WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental programs needed

  1. First session: needs for experimental programs; Session 1: Les besoins et programmes experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waeckel, N.; Beguin, S.; Delbecq, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Assedo, R.; Hittner, D. [AREVA/FRAMATOME, 92 - La Defense (France); Carre, F.; Renault, C. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN/DPSF), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France); Bardelay, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DSRE), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2005-07-01

    Adequate experimental facilities for material irradiation or material / system qualification must be available, first for the development of the current PWR-type reactor concerning the extension of its operating life, the optimization of its nuclear fuel and its capacity to fit the power demand, secondly for the development of the fourth generation of reactors which implies important experimental research work particularly in the fields of: - new nuclear fuels particularly nitrides and carbides, - materials able to sustain high and very high temperatures, - high temperature helium cooling systems, or - feasibility studies for a completely closed fuel cycle inside the reactor core allowing both a complete recycling and the separation of actinides. (A.C.)

  2. Forecast of criticality experiments and experimental programs needed to support nuclear operations in the United States of America: 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Forecast is generated by the Chair of the Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup (ENIWG), with input from Department of Energy and the nuclear community. One of the current concerns addressed by ENIWG was the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board`s Recommendation 93-2. This Recommendation delineated the need for a critical experimental capability, which includes (1) a program of general-purpose experiments, (2) improving the information base, and (3) ongoing departmental programs. The nuclear community also recognizes the importance of criticality theory, which, as a stepping stone to computational analysis and safety code development, needs to be benchmarked against well-characterized critical experiments. A summary project of the Department`s needs with respect to criticality information includes (1) hands-on training, (2) criticality and nuclear data, (3) detector systems, (4) uranium- and plutonium-based reactors, and (5) accident analysis. The Workgroup has evaluated, prioritized, and categorized each proposed experiment and program. Transportation/Applications is a new category intended to cover the areas of storage, training, emergency response, and standards. This category has the highest number of priority-1 experiments (nine). Facilities capable of performing experiments include the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) along with Area V at Sandia National Laboratory. The LACEF continues to house the most significant collection of critical assemblies in the Western Hemisphere. The staff of this facility and Area V are trained and certified, and documentation is current. ENIWG will continue to work with the nuclear community to identify and prioritize experiments because there is an overwhelming need for critical experiments to be performed for basic research and code validation.

  3. Experimental programs; Programmes experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this Workshop is to establish the status of the experiments for transmutation demonstration and assessment, especially for innovative options and accelerator driven systems (ADS), to establish the results expected to be available for 2006 and to indicate the needs, and to exchange information on experiments. Only one communication is available and concerns the PROFIL irradiation experiments performed with the Phenix reactor. In these experiments, isotopes are separately set in a fuel needle which is placed in a fuel assembly close to the core centre. Samples are analyzed after irradiation in order to determine their variation of composition. These experiments supply precious information about basic nuclear data (capture, fission, n,2n and branching factors) with limited uncertainties. (J.S.)

  4. Eating disorders need more experimental psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anita

    2016-11-01

    Eating disorders are severe and disabling mental disorders. The scientific study of eating disorders has expanded dramatically over the past few decades, and provided significant understanding of eating disorders and their treatments. Those significant advances notwithstanding, there is scant knowledge about key processes that are crucial to clinical improvement. The lack of understanding mechanisms that cause, maintain and change eating disorders, currently is the biggest problem facing the science of eating disorders. It hampers the development of really effective interventions that could be fine-tuned to target the mechanisms of change and, therefore, the development of more effective treatments. It is argued here that the science of eating disorders and eating disorder treatment could benefit tremendously from pure experimental studies into its mechanisms of change, that is, experimental psychopathology (EPP). To illustrate why eating disorders need more EPP research, some key symptoms - restriction of intake, binge eating and body overvaluation - will be discussed. EPP studies challenge some generally accepted views and offer a fresh new look at key symptoms. This will, consequently, better inform eating disorder treatments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Pupils with Special Educational Needs. Program Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Legislative Commission on Expenditure Review, Albany.

    The document reviews the New York State Education Department's management of state aid for remedial education in the program for serving Pupils with Special Educational Needs (PSEN), the intent of which is to help low-achieving students overcome their disadvantage in learning. Four separate aspects are examined: (1) program intent, evolution, and…

  6. Assessing the Need for a University Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzberger, Linda K.

    1980-01-01

    At Loyola University of Chicago a needs assessment procedure was used to decide whether to establish a master's degree program in public administration that would serve many part-time students. It required the analysis of potential participants, the university, faculty, competing programs, and potential employers. (CT)

  7. Programs for Adolescent Mothers Are Needed

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2000-01-01

    This column reviews the article “The Door's Perinatal Program for Pregnant and Parenting Teens” [Journal of Perinatal Education, 9(2), 39–46] and acknowledges the need for innovative programs to help reduce the risks associated with adolescent pregnancy and teen births.

  8. Program Needs Assessment: The Telephone Survey Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, Carol

    This guidebook explains how to conduct a telephone survey that will gather the information necessary for new program needs assessment in the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education system. The guidebook is based on pilot assessments conducted by Fox Valley Technical College. The guidebook contains five sections: (1) introduction--why…

  9. Undergraduate Consumer Affairs Program Needs: Employers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kathryn; Saboe-Wounded Head, Lorna; Cho, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six Consumer Affairs (CA) internship supervisors were surveyed to identify critical knowledge and skills demonstrated by interns and to examine the importance of knowledge and skills needed in the workplace from the supervisors' perspectives.The knowledge and skills measured were identified through program goals. Results revealed that CA…

  10. Mesonet Programs - Needs and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, J.; Doherty, J.

    2010-09-01

    Authors: Jeremy Usher Managing Director, Europe WeatherBug® Professional John Doherty Senior Vice President Sales & Marketing WeatherBug® Professional There are many well documented and compelling needs for significant improvements in mesoscale meteorological observations throughout many parts of the world. This is evidenced by the fact that the vast majority of severe weather impacts and related life, property and economic losses are associated with mesoscale events such as tornados, thunderstorms, fronts, squall lines, etc. Additionally, the looming impacts of climate change are likely to vary substantially on a regional basis requiring more detailed information on a finer scale. Hence, development of comprehensive densely spaced observing systems can establish the critical information repositories needed to improve: short- and medium-term weather and wind forecasting down to local scales, climate monitoring on a regional basis, as well as decision support capabilities including plume dispersion modeling and air quality forecasting, to name a few. It is imperative that governmental/public/private/academic partnerships are formed to leverage the collective expertise, assets and technological know-how of each sector. Collaboration of this type is particularly germane given that many existing mesonets (weather networks) have been deployed by local organizations with local considerations in mind. These stakeholders maintain the capacity to react quickly and efficiently and are best positioned to recommend future network evolution within their domains. Additionally, coordination will go a long way toward avoiding duplication of effort and promote both a robust private sector and wise expenditure of public funds. This presentation will outline the major building blocks of a mesonet program and discuss best practices for a multi-tiered, multi-faceted "network of networks" approach that maximizes the value derived from leveraging existing assets and serves multiple

  11. Migrant Education Program. Comprehensive Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Minnesota Migrant Education Program (MEP) is to help migrant children and youth overcome challenges of mobility, frequent absences, late enrollment into school, social isolation, and other difficulties associated with a migratory life, in order that they might succeed in school. Furthermore, the Minnesota MEP must give…

  12. Need for Methamphetamine Programming in Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreault, Amy R.; Miller, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported sought to identify the prevention education needs involving methamphetamine through survey methodology. The study focused on a random sample of U.S. states and the Extension Directors within each state, resulting in a 70% response rate (n = 134). Findings revealed that 11% reported they had received methamphetamine user…

  13. Needs and Acculturative Stress of International Students in CACREP Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Malvika; Laux, John M.; Roseman, Christopher P.; Tiamiyu, Mojisola; Spann, Sammy

    2017-01-01

    International students enrolled in programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs provided acculturative stress and needs data. Acculturative stress was correlated with academic, social, language, and cultural needs. Furthermore, relationships were found between students' types of needs.…

  14. Reporting a program evaluation: Needs, program plan, intervention, and decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón Moscoso, Salvador; Chaves, Susana Sanduvete; Vidal, Mariona Portell; Teresa Anguera Argilaga, M.

    2013-01-01

    The approach to intervention programs varies depending on the methodological perspective adopted. This means that health professionals lack clear guidelines regarding how best to proceed, and it hinders the accumulation of knowledge. The aim of this paper is to set out the essential and common aspects that should be included in any program evaluation report, thereby providing a useful guide for the professional regardless of the procedural approach used. Furthermore, the paper seeks to ...

  15. Intergenerational Programming in Extension: Needs Assessment as Planning Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Matthew; Liu, Shih-Tsen; Radhakrishna, Rama B.

    2003-01-01

    A needs assessment of 161 Extension educators in family and consumer science and 4-H/youth development received 28 responses indicating preferences regarding intergenerational program content and delivery format. Results were used to develop curriculum and program delivery strategies and begin planning for a statewide intergenerational program.…

  16. Experimental evaluation of a photovoltaic simulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Doty, J.; Bailey, B.; Stewart, R. (AWS Scientific Inc., Albany, NY (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A widely used photovoltaic (PV) simulation code, PVFORM, is evaluated in a grid-connected configuration against experimental data from a prototype demand-side management PV array. Taking advantage of the comprehensive array monitoring program, each of the key algorithms composing the simulation code is evaluated independently. PVFORM as a whole was not found to have any major flaws, but was found to overpredict actual power output due mostly to assuming ideal array sun-tracking performance and ideal maximum power point tracking.

  17. Cryogenic instrumentation needs in the controlled thermonuclear research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    The magnet development effort for the controlled thermonuclear research program will require extensive testing of superconducting coils at various sizes from small-scale models to full-size prototypes. Extensive use of diagnostic instrumentation will be required and to make detailed comparisons of predicted and actual performance in magnet tests and to monitor the test facility for incipient failure modes. At later stages of the program, cryogenic instrumentation will be required to monitor magnet system performance in fusion power reactors. Measured quantities may include temperature, strain, deflection, coil resistance, helium coolant pressure and flow, current, voltages, etc. The test environment, which includes high magnetic fields (up to 8-10 T) and low temperature, makes many commercial measuring devices inoperative or at least inaccurate. In order to ensure reliable measurements, careful screening of commercial devices for performance in the test environment will be required. A survey of potentially applicable instrumentation is presented along with available information on operation in the test environment based on experimental data or on analysis of the physical characteristics of the device. Areas where further development work is needed are delineated.

  18. Students' Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Paula Andrea; Valencia, Luz María; Montoya, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate professors' needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy…

  19. Needs and Problems of Posbindu Program: Community Health Volunteers Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, S. T.; Andriyani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Posbindu is a form of public participation to conduct early detection and monitoring of risk factors for non-communicable diseases(NCD), and where it was carried out in as an integrated manner, routine and periodic event. This paper aims to investigates the needs and problems on Posbindu Program based on community health volunteers(CHVs) perspective. This study used descriptive qualitative method by open ended questions. Content analysis using to explicating the result. There are 3 theme finding about elderly needs in Posbindu; medical care, support group community, and health education. We found four theme problems which in Posbindu program: low motivation from elderly, Inadequate of facilities, physical disability, failed communication. To be effective in Posbindu program, all the stakeholders have reached consensus on the Posbindu program as elderly need. CHVs need given wide knowledge about early detection, daily care, control disease continuously so that the elderly keep feeling the advantages of coming to the Posbindu.

  20. Needs Analysis of Blind Students in Teaching Practice Program

    OpenAIRE

    *, Iswahyuni; Junining, Esti; Dewi, Dian Novita; Linta, Alies Poetri; Suwarso, Pratnyawati Nuridi

    2015-01-01

    As an inclusive university, Brawijaya University has accepted students with special needs in some differentstudy programs. Two of those are blind / visually impaired students who enrol English Language EducationStudy Program in which the program prepares the students to be English teachers. As a consequence, thestudents must be ready to do teaching practice in a public school when they are in the seventh semester. Thisstudy is going to find out the problems of the visually impaired students i...

  1. Special Needs of Adolescent Mothers and Their Infants: Innovative Programs that Meet These Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorance, Anne G.; Etheridge, George W.

    This paper examines the needs of adolescent mothers and their infants and describes innovative programs designed to meet those needs. It discusses characteristics of adolescent mothers, including their educational level, their obstetric performance, their parenting practices, and the socioeconomic consequences of early parenthood. The paper then…

  2. Special Needs TESL Program, 1978-79, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Robert L.

    The Teaching English as a Second Language Program was developed as a response to the needs of a multicultural population. It provides services geared to the individual needs of non-English speaking children in elementary and junior high schools. Children were seen for five 40 to 45 minute periods weekly in groups of 10 to 12. An audio-lingual…

  3. Meeting Youth Needs with Community Programs. ERIC Digest, Number 86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    Rather than viewing youth as an isolated and alienated subculture, it is more useful to view the needs of youth as largely determined by where and how they live, and to recognize that they differ from one another just as adults do. Professionals and volunteers in community youth programs need to understand how the youth they work with experience…

  4. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  5. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related

  6. Hydrogen hybrid vehicle engine development: Experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Blarigan, P. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A hydrogen fueled engine is being developed specifically for the auxiliary power unit (APU) in a series type hybrid vehicle. Hydrogen is different from other internal combustion (IC) engine fuels, and hybrid vehicle IC engine requirements are different from those of other IC vehicle engines. Together these differences will allow a new engine design based on first principles that will maximize thermal efficiency while minimizing principal emissions. The experimental program is proceeding in four steps: (1) Demonstration of the emissions and the indicated thermal efficiency capability of a standard CLR research engine modified for higher compression ratios and hydrogen fueled operation. (2) Design and test a new combustion chamber geometry for an existing single cylinder research engine, in an attempt to improve on the baseline indicated thermal efficiency of the CLR engine. (3) Design and build, in conjunction with an industrial collaborator, a new full scale research engine designed to maximize brake thermal efficiency. Include a full complement of combustion diagnostics. (4) Incorporate all of the knowledge thus obtained in the design and fabrication, by an industrial collaborator, of the hydrogen fueled engine for the hybrid vehicle power train illustrator. Results of the CLR baseline engine testing are presented, as well as preliminary data from the new combustion chamber engine. The CLR data confirm the low NOx produced by lean operation. The preliminary indicated thermal efficiency data from the new combustion chamber design engine show an improvement relative to the CLR engine. Comparison with previous high compression engine results shows reasonable agreement.

  7. The need for dental health screening and referral programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebich, T; Kumar, J; Brustman, B A; Green, E L

    1982-01-01

    School-based dental health screening and referral programs can have a tremendous impact on a community. They provide examinations to children, some of whom have never seen a dentist, and refer those in need of treatment. When coordinated with other dental health activities, these programs can also raise the overall consciousness about oral health and need for health care in children and parents alike. By their concern for dental health and encouragement to the children to participate in the screening programs and follow through on referrals, school officials can serve as role models to the children and further reinforce the importance of dental health. By conducting the screenings on a local level, the problem is seen as a community one, and is more likely to be meaningfully addressed. School officials, health personnel and teachers are instrumental in initiating and conducting these programs and are thus responsible for the benefits the children derive from the screenings.

  8. Program Management Educational Needs of Idaho Business and Marketing Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchel, Allen; Cannon, John; Duncan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived program management professional development needs of Idaho secondary business/marketing teachers (N = 233) in order to guide pre-service curriculum development and in-service training activities. Sixty-two percent (n = 146) of the 233 teachers completed a modified version of Joerger's (2002)…

  9. Students’ Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Bedoya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to investigate professors’ needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy for contractual and academic reasons. Additionally, data revealed their desire to learn English to communicate in both academic and non-academic settings. Moreover, the lack of time and effective learning strategies were reported as comprising the main constraints for learning. Finally, the authors present the strengths and weaknesses of the program as well as the participants’ suggestions for curriculum restructuring.

  10. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  11. Needs Assessment for the Job Skills Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    ad Idantly by block n mber) Job Skills, Literacy , Basic Skills, Education, Training, Needs Assessment, Computer Based Instruction, Program Evaluation...developin9 and mpeenting the functional MOS’oriented basic Skils rForam IJSEP) Washington, D.C.: American Institutes for Research, April 1983. 2...The newly proposed standardized FBSEP II will include the general areas of language, literacy , computing, speaking, and learning strategies

  12. Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals: Needs, Strategies, Programs, and Online Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Dunbar, R. W.; Beane, R. J.; Bruckner, M.; Bralower, T. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geoscience faculty, departments, and programs play an important role in preparing future geoscience professionals. One challenge is supporting the diversity of student goals for future employment and the needs of a wide range of potential employers. Students in geoscience degree programs pursue careers in traditional geoscience industries; in geoscience education and research (including K-12 teaching); and opportunities at the intersection of geoscience and other fields (e.g., policy, law, business). The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project has documented a range of approaches that departments use to support the development of geoscience majors as professionals (serc.carleton.edu/departments). On the Cutting Edge, a professional development program, supports graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing an academic career through workshops, webinars, and online resources (serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep). Geoscience departments work at the intersection of student interests and employer needs. Commonly cited program goals that align with employer needs include mastery of geoscience content; field experience; skill in problem solving, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaboration; and the ability to learn independently and take a project from start to finish. Departments and faculty can address workforce issues by 1) implementing of degree programs that develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students need, while recognizing that students have a diversity of career goals; 2) introducing career options to majors and potential majors and encouraging exploration of options; 3) advising students on how to prepare for specific career paths; 4) helping students develop into professionals, and 5) supporting students in the job search. It is valuable to build connections with geoscience employers, work with alumni and foster connections between students and alumni with similar career interests, collaborate with

  13. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diggele, Christie; Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT) program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception. The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61%) of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91%) of students, and 6/23 (26%) of students participated in a focus group. Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools. The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning.

  14. What Does the Nation Need From the Federal Climate Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    Federally funded U.S. climate research has a long and strong history. This research, carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Global Change Research Program / Climate Change Science Program (USGCRP/CCSP), has led to groundbreaking developments in the understanding of past, present, and future climate, its effects on society and ecosystems, and potential response options to cope with climate variability and change. A consequence of these developments is that society's concern regarding climate change has grown significantly in the past decade and the questions that society has on the issue are now quite different than at the outset of the program in 1990. It is imperative that the climate research enterprise be responsive to this evolution, while maintaining a strong base of "discovery science" and long-term observations. In an effort to do so, the USGCRP/CCSP has initiated a bottom-up strategic planning process to account for the changing needs and emerging scientific opportunities. This talk will outline some of the key directions that have been recommended to the program from the end-user and scientific audiences with which it has had wide-ranging consultations over the past several months.

  15. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1 how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of the implementation of PBL curriculum? 2 What kinds of support do university academic staff need in order to maintain PBL implementation? Through a combination of a literature review, interviews with 6 PBL experts which emphasize the importance of PBL facilitators, and document analysis of reflection notes from 18 trainees of a PBL workshop, this study will produce a guideline in developing a PBL Academic Staff Development Program for an institute wishes to implement and retain PBL as the education strategy.

  16. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  17. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  18. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  19. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  20. A Needs Assessment of Aquaculture Extension Agents, Specialists, and Program Administrators in Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Michael H.; Gibson, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    The study reported here identified continuing education and training needs of aquaculture Extension agents, specialists, and program administrators in 10 competency areas relating to the need for continuing education or training. Fourteen resources on the AquaNIC Web site were also evaluated, as was the efficacy of the AQUA-EXT listserv. Data were…

  1. We Don't Need a "Geoengineering" Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.

    2011-12-01

    Most approaches commonly labeled as 'geoengineering' can be divided into two categories: approaches that attempt to reduce the change in atmospheric composition caused by anthropogenic emissions (commonly labeled CDR, for Carbon Dioxide Removal), and approaches that attempt to reduce the change in climate caused by changes in atmospheric composition (commonly labeled SRM, for Sunlight Reflection Methods or Solar Radiation Management). CDR is relatively uncontroversial (apart from ocean fertilization), and the primary issues are typically cost, effectiveness, local environmental consequences, and verification. In contrast, SRM has provoked much controversy, because large-scale SRM deployments necessarily would affect everyone on this planet. Several proposals have been tabled for SRM-specific or geoengineering-specific research and governance structures, treating SRM or geoengineering research as a thing apart. We should instead view CDR and SRM research as part of a broader continuum of activities aimed at understanding Earth system dynamics and reducing risks associated with climate change. The scope of existing research efforts should be broadened so that CDR and SRM approaches are, at this stage in development, treated as an extension of what we are already doing. What is 'geoengineering research'? A primary need at this time is for expansion of scope of and funding for existing climate-related research efforts. For examples: Scientists studying the role of aerosols in clouds or stratospheric processes can expand the domain of concern to consider effects of intentionally introduced aerosols (and not just natural aerosols and aerosols we introduce as a byproduct of civilization's normal functioning). Scientists studying effects of land-surface change on global and regional climates can expand the domain of concern beyond inadvertent effects to consider effects of land-surface changes undertaken with the intent to affect these climates. Research programs aimed at

  2. Review of predialysis education programs: a need for standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Bosch J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith Van den Bosch,1 D Simone Warren,1 Peter A Rutherford21Pallas Health Research and Consultancy BV, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Baxter Healthcare SA, Zürich, SwitzerlandAbstract: To make an informed decision on renal replacement therapy, patients should receive education about dialysis options in a structured program covering all modalities. Many patients do not receive such education, and there is disparity in the information they receive. This review aims to compile evidence on effective components of predialysis education programs as related to modality choice and outcomes. PubMed MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Ovid searches (from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2013 with the main search terms of “predialysis”, “peritoneal dialysis”, “home dialysis”, “education”, “information”, and “decision” were performed. Of the 1,005 articles returned from the initial search, 110 were given full text reviews as they potentially met inclusion criteria (for example, they included adults or predialysis patients, or the details of an education program were reported. Only 29 out of the 110 studies met inclusion criteria. Ten out of 13 studies using a comparative design, showed an increase in home dialysis choice after predialysis education. Descriptions of the educational process varied and included individual and group education, multidisciplinary intervention, and varying duration and frequency of sessions. Problem-solving group sessions seem to be an effective component for enhancing the proportion of home dialysis choice. Evidence is lacking for many components, such as timing and staff competencies. There is a need for a standardized approach to evaluate the effect of predialysis educational interventions.Keywords: dialysis, end-stage renal disease, informed decision, modality choice

  3. Discussing the Need of Experimental Replication with 5th Grade Students Conducting a Mealworm Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asshoff, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Scientific inquiry requires the replication of results in experimental studies. Recent studies draw a severe picture on the need of replication and the difficulties in replicating already published studies. As replicated confirmation of results is the basis of scientific and medical research, there may be a need to introduce the topic of…

  4. The School Breakfast Program Provides Needed Fuel for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Edward; Heitman, Jennifer

    1988-01-01

    The article considers the many contributions of school breakfast programs to children's health and academic achievement and also suggests ways in which greater student and school participation in such programs can be achieved. (CB)

  5. The Need and Curricula for Health Professions Education Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Daley, Barbara J.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the emerging social and organizational contexts for health professions education and the rationale for foundational adult and continuing education concepts to be included in the curricula of HPE graduate programs.

  6. Mission Need Statement for the Theater Medical Information Program (TMIP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    ...) Memorandum, 31 Mar 1995, Medical Program Guidance, FY 1997-2001; ASD(HA) DoD Corporate Information Management Strategic Plan and Enterprise Integration Implementing Strategy, Goals 2, 3, and 4...

  7. Programming to Meet the Needs of the Lesbigay Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, R. T. III

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of college student activities planning to meet needs of gay and lesbian students focuses on the need to create a campus climate of tolerance and appreciation. A model for development of gay self-acceptance is outlined, and considerations in hiring performers, and facilitating clubs and organizations are examined. (MSE)

  8. Heavy Ions at the LHC Physics Perspectives and Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Schükraft, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    Ultrarelativistic heavy ion physics is entering the new era of collider experiments with the start-up of RHIC at BNL and construction for detectors at HC well under way. At this crossroads, the article will give a summary of the experimental program and our current view of heavy ion physics at the LHC, concentrating in particular on physics topics that are different or unique compared to current facilities.

  9. Data Processing: The Need for Programs in Business Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, James

    1980-01-01

    There is a demand in industry for both computer science graduates and business information systems graduates. Educators need to start this training at the secondary level with an introduction to all phases of data processing for any interested student. (CT)

  10. The need for a fusion technology information program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, D.L. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    In providing an adequate energy technology for the future, which new programs should be considered by the Department of Energy national laboratories to ensure that the US remains in the forefront of international science and technology is an important question. This paper suggests that the urgency for energy independence demands an active communication program that would increase awareness of energy as a critical national issue and would present fusion, with its benefits and risks, as one of the long-term alternative energy sources.

  11. Identifying Needs to Develop a PBL Staff Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims…

  12. The need for a North American coordinated bird monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Bart; Ralph C. John

    2005-01-01

    Bird monitoring is at a crossroads. While monitoring programs have existed in North America for nearly a century, recent political, biological, sociological, and economic changes necessitate a new and more efficient approach. Fortunately we now have tools available to meet the demands, including powerful coalitions of the willing within agencies, organizations, and...

  13. Beyond Need and Merit: Strengthening State Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christine, Ed.; Whitfield, Sarah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in tuition levels, accelerated by declining state funding to institutions, have combined with stagnant or falling household incomes to make it more difficult for many college students to finance postsecondary education. In this environment, state grant programs are more important than ever. These funds have the potential to make…

  14. Report: EPA’s Fleet Management Program Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0001, October 6, 2014. If oversight of the EPA’s fleet is not improved, the $6 million-per-year program could be ineffective and inefficient in supporting the agency’s mission and reporting data to the federal system.

