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Long Chang

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been conducted regarding how reference librarians can evaluate and improve the quality of the answers they provide to users' inquiries. There has been considerably less discussion, however, concerning how to improve the quality of the delivery of those answers, and to upgrade the overall quality of reference services as a whole. Suggestions for improving the quality of service contained within the business literature may be applied to improve library services as well. In this paper the use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD as a tool for improving reference services quality is explored and an adapted framework referred to as service quality function deployment is proposed.

  15. Deployment of a Grid-based Medical Imaging Application

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Frate, C; Gálvez, J; Hassan, W; Hauer, T; Manset, D; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Rogulin, D; Solomonides, T; Warren, R

    2005-01-01

    The MammoGrid project has deployed its Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)-based Grid application in a real environment comprising actual participating hospitals. The resultant setup is currently being exploited to conduct rigorous in-house tests in the first phase before handing over the setup to the actual clinicians to get their feedback. This paper elaborates the deployment details and the experiences acquired during this phase of the project. Finally the strategy regarding migration to an upcoming middleware from EGEE project will be described. This paper concludes by highlighting some of the potential areas of future work.

  16. Multi-CubeSat Deployment Strategies: How Different Satellite Deployment Schemes Affect Satellite Separation and Detection for Various Types of Constellations and Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    velocity vector relative to the velocity vector of the control satellite ) 3 3. Location of deployment within the orbit (argument of latitude of a circular... orbit ) 4. Delay time between deployment of individual satellites in a given constellation More detail on the methodology of this investigation is...deployed during a single launch. While deploying multiple satellites at once is advantageous as it allows for many CubeSats to be inserted into orbit

  17. British International Schools: The Deployment and Training of Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) as to the role and deployment of British international school teaching assistants. Through questionnaires and a follow up open discussion with headteachers from British international schools it was found that, due to the differing…

  18. Simultaneous Fleet Deployment and Network Design of Liner Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelareh, Shahin; Pisinger, David

    A mixed integer linear programming formulation is proposed for the simultaneous design of network and fleet deployment of a liner service providers for deep-sea shipping. The underlying network design problem is based on a 4-index (5-index by considering capacity type) formulation of the hub...

  19. Modeling deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines is a key solution to mitigating economic losses caused by Xylella fastidiosa. While Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines under development display mild symptoms and have lower bacterial populations than susceptible varieties, all appear to remain ...

  20. Cloud Environment Automation: from infrastructure deployment to application monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Costantini, A.; Bucchi, R.; Italiano, A.; Michelotto, D.; Panella, M.; Pergolesi, M.; Saletta, M.; Traldi, S.; Vistoli, C.; Zizzi, G.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    The potential offered by the cloud paradigm is often limited by technical issues, rules and regulations. In particular, the activities related to the design and deployment of the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud layer can be difficult to apply and time-consuming for the infrastructure maintainers. In this paper the research activity, carried out during the Open City Platform (OCP) research project [1], aimed at designing and developing an automatic tool for cloud-based IaaS deployment is presented. Open City Platform is an industrial research project funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), started in 2014. It intends to research, develop and test new technological solutions open, interoperable and usable on-demand in the field of Cloud Computing, along with new sustainable organizational models that can be deployed for and adopted by the Public Administrations (PA). The presented work and the related outcomes are aimed at simplifying the deployment and maintenance of a complete IaaS cloud-based infrastructure.

  1. Abstraction Layer For Development And Deployment Of Cloud Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Minh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present an abstraction layer for cloud computing, which intends to simplify the manipulation with virtual machines in clouds for easy and controlled development and deployment of cloud services. It also ensures interoperability between different cloud infrastructures and allows developers to create cloud appliances easily via inheritance mechanisms.

  2. The Effects of Combat Deployments on Children and Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-12

    violence against children.”10 It’s not simply the absence of the deployed adult that correlates to the increase in abuse, but the stressful times of...door to voice over internet protocol, webcam , etc. However, mental health professionals are also wary of the sharing of too much information—spouses

  3. Relationships between Soldiers' PTSD Symptoms and Spousal Communication during Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sarah; Loew, Benjamin; Allen, Elizabeth; Stanley, Scott; Markman, Howard; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Social support, including support from spouses, may buffer against posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The current study assessed whether the frequency of spousal communication during a recent deployment, a potentially important source of support for soldiers, was related to postdeployment PTSD symptoms. Data came from 193 married male Army soldiers who returned from military deployment within the past year. For communication modalities conceptualized as “delayed” (i.e., letters, care packages, and e-mails), greater spousal communication frequency during deployment was associated with lower postdeployment PTSD symptom scores, but only at higher levels of marital satisfaction (p = .009). At lower marital satisfaction, more “delayed” spousal communication during deployment was associated with more PTSD symptoms (p = .042). For communication modalities conceptualized as “interactive” (i.e., phone calls, instant messaging, instant messaging with video), the same general direction of effects was seen, but the interaction between communication frequency and marital satisfaction predicting PTSD symptoms did not reach significance. PMID:21618290

  4. Deployment of Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria Institutional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deployment of Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria Institutional Digital Repository. A Aliyu, Z Mohammed. Abstract. The paper discussed the concept of open access initiative and its relevance to the development of digital repositories. It primarily focused on the institutional digital repository project of the Ahmadu Bello ...

  5. Does mental health stigma change across the deployment cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Maria M; Boasso, Alyssa M; Nash, William P; Litz, Brett T

    2014-12-01

    Prior research on mental health stigma in military personnel has been cross-sectional. We prospectively examined the course of perceived mental health stigma in a cohort of deployed U.S. combat Marines. Participants (N = 768) were assessed 1 month before a 7-month deployment to Afghanistan, and again at 1, 5, and 8 months postdeployment. We also examined three predictors of the course of stigma: post-traumatic stress disorder symptom severity, vertical and horizontal unit cohesion, and mental health treatment utilization while deployed. Perceptions of stigma remained largely stable across the deployment cycle, with latent growth curve analyses revealing a statistically significant but small decrease in stigma over time. Lower post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and greater perceived vertical and horizontal support predicted decreases in stigma over time, whereas mental health treatment utilization in theater did not predict the course of stigma. Perceived stigma was low and largely stable over time. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin deploying Solar Wind Composition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm lunar surface camera. Aldrin has just deployed the Solar Wind Composition experiment, a component of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP).

  7. Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility: Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Werner, M.; Spikes, A.; Komomua, C.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility. In anticipation of the opening of the ESIF, NREL held the workshop August 21-23, 2012 and invited participants from utilities, government, industry, and academia to discuss renewable integration challenges and discover new ways to meet them by taking advantage of the ESIF's capabilities.

  8. Aerial Deployment and Inflation System for Mars Helium Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeler, Tim; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Hall, Jeffery, L.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Pauken, Michael T.; Walsh, Gerald J.; White, Christopher V.

    2009-01-01

    A method is examined for safely deploying and inflating helium balloons for missions at Mars. The key for making it possible to deploy balloons that are light enough to be buoyant in the thin, Martian atmosphere is to mitigate the transient forces on the balloon that might tear it. A fully inflated Mars balloon has a diameter of 10 m, so it must be folded up for the trip to Mars, unfolded upon arrival, and then inflated with helium gas in the atmosphere. Safe entry into the Martian atmosphere requires the use of an aeroshell vehicle, which protects against severe heating and pressure loads associated with the hypersonic entry flight. Drag decelerates the aeroshell to supersonic speeds, then two parachutes deploy to slow the vehicle down to the needed safe speed of 25 to 35 m/s for balloon deployment. The parachute system descent dynamic pressure must be approximately 5 Pa or lower at an altitude of 4 km or more above the surface.

  9. Developing Deployable Spoken Language Translation Systems given Limited Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Eck, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Approaches are presented that support the deployment of spoken language translation systems. Newly developed methods allow low cost portability to new language pairs. Proposed translation model pruning techniques achieve a high translation performance even in low memory situations. The named entity and specialty vocabulary coverage, particularly on small and mobile devices, is targeted to an individual user by translation model personalization.

  10. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  11. Deployment of vendor innovation capability in contract electronic manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Mefford, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores deployment of innovation capability in outsourcing from the vendor perspective. Vendor’s innovation-related competences are used to capture vendor innovativeness. A multiple-case study was applied with two Contract Electronic Manufacturers. Based on the data analysis we propose...

  12. A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Benefits of mobile phone deployment for children <5 in low resource settings remain unproven. The target population of the current demonstration study in Bushenyi District, Uganda, presented with acute fever, pneumonia, or diarrhoea and were treated by community health workers (CHWs) providing ...

  13. Advances in Anesthesia Delivery in the Deployed Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John E; Barras, William P

    2016-01-01

    Lessons learned over the past decade and a half of combat casualty management has brought about numerous advances in trauma anesthesia practice. In the post-Vietnam era, deployable anesthesia equipment centered on the capability to provide a balanced anesthetic technique, utilizing a combination of volatile gas and intravenous anesthetic adjuncts. The evolution of the modern battlefield has forced anesthesia providers across the military to adapt to mission requirements that often dictate a surgical capability that is more rapidly mobile and less reliant on logistical support. Institutional medical equipment development has focused on fielding a lighter, more mobile volatile gas delivery method. Despite numerous advances in anesthetic gas delivery, many veteran anesthesia providers have come to recognize the value of alternative anesthetic techniques in the deployed setting. One of the most appealing advances in combat anesthesia practice is the emergence of total intravenous anesthetics (TIVA) for trauma management and resuscitation. Although there have been numerous developments in anesthetic equipment for use in the deployed setting, TIVA has many advantages over volatile gas administration. Future research, development, and education should focus on TIVA and the ability to provide this as an alternative safe anesthetic for patients in austere environments. It is imperative to retain the lessons we have learned in order to adapt more effectively in future conflicts. This accumulation of knowledge must inform future innovative solutions to the challenges of casualty management in a deployed setting.

  14. Security-by-Experiment: Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; Hadziosmanovic, D.; Dechesne, Francien

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly

  15. An investigation on the deployments of major computer system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The resultant analysis revealed the choice of deploying compromise-operating systems, such as, Unix, Novel Netware and Linux, during the server end of building a large and complex networks for effective resources management, while, Windows XP is most suitable for implementing users and clients- end workstations, ...

  16. Soldiers' personal technologies on deployment and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Fullerton, Nicole; Crumpton, Rosa; Metzger-Abamukong, Melinda; Fantelli, Emily

    2012-05-01

    Personal technologies such as smartphones, computers, and gaming devices, are ubiquitous in the civilian world. Consequently they represent ideal vehicles for disseminating psychological and other health resources and interventions. However, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. We conducted the most comprehensive survey to date of the use, availability, and need for personal technologies by U.S. military service members. Our survey asked detailed questions about computers and the Internet, phones and smartphones, other mobile or portable technologies, gaming devices, and TV and video media used during deployment and at permanent duty station or home. We collected data by paper-and-pencil survey in 2010 and 2011 from 331 active Army service members at a processing and registration center in a large military installation in the western United States. Two cohorts were surveyed: Soldiers who had previously been deployed to a warzone and soldiers who had never been deployed. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across all popular electronic media. Soldiers at home essentially resembled civilian consumers in their use of popular technologies. Some technologies, including the Internet, gaming, and TV, were widespread on deployment. Others, most notably cellphones, were more restricted by availability, connectivity, opportunity, and military regulation in the warzone. Results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  17. Deployment of Recommender Systems: Operational and Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Abhijeet

    2011-01-01

    E-commerce firms are increasingly adopting recommendation systems to effectively target customers with products and services. The first essay examines the impact that improving a recommender system has on firms that deploy such systems. A market with customers heterogeneous in their search costs is considered. We find that in a monopoly, a firm…

  18. The Development and Deployment of a Virtual Unit Operations Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanath, Sreeram; Williams, Jason; Hilliard, Marcus; Wiesner, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Computer-simulated experiments offer many benefits to engineering curricula in the areas of safety, cost, and flexibility. We report our experience in developing and deploying a computer-simulated unit operations laboratory, driven by the guiding principle of maximum fidelity to the physical lab. We find that, while the up-front investment in…

  19. Designing and Deploying 3D Collaborative Games in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Apostolos; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Terzidou, Theodouli

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on methodologies of serious games deployment and evaluation. Particularly, this study will present a specific category of serious games that are based on Collaborative Virtual Environments and they aim to support Collaborative Learning. We call these serious games Collaborative Virtual Educational Games (CVEG). The paper aims to…

  20. Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies to promote mental health in the Military. AB Adler, PD Bliese, CA Castro. Abstract. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association 2011 294 pages ISBN-13: 978-1-4338-0881-4. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  1. Implications of Privatizing U.S Marine Deployed Tactical Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Scope: To provide the first of two knowledge and skill areas required to effectively deploy the SWAN-D VSAT terminal. The first half o this 10...will be able to configure the networking equipment within a SWAN-D VSAT terminal to pass NIPR/SIPR data, voice and video traffic to distant end

  2. Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shankle, Dean E.; Shankle, Jeremy P.

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Shankle, D.E., & Shankle, J.P. (2006). Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria:

  3. The feasibility of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, Six Sigma Road Mapping can be linked to QFD to balance the quality requirements in terms of planned quality, offered quality and expected quality. Keywords: Customer Satisfaction Performance; Graduate School; Quality Function Deployment; Six Sigma Road Mapping; Six Sigma Roadmaps; Theory of ...