  15. THE NEED FOR A NATIONAL DERADICALISATION PROGRAM IN AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie Auld

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of deradicalisation programs in Afghanistan has potential to prolong the violence and turmoil in the country for decades. With years of conflict, multiple forms of government, high unemployment, high levels of poverty, and a constant influx of Western cultural norms and media fighting against the traditionalist Afghan culture strongly embedded in a conservative reading of Islam, Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalism. Youth are susceptible to an environment that causes radicalism and nurtures it, and with the ever-present national conflict, this radicalisation has an outlet in the form of insurgency and terrorism. Groups like the Taliban have easily recruited and radicalised individuals using religion as a justification for their violence. Deradicalisation in Afghanistan is an under researched topic and an underfunded pursuit. With no national deradicalisation strategy it is left to international actors and local organisations to engage in these programs. More must be done to engage with those who have become radicalised and those in high-risk zones in order to help secure the long-term future of Afghanistan. I will discuss how Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalisation of individuals due to Afghanistan’s violent, hostile environment with high rates of poverty, high unemployment and distrust toward the authorities. I will then discuss how religion is used a justification by extremist groups for individuals to commit violent acts and how the increasingly precarious security situation in the country means a sound national deradicalisation program is essential. I conclude that any deradicalisation efforts undertaken by the Afghan government so far are piecemeal and inadequate to deal with the on-going problems present in the country and that lessons must be learnt from programs in other Islamic countries that have successfully deradicalised violent extremist groups.

  16. Identifying Employer Needs from Accounting Information Systems Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Thomas W.; Kruck, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    As the need for new hires with accounting and information technology knowledge increases, a new major in accounting information systems (AIS) has emerged. This new AIS degree is a hybrid of accounting concepts and common business subjects combined with key information technology issues. Employers were presented with 56 core content areas found in…

  17. Research needs for programs that provide natural environments for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood L. Shafer

    1977-01-01

    The major emphases of selected Symposium papers are underscored, and some personal thoughts are presented on how childrens' understanding of natural environments will eventually affect the quality of this Nation's environment. Special emphasis is given to research needs for insuring the establishment, protection, and management of natural environments for...

  18. Family Programming for Incarcerated Parents: A Needs Assessment among Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazura, Kerry

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the needs, as perceived by the offender, of families with incarcerated individuals. Seeks to determine inmates' family and parenting issues and concerns, and to assess their interest in formal and informal family services. Results demonstrate that although male and female inmates have different concerns, both seem to value their…

  19. Iodine. Do we need an enrichment program in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Andersson, G.; Haraldsdottir, J.

    1996-01-01

    A working group was established to evaluate the need for iodine enrichment in Denmark. Judged from studies of urinary iodine excretion and one dietary survey the intake of iodine in Denmark is low compared with recommended intakes. The occurrence of non-toxic goitre is relatively high; between 9...

  20. Path from Urgent Operational Need to Program of Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    equip the force as a result of capability gaps are the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO), Asymmetric Warfare Group (AWG...develop rapid capability. Our soldiers performing missions in Afghanistan and Iraq began to face a new threat— Improvised Explosive Devices (IED...required in accor- dance with 10 United States Code § 2366a and § 2366b. Affordability assessments are usually not applicable to urgent need solutions

  1. Needs-Based Programs: Eligibility and Benefit Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    of m- Allm Veto= Nwftal Famt- Dim- IbWAd- amw- -m SSM - f~l dd __ s Bt p !Iidtt a m ablt Wind a aftim Ya LAWr Ibsh laD adi Grata 1 I I 1 I Pasta " I I...preschool program health, educational, nutri- are primarily for young offers educational, tional, social and other children (ages 3 to that age dental ...service to nstic, treamt, preno- evrxujom tal health services families below a certain tive, emerux:y, dental to medically unlerserved in(Mme. services

  2. Workshop on Advancing Experimental Rock Deformation Research: Scientific and Technical Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, Terry E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-05-31

    A workshop for the experimental rock deformation community was held in Boston on August 16-19, 2012, following some similar but smaller preliminary meetings. It was sponsored primarily by the NSF, with additional support from the DOE, the SCEC, and in-kind support by the USGS. A white paper summarizing the active discussions at the workshop and the outcomes is available (https://brownbox.brown.edu/download.php?hash=0b854d11). Those attending included practitioners of experimental rock deformation, i.e., those who conduct laboratory experiments, as well as users of the data provided by practitioners, namely field geologists, seismologists, geodynamicists, earthquake modelers, and scientists from the oil and gas industry. A considerable fraction of those attending were early-career scientists. The discussion initially focused on identifying the most important unsolved scientific problems in all of the research areas represented by the users that experiments would help solve. This initial session was followed by wide-ranging discussions of the most critical problems faced by practitioners, particularly by early-career scientists. The discussion also focused on the need for designing and building the next generation of experimental rock deformation equipment required to meet the identified scientific challenges. The workshop participants concluded that creation of an experimental rock deformation community organization is needed to address many of the scientific, technical, and demographic problems faced by this community. A decision was made to hold an organizational meeting of this new organization in San Francisco on December 1-2, 2012, just prior to the Fall Meeting of the AGU. The community has decided to name this new organization “Deformation Experimentation at the Frontier Of Rock and Mineral research” or DEFORM. As of May 1, 2013, 64 institutions have asked to be members of DEFORM.

  3. A Program Evaluation Process to Meet the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellante, Donna; Donne, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    The process of program evaluation was utilized to evaluate the education program, provide information to make decisions on its ability to comply with mandates from the state education department, and develop or improve the program to meet the goals of the new initiative to meet the needs of English language learners. The program evaluation process…

  4. Description and preliminary results of the PACEM 2 experimental program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, P.; Lavergnat, J.; Sylvain, M.

    The CNET experimental PACEM program, which is aimed at obtaining a better understanding of multipath propagation on microwave line-of-sight channels, is considered. The results of a previous experiment on channel modeling is summarized, and an experiment investigating the seasonal variations on a space diversity channel is described. To monitor the experiment remotely, an efficient data compression technique that involved Hadamard transforming was used. It is shown that the number of significant transform coefficients allows a quick evaluation of the propagation channel behavior without decompressing the data. First results obtained using the method are presented for a one-year period.

  5. Upgrading program of the experimental fast reactor Joyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, A.; Yogo, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Iibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo finished its operation as an irradiation core in June, 2000. Throughout the operation of MK-I (breeder core) and MK-II (irradiation core), the net operation time has exceeded 60,000 hours. During these operations there were no fuel failures or serious plant problems. The MK-III modification program will improve irradiation capability to demonstrate advanced technologies for commercial Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). When the MK-III core is started, it will support irradiation tests in feasibility studies for fast reactor and related fuel cycle research and development in Japan. (authors)

  6. Experimental control of a fluidic pinball using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaudo, Cedric; Zhong, Peng; Noack, Bernd R.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    The wake stabilization of a triangular cluster of three rotating cylinders was investigated in the present study. Experiments were performed at Reynolds number Re 6000, and compared with URANS-2D simulations at same flow conditions. 2D2C PIV measurements and constant temperature anemometry were used to characterize the flow without and with actuation. Open-loop actuation was first considered for the identification of particular control strategies. Machine learning control was also implemented for the experimental study. Linear genetic programming has been used for the optimization of open-loop parameters and closed-loop controllers. Considering a cost function J based on the fluctuations of the velocity measured by the hot-wire sensor, significant performances were achieved using the machine learning approach. The present work is supported by the senior author's (R. J. Martinuzzi) NSERC discovery Grant. C. Raibaudo acknowledges the financial support of the University of Calgary Eyes-High PDF program.

  7. Understanding men and programming sexuality education to meet their needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, C; Tucker, J

    1988-01-01

    Because sexuality education for teenage men may affect contraceptive use, there is an increased emphasis in family planning clinics on sexuality education for young men. Friends are the primary source of sexual learning for young males, rather than families or schools. Yet, teenage pregnancy can seriously affect a young man's life in financial and career-limiting ways. Sex role stereotypes, especially the masculinity role, contributes to males' reluctance to obtain information about sexuality and contraception. Stereotyping reinforces the devaluation of the female as a sexual object, and increases males' homophobia. The peer pressure young males feel to initiate sexual activity is intense. This makes young males reluctant to refuse or delay sexual activity. The idea of delaying or refusing intercourse needs to be presented as an action that can be done without the threat of damaging one's self-image or losing peers' respect. Better communication with sexual partners would serve to improve the effective use of contraceptives. Promotion of family planning as a "man's issue" would involve men in the decision to use contraception, a decision that is largely seen as determined solely by women. Within today's teen culture, sex is acceptable, but birth control is not. However, the condom is an easy, effective birth control method for use by teen males. Condoms do not require a prescription, are safe, easy to use, and can prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. Parents, schools, and family planning clinics need to involve men in family planning and help them to feel more positive about contraception. Male involvement planning has an important part to play in broadening young people's perceptions of their roles in society.

  8. The need for faculty training programs in effective feedback provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Wahbi A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Al Wahbi1,2 1King Saud University for Health Sciences, 2King Abdulaziz Medical City, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: An important aspect of professional teaching practice is a practitioner's ability to critically evaluate the performances of subordinates for whom he or she is responsible. This is a common practice within social sciences as well as for professionals from applied specialties. The literature on professional clinical expertise identifies reflective practice as perfect when they are thoroughly accepted by practitioners. In health-related professions, critical reflection in the form of feedback that serves as the bridge between theory and practice is endorsed. The aims and objectives of this study were directed toward the application of a mixed methodology approach in order to evaluate the requirements for a feedback training program and to detect the present feedback provision skills of clinical mentors in practice. The quantitative analysis measured the effectiveness of clinical teachers' feedback in order to understand whether their understanding of and skills for giving feedback to promote students were adequate. On the other hand, the qualitative methods explored self-perceptions of feedback skills and efficacy in enabling students to improve their clinical practice. Effective feedback from faculty and the learner provides a useful and meaningful experience for absorbing knowledge and critical thinking into clinical practice. Nonadherence and limited expertise of mentors in giving feedback are the main themes of this study, and were evaluated and acknowledged through systematic analysis. Keywords: clinical mentors, feedback mechanism, feedback proficiency 

  9. Structural fire resistance experimental research priority needs of U.S. industry

    CERN Document Server

    Almand, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Structural Fire Resistance Experimental Research – Priority Needs of U.S. Industry provides a synthesis of stakeholder input to a prioritized agenda for research at the National Fire Research Laboratory (NFRL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) designed to accelerate the implementation of performance-based fire engineering for structures. The NFRL presents a broad range of unanswered questions regarding the performance of real structures in fire conditions, and informs performance-based design methods and standards in this field. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review of large-scale structural fire testing and compiled research needs from a variety of sources. The book addresses major issues of broad concern in the fire community, such as real fire exposure and structural response, composite floor system performance, enhancing modeling performance, and understanding the embedded safety features in design methods. It concludes with a prioritized set of research reco...

  10. The Army Preposition Afloat Program: Is It a Program We Need?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curl, William

    1998-01-01

    ... of most required classes. This paper addresses the evolution of the APA program, describes the current and planned APA program, discusses management of the APA, and looks critically at the value of the program in support...

  11. Differential Programming Needs of College Students Preferring Web-Based Versus In-Person Physical Activity Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Forman, Evan M; Butryn, Meghan L; Herbert, James D

    2017-09-21

    College students report several barriers to exercise, highlighting a need for university-based programs that address these challenges. In contrast to in-person interventions, several web-based programs have been developed to enhance program engagement by increasing ease of access and lowering the necessary level of commitment to participate. Unfortunately, web-based programs continue to struggle with engagement and less-than-ideal outcomes. One explanation for this discrepancy is that different intervention modalities may attract students with distinctive activity patterns, motivators, barriers, and program needs. However, no studies have formally evaluated intervention modality preference (e.g., web-based or in-person) among college students. The current study sought to examine the relationship between intervention modality preference and physical activity programming needs. Undergraduate students (n = 157) enrolled in psychology courses at an urban university were asked to complete an online survey regarding current activity patterns and physical activity program preferences. Participants preferring web-based physical activity programs exercised less (p = .05), were less confident in their abilities to exercise (p = .01), were less likely to endorse the maintenance stage of change (p programming. Findings suggest that students preferring web-based programming may require programs that enhance self-efficacy by fostering goal-setting and problem-solving skills. A user-centered design approach may enhance the engagement (and therefore effectiveness) of physical activity promotion programs for college students.

  12. Sustaining Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs in Schools: Needs and Barriers Identified by School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Lesley R.; Brandt, Heather M.; Prince, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background: To reduce teen pregnancy rates, prevention programs must be consistently available to large numbers of youth. However, prevention efforts have been historically conducted with little emphasis on ensuring program sustainability. This study examined the needs and barriers to sustaining teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) programming in…

  13. Outdoor Recreation in Florida: A Comprehensive Program for Meeting Florida's Outdoor Recreation Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee.

    A comprehensive program for meeting outdoor recreational needs in Florida is described in this planning and reference document in terms of objectives for the program through the year 1975 (with projections to the year 2000). The scope and nature of outdoor recreation are defined, and a justification for an outdoor recreation program is presented.…

  14. Early-Life Nutritional Programming of Type 2 Diabetes: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Vaiserman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence from both experimental and human studies suggest that inadequate nutrition in early life can contribute to risk of developing metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes (T2D in adult life. In human populations, most findings supporting a causative relationship between early-life malnutrition and subsequent risk of T2D were obtained from quasi-experimental studies (‘natural experiments’. Prenatal and/or early postnatal exposures to famine were demonstrated to be associated with higher risk of T2D in many cohorts around the world. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression as a possible major contributor to the link between the early-life famine exposure and T2D in adulthood. Findings from these studies suggest that prenatal exposure to the famine may result in induction of persistent epigenetic changes that have adaptive significance in postnatal development but can predispose to metabolic disorders including T2D at the late stages of life. In this review, quasi-experimental data on the developmental programming of T2D are summarized and recent research findings on changes in DNA methylation that mediate these effects are discussed.

  15. The need for quasi-experimental methodology to evaluate pricing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, F R; Cuesta, A

    1993-01-01

    Family planning program managers may be easily misled by conclusions about the effects of price increases on the demand for services when the findings are based on pre-experiments such as the single-group pretest-posttest study, generally believed to be practical. This report presents financial and service data from clinics of the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Ecuatoriana (APROFE) in Ecuador, which, analyzed according to the single-group pretest-posttest design, would suggest that the demand for intrauterine device services is inelastic. However, considerable demand elasticity is detected when data are analyzed according to more rigorous quasi-experimental designs. Using the single-group pretest-posttest design for pricing studies is too flawed to be considered practical. Wherever possible, strong designs should be used in operations research, especially in pricing studies.

  16. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  17. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskin, Evelyn [GE Infrastructure Energy; Craddick, William G [ORNL; Lenarduzzi, Roberto [ORNL; Wendt, Robert L [ORNL; Woodbury, Professor Keith A. [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  18. Experimental Program on Composite Steel and Concrete Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubecky, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Plate bridges with encased beams are suitable for building bridges of short and medium range. The paper presented focuses on the research into progressive bridges with encased filler beams of modified steel sections designed to minimize steel consumption without affecting essentially the overall structure resistance. This type of construction is suitable for bridges over short and middle spans as it offers a number of advantages, such as little headroom, quite clear static action of forces and a short construction period with no falsework required. Among some disadvantages is the economic inefficiency of steel I-sections, which are employed in the majority of bridges of this type. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of more economical design approaches and more purposeful arrangement and employment of steel beams. The paper presented brings some results from experimental tests on elements with encased steel filler-beams acting compositely under both short-term static and dynamic loads, and long-term load.

  19. Neurolinguistic programming used to reduce the need for anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients undergoing MRI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bigley, J; Griffiths, P D; Prydderch, A; Romanowski, C A J; Miles, L; Lidiard, H; Hoggard, N

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success of neurolinguistic programming in reducing the need for general anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients who require MRI and to consider the financial...

  20. More Clouds Form Over 340B Program: Potential Medicare Cut Underlines Need to Rein In Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    In an effort to control costs, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services wants to exact a severe reduction in reimbursement to hospitals that participate in the 340B Drug Pricing Program. The author discusses the program's shortcomings, the actions taken to address them, and how participating hospitals might be affected by the cut.

  1. Positive Youth Development Programs Targeting Students with Greater Psychosocial Needs: A Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, and the related programs were designed and implemented by school social workers. After completion of the Tier 2 Program (Secondary 1 Level, 9,931 participants in 212 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C in order to assess their views of the program, workers, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the agencies to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed” overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Four major types of program were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (n = 58, programs concentrating on volunteer training and services (n = 31, programs offering both adventure-based counseling and volunteer training activities (n = 91, and other programs with different foci (n = 32. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the programs and the workers, and over four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. The present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong for the Full Implementation Phase.

  2. Positive youth development programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: subjective outcome evaluation over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the views of 153,761 students participating in a positive youth development program designed for participants with greater psychosocial needs (the Tier 2 Program) in the context of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. The program was implemented in the extension phase of the project from 2009/10 to 2011/12 school years. A validated subjective outcome evaluation scale was used to assess the views of the program participants toward the program qualities, implementer qualities, and program effectiveness after completion of the program. Nine datasets were used which were derived from the aggregated reports submitted by social service providers designing the Tier 2 Program. Participants generally held favorable views of program qualities, implementer qualities, as well as program effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program. Some small grade and program differences on subjective outcome evaluation were also found. Both program qualities and implementer qualities were significant predictors of program effectiveness in different grades. Consistent with the findings of the initial phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S., the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong is perceived favorably by program participants and its perceived effectiveness was high. Significant but small grade and program approach differences on subjective outcome evaluation were found. Both program and implementer qualities were predictive of perceived program effectiveness in different grades. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Meeting Extension Programming Needs with Technology: A Case Study of Agritourism Webinars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Samantha Rozier; Komar, Stephen; Schilling, Brian; Tomas, Stacy R.; Carleo, Jenny; Colucci, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    As clientele needs diversify, Extension educators are examining new technologies, including online tools, to deliver educational programming and resources. Using agritourism as the educational topic, the study reported here sought to evaluate participants' acceptance of online educational programming (webinars) and the effectiveness of the…

  4. An Orientation to Vision Loss Program: Meeting the Needs of Newly Visually Impaired Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Julia J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a program developed to meet the needs of individuals, and their families, new to the experience of vision loss. Program components address education services and resources, issues concerning the emotional response to vision loss and adjustment, tips and ideas for daily functioning, and ways to enhance families' awareness. (RJM)

  5. Multiple-Methods Needs Assessment of California 4-H Science Education Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worker, Steven M.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Ambrose, Andrea; Brian, Kelley; Schoenfelder, Emily; Smith, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    The California 4-H Science Leadership Team conducted a statewide assessment to evaluate the needs of county-based 4-H programs related to the key areas of the 4-H Science Initiative: program development and design, professional development, curricula, evaluation, partnerships, and fund development. The use of multiple qualitative data sources…

  6. 25 CFR 36.50 - Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... assessment. Each school shall complete a formal, formative evaluation at least once every seven (7) years... each school, Agency or Area, as appropriate, a standardized needs assessment and evaluation instrument... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs...

  7. Does the United States’ Strategic Mobility Program Support the Needs of Operational Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    engineering and humanitarian relief missions conducted by USSOUTHCOM in Cnetral American and the Carribean . 70 Ibid. 25 vessels with two berths of...Does the United States’ Strategic Mobility Program Support the Needs of Operational Commanders? A Monograph by MAJ Erik E. Hilberg United...per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Computer Program Development Approaches and Computer Programming Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Approved for plbi elaSO; 81 1ibutio u0lim t 03 /1 Technical Report TR-853 December 1979 An Experimental Investigation of Computer Program Development...this Report) Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of rhe ah.tr.ct entled i f [31-k 20, ! dil(enot fo, ).R...55t -3 O 2 a. tL loco o.uaZ 4 1 0 0 - .. a .CO acca 4 * ao -- c- - .an za-e~a- 2.5 aa34z98ba a- CHAPTER VII coipletely differentiated outcome is

  9. Strategies for fostering basic psychological needs support in high quality youth leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Corliss; Harlow, Meghan; Kendellen, Kelsey

    2017-04-01

    Youth leadership programming has become an increasingly common context to foster basic psychological needs and promote youth development. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore strategies involved in fostering youth needs support within six leadership programs. Two leaders and 30 youth participated in semi-structured interviews to better understand the strategies used to foster needs support. Findings revealed that leaders were able to foster a sense of relatedness among youth through building trusting adult-youth relationships and nurturing an inclusive environment. Maximizing choice and negotiating youth voice helped to foster youth's autonomy. Finally, creating a task-oriented climate and providing intentional opportunities for skill-building helped to foster youth's competence. Findings suggest that training for leaders is critical in understanding what, and how strategies should be employed to help foster youth needs support in leadership programming. Limitations and future directions are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INNOVATIVE TRAINING General § 387.1 What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? This program is designed— (a) To develop new types of training programs for rehabilitation personnel and to demonstrate the effectiveness of these new types of training programs for rehabilitation personnel in providing rehabilitation...

  11. Low-income energy assistance programs: a profile of need and policy options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This second report of the Fuel Oil Marketing Advisory Committee (FOMAC) of DOE is twofold: to update information on the energy needs of low-income persons and governmental response to such needs; and to emphasize the need for energy-conservation programs that may alleviate the enormous financial burden placed on low-income people by rising energy prices. FOMAC has continued to develop further and refine its initial energy-conservation recommendations. Mainly, the updated assessment document finds that the poor will expend at least 35% of their income directly on energy and will spend at least 21% of their income on household energy. Other economic impacts of rising energy costs on low-income groups are summarized. Appropriations and stipulations by Congress to aid the lo-income people are reviewed. After careful review of various program designs, FOMAC continues to support the income indexing/vendor line of credit approach. This design provides assistance to elgible households based on: energy needed, cost of fuel, and percentage of income. The cost of implementing the FOMAC design nationally would, according to estimates, range from $3.5 to $4.6 billion for the 1980-1981 winter heating season. A figure of $1.6 to $2.2 billion is being discussed in the Congress. Meeting the ongoing energy needs of the poor will require a coherent national policy which consists of aid in paying energy bills and aid in the poor's effort to conserve energy. The report seeks to promote such policies. Needs assessment, government response, FOMAC model, comments on the programs, projected cost of 1980-1981 Energy Assistance Program, need for conservation programs, and program financing are discussed.

  12. Communication Skills Training in Ophthalmology: Results of a Needs Assessment and Pilot Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anuradha; Browning, David; Haviland, Miriam J; Jackson, Mary Lou; Luff, Donna; Meyer, Elaine C; Talcott, Katherine; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2017-09-01

    To conduct a needs assessment to identify gaps in communication skills training in ophthalmology residency programs and to use these results to pilot a communication workshop that prepares residents for difficult conversations. A mixed-methods design was used to perform the needs assessment. A pre-and postsurvey was administered to workshop participants. Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School (HMS), Department of Ophthalmology. HMS ophthalmology residents from postgraduate years 2-4 participated in the needs assessment and the workshop. Ophthalmology residency program directors in the United States participated in national needs assessment. Ophthalmology program directors across the United States were queried on their perception of resident communication skills training through an online survey. A targeted needs assessment in the form of a narrative exercise captured resident perspectives on communication in ophthalmology from HMS residents. A group of HMS residents participated in the pilot workshop and a pre- and postsurvey was administered to participants to assess its effectiveness. The survey of program directors yielded a response rate of 40%. Ninety percent of respondents agreed that the communication skills training in their programs could be improved. Fifteen of 24 residents (62%) completed the needs assessment. Qualitative analysis of the narrative material revealed four themes; (1) differing expectations, (2) work role and environment, (3) challenges specific to ophthalmology, and (4) successful strategies adopted. Nine residents participated in the workshop. There was a significant improvement post-workshop in resident reported scores on their ability to manage their emotions during difficult conversations (p = 0.03). There is an opportunity to improve communication skills training in ophthalmology residency through formalized curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. A Study to Determine the Need for Development of a Vocational Education Program in Solar Energy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. Paul; Orsak, Charles G.

    To determine the need for the development of a vocational education program in solar energy, an advisory committee considered opportunities for solar energy technicians and the need for the development of training programs and curricula and formulated recommendations for a program and curriculum. They concluded that the immediate need for persons…

  14. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits A to F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits A through F. Among the information included in the exhibits is the experimental model schedule, the schematic representation, the content display, and the course outlines for all courses in the program.…

  15. The Effect of a Training Program in Improving First Classes Teachers Skills in Dealing with Special Needs Students in Regular Classroom in Amman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taj, Heyam Musa; Al-Oweidi, Alia Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a training program in improving first classes female teachers' skills in dealing with special needs students in regular classroom among a sample of private schools female teachers in Amman. The study adopted the quasi-experimental approach based on two equivalent groups, as the sample…

  16. A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of Schoolwide Violence Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Tia Navelene; Leite, Walter; Smith, Stephen W.

    2017-01-01

    Violence prevention programs are commonplace in today's schools, though reviews of the literature reveal mixed empirical findings on their effectiveness. Often, these programs include a variety of components such as social skills training, student mentoring, and activities designed to build a sense of school community that have not been tested for…

  17. The Mount Sinai (New York) Visiting Doctors Program: meeting the needs of the urban homebound population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Katherine; Hernandez, Cameron R; DeCherrie, Linda V; Soriano, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors program, a joint program of Mount Sinai Medical Center's Departments of Medicine and Geriatrics, is a large multidisciplinary teaching, research, and clinical care initiative serving homebound adults in Manhattan since 1995. Caring for more than 1,000 patients annually, the physicians of Visiting Doctors make more than 6,000 urgent and routine visits each year, making it the largest program of its kind in the country. Services include 24-hour physician availability, palliative care, social work case management, collaboration with nursing agencies, and in-home specialty consultation. The program serves many individuals who have previously received inadequate and inconsistent medical care. Patients are referred by social service agencies, localphysicians, and hospitals and are primarily frail older individuals with complex needs. Funded by Mount Sinai and private support, the program serves as a major teaching site for medical nursing, and social work trainees interested in home-based primary care.

  18. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Störmann Sylvère

    2011-09-01

    last 2 years. Six programs (27% offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82% feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41% involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%, enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50% and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%. Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students.

  19. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    programs (27%) offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82%) feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41%) involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%), enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50%) and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%). Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students. PMID:21943281

  20. Needs, interests, and attitudes of university faculty for a wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhart, G A; Ebro, L L; Claypool, P L

    1988-08-01

    During the 1986-1987 academic year, 484 full-time faculty members at Oklahoma State University responded to a health habits questionnaire. The purpose of this study was to assess the needs, interests, and attitudes of faculty for a wellness program. Behaviors were assessed in the following categories: cigarette smoking, alcohol/drugs, eating habits, exercise/fitness, stress management, and safety. Only 100 (20.6%) of the total indicated that they were currently smokers. Neither the alcohol/drugs nor the safety categories appeared to be problem areas, with no significance noted. Categories indicating a need for improvement were exercise/fitness, eating habits, and stress management. Faculty members were interested in and willing to participate in a wellness program. Preferred areas of interest in rank order were (1) exercise/fitness, (2) stress management, and (3) nutrition. Results of this study indicate that faculty in a major university are interested in wellness and will participate in a wellness program. Need and interest suggest that an exercise/fitness program should be instituted first, with stress management and nutrition components added as funds become available. A successful wellness program in a university setting has implications for happier, more productive employees, reduced absenteeism, and lower health insurance premiums.

  1. Defense Logistics Agency Disposition Services Needs to Improve Demilitarization Program Self-Assessment Evaluations - Redacted

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Defense Logistics Agency Disposition Services Needs to Improve Demilitarization Program Self ‑Assessment Evaluations Management Comments and Our...and control of the Compliance Assessment Management System (CAMS);9 • provide and coordinate protocols and instructions to the CDDs to complete self ...assessments; • notify DLA Disposition Services management of self -assessments results, repeat findings, suggested corrective actions, best practices

  2. Evaluating the Navy’s Enlisted Accessions Testing Program Based on Future Talent Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    maximize workplace efficiency. As a result of targeting these high-quality applicants and creating more efficient leadership training programs, these...organization, which is known for exceptionally high safety standards and performance, small inefficiencies in the areas of teamwork and leadership ...recruiting needs. We found that the Navy is inadequately assessing applicant skills and attributes through its primary use of cognitive testing

  3. Joining Youth Needs and Program Services. Urban Diversity Series No. 104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    This paper discusses the challenges of effectively matching the needs of youth populations with program services. An introduction reviews some broad issues that shape the discussion, namely whether youth is a period integrated into the course of life or a separatist culture. A second section proposes an ecological approach to youth services, which…

  4. 25 CFR 10.1 - Why are policies and standards needed for Indian country detention programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., design and construction or renovation of detention facilities, community residential, or holding... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Why are policies and standards needed for Indian country detention programs? 10.1 Section 10.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND...

  5. The Context for Marginal Secondary ESL Programs: Contributing Factors and the Need for Further Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    This essay suggests that many factors cause English-as-a-Second-Language programs to be isolated from mainstream school processes and to be given marginal status. Factors include lack of experience, one-way assimilation, lack of empathy, melting pot myth, the English-only movement, and the continuing need for a "labor underclass." (24 references)…

  6. A Needs Assessment for the Introduction of a Food Science Program at the Univ. of Guyana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Donna

    2012-01-01

    This research describes the outcome of a needs assessment to determine whether the Univ. of Guyana should introduce a Food Science program. The research design utilized interviews and questionnaires to large manufacturing organizations and agroprocessors to determine if the required skills are available for the manufacturing process. Results…

  7. Comprehensive Support Services Program for Serving Pupils with Special Educational Needs, 1975 - 1976. Report and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Sarah H.

    Presented are a description and evaluation report of the Comprehensive Support Services Program (CSSP), a regional effort by seven New York school districts to identify, evaluate, and provide supplemental educational support for learning disabled students with special educational needs through a multi-disciplinary team in each school. Summarized…

  8. Community Needs Assessment for an Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology Program at Maui, Molokai, and Lanai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Jean A.

    In June 1992, Maui Community College (MCC), in Hawaii, conducted a survey of the communities of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Hana to determine perceived needs for an associate degree and certificate program in electronics and computer engineering. Questionnaires were mailed to 500 firms utilizing electronic or computer services, seeking information…

  9. Are State Non-Need, Merit-Based Scholarship Programs Impacting College Enrollment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Patricia L.; Kienzl, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether non-need, merit-based scholarship programs are effective in encouraging students to enroll in postsecondary education and, more specifically, attend an in-state college. National residence and migration data from 1992 to 2004 (alternating even years) were used within a fixed effect regression framework. This approach,…

  10. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  11. An empirical examination among Canadian teachers of determinants of the need for employees' assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aaron; Schwartz, Hanit

    2002-06-01

    The goal of this study was to propose and test a model of the determinants of the need for employees' assistance programs. The research model proposed six independent variables related to employees' assistance programs: organizational support, personal coping, negative spillover, occupational commitment, job satisfaction, and tenure. The model proposed that the relationship between the independent variables and the need for employees' assistance programs was not direct but was mediated by work-nonwork conflict and job stress. Questionnaires were mailed to employees of a school district in western Canada, and 300 usable questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 42%. The research model received modest support from the data. Some of the fit indices were not as strong as expected. On the other hand, the conceptual model was supported.

  12. Adapting the 'family wellbeing' empowerment program to the needs of remote indigenous school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsey, Komla; Whiteside, Mary; Daly, Sathyabhama; Deemal, Audrey; Gibson, Teresa; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Wilson, Andrew; Santhanam, Radhika; Haswell-Elkins, Melissa R

    2005-04-01

    To adapt the Family Wellbeing empowerment program, which was initially designed to support adults to take greater control and responsibility for their decisions and lives, to the needs of Indigenous school children living in remote communities. At the request of two schools in remote Indigenous communities in far north Queensland, a pilot personal development and empowerment program based on the adult Family Wellbeing principles was developed, conducted and evaluated in the schools. The main aims of the program were to build personal identity and to encourage students to recognise their future potential and be more aware of their place in the community and wider society. Participation in the program resulted in significant social and emotional growth for the students. Outcomes described by participating students and teachers included increased analytical and reflective skills, greater ability to think for oneself and set goals, less teasing and bullying in the school environment, and an enhanced sense of identity, friendship and 'social relatedness'. This pilot implementation of the Family Wellbeing Program adapted for schools demonstrated the program's potential to enhance Indigenous young people's personal growth and development. Challenges remain in increasing parental/ family involvement and ensuring the program's sustainability and transferability. The team has been working with relevant stakeholders to further develop and package the School-based Family Wellbeing program for Education Queensland's New Basics curriculum framework.

  13. Material response mechanisms are needed to obtain highly accurate experimental shock wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jerry W.

    2017-01-01

    The field of shock wave compression of matter has provided a simple set of equations relating thermodynamic and kinematic parameters that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across a steady plane shock wave with one-dimensional flow. Well-known condensed matter shock wave experimental results will be reviewed to see whether the assumptions required for deriving these simple R-H equations are satisfied. Note that the material compression model is not required for deriving the 1-D conservation flow equations across a steady plane shock front. However, this statement is misleading from a practical experimental viewpoint since obtaining small systematic errors in shock wave measured parameters requires the material compression and release mechanisms to be known. A review will be presented on errors in shock wave data from common experimental techniques for elastic-plastic solids. Issues related to time scales of experiments, steady waves with long rise times and detonations will also be discussed

  14. Analysis of medical students' needs for development of a career guidance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyejin; Kim, Eunjeong; Hwang, Jinyoung; Lee, Seunghee

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide basic data for the development of a career guidance program through a demand survey. For this purpose, three study topics were examined: Is there a difference between the satisfaction and importance of a career program? Is there a difference between the satisfaction and importance of a career program by gender, grade level? and What type of mentor and the mentoring way of medical students demanded? The subjects were 380 students at Seoul National University College of Medicine. The data were analyzed by frequency analysis, paired t-test, and Borich's formula. By t-test with matched samples for satisfaction-importance, We noted statistically significant differences in all domains. In particular, the difference was greater in the second year. According to the needs analysis, the most urgent program is meeting with seniors in various career areas. Also, medical students hope for mentor from clinical professors of the university and successful medical practitioners, and personal counseling. These results show that medical students need a career guidance program. The findings of the study can be used to guide the development of career education programs and curriculum for medicine students.

  15. Unique program aims to connect frequent ED utilizers with medical homes, resources to meet complex needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Sinai Hospital of Baltimore in Baltimore, MD, is partnering with HealthCare Access Maryland, a non-profit organization in the state, to link patients who frequent the ED for care with medical homes and other resources that can better meet their medical and social needs. Under the Access Health Program, ED-based care coordinators intervene with patients who meet program criteria, linking them with medical homes and other resources that address their complex needs. The hospital has devised a flag to notify the ED when a frequent-utilizing patient presents in the department for care. Care coordinators then meet with these patients and get their consent to participate in the program. Within a week of the ED visit, care coordinators schedule a home visit with the patient to establish a care plan containing specific goals and a time frame to carry out these goals. Patients remain in the program for 90 days as care coordinators work to hand them off to longer-term resources. Many of the patients enrolled in the program have substance abuse and mental health problems. Patients are also often uninsured and/or homeless. Within two months of launching the program, care coordinators enrolled 74 patients, with the goal of eventually bringing that number to 200.

  16. The Needs of Primary English Teachers for an In-Service Teacher Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enisa Mede

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the needs of the primary English teachers at a private school about an in-service teacher training program. Under the light of former studies and literature, this study attempts to find out their needs on the predefined concepts namely, adaptation of teaching methods, emphasis on language skills, utilization of technology, classroom environment, instructional practices and material development. The differences between the needs of the participating teachers according to their grade level (K1-4 were examined as well. A sample of 60 primary English teachers working in private schools around different cities in Turkey participated in this study. Data were collected through a triangulated approach, in which questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and teacher diaries were administered to the participating teachers. The findings revealed except for the material development, the primary English teachers are in a high need of a design for an in-service training program on the predefined concepts. Besides, the only difference between the grade levels was in relation to the utilization of technology. These findings will serve as basis for the design of a new in-service teacher training program to meet their needs in the following academic years.

  17. An Irish Cross-Institutional User Needs Analysis of Undergraduate Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Mary Costelloe

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Research literature and practical experience of subject experts indicate that teaching programming to novices has proven challenging for both learner and lecturer. A number of difficulties arise when teaching novices to program. These ranges from the inadequacy of the undergraduate students’ problem-solving skills, problems with understanding programming constructs, to the complexity of the environments in which the students develop their solutions. This paper outlines a project which aims to address some of the challenges faced by novice programmers by providing them with an innovative learning tool, incorporating a set of Reusable Learning Objects (RLOs, based on sound pedagogical principles and encapsulated in a Constructivist Learning Environment (CLE. The Learning Objects will focus on the common areas of weaknesses that are determined by an Irish cross-institutional User Needs Analysis. The initial research activity was to conduct a User Needs Analysis, which was carried out in the three third level academic partner institutions and which will inform and direct the remainder of the research project. The User Needs Analysis confirmed that first year undergraduate students find programming the most challenging module they study. Programming constructs such as Arrays, Looping and Selection were shown to be the most problematic in semester one, and Methods and Polymorphism posing difficulties in semester two. Interestingly the students’ actual and perceived difficulties with the concepts were not in-line, with the students perceiving their difficulties to be less than they actually were. The students acknowledge that problem-solving abilities impacted on their performance but only 20% of students in one college admitted to thinking about their approach in designing programming solutions. The results of the User Needs Analysis directs the design and development of the RLOs and the learning tool.

  18. Impacts of the Boston prekindergarten program on the school readiness of young children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina

    2016-11-01

    Theory and empirical work suggest inclusion preschool improves the school readiness of young children with special needs, but only 2 studies of the model have used rigorous designs that could identify causality. The present study examined the impacts of the Boston Public prekindergarten program-which combined proven language, literacy, and mathematics curricula with coaching-on the language, literacy, mathematics, executive function, and emotional skills of young children with special needs (N = 242). Children with special needs benefitted from the program in all examined domains. Effects were on par with or surpassed those of their typically developing peers. Results are discussed in the context of their relevance for policy, practice, and theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Development plan for the External Hazards Experimental Group. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Burns, Douglas Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kammerer, Annie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the development plan for a new multi-partner External Hazards Experimental Group (EHEG) coordinated by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) technical pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Currently, there is limited data available for development and validation of the tools and methods being developed in the RISMC Toolkit. The EHEG is being developed to obtain high-quality, small- and large-scale experimental data validation of RISMC tools and methods in a timely and cost-effective way. The group of universities and national laboratories that will eventually form the EHEG (which is ultimately expected to include both the initial participants and other universities and national laboratories that have been identified) have the expertise and experimental capabilities needed to both obtain and compile existing data archives and perform additional seismic and flooding experiments. The data developed by EHEG will be stored in databases for use within RISMC. These databases will be used to validate the advanced external hazard tools and methods.

  20. Whither Instructional Design and Teacher Training? The Need for Experimental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gropper, George L.

    2015-01-01

    This article takes a contrarian position: an "instructional design" or "teacher training" model, because of the sheer number of its interconnected parameters, is too complex to assess or to compare with other models. Models may not be the way to go just yet. This article recommends instead prior experimental research on limited…

  1. Students' needs reflected in the efl program: a small-scale evaluation of the methodologies proposed in an english program

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Acosta Lisbeth; Ramos Holguín Bertha

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate if there were discrepancies or not among the methodology proposed in the English program, students’ needs and what the teacher was actually doing in her classes, 13 ninth graders were asked to answer two questionnaires and they were also observed while they were in their English classes at the Institución Educativa Departamental El Vino (Cundinamarca, Colombia). The English teacher was also interviewed and a self- assessment questionnaire was given to her. The analysis of...

  2. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Holman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  3. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  4. An Experimental Test of the LEADER MATCH Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean E.

    Fiedler's Contingency Model of Leadership Effectiveness, which asserts that leadership effectiveness is a function of leadership style and situational context, is the basis for a leadership training program called Leader Match. This study attempts to replicate previous research which has demonstrated improved performance attributable to the Leader…

  5. Ethical regulation or regulating ethics? The need for both internal and external governance of human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomossy, George F

    2002-10-01

    Research regulation is a timely topic for discussions in bioethics and public health policy. This response to articles in the previous special issue of the Monash Bioethics Review emphasises the importance of having both internal and external controls on human experimentation. Unless both elements are incorporated into research ethics governance frameworks, they will ultimately fail to achieve what should be their primary goal: human subject protection.

  6. DM-style program caters to behavioral needs of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Modeled after traditional employee assistance programs, a new program offered by CIGNA Behavioural Health is designed to meet the needs of college students, many of whom are vulnerable to emotional disorders as they grapple with independence and the rigors of campus life for the first time. Conditions such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse are on the rise in college-age individuals, and developers of the new approach suggest that early intervention can get such problems under control before they reach the crisis stage.

  7. Getting to Know Library Users’ NeedsExperimental Ways to User-centred Library Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Harbo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘Meeting the User’ is a programme committee under the Danish Electronic Research Library. As a development group at a national level we see our role as facilitating an innovative culture within academic libraries, focusing on users’ needs and the way libraries meet them. In collaboration with a consultancy firm, the committee organized a travelling workshop in four cities in 2010. The workshop introduced practical ways for library staff to get to know their users’ needs for services and was based on anthropological methods. The travelling workshop was part of a larger project called ‘A Journey of Discovery in Danish Library User Land’ (translated from Danish Brugerkaravanen, which also included a national thematic day, a blog and the publication of a method guide. There is an ongoing need for academic libraries to improve their services. One strategy is to become more aware of the users’ needs. On the one hand we have libraries which give access to a lot of information, offer courses in information literacy and strive to be a part of the learning environment. On the other hand we are not always certain of the needs of our users. If libraries want to improve the way they serve their users’ needs, they must innovate their services, facilities and courses by building upon what you could call ‘user logic’ and not upon classical ‘library logic’. ‘User logic’ is that which is meaningful for the user instead of what is traditionally meaningful for a library. Finding out what the users’ needs are, requires methods to study the users. In order to discover the shortest route from knowledge via idea to action, we looked for methods that can be employed by librarians or library information specialists. This article describes how 110 librarians and information specialists acquired such methods in four cities and in four days, by means of a workshop structured like a guided tour through the land of library users. The goal of the

  8. Prices need no preferences: social trends determine decisions in experimental markets for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaev, Ivo; Seymour, Ben; Chater, Nick; Winston, Joel S; Yoshida, Wako; Wright, Nicholas; Symmonds, Mkael; Dolan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A standard view in health economics is that, although there is no market that determines the "prices" for health states, people can nonetheless associate health states with monetary values (or other scales, such as quality adjusted life year [QALYs] and disability adjusted life year [DALYs]). Such valuations can be used to shape health policy, and a major research challenge is to elicit such values from people; creating experimental "markets" for health states is a theoretically attractive way to address this. We explore the possibility that this framework may be fundamentally flawed-because there may not be any stable values to be revealed. Instead, perhaps people construct ad hoc values, influenced by contextual factors, such as the observed decisions of others. The participants bid to buy relief from equally painful electrical shocks to the leg and arm in an experimental health market based on an interactive second-price auction. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to two experimental conditions where the bids by "others" were manipulated to follow increasing or decreasing price trends for one, but not the other, pain. After the auction, a preference test asked the participants to choose which pain they prefer to experience for a longer duration. Players remained indifferent between the two pain-types throughout the auction. However, their bids were differentially attracted toward what others bid for each pain, with overbidding during decreasing prices and underbidding during increasing prices. Health preferences are dissociated from market prices, which are strongly referenced to others' choices. This suggests that the price of health care in a free-market has the capacity to become critically detached from people's underlying preferences. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Neurolinguistic programming used to reduce the need for anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients undergoing MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, J; Griffiths, P D; Prydderch, A; Romanowski, C A J; Miles, L; Lidiard, H; Hoggard, N

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success of neurolinguistic programming in reducing the need for general anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients who require MRI and to consider the financial implications for health providers. This was a prospective study performed in 2006 and 2007 at a teaching hospital in England and comprised 50 adults who had unsuccessful MR examinations because of claustrophobia. The main outcome measures were the ability to tolerate a successful MR examination after neurolinguistic programming, the reduction of median anxiety scores produced by neurolinguistic programming, and models of costs for various imaging pathways. Neurolinguistic programming allowed 38/50 people (76%) to complete the MR examination successfully. Overall, the median anxiety score was significantly reduced following the session of neurolinguistic programming. In conclusion, neurolinguistic programming reduced anxiety and subsequently allowed MRI to be performed without resorting to general anaesthesia in a high proportion of claustrophobic adults. If these results are reproducible, there will be major advantages in terms of patient safety and costs. PMID:19505969

  10. Neurolinguistic programming used to reduce the need for anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients undergoing MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, J; Griffiths, P D; Prydderch, A; Romanowski, C A J; Miles, L; Lidiard, H; Hoggard, N

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success of neurolinguistic programming in reducing the need for general anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients who require MRI and to consider the financial implications for health providers. This was a prospective study performed in 2006 and 2007 at a teaching hospital in England and comprised 50 adults who had unsuccessful MR examinations because of claustrophobia. The main outcome measures were the ability to tolerate a successful MR examination after neurolinguistic programming, the reduction of median anxiety scores produced by neurolinguistic programming, and models of costs for various imaging pathways. Neurolinguistic programming allowed 38/50 people (76%) to complete the MR examination successfully. Overall, the median anxiety score was significantly reduced following the session of neurolinguistic programming. In conclusion, neurolinguistic programming reduced anxiety and subsequently allowed MRI to be performed without resorting to general anaesthesia in a high proportion of claustrophobic adults. If these results are reproducible, there will be major advantages in terms of patient safety and costs.

  11. Search for Pentaquarks: the Experimental Program at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Niccolai

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidences for the existence of exotic 5-quark baryons have been reported recently by several groups. These data may open new perspectives in hadron spectroscopy as well as in QCD. However, the statistical significance of these results is quite low, and the pentaquark signal has not been seen in various other experiments. The new dedicated experiments currently underway at CLAS will hopefully give a clearer answer on the existence and, possibly, on the properties of pentaquarks. This paper summarizes the results obtained so far in the search for 5-quark states and describes the characteristics and goals of the new experiments running at CLAS.

  12. Factors associated with reported need for dental care among people who are homeless using assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Girgis, Dina; Self, Karl; Jackson, Scott; McGinley, Emily L; Tarima, Sergey S

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective secondary data analysis of the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients database was conducted to identify the demographic characteristics and correlates associated with reported need for dental care among people who are homeless in the United States. Overall, 10% of people who were homeless reported that dental care was their most needed service. Of these, 17% had a dental visit within the previous 12 months, 52% were racial/ethnic minorities, 76% lived in a central city, and 26% were veterans. The unadjusted odds for reporting a need for dental care was highest among veterans who were homeless and those whose last dental visit occurred more than 12 months ago. Compared to nonveterans who were homeless, veterans had twice the adjusted odds for reporting a need for dental care. The adjusted odds for reporting a need for dental care were lowest for those with dental insurance. Evaluation of the data suggests that dental insurance was associated with reporting lower need for dental care. Veterans who were homeless reported higher odds for dental care. Strengthening existing oral health-care programs sensitive to the needs of people who are homeless may improve their oral health and reduce their dental-disease-related morbidity.

  13. Defense Acquisitions: Better Approach Needed to Account for Number, Cost, and Performance of Non-Major Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and equipment. About 40 percent of that total is for major defense acquisition programs or ACAT I programs. DOD also invests in other, non-major... ACAT II and III programs that are generally less costly at the individual program level. These programs typically have fewer reporting requirements...and are overseen at lower organizational levels than ACAT I programs, although they may have annual funding needs that are just as significant

  14. Does One Size Fit All? Assessing the Need for Organizational Second Victim Support Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Hanan H; Wu, Albert W

    2017-06-30

    Second victims are health care providers who are emotionally traumatized after experiencing an unanticipated patient's adverse event. To support second victims, organizations can provide a dedicated support program for their workers. The aim of this study was to assess the extent of the second victim problem in acute care hospitals in the state of Maryland, the availability of emotional support services, and the need for organizational support programs. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 43 patient safety representatives from 38 acute hospitals in Maryland. Data were analyzed using QSR NVivo10 software and a mixed-methods approach to generate codes and extract themes from the interviews. Descriptive statistics were generated for hospital and participant characteristics. The response rate was 83% of hospitals. All participants reported that they and their executives were aware of the second victim problem. Although participants varied in their perceptions of whether a dedicated second victim support program would be helpful for their hospital, all thought that hospitals should offer organizational support programs. Several organizations are attempting to promote a "just culture" in responding to events, and there continues to be stigma associated with speaking up during a root cause analysis, and with accessing support if it were offered. The second victim problem is recognized in all hospitals in Maryland. However, even when support is available, health care providers face stigma and other barriers in accessing it. Future efforts should assess the need for second victim programs from the perspectives of second victims themselves to identify barriers and improve uptake of needed support.

  15. Unmet needs in continuing medical education programs for rural Chinese township health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Yi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to describe the system of continuing medical education (CME in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and to ascertain the perceived needs related to that system, in order to improve the performance of health professionals in Chinese township health centers (THCs. Methods: In-depth key informant interviews were conducted to gain insights into the current CME system. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was also carried out from March to August 2014 in order to identify perceived needs among THC personnel in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Logistic regression was used to identify factors related to respondents’ interest in pursuing different levels of degree study. Results: The areas of need perceived by the respondents included general clinical competence and emergency or first aid knowledge. Most respondents wanted to study at medical colleges in order to obtain a higher degree. Respondents aged below 45 years with neutral or positive attitudes about the benefit of degree study for the licensure examination were more likely to attend a bachelor-level CME program than their older peers and respondents with negative attitudes towards degree study. Female respondents and respondents aged below 45 years were more likely to attend a junior college CME program than males and older respondents, respectively. Conclusion: It is necessary to develop degree-linked CME programs to meet the need for young health professionals in Chinese THCs; therefore, this programs can improve the expertise of poorly educated young health workers, who overwhelm rural Chinese heath systems.

  16. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  17. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liby, Alan L [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  18. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Addressing the health needs of the underserved: a national faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ellen; Wingard, Deborah L; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Heifetz, Ruth; Gilbreath, Stuart

    2008-11-01

    The authors developed a three-week faculty development program, "Addressing the Health Needs of the Underserved" (funded by Title VII), and later incorporated a year long Fellowship in Underserved Medicine. This article describes these programs from 1999 to 2007, focusing on participants, curricula, outcomes, and potential impact.Participants (n = 107) in the three-week faculty development program came from 29 states and Puerto Rico, with more than 25% from underrepresented minorities in the health professions. The program focused on three skill sets: creating and sustaining community programs and partnerships; core faculty development/academic skills; and personal and professional renewal. Outcomes measured with follow-up surveys and interviews in 2003 revealed that since their participation, the first 53 participants to complete the program had created 30 new or modified residency curricula, 19 new student curricula, and 7 new student-run free clinic projects. Pre-post measures from 2003 to 2007 identified an overall 46% increase in skill confidence, with the greatest increase reported for designing a promotora (community lay health promoter) program. Participants expressed particular satisfaction with becoming part of a national community of scholars in the field of underserved medicine.For the year long, on-site Fellowship in Underserved Medicine, four of the first six fellows who completed the fellowship were former University of California-San Diego Student-Run Free Clinic Project student leaders who left San Diego to complete family medicine residency and returned to complete the fellowship. All six currently work with underserved communities as their primary focus, five in the United States and one internationally with Doctors Without Borders.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  20. The scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Profile of the population in need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, J.F.; Michels, E.; Carroll, D.; Berdux, N.

    1994-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a national evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, an energy efficiency program that provides financial assistance to qualifying low-income households for the {open_quotes}weatherization{close_quotes} of their housing units. The evaluation, being conducted for the Department by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is comprised of five studies. One of the five is a two-part analysis of the scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program and other resources devoted to low-income energy efficiency, including the number of dwellings weatherized to date and the population remaining to be served. This study is referred to here as the {open_quotes}Scope{close_quotes} study. This report presents the results of the second part of the {open_quotes}Scope{close_quotes} study, which investigates the characteristics of the population eligible for and in need of the DOE Weatherization Assistance Program - The Profile of the Population in Need. The {open_quotes}Profile{close_quotes} study is an attempt to use the Energy Information Administration`s Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 1990 to define the weatherization-related characteristics of the low-income population. The RECS, a national survey with a sample size of 5,095 households, is the most reliable source for information regarding residential energy-use and housing characteristics because data is collected from fuel vendors on actual household energy bills and consumption for a large and representative sample of households.