  4. Structural analysis of ITER multi-purpose deployer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuelraj, Manoah Stephen, E-mail: manoah@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Dutta, Pramit; Gotewal, Krishan Kumar; Rastogi, Naveen [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Tesini, Alessandro [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046, 1306 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Choi, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: chang-hwan.choi@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046, 1306 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • System modelling for structural analysis of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Finite element modeling of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Static, modal and seismic response analysis of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Iterative structural analysis and design update to satisfy the structural criteria. • Modal analysis for various kinematic configurations. • Reaction force calculations on the interfacing systems. - Abstract: The Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD) is a general purpose ITER in-vessel remote handling (RH) system. The main handling equipment, known as the MPD Transporter, consists of a series of linked bodies, which provide anchoring to the vacuum vessel port and an articulated multi-degree of freedom motion to perform various in-vessel maintenance tasks. During the in-vessel operations, the structural integrity of the system should be guaranteed against various operational and seismic loads. This paper presents the structural analysis results of the concept design of the MPD Transporter considering the seismic events. Static structural, modal and frequency response spectrum analyses have been performed to verify the structural integrity of the system, and to provide reaction forces to the interfacing systems such as vacuum vessel and cask. Iterative analyses and design updates are carried out based on the reference design of the system to improve the structural behavior of the system. The frequency responses of the system in various kinematics and payloads are assessed.

  5. Quality function deployment in the food industry: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, A.I.A.; Dekker, M.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed literature review on the topic of the application of quality function deployment (QFD) in the food industry. This review is extended with a thorough description of the methodologies involved in the practice of QFD within food companies, exemplified with the help of a

  6. Structural realism versus deployment realism: A comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Timothy D

    2016-10-01

    In this paper I challenge and adjudicate between the two positions that have come to prominence in the scientific realism debate: deployment realism and structural realism. I discuss a set of cases from the history of celestial mechanics, including some of the most important successes in the history of science. To the surprise of the deployment realist, these are novel predictive successes toward which theoretical constituents that are now seen to be patently false were genuinely deployed. Exploring the implications for structural realism, I show that the need to accommodate these cases forces our notion of "structure" toward a dramatic depletion of logical content, threatening to render it explanatorily vacuous: the better structuralism fares against these historical examples, in terms of retention, the worse it fares in content and explanatory strength. I conclude by considering recent restrictions that serve to make "structure" more specific. I show however that these refinements will not suffice: the better structuralism fares in specificity and explanatory strength, the worse it fares against history. In light of these case studies, both deployment realism and structural realism are significantly threatened by the very historical challenge they were introduced to answer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Deployment Mechanism for Conventional Solar Array Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgetts Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is described, by which flexible blankets could be deployed from existing solar panel designs. These blankets could be covered with flexible cells, or they could be reflective films to form a concentrator array. Either way, the performance of an existing array design could be enhanced.

  8. Design of a deployment rotation mechanism for microsatellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelal, G.F.; Bakr Elhady, A.; Kassab, M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar array rotation mechanism provides a hinged joint between the solar panel and satellite body, smooth rotation of the solar array into deployed position and its fixation in this position. After unlocking of solar panel (while in orbit), rotation bracket turns towards ready-to-work position under

  9. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  10. Environmental Planning While Deployed: Mission Hindrance or Enhancement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    threats can result in significant health risks to the JTF [joint task force], adversely impacting readiness.” These threats include endemic insect ...significant power to heat or cool. Energy audits are also being considered as a way to reduce energy consumption at more permanent facilities in deployed

  11. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  12. Poor sleep after military deployment: associations with mental health difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E J F; Greenberg, N; Jones, N

    2016-08-19

    Sleep difficulties, alcohol use and mental illness are often related; military studies suggest that post-deployment is a high-risk period for sleep problems. To examine the prevalence of post-deployment sleep difficulties in UK Armed Forces (UKAF) personnel and associations with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and any mental disorder (AMD) symptoms. A prospective, self-report, observational study of UKAF members returning from Afghanistan, questionnaire data were collected immediately following and 6 months post-deployment. A total of 1636 participants provided study data at both time points. Twenty-three per cent of personnel reported sleep difficulties at follow-up; 11% reported sleep-related interference with daily functioning. Sleep problems were significantly associated with AUD and AMD. Initial post-deployment sleep problems were predictive of AMD but not AUD at follow-up. The disclosure of alcohol misuse and mental ill-health in UKAF personnel is often inhibited by stigmatizing beliefs; detection could be enhanced by inquiring about sleep problems which may be less stigmatizing than direct enquiries about alcohol misuse and psychological well-being. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Strategies for Power Line Communications Smart Metering Network Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sendin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids are becoming a reality all over the world. Nowadays, the research efforts for the introduction and deployment of these grids are mainly focused on the development of the field of Smart Metering. This emerging application requires the use of technologies to access the significant number of points of supply (PoS existing in the grid, covering the Low Voltage (LV segment with the lowest possible costs. Power Line Communications (PLC have been extensively used in electricity grids for a variety of purposes and, of late, have been the focus of renewed interest. PLC are really well suited for quick and inexpensive pervasive deployments. However, no LV grid is the same in any electricity company (utility, and the particularities of each grid evolution, architecture, circumstances and materials, makes it a challenge to deploy Smart Metering networks with PLC technologies, with the Smart Grid as an ultimate goal. This paper covers the evolution of Smart Metering networks, together with the evolution of PLC technologies until both worlds have converged to project PLC-enabled Smart Metering networks towards Smart Grid. This paper develops guidelines over a set of strategic aspects of PLC Smart Metering network deployment based on the knowledge gathered on real field; and introduces the future challenges of these networks in their evolution towards the Smart Grid.

  14. 78 FR 65751 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... agencies, tolling authorities, and transit authorities, to apply for deployment planning grants. The Moving..., and Simulation Guidance; Model System Engineering documents; and technology transfer activities such... Plan (PMP) and a System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP). These plans should be finalized and...

  15. Energy storage deployment and innovation for the clean energy transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, Noah; Lill, Felix; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2017-09-01

    The clean energy transition requires a co-evolution of innovation, investment, and deployment strategies for emerging energy storage technologies. A deeply decarbonized energy system research platform needs materials science advances in battery technology to overcome the intermittency challenges of wind and solar electricity. Simultaneously, policies designed to build market growth and innovation in battery storage may complement cost reductions across a suite of clean energy technologies. Further integration of R&D and deployment of new storage technologies paves a clear route toward cost-effective low-carbon electricity. Here we analyse deployment and innovation using a two-factor model that integrates the value of investment in materials innovation and technology deployment over time from an empirical dataset covering battery storage technology. Complementary advances in battery storage are of utmost importance to decarbonization alongside improvements in renewable electricity sources. We find and chart a viable path to dispatchable US$1 W-1 solar with US$100 kWh-1 battery storage that enables combinations of solar, wind, and storage to compete directly with fossil-based electricity options.

  16. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    Objectives: To determine the number, nature and severity of usability issues radiologists encounter while using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice, and to assess how well the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation generalize to clinical

  17. Wind Energy Deployment Process and Siting Tools (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Regardless of cost and performance, some wind projects cannot proceed to completion as a result of competing multiple uses or siting considerations. Wind energy siting issues must be better understood and quantified. DOE tasked NREL researchers with depicting the wind energy deployment process and researching development considerations. This presentation provides an overview of these findings and wind siting tools.

  18. DEPLOYMENT OF VOIP ON WIRELINE NETWORK USING OPNET

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EKPAH

    discussing the explosion of VoIP deployments and corporate rollouts have ... comprehensive library of network protocol and models. .... model the activities of the LAN users. One of these workstations generates the background traffic of the floor while the other two act as parties in VoIP sessions. For example, the. Ethernet ...

  19. The ‘Deployment of Extra Processing’ Account of Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazekas, Peter; Nanay, Bence

    2015-01-01

    The paper formulates an alternative view about the core function of attention claiming that attention is not selection but the deployment of extra processing capacity. This way of thinking about attention has greater explanatory power, since it proposes a common implementation both for selection ...

  20. A Structural Approach and Deployment of a Substation Automation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jeong Sik; Lee, Kwon Han; Choi, Dae Hee; Choi, Yong Bum; Lee, Hak Sung [Hyosung Corporation (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the definition of a substation automation system and presents core components and its layered structure based on the modular approach. Also it introduces the implementation and deployment of our substation automation system which was adopted to the field recently. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A Deployment Strategy for Multiple Types of Requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuxun

    2015-10-01

    Node deployment is one of the most crucial issues in wireless sensor networks, and it is of realistic significance to complete the deployment task with multiple types of application requirements. In this paper, we propose a deployment strategy for multiple types of requirements to solve the problem of deterministic and grid-based deployment. This deployment strategy consists of three deployment algorithms, which are for different deployment objectives. First, instead of general random search, we put forward a deterministic search mechanism and the related cost-based deployment algorithm, in which nodes are assigned to different groups which are connected by near-shortest paths, and realize significant reduction of path length and deployment cost. Second, rather than ordinary nondirection deployment, we present a notion of counterflow and the related delay-based deployment algorithm, in which the profit of deployment cost and loss of transmission delay are evaluated, and achieve much diminishing of transmission path length and transmission delay. Third, instead of conventional uneven deployment based on the distances to the sink, we propose a concept of node load level and the related lifetime-based deployment algorithm, in which node distribution is determined by the actual load levels and extra nodes are deployed only where really necessary. This contributes to great improvement of network lifetime. Last, extensive simulations are used to test and verify the effectiveness and superiority of our findings.

  2. Deployment, Design, and Commercialization of Carbon-Negative Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel Lucio

    Climate change mitigation requires gigaton-scale carbon dioxide removal technologies, yet few examples exist beyond niche markets. This dissertation informs large-scale implementation of bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS), a carbon-negative energy technology. It builds on existing literature with a novel focus on deployment, design, commercialization, and communication of BECCS. BECCS, combined with aggressive renewable deployment and fossil emission reductions, can enable a carbon-negative power system in Western North America by 2050, with up to 145% emissions reduction from 1990 levels. BECCS complements other sources of renewable energy, and can be deployed in a manner consistent with regional policies and design considerations. The amount of biomass resource available limits the level of fossil CO2 emissions that can still satisfy carbon emissions caps. Offsets produced by BECCS are more valuable to the power system than the electricity it provides. Implied costs of carbon for BECCS are relatively low ( 75/ton CO2 at scale) for a capital-intensive technology. Optimal scales for BECCS are an order of magnitude larger than proposed scales found in existing literature. Deviations from optimal scaled size have little effect on overall systems costs - suggesting that other factors, including regulatory, political, or logistical considerations, may ultimately have a greater influence on plant size than the techno-economic factors considered. The flexibility of thermochemical conversion enables a viable transition pathway for firms, utilities and governments to achieve net-negative CO 2 emissions in production of electricity and fuels given increasingly stringent climate policy. Primary research, development (R&D), and deployment needs are in large-scale biomass logistics, gasification, gas cleaning, and geological CO2 storage. R&D programs, subsidies, and policy that recognize co-conversion processes can support this pathway to commercialization

  3. Intent-based resource deployment in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Geeth; Pham, Tien; Sullivan, Paul; Grueneberg, Keith; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Norman, Tim

    2012-06-01

    Information derived from sensor networks plays a crucial role in the success of many critical tasks such as surveillance, and border monitoring. In order to derive the correct information at the right time, sensor data must be captured at desired locations with respect to the operational tasks in concern. Therefore, it is important that at the planning stage of a mission, sensing resources are best placed in the field to capture the required data. For example, consider a mission goal identify snipers, in an operational area before troops are deployed - two acoustic arrays and a day-night video camera are needed to successfully achieve this goal. This is because, if the resources are placed in correct locations, two acoustic arrays could provide direction of the shooter and a possible location by triangulating acoustic data whereas the day-night camera could produce an affirmative image of the perpetrators. In order to deploy the sensing resources intelligently to support the user decisions, in this paper we propose a Semantic Web based knowledge layer to identify the required resources in a sensor network and deploy the needed resources through a sensor infrastructure. The knowledge layer captures crucial information such as resources configurations, their intended use (e.g., two acoustic arrays deployed in a particular formation with day-night camera are needed to identify perpetrators in a possible sniper attack). The underlying sensor infrastructure will assists the process by exposing the information about deployed resources, resources in theatre, and location information about tasks, resources and so on.

  4. TQM and lean strategy deployment in Italian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Baccarani, Claudio

    2016-10-03

    Purpose This paper aims to contribute to the debate concerning total quality management (TQM)-Lean strategy in public healthcare by analyzing the deployment path for implementation, the possible benefits that can be achieved and the encountered pitfalls. Design/methodology/approach Three case studies are drawn from three large Italian hospitals with more than 500 beds each and structured with many departments. The hospitals are located in Tuscany, Italy. These three hospitals have embraced TQM and Lean, starting from strategic objectives and their deployment. At the same time, they have also implemented many TQM-Lean tools. The case studies are based on interviews held with four managers in each of these three public hospitals. Findings Results from the interviews show that there is a specific deployment path for TQM-Lean implementation. The hospitals have also achieved benefits linked to patient satisfaction and improved organizational performances. Problems related to organizational and cultural issues, such as senior managers' commitment, staff management, manufacturing culture and tools adaptation, could affect the benefits. Research limitations/implications The research has been carried out in just three Italian public hospitals. Hence, similar investigations could be managed in other countries. Researchers could also use a larger sample and investigate these issues by means of quantitative inquiry. Practical implications Practitioners could try to apply the deployment path revealed by these case studies in other public and private hospitals. Originality/value The results of this research show that there is a specific, new deployment path for implementing TQM-Lean strategy in some public hospitals.

  5. Developmental issues impacting military families with young children during single and multiple deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Lisa Hains; Berry, Kathy D

    2009-10-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in war time deployments for military service members. How have young children been affected by single and multiple Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) deployments? We found young children with a deployed parent showed increased behavior problems during deployment and increased attachment behaviors at reunion compared with children whose parents had not experienced a recent deployment. Child behavior problems were related to many individual child and family characteristics, such as child age and temperament, length of the deployment, total time deployed parent was absent, number of moves, and number of stressors reported by parent. Child attachment behaviors were related to the length of the deployment, number of deployments, and the number of stressors faced by the parent. Soldiers and spouses of soldiers who chose not to re-enlist more often described themselves as depressed, and had children with many more behavior problems at reunion.