  1. The Scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Profile of the Population in Need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a national evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, an energy efficiency program that provides financial assistance to qualifying low-income households for the ''weatherization'' of their housing units. The evaluation, being conducted for the Department by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is comprised of five studies. One of the five is a two-part analysis of the scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program and other resources devoted to low-income energy efficiency, including the number of dwellings weatherized to date and the population remaining to be served. This study is referred to here as the ''Scope'' study. This report presents the results of the second part of the ''Scope'' study, which investigates the characteristics of the population eligible for and in need of the DOE Weatherization Assistance Program--The Profile of the Population in Need. The ''Profile'' study is an attempt to use the Energy Information Administration's Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 1990 to define the weatherization-related characteristics of the low-income population. The RECS, a national survey with a sample size of 5,095 households, is the most reliable source for information regarding residential energy-use and housing characteristics because data is collected from fuel vendors on actual household energy bills and consumption for a large and representative sample of households.

  2. Organisational and methodological aspects of experimental training programs for athletes lightweights in academic rowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Omelchenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: develop an experimental training program for lightweight rowers in academic rowing. Material: the study involved 27 qualified athletes who are engaged in academic rowing over 6 years, age 19-22 years, with sports qualifications KMS and MS. To better design the training program was conducted to study this physical condition of athletes also took into account the opinion of the leading coaches in academic rowing that are engaged with lightweight rowers. Results: as a result of an experimental study was designed training program in academic rowing. Conclusions: Experimental training program rowing provided its use for a year and was designed in the form of blocks and aims to developing and improving endurance (speed and power, strength and maximum strength. The experimental technique that was used in the training process, was designed with the preparation phase and plan on mesocycles and microcycle.

  3. Organisational and methodological aspects of experimental training programs for athletes lightweights in academic rowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelchenko E.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: develop an experimental training program for lightweight rowers in academic rowing. Material: the study involved 27 qualified athletes who are engaged in academic rowing over 6 years, age 19-22 years, with sports qualifications KMS and MS. To better design the training program was conducted to study this physical condition of athletes also took into account the opinion of the leading coaches in academic rowing that are engaged with lightweight rowers. Results: as a result of an experimental study was designed training program in academic rowing. Conclusions: Experimental training program rowing provided its use for a year and was designed in the form of blocks and aims to developing and improving endurance (speed and power, strength and maximum strength. The experimental technique that was used in the training process, was designed with the preparation phase and plan on mesocycles and microcycle.

  4. A Statistical Approach for Selecting Buildings for Experimental Measurement of HVAC Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinowski Paweł

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a statistical methodology for selecting representative buildings for experimentally evaluating the performance of HVAC systems, especially in terms of energy consumption. The proposed approach is based on the k-means method. The algorithm for this method is conceptually simple, allowing it to be easily implemented. The method can be applied to large quantities of data with unknown distributions. The method was tested using numerical experiments to determine the hourly, daily, and yearly heat values and the domestic hot water demands of residential buildings in Poland. Due to its simplicity, the proposed approach is very promising for use in engineering applications and is applicable to testing the performance of many HVAC systems.

  5. A Statistical Approach for Selecting Buildings for Experimental Measurement of HVAC Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Paweł; Ziembicki, Piotr

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a statistical methodology for selecting representative buildings for experimentally evaluating the performance of HVAC systems, especially in terms of energy consumption. The proposed approach is based on the k-means method. The algorithm for this method is conceptually simple, allowing it to be easily implemented. The method can be applied to large quantities of data with unknown distributions. The method was tested using numerical experiments to determine the hourly, daily, and yearly heat values and the domestic hot water demands of residential buildings in Poland. Due to its simplicity, the proposed approach is very promising for use in engineering applications and is applicable to testing the performance of many HVAC systems.

  6. Report: EPA’s Information Security Program Is Established, but Improvements Are Needed to Strengthen Its Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #18-P-0031, October 30, 2017. Although the EPA has an effective information security program, management emphasis is needed to achieve a higher level of maturity for the agency’s information security program.

  7. Small Business: Action Needed to Determine Whether DOD’s Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program Should Be Made Permanent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    SMALL BUSINESS Action Needed to Determine Whether DOD’s Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program Should Be... Subcontracting Plan Test Program Should Be Made Permanent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...committees November 2015 SMALL BUSINESS Action Needed to Determine Whether DOD’s Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program Should Be Made

  8. The key roles of four Experimental Forests in the LTSP International Research Program [Chapter 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Powers; David H. Alban; Robert Denner; John D. Elioff; Gary O. Fiddler; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Felix Ponder; Allan E. Tiarks; Peter E. Avers; Richard G. Cline; Nelson S. Loftus

    2014-01-01

    Four Experimental Forests were pivotal in piloting the long-term soil productivity (LTSP) cooperative research program - one of the most successful and extensive collaborative science efforts yet undertaken by the USDA Forest Service. Launched on the Palustris, Challenge, Marcell, and Priest River Experimental Forests, LTSP traces to a seminal discussion during a field...

  9. A framework program for the teaching of alternative methods (replacement, reduction, refinement) to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Blaauboer, Bas; Caloni, Francesca; Cosson, Pierre; Curren, Rodger; Goldberg, Alan; Gruber, Franz; Ohl, Frauke; Pfaller, Walter; van der Valk, Jan; Vinardell, Pilar; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Development of improved communication and education strategies is important to make alternatives to the use of animals, and the broad range of applications of the 3Rs concept better known and understood by different audiences. For this purpose, the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing in Europe (CAAT-Europe) together with the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t(4)) hosted a three-day workshop on "Teaching Alternative Methods to Animal Experimentation". A compilation of the recommendations by a group of international specialists in the field is summarized in this report. Initially, the workshop participants identified the different audience groups to be addressed and also the communication media that may be used. The main outcome of the workshop was a framework for a comprehensive educational program. The modular structure of the teaching program presented here allows adaptation to different audiences with their specific needs; different time schedules can be easily accommodated on this basis. The topics cover the 3Rs principle, basic research, toxicological applications, method development and validation, regulatory aspects, case studies and ethical aspects of 3Rs approaches. This expert consortium agreed to generating teaching materials covering all modules and providing them in an open access online repository.

  10. A experimental research program on chirality at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Christina [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Heavy-ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to investigate the fundamental laws of physics of the strong force. The extreme conditions created by the collisions within a finite volume are akin to the properties of the deconfined partonic state which existed very shortly after the Big Bang and just prior to visible matter formation in the Universe. In this state massless quarks and gluons (partons) are ``quasi free" particles, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). By following the expansion and cooling of this state, we will map out the process of nucleonic matter formation, which occurs during the phase transition. The fundamental properties of this early partonic phase of matter are not well understood, but they are essential for confirming QCD (Quantum Chromo-Dynamics) and the Standard Model. The specific topic, chiral symmetry restoration, has been called ``the remaining puzzle of QCD.'' This puzzle can only be studied in the dense partonic medium generated in heavy-ion collisions. The research objectives of this proposal are the development and application of new analysis strategies to study chirality and the properties of the medium above the QGP phase transition using hadronic resonances detected with the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN research laboratory in Switzerland. This grant funded a new effort at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) to investigate the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) at the highest possible energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN via the ALICE experiment. The findings added to our knowledge of the dynamical evolution and the properties of the hot, dense matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, and provided a deeper understanding of multi-hadron interactions in these extreme nuclear matter systems. Our group contributed as well to the hardware and software for the ALICE USA-funded Calorimeter Detector (EMCal). The LHC research program and its

  11. How to Help Unemployed Find Jobs Quickly : Experimental Evidence from a Mandatory Activation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graversen, B.K.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how a mandatory activation program in Denmark affects the job finding rate of unemployed workers.The activation program was introduced in an experimental setting where about half of the workers who became unemployed in the period from November 2005 to March 2006 were randomly

  12. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits G to L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits G through L. Among the information included in the exhibits is the evaluation reports of the commission on accreditation, the detailed curriculum, and the accredited program's scope, sequence, and course…

  13. Mapping training needs for dissemination and implementation research: lessons from a synthesis of existing D&I research training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David A; Proctor, Enola K; Brownson, Ross C; Straus, Sharon E

    2017-09-01

    With recent growth in the field of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, multiple training programs have been developed to build capacity, including summer training institutes, graduate courses, degree programs, workshops, and conferences. While opportunities for D&I research training have expanded, course organizers acknowledge that available slots are insufficient to meet demand within the scientific and practitioner community. In addition, individual programs have struggled to best fit various needs of trainees, sometimes splitting coursework between specific D&I content and more introductory grant writing material. This article, stemming from a 2013 NIH workshop, reviews experiences across multiple training programs to align training needs, career stage and role, and availability of programs. We briefly review D&I needs and opportunities by career stage and role, discuss variations among existing training programs in format, mentoring relationships, and other characteristics, identify challenges of mapping needs of trainees to programs, and present recommendations for future D&I research training.

  14. Experimental ruminant models for bovine neosporosis: what is known and what is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Julio; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Ferre, Ignacio; Pérez, Valentín; Campero, Carlos; Mota, Rinaldo; Innes, Elisabeth; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2014-09-01

    At present, bovine neosporosis is an important worldwide concern because of its wide geographic distribution and economic impact. Abortion is the main clinical sign of bovine neosporosis in both dairy and beef cattle. Ruminant challenge models are critical to evaluate potential vaccine candidates to help tackle bovine neosporosis and to study pathogenesis and host responses to infection. Several research groups have developed ruminant models of Neospora caninum infection independently of others, resulting in a high degree of variability due to the use of different species of animals, breeds, strains/isolates of N. caninum, doses, routes and times of inoculation. Standardization is greatly needed to advance research in a more collaborative, timely and efficient manner. In the absence of widely accepted international guidelines, this manuscript serves to summarize and discuss the different models and parameters currently in use. Parameters essential for the development of non-pregnant and pregnant ruminant models are outlined and the main knowledge gaps are identified. This information could act as the basis to develop a consensus for international standard guidelines for ruminant models of neosporosis that would be helpful for researchers in this field worldwide.

  15. Genomic selection needs to be carefully assessed to meet specific requirements in livestock breeding programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Elisabeth; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Genomic selection is a promising development in agriculture, aiming improved production by exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. It opens opportunities for research, as novel algorithms and lab methodologies are developed. Genomic selection can be applied in many breeds and species. Further research on the implementation of genomic selection (GS) in breeding programs is highly desirable not only for the common good, but also the private sector (breeding companies). It has been projected that this approach will improve selection routines, especially in species with long reproduction cycles, late or sex-limited or expensive trait recording and for complex traits. The task of integrating GS into existing breeding programs is, however, not straightforward. Despite successful integration into breeding programs for dairy cattle, it has yet to be shown how much emphasis can be given to the genomic information and how much additional phenotypic information is needed from new selection candidates. Genomic selection is already part of future planning in many breeding companies of pigs and beef cattle among others, but further research is needed to fully estimate how effective the use of genomic information will be for the prediction of the performance of future breeding stock. Genomic prediction of production in crossbreeding and across-breed schemes, costs and choice of individuals for genotyping are reasons for a reluctance to fully rely on genomic information for selection decisions. Breeding objectives are highly dependent on the industry and the additional gain when using genomic information has to be considered carefully. This review synthesizes some of the suggested approaches in selected livestock species including cattle, pig, chicken, and fish. It outlines tasks to help understanding possible consequences when applying genomic information in breeding scenarios. PMID

  16. Genomic selection needs to be carefully assessed to meet specific requirements in livestock breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection is a promising development in agriculture, aiming improved production by exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. It opens opportunities for research, as novel algorithms and lab methodologies are developed. Genomic selection can be applied in many breeds and species. Further research on the implementation of genomic selection in breeding programs is highly desirable not only for the common good, but also the private sector (breeding companies. It has been projected that this approach will improve selection routines, especially in species with long reproduction cycles, late or sex-limited or expensive trait recording and for complex traits. The task of integrating genomic selection into existing breeding programs is, however, not straightforward. Despite successful integration into breeding programs for dairy cattle, it has yet to be shown how much emphasis can be given to the genomic information and how much additional phenotypic information is needed from new selection candidates. Genomic selection is already part of future planning in many breeding companies of pigs and beef cattle among others, but further research is needed to fully estimate how effective the use of genomic information will be for the prediction of the performance of future breeding stock. Genomic prediction of production in crossbreeding and across-breed schemes, costs and choice of individuals for genotyping are reasons for a reluctance to fully rely on genomic information for selection decisions. Breeding objectives are highly dependent on the industry and the additional gain when using genomic information has to be considered carefully. This review synthesizes some of the suggested approaches in selected livestock species including cattle, pig, chicken and fish. It outlines tasks to help understanding possible consequences when applying genomic information in

  17. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  18. The Need for an R&D and Upgrade Program for CMS Software and Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Elmer, Peter; Stenson, Kevin; Wittich, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Over the next ten years, the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will be greatly extended through increases in the instantaneous luminosity of the accelerator and large increases in the amount of collected data. Due to changes in the way Moore's Law computing performance gains have been realized in the past decade, an aggressive program of R&D is needed to ensure that the computing capability of CMS will be up to the task of collecting and analyzing this data.

  19. Clinical SAS programming in India: A study of industry needs versus wants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithiyanandhan Ananthakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical SAS (www.sas.com programming industry, in India, has seen a rapid growth in the last decade and the trend seems set to continue, for the next couple of years, due to cost advantage and the availability of skilled labor. On one side the industry needs are focused on less execution time, high margins, segmented tasks and the delivery of high quality output with minimal oversight. On the other side, due to the increased demand for skilled resources, the wants of the programmers have taken a different shift toward diversifying exposure, unsustainable wage inflation due to multiple opportunities and generally high expectations around career progression. If the industry needs are not going to match with programmers want, or vice versa, then there is the possibility that the current year on year growth may start to slow or even go into decline. Aim: This paper is intended to identify the gap between wants and need and puts forwards some suggestions, for both sides, in ways to change the equation to benefit all. Settings and Design: Questionnaire on similar themes created to survey managers and programmers working in clinical SAS programming industry and was surveyed online to collect their perspectives. Their views are compared for each theme and presented as results. Materials and Methods: Two surveys were created in www.surveymonkey.com. Management: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SAS_India_managment_needvswant_survey. Programmer: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SAS_India_programmer_needvswant_survey. Statistical Analysis Used: Bar chart and pie chart used on data collect to show segmentation of data. Results and Conclusions: In conclusion, it seeks to highlight the future industry direction and the skillset that existing programmers need to have, in order to sustain the momentum and remain competitive, to contribute to the future pipeline and the development of the profession in India.

  20. Culturally and linguistically diverse students in health professional programs: an exploration of concerns and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, C; Outram, S

    2012-07-01

    Cultural diversity among students in tertiary institutions in Australia and globally has increased rapidly in the last decade, and is continuing to do so. Focus groups were held at the University of Newcastle, NSW to: (1) examine the specific needs of international students in the Master of Pharmacy, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Nursing programs in relation to language and cultural considerations and (2) to understand the attitudes of domestic students to the cultural issues faced among their peers. The project explored these issues with the intention to inform curricula changes to accommodate the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. The key themes emerging from international students were: difficulties in spoken language, differences in professional roles and expectations, differences in methods of learning, inadequate social interaction outside the classroom and acceptance of differences in cultural and religious practices. The domestic student views reinforced the comments from international students both in regard to social interaction and in regard to participation in class discussions. Although local students were interested in learning from international students about their culture and religious beliefs, there were limited initiatives from both sides. There is a need for tertiary institutions that benefit economically from increasing the numbers of international students to help them to study and live in a new environment. Assistance needs to go beyond learning the English language to helping students understand its use in a professional context (health terminology and slang used by patients), the nuances of the health professional disciplines in a western society, the approach to study and problem-based learning styles and skills to assist with social interaction. The results of the present exploration have led to a series of proposed actions for the University of Newcastle. These recommendations are applicable to any "Western

  1. Strengthening Mental Health Programs for Secondary School Students with High Support Needs: A Framework for Effective School Case Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Terry

    2005-01-01

    MindMatters Plus (MM+) is a program that focuses on building the capacity of secondary schools to meet the needs of students who have high support needs in the area of mental health. A necessity to supplement this work with specific strategies and processes allied to the delivery of mental health programs in secondary schools was identified.…

  2. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Catherine

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore10 faculty participant's lived experiences, perceptions of roles in the teaching-learning process, and perceptions of at-risk URM (ARURM) student academic support needs. Colaizzi's method was used for data interpretation, revealing four themes. The first theme relates to the perceived under-preparedness of students and related consequences. The second theme represents a perceived lack of awareness and knowledge of students and faculty. The third theme represents the evolving context of the teaching-learning process. The fourth theme reflects a desire to help ARURM students at faculty and institutional levels. Data generated themes guided development of the Academy of Future Health Professionals, a four credit summer-bridge program created to provide ARURM students with additional education and socialization into professional roles. Implications for positive social change include increasing the number of ARURM students admitted to health profession programs of study, which may result in increasing URMs in professional practice, increasing URM professional mentors, and decreasing health disparities of URMs.

  3. THE GAP BETWEEN LEARNING NEEDS AND ITS’ IMPLEMENTATION IN ENGLISH FOR HOSPITALITY SPECIFIC PURPOSES PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Kardijan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is to reveal the gap between the English language communicative competence required by students of the hospitality department and English learning program provided at state of Vocational High School 1 Tasikmalaya, Indonesia, drawing through qualitative evaluation approach, including semi-structured interviews and observations. It explores how learning needs is implemented in teaching-learning process and the respondents’ description, what they saw and what they felt. Findings show inconsistency between learning needs in enrichment students’ English communicative competence and teaching-learning process. This prompts a re-instructional design of English learning for hospitality specific purposes program at this department currently. It provides to support of graduating required at hospitality industry workplace. Lead of recommendations, in terms of both the instructional design including materials development, teaching method usage and the professional development of ESP teachers, to address an understanding of the gap identified, so that students will enable to communicate more effectively with the English, in such contexts graduates can hire at the hospitality industry workplace.

  4. Urgent need to strengthen and expand screening and other cancer control programs in the CARICOM Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Renee A; Simeon, Donald T

    2017-11-01

    With high mortality in breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancers in Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries, we examined cancer control initiatives including screening as well as the implementation of relevant international and regional mandates. Secondary data were used to examine cancer control initiatives, which included the presence of national policies, programs, and screening services as well as the implementation of international and regional mandates. To identify the data, an on-line search was conducted using Google/Google Scholar. Data were available for 14 of the 15 full members of CARICOM. Although only six countries had distinct cancer control policies, strategies or action plans, all 14 had key elements of cancer control programs. Screening services were available in the 14 countries for cervical, in 12 countries for breast and in 11 for colorectal cancer. However, only four countries had screening policies. In addition, screening guidelines were available for cervical cancer in nine countries, in one country for breast and in none for colorectal cancer. Selected tobacco control policies were present in the 14 countries and immunization policies for human papillomavirus (HPV) in 13. Treatment services included chemotherapy in 10 countries and radiotherapy in six. Nine countries had palliative care services for patients with advanced disease. The countries were at different stages of implementation/compliance with international and regional mandates and frameworks. There is an urgent need to develop and implement comprehensive and customized cancer control policies addressing screening programs, treatment and palliative care.

  5. Recommendations for cervical cancer screening programs in developing countries: the need for equity and technological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazcano-Ponce Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The cervical cancer screening programs (CCSP have not been very efficient in the developing countries. This explains the need to foster changes on policies, standards, quality control mechanisms, evaluation and integration of new screening alternatives considered as low and high cost, as well as to regulate colposcopy practices and the foundation of HPV laboratories. Cervical cancer (CC is a disease most frequently found in poverty-stricken communities and reflecting a problem of equity at both levels gender and regional, and this, is not only due to social and economic development inequalities, but to the infrastructure and human resources necessary for primary care. For this reason, the CCSP program must be restructured, a to primarily address unprivileged rural and urban areas; b to foster actions aimed at ensuring extensive coverage as well as a similar quality of that coverage in every region; c to use screening strategies in keeping with the availability of health care services. In countries with a great regional heterogeneity, a variety of screening procedures must be regulated and standardized, including a combination of assisted visual inspection, cervical cytology and HPV detection; d regional community intervention must be set up to assess the effectiveness of using HPV detection as an strategy in addition to cervical cytology (pap smear; e the practice of colposcopy must be regulated to prevent the use of it in healthy women at a population level, thus preventing unnecessary diagnosis and treatment which not only are expensive but also causes unnecessary anxiety to women at risk; f the operation of those clinical laboratories using HPV as a detection strategy must likewise be accredited and regulated and g the CCSP program for assuring health care quality should meet the expectations of its beneficiaries, and increase the knowledge in cervical cancer related matters. Finally, though a variety of clinical tests on prophylactic and

  6. Optimal selection of space transportation fleet to meet multi-mission space program needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Montoya, Alex J.

    1989-01-01

    A space program that spans several decades will be comprised of a collection of missions such as low earth orbital space station, a polar platform, geosynchronous space station, lunar base, Mars astronaut mission, and Mars base. The optimal selection of a fleet of several recoverable and expendable launch vehicles, upper stages, and interplanetary spacecraft necessary to logistically establish and support these space missions can be examined by means of a linear integer programming optimization model. Such a selection must be made because the economies of scale which comes from producing large quantities of a few standard vehicle types, rather than many, will be needed to provide learning curve effects to reduce the overall cost of space transportation if these future missions are to be affordable. Optimization model inputs come from data and from vehicle designs. Each launch vehicle currently in existence has a launch history, giving rise to statistical estimates of launch reliability. For future, not-yet-developed launch vehicles, theoretical reliabilities corresponding to the maturity of the launch vehicles' technology and the degree of design redundancy must be estimated. Also, each such launch vehicle has a certain historical or estimated development cost, tooling cost, and a variable cost. The cost of a launch used in this paper includes the variable cost plus an amortized portion of the fixed and development costs. The integer linear programming model will have several constraint equations based on assumptions of mission mass requirements, volume requirements, and number of astronauts needed. The model will minimize launch vehicle logistic support cost and will select the most desirable launch vehicle fleet.

  7. Do programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people leaving prison meet their health and social support needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope; Lloyd, Jane E; Joshi, Chandni; Malera-Bandjalan, Kathy; Baldry, Eileen; McEntyre, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Juanita; Reath, Jennifer; Indig, Devon; Harris, Mark F

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this review was to synthesise evidence on the health and social support needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people leaving prison and on programs which aid successful community re-entry. A systematic literature review was undertaken of peer-reviewed and grey literature published between 2001 and 2013, focusing on the post-release needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and pre- and post-release programs. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have high health and social support needs on leaving prison. There is little literature evidence that re-entry programs commonly consider health needs, support linkages with primary care or Aboriginal Medical Services, or are designed in consideration of the particular needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In the absence of evaluative evidence on re-entry programs in this group, we have synthesised the best practice recommendations. Re-entry programs must be culturally competent in design and delivery, holistic, take a long-term view, involve families and communities, demonstrate interagency coordination and promote linkages between prison and community-based services. There is an urgent need for accessible pre- and post-release programs which meet the particular needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including their health needs. Programs must be flexible, comprehensive and accessible to those on remand or with short sentences. Stronger linkage with primary care and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health organisations is recommended. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Establishing physician to patient ratios and predicting workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology-oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Jacqueline M; Hand, Jack; Byron, Patricia; Strother, Douglas; Blanchette, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A Human Resources (HR) Committee of C17, the national network of Canadian academic pediatric hematology/oncology programs, obtained comprehensive data enabling analysis and planning for the physician workforce. This study establishes physician to patient ratios and predicts workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology programs. Over a 10-year period, six surveys were sent to the 17 pediatric tertiary care centers treating children with cancer and blood disorders. Data were obtained on physician demographics, full time equivalent (FTE) positions, and time spent in clinical, research, education, and administrative activities. Survey results were debated at the C17 national meetings to obtain consensus on workload ratios. Since 1999, the pediatric hematologist/oncologist workforce has increased from 71 FTE (43 oncology, 20 hematology, 8 BMT) to 109.5 FTE positions (69.7 oncology, 29.4 hematology, and 10.4 BMT). The median age of pediatric hematologists/oncologists increased from 46 years to 52 years and the male to female ratio changed from 1.8:1 to 0.9:1. The 2011 job profile showed the median time spent on activities was 60% clinical, 15% education, 15% research, and 10% administration. After assessing workload, models of care, and optimal physician FTE per program, the C17 HR Committee recommended a ratio of one oncologist per 15 newly diagnosed patients with malignancy and a ratio of one BMT physician per 15 transplants. For every 2.5 oncologists, a 1.0 hematologist is the minimum required. Physician staffing ratios for pediatric hematology/oncology programs have been established and should be adopted across Canadian academic institutions as a standard. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. Technical progress [in FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griem, H.

    1981-12-31

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs and in many cases these theoretical development helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, the authors summarize the technical progress in five major areas: (1) rf interaction with plasmas including wave propagation, rf heating, rf induced runaways and current drive; (2) spheromak -- formation, equilibrium, and stability; (3) stability of nonaxisymmetric systems (EBT, mirror, etc.); (4) stability theory of toroidal plasmas -- tokamak, RFP, etc.; and (5) nonlinear theory.

  10. Examining the response programming function of the Quiet Eye: Do tougher shots need a quieter eye?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters-Symons, Rosanna; Wilson, Mark; Klostermann, Andre; Vine, Samuel

    2017-10-23

    Support for the proposition that the Quiet Eye (QE) duration reflects a period of response programming (including task parameterisation) has come from research showing that an increase in task difficulty is associated with increases in QE duration. Here, we build on previous research by manipulating three elements of task difficulty that correspond with different parameters of golf-putting performance; force production, impact quality and target line. Longer QE durations were found for more complex iterations of the task and furthermore, more sensitive analyses of the QE duration suggest that the early QE proportion (prior to movement initiation) is closely related to force production and impact quality. However, these increases in QE do not seem functional in terms of supporting improved performance. Further research is needed to explore QE's relationship with performance under conditions of increased difficulty.

  11. The Needs of Primary English Teachers for an In-Service Teacher Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enisa Mede

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the needs of the primary English teachers at a private school about an in-service teacher training program. Under the light of former studies and literature, this study attempts to find out their needs on the predefined concepts namely, adaptation of teaching methods, emphasis on language skills, utilization of technology, classroom environment, instructional practices and material development. The differences between the needs of the participating teachers according to their grade level (K1-4 were examined as well. A sample of 60 primary English teachers working in private schools around different cities in Turkey participated in this study. Data were collected through a triangulated approach, in which questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and teacher diaries were administered to the participating teachers. The findings revealed except for the material development, the primary English teachers are in a high need of a design for an in-service training program on the predefined concepts. Besides, the only difference between the grade levels was in relation to the utilization of technology. These findings will serve as basis for the design of a new in-service teacher training program to meet their needs in the following academic years.Keywords: In-service teacher education, primary English language teachers, teacher needs, program design. İlköğretim Düzeyi İngilizce Öğretmenlerinin Hizmetiçi Eğitim Programlarına İlişkin İhtiyaçlarıÖzBu çalışma, ilköğretim düzeyi İngilizce öğretmenlerinin hizmetiçi eğitim ihtiyaçlarını yönelik ihtiyaçlarını belirlemeyi amaçlamaktadır. Önceden yapılan çalışmaların ışığında, bu çalışma öğretmenlerinin önceden belirlenmiş kavramlar olan öğretim yöntem ve tekniklerinin adaptasyonu, dil becerilerinin vurgulanması, teknolojinin kullanımı, sınıf ortamı, öğretimde uygulamalar ve materyal geliştirme

  12. Considering the needs of indigenous and local populations in conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Florent; Brondizio, Eduardo S

    2017-04-01

    Local rural and indigenous communities have assumed increasing responsibility for conservation within and between areas buffering the impacts of agricultural or resource-extraction zones and protected areas. Empowering local communities as central partners in conservation and climate-change mitigation has allowed many people to gain access to land and citizenship rights but has provided limited improvements in access to social services and economic opportunities even as expectation about their role as environmental stewards grows. These expectations, however, are inconsistent with reality. We conducted multiple field studies in Brazil since the mid-1980s to illustrate the discrepancies between conservation programs and local conditions and expectations. We suggest that public policies and conservation programs should not delegate responsibility for managing protected areas to local and indigenous communities without considering local needs and expectations and locals' attitudes toward conservation. In other words, behavior that maintains or improves the environment should not be treated as traditional based on the expectations of outsiders. Framing local populations as traditional environmentalists creates contradictions and frustrations for local populations and for conservation professionals and policy makers. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Training Needs Assessment to Design Empowerment Programs for Preventing Domestic Violence Against Iranian Married Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kianfard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The World Health Organization declared violence against women a top priority for health and emphasized the importance of the world's attention to the prevention and control programs. This study was conducted aimed to identify the training needs of married women referring to health centers in Ahvaz with the objective of enabling the design of a program to prevent violence. Methodology: This sectional study consisted of two qualitative and quantitative studies. In qualitative study, the opinions of 30 married women residing in Ahvaz were collected and analyzed in four focus group discussions. using a validated and reliable questionnaire, the knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy and performance of 320 married women in area of domestic violence were identified Findings: 79% of the women surveyed had adequate awareness about violence against women. 34% of the target group in the field of domestic violence against women has had the right attitude and more than 80% of them stated that violence by men is considered inevitable and natural. 89% of the target group expressed lack of efficacy for the prevention of domestic violence against women. The findings also suggest that there is significant relationship between education and early marriage with violent behavior. Conclusion: providing proper education and awareness to women and group discussion and clarification in order to change attitudes and increase efficacy in abused women against domestic violence are the necessary strategies which result in changing attitudes of women and increasing empowerment of women against domestic violence.

  14. Sleep technologists educational needs assessment: a survey of polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory therapy education program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Ellen; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assessed the community and educational needs for sleep technologists by surveying program directors of nationally accredited polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory care educational programs. Currently, little is known about our educational capacity and the need for advanced degrees for sleep medicine technical support. A questionnaire was developed about current and future community and educational needs for sleep technologists. The questionnaire was sent to directors of CAAHEP-accredited polysomnography and electroneurodiagnostic technology programs (associate degree and certificate programs), and directors of CoARC-accredited respiratory therapy associate degree and bachelor degree programs (n = 358). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via an internet survey tool. Data analysis was conducted with the IBM SPSS statistical package and included calculating means and standard deviations of the frequency of responses. Qualitative data was analyzed and classified based on emerging themes. One hundred seven of 408 program directors completed the survey. Seventy-four percent agreed that demand for qualified sleep technologists will increase, yet 50% of those surveyed believe there are not enough educational programs to meet the demand. Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed agreed that the educational requirements for sleep technologists will soon increase; 79% of those surveyed believe sleep centers have a need for technologists with advanced training or specialization. Our study shows educators of associate and certificate degree programs believe there is a need for a bachelor's degree in sleep science and technology.

  15. The practices and needs of dietitian in school lunch program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition-related problems among school-age children nowadays become potentially serious. In order to prevent obesity and other nutritionally related diseases in the young generation, a school lunch program has been proposed and conducted in Taiwan. It is to ensure that students' nutritional intake meets the daily requirement and to help students develop correct eating habits and maintain a healthy lifestyle. A professional dietitian who has a clear concept regarding food material utilization, cooking methods and nutritional values thus becomes important. However, the majority of schools in Taiwan are unable to offer the post of dietitian due to budgetary constraints and lack of organization. The responsibility of a dietitian is usually held by teachers, school nurses and other administrative staff. This problem has hindered the nutritional education in schools and made school lunches less beneficial to the children's nutritional needs. For the current status of dietitians in schools, a large gap is found between the currently supplied school lunches and the nutritionally standardized school lunches. It also exists in relation to education and hygiene. One of the solutions requires an infrastructure to support plans and policy, reasonable adequate budget, well human affairs establishment and coordination of all aspects. While the needed infrastructure is being proposed, an access to the professionalism of the currently employed dietitians can be strategically explored by constructing an education system. Through the system, schools without on-campus dietitians will be able to utilize their expertise with which the improvement of school lunches can be expectedly accomplished.

  16. Tailoring a graduate nurse program to meet the needs of our next generation nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubit, Katrina A; Ryan, Brigid

    2011-01-01

    Graduate Nurse (GN) transition into clinical practice is recognised by nursing academics and clinicians alike as being problematic on a number of levels, particularly around GN support. The general consensus is that Graduate Nurse Programs (GNP) provided by health care organisations are the most effective strategy for providing support to GN during their first 12months in clinical practice. This study reports on the redevelopment of an existing GNP in response to GN feedback. The new GNP incorporated specific strategies to meet the needs of the newest cohort of Graduate Nurses - Generation Y. Evaluation of the new GNP was undertaken through on-line surveys and two focus groups. The findings confirmed that GNs continue to experience stress and anxiety during their first year, but this can be mitigated by participation in a formal GNP which has a strong focus on support and socialisation. Further, by directing attention toward meeting some of the more specific needs of Generation Y GNs the retention of this valuable resource can be increased. In 2009, the retention of GN for the 12months following completion of the GDP was 88% compared to 64% in 2008. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Matching user needs to technology in dementia care: experiences with the Alma Supervisor Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torhild Holthe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of individuals with dementia in Norway is more than 78,000, and, as in all other European countries, this figure is expected to rise over the coming decades. The Norwegian Health Directorate encourages municipalities to make use of ‘welfare technology’ in order to contribute to independent living and quality of life in older adults, to increase the quality of community health care, to save time when providing community health services and to reduce costs, e.g. admission to a nursing home. Introducing welfare technology to care recipients requires innovation on the part of the community health care service with regard to increasing the competency of the staff in the operation of the technologies, as well as in establishing an infrastructure for ‘digital communication’. Research has shown that access to assistive technology may support individuals with mild cognitive impairments, as well as in an early phase of dementia. However, it is crucial that the technology addresses an identified need, and that the device is tailored to the person’s preferences and context. Therefore, it is important to train health professionals to assess the user’s needs and preferences and to identify resources and limitations in the particular context. Alma’s House in Oslo is a demonstration site and education center for welfare technologies. The education program for the certification of Alma supervisors has become an important strategy in educating occupational therapists (OTs and nurses on how to assess user needs, identify appropriate technology and implement this into the care recipient’s home.

  18. Aligning Needs, Expectations, and Learning Outcomes to Sustain Self-Efficacy through Transfer Learning Community Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptien, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses strengths and difficulties encountered in implementing transfer learning community models and how efficacy is supported through transfer learning community programming. Transfer programming best practices and recommendations for program improvements are presented.

  19. CATAL: an experimental program for the automation of a specialized library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, R.

    1981-12-31

    A description is given of an experimental program for automated information retrieval at the Physics Institute of the University of Catania, Italy. Studies are made of optimizing data retrieval time, and descriptions are given of the semantic contents of individual monographs by the use of the universal decimal classification. 6 figures.

  20. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Key Navy Programs' Compliance with DOD's Federated Business Enterprise Architecture Needs to be Adequately Demonstrated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hite, Randolph C; Lakhmani, Neela; Barkakati, Nabajyoti; Doherty, Neil; Glover, Nancy; Longcore, Emily; Holland, Michael; Le, Anh; Leiling, Josh; McCracken, Lee; Srikanth, Sushmita

    2008-01-01

    .... In particular, the programs BEA compliance assessments did not: * Include all relevant architecture products, such as products that specify the technical standards needed to promote interoperability among related systems...

  1. How needs and preferences of employees influence participation in health promotion programs: A six-month follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rongen (Anne); S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); W. van Ginkel (Wouter); D. Lindeboom; M. Pet (Martin); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Low participation in health promotion programs (HPPs) might hamper their effectiveness. A potential reason for low participation is disagreement between needs and preferences of potential participants and the actual HPPs offered. This study aimed to investigate employees'

  2. Effects of a new experimental training program on V.O2max and running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporis, G; Ruzic, L; Leko, G

    2008-06-01

    By testing the V.O(2max) and running performance in soccer players, the purpose of the study was to determine whether an experimental conditioning program would elicit better effects than the widely used traditional program, especially across longer distances. Laboratory measurements of maximal oxygen consumption and maximal heart rate were performed on 48 soccer players (U19) from two first league soccer teams (Experimental team, n=24; Control team n=24). Exercise intensities were calculated from heart rate maximum. Detailed training programs for both the experimental and control groups were designed for the 13-week period. The main intervention was performed in the conditioning phase where the control group performed traditional conditioning (straight-line running, with stretching exercises in the break) and the experimental group underwent a conditioning training program on designed polygon, very much akin to a real game situation; sprint-runs with or without the ball and rapid changes in direction. During the 20, 40 or 60m sprint-run the players had to perform specific ball drills depending on marked polygon station. Running performance at 60, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1200, 2 400 m distances and V.O(2max) were tested in the initial, transitory (week 6) and final trials. Significant improvement in 200, 400, 800, 1200, 2 400 m running performance and V.O(2max) (Ptrial. However, in this group the gained improvements quickly disappeared after the beginning of the competitive season as recorded at the final trial. Discriminant analysis revealed that the groups differed the most in the 200 m variable. The new experimental program is better suited for the enhancement of V.O(2max) and running performance in soccer players and the gained improvement lasted well into the competition season.

  3. An experimental program for physical education of rugby players at the stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Martyrosyan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a program of general physical training of rugby players at the stage of specialized basic training and to investigate the dynamics of indicators of general physical preparedness using computer technology. Material & Methods: study involved 60 athletes aged 16-18 years. Results: content of the comprehensive program of general physical training of rugby athletes at the stage of specialized basic training and the results of an experimental verification of its implementation are presented. Conclusion: in the course of the pedagogical experiment, the effectiveness of using the developed experimental program for improving the training process of rugby players of 16-18 years is proved, which is confirmed by the results of the research.

  4. Work-Experience and Work-Study Programs for Students with Special Needs: Quality Indicators of Transition Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Lech A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This article proposes a continuum of employment training options for students with special needs and identifies program quality indicators in the areas of assessment and the Individual Education Plan; the employment training program; community-based settings; provisions for on-site training and evaluation; and interagency cooperation. (DB)

  5. Volunteer Activities and Their Relationship to Motivational Needs: A Study of the Stamp Union Program Research Report 18-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balenger, Victoria J.; And Others

    Volunteer student union programming board members at the University of Maryland, College Park were asked to designate the five programming board activities or experiences that they considered to be the most appealing. Activities and experiences had been previously rated according to how they met motivational needs for achievement, affiliation, or…

  6. Vaccines for Children: Reexamination of Program Goals and Implementation Needed to Ensure Vaccination. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    This report presents: (1) a review of the evidence that vaccine cost has prevented children from being immunized on time; (2) an evaluation of the implementation of the Vaccines For Children (VFC) program, including whether this program, as implemented, is likely to meet the needs of the under-immunized children; and (3) some options for improving…

  7. Social cohesion through football: a quasi-experimental mixed methods design to evaluate a complex health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Sally; Bunde-Birouste, Anne; Evers, Clifton; Kemp, Lynn; MacKenzie, Julie; Henley, Robert

    2010-10-05

    Social isolation and disengagement fragments local communities. Evidence indicates that refugee families are highly vulnerable to social isolation in their countries of resettlement. Research to identify approaches to best address this is needed. Football United is a program that aims to foster social inclusion and cohesion in areas with high refugee settlement in New South Wales, Australia, through skills and leadership development, mentoring, and the creation of links with local community and corporate leaders and organisations. The Social Cohesion through Football study's broad goal is to examine the implementation of a complex health promotion program, and to analyse the processes involved in program implementation. The study will consider program impact on individual health and wellbeing, social inclusion and cohesion, as well as analyse how the program by necessity interacts and adapts to context during implementation, a concept we refer to as plasticity. The proposed study will be the first prospective cohort impact study to our knowledge to assess the impact of a comprehensive integrated program using football as a vehicle for fostering social inclusion and cohesion in communities with high refugee settlement. A quasi-experimental cohort study design with treatment partitioning involving four study sites. The study employs a 'dose response' model, comparing those with no involvement in the Football United program with those with lower or higher levels of participation. A range of qualitative and quantitative measures will be used in the study. Study participants' emotional well being, resilience, ethnic identity and other group orientation, feelings of social inclusion and belonging will be measured using a survey instrument complemented by relevant data drawn from in-depth interviews, self reporting measures and participant observation. The views of key informants from the program and the wider community will also be solicited. The complexity of the

  8. Social cohesion through football: a quasi-experimental mixed methods design to evaluate a complex health promotion program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemp Lynn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Social isolation and disengagement fragments local communities. Evidence indicates that refugee families are highly vulnerable to social isolation in their countries of resettlement. Research to identify approaches to best address this is needed. Football United is a program that aims to foster social inclusion and cohesion in areas with high refugee settlement in New South Wales, Australia, through skills and leadership development, mentoring, and the creation of links with local community and corporate leaders and organisations. The Social Cohesion through Football study's broad goal is to examine the implementation of a complex health promotion program, and to analyse the processes involved in program implementation. The study will consider program impact on individual health and wellbeing, social inclusion and cohesion, as well as analyse how the program by necessity interacts and adapts to context during implementation, a concept we refer to as plasticity. The proposed study will be the first prospective cohort impact study to our knowledge to assess the impact of a comprehensive integrated program using football as a vehicle for fostering social inclusion and cohesion in communities with high refugee settlement. Methods/design A quasi-experimental cohort study design with treatment partitioning involving four study sites. The study employs a 'dose response' model, comparing those with no involvement in the Football United program with those with lower or higher levels of participation. A range of qualitative and quantitative measures will be used in the study. Study participants' emotional well being, resilience, ethnic identity and other group orientation, feelings of social inclusion and belonging will be measured using a survey instrument complemented by relevant data drawn from in-depth interviews, self reporting measures and participant observation. The views of key informants from the program and the wider community will

  9. Assessing the needs of residency program directors to meet the ACGME general competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Jeanne K; Allen, Ruth M; Clardy, James

    2002-07-01

    New accreditation requirements for residency training programs require residents to have educational experiences that allow them to demonstrate competency in the following areas: (1) patient care, (2) medical knowledge, (3) practice-based learning and improvement, (4) interpersonal and communication skills, (5) professionalism, and (6) systems-based practice. Residents' competence must be assessed with dependable measures. Residency training program directors (PDs) need assistance in complying with these new requirements. Using a survey modified from Michigan State University, we asked PDs to rate their current understanding of and preparation for the general competencies and to provide written comments. PDs of the 47 ACGME-accredited programs received e-mailed instructions to complete the Web-based survey. Twenty-four PDs (51%) complied by the deadline. The mean ratings were calculated from a five-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, major impediment or least useful, 5 = strongly agree, not an impediment, or most useful). PDs felt they were informed (3.45) and understood (3.67) the requirements, but they were not well prepared to meet them (2.95). The perceived impediments to implementation included amount of PD time (2.27), amount of residents' protected time for the curriculum (2.30), amount of residency support staff (2.73), lack of expertise in curriculum development (2.73) and evaluation (2.41), and lack of funding for resources other than personnel (2.91). PDs rated types of assistance that would be helpful: developing workshops or presentations on curriculum development and evaluation techniques (3.82), developing curricula (4.14), providing one-on-one consultation (4.23), receiving examples of materials, methods, and ideas from other programs (4.41), and describing evaluation methods/instruments (4.50). Written comments stated that time to concentrate on the topic, release time from clinical responsibilities, and technical computer support would be helpful

  10. The efficacy of social-influence prevention programs versus "standard care": are new initiatives needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ary, D V; Biglan, A; Glasgow, R; Zoref, L; Black, C; Ochs, L; Severson, H; Kelly, R; Weissman, W; Lichtenstein, E

    1990-06-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a school-based smoking prevention program after 1 year, using school (22 middle/elementary schools, 15 high schools) as both the unit of randomization and the unit of analysis. The multigrade level (grades 6 through 9) intervention was designed to address comprehensively the social influence factors that encourage smoking. Teacher survey data indicated that treatment schools had a median of 10 classroom sessions devoted to tobacco/drug use education, 5 of which were the sessions designed for this evaluation, and control schools had also dedicated a median of 10 classroom sessions to tobacco/drug education. Thus, the study evaluated the incremental effects of the social influence intervention compared to "standard-care" curricula. Among those who reported smoking one or more cigarettes in the month prior to the intervention, there was a significant treatment effect on rate of smoking at one year, but no grade level, gender, or interaction effects. The 1-year covariate-adjusted smoking rate among pretest smokers in the treatment schools was 76.6 cigarettes per month, compared to 111.6 cigarettes per month in control schools, a 31.4% difference. These effects were not accounted for by differential subject attrition. The analyses for nonsmokers, however, showed no significant effects, and the program did not affect self-reported alcohol or marijuana use. Taken together with the results of other prevention studies, these results point to the need for the development and evaluation of new initiatives to prevent substance use.

  11. BIM and Sustainability Education: Incorporating Instructional Needs into Curriculum Planning in CEM Programs Accredited by ACCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher education ought to support the identification of training needs for industrial building information modelling (BIM curriculum development and sustainability education in the fields of civil engineering and management (CEM. This paper proposes a framework based on a four-phase step-by-step quality function deployment (QFD application for CEM curriculum planning and quality management. The framework attempts to respond to requests collected from 17 professionals and professors in order to integrate BIM into the higher education curriculum in China with a specific focus on construction management programs accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE. The entropy method and a K1–K6 scale adapted from Bloom’s revised cognitive process were employed to evaluate the CEM curriculum in QFD. The proposed framework was successfully applied to CEM curriculum planning, which included two curriculums of the four main knowledge areas provided by the Chinese CEM guidelines: construction cost and flow construction. Two curriculum areas showed that content should focus on knowledge such as (a Program evaluation and review technique(PERT planning; (b construction optimization in flow construction; (c principles of bill of quantities and (d construction consumption in construction costs. As for teaching quality management in China, the higher education curriculum should focus on three aspects to promote curriculum integration: (a pedagogical design; (b teaching resource and material and (c curriculum assessment. This research sheds light on the pedagogical shift to a similar context that has established guidelines accredited by the ACCE, with respect to reviewing curriculum planning from a knowledge system perspective in order to meet industrial demands at the operational level.

  12. Lacunae in noncommunicable disease control program: Need to focus on adherence issues!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarundeep Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic non communicable diseases in India have increased in magnitude with earlier onset and more likelihood of complications. Much emphasis is given to early diagnosis and timely treatment. Additionally, tertiary prevention through medication adherence is needed to limit disability and prevent early onset of complications. This study was aimed to assess the magnitude of medication and lifestyle adherence among elderly patients suffering from diabetes and hypertension in rural areas of Punjab. Methodology: This was a clinic based study in district Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab. Patients were subjected to regular blood pressure and blood glucose monitoring. Thereafter they were offered free medications through weekly clinic held at Community Health Center, Bassi Pathana. Along with treatment, Public Health Nurse conducted counselling on diet and lifestyle. Frequency and process of taking medications was explained in local language and records duly maintained during visits. Results: Nearly 70% of study subjects were more than 50 years old. Males constituted 26% of the sample and 60% of subjects were illiterate. Large majority of study subjects did not consumed tobacco (98.08% or alcohol (89.42% in past thirty days. In-sufficient physical activity and poor compliance to diet was reported by 10.5% (Males: 7.4%, Females: 11.7% and 23.5% (Males: 31.5%, Females: 20.8% subjects. Nearly 46.15% of study subjects reported missing prescribed medications. Nearly 61.54% of study subjects were very sure that they will be able to take medicines as directed by physician. Conclusion: National Program for Control of Diabetes, Cardio-vascular Disease and Stroke relies on early diagnosis and treatment non- communicable diseases. However, with reported levels of adherence to medication and lifestyle interventions, there is an urgent need of exploring innovative ways to ensure compliance and improve treatment outcomes.

  13. Development of a Canadian deceased donation education program for health professionals: a needs assessment survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jennifer; Shemie, Sam D; Lotherington, Ken; Appleby, Amber; Hall, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to determine how Canadian healthcare professionals perceive their deficiencies and educational requirements related to organ and tissue donation. We surveyed 641 intensive care unit (ICU) physicians, 1,349 ICU nurses, 1,561 emergency room (ER) physicians, and 1,873 ER nurses. The survey was distributed by the national organization for each profession (the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the National Emergency Nurses Association). Canadian Blood Services developed the critical care physician list in collaboration with the Canadian Critical Care Society. Survey development included questions related to comfort with, and knowledge of, key competencies in organ and tissue donation. Eight hundred thirty-one (15.3%) of a possible 5,424 respondents participated in the survey. Over 50% of respondents rated the following topics as highly important: knowledge of general organ and tissue donation, neurological determination of death, donation after cardiac death, and medical-legal donation issues. High competency comfort levels ranged from 14.7-50.9% for ICU nurses and 8.0-34.6% for ER nurses. Competency comfort levels were higher for ICU physicians (67.5-85.6%) than for ER physicians who rated all competencies lower. Respondents identified a need for a curriculum on national organ donation and preferred e-learning as the method of education. Both ICU nurses and ER practitioners expressed low comfort levels with their competencies regarding organ donation. Intensive care unit physicians had a much higher level of comfort; however, the majority of these respondents were specialty trained and working in academic centres with active donation and transplant programs. A national organ donation curriculum is needed.

  14. Why are you here? Needs analysis of an interprofessional health-education graduate degree program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cable C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Christian Cable,1,2 Mary Knab,3,4 Kum Ying Tham,5,6 Deborah D Navedo,3 Elizabeth Armstrong3,7,81Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, 2Texas A&M University Health Science Center, TAMHSC College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, 3MGH Institute of Health Professions, 4Physical and Occupational Therapy Services Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 5Emergency Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7Harvard Macy Institute, 8Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Little is known about the nature of faculty development that is needed to meet calls for a focus on quality and safety with particular attention to the power of interprofessional collaborative practice. Through grounded-theory methodology, the authors describe the motivation and needs of 20 educator/clinicians in multiple disciplines who chose to enroll in an explicitly interprofessional master's program in health profession education. The results, derived from axial coding described by Strauss and Corbin, revealed that faculty pursue such postprofessional master's degrees out of a desire to be better prepared for their roles as educators. A hybrid-delivery model on campus and online provided access to graduate degrees while protecting the ability of participants to remain in current positions. The added benefit of a community of practice related to evidence-based and innovative models of education was valued by participants. Authentic, project-based learning and assessment supported their advancement in home institutions and systems. The experience was described by participants as a disruptive innovation that helped them attain their goal of leadership in health profession education.Keywords: health education

  15. Identification of the Competencies Needed to Apply Social Marketing to Extension Programming: Results of a Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.; Stubbs, Eric; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Huynh, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the specific competencies needed to apply social marketing, a promising approach to behavior change, to Extension programming. A modified Delphi study was used to achieve group consensus among a panel of experts on the skills, characteristics, and knowledge needed to successfully apply this behavior change…

  16. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  17. Tailoring an educational program on the AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators to meet stakeholder needs: lessons learned in the VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Marlena H; Rivard, Peter E; Shwartz, Michael; Borzecki, Ann; Yaksic, Enzo; Stolzmann, Kelly; Zubkoff, Lisa; Rosen, Amy K

    2018-02-14

    Given that patient safety measures are increasingly used for public reporting and pay-for performance, it is important for stakeholders to understand how to use these measures for improvement. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are one particularly visible set of measures that are now used primarily for public reporting and pay-for-performance among both private sector and Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals. This trend generates a strong need for stakeholders to understand how to interpret and use the PSIs for quality improvement (QI). The goal of this study was to develop an educational program and tailor it to stakeholders' needs. In this paper, we share what we learned from this program development process. Our study population included key VA stakeholders involved in reviewing performance reports and prioritizing and initiating quality/safety initiatives. A pre-program formative evaluation through telephone interviews and web-based surveys assessed stakeholders' educational needs/interests. Findings from the formative evaluation led to development and implementation of a cyberseminar-based program, which we tailored to stakeholders' needs/interests. A post-program survey evaluated program participants' perceptions about the PSI educational program. Interview data confirmed that the concepts we had developed for the interviews could be used for the survey. Survey results informed us on what program delivery mode and content topics were of high interest. Six cyberseminars were developed-three of which focused on two content areas that were noted of greatest interest: learning how to use PSIs for monitoring trends and understanding how to interpret PSIs. We also used snapshots of VA PSI reports so that participants could directly apply learnings. Although initial interest in the program was high, actual attendance was low. However, post-program survey results indicated that perceptions about the

  18. Security, Dignity, Caring Relationships, and Meaningful Work: Needs Motivating Participation in a Job-Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Miller-Dyce, Cherrel; Carlone, David

    2008-01-01

    Researchers asked 17 participants in a job-training program to describe their personal struggles following an economic restructuring. Examined through a critical theoretical lens, findings indicate that the learners enrolled in the program to reclaim security, dignity, meaningful work, and caring relationships. Program planners at community…

  19. Progress report of a research program in experimental high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Cutts, D.