  6. Programming and Runtime Support to Blaze FPGA Accelerator Deployment at Datacenter Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Muhuan; Wu, Di; Yu, Cody Hao; Fang, Zhenman; Interlandi, Matteo; Condie, Tyson; Cong, Jason

    2016-10-01

    With the end of CPU core scaling due to dark silicon limitations, customized accelerators on FPGAs have gained increased attention in modern datacenters due to their lower power, high performance and energy efficiency. Evidenced by Microsoft's FPGA deployment in its Bing search engine and Intel's 16.7 billion acquisition of Altera, integrating FPGAs into datacenters is considered one of the most promising approaches to sustain future datacenter growth. However, it is quite challenging for existing big data computing systems-like Apache Spark and Hadoop-to access the performance and energy benefits of FPGA accelerators. In this paper we design and implement Blaze to provide programming and runtime support for enabling easy and efficient deployments of FPGA accelerators in datacenters. In particular, Blaze abstracts FPGA accelerators as a service (FaaS) and provides a set of clean programming APIs for big data processing applications to easily utilize those accelerators. Our Blaze runtime implements an FaaS framework to efficiently share FPGA accelerators among multiple heterogeneous threads on a single node, and extends Hadoop YARN with accelerator-centric scheduling to efficiently share them among multiple computing tasks in the cluster. Experimental results using four representative big data applications demonstrate that Blaze greatly reduces the programming efforts to access FPGA accelerators in systems like Apache Spark and YARN, and improves the system throughput by 1.7 × to 3× (and energy efficiency by 1.5× to 2.7×) compared to a conventional CPU-only cluster.

  7. Antenna Deployment for the Localization of Partial Discharges in Open-Air Substations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Sánchez-Fernández, Matilde; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2016-04-15

    Partial discharges are ionization processes inside or on the surface of dielectrics that can unveil insulation problems in electrical equipment. The charge accumulated is released under certain environmental and voltage conditions attacking the insulation both physically and chemically. The final consequence of a continuous occurrence of these events is the breakdown of the dielectric. The electron avalanche provokes a derivative of the electric field with respect to time, creating an electromagnetic impulse that can be detected with antennas. The localization of the source helps in the identification of the piece of equipment that has to be decommissioned. This can be done by deploying antennas and calculating the time difference of arrival (TDOA) of the electromagnetic pulses. However, small errors in this parameter can lead to great displacements of the calculated position of the source. Usually, four antennas are used to find the source but the array geometry has to be correctly deployed to have minimal errors in the localization. This paper demonstrates, by an analysis based on simulation and also experimentally, that the most common layouts are not always the best options and proposes a simple antenna layout to reduce the systematic error in the TDOA calculation due to the positions of the antennas in the array.

  8. Antenna Deployment for the Localization of Partial Discharges in Open-Air Substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Robles

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Partial discharges are ionization processes inside or on the surface of dielectrics that can unveil insulation problems in electrical equipment. The charge accumulated is released under certain environmental and voltage conditions attacking the insulation both physically and chemically. The final consequence of a continuous occurrence of these events is the breakdown of the dielectric. The electron avalanche provokes a derivative of the electric field with respect to time, creating an electromagnetic impulse that can be detected with antennas. The localization of the source helps in the identification of the piece of equipment that has to be decommissioned. This can be done by deploying antennas and calculating the time difference of arrival (TDOA of the electromagnetic pulses. However, small errors in this parameter can lead to great displacements of the calculated position of the source. Usually, four antennas are used to find the source but the array geometry has to be correctly deployed to have minimal errors in the localization. This paper demonstrates, by an analysis based on simulation and also experimentally, that the most common layouts are not always the best options and proposes a simple antenna layout to reduce the systematic error in the TDOA calculation due to the positions of the antennas in the array.

  9. A distributed parallel genetic algorithm of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Shuang; Xu, Gao-Chao; Fu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA) of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform.

  10. Antenna Deployment for the Localization of Partial Discharges in Open-Air Substations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Sánchez-Fernández, Matilde; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Partial discharges are ionization processes inside or on the surface of dielectrics that can unveil insulation problems in electrical equipment. The charge accumulated is released under certain environmental and voltage conditions attacking the insulation both physically and chemically. The final consequence of a continuous occurrence of these events is the breakdown of the dielectric. The electron avalanche provokes a derivative of the electric field with respect to time, creating an electromagnetic impulse that can be detected with antennas. The localization of the source helps in the identification of the piece of equipment that has to be decommissioned. This can be done by deploying antennas and calculating the time difference of arrival (TDOA) of the electromagnetic pulses. However, small errors in this parameter can lead to great displacements of the calculated position of the source. Usually, four antennas are used to find the source but the array geometry has to be correctly deployed to have minimal errors in the localization. This paper demonstrates, by an analysis based on simulation and also experimentally, that the most common layouts are not always the best options and proposes a simple antenna layout to reduce the systematic error in the TDOA calculation due to the positions of the antennas in the array. PMID:27092501

  11. What pre-deployment and early post-deployment factors predict health function after combat deployment?: a prospective longitudinal study of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) soldiers

    OpenAIRE

    McAndrew, Lisa M; D?Andrea, Elizabeth; Lu, Shou-En; Abbi, Bhavna; Yan, Grace W.; Engel, Charles; Quigley, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical and mental function are strong indicators of disability and mortality. OEF/OIF Veterans returning from deployment have been found to have poorer function than soldiers who have not deployed; however the reasons for this are unknown. Methods A prospective cohort of 790 soldiers was assessed both pre- and immediately after deployment to determine predictors of physical and mental function after war. Results On average, OEF/OIF Veterans showed significant declines in both phy...

  12. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  13. Cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) self-deployable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Chmielewski, Artur B.; Hayashi, Shunichi; Yamada, Toshiro

    1999-05-01

    Experiments have confirmed the feasibility of an innovative, new class of very simple, reliable, low mass, low packaging volume, and low-cost self-deployable structures for space and commercial applications. The concept called 'cold hibernated elastic memory' (CHEM) utilizes shape memory polymers (SMP) in open cellular (foam) structures. The SMP foam materials are under development by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The CHEM structures are described here and their major advantages are identified over other expandable/deployable structures. In preliminary proof- of-concept investigation conducted on SMP foams, all evaluation/test results were very encouraging and confirmed the basic characteristics of CHEM structures. The main objective of this program is to develop and validate the CHEM structure technology for most promising space applications. However, possible terrestrial commercial applications are also anticipated and described in this paper as well.

  14. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    medication, this paper is the first to investigate the effect of recent military deployments on a broader measure of mental health, for a full population of Danish soldiers and a comparison group of eligible men. We exploit a panel of Danish health administrative records and use propensity score matching...... on specific diagnoses such as PTSD. Another challenge is that the differences between soldiers and non-soldiers are not necessarily causal, instead possibly reflecting an underlying propensity towards active military service. Using the objective measures of hospitalizations and the purchase of mental health...... for time trends and other omitted variables affecting both groups. Overall, we find a significant and long-lasting adverse effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health, regardless of the comparison groups and underlying assumptions....

  15. The Adaptable, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wercinski, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The initial system-level development of the nano-ADEPT architecture will culminate in the launch of a 0.7 meter deployed diameter ADEPT sounding rocket flight experiment named, SR-1. Launch is planned for August 2017. The test will utilize the NASA Flight Opportunities Program sounding rocket platform provided by UP Aerospace to launch SR-1 to an apogee over 100 km and achieve re-entry conditions with a peak velocity near Mach 3. The SR-1 flight experiment will demonstrate most of the primary end-to-end mission stages including: launch in a stowed configuration, separation and deployment in exo-atmospheric conditions, and passive ballistic re-entry of a 70-degree half-angle faceted cone geometry.

  16. Clean coal technology deployment: From today into the next millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papay, L.T.; Trocki, L.K.; McKinsey, R.R. [Bechtel Technology and Consulting, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s clean coal technology (CCT) program succeeded in developing more efficient, cleaner, coal-fired electricity options. The Department and its private partners succeeded in the demonstration of CCT -- a major feat that required more than a decade of commitment between them. As with many large-scale capital developments and changes, the market can shift dramatically over the course of the development process. The CCT program was undertaken in an era of unstable oil and gas prices, concern over acid rain, and guaranteed markets for power suppliers. Regulations, fuel prices, emergency of competing technologies, and institutional factors are all affecting the outlook for CCT deployment. The authors identify the major barriers to CCT deployment and then introduce some possible means to surmount the barriers.

  17. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.

  18. Distributed Wi-Fi Interference Coordination for Dense Deployments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abinader, Fuad; Choudhury, Sayantan; Souza Jr., Vicente A.

    2017-01-01

    Unlicensed spectrum is increasingly being used by mobile operators to meet the mobile traffic demand, and Wi-Fi is foreseen as one of the technologies for implementing mobile traffic offloading. However, Wi-Fi efficiency does not scale well as node density increases, and IEEE 802.11ax Task Group...... (TGax) was created in 2014 for developing WiFi technology enhancements in dense deployments. This paper investigates Wi-Fi performance in the presence of Overlapping Basic Subscriber Set (OBSS) Wi-Fi networks in indoor dense deployments. We observe that Wi-Fi could benefit from scheduled operation...... with proper OBSS interference coordination. We propose a novel distributed interference coordination scheme for Wi-Fi scheduled mode operation, and evaluate it through system level simulations. Results indicate that the proposed scheme provides significant improvements over Enhanced Distributed Channel Access...

  19. Deployment and Implementation Strategies for Massive MIMO in 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panzner, Berthold; Zirwas, Wolfgang; Dierks, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Massive MIMO has emerged as one technology enabler for the next generation mobile communications 5G. The gains promised by massive MIMO are augured to overcome the capacity crunch in today's mobile networks and to pave the way for the ambitious targets of 5G. The challenge to realize massive MIMO...... for 5G is a successful and cost-efficient integration in the overall network concept. This work highlights deployment and implementation strategies for massive MIMO in the context of 5G indoor small cell scenarios. Different massive MIMO deployment scenarios are analyzed for a standard 3GPP indoor...... to spatial streams is varied stepwise from equality to a factor of ten. For implementation of massive MIMO in 5G networks trends in beamforming techniques, mutually coupled subarrays, over the calibration procedure and estimated ADC performance in 2020 time-frame are discussed. Based on the debate the paper...

  20. On the deployment of agents by binary information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Persis, Claudio; Cao, Ming; Ceragioli, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    We study the problem of deploying on a line a group of N agents with kinematic continuous-time model x˙i = ui , i = 1,...,N , (1) with xi ,ui ∈ R. The agents are connected through an undirected chain graph G = (V ,E ), with V = {1,2,...,N} and E = {(1,2),...,(i,i + 1),...,(N − 1,N)}. Moreover, we

  1. Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Crop Storages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Pilegaard; Green, Ole; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2015-01-01

    of a wireless sensor network based system that provides continuous, automatic, and up-to-date information on a crop storage, while presenting the data in an easily accessible manner, is also described. The design decisions, challenges, and practical experiences from real-world large scale deployment...... of the system are also discussed. It is concluded that the network works well for the intended application and that the intended users also see a value in the provided service....

  2. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    PhD program in Clinical Psychology . 6.2-6.4: Nothing to Report 7. PARTICIPANTS & OTHER COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS Personnel Role Person...randomized clinical trial with a sample of 150 Active Duty families who are within 6 months of deployment. Families will be randomized to receive the...develop Strong Parents Self-Care manual (for comparison arm), (4) obtain regulatory approvals for randomized clinical trial, (5) launch randomized

  3. Policies to Enable Bioenergy Deployment: Key Considerations and Good Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolinksi, Sharon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Bioenergy is renewable energy generated from biological source materials, and includes electricity, transportation fuels and heating. Source materials are varied types of biomass, including food crops such as corn and sugarcane, non-edible lignocellulosic materials such as agricultural and forestry waste and dedicated crops, and municipal and livestock wastes. Key aspects of policies for bioenergy deployment are presented in this brief as part of the Clean Energy Solutions Center's Clean Energy Policy Brief Series.

  4. Utility communication networks and services specification, deployment and operation

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This CIGRE green book begins by addressing the specification and provision of communication services in the context of operational applications for electrical power utilities, before subsequently providing guidelines on the deployment or transformation of networks to deliver these specific communication services. Lastly, it demonstrates how these networks and their services can be monitored, operated, and maintained to ensure that the requisite high level of service quality is consistently achieved.

  5. Summary of panel session 3 -- Environmental issues affecting CCT deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausker, K. [Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The panelists discussed a variety of environmental issues that affect CCT deployment, and more broadly speaking, power development in general. The issues were both international and domestic in nature. The author summarizes the issues discussed. A summary is also presented which highlights ideas from the panelists that could be characterized as solutions to the demand for improved environmental performance and the surrounding uncertainties. The author offers some personal comments and observations.

  6. How Have Deployments During the War on Terrorism Affected Reenlistment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    reenlist. However, added pay can compensate for suboptimal deployment, whether it is too much or too little. We use the model to motivate our...a micro model of reenlistment behavior that motivates the assumption that the bonus-setting behavior outlined in the previous section is optimal and...Michael, “Mortality Risk and Bequests ,” Econometrica, Vol. 57, No. 4, July 1989, pp. 779–813. Karney, Benjamin R., and John S. Crown, Families Under

  7. The dimensions, development, and deployment of strategic leader capability

    OpenAIRE

    Laljani, Narendra

    2007-01-01

    This research – which was motivated by a perceived gap between the reality of the world of the strategic leader and leadership development practice - offers an integrated perspective on the dimensions, development, and deployment of strategic leader capability. In the first of three thematically linked projects, a conceptual framework was developed based on four key dimensions of capability: judgement, the strategic conversation, contextual mastery, and behavioural comple...