    1990-07-01

    An experimental program in strong and electro-weak interaction physics of elementary particles is being carried out using electronic detection techniques. Experiments have been performed at Brown, Brookhaven, and Fermilab. The work described in this report by the Electronic Detector Group addresses the following: neutrino interactions and intrinsic properties, preparations for experiments ( D--ZERO'') at the FNAL 2 TeV {bar p}p Collider, new detection techniques for neutrino properties.

  20. Analysis and presentation of experimental results with examples, problems and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulides, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a guide to the analysis and presentation of experimental results. It develops various techniques for the numerical processing of experimental data, using basic statistical methods and the theory of errors. After presenting basic theoretical concepts, the book describes the methods by which the results can be presented, both numerically and graphically. The book is divided into three parts, of roughly equal length, addressing the theory, the analysis of data, and the presentation of results. Examples are given and problems are solved using the Excel, Origin, Python and R software packages. In addition, programs in all four languages are made available to readers, allowing them to use them in analyzing and presenting the results of their own experiments. Subjects are treated at a level appropriate for undergraduate students in the natural sciences, but this book should also appeal to anyone whose work involves dealing with experimental results.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION ON MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MALE PUPILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevenka Zrnzević

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The research purpose was to determine the effects of the experimental program of physical education on morphological characteristics of male pupils from the first-grade of primary school. The experimental program was carried out on the sample of 50 male pupils of the primary schools in Leposavic and Zvecan, age of 7 years ± 6 months. Morphological characteristics were estimated according to 13 variables (body height, total arm length, leg length, biacromial diameter, biiliocristal diameter, wrist width, chest circum ference, upper arm circum ference, upper leg circum ference, triceps skin fold, subscapular skin fold, abdomen skin fold and body mass. The results of the research were processed through standard procedures and basic descriptive parameters were calculated, and variations were determined using multi-variable analysis of variance (MAN′s and uni-variable analysis of variance (AN′s. Multivariable analysis of variance showed a significant statistic difference in morphological characteristics showed at initial and final measuring. On the basis of the results and discussion, it can be concluded that the experimental program has statistically significant effects on the changes of some morphological characteristics.

  2. Experimental Models of Maternal Obesity and Neuroendocrine Programming of Metabolic Disorders in Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. Reynolds

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies have clearly shown that disease risk in later life is increased following a poor early life environment, a process preferentially termed developmental programming. In particular, this work clearly highlights the importance of the nutritional environment during early development with alterations in maternal nutrition, including both under- and overnutrition, increasing the risk for a range of cardiometabolic and neurobehavioral disorders in adult offspring characterized by both adipokine resistance and obesity. Although the mechanistic basis for such developmental programming is not yet fully defined, a common feature derived from experimental animal models is that of alterations in the wiring of the neuroendocrine pathways that control energy balance and appetite regulation during early stages of developmental plasticity. The adipokine leptin has also received significant attention with clear experimental evidence that normal regulation of leptin levels during the early life period is critical for the normal development of tissues and related signaling pathways that are involved in metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. There is also increasing evidence that alterations in the epigenome and other underlying mechanisms including an altered gut–brain axis may contribute to lasting cardiometabolic dysfunction in offspring. Ongoing studies that further define the mechanisms between these associations will allow for identification of early risk markers and implementation of strategies around interventions that will have obvious beneficial implications in breaking a programmed transgenerational cycle of metabolic disorders.

  3. Energy Efficiency Finance Programs: Use Case Analysis to Define Data Needs and Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Larsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kramer, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    There are over 200 energy efficiency loan programs—across 49 U.S. states—administered by utilities, state/local government agencies, or private lenders.1 This distributed model has led to significant variation in program design and implementation practices including how data is collected and used. The challenge of consolidating and aggregating data across independently administered programs has been illustrated by a recent pilot of an open source database for energy efficiency financing program data. This project was led by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the Investor Confidence Project, the Clean Energy Finance Center (CEFC), and the University of Chicago. This partnership discussed data collection practices with a number of existing energy efficiency loan programs and identified four programs that were suitable and willing to participate in the pilot database (Diamond 2014).2 The partnership collected information related to ~12,000 loans with an aggregate value of ~$100M across the four programs. Of the 95 data fields collected across the four programs, 30 fields were common between two or more programs and only seven data fields were common across all programs. The results of that pilot study illustrate the inconsistencies in current data definition and collection practices among energy efficiency finance programs and may contribute to certain barriers.

  4. Industrial demand-side management programs: What`s happened, what works, what`s needed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, J.A.; Nadel, S.M. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-03-01

    In order to analyze experience to date with industrial demand-side management (DSM), a survey of utilities was conducted and a database of industrial DSM programs was prepared. More than eighty utilities and third-party organizations were interviewed. Data were collected via phone, fax, and/or mail from the utilities and entered into a database. In order to limit the scope of this study, the database contains incentive-based, energy-saving programs and not load management or information-only programs (including technical assistance programs). Programs in the database were divided into four categories: two ``prescriptive rebate`` categories and two ``custom rebate`` categories. The database contains 31 incentive-based, energy-saving industrial DSM programs offered by 17 utilities. The appendix to this report summarizes the results approximately 60 industrial DSM programs. Most of the programs included in the appendix, but not in the database, are either C&I programs for which commercial and industrial data were not disaggregated or new industrial DSM programs for which data are not yet available.

  5. Report: Environmental Job Training Program Implemented Well, But Focus Needed on Possible Duplication With Other EPA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0843, September 21, 2012. EPA effectively established and adhered to competitive criteria that resulted in the selection of job training proposals that addressed the broad goals of the Environmental Job Training program.

  6. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freigburghaus Franziska

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy. The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Methods Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists. Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Results Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents. A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. Conclusion In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and

  7. A Study of School Feeding Programs: I. Economic Eligibility and Nutritional Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Lillian; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Family income and size are presently used to determine children's eligibility for free school lunches. The need exists for the development of other criteria (such as nutritional data) to include all children whose diets need improving. (DM)

  8. Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engines /QCSEE/ - A technology development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    NASA's QCSEE Program (Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine) performed by the General Electric Company covers a wide range of advanced propulsion technology features applicable to future subsonic engine concepts. These technology features are combined into two engine and nacelle configurations for demonstration of program goals. This paper presents descriptions of two engine/nacelle configurations and shows the flow of technology developed in component programs into the configurations. The under-the-wing (UTW) configuration, featuring major innovative and advanced components, such as a large variable pitch fan and a composite material integrated engine and nacelle structure, has been tested at General Electric's Peebles, Ohio test facility. The key characteristics of the engine as observed from the initial test series are presented.

  9. The Iraq Community Action Program: USAID’s Agreement with CHF Met Goals, but Greater Oversight Is Needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION THE IRAQ COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAM: USAID’S AGREEMENT WITH CHF MET...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Iraq Community Action Program: USAID’s Agreement with CHF Met Goals, but Greater Oversight Is Needed 5a...for International Development (USAID) has obligated about $276 million to Cooperative Housing Foundation International ( CHF ) to implement the

  10. Examining the Need for Chinese Language Programs in Mid-Atlantic Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhey, Ruth Ann Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Public education reform designed for K-12 and higher education exists to transform teaching and learning within the United States in order to graduate today's student. One specific initiative on the federal, state, and local levels is the implementation of Chinese language programs. Some of the Chinese language programs in the K-12 education…

  11. Visual Basic Programming Impact on Cognitive Style of College Students: Need for Prerequisites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Garry L.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the impact learning a visual programming language, Visual Basic, has on hemispheric cognitive style, as measured by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator (HMI). The question to be answered is: will a computer programming course help students improve their cognitive abilities in order to perform well? The cognitive styles for…

  12. Evaluating a New and Aspiring County Extension Director Leadership Education Program: Determining Outcomes and Needed Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Owen, Mitchel; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    This leadership education evaluation study explored the leadership development outcomes of potential county extension directors and the ways to improve the program. The leadership education program aimed to improve participants' leadership abilities in understanding self, building relationships and managing resources. The analysis of quantitative…

  13. What Workplace Education Programs Need To Know about Behavioral Change: Tapping the Work of Kurt Lewin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Mary Crabbe

    Kurt Lewin's seminal work in organizational communication could potentially help solve many dilemmas faced by workplace literacy programs as they attempt to ensure that program participants not only learn basic skills but also use them in the context of work. According to Lewin's "field theory" approach, an individual's behavior is a…

  14. The Actuality, Inefficiency, and Needs of EFL Teacher-Preparation Programs in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Salim Al-Seghayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing an effective English-teacher-preparation program and the provision of providing ongoing support and professional development opportunities are key compounding factors in preparing knowledgeable and competent English teachers linguistically and pedagogically as well as in facilitating their professional growth throughout their mammoth teaching journeys. This paper presents an in-depth discussion of the current training available to Saudi English teachers and reviews the changes that English-teacher-preparation programs have undergone over the years. Then, a pre-service and in-service teacher-preparation program will be proposed in addition to a continuing professional development program for Saudi EFL teachers. Finally, a number of key issues will be highlighted to ensure the effectiveness of the proposed training program.

  15. Rural After-School Programs: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Youth and Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany L. Letiecq

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Extant research has focused on out-of-school time among urban and suburban youth, yet there remains scant information on rural low-income youth and their families. This study examines the salience of after-school programs for rural youth. Using an ecological framework, we assess changes in youth behavior and skill acquisition based on reports from 47 youth attending after-school programs in two rural communities, along with their primary caregivers and teachers. Results indicate enhanced life skills and social behaviors among youth attendees. Implications for future research, programming, and policymaking are discussed.

  16. Help Wanted: American Drone Program Needs Multifaceted Support to be Effective

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, S

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. drone program in Pakistan faces strong resistance in Pakistan. Because the program solely seeks to eliminate terrorist groups and leaders through bombing campaigns, with no built in social support, the local population’s anti-American sentiment has reached the highest level in history. This angry mood against U.S. drone programs is spreading throughout the Islamic world. To counter this anti-American sentiment, and increase the drone program’s effectiveness, the U.S. must invest in m...

  17. A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students Utilizing the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaki, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Shigeta; Kojima, Yoichiro; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Yoshizawa, Kousuke; Tada, Mitsuhiro

    Since 2005, Tomakomai National College of Technology has been conducting “A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students” , in which the students actively challenged to resolve technical problems of local companies through internships and graduation researches. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. It has been revealed that the program is practical and effective engineering education for the students, i.e. “Future Engineers” . In addition, it leads to the revitalization of local companies which carried out collaborative researches with the participating students.

  18. A meta-analysis of experimental studies of diversion programs for juvenile offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Craig S; Gearing, Robin E; MacKenzie, Michael J; Brewer, Kathryne B; Ibrahim, Rawan

    2012-02-01

    Research to establish an evidence-base for the treatment of conduct problems and delinquency in adolescence is well established; however, an evidence-base for interventions with offenders who are diverted from the juvenile justice system has yet to be synthesized. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of experimental studies testing juvenile diversion programs and to examine the moderating effect of program type and implementation quality. A literature search using PsycINFO, Web of Science, and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service data-bases and research institute websites yielded 28 eligible studies involving 57 experimental comparisons and 19,301 youths. Recidivism was the most common outcome reported across all studies. Overall, the effect of diversion programs on recidivism was non-significant (k=45, OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.43-1.58). Of the five program types identified, including case management (k=18, OR=0.78), individual treatment (k=11, OR=0.83), family treatment (k=4, OR=0.57), youth court (k=6, OR=0.93), and restorative justice (k=6, OR=0.87), only family treatment led to a statistically significant reduction in recidivism. Restorative justice studies that were implemented with active involvement of researchers led to statistically significant reductions in recidivism (k=3, OR=0.69). Other outcomes, including frequency of offending, truancy, and psycho-social problems were reported infrequently and were not subjected to meta-analysis. High levels of heterogeneity characterize diversion research. Results of this study recommend against implementation of programs limited to case management and highlight the promise of family interventions and restorative justice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Andrews’ Principles of Risk, Need, and Responsivity as Applied in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs: Meta-Analysis of Crime and Drug Use Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Michael L.; Pearson, Frank S.; Podus, Deborah; Hamilton, Zachary K.; Greenwell, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to answer the question: Can the Andrews principles of risk, needs, and responsivity, originally developed for programs that treat offenders, be extended to programs that treat drug abusers? Methods Drawing from a dataset that included 243 independent comparisons, we conducted random-effects meta-regression and ANOVA-analog meta-analyses to test the Andrews principles by averaging crime and drug use outcomes over a diverse set of programs for drug abuse problems. Results For crime outcomes, in the meta-regressions the point estimates for each of the principles were substantial, consistent with previous studies of the Andrews principles. There was also a substantial point estimate for programs exhibiting a greater number of the principles. However, almost all of the 95% confidence intervals included the zero point. For drug use outcomes, in the meta-regressions the point estimates for each of the principles was approximately zero; however, the point estimate for programs exhibiting a greater number of the principles was somewhat positive. All of the estimates for the drug use principles had confidence intervals that included the zero point. Conclusions This study supports previous findings from primary research studies targeting the Andrews principles that those principles are effective in reducing crime outcomes, here in meta-analytic research focused on drug treatment programs. By contrast, programs that follow the principles appear to have very little effect on drug use outcomes. Primary research studies that experimentally test the Andrews principles in drug treatment programs are recommended. PMID:24058325

  20. Report: EPA Improved Its National Security Information Program, but Some Improvements Still Needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-P-0196, June 2, 2016. The EPA will continue to improve its national security information program by completing information classification guides that can be used uniformly and consistently throughout the agency.

  1. Civilian Marksmanship Program Corporation Needs to Fully Comply With the Law on Sales of Firearms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... As required by the Fiscal Year 1996 National Defense Authorization Act, the program was to be transitioned from the Army to the private, nonprofit Corporation for the Promotion of Rifle Practice...

  2. The fetal programming of food preferences: current clinical and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Molle, R; Bischoff, A R; Portella, A K; Silveira, P P

    2015-09-28

    Increased energy consumption is one of the major factors implicated in the epidemic of obesity. There is compelling evidence, both clinical and experimental, that fetal paucity of nutrients may have programming effects on feeding preferences and behaviors that can contribute to the development of diseases. Clinical studies in different age groups show that individuals born small for their gestational age (SGA) have preferences towards highly caloric foods such as carbohydrates and fats. Some studies have also shown altered eating behaviors in SGA children. Despite an apparent discrepancy in different age groups, all studies seem to converge to an increased intake of palatable foods in SGA individuals. Small nutrient imbalances across lifespan increase the risk of noncommunicable diseases in adult life. Homeostatic factors such as altered responses to leptin and insulin and alterations in neuropeptides associated with appetite and satiety are likely involved. Imbalances between homeostatic and hedonic signaling are another proposed mechanism, with the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathway having differential reward and pleasure responses when facing palatable foods. Early exposure to undernutrition also programs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with SGA having higher levels of cortisol in different ages, leading to chronic hyperactivity of this neuroendocrine axis. This review summarizes the clinical and experimental evidence related to fetal programming of feeding preferences by SGA.

  3. Rural After-School Programs: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Youth and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Bethany L. Letiecq; Sandra J. Bailey; Julie A. Keller

    2007-01-01

    Extant research has focused on out-of-school time among urban and suburban youth, yet there remains scant information on rural low-income youth and their families. This study examines the salience of after-school programs for rural youth. Using an ecological framework, we assess changes in youth behavior and skill acquisition based on reports from 47 youth attending after-school programs in two rural communities, along with their primary caregivers and teachers. Results indicate enhanced life...

  4. The French human biomonitoring program: First lessons from the perinatal component and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereumeaux, Clémentine; Fillol, Clémence; Charles, Marie-Aline; Denys, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a progress report of the French human biomonitoring (HBM) program established in 2010. This program has been designed to provide a national representative estimation of the French population's exposure to various environmental chemicals and to study the determinants of exposure. This program currently consists in two surveys: a perinatal component related to a selection of 4145 pregnant women who have been enrolled in the Elfe cohort (the French Longitudinal Study since Childhood) in 2011, and a general population survey related to adults aged 18-74 years and children as from 6 years (Esteban). The aim of this manuscript is to present highlights of the French human biomonitoring program with particular focus on the prioritization of biomarkers to be analyzed in the program and the selection of biomarkers applied to both program components. The Delphi method was used to establish a consensual list of prioritized biomarkers in 2011. First results of the perinatal component of the French HBM program have shown that the biomarkers prioritized were relevant, as almost all pregnant women were exposed to them. However, for some biomarkers, levels' decreases have been observed which may partly be explained by measures taken to prohibit some of these chemicals (e.g. atrazine) and by industrial processes evolutions leading to the substitution of others (e.g. bisphenol A, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate/DEHP, dialkyl phosphates). Therefore, the list of biomarkers to be monitored in the French HBM program has been implemented to include some substitutes of biomarkers prioritized in the first instance (e.g. bisphenol S, F). Finally, this method combines rigor and flexibility and helped us to build a prioritized list that will be shared and supported by many if not all actors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Including Students with Special Educational Needs in Rocky Mountain Region Catholic Schools' Regular Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jill Ann Perry

    2013-01-01

    Through a consensual qualitative research and phenomenological approach, this study explored the function of serving students in Catholic schools with special educational needs. Utilizing a survey, a breadth of data were collected from teachers and administrators on the incidence of special educational needs, services available, accommodations and…

  6. Technology Staff-Development and Support Programs: Applying Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Pownell, David

    1998-01-01

    Presents Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs (physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, self-actualization) as a model for developing technology training and support for teachers, identifies basic technology-related needs that must be met before higher levels of technology integration can be achieved, and offers seven implications to help…

  7. Master in oral biology program: A path to addressing the need for future dental educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergenson, Margaret A; Barritt, Laura C; O'Kane, Barbara J; Norton, Neil S

    2017-11-01

    In dental education, the anatomical sciences, which include gross anatomy, histology, embryology, and neuroanatomy, encompass an important component of the basic science curriculum. At Creighton University School of Dentistry, strength in anatomic science education has been coupled with a solid applicant pool to develop a novel Master of Science in Oral Biology, Anatomic Sciences track degree program. The program provides a heavy emphasis on developing teaching skills in predoctoral students as well as exposure to research processes to encourage the cohort to pursuing a career in academic dentistry. The individuals considered for this program are applicants for admission to the School of Dentistry that have not been accepted into the entering dental class for that year. The students undertake a two year curriculum, studying anatomic sciences with a special emphasis on teaching. The students also must complete a research project that requires a thesis. The students in the program are guaranteed acceptance to dental school upon successful completion of the program. After six years, the first ten students have received their Master of Science degrees and continued in dental school. The program is favorably viewed by the faculty and participating students. It is also considered successful by metrics. Nine of the ten graduates have said they would like to participate in academic dentistry in some capacity during their careers. Anat Sci Educ 10: 607-612. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. The Incarcerated Female Felon and Substance Abuse: Demographics, Needs Assessment, and Program Planning for a Neglected Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeannette F.; McNeill, Kevin F.; Rienzi, Beth M.; DeLouth, Tara-Nicholle B.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a survey of incarcerated women (N=203) to determine program needs and to describe the inmate population. Results indicate that the typical inmate was a European American mother of two children. Most were multiple offenders with a history of abuse and addiction, and desired substance abuse education and treatment. (RJM)

  9. Developing a Contemporary Dairy Foods Extension Program: A Training and Technical Resource Needs Assessment of Pennsylvania Dairy Foods Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrko, Joseph; Kaylegian, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Growth in the dairy industry and the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act have renewed interest in dairy foods processing extension positions. A needs assessment survey was sent to Pennsylvania dairy processors and raw milk providers to guide priorities for a dairy foods extension program. The successful development and delivery of…

  10. Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope. Programming for Students with Special Needs. Book 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarren, Sandra G. Bernstein

    2004-01-01

    "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope" is Book 10 in the Programming for Students with Special Needs series; a revision and expansion of the 1997 Alberta Learning teacher resource, "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Possible Prenatal Alcohol-Related Effects."…

  11. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Professionals' Climate Change Perceptions, Willingness, and Perceived Barriers to Programming: An Educational Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Rachel E.; Vuola, Aaron J.; Megalos, Mark A.; Adams, Damian C.; Monroe, Martha C.

    2014-01-01

    The educational needs assessment reported here measured North Carolina Cooperative Extension (NCCE) professionals' perceptions of global warming and identified barriers to climate change programming. Survey results from 400 NCCE professionals show 70% are cautious, concerned, or alarmed about global warming. Liberal and female Extension…

  12. A Needs Assessment Study and Curriculum Development for a Public and Private Security Program at Alvin Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethscheider, John

    A needs assessment for a community college curriculum in public and private security was conducted by surveying 50 high schools, four-year colleges, and private security agencies in the Alvin Community College area; 36 institutions responded. Findings revealed: most have a designated director of their security program; most would rather hire the…

  13. Best Practices for Serving Students with Special Food and/or Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Alexandra; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research project was to identify goals and establish best practices for school nutrition (SN) programs that serve students with special food and/or nutrition needs based on the four practice categories identified in previous National Food Service Management Institute, Applied Research Division (NFSMI, ARD)…

  14. Prompting All Students to Learn: Examining Dynamic Assessment of Special Needs and Typical Students in a Prekindergarten Inclusive French Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, Michele; Peker, Hilal

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a teacher's prompting strategies and the use of dynamic assessment (DA) in an inclusive prekindergarten French program. Prior research has shown that DA is an effective method to assess both foreign language learning and first language development for typically developing students and for students with special needs, as well as…

  15. Changes in physical activity and sedentary time in the Finnish Schools on the Move program: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Henna L; Hirvensalo, Mirja H; Kulmala, Janne; Hakonen, Harto; Kankaanpää, Anna; Laine, Kaarlo; Laakso, Lauri; Tammelin, Tuija H

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the Finnish Schools on the Move program is to create a more active and pleasant school day through physical activity (PA). In this quasi-experimental design, we compared changes in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time (ST) during the school day and outside school hours for Grades 1-9 over two academic years in four program schools and two reference schools. Altogether 319 girls and boys aged 7-15 participated in the study between 2010 and 2012. MVPA and ST were measured four times over the 1.5-year follow-up period for seven consecutive days, using a hip-worn ActiGraph accelerometer. Linear growth curve modeling was used to examine the effect of the program on MVPA and ST during follow-up. School day MVPA increased (P = 0.010) and school day ST decreased (P = 0.008) in program primary schools (Grades 1-6) more compared with the reference schools. The effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the difference in change (from the first to the last measurement) were small (d = 0.18 and d = -0.27, respectively). No differences in the changes of leisure-time or whole-day MVPA and ST between the program and reference schools were observed during follow-up. In conclusion, the changes in school day MVPA and ST did not translate into positive effects across the whole day. More effective and longer promotion actions are needed for positive changes in PA and ST, especially in lower secondary schools and for all daily segments. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I

    2002-11-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  17. Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: Small-Scale Industrial Project. Certificate of need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    This Certificate of Need draft was prepared to meet new requirements as imposed by the Minnesota Energy Agency (MEA) since the original Erie/DOE contract was signed. The preparation of this document was authorized with the approval of the Certificate of Need contained in Contract Amendment No. A-005 of the Erie/DOE contract. With the issue of the Certificate of Need draft, Erie Mining Company considers this document requirement complete as it pertains to Phase I activities and delivered to DOE in accordance with Erie/DOE contract EW-78-C-02-5066 Appendix A, Part 3.I.F.5.

  18. National survey of training needs reported by public health professionals in chronic disease programs in state, territorial, and local governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Lynne S; Majestic, Elizabeth A; Ayele, Missale; Strasser, Sheryl; Weaver, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors published desirable competencies for professionals in public health chronic disease programs. Assessing the training needs of these professionals is an important step toward providing appropriate training programs in chronic disease prevention and control competencies. Conduct a survey of the chronic disease workforce in state and local health departments to identify professional training needs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of state, territorial, and local public health professionals who work in chronic disease programs to identify their self-reported training needs, using the membership lists of 3 professional organizations that included practitioners in chronic disease public health programs. The survey was national, used a convenience sample, and was conducted in 2011. The survey was developed using an algorithm to select anonymous participants from the membership lists of the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, the Directors for Health Promotion and Education, and the National Association of County & City Health Officials. The survey included questions about professional background, chronic disease activities, confidence about skills, and needs for training. The survey had 567 responses (38% response ratio). The majority of the respondents were female, non-Hispanic white, and 40 years or older. Respondents were not confident of their skills in health economics (38%) and technology and data management (23%). The most requested training topics were assessing the effects of policies, laws, and regulations (70%) and health economics (66%). This survey included local, territorial, and state public health professionals who work in chronic disease programs. These reported training needs in quantitative measurement methods and policy-related topics suggest key subjects for future training and education curricula.

  19. A Test of Basic Psychological Needs Theory in a Physical-Activity-Based Program for Underserved Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lindley; McDonough, Meghan H; Blankenship, Bonnie T; LeBreton, James M

    2017-02-01

    This study used a randomized controlled design to test the pathways in basic psychological needs theory, where social relationships characterized by autonomy support, involvement, and structure foster psychological need satisfaction and well-being. Participants were recruited from a physical-activity-based youth program. A new staff training was implemented to manipulate the use of each interpersonal characteristic by program staff (N = 24 observed) and perceptions of each interpersonal characteristic, psychological needs, hope, and self-worth in youth (N = 379 surveyed pre- and postprogram). Staff in the intervention condition used greater overall observed autonomy support, involvement, and structure. Condition assignment did not lead to differences in youth perceptions, but observed staff behaviors positively predicted youth perceptions of staff and perceptions of staff positively predicted change in well-being. Findings indicate that the training manipulated how staff engaged youth, and autonomy support, involvement, and structure are useful strategies to foster well-being in youth.