  8. Thin film solar cell inflatable ultraviolet rigidizable deployment hinge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simburger, Edward J. (Inventor); Matsumoto, James H. (Inventor); Giants, Thomas W. (Inventor); Garcia, III, Alec (Inventor); Perry, Alan R. (Inventor); Rawal, Suraj (Inventor); Marshall, Craig H. (Inventor); Lin, John K. H. (Inventor); Day, Jonathan Robert (Inventor); Kerslake, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible inflatable hinge includes curable resin for rigidly positioning panels of solar cells about the hinge in which wrap around contacts and flex circuits are disposed for routing power from the solar cells to the power bus further used for grounding the hinge. An indium tin oxide and magnesium fluoride coating is used to prevent static discharge while being transparent to ultraviolet light that cures the embedded resin after deployment for rigidizing the inflatable hinge.

  9. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment by Federal Government Agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cory, K.; Coggeshall, C.; Coughlin, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this report is to examine how federal agencies can finance on-site PV projects. It explains state-level cash incentives available, the importance of solar renewable energy certificate revenues (in certain markets), existing financing structures, as well as innovative financing structures being used by federal agencies to deploy on-site PV. Specific examples from the DOD, DOE, and other federal agencies are highlighted to explain federal project financing in detail.

  10. Lessons Learned from Deploying an Analytical Task Management Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.; Welch, Clara; Arceneaux, Joshua; Bulgatz, Dennis; Hunt, Mitch; Young, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Defining requirements, missions, technologies, and concepts for space exploration involves multiple levels of organizations, teams of people with complementary skills, and analytical models and simulations. Analytical activities range from filling a To-Be-Determined (TBD) in a requirement to creating animations and simulations of exploration missions. In a program as large as returning to the Moon, there are hundreds of simultaneous analysis activities. A way to manage and integrate efforts of this magnitude is to deploy a centralized database that provides the capability to define tasks, identify resources, describe products, schedule deliveries, and generate a variety of reports. This paper describes a web-accessible task management system and explains the lessons learned during the development and deployment of the database. Through the database, managers and team leaders can define tasks, establish review schedules, assign teams, link tasks to specific requirements, identify products, and link the task data records to external repositories that contain the products. Data filters and spreadsheet export utilities provide a powerful capability to create custom reports. Import utilities provide a means to populate the database from previously filled form files. Within a four month period, a small team analyzed requirements, developed a prototype, conducted multiple system demonstrations, and deployed a working system supporting hundreds of users across the aeros pace community. Open-source technologies and agile software development techniques, applied by a skilled team enabled this impressive achievement. Topics in the paper cover the web application technologies, agile software development, an overview of the system's functions and features, dealing with increasing scope, and deploying new versions of the system.

  11. Reintegration After Deployment: Supporting Citizen Warriors and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    families. Achieving Reintegration Success RAND researchers administered a survey and conducted interviews with service members and spouses. The...responses indicated that families with successful reintegration experiences share common traits. These families felt ready for deployment, had good...Department of Defense (DoD) can use these findings to empower families to be active, effective architects of their own reintegration success . Doing so is

  12. Strategies for Power Line Communications Smart Metering Network Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Sendin; Ivan Peña; Pablo Angueira

    2014-01-01

    Smart Grids are becoming a reality all over the world. Nowadays, the research efforts for the introduction and deployment of these grids are mainly focused on the development of the field of Smart Metering. This emerging application requires the use of technologies to access the significant number of points of supply (PoS) existing in the grid, covering the Low Voltage (LV) segment with the lowest possible costs. Power Line Communications (PLC) have been extensively used in electricity grids ...

  13. Project Update: Increased Fuel Affordability through Deployable Refining Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8- 98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 PROJECT UPDATE: INCREASED FUEL AFFORDABILITY THROUGH DEPLOYABLE REFINING TECHNOLOGY August...Generator fuel ~ 1-2 gph Waste extract ~ 20 gph Feed extractant ~ 20 gph Extraction fluid = denatured ( methanol or DB) ethanol / water 70 / 30...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 August 2016 – 30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Project Update: Increased Fuel Affordability through

  14. Impact of SDN Controllers Deployment on Network Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Nencioni, Gianfranco; Helvik, Bjarne Emil; Gonzalez, Andres Javier; Heegaard, Poul Einar; Kamisinski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined networking (SDN) promises to improve the programmability and flexibility of networks, but it may bring also new challenges that need to be explored. The purpose of this technical report is to assess how the deployment of the SDN controllers affects the overall availability of SDN. For this, we have varied the number, homing and location of SDN controllers. A two-level modelling approach that is used to evaluate the availability of the studied scenarios. Our results show how n...

  15. Base Station Antenna Pattern Distortion in Practical Urban Deployment Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2014-01-01

    the intrinsic propagation mechanisms of the urban environment (far-field) can contribute to the distortion of the radiation pattern observed in a practical deployment scenario, especially when comparing it to the antenna pattern provided by the manufacturer and typically measured in free space. This paper......-field distortion has been evaluated by means of finite integration technique (FIT) simulations, while the far-field effects have been analyzed through intelligent ray tracing (IRT)....

  16. Downward-deployed tethered platforms for high enthalpy aerothermodynamic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, George M.; Siemers, Paul M.; Squires, R. Kenneth; Wolf, Henry; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.

    1988-01-01

    The data on aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic interactions at altitudes above 50 km is extremely limited because of the relative inaccessibility of the region to research vehicles of any sort. This paper addresses the practicability of using downward deployed satellites tethered to an orbiting host vehicle in order to obtain steady-state data in the upper reaches of the region above 80 or 90 km.

  17. Telephone Support During Overseas Deployment for Military Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Graney MJ, & Burns R. Decision Making During the Deployment Cycle. The Family Journal , 2016. DOI: 10.1177/1066480716648686. o Nichols LO, Martindale...1.6 children . They were well educated (15 years education) and 55% were employed. The majority were Caucasian/White (80%) with 16% being Hispanic...replacing a car), financial decisions (e.g., budget, debt repayment), and decisions about children (e.g., medical, educational, discipline). For the

  18. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  19. Special Spiritual Connections: Chaplain Deployments With Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY SPECIAL SPIRITUAL CONNECTIONS: CHAPLAIN DEPLOYMENTS WITH SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES...allowing for a larger meeting with Imams, including tribal Sheikh and Imam Jalal al Faraji Abdullah.22 Ch. Kline’s partnership with Sheikh...engagements. Ch. Terrinoni led efforts to engage African leaders and build relationships on behalf of the CJTF Commander and the Director of

  20. Software as a service approach to sensor simulation software deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Steven; Miller, Gordon; Mayott, Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Traditionally, military simulation has been problem domain specific. Executing an exercise currently requires multiple simulation software providers to specialize, deploy, and configure their respective implementations, integrate the collection of software to achieve a specific system behavior, and then execute for the purpose at hand. This approach leads to rigid system integrations which require simulation expertise for each deployment due to changes in location, hardware, and software. Our alternative is Software as a Service (SaaS) predicated on the virtualization of Night Vision Electronic Sensors (NVESD) sensor simulations as an exemplary case. Management middleware elements layer self provisioning, configuration, and integration services onto the virtualized sensors to present a system of services at run time. Given an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) environment, enabled and managed system of simulations yields a durable SaaS delivery without requiring user simulation expertise. Persistent SaaS simulations would provide on demand availability to connected users, decrease integration costs and timelines, and benefit the domain community from immediate deployment of lessons learned.

  1. Technology development for cryogenic deployable telescope structures and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Charles B.; Gilman, Larry; Reynolds, Paul

    2003-12-01

    At 6-7 meters in diameter, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will require structures that remain stable to levels that are on the order of 10 nanometers under dynamic and thermal loading while operating at cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the JWST will be the first telescope in space that is deployed, resulting in an aperture that is not only segmented, but has hinge-lines and the associated joining systems or latches in it. In order to understand the behavior and reduce the risk associated with very large, deployed structures and the stability of the associated structure and latches, we developed and tested the largest cryogenic structure ever built and then characterized its stability. This paper presents a description of the design of the Development Optical Telescope Assembly (DOTA), the testing performed, and the results of the testing performed on it. We discuss the material selection and characterization processes, give a description of the test configurations, describe the metrology equipment and the validation process for it, provide the test results, and summarize the conclusions drawn from the results. The testing and associated results include characterization of the thermal stability of the large-scale structure, characterization of the micro-dynamic stability of the latching system, and measurements of the deployment capability of the mechanisms. We also describe how the DOTA design relates to the JWST design and how the test results relate to the JWST requirements.

  2. CHEM-Based Self-Deploying Planetary Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2007-01-01

    A document proposes self-deploying storage tanks, based on the cold elastic hibernated memory (CHEM) concept, to be used on remote planets. The CHEM concept, described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, involves the use of open-cell shape-memory-polymer (SMP) foam sandwich structures to make lightweight, space-deployable structures that can be compressed for storage and can later be expanded, then rigidified for use. A tank according to the proposal would be made of multiple SMP layers (of which at least one could be an SMP foam). The tank would be fabricated at full size in the rigid, deployed condition at ambient temperature, the SMP material(s) having been chosen so that ambient temperature would be below the SMP glass-transition temperature (T(sub g)). The tank would then be warmed to a temperature above T(sub g), where it would be compacted and packaged, then cooled to below T(sub g) and kept there during launch and transport to a distant planet. At the assigned position on the planet, the compacted tank would be heated above T(sub g) by the solar radiation making it rebound to its original size and shape. Finally, the tank would be rigidified through natural cooling to below T(sub g) in the planetary ambient environment.

  3. CHEM-Based Self-Deploying Spacecraft Radar Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Huang, John; Ghaffarian, Reza

    2004-01-01

    A document proposes self-deploying spacecraft radar antennas based on cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures. Described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the CHEM concept is one of utilizing open-cell shape-memory-polymer (SMP) foams to make lightweight structures that can be compressed for storage and can later be expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM-based antenna according to the proposal would comprise three layers of microstrip patches and transmission lines interspersed with two flat layers of SMP foam, which would serve as both dielectric spacers and as means of deployment. The SMP foam layers would be fabricated at full size at a temperature below the SMP glass-transition temperature (Tg). The layers would be assembled into a unitary structure, which, at temperature above Tg, would be compacted to much smaller thickness, then rolled up for storage. Next, the structure would be cooled to below Tg and kept there during launch. Upon reaching the assigned position in outer space, the structure would be heated above Tg to make it rebound to its original size and shape. The structure as thus deployed would then be rigidified by natural cooling to below Tg

  4. Deploying the AstroGrid: Science Use Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Harrison, P. A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Hill, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    AstroGrid (see http://www.astrogrid.org), a UK eScience project with collaborating groups drawn from the major UK data archive centres, is creating the UK's Virtual Observatory. In order to ensure rapid user feedback AstroGrid is fully deploying each iteration release, connected to relevant data and application products, in such a fashion as to allow scientific use of that release. The early users are primarily the science advisory group and now the beta tester communities of the project. The scientific functionality of the current (Sep. 2004) deployment is highlighted. This includes access to a sophisticated workflow capability. Its use in allowing image extraction from multiple image datasets, input photometry file creation, redshift determination, and visualisation for the outputs to allow discovery of high redshift objects is described. Further examples show the use of the latest Astrophysical Data Query language standard and how it is being used to enable large data queries of remote databases in searching for low mass objects in the Pleiades with results returned to a virtual ``MySpace'' user storage area, where further visualisation and processing can be performed. We note how the deployed system is being tested by the science community, and how that comment and feedback is vital in informing the project as to future releases including the January 2005 ``AstroGrid Release 1''.

  5. Wireless Sensor Network Deployment for Monitoring Wildlife Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Vicente López-Bao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are being deployed in very diverse application scenarios, including rural and forest environments. In these particular contexts, specimen protection and conservation is a challenge, especially in natural reserves, dangerous locations or hot spots of these reserves (i.e., roads, railways, and other civil infrastructures. This paper proposes and studies a WSN based system for generic target (animal tracking in the surrounding area of wildlife passages built to establish safe ways for animals to cross transportation infrastructures. In addition, it allows target identification through the use of video sensors connected to strategically deployed nodes. This deployment is designed on the basis of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, but it increases the lifetime of the nodes through an appropriate scheduling. The system has been evaluated for the particular scenario of wildlife monitoring in passages across roads. For this purpose, different schemes have been simulated in order to find the most appropriate network operational parameters. Moreover, a novel prototype, provided with motion detector sensors, has also been developed and its design feasibility demonstrated. Original software modules providing new functionalities have been implemented and included in this prototype. Finally, main performance evaluation results of the whole system are presented and discussed in depth.

  6. Hearing loss associated with US military combat deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S Wells

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to define the risk of hearing loss among US military members in relation to their deployment experiences. Data were drawn from the Millennium Cohort Study. Self-reported data and objective military service data were used to assess exposures and outcomes. Among all 48,540 participants, 7.5% self-reported new-onset hearing loss. Self-reported hearing loss showed moderate to substantial agreement (k = 0.57-0.69 with objective audiometric measures. New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.49-1.77, as well as male sex and older age. Among deployers, new-onset hearing loss was also associated with proximity to improvised explosive devices (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.62-2.73 and with experiencing a combat-related head injury (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 3.77-12.54. These findings have implications for health care and disability planning, as well as for prevention programs.

  7. Deployment of distributed applications in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Virginia; Atzori, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The increase in computation and sensing capabilities as well as in battery duration of commercially available Wireless Sensors Network (WSN) nodes are making the paradigm of an horizontal ambient intelligence infrastructure feasible. Accordingly, the sensing, computing and communicating infrastructure is set with a programmable middleware that allows for quickly deploying different applications running on top of it so as to follow the changing ambient needs. In this scenario, we face the problem of setting up the desired application in complex scenarios with hundreds of nodes, which consists of identifying which actions should be performed by each of the nodes so as to satisfy the ambient needs while minimizing the application impact on the infrastructure battery lifetime. Accordingly, we approach the problem by considering every possible decomposition of the application's sensing and computing operations into tasks to be assigned to each infrastructure component. The contribution of energy consumption due to the performance of each task is then considered to compute a cost function, allowing us to evaluate the viability of each deployment solution. Simulation results show that our framework results in considerable energy conservation with respect to sink-oriented or cluster-oriented deployment approaches, particularly for networks with high node densities, non-uniform energy consumption and initial energy, and complex actions.

  8. Critical care pharmacy workforce: UK deployment and characteristics in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Mark; Barton, Greg; Bourne, Richard S; McKenzie, Catherine

    2017-10-11

    Clinical pharmacists reduce medication errors and optimize the use of medication in critically ill patients, although actual staffing level and deployment of UK pharmacists is unknown. The primary aim was to investigate the UK deployment of the clinical pharmacy workforce in critical care and compare this with published standards. An electronic data entry tool was created and distributed for UK critical care pharmacy services to record their critical care workforce deployment data. Data were received for 279 critical care units in 171 organizations. Clinical pharmacist input was identified for 98.6% of critical care units. The median weekday pharmacist input to critical care was 0.045 whole time equivalents per Level 3 (ICU) bed with significant interregional variation. Weekend services were sparse. Pharmacists spent 24.5% of time on the multidisciplinary team ward round, 58.5% of time on independent patient review and 17% of time on other critical care professional support activities. There is significant variation in staffing levels when services are stratified by highest level of competence of critical care pharmacist within an organization (P = 0.03), with significant differences in time spent on the multi-disciplinary ward round (P = 0.010) and on other critical care activities (P = 0.009), but not on independent patient review. Investment in pharmacy services is required to improve access to clinical pharmacy expertise at weekends, on MDT ward rounds and for other critical care activities. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Review of Large Spacecraft Deployable Membrane Antenna Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Quan; Qiu, Hui; Li, Xiao; Yang, Shu-Li

    2017-11-01

    The demand for large antennas in future space missions has increasingly stimulated the development of deployable membrane antenna structures owing to their light weight and small stowage volume. However, there is little literature providing a comprehensive review and comparison of different membrane antenna structures. Space-borne membrane antenna structures are mainly classified as either parabolic or planar membrane antenna structures. For parabolic membrane antenna structures, there are five deploying and forming methods, including inflation, inflation-rigidization, elastic ribs driven, Shape Memory Polymer (SMP)-inflation, and electrostatic forming. The development and detailed comparison of these five methods are presented. Then, properties of membrane materials (including polyester film and polyimide film) for parabolic membrane antennas are compared. Additionally, for planar membrane antenna structures, frame shapes have changed from circular to rectangular, and different tensioning systems have emerged successively, including single Miura-Natori, double, and multi-layer tensioning systems. Recent advances in structural configurations, tensioning system design, and dynamic analysis for planar membrane antenna structures are investigated. Finally, future trends for large space membrane antenna structures are pointed out and technical problems are proposed, including design and analysis of membrane structures, materials and processes, membrane packing, surface accuracy stability, and test and verification technology. Through a review of large deployable membrane antenna structures, guidance for space membrane-antenna research and applications is provided.

  10. Floating Potential Probe Deployed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2001-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 2000, at the request of the International Space Station (ISS) Program Office, a Plasma Contactor Unit Tiger Team was set up to investigate the threat of the ISS arcing in the event of a plasma contactor outage. Modeling and ground tests done under that effort showed that it is possible for the external structure of the ISS to become electrically charged to as much as -160 V under some conditions. Much of this work was done in anticipation of the deployment of the first large ISS solar array in November 2000. It was recognized that, with this deployment, the power system would be energized to its full voltage and that the predicted charging would pose an immediate threat to crewmembers involved in extravehicular activities (EVA's), as well as long-term damage to the station structure, were the ISS plasma contactors to be turned off or stop functioning. The Floating Potential Probe was conceived, designed, built, and deployed in record time by a crack team of scientists and engineers led by the NASA Glenn Research Center in response to ISS concerns about crew safety.

  11. Programmable Deployment of Tensegrity Structures by Stimulus-Responsive Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Wu, Jiangtao; Paulino, Glaucio H; Qi, H Jerry

    2017-06-14

    Tensegrity structures with detached struts are naturally suitable for deployable applications, both in terrestrial and outer-space structures, as well as morphing devices. Composed of discontinuous struts and continuous cables, such systems are only structurally stable when self-stress is induced; otherwise, they lose the original geometrical configuration (while keeping the topology) and thus can be tightly packed. We exploit this feature by using stimulus responsive polymers to introduce a paradigm for creating actively deployable 3D structures with complex shapes. The shape-change of 3D printed smart materials adds an active dimension to the configurational space of some structural components. Then we achieve dramatic global volume expansion by amplifying component-wise deformations to global configurational change via the inherent deployability of tensegrity. Through modular design, we can generate active tensegrities that are relatively stiff yet resilient with various complexities. Such unique properties enable structural systems that can achieve gigantic shape change, making them ideal as a platform for super light-weight structures, shape-changing soft robots, morphing antenna and RF devices, and biomedical devices.

  12. Differential Child Maltreatment Risk Across Deployment Periods of US Army Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christine M; Ross, Michelle E; Wood, Joanne N; Griffis, Heather M; Harb, Gerlinde C; Mi, Lanyu; Song, Lihai; Strane, Douglas; Lynch, Kevin G; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We described the risk for maltreatment among toddlers of US Army soldiers over different deployment cycles to develop a systematic response within the US Army to provide families appropriate supports. We conducted a person-time analysis of substantiated maltreatment reports and medical diagnoses among children of 112,325 deployed US Army soldiers between 2001 and 2007. Risk of maltreatment was elevated after deployment for children of soldiers deployed once but not for children of soldiers deployed twice. During the 6 months after deployment, children of soldiers deployed once had 4.43 substantiated maltreatment reports and 4.96 medical diagnoses per 10,000 child-months. The highest maltreatment rate among children of soldiers deployed twice occurred during the second deployment for substantiated maltreatment (4.83 episodes per 10,000 child-months) and before the first deployment for medical diagnoses of maltreatment (3.78 episodes per 10,000 child-months). We confirmed an elevated risk for child maltreatment during deployment but also found a previously unidentified high-risk period during the 6 months following deployment, indicating elevated stress within families of deployed and returning soldiers. These findings can inform efforts by the military to initiate and standardize support and preparation to families during periods of elevated risk.

  13. Research on backbone node deployment for Wireless Mesh Networks in dynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meiyi; Cao, Shengling

    2017-08-01

    Wireless Mesh Network is a type of wireless networks in which demands of bandwidth for users has mobility. The backbone node placement of wireless mesh networks in a dynamic scenario is investigated, and the TSDPSO algorithm is used to adapt the dynamic environment, which updates node deployment location to adapt to changes in demand if it detects environmental changes at the beginning of the cycle time. In order to meet the demands of bandwidth for users and network connectivity, particle swarm optimization algorithm is employed to select the gateway location, then nodes to the backbone network is added constantly until all requirement is covered. The experimental results show that algorithm could get effective solution in dynamic environment.

  14. Wireless sensor network deployment for monitoring soil moisture dynamics at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Filippi, E.; Ioriatti, L.; Martinelli, M.; Massa, A.; Toller, G.

    2009-12-01

    We describe a recent deployment of soil moisture and temperature sensors in an apple tree orchard aimed at exploring the interaction between soil moisture dynamics and plant physiology. The field is divided into three parcels with different constant irrigation rates. The deployment includes dendrometers which monitor the variations of the trunk diameter. The idea is to monitor continuously and at small time steps soil moisture dynamics, soil temperature and a parameter reflecting plant stress at the parcel scale, in order to better investigate the interaction between plant physiology and soil moisture dynamics. Other sensors monitoring plant physiology can be easily accommodated within the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). The experimental site is an apple orchard of 5000 m2 located at Cles, province of Trento, Italy, at the elevation of 640 m.a.s.l. In this site about 1200 apple trees are cultivated (cultivar Golden Delicious). The trees have been planted in 2004 in north-south rows 3.5 m apart. The deployment consists of 27 locations connected by a multi hop WSN, each one equipped with 5 soil moisture sensors (capacitance sensors EC-5, decagon Service) at the depths of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 80 cm, and a temperature sensor at the depth of 20 cm, for a total of 135 soil moisture and 27 temperature sensors. The proposed monitoring system is based on totally autonomous sensor nodes which allow both real time and historic data management. The data gathered are then organized in a database on a public web site. The node sensors are connected through an input/output interface to a WSN platform. The power supply consists of a solar panel able to provide 250 mA at 7 V and a 3V DC/DC converter based on a dual frequency high efficient switching regulator. The typical meteorological data are monitored with a weather station located at a distance of approximately 100 m from the experimental site. Great care has been posed to calibration of the capacitance sensors both in the

  15. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background...... information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. The Subtask 2 report covers OC3 background information and objectives of the task, OC3 benchmark exercises...... of aero-elastic offshore wind turbine codes, monopile foundation modeling, tripod support structure modeling, and Phase IV results regarding floating wind turbine modeling....

  16. Task 9. PV deployment in developing countries. Institutional framework and financial instruments for PV deployment in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the institutional framework and financial instruments necessary for PV deployment in developing countries. This guide describes the institutional and financial aspects that need to be addressed to ensure that a long term sustainable (and profitable) PV market is established in developing countries. The guide details main fundamental functions that need to be performed such as the agents needed to perform the functions and their differing roles within the framework, the relationships between these agents and the financial instruments available. It is stated that the majority of the aspects recommended in this guide can be adopted to two main PV deployment models: direct sales and rural electrification and development programmes. It is noted that both approaches will have to be tailored and adapted to local conditions.

  17. Delta XTE Spacecraft Solar Panel Deployment, Hangar AO at Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The footage shows technicians in the clean room checking and adjusting the deployment mechanism of the solar panel for XTE spacecraft. Other scenes show several technicians making adjustments to software for deployment of the solar panels.

  18. High-Performance Elastically Self-Deployed Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable roll-out solar array (ROSA) structural platform that when combined with...

  19. A longitudinal study of partners of deployed personnel from the Netherlands’ armed forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andres, M.D.; Moelker, R.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the longitudinal relationships among work–family conflict, general life stress, social isolation, and psychological distress of partners of deployed military personnel. Regression analyses revealed that psychological distress experienced in early stages of deployment predicted

  20. Surface transportation security and reliability information system model deployment : iFlorida final concept of operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-03

    FDOT began design of a Surface Transportation Security and Reliability Information System Model Deployment in May 2003. This model deployment focuses on enhancing the security and reliability of the surface transportation system through the widesprea...

  1. Psychiatric History, Deployments, and Impacts of Seeking Mental Health Care in a Combat Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Rates of mental health in service members deployed to Afghanistan continue to rise, with service members with 3+ deployments displaying highest rates of psychological problems and use of psychiatric medications.

  2. 76 FR 34286 - ITS Joint Program Office; Webinar on Connected Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment Analysis Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... between vehicles, infrastructure, and personal communications devices to improve safety, mobility, and... ITS Joint Program Office; Webinar on Connected Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment Analysis Report... Connected Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment Analysis Report. The webinar will provide an opportunity for...

  3. Soldier Dimensions and Operational Readiness in U.S. Army Forces Deployed to Kosovo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castro, Carl

    1999-01-01

    .... In a recent study of U.S. Army units deployed to Kosovo in support of a multinational peacekeeping mission, soldier attitudes and health were surveyed on site, mid-way during a 6-month deployment...

  4. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  5. Logistics analysis to Improve Deployability (LOG-AID): Field Experiment/Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    .... Under sponsorship of the Air Force Research Laboratory Logistics Readiness Branch (AFRL/HESR), the Synergy team analyzed the current wing-level deployment process as part of the Logistics Analysis to Improve Deployability (LOG-AID) program...

  6. Deployment Effects on Children and Adolescents: Designing and Deploying a Developmentally Appropriate Education and Screening Video Program for Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-22

    Alexander, 2007). Deployment Effects on Children 45 Stanford psychologist Albert Bandura’s social learning theory suggests that children easily...performing possible options and suffering the consequences" ( Bandura , 1977, p. 27), rather, we benefit from the power of example, observing others by...vicarious experience. Modeling others experiences, we potentially gain as much impact as direct exposure to the event. Through media effects, Bandura

  7. Effects of Long-Term Stowage on the Deployment of Bistable Tape Springs

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmeyer, Alex; Pellegrino, Sergio; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of strain-energy-deployed space structures, material relaxation effects play a significant role in structures that are stowed for long durations, for example, in a space vehicle prior to launch. Here, the deployment of an ultrathin carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) tape spring is studied, with the aim of understanding how long-duration stowage affects its deployment behavior. Analytical modeling and experiments show that the deployment time increases predictably with stowa...

  8. Animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  9. Parental Deployment and Youth in Military Families: Exploring Uncertainty and Ambiguous Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Angela J.; Mancini, Jay A.; Wilcox, Ryan M.; Grass, Saralyn R.; Grass, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    Parental deployment has substantial effects on the family system, among them ambiguity and uncertainty. Youth in military families are especially affected by parental deployment because their coping repertoire is only just developing; the requirements of deployment become additive to normal adolescent developmental demands. Focus groups were used…

  10. Keeping engaged during deployment : The interplay between self-efficacy, family support, and threat exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahaij, R.; Kamphuis, W.; Berg, C.E. van den

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the importance of 2 resilience resources for service members’ ability to deal with threat during deployment. Military self-efficacy and family support were measured before deployment and related to work engagement and burnout levels of service members during deployment. We

  11. Development of deployable structures for large space platform systems, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Generic deployable spacecraft configurations and deployable platform systems concepts were identified. Sizing, building block concepts, orbiter packaging, thermal analysis, cost analysis, and mass properties analysis as related to platform systems integration are considered. Technology needs are examined and the major criteria used in concept selection are delineated. Requirements for deployable habitat modules, tunnels, and OTV hangars are considered.