  20. Customizing for clients: developing a library liaison program from need to plan*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Michele R.; Butson, Linda C.; Rezeau, Michelle E.; Tucker, Prudence J.; Boyle, Marian E.; Clayton, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Building on the experiences of librarian representatives to curriculum committees in the colleges of dentistry, medicine, and nursing, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) Strategic Plan recommended the formation of a Library Liaison Work Group to create a formal Library Liaison Program to serve the six Health Science Center (HSC) colleges and several affiliated centers and institutes. The work group's charge was to define the purpose and scope of the program, identify models of best practice, and recommend activities for liaisons. The work group gathered background information, performed an environmental scan, and developed a philosophy statement, a program of liaison activities focusing on seven |primary areas, and a forum for liaison communication. Hallmarks of the plan included intensive subject specialization (beyond collection development), extensive communication with users, and personal information services. Specialization was expected to promote competence, communication, confidence, comfort, and customization. Development of the program required close coordination with other strategic plan implementation teams, including teams for collection development, education, and marketing. This paper discusses the HSCL's planning process and the resulting Library Liaison Program. Although focusing on an academic health center, the planning process and liaison model may be applied to any library serving diverse, subject-specific user populations. PMID:11209807

  1. Customizing for clients: developing a library liaison program from need to plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, M R; Butson, L C; Rezeau, M E; Tucker, P J; Boyle, M E; Clayton, G

    2001-01-01

    Building on the experiences of librarian representatives to curriculum committees in the colleges of dentistry, medicine, and nursing, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) Strategic Plan recommended the formation of a Library Liaison Work Group to create a formal Library Liaison Program to serve the six Health Science Center (HSC) colleges and several affiliated centers and institutes. The work group's charge was to define the purpose and scope of the program, identify models of best practice, and recommend activities for liaisons. The work group gathered background information, performed an environmental scan, and developed a philosophy statement, a program of liaison activities focusing on seven primary areas, and a forum for liaison communication. Hallmarks of the plan included intensive subject specialization (beyond collection development), extensive communication with users, and personal information services. Specialization was expected to promote competence, communication, confidence, comfort, and customization. Development of the program required close coordination with other strategic plan implementation teams, including teams for collection development, education, and marketing. This paper discusses the HSCL's planning process and the resulting Library Liaison Program. Although focusing on an academic health center, the planning process and liaison model may be applied to any library serving diverse, subject-specific user populations.

  2. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  3. Pilot study of the Korean Parent Training Program using a partial group randomized experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin; Boutain, Doris; Chun, Jin-Joo; Kim, Sangho; Im, Hyesang

    2017-01-01

    Problems Korean American (KA) children experience mental health problems due to difficulties in parenting dysfunction complicated by living in two cultures. Methods Korean Parent Training Program (KPTP) was pilot tested with 48 KA mothers of children (ages 3–8) using partial group randomized controlled experimental study design. Self-report survey and observation data were gathered. Findings Analyses using generalized estimating equation indicated the intervention group mothers increased effective parenting and their children decreased behavior problems and reported less acculturation conflict with mothers. Conclusions The KPTP is a promising way to promote effective parenting and increase positive child mental health in KA families. PMID:24645901

  4. [30 years heart transplantation program in Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošková, Lenka; Málek, Ivan; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Podzimková, Marianna; Hegarová, Markéta; Dorazilová, Zora; Kautzner, Josef; Netuka, Ivan; Pirk, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Heart transplantation has become in recent decades an established method for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Precisely, it was in January 2014 when 30 years have passed since the start of clinical heart transplantation program at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine. 936 heart transplants were performed by the end of 2013. The transplant program has reached considerable development since its beginnings. The knowledge of whole issue has deepened, indication criteria have been extended, new immunosuppressives are available and many of them are still in research. Life expectancy of patients has been prolonged and quality of life has improved. Nevertheless, the care of transplant patient is very complicated task for medical professionals and brings a lot of problems to solve.

  5. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  6. Training Needs Assessment: A Must for Developing an Effective Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Presents a rationale for conducting training needs assessment and discusses types of analyses: organizational, task, and individual. Compares advantages and disadvantages of the following assessment methods: surveys, interviews, performance appraisals, observations, tests, assessment centers, focus groups, document reviews, and advisory…

  7. Meeting the Academic Needs of Minority Students through a Non-academic Mentoring Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Mary Rincón

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the preliminary results of a mentoring program developed by the Mount Pleasant Independent School District (MPISD in the State of Texas with the goal of improving low-achieving students’ results on the math and reading state mandated tests, Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS. The article describes the level of development of the program at the end of the first year of implementation and shows what may be the positive impact of youth participation in mentoring relationships. The apparent impact of the mentoring program is shown through improved scores of TAKS tests of fifth grade and is illustrated in the experience of a mentor teacher and her group of students. Although it does not specifically target ethnic and language minorities, their improved academic performance may have been the result of the mentoring experience.

  8. Help Wanted: American Drone Program Needs Multifaceted Support to be Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. drone program in Pakistan faces strong resistance in Pakistan. Because the program solely seeks to eliminate terrorist groups and leaders through bombing campaigns, with no built in social support, the local population’s anti-American sentiment has reached the highest level in history. This angry mood against U.S. drone programs is spreading throughout the Islamic world. To counter this anti-American sentiment, and increase the drone program’s effectiveness, the U.S. must invest in multifaceted, socio-economic support efforts to educate the population and rebuild the gratuity, trust, and commitment of Pakistan’s people to the “War on Terror.”

  9. NASA DEVELOP Program: Students Extending Earth Science Research to Address Community Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A. L.; Ross, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    Eight years ago, several students at NASA Langley Research Center launched the DEVELOP Program. DEVELOP is now at six NASA centers and is a program element of the NASA Applied Sciences Human Capital Development Program that extends the use of Earth observation sources to address Earth science issues in local communities. Students in the program strengthen their leadership and academic skills by analyzing scientific data, experimenting with novel technology, and engaging in cooperative interactions. Graduate, undergraduate and high school students from across the United States collaborate to integrate NASA space-based Earth observation sources and partner agencies' science data, models and decision support tools. Information from these collaborations result in rapid prototype projects addressing local policy and environmental issues. Following a rigorous 10-week term, DEVELOP students present visual products demonstrating the application of NASA scientific information to community leaders at scientific and public policy forums such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the Southern Growth Policies Board (SGPB). Submission of written products to peer-reviewed scientific publications and other public databases is also done. Student experiences and interactions working with NASA data, advanced technological programs and community leaders have, and continue to prove, beneficial to student professional development. DEVELOP's human capital development focus affords students real world experience, making them a valuable asset to the scientific and global community and to the continuation of a scientifically aware society. NASA's DEVELOP Program is more than scientific exploration and valuable results; DEVELOP fosters human capital development by bridging the gap between NASA science research and federal, state, local and tribal resource managers.

  10. Earth Institute at Columbia University ADVANCE Program: Addressing Needs for Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M.; Mutter, J.; Miller, R.; Pfirman, S.; Laird, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth Institute has received a major NSF ADVANCE grant targeted at increasing the participation and advancement of women scientists and engineers in the Academy through institutional transformation. The Earth Institute at Columbia University includes 9 research institutes including Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), International Research Institute (IRI) for Climate Prediction, Earth Engineering Center, NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Risks and Hazards, Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development, and Center for Global Health and Economic Development and six academic departments including Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B, School of Arts and Sciences), Earth and Environmental Engineering (DEEE, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Department of Environmental Health (School of Public Health), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES, School of Arts and Sciences), Department of International and Public Affairs (School of International and Policy Affairs), and Barnard College Department of Environmental Science. The Earth Institute at Columbia University's ADVANCE program is based both on a study of the status of women at Columbia and research on the progression of women in science elsewhere. The five major targets of the Columbia ADVANCE program are to (1) change the demographics of the faculty through intelligent hiring practices, (2) provide support to women scientists through difficult life transitions including elder care and adoption or birth of a child, (3) enhance mentoring and networking opportunities, (4) implement transparent promotion procedures and policies, and (5) conduct an institutional self study. The Earth Institute ADVANCE program is unique in that it addresses issues that tend to manifest themselves in the earth and environmental fields, such as extended

  11. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, Greg [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, Christine [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, Kevin [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Kosson, David [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, Eric [SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (United States); Mallick, Pramod [US DOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox –“Version 2.0” which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  12. Programs Needed for 2017 Take Your Child to Work Day | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Wednesday, June 28, the NCI grounds will be filled with the chatter and laughter of children for the 21st annual Take Your Child to Work Day event. Every year, the event aims to spark children’s interest in science through a variety of programs and activities.

  13. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  14. Prevalence of Physical Disability and Accommodation Needs among Students in Physical Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Martha R.; Peterson, Cathryn A.; Gibbs, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Most research on graduate students with disabilities (SWDs) has focused on medical education. The purposes of this study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of students with physical disabilities (SWPDs) in physical therapy programs, (2) identify common types of physical disabilities, (3) document the types of accommodations requested by SWPDs,…

  15. Preparing Teachers To Meet the Needs of Students with Severe Disabilities: Program Configuration and Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryndak, Diane Lea; Clark, Denise; Conroy, Maureen; Stuart, Christy Holthaus

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides information on: (1) nationally recognized masters programs to prepare teachers with expertise in severe disabilities and (2) areas of expertise considered essential for teachers who work with these students. Results are discussed according to the population of students, content courses, field experiences, credit hours, and…

  16. Metropolitan Programs in Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations; A Need and Attitude Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hollie B.; And Others

    To establish the feasibility of implementing applied biological and agricultural occupations programs in the metropolitan area of Chicago, four populations were surveyed by means of mailed questionnaires or interest inventories to determine: (1) the employment opportunities in the applied biological and agricultural industries, (2) the interests…

  17. The Non-Consonance between Tourism Universities' Programs and the Needs of Tourism Employment in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mairna Hussein

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the reasons behind the contradiction between the outputs of tourism educational programs in Jordanian universities and expectations of tourism employers from the perception of tourism private businesses (travel agents and hotels), also to make an evaluation of universities' educational outcomes. Seventy-nine tourism…

  18. The Need to Consider Ethnocultural Context in Prevention Programming: A Case Example from Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Susana; Baker, Charlene K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This article highlights the importance of incorporating ethnocultural contexts in prevention research and programming. We provide a case example from our research in youth violence prevention in Hawai'i. Methods: Data were collected in multiethnic communities on O'ahu. Focus groups were conducted with high school-aged youths of Native…

  19. A Case Study of Dual Language Program Administrators: The Teachers We Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joan R.

    2017-01-01

    In support of growing numbers of dual language programs nation-wide, dual language school administrators seek to find teachers who are specifically prepared to work with dual language learners for additive biliteracy. For this research the author utilized a case study design to explore practicing dual language administrators' perspectives…

  20. The Victorian CPAP program: is there a need for additional education and support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, R L; Naughton, M T; Pierce, R J; Sasse, A; Teichtahl, H; Ho, M; Campbell, D A

    2002-11-01

    The Victorian Continuous Positive Airways Pressure (CPAP) Program provides CPAP services to financially disadvantaged individuals with moderate to severe sleep apnoea. To evaluate health outcomes in patients referred to the pilot program in order to: (i) assess the magnitude of health benefit from treatment in this highly selected population and (ii) identify patient characteristics or factors related to service provision that may influence outcome. We adopted a simple before-after research design. Patients who were referred to the program were recruited from five sleep centres. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and 1 and 3 months after commencing CPAP. Generic and disease-specific quality of life were assessed using the MOS 36-Item Short-form Health Survey and the Sleep Apnoea Quality-of-life Index, respectively. Subjective daytime sleepiness was measured using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Sleep-Wake Activity Inventory. Of the 68 subjects enrolled in the study, 59 were available for follow up. There were significant improvements in daytime sleepiness (P CPAP-machine type were not predictors of outcome (P > 0.05). This review of the Victorian CPAP Program identified significant improvements in subjective daytime sleepiness and quality of life, despite the negative impact of treatment-related symptoms. Future research should explore whether services can be modified to help reduce the impact of treatment-related side-effects.

  1. Serving Clientele with Disabilities: An Assessment of Texas FCS Agents' Needs for Implementing Inclusive Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rick L.; Grenwelge, Cheryl; Benz, Michael R.; Zhang, Dalun; Resch, J. Aaron; Mireles, Gerardo; Mahadevan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study to assess Texas Family Consumer Science (FCS) Extension professionals' experiences working with individuals with disabilities and their perceived skills in promoting and delivering inclusive educational programming for this audience. Study results indicate that overall Extension educators viewed…

  2. Enriching the Public History Dialogue: Effective Museum Education Programs for Audiences with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Mary Kate

    2013-01-01

    Effective public history dialogue depends on all voices having adequate access to interpretation and experience set in historical and/or cultural environments. The dissertation explores programming developed specifically for secondary education students who have intellectual disabilities and other related cognitive and developmental disabilities.…

  3. Only Ex-Offenders Need Apply. The Ohio Parole Officer Aide Program. An Exemplary Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    The Parole Officer Aide Program of Ohio employs qualified ex-offenders as Parole Officer Aides (POA). The POA is given on-the-job training for six months and assumes the identical tasks as parole officers with the exception of signing parole violation reports. The POA's background and familiarity with local situations gives him the ability to…

  4. A CLIC Damping Wiggler Prototype at ANKA: Commissioning and Preparations for a Beam Dynamics Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Axel; Casalbuoni, Sara; Ferracin, Paolo; Garcia Fajardo, Laura; Gerstl, Stefan; Gethmann, Julian; Grau, Andreas; Huttel, Erhard; Khrushchev, Sergey; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Saez de Jauregui, David; Schmickler, Hermann; Schoerling, Daniel; Shkaruba, Vitaliy; Smale, Nigel; Tsukanov, Valery; Zisopoulos, Panagiotis; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, BINP and KIT a prototype of a superconducting damping wiggler for the CLIC damping rings has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source. On the one hand, the foreseen experimental program aims at validating the technical design of the wiggler, particularly the conduction cooling concept applied in its cryostat design, in a long-term study. On the other hand, the wiggler's influence on the beam dynamics particularly in the presence of collective effects is planned to be investigated. ANKA's low-alpha short-bunch operation mode will serve as a model system for these studies on collective effects. To simulate these effects and to make verifiable predictions an accurate model of the ANKA storage ring in low-alpha mode, including the insertion devices is under parallel development. This contribution reports on the first operational experience with the CLIC damping wiggler prototype in the ANKA storage ring and steps towards the planned advanced experimental program with th...

  5. PROGRAMMING OF METHODS FOR THE NEEDS OF LOGISTICS DISTRIBUTION SOLVING PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Štangová

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Logistics has become one of the dominant factors which is affecting the successful management, competitiveness and mentality of the global economy. Distribution logistics materializes the connesciton of production and consumer marke. It uses different methodology and methods of multicriterial evaluation and allocation. This thesis adresses the problem of the costs of securing the distribution of product. It was therefore relevant to design a software product thet would be helpful in solvin the problems related to distribution logistics. Elodis – electronic distribution logistics program was designed on the basis of theoretical analysis of the issue of distribution logistics and on the analysis of the software products market. The program uses a multicriterial evaluation methods to deremine the appropriate type and mathematical and geometrical method to determine an appropriate allocation of the distribution center, warehouse and company.

  6. Military Compensation: Additional Actions Are Needed to Better Manage Special and Incentive Pay Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    or retention decisions as a way to foster top talent and improve program results. For example, DOD guidance we reviewed on critical skills ...Aviation Continuation Pay); (6) Skill incentive pay or proficiency bonus (e.g., Foreign Language Proficiency Pay , Career Enlisted Flyer Incentive... language skills , information technology, cyber warfare (i.e., cybersecurity), and special operations. In selecting case studies from this pool of

  7. Developing Training Programs to Save Lives: Serving Students with Complex or Emergency Healthcare Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Annmarie; Rozalski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The number of students with special health care needs (SHCN; McPherson, Arango & Fox, 1998) and the frequency of life-threatening health emergencies in schools (e.g., asthma, diabetes, severe allergic reactions, cardiac arrest, seizure disorders), continues to increase. It has become increasingly important for teachers to be trained in…

  8. Investigating the Needs for Measurement and Evaluation Course: A Case Study on English Language Teaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Memet; Türkkan, Buket Turhan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the needs related to the attainments, content, processes of teaching-learning and measurement-evaluation aspect of Measurement and Evaluation course. This research was designed as a case study which is one of the qualitative research designs. The most common problem in Measurement and Evaluation courses was found…

  9. Nursing Students' Readiness for the Numeracy Needs of Their Program: Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Linda; Frederiks, Anita; Wandel, Andrew P.; Robinson, Clare; Abdulla, Shahab; Hussain, Zanubia

    2017-01-01

    Numeracy needs of nursing students are often underestimated by students when they enter university. Even when students are aware of the mathematics required, students underestimate or overestimate the skills they have. Research has highlighted the mathematics and numeracy skills required of nurses and nursing students and numerous studies have…

  10. The Caring Community as a Context for Joining Youth Needs and Program Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that many of the needs youth have are determined by where and how they live. Suggests youth services providers should take a constructivist approach by helping communities and organizations create services that provide and nurture caring attitudes and behaviors. Presents recommendations for modifying cultures and organizing caring…

  11. An Iterative Needs Assessment/Evaluation Model for a Japanese University English-Language Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study is the development and implementation of the Iterative Needs Assessment/Evaluation Model for use as part of an English curriculum reform project at a four-year university in Japan. Three questions were addressed in this study: (a) what model components were necessary for use in a Japanese university setting; (b) what survey…

  12. Marketing Need-Based Financial Aid Programs: An Institutional Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities represent one of the most utilized sources of need-based financial aid information for students and families, and yet most research in access marketing is focused at the national and state levels. There is sparse published information about the effects of financial aid marketing observed through quantitative analysis, in…

  13. A Survey of Writing Instruction in Adult ESL Programs: Are Teaching Practices Meeting Adult Learner Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rebeca; Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Schaetzel, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Recent legislation and education standards focus on the importance of developing students' academic and professional writing skills. Research on the teaching of writing has articulated the types of texts and features of writing that students need to produce to succeed. At the same time, studies of writing in adult education have found that limited…

  14. Differences in Faculty Development Needs: Implications for Educational Peer Review Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Kate E.; McKey, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of faculty development in terms of the educational role is to assist faculty in becoming better educators. Educational peer review (EPR) is one method of faculty development. This article is based on a study that explored the different development needs of nursing faculty within a school of nursing at an Ontario university. The study…

  15. 5 Steps to Food Preservation Program Meets the Needs of Idaho Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Lorie; Hoffman, Katie

    2014-01-01

    University of Idaho FCS Extension Educators in southeastern Idaho developed a five-lesson condensed version of safe food preservation classes, driven by participants' interest to meet the needs of everyday home preservers. A post-test survey revealed that participants took the course to be self-reliant, use their own produce, and be in control of…

  16. The Need for Clinical Hand Education in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Jenifer; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Munyak, John; Choueka, Jack; Patel, Nima P

    2016-09-01

    Complaints related to the hands, wrists, and fingers comprise approximately 3.7 million emergency department visits annually. The complexity of this subject can confound timely diagnosis and treatment, particularly if the treating physician has not received specialized training. We set out to determine whether emergency medicine training in the USA provides adequate preparation for dealing with the identification, management, and treatment of hand, wrist, and finger injuries. The curricula for 160 accredited U.S. emergency medicine programs were obtained. Each of these was examined to see whether a clinical "hand" rotation was included as a required module. Clinical hand rotations were then classified by length of rotation, the postgraduate years in which they were offered, and if they were offered as stand-alone modules or combined with other rotations. Of the 160 programs, 21 (13.1%) require a clinical hand rotation. Sixteen offer a dedicated module, and five are part of another rotation. The mean amount of time dedicated to hand education was 3 weeks. The 16 dedicated hand rotations had a mean duration of 2.69 weeks; combined rotations were 4 weeks. Four incorporated hand education in the first postgraduate year (PGY-1), 13 into the second (PGY-2), and 3 into the third (PGY-3). Despite the preponderance of hand injuries seen by emergency physicians, the clinical and legal pitfalls that accompany these conditions, and the benefits to be gained from specialized training, very few programs emphasize clinical hand training in an equivalent fashion.

  17. Implementing a care coordination program for children with special healthcare needs: partnering with families and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, April; Lizzi, Michele; Marx, Alison; Chilkatowsky, Maryann; Trachtenberg, Symme W; Ogle, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination has been a key theme in national forums on healthcare quality, design, and improvement. This article describes the characteristics of a care coordination program aimed at supporting families in building care coordination competencies and providers in the coordination of care across multiple specialties. The program included implementation of a Care Coordination Counselor (CC Counselor) and several supporting tools-Care Binders, Complex Scheduling, Community Resources for Families Database, and a Care Coordination Network. Patients were referred by a healthcare provider to receive services from the CC Counselor or to receive a Care Binder organizational tool. To assess the impact of the counselor role, we compared patient experience survey results from patients receiving CC Counselor services to those receiving only the Care Binder. Our analysis found that patients supported by the CC Counselor reported greater agreement with accessing care coordination resources and identifying a key point person for coordination. Seventy-five percent of CC Counselor patients have graduated from the program. Our findings suggest that implementation of a CC Counselor role and supporting tools offers an integrative way to connect patients, families, and providers with services and resources to support coordinated, continuous care. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  18. Introducing Third-Year Chemistry Students to the Planning and Design of an Experimental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; Phillips, David Norman; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm

    1997-10-01

    The design and planning of an experimental program is often an important aspect of the job description of recent graduate employees in chemical industry and time should therefore be devoted to this activity in an undergraduate course. This paper describes a pencil and paper activity which involves the design and planning of an experimental programme which may lead to the solution of the problem. These skills are an essential pre-requisite to any experimental activity. We provide the students with a list of problems similar to those that a new graduate could encounter on commencing employment in chemical industry. They are real problems, which the Inorganic Chemistry staff of the School have been previously asked to solve for local industry. A staff member acts as the "client", and the students is the "consultant". The aim is that by a series of interviews between the client and the consultant, the students can refine a vague problem statement into a quantitative statement, and then from this develop a proposal to investigate the problem in order to confirm the cause. This proposal is submitted to the client for assessment. The students are expected to arrange one meeting with the supervisor in each week. This activity is highly commended by the School of Applied Chemistry's Advisory Board, which is primarily comprised of industrial chemists.

  19. Overview of C-2U FRC Experimental Program and Plans for C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Cappello, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's experimental program has been focused on a demonstration of reliable field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment, driven by fast ions via high-power neutral-beam (NB) injection. The world's largest compact-toroid experimental devices, C-2 and C-2U, have successfully produced a well-stabilized, sustainable FRC plasma state with NB injection (input power, PNB 10 + MW; 15 keV hydrogen) and end-on coaxial plasma guns. Remarkable improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas have led to further improved fast-ion build up; thereby, an advanced beam-driven FRC state has been produced and sustained for up to 5 + ms (longer than all characteristic system time scales), only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints such as NB and plasma-gun power supplies. To further improve the FRC performance the C-2U device is being replaced by C-2W featuring higher injected NB power, longer pulse duration as well as enhanced edge-biasing systems and substantially upgraded divertors. Main C-2U experimental results and key features of C-2W will be presented. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  20. Development and feasibility of need-based yoga program for family caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Jagannathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aim: Yoga has been found to be effective in the management of stress. This paper describes the development of a yoga program aimed to reduce burden and improve coping of family caregivers of inpatients with schizophrenia in India. Materials and Methods: Based on the assessment of caregiver needs, literature review, and expert opinion, a ten-day group yoga program was initially developed using the qualitative inductive method of inquiry. Each day′s program included warm-up exercises, yogic asanas, pranayama, and satsang. A structured questionnaire eliciting comments on each day′s contents was given independently to ten experienced yoga professionals working in the field of health for validation. The final version of the program was pilot-tested on a group of six caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia admitted at NIMHANS, Bangalore. Results: On the question of whether the program would help reduce the burden of caregivers, six of the ten experts (60% gave a rank of four of five (very much useful. Based on comments of the experts, several changes were made to the program. In the pilot-testing stage, more than 60% of the caregivers assigned a score of four and above (on a five-point Likert scale, five being extremely useful for the overall program, handouts distributed, and performance of the trainer. Qualitative feedback of the caregivers further endorsed the feasibility and usefulness of the program. Conclusion: The developed yoga program was found to be acceptable to caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia.

  1. What Works in Integrated Care Programs for Older Adults with Complex Needs? A Realist Review

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Jennifer; Kirst, Maritt; Burns, Tim; Goldhar, Jodeme; O?Campo, Patricia; Wojtak, Anne; Wodchis, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Integrated healthcare models are increasingly being implemented to reduce health system fragmentation and costs related to high service utilization through increased community intervention (e.g., home care) for populations with complex care needs like older adults. These models are intended to increase coordination of the healthcare system, and improve the patient and caregiver experience. However, these models have returned mixed results and the context and mechanisms of integr...

  2. Joint Exercise Program: DOD Needs to Take Steps to Improve the Quality of Funding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    training exercises. These exercises are primarily aimed at developing the skills needed by U.S. forces to operate in a joint environment and can...military services to build trust and relationships with one another, U.S. allies, and potential partners while developing the skills necessary to...of forces; diplomatic (political and military) considerations; and real world events, such as natural disasters. Though DOD officials stated that

  3. Need of reevaluation of the parameters of semen straws to be used in artificial insemination programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Angel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In buffalo industry artificial insemination is being used in breeding programs of our country . It has limitations such us seasonality, difficult estrus detection and low pregnancy rates when compared with cattle. IATF programs using a single insemination show results from 10 to 50% pregnancy rate, little information is available about minimum requirements of spermatozoa for IA. The aim of this paper is to compare the pregnancy rates after using narual mating or frozen semen in a sincronization of ovulation program. This work were conducted in Pueblo Nuevo Cordoba Colombia in August during the breeding season of 2005-6. 99 multiparous crossbred females were used with 50 to 150 postpartum days. Body score condition of 3,5 to 4. All animals were palpated to exclude anatomical alterations. Ovsynch protocol for IATF reported by Baruselli (2000, they were allocated in two groups: Buffalo group, after the last GnRH analog injection 17 females were allocated with 5 bulls, and IATF Group 82 females were inseminated 16 hours later. The semen of 7 different buffalo bulls were used and evaluated and qualified as normal. Inseminations were performed by 3 different technicians. A blood sample was obtained 20 days after IA to determine pregnancy by determinations of P4 levels using chemiluminiscence, ≥1ng/ml were used as cut off value to determine pregnancy. Data were compared using Chi square test. 70% (12/17 females of the bull group and 29% (24/82 of IATF group were diagnosed us pregnant using P4, this difference were statistically significant (P≤0.001. Buffalo bulls mount all females. No statistical differences were found in pregnancy rates of the bulls used for IATF, from 12% to 37 %, one exceptional bull obtain 71%. As expected bulls have higher pregnancy rates than artificial insemination, the results obtained here allow researchers to evaluated semen quality, specially density to improve results IATF in buffaloes.