  12. Development of deployable structures for large space platforms. Volume 2: Design development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    Design evolution, test article design, test article mass properties, and structural analysis of deployable platform systems are discussed. Orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) hangar development, OTV hangar concept selection, and manned module development are discussed. Deployable platform systems requirements, material data base, technology development needs, concept selection and deployable volume enclosures are also discussed.

  13. Post-traumatic stress symptoms 5 years after military deployment to Afghanistan : An observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, Iris; Reijnen, Alieke; Vermetten, Eric; Geuze, Elbert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deployment can put soldiers at risk of developing post-traumatic stress symptoms. Despite several longitudinal studies, little is known about the timing of an increase in post-traumatic stress symptoms relative to pre-deployment. Longitudinal studies starting pre-deployment, in which

  14. A Comparison of Dependent Primary Care Utilization Rates Based on Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-09

    analysis to obtain the deployment data was completed by ASMR , another contractor used to Health Care Utilization and Deployments 15 complete...2007. The deployment dataset was created by ASMR using all encounter data for active duty Soldiers and running the Social Security numbers of these

  15. Do soldiers seek more mental health care after deployment? Analysis of mental health consultations in the Netherlands Armed Forces following deployment to Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Elisabeth Liesbeth M; Vermetten, Eric; van Schaik, Digna Anneke J F; Leenstra, Tjalling

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment to combat zones puts military personnel to a number of physical and mental challenges that may adversely affect mental health. Until now, few studies have been performed in Europe on mental health utilization after military deployment. We compared the incidence of mental health consultations with the Military Mental Health Service (MMHS) of military deployed to Afghanistan to that of non-deployed military personnel. We assessed utilization of the MMHS by the full cohort of the Netherlands Armed Forces enlisted between 2008 and 2010 through linkage of mental health and human resource information systems. The total population consisted of 50,508 military (18,233 deployed, 32,275 non-deployed), who accounted for 1,906 new consultations with the MMHS. The follow-up was limited to the first 2 years following deployment. We observed higher mental health care utilization in deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel; hazard ratio (HR), adjusted for sex, military branch and time in service, 1.84 [95% CI 1.61-2.11] in the first and 1.28 [1.09-1.49] in the second year after deployment. An increased risk of adjustment disorders (HR 2.59 [2.02-3.32] and 1.74 [1.30-2.32]) and of anxiety disorders (2.22 [1.52-3.25] and 2.28 [1.50-3.45]) including posttraumatic stress disorder (5.15 [2.55-10.40] and 5.28 [2.42-11.50]), but not of mood disorders (1.33 [0.90-1.97] and 1.11 [0.68-1.82]), was observed in deployed personnel in the first- and second-year post-deployment, respectively. Military personnel deployed in a unit with a higher risk of confrontation with potentially traumatic events had a higher HR (2.13 [1.84-2.47] and 1.40 [1.18-1.67]). Though absolute risk was low, in the first and second year following deployment to Afghanistan there was an 80 and 30% higher risk for mental health problems resulting in a consultation with the Dutch MMHS compared to military never deployed to Afghanistan. These observations underscore the need for an adequate mental

  16. Do soldiers seek more mental health care after deployment? Analysis of mental health consultations in the Netherlands Armed Forces following deployment to Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth (Liesbeth M. Taal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Military deployment to combat zones puts military personnel to a number of physical and mental challenges that may adversely affect mental health. Until now, few studies have been performed in Europe on mental health utilization after military deployment. Objective: We compared the incidence of mental health consultations with the Military Mental Health Service (MMHS of military deployed to Afghanistan to that of non-deployed military personnel. Method: We assessed utilization of the MMHS by the full cohort of the Netherlands Armed Forces enlisted between 2008 and 2010 through linkage of mental health and human resource information systems. Results: The total population consisted of 50,508 military (18,233 deployed, 32,275 non-deployed, who accounted for 1,906 new consultations with the MMHS. The follow-up was limited to the first 2 years following deployment. We observed higher mental health care utilization in deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel; hazard ratio (HR, adjusted for sex, military branch and time in service, 1.84 [95% CI 1.61–2.11] in the first and 1.28 [1.09–1.49] in the second year after deployment. An increased risk of adjustment disorders (HR 2.59 [2.02–3.32] and 1.74 [1.30–2.32] and of anxiety disorders (2.22 [1.52–3.25] and 2.28 [1.50–3.45] including posttraumatic stress disorder (5.15 [2.55–10.40] and 5.28 [2.42–11.50], but not of mood disorders (1.33 [0.90–1.97] and 1.11 [0.68–1.82], was observed in deployed personnel in the first- and second-year post-deployment, respectively. Military personnel deployed in a unit with a higher risk of confrontation with potentially traumatic events had a higher HR (2.13 [1.84–2.47] and 1.40 [1.18–1.67]. Conclusions: Though absolute risk was low, in the first and second year following deployment to Afghanistan there was an 80 and 30% higher risk for mental health problems resulting in a consultation with the Dutch MMHS compared to military never

  17. DESAIN DAN PEMBUATAN ALAT PENGGILING DAGING DENGAN QUALITY FUNCTION DEPLOYMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanus Ongkodjojo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality Function Deployment (QFD is a powerful development methodology with a wide range of applications. This paper presents a simple case using QFD on the design, detail, and process phase of a Meat Grinder product as a tool of improvement for hygienic of the Meat Grinder. The main purpose of QFD in this study was to apply in construction a method of customer-oriented design used in other industries, and to adapt some of the tables and matrices. Another purpose of this case study was to test the applicability of QFD in the design and process planning of a Meat Grinder. The developed prototype was chosen to be the screw part as the main part of the Grinder and a significant achievement was made on the improvement of hygienic, noted on less corrosive material selected of aluminum alloy 514.0 and improvement of surface roughness of 62.2%. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Quality Function Deployment (QFD adalah metodologi pengembangan yang cukup handal dengan rentang aplikasi yang luas. Makalah ini mempresentasikan kasus sederhana penggunaan metode QFD pada tahapan desain, detail dan proses produk penggiling daging sebagai alat untuk meningkatkan higenitasnya. Tujuan utama dari QFD pada studi ini adalah untuk menerapkan desain yang berorientasi pada pelanggan dengan mengadaptasi beberapa matriks dan table pada tahapan-tahapannya. Tujuan yang lain yaitu untuk menguji kemampuan QFD pada proses perancangan sebuah penggiling daging. Prototipe yang dipilih untuk dikembangkan yaitu bagian ulir sebagai bagian utama dari sebuah penggiling daging dan hasil yang cukup signifikan telah didapat pada hal higenitas, ditandai dengan terpilihnya material yang kurang korosif yaitu paduan aluminium 514.0 sebagai material yang digunakan serta perbaikan nilai kekasaran permukaan sebesar 62.2 % dari produk yang telah ada dipasaran. Kata kunci: quality function deployment, the house of quality, penggiling daging.

  18. Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Leslie; Johnson, Les

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS, which is planned on an Air Force GPS Satellite replacement mission in June 2002, will use the flight proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a tether (5 km bare wire plus 10 km non-conducting Dyneema) from a Delta II second stage to achieve ~0.4N drag thrust. ProSEDS will utilize the tether-generated current to provide limited spacecraft power. The ProSEDS instrumentation includes Langmuir probes and Differential Ion Flux Probes, which will determine the characteristics of the ambient ionospheric plasma. Two Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers will be used (one on the Delta and one on the endmass) to help determine tether dynamics and to limit transmitter operations to occasions when the spacecraft is over selected ground stations. The flight experiment is a precursor to the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission, which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes-all using electrodynamic thrust. An immediate application of ProSEDS technology is for the removal of spent satellites for orbital debris mitigation. In addition to the use of this technology to provide orbit transfer and debris mitigation it may also be an attractive option for future missions to Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere. .

  19. Transcardiac conducted electrical weapon (TASER) probe deployments: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William P; Teacher, Eric; Winslow, James E

    2012-12-01

    TASER (TASER International, Scottsdale, AZ) conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are commonly used by law enforcement officers. Although animal studies have suggested that transcardiac CEW discharges may produce direct cardiac effects, this has not been demonstrated in human studies. This study sought to determine the incidence and outcomes of transcardiac CEW probe impact locations in a large series of actual CEW deployments. A multi-center database of consecutive CEW uses by law enforcement officers was retrospectively reviewed. Case report forms were independently reviewed by three investigators to identify cases with paired probe configurations potentially producing a transcardiac discharge vector. Descriptive analysis was performed and inter-rater reliability was assessed. Among 1201 total CEW uses, 813 included probe deployments and 178 cases had paired anterior probe impacts potentially capable of producing a transcardiac discharge vector. This represents 14.8% of all CEW uses (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.9-16.9%) and 21.9% of CEW uses in probe mode (95% CI 19.1-24.9%). Inter-rater agreement was very good, with kappa = 0.82. There were no immediate deaths in any cases (97.5% CI 0.0-0.3%) to suggest a cardiac dysrhythmia, including those with transcardiac discharge vector. CEW deployments with probe impact configurations capable of producing a transcardiac discharge occur in a minority of cases in field use conditions. None of these cases, transcardiac or otherwise, produced immediately fatal dysrhythmias. These data support the overall safety of CEWs and provide a benchmark estimate of the likelihood of transcardiac discharge vectors occurring in field use of CEWs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydraulic Hybrid Parcel Delivery Truck Deployment, Testing & Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Jean-Baptiste [Calstart Incorporated, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-03-07

    Although hydraulic hybrid systems have shown promise over the last few years, commercial deployment of these systems has primarily been limited to Class 8 refuse trucks. In 2005, the Hybrid Truck Users Forum initiated the Parcel Delivery Working Group including the largest parcel delivery fleets in North America. The goal of the working group was to evaluate and accelerate commercialization of hydraulic hybrid technology for parcel delivery vehicles. FedEx Ground, Purolator and United Parcel Service (UPS) took delivery of the world’s first commercially available hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery trucks in early 2012. The vehicle chassis includes a Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid drive system, integrated and assembled by Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., with a body installed by Morgan Olson. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, CALSTART and its project partners assessed the performance, reliability, maintainability and fleet acceptance of three pre-production Class 6 hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery vehicles using information and data from in-use data collection and on-road testing. This document reports on the deployment of these vehicles operated by FedEx Ground, Purolator and UPS. The results presented provide a comprehensive overview of the performance of commercial hydraulic hybrid vehicles in parcel delivery applications. This project also informs fleets and manufacturers on the overall performance of hydraulic hybrid vehicles, provides insights on how the technology can be both improved and more effectively used. The key findings and recommendations of this project fall into four major categories: -Performance, -Fleet deployment, -Maintenance, -Business case. Hydraulic hybrid technology is relatively new to the market, as commercial vehicles have been introduced only in the past few years in refuse and parcel delivery applications. Successful demonstration could pave the way for additional purchases of hydraulic hybrid vehicles throughout the

  1. A Portable, Field-Deployable Analyzer for Isotopic Water Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Gupta, M.; Huang, Y. W.; Lacelle, D.; McKay, C. P.; Fortson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have for many years been used to study the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate among other applications. Typically, discrete water samples are collected and transported to a laboratory for isotope analysis. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have generally been limited in scope and time-resolution. Field sampling of water isotopes has been shown in recent years to provide dense data sets with the increased time resolution illuminating substantially greater short term variability than is generally observed during discrete sampling. A truly portable instrument also opens the possibility to utilize the instrument as a tool for identifying which water samples would be particularly interesting for further laboratory investigation. To make possible such field measurements of liquid water isotopes, Los Gatos Research has developed a miniaturized, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer. The prototype miniature liquid water isotope analyzer (mini-LWIA) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology in a rugged, Pelican case housing for easy transport and field operations. The analyzer simultaneously measures both δ2H and δ18O from liquid water, with both manual and automatic water introduction options. The laboratory precision for δ2H is 0.6 ‰, and for δ18O is 0.3 ‰. The mini-LWIA was deployed in the high Arctic during the summer of 2015 at Inuvik in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Samples were collected from Sachs Harbor, on the southwest coast of Banks Island, including buried basal ice from the Lurentide Ice Sheet, some ice wedges, and other types of ground ice. Methodology and water analysis results from this extreme field deployment will be presented.

  2. LG-CONSTRUCTOR for rapid deployment of LG wargaming tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg

    2002-07-01

    LG-CONSTRUCTOR is a knowledge acquisition and construction component intended to facilitate rapid deployment of the LG- based tools. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will supply warfighters at all levels with the patterns of games. A warfighter will be able to consider and visualize the most viable patterns and quickly convert them into the LG hypergame, most adequate to the current mission. The adequacy of construction will be tested on the fly by playing and re-playing semi-finished hypergames. In order to construct a hypergame, LG- CONSTRUCTOR will define the board (with specific space-time scale), the pieces, the variety of legal movements and other activities of pieces, additional gaming constraints that define legal moves like winning conditions, rules of engagement, abort conditions, etc. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will store a number of pattern-ABG and complete pattern-hypergames developed earlier. After deployment to the mission, the military personnel will be able to play an appropriate pattern-hypergame. During this play, a military analyst will dynamically adjust this game to the real state of affairs. The required knowledge acquisition by pattern-game playing and game adjustment will be controlled by LG-CONSTRUCTOR. Step-by-step, by interacting with an analyst, LG-CONSTRUCTOR will generate a new hypergame, a network of interlinked ABG. For this generation, it may combine a number of pattern-ABG and complete pattern-hypergames. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will be capable of the real time construction due to transparency of LG game representation and high computational efficiency of LG-Strategist, an LG strategy-generating component. It will assist LG-CONSTRUCTOR in testing new games. This construction by playing and adjusting certain game-patterns will allow rapid deployment of LG-STRATEGIST during the mission. In this paper, we will consider the details of required knowledge acquisition and construction.

  3. Experimental Validation of Elliptical Fin-Opening Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Garner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An effort to improve the performance of ordnance has led to the consideration of the use of folding elliptical fins for projectile stabilization. A second order differential equation was used to model elliptical fin deployment history and accounts for: deployment with respect to the geometric properties of the fin, the variation in fin aerodynamics during deployment, the initial yaw effect on fin opening, and the variation in deployment speed based on changes in projectile spin. This model supports tests conducted at the Transonic Experimental Facility, Aberdeen Proving Ground examining the opening behavior of these uniquely shaped fins. The fins use the centrifugal force from the projectile spin to deploy. During the deployment, the fin aerodynamic forces vary with angle-of-attack changes to the free stream. Model results indicate that projectile spin dominates the initial opening rates and aerodynamics dominate near the fully open state. The model results are examined to explain the observed behaviors, and suggest improvements for later designs.

  4. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  5. Introduction to the special section on communication and wartime deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Katheryn C; Wilson, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have taken a heavy toll on the physical, psychological, and relational health of military service members and their families. The articles included in this special section of Health Communication add to the robust, interdisciplinary body of research on the health consequences of wartime deployment by examining how communication enables the recovery process of service members and their families. Because communication processes can signal health problems, construct and promote family resiliency, and shape the content and delivery of health interventions, our discipline's theory and research can help inform ongoing efforts to support military families as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down.

  6. Designing a total data solution technology, implementation, and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Burkey, Roxanne

    2000-01-01

    Your company's global competitiveness depends on the utilization and maintenance of information. Current data handling practices-storing, updating, and accessing data-can be either a problem or a significant strategic advantage for your company. Designing a Total Data Storage Solution: Technology, Implementation, and Deployment gives you the information you need to compare current technologies and determine which is best suited to your enterprise.This book defines and explains the components that make up total cost of ownership along with the impact of integrating current changes in technology

  7. Article of Clothing for Storing and Deploying a Scarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Robert (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A clothing article surrounds a wearer's upper torso. The article includes connected front portion, a collar. A sleeve is formed in the front portion. A jacket, and coat with an attachable/detachable scarf will be folded and stored in the inter portion of the front side of the collar area with elastic at each end and Velcro onto the inner portion of your collar, therefore eliminating the lost of them by any consumers, and especially children. A sleeve like collar attached to the coat and jacket for storing a scarf and making it easily deployable while in use.

  8. India Solar Resource Data: Enhanced Data for Accelerated Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    Identifying potential locations for solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) projects requires an understanding of the underlying solar resource. Under a bilateral partnership between the United States and India - the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue - the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has updated Indian solar data and maps using data provided by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) and the National Institute for Solar Energy (NISE). This fact sheet overviews the updated maps and data, which help identify high-quality solar energy projects. This can help accelerate the deployment of solar energy in India.

  9. Patent Deployment Strategies and Patent Value in LED Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Fu; Chang, Keng-Wei; Zhou, Wei; Hao, Juan; Yuan, Chien-Chung; Chang, Ke-Chiun

    2015-01-01

    This study applies two variables in the measurement of company patent deployment strategies: patent family depth and earn plan ratio. Patent family depth represents the degree to which certain fields and markets are valued by the patent owner. Earn plan ratio defined as the ratio of the number of patent forward citations to patent family size. Earn plan ratio indicates the degree to which a patent family could be cited by later innovators and competitors. This study applies a logistic regression model in the analysis LED industry data. The results demonstrate that patent value has a positive relationship with the patent family depth, and earn plan ratio.

  10. The Association Between Suicide and OIF/OEF Deployment History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association. 2006;295(9):1023-1032. 6. Haney EM, O’Neil ME, Carson S, et al. Suicide...former U.S. military personnel? Ann Epidemiol. Oct 2009;19(10):757-760. 32. Kang HK, Bullman TA. Mortality among US veterans of the Persian Gulf War: 7... Ann Epidemiol 2009;19:757-760. 6. Spelman JF, Hunt SC, Seal KH, Burgo-Black L. Post deployment care for returning combat veterans. J Gen Intern Med

  11. Deploy Nalu/Kokkos algorithmic infrastructure with performance benchmarking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domino, Stefan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ananthan, Shreyas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Alan B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The former Nalu interior heterogeneous algorithm design, which was originally designed to manage matrix assembly operations over all elemental topology types, has been modified to operate over homogeneous collections of mesh entities. This newly templated kernel design allows for removal of workset variable resize operations that were formerly required at each loop over a Sierra ToolKit (STK) bucket (nominally, 512 entities in size). Extensive usage of the Standard Template Library (STL) std::vector has been removed in favor of intrinsic Kokkos memory views. In this milestone effort, the transition to Kokkos as the underlying infrastructure to support performance and portability on many-core architectures has been deployed for key matrix algorithmic kernels. A unit-test driven design effort has developed a homogeneous entity algorithm that employs a team-based thread parallelism construct. The STK Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) infrastructure is used to interleave data for improved vectorization. The collective algorithm design, which allows for concurrent threading and SIMD management, has been deployed for the core low-Mach element- based algorithm. Several tests to ascertain SIMD performance on Intel KNL and Haswell architectures have been carried out. The performance test matrix includes evaluation of both low- and higher-order methods. The higher-order low-Mach methodology builds on polynomial promotion of the core low-order control volume nite element method (CVFEM). Performance testing of the Kokkos-view/SIMD design indicates low-order matrix assembly kernel speed-up ranging between two and four times depending on mesh loading and node count. Better speedups are observed for higher-order meshes (currently only P=2 has been tested) especially on KNL. The increased workload per element on higher-order meshes bene ts from the wide SIMD width on KNL machines. Combining multiple threads with SIMD on KNL achieves a 4.6x speedup over the baseline, with

  12. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two

  13. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  14. The Effect of Deployment Frequencies on the Military Divorce Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    support, logistics and administration, health care , cryptology, ordnance, communications systems, weapons systems and control, and unrated. 11...10.11% 16.54% 9.28% 5.50% Aviation ground support 16.46% 14.69% 17.53% 4.89% Logistics and administration 21.33% 19.07% 11.15% 9.14% Health care ...deployed and nondeployed military members. It may be the case that something as simple as mandatory premarital counseling could give members the tools

  15. Patent Deployment Strategies and Patent Value in LED Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Fu; Chang, Keng-Wei; Zhou, Wei; Hao, Juan; Yuan, Chien-Chung; Chang, Ke-Chiun

    2015-01-01

    This study applies two variables in the measurement of company patent deployment strategies: patent family depth and earn plan ratio. Patent family depth represents the degree to which certain fields and markets are valued by the patent owner. Earn plan ratio defined as the ratio of the number of patent forward citations to patent family size. Earn plan ratio indicates the degree to which a patent family could be cited by later innovators and competitors. This study applies a logistic regression model in the analysis LED industry data. The results demonstrate that patent value has a positive relationship with the patent family depth, and earn plan ratio. PMID:26098313

  16. A regulations’ survey for the wireless telecommunications deployment in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gustavo Morales-Guarín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the current wireless telecommunications infrastructure deployment regulations in Colombia. It also refers to the possible effects that this infrastructure could cause to the country`s health and environment. similarly, the results obtained show a comparison between the Argentina’s current regulations, one of the most relevant researches carried out and the Colombian case. finally, some recommendations are proposed that can be considered in the project of regulations applicable in Colombia for the ensuring purpose that the non-ionizing radiation generated by wireless communications systems do not have effects on health and the environment.

  17. Deployable reflector design for Ku-band operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankersley, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A project was conducted to extend the deployable antenna technology state-of-the art through the design, analysis, construction, and testing of a lightweight, high surface tolerance, 12.5 foot diameter reflector for Ku-band operation. The applicability of the reflector design to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) program was one requirement to be met. A documentary of the total program is presented. The performance requirements used to guide and constrain the design are discussed. The radio frequency, structural/dynamic, and thermal performance results are reported. Appendices are used to provide test data and detailed fabrication drawings of the reflector.

  18. Deployable Propulsion, Power and Communications Systems for Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Carr, J.; Boyd, D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing thin-film based, deployable propulsion, power, and communication systems for small spacecraft that could provide a revolutionary new capability allowing small spacecraft exploration of the solar system. By leveraging recent advancements in thin films, photovoltaics, and miniaturized electronics, new mission-level capabilities will be enabled aboard lower-cost small spacecraft instead of their more expensive, traditional counterparts, enabling a new generation of frequent, inexpensive deep space missions. Specifically, thin-film technologies are allowing the development and use of solar sails for propulsion, small, lightweight photovoltaics for power, and omnidirectional antennas for communication.

  19. Deployable Propulsion and Power Systems for Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing thin-film based, deployable propulsion, power and communication systems for small spacecraft that could provide a revolutionary new capability allowing small spacecraft exploration of the solar system. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout reconnaissance mission will demonstrate solar sail propulsion on a 6U CubeSat interplanetary spacecraft and lay the groundwork for their future use in deep space science and exploration missions. Solar sails use sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like sail made of a lightweight, highly reflective material. This continuous photon pressure provides propellantless thrust, allowing for very high delta V maneuvers on long-duration, deep space exploration. Since reflected light produces thrust, solar sails require no onboard propellant. The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) is a launch stowed, orbit deployed array on which thin-film photovoltaic and antenna elements are embedded. Inherently, small satellites are limited in surface area, volume, and mass allocation; driving competition between power, communications, and GN&C (guidance navigation and control) subsystems. This restricts payload capability and limits the value of these low-cost satellites. LISA-T is addressing this issue, deploying large-area arrays from a reduced volume and mass envelope - greatly enhancing power generation and communications capabilities of small spacecraft. The NEA Scout mission, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program and managed by NASA MSFC, will use the solar sail as its primary propulsion system, allowing it to survey and image one or more NEA's of interest for possible future human exploration. NEA Scout uses a 6U cubesat (to be provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory), an 86 sq m solar sail and will weigh less than 12 kilograms. NEA Scout will be launched on the first flight of the Space Launch System in 2018. Similar in concept

  20. Retinal dialysis and detachment in a child after airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliott, Dean; Hauch, Adam; Kim, Rubin W; Fawzi, Amani

    2011-04-01

    A variety of airbag-associated ocular injuries have been reported in children sitting in the front passenger seat during automobile collisions. These injuries range from corneal abrasions to traumatic hyphema with secondary glaucoma and cataract. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who experienced retinal dialysis and detachment associated with airbag deployment. The patient recovered 20/20 visual acuity after cryopexy and placement of a radial sponge. Copyright © 2011 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality Function Deployment – QFD As a Strategic Marketing Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumeninng Abrantes dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Quality Function Deployment (QFD is a structured method that aims to convert the needs and desires of customers in product quality characteristics. From its origins, more than forty years ago, it has been applied in various organizations in product development and improvement of existing products. This paper aims to show how QFD can be used as a strategic marketing tool. The research method is qualitative with bibliographical research. The results indicate that the use of the attributes of the "House of Quality" in the various sales stages is a market differentiation strategy and a wide applicability of QFD in marketing, transcending the boundaries of product design and production areas.

  2. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source, is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data......-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility...

  3. Experimental macroevolution†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  4. Deployment Testing of Flexible Composite Hinges in Bi-Material Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Trease, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Composites have excellent properties for strength, thermal stability, and weight. However, they are traditionally highly rigid, and when used in deployable structures require hinges bonded to the composite material, which increases complexity and opportunities for failure. Recent research in composites has found by adding an elastomeric soft matrix, often silicone instead of an epoxy, the composite becomes flexible. This work explores the deployment repeatability of silicone matrix composite hinges which join rigid composite beams. The hinges were found to have sub-millimeter linear deployment repeatability, and sub-degree angular deployment repeatability. Also, an interesting relaxation effect was discovered, as a hinges deployment error would decrease with time.

  5. Positive and negative memories in Danish soldiers – before, during, and after deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Bohn, Annette; Staugaard, Søren Risløv

    This study compares the characteristics of positive and negative memories in 610 Danish soldiers across three measurement points (before, during and after deployment). Participants were asked to report the most positive and most negative memory from their lives before deployment, and to report...... the most positive and most negative memories concerning their deployment (during deployment and right after deployment). The memory narratives were coded by two independent raters for specificity, coherence, and degree of desorganisation. For all three time points, these ratings were compared across time...

  6. 'Post-deployment appraisal' and the relationship with stress and psychological health in Australian veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Breanna; Forbes, Andrew; Kelsall, Helen; Clarke, David; Ikin, Jill; Sim, Malcolm

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how veterans appraise their post-deployment experiences could provide insight into better assisting their deployment transitions. We aimed to assess the factor structure of positive and negative post-deployment appraisals in Australian veterans and to examine the resultant factors in their relationship with military stress and psychological health. Questions capturing post-deployment attitudes were developed by the researchers in collaboration with veterans. The questions were administered to 1938 veterans and the results factor analysed. The relationships between post-deployment appraisal, military stress and psychological health were examined using Structural Equation Modelling. A three-factor solution was found for the post-deployment appraisal questions; representing personal development, lack of recognition, and appreciation of life and country. Military stress was associated with the three factors and psychological health. The three factors were weakly to moderately associated with psychological health. Mediation between military stress and psychological health by any post-deployment appraisal factor was minimal. Post-deployment appraisal measures three important attitudes and concerns of veterans after deployment. Military stress is associated with the post-deployment appraisal factors. However, the factors did not mediate the relationship between military stress and psychological health. These factors provide insight into how veterans appraise their complex array of post-deployment experiences, and may provide useful in regard to transitions and integration into civilian life.