  4. Using a logic model to evaluate the Kids Together early education inclusion program for children with disabilities and additional needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Kathleen; Manning, Claire; Williams, Kathryn; O'Brien, Ginger; Sutherland, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Despite clear evidence that learning and social opportunities for children with disabilities and special needs are more effective in inclusive not segregated settings, there are few known effective inclusion programs available to children with disabilities, their families or teachers in the early years within Australia. The Kids Together program was developed to support children with disabilities/additional needs aged 0-8 years attending mainstream early learning environments. Using a key worker transdisciplinary team model, the program aligns with the individualised package approach of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). This paper reports on the use of a logic model to underpin the process, outcomes and impact evaluation of the Kids Together program. The research team worked across 15 Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centres and in home and community settings. A realist evaluation using mixed methods was undertaken to understand what works, for whom and in what contexts. The development of a logic model provided a structured way to explore how the program was implemented and achieved short, medium and long term outcomes within a complex community setting. Kids Together was shown to be a highly effective and innovative model for supporting the inclusion of children with disabilities/additional needs in a range of environments central for early childhood learning and development. The use of a logic model provided a visual representation of the Kids Together model and its component parts and enabled a theory of change to be inferred, showing how a coordinated and collaborative approached can work across multiple environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Do Experimental and Nonexperimental Evaluations Give Different Answers about the Effectiveness of Government-Funded Training Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David H.; Michalopoulos, Charles; Robin, Philip K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between…

  6. Department of Defense Food service Program Needs Contracting and Management Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-20

    beef, and peeled shrimp, valued at $6,305, were expensed but not used in September 1979 to avoid returning the part of the allowance not needed...Canned 4.00 CORN, Whole Grain, Canned " 7.50 JUICE, Orange, Canned 1.875 JUICE, Pineapple , Canned "’ 1.875 JUICE, Tomato, Canned " 3.75 PEACHES, Sliced...Canned " 3.25 PEARS, Halved, Canned " 2.25 PEAS, Green, Canned " 6.125 PINEAPPLE , Sliced, Canned " 4.00 TOMATOES, Canned 14.50 FLOUR, Wheat " 37.50

  7. A380 pavement experimental program-rigid campaign : slab pattern, instrumentation, static test procedure, fatigue test introduction

    OpenAIRE

    LERAT, P; FABRE, C; BALAY, JM

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes several experimentations on rigid pavements at Toulouse Blagnac airport, tested with heavy aircraft landing gear simulator developed by Airbus S.A.S. The main contributors of this program are Airbus, the French Civil Aviation Administration (STBA) and the French Road and Bridges Laboratory (LCPC). The first part of the program (1998 2000) deals with bituminous pavement. In 2001-2002-2003 the program has focused on Rigid tests. The main aim has been therefore to improve th...

  8. So what really is user experience? An experimental study of user needs and emotional responses as underlying constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Tirza; Kaß, Christina; Schramm, Thomas; Zapf, Dieter

    2017-12-01

    This driving simulator study extended knowledge on user experience using a strategy to mitigate distraction resulting from the use of in-vehicle information systems (IVISs). It examined the impact of system restrictions on users' needs, emotions and consequences of users' experience in terms of psychological reactance. In a repeated measures design, we asked 53 participants to perform secondary tasks with an IVIS while driving. Three versions of the system varied with respect to the number of operable functionalities. The more functionalities that were disabled while driving, the more negatively users rated the systems. Multilevel regression analyses of at least n = 155 data points revealed that drivers' need fulfilment predicted their emotions. Reactance depended on users' need fulfilment and emotions. Experienced autonomy mediated the relation between functional limitations and reactance. When developing interactive systems, one should focus on needs and be aware of potential unwanted consequences such as psychological reactance. Practitioner Summary: This driving simulator study highlights the importance of considering need fulfilment and users' emotions when developing an interactive system that provides high user experience. System restrictions could have negative consequences as users might show psychological reactance.

  9. The 3D structure of the hadrons: recents results and experimental program at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Camacho C.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD at large distances still remains one of the main outstanding problems of nuclear physics. Studying the internal structure of hadrons provides a way to probe QCD in the non-perturbative domain and can help us unravel the internal structure of the most elementary blocks of matter. Jefferson Lab (JLab has already delivered results on how elementary quarks and gluons create nucleon structure and properties. The upgrade of JLab to 12 GeV will allow the full exploration of the valence-quark structure of nucleons and the extraction of real threedimensional pictures. I will present recent results and review the future experimental program at JLab.

  10. Needs Assessment for Creating a Patient-Centered, Community-Engaged Health Program for Homeless Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan Ake

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women who experience homelessness during pregnancy have poorer birth outcomes than the general population. This exploratory research describes the needs assessment of homeless women currently living at a shelter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to identify unmet needs related to maternal and infant perinatal health as the first step in designing a mutually beneficial patient-centered service-learning program for medical students to address these needs. Methods: Two 1-hour focus groups were held at a shelter for women who are homeless and/or victims of domestic violence. A total of 13 women participated in each session; four medical students and a physician served as facilitators and scribes at each session. The facilitators alternated asking predetermined open- and close-ended questions, followed by discussion among participants. Questions elicited experiences during pregnancy, what went well, what women living in the shelter struggled with, and what support they wished for but did not have. Scribes captured the conversation through hand-written notes and used content analysis in order of frequency. Results: Thirteen themes were identified. The 5 most frequently identified themes were a need for pregnancy education, access/transportation, baby care, advocacy, and material necessities. Participating shelter residents and the medical students expressed interest in working with one another and forming a long-term partnership with the shelter. Conclusions: Results of this needs assessment will inform the creation of a new shelter-based medical education program that will meet homeless women’s needs while preparing medical students for patient-centered, community-responsive care.

  11. Effect of 3basic life support training programs in future primary school teachers. A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Patón, R; Freire-Tellado, M; Basanta-Camiño, S; Barcala-Furelos, R; Arufe-Giraldez, V; Rodriguez-Fernández, J E

    2017-07-17

    To evaluate the learning of basic life support (BLS) measures on the part of laypersons after 3different teaching programs. A quasi-experimental before-after study involving a non-probabilistic sample without a control group was carried out. Primary school teacher students from the University of Santiago (Spain). A total of 124 students (68.8% women and 31.2% men) aged 20-39 years (M=22.23; SD=3.79), with no previous knowledge of BLS, were studied. Three teaching programs were used: a traditional course, an audio-visual approach and feedback devices. Chest compressions as sole cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill evaluation: average compression depth, compression rate, chest recoil percentage and percentage of correct compressions. Automated external defibrillator: time needed to apply a shock before and after the course. There were significant differences in the results obtained after 2minutes of chest compressions, depending on the training program received, with feedback devices having a clear advantage referred to average compression depth (p<0.001), compression rate (p<0.001), chest recoil percentage (p<0.001) and percentage of correct compressions (p<0.001). Regarding automated external defibrillator, statistically significant differences were found in Tafter (p=0.025). The teaching course using feedback devices obtained the best results in terms of the quality of chest compressions, followed by the traditional course and audio-visual approach. These favorable results were present in both men and women. All 3teaching methods reached the goal of reducing defibrillation time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. An Experimental Trial of Adaptive Programming in Drug Court: Outcomes at 6, 12 and 18 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Harron, Ashley

    2014-06-01

    Test whether an adaptive program improves outcomes in drug court by adjusting the schedule of court hearings and clinical case-management sessions pursuant to a priori performance criteria. Consenting participants in a misdemeanor drug court were randomly assigned to the adaptive program (n = 62) or to a baseline-matching condition (n = 63) in which they attended court hearings based on the results of a criminal risk assessment. Outcome measures were re-arrest rates at 18 months post-entry to the drug court and urine drug test results and structured interview results at 6 and 12 months post-entry. Although previously published analyses revealed significantly fewer positive drug tests for participants in the adaptive condition during the first 18 weeks of drug court, current analyses indicate the effects converged during the ensuing year. Between-group differences in new arrest rates, urine drug test results and self-reported psychosocial problems were small and non-statistically significant at 6, 12 and 18 months post-entry. A non-significant trend (p = .10) suggests there may have been a small residual impact (Cramer's ν = .15) on new misdemeanor arrests after 18 months. Adaptive programming shows promise for enhancing short-term outcomes in drug courts; however, additional efforts are needed to extend the effects beyond the first 4 to 6 months of enrollment.

  13. Health care Providers Needs About Malaria Control Program in Puskesmas Kisam Tinggi, South Ogan Komering Ulu District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Arisanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is an infectious disease that is still a health problem in Indonesia, which can cause death, especially in high-risk groups such as infants, toddlers, pregnant women and can directly lead to anemia and decreased work productivity. South Ogan Komering Ulu District was one of the endemic areas in South Sumatera Province. In a previous study in the District South Ogan Komering Ulu County Superior Data AMI found that high and low knowledge society related to malaria and most of respondents have not received counseling. Objective:The purpose of this study was to determine the needs of health care providers in malaria control programs. Methods:Data collected through in-depth interviews. Informant interviews are two people responsible for malaria at the health department, the head of health centers and two people responsible for malaria in health centers. Results: The results showed that the needs required by the health care providers to improve health care services, especially malaria is a need for laboratory equipment (microscope, reagents, and rapid diagnostic test, the need for microscopic power, the need for malaria drugs that are still effective, procurement of mosquito nets, education malaria to the community, and training needs for existing microscopic officer. Conclusion: The need of health care providers is the fulfillment of the malaria supplies equipment, laboratory personnel and training that support the ability of health care providers. With the fulfillment of the provider of health services to the community are expected to be performing well. Recommendation:Budget is needed to support supplier equipment & training.

  14. Experimental alternatives for evaluation of progenies and clones in eucalyptus breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Elaine Aparecida de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using augmented block designs and spatial analysis methods for early stage selection in eucalyptus breeding programs was tested. A total of 113 half-sib progenies of Eucalyptus urophylla and eight clones were evaluated in an 11 x 11 triple lattice experiment at two locations: Posto da Mata (Bahia, Brazil and São Mateus (Minas Gerais, Brazil. Four checks were randomly allocated within each block. Plots consisted of 15 m long rows containing 6 plants spaced 3 m apart. The girth at breast height (cm/plant was evaluated at 19 and 26 months of age. Variance analyses were performed according to the following methods: lattice design, randomized complete block design, augmented block design, Papadakis method, moving means method, and check plots. Comparisons among different methods were based on the magnitude of experimental errors and precision of the estimates of genetic and phenotypic parameters. General results indicated that augmented block design is useful to evaluate progenies and clones in early selection in eucalyptus breeding programs using moderate and low selection intensities. However, this design is not suitable for estimating genetic and phenotypic parameters due to its low precision. Check plots, nearest neighbour, Papadakis (1937, and moving means methods were efficient in removing the heterogeneity within blocks. These efficiencies were compared to that in lattice analysis for estimation of genetic and phenotypic parameters.

  15. [Developmental programming of metabolic diseases--a review of studies on experimental animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Iwona; Zgódka, Paulina; Milewska, Marta; Błaszczyk, Maciej; Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development in utero is a complex and dynamic process that requires interaction between the mother organism and the fetus. The delivery of macro--and micronutrients, oxygen and endocrine signals has crucial importance for providing a high level of proliferation, growth and differentiation of cells, and a disruption in food intake not only has an influence on the growth of the fetus, but also has negative consequences for the offspring’s health in the future. Diseases that traditionally are linked to inappropriate life style of adults, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arterial hypertension, can be "programmed" in the early stage of life and the disturbed growth of the fetus leads to the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The structural changes of some organs, such as the brain, pancreas and kidney, modifications of the signaling and metabolic pathways in skeletal muscles and in fatty tissue, epigenetic mechanisms and mitochondrial dysfunction are the basis of the metabolic disruptions. The programming of the metabolic disturbances is connected with the disruption in the intrauterine environment experienced in the early and late gestation period. It causes the changes in deposition of triglycerides, activation of the hormonal "stress axis" and disturbances in the offspring’s glucose tolerance. The present review summarizes experimental results that led to the identification of the above-mentioned links and it underlines the role of animal models in the studies of this important concept.

  16. [The experimental drug prescription program in Andalusia [PEPSA]: procedure for recruiting participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Joan Carles; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Romero, Manuel; Gómez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Salvador; León, M Isabel; Rodríguez, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    In this field note we describe the steps followed in the process of recruiting participants for the experimental drug prescription program in Andalusia (PEPSA). This trial is a comparative, randomized, open study of the difference between intravenous heroin treatment and oral methadone for socially excluded, opiate-dependent patients, in whom other available treatments have been unsuccessful. Because this is a hidden and hard-to-reach population, a specific approach was planned to put as many patients as possible in touch with the program. A previous study of the target population's distribution in the City of Granada was performed and the city was divided into three areas. Potential participants were interviewed in squares, soup kitchens and methadone dispensaries by outreach workers and peers, who suggested they make an appointment with a PEPSA physician. Peer-driven intervention was a crucial instrument in this recruitment procedure, allowing greater access to the target population. Furthermore, this approach allowed contact with drug users who do not attend health and social services. The work of the outreach team involved educating these users in harm reduction and offering them health and social alternatives beyond the clinical trial.

  17. The Hippocratic need for adequate supports while merging programs: at first do no harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipple, John W.

    2017-03-01

    In response to a paper calling for the re-engagement of agricultural education with the sciences and science education, this essay is supportive but argues to proceed with caution: one that at first does no harm. I offer a supplementary lens and story of change at Cornell University as a cautionary and motivational tale. I concur with the authors who want to redirect faculty, departments, and societies of agricultural educators to become more tightly aligned with the sciences. The need for and ability to better contribute to the critical discussions on contemporary agriculture issues (e.g., urban farming, GMOs, sustainability, local economies) is timely and important. The trick, however, is to do this without weakening the agricultural education community to the point of extinction. Drawing on Institutional Theory, I offer an enhanced perspective highlighting the importance of resource, conformity, and legitimacy. I explore the nature of competing pressures: the strong and restrictive ties to isolated communities and the pressure to reengage a community with a more socially and intellectually central world. I want to emphasize how these strong ties are typically beneficial to the organizations of interest, despite what it may look like to others outside that sector. It is argued that agricultural education will become increasingly "vulnerable and isolated" should it not cross the street and at least partially connect with contemporary science, social science, and new policy and ethical concerns.

  18. [A contraceptive social marketing (CSM) program needs continuity of management: the Asociacion Demografica Salvadorena (ADS) in 1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, G

    1984-01-01

    The Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS) learned an important lesson during 1983--a contraceptive social markeing (CSM) program needs continuity of management to ensure that all components remain inegrated and all actions are coordinated within the organization. Ever since in early 1983, ADS has not had an executive specifically assigned to run the CSM project and make the important month-by-month, tactical decisions that keep a program's activities focused on meeting sales goals. Instead, executive tasks were delegated on an ad hoc basis to ADS' administrative staff. Fortunately, the program's administrative design was well-developed, and ADS' dedicated personnel were able to effectively accomplish the daily business of keeping records and getting products out to retailers. Advertising, promotion and product development suffered, however. So the new executive or general manager will need to examine these areas 1st. Although El Salvador's CSM operates in unstable social and economic conditions, and despite a dramatic fall in condom sales last year, the ADS can still do much to increase its couple years of protection at costs significantly lower than those of clinic and community-based distribution systems. Research done thus far indicates a substantial demand for ADS products. Consequently, while not set in ideal conditions, physical distribution and marketing functions can be accomplished. But, as the ADS has discovered, even with a strong leader like Dr. Gustavo Argueta, CSM enterprises do not function automatically. Producing projected sales goals depends on the continuity of "hands-on" management. full text

  19. Exploring health care providers' perceptions of the needs of stroke carers: informing development of an optimal health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Casey L; Moore, Gaye; Rolley, John X; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Gonzales, Graeme; Hsueh, Ya-Seng Arthur; Castle, David

    2014-01-01

    Health care provider experiences of the carer have been researched, but little is written about how these can inform development of support programs. This study aimed to (1) explore health care provider perceptions of stroke carer roles and support needs and (2) examine carer needs across the stroke care trajectory to assist with development of an Optimal Health Program (OHP) to support carers. This study is part of a staged program of research that will evaluate and refine the OHP. Four dual-moderated semi-structured focus groups of stroke health care providers across acute, subacute, and community rehabilitation services were conducted. Facilitators used a semi-structured focus group schedule to guide discussion. Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic and content analysis. Three key themes emerged: transition, information, and impact of stroke. A number of subthemes highlighted the distinct roles of health care providers and carers. Specific elements of the OHP were identified as having the potential to advance support for carers across the stroke care trajectory. Findings support the integration of an OHP for carers within existing stroke care services in Australian public hospital and community settings. This study suggests how health care provider experiences could inform a self-management OHP to assist carers in navigating stroke services and to address their health-related concerns.

  20. Evaluation of AIDS health education program on knowledge, attitude and practice of experimental assistant dentists in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaiezadeh D

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available In this quasi-experimental study, we have evaluated the effects of an educational program on the level of knowledge, attitude and practice methods of experimental assistant dentists in Shiraz, regarding AIDS and HIV transmission. These variables were assessed before and after an educational program, by a questionnaire and a checklist. The educational program consisted of lectures and group discussions, held in 4 sessions during one month. The second assessments of knowledge, attitude, and of practice methods were performed six weeks and three months after the completion of the educational program, respectively. The scores were significantly different before and after the educational program, which can therefore be considered effective in improving knowledge, attitude and practice methods in the cases under study.

  1. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  2. Why national eHealth programs need dead philosophers: Wittgensteinian reflections on policymakers' reluctance to learn from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Ashcroft, Richard E; Parsons, Wayne

    2011-12-01

    , paradox, incompleteness, and confusion. But going beyond technical "solutions" and engaging with these language games would clash with the bounded rationality that policymakers typically employ to make their eHealth programs manageable. This may explain their limited and contained response to the nuanced messages of in-depth case study reports. The complexity of contemporary health care, combined with the multiple stakeholders in large technology initiatives, means that national eHealth programs require considerably more thinking through than has sometimes occurred. We need fewer grand plans and more learning communities. The onus, therefore, is on academics to develop ways of drawing judiciously on the richness of case studies to inform and influence eHealth policy, which necessarily occurs in a simplified decision environment. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund.

  3. Acute care for stunned myocardium after lightning strike is life-saving: need for public awareness programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Armin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lightning injury is a global public health problem. It still exists as a major environmental threat in developing nations where majority of population lives in rural areas. The different mechanisms of lightning injury can result in a spectrum of injuries ranging from minor, through moderate to severe. The most common cause of death due to lightning strike is cardiopulmonary arrest. Prognosis and outcome in moderate to severe lightning injury depends on timing of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and specialized care to prevent anoxic injury to vital organs. India lags behind in public education, awareness programs and health resources and has the biggest number of reported deaths due to lightning injuries. In this report, the authors highlight the importance of early cardiopulmonary support to a victim of direct lightning strike, which saved his life, and lay emphasis on the need to develop public awareness programs.

  4. Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating a Program to Address the Oral Health Needs of Aboriginal Children in Port Augusta, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Parker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aboriginal Australian children experience profound oral health disparities relative to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. In response to community concerns regarding Aboriginal child oral health in the regional town of Port Augusta, South Australia, a child dental health service was established within a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service. A partnership approach was employed with the key aims of (1 quantifying rates of dental service utilisation, (2 identifying factors influencing participation, and (3 planning and establishing a program for delivery of Aboriginal children’s dental services that would increase participation and adapt to community needs. In planning the program, levels of participation were quantified and key issues identified through semistructured interviews. After 3.5 years, the participation rate for dental care among the target population increased from 53 to 70 percent. Key areas were identified to encourage further improvements and ensure sustainability in Aboriginal child oral health in this regional location.

  5. Assessing Training Needs of LIS Professionals: A Prerequisite for Developing Training Programs in University Libraries of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Bhatti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated LIS professionals’ perception related to their training needs in university libraries of Pakistan. The study adopted a descriptive survey design and the data were collected using a questionnaire administered to 150 LIS professionals in 59 public and private universities recognized by the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan. The response rate was 84 percent. The results obtained show that LIS professionals need training related to troubleshooting new technologies, endnote, data compression, Internet, social media such as Facebook, Blogger, Flickr, Twitter, and online databases. The respondents considered seminars, web-based training, computer tutorials, ad-hoc training sessions by staff members, and group briefings as effective training programs for improving their professional skills.

  6. Progress report of a research program in experimental and theoretical high energy physics, 1 June 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, R.; Cutts, D.; Fried, H.M. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The main emphasis in the theoretical program has been in the area of string theory; also investigated were confinement and other aspects of QCD, electroweak symmetry breaking, and electroweak baryogenesis. The research program in computational physics concentrated on the development of the source Galerkin method of numerical quantum field theory. One portion of the experimental program dealt with interactions of leptons and hadrons from accelerator and strophysics sources. A description of the Large Volume Detector at Gran Sasso and its use as a stellar collapse monitor is given, along with an account of research and development on resistive plate counters. The rest of the experimental program concerns hadron collider and neutrino physics, with major emphasis on the D0 experiment at the TeVatron. The commissioning of the D0 detector and its operation are described, along with D0 analysis. Also reported is a novel cryogenic technique utilizing superfluid helium for neutrino calorimetry. 122 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs.

  7. Experimental Engineering Section semiannual progress report, March 1-August 31, 1976. Volume 2. Biotechnology and environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Mrochek, J. E. [comps.

    1978-03-01

    This volume contains the progress report of the biotechnology and environmental programs in the Experimental Engineering Section of the Chemical Technology Division. Research efforts in these programs during this report period have been in five areas: (1) environmental research; (2) centrifugal analyzer development; (3) advanced analytical systems development; (4) bioengineering research; and (5) bioengineering development. Summaries of these programmatic areas are contained in Volume I.

  8. Building a social capital model of research development: The case of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    OpenAIRE

    James S Dietz

    2000-01-01

    This paper argues that social capital theory, originally developed to explain collective, cooperative behavior, can be applied in understanding how better to use science and technology to advance social and economic objectives of underdeveloped regions. Using the case of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), broad issues affecting priority setting, knowledge utilization, and program evaluation are examined to shape a revised theory of social capital, EPSCoR, and...

  9. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  10. Autonomy support and need satisfaction in prevocational programs on care farms: The self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen-Dalskau, Lina H; Morken, Margrete; Berget, Bente; Pedersen, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Mental health problems are leading causes for early and prolonged withdrawal from the workforce. Green work on care farms represents a prevocational training program intended to stimulate return to work for people with mental health problems. Research suggests that care farms may improve mental health, but there is still little knowledge of the subjective perspective of clients in green work programs. To gain a deeper and broader understanding of the individual experiences of people with mental health problems participating in green work on care farms in Norway. A hermeneutic phenomenological research design was applied. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted. The self-determination theory (SDT) was adapted to gain a deeper understanding of the themes that emerged in the analysis process of the interviews. Five main themes materialize describing participants' experiences within the green work program. The main themes consist of (1) structure and flexibility, (2) understanding and acknowledgement, (3) guidance and positive feedback, (4) nature and animals, and (5) reflections on personal functioning and the future. The main themes identified indicate a high degree of autonomy support and need satisfaction within the care farm context, which according to SDT can facilitate good human functioning, and well-being.

  11. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study. Weatherization Assistance Program: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  12. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize. and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cowl-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale. risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  13. Developmental programming of metabolic diseases – a review of studies on experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Piotrowska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development in utero is a complex and dynamic process that requires interaction between the mother organism and the fetus. The delivery of macro – and micronutrients, oxygen and endocrine signals has crucial importance for providing a high level of proliferation, growth and differentiation of cells, and a disruption in food intake not only has an influence on the growth of the fetus, but also has negative consequences for the offspring’s health in the future. Diseases that traditionally are linked to inappropriate life style of adults, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arterial hypertension, can be “programmed” in the early stage of life and the disturbed growth of the fetus leads to the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The structural changes of some organs, such as the brain, pancreas and kidney, modifications of the signaling and metabolic pathways in skeletal muscles and in fatty tissue, epigenetic mechanisms and mitochondrial dysfunction are the basis of the metabolic disruptions. The programming of the metabolic disturbances is connected with the disruption in the intrauterine environment experienced in the early and late gestation period. It causes the changes in deposition of triglycerides, activation of the hormonal “stress axis” and disturbances in the offspring’s glucose tolerance. The present review summarizes experimental results that led to the identification of the above-mentioned links and it underlines the role of animal models in the studies of this important concept.

  14. Overview of C-2W Field-Reversed Configuration Experimental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Romero, J.; Smirnov, A.; Song, Y.; Thompson, M. C.; van Drie, A.; Yang, X.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's research has been devoted to producing a high temperature, stable, long-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma state by neutral-beam injection (NBI) and edge biasing/control. C-2U experiments have demonstrated drastic improvements in particle and energy confinement properties of FRC's, and the plasma performance obtained via 10 MW NBI has achieved plasma sustainment of up to 5 ms and plasma (diamagnetism) lifetimes of 10 + ms. The emerging confinement scaling, whereby electron energy confinement time is proportional to a positive power of the electron temperature, is very attractive for higher energy plasma confinement; accordingly, verification of the observed Te scaling law will be a key future research objective. The new experimental device, C-2W (now also called ``Norman''), has