  7. Effect of parents' wartime deployment on the behavior of young children in military families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Molinda M; Frank, Deborah A; White, Laura F; Shope, Timothy R

    2008-11-01

    To describe the effect of wartime military deployments on the behavior of young children in military families. Cross-sectional study. Childcare centers on a large Marine base. Parents and childcare providers of children aged 1(1/2) to 5 years enrolled in on-base childcare centers. Main Exposure Parental deployment. Mean externalizing, internalizing, and total symptom scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (1(1/2)-5 years) and the CBCL-Teacher Report Form (TRF) (1(1/2)-5 years). One hundred sixty-nine of 233 consenting families (73%) participated. Nonresponders did not differ from responders in their child's age or TRF scores. Fifty-five children (33%) had a deployed parent. Parents with children aged 3 years or older and a deployed spouse had significantly higher depression scores than those without a deployed spouse. There were no differences in the demographic characteristics between groups. After controlling for respondent's age, stress and depressive symptoms, deployed service member's rank, and total number of children in the home, we found an age by deployment interaction: children aged 3 years or older with a deployed parent had significantly higher CBCL externalizing and total scores (externalizing, 48.50 vs 43.31, P deployed parent. This study is the first to show that children aged 3 years or older with a deployed parent exhibit increased behavioral symptoms compared with peers without a deployed parent after controlling for caregiver's stress and depressive symptoms.

  8. Aggressive and violent behavior among military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence and link with deployment and combat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus, Deirdre; Rona, Roberto; Dickson, Hannah; Somaini, Greta; Fear, Nicola; Wessely, Simon

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analyses were conducted on studies of the prevalence of aggressive and violent behavior, as well as of violent offenses and convictions, among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and/or Afghanistan; the relationship with deployment and combat exposure; and the role that mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have on the pathway between deployment and combat to violence. Seventeen studies published between January 1, 2001, and February 12, 2014, in the United States and the United Kingdom met the inclusion criteria. Despite methodological differences across studies, aggressive behavior was found to be prevalent among serving and formerly serving personnel, with pooled estimates of 10% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1, 20) for physical assault and 29% (95% CI: 25, 36) for all types of physical aggression in the last month, and worthy of further exploration. In both countries, rates were increased among combat-exposed, formerly serving personnel. The majority of studies suggested a small-to-moderate association between combat exposure and postdeployment physical aggression and violence, with a pooled estimate of the weighted odds ratio = 3.24 (95% CI: 2.75, 3.82), with several studies finding that violence increased with intensity and frequency of exposure to combat traumas. The review's findings support the mediating role of PTSD between combat and postdeployment violence and the importance of alcohol, especially if comorbid with PTSD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Computational design analysis for deployment of cardiovascular stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammareddi, Sriram; Sun, Guangyong; Li, Qing

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease has become a major global healthcare problem. As one of the relatively new medical devices, stents offer a minimally-invasive surgical strategy to improve the quality of life for numerous cardiovascular disease patients. One of the key associative issues has been to understand the effect of stent structures on its deployment behaviour. This paper aims to develop a computational model for exploring the biomechanical responses to the change in stent geometrical parameters, namely the strut thickness and cross-link width of the Palmaz-Schatz stent. Explicit 3D dynamic finite element analysis was carried out to explore the sensitivity of these geometrical parameters on deployment performance, such as dog-boning, fore-shortening, and stent deformation over the load cycle. It has been found that an increase in stent thickness causes a sizeable rise in the load required to deform the stent to its target diameter, whilst reducing maximum dog-boning in the stent. An increase in the cross-link width showed that no change in the load is required to deform the stent to its target diameter, and there is no apparent correlation with dog-boning but an increased fore-shortening with increasing cross-link width. The computational modelling and analysis presented herein proves an effective way to refine or optimise the design of stent structures.

  10. Clustering-based interference management in densely deployed femtocell networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Dai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deploying femtocells underlaying macrocells is a promising way to improve the capacity and enhance the coverage of a cellular system. However, densely deployed femtocells in urban area also give rise to intra-tier interference and cross-tier issue that should be addressed properly in order to acquire the expected performance gain. In this paper, we propose an interference management scheme based on joint clustering and resource allocation for two-tier Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM-based femtocell networks. We formulate an optimization task with the objective of maximizing the sum throughput of the femtocell users (FUs under the consideration of intra-tier interference mitigation, while controlling the interference to the macrocell user (MU under its bearable threshold. The formulation problem is addressed by a two-stage procedure: femtocells clustering and resource allocation. First, disjoint femtocell clusters with dynamic sizes and numbers are generated to minimize intra-tier interference. Then each cluster is taken as a resource allocation unit to share all subchannels, followed by a fast algorithm to distribute power among these subchannels. Simulation results show that our proposed schemes can improve the throughput of the FUs with acceptable complexity.

  11. Communication tools between Grid virtual organisations, middleware deployers and sites

    CERN Document Server

    Dimou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Grid Deployment suffers today from the difficulty to reach users and site administrators when a package or a configuration parameter changes. Release notes, twiki pages and news’ broadcasts are not efficient enough. The interest of using GGUS as an efficient and effective intra-project communication tool is the message to the user community presented here. The purpose of GGUS is to bring together End Users and Supporters in the Regions where the Grid is deployed and in operation. Today’s Grid usage is still very far from the simplicity and functionality of the web. While pressing for middleware usability, we try to turn the Global Grid User Support (GGUS) into the central tool for identifying areas in the support environment that need attention. To do this, we exploit GGUS' capacity to expand, by including new Support Units that follow the project's operational structure. Using tailored GGUS database searches we obtain concrete results that prove where we need to improve procedures, Service Level Agreemen...

  12. Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 Contingency Drogue Deploy Velocity Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Robert S.; Stochowiak, Susan; Smith, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    As a backup to the GPS-aided Kalman filter and the Barometric altimeter, an "adjusted" velocity trigger is used during entry to trigger the chain of events that leads to drogue chute deploy for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). Even though this scenario is multiple failures deep, the Orion Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) software makes use of a clever technique that was taken from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) program, which recently successfully landing the Curiosity rover on Mars. MSL used this technique to jettison the heat shield at the proper time during descent. Originally, Orion use the un-adjusted navigated velocity, but the removal of the Star Tracker to save costs for EFT-1, increased attitude errors which increased inertial propagation errors to the point where the un-adjusted velocity caused altitude dispersions at drogue deploy to be too large. Thus, to reduce dispersions, the velocity vector is projected onto a "reference" vector that represents the nominal "truth" vector at the desired point in the trajectory. Because the navigation errors are largely perpendicular to the truth vector, this projection significantly reduces dispersions in the velocity magnitude. This paper will detail the evolution of this trigger method for the Orion project and cover the various methods tested to determine the reference "truth" vector; and at what point in the trajectory it should be computed.

  13. Quality Function Deployment: Application to Chemotherapy Unit Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s healthcare organizations are challenged by pressures to meet growing population demands and enhance community health through improving service quality. Quality function deployment is one of the widely-used customerdriven approaches for health services development. In the current study, quality function deployment is used to improve the quality of chemotherapy unit services. Methods: First, we identified chemotherapy outpatient unit patients as chemotherapy unit customers. Then, the Delphi technique and component factor analysis with orthogonal rotation was employed to determine their expectations. Thereafter, data envelopment analysis was performed to specify user priorities. We determined the relationships between patients’ expectations and service elements through expert group consensus using the Delphi method and the relationships between service elements by Pearson correlation. Finally, simple and compound priorities of the service elements were derived by matrix calculation. Results: Chemotherapy unit patients had four main expectations: access, suitable hotel services, satisfactory and effective relationships, and clinical services. The chemotherapy unit has six key service elements of equipment, materials, human resources, physical space, basic facilities, and communication and training. There were four-level relationships between the patients’ expectations and service elements, with mostly significant correlations between service elements. According to the findings, the functional group of basic facilities was the most critical factor, followed by materials. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can be a general guideline as well as a scientific, structured framework for chemotherapy unit decision makers in order to improve chemotherapy unit services.

  14. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, DEPLOYMENT AND EXCHANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy C. Herndon

    2001-02-28

    Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC21-95EW55101) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Florida State University's Institute for International Cooperative Environmental Research (IICER) was designed to facilitate a number of joint programmatic goals of both the DOE and the IICER related to international technology identification, development, demonstration and deployment using a variety of mechanisms to accomplish these goals. These mechanisms included: laboratory and field research; technology demonstrations; international training and technical exchanges; data collection, synthesis and evaluation; the conduct of conferences, symposia and high-level meetings; and other appropriate and effective approaches. The DOE utilized the expertise and facilities of the IICER at Florida State University to accomplish its goals related to this cooperative agreement. The IICER has unique and demonstrated capabilities that have been utilized to conduct the tasks for this cooperative agreement. The IICER conducted activities related to technology identification, development, evaluation, demonstration and deployment through its joint centers which link the capabilities at Florida State University with collaborating academic and leading research institutions in the major countries of Central and Eastern Europe (e.g., Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland) and Russia. The activities and accomplishments for this five-year cooperative agreement are summarized in this Final Technical Report.

  15. Deployable bamboo structure project: A building life-cycle report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Adrian; Prastyatama, Budianastas; Sagara, Altho; Wirabuana, Revian N.

    2017-11-01

    Bamboo is considered as a sustainable material in the world of construction, and it is vastly available in Indonesia. The general utilization of the material is increasingly frequent, however, its usage as a deployable structure-a recently-developed use of bamboo, is still untapped. This paper presents a report on a deployable bamboo structure project, covering the entire building life-cycle phase. The cycle encompasses the designing; fabrication; transportation; construction; operation and maintenance; as well as a plan for future re-use. The building is made of a configuration of the structural module, each being a folding set of bars which could be reduced in size to fit into vehicles for easy transportation. Each structural module was made of Gigantochloa apus bamboo. The fabrication, transportation, and construction phase require by a minimum of three workers. The fabrication and construction phase require three hours and fifteen minutes respectively. The building is utilized as cafeteria stands, the operation and maintenance phase started since early March 2017. The maintenance plan is scheduled on a monthly basis, focusing on the inspection of the locking mechanism element and the entire structural integrity. The building is designed to allow disassembly process so that it is reusable in the future.

  16. Deployment of the CMS software on the WLCG Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Behrenhoff, Wolf

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Experiment is taking high energy collision data at CERN. The computing infrastructure used to analyse the data is distributed round the world in a tiered structure. In order to use the 7 Tier-1 sites, the 50 Tier-2 sites and a still growing number of about 30 Tier-3 sites, the CMS software has to be available at those sites. Except for a very few sites the deployment and the removal of CMS software is managed centrally. Since the deployment team has no local accounts at the remote sites all installation jobs have to be sent via Grid jobs. Via a VOMS role the job has a high priority in the batch system and gains write privileges to the software area. Due to the lack of interactive access the installation jobs must be very robust against possible failures, in order not to leave a broken software installation. The CMS software is packaged in RPMs that are installed in the software area independent of the host OS. The apt-get tool is used to resolve package dependencies. This paper reports about the recen...

  17. Information technology deployment in a transition economy: Results from Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovelja Tomaž

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Information technology (IT is increasingly establishing itself as one of the major topics of study in the OECD area. The resulting OECD studies found that IT has an enormous productive potential; however before an economy can gain most of IT's benefits, several challenges need to be successfully addressed. The key challenges these studies identified are adequate organizational transformations of the enterprises and adequate reorganization of key national institutions. How these two challenges are tackled by the economies that are going through the transition from a socialist towards a coordinated/liberal market economy is, unfortunately, not equally well documented. To improve this situation in this paper I present new findings from one transition economy concerning the issues that the developed OECD countries already highlighted as critical for the successful deployment of IT, and issues that seem specific to the transition environments. The presented findings are based on the study I conducted into 94 enterprises, representing the population of the 914 biggest added value generating enterprises in Slovenia. This article thus tries to allow Slovenia and other economies in a similar situation to draw broad and important conclusions with managerial and political implications on how to deploy all available IT potential.

  18. Applying fuzzy analytic network process in quality function deployment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Afsharkazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an empirical study of QFD implementation when fuzzy numbers are used to handle the uncertainty associated with different components of the proposed model. We implement fuzzy analytical network to find the relative importance of various criteria and using fuzzy numbers we calculate the relative importance of these factors. The proposed model of this paper uses fuzzy matrix and house of quality to study the products development in QFD and also the second phase i.e. part deployment. In most researches, the primary objective is only on CRs to implement the quality function deployment and some other criteria such as production costs, manufacturing costs etc were disregarded. The results of using fuzzy analysis network process based on the QFD model in Daroupat packaging company to develop PVDC show that the most important indexes are being waterproof, resistant pill packages, and production cost. In addition, the PVDC coating is the most important index in terms of company experts’ point of view.

  19. RFID Reader Anticollision Protocols for Dense and Mobile Deployments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul Aziz Mbacke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification technology has allowed its large adoption and led to increasing deployments of RFID solutions in diverse environments under varying scenarios and constraints. The nature of these constraints ranges from the amount to the mobility of the readers deployed, which in turn highly affects the quality of the RFID system, causing reading collisions. Although several solutions were proposed to engage the issue of reading collision, few were ever concerned with the densification and/or mobility of readers. This paper proposes two distributed TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access approaches designed to reduce these collisions through local coordination between neighboring devices for different scenarios tested here. The first proposal is based on a reservation phase organized between readers with different priority levels given to readers depending on their previous success. The second one takes advantage of the particular case of RFID collisions, allowing a local and mutual decision of each reader to access or not tags in their vicinity. Simulations were run over different stressful environments in terms of tag/reader density and mobility, proving that our proposals achieved the best performance in terms of throughput, collision avoidance and coverage delay when compared to other collision reducing schemes.

  20. Deployment Environment for a Swarm of Heterogeneous Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Abukhalil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to develop a framework that can deploy and provide coordination between multiple heterogeneous agents when a swarm robotic system adopts a decentralized approach; each robot evaluates its relative rank among the other robots in terms of travel distance and cost to the goal. Accordingly, robots are allocated to the sub-tasks for which they have the highest rank (utility. This paper provides an analysis of existing swarm control environments and proposes a software environment that facilitates a rapid deployment of multiple robotic agents. The framework (UBSwarm exploits our utility-based task allocation algorithm. UBSwarm configures these robots and assigns the group of robots a particular task from a set of available tasks. Two major tasks have been introduced that show the performance of a robotic group. This robotic group is composed of heterogeneous agents. In the results, a premature example that has prior knowledge about the experiment shows whether or not the robots are able to accomplish the task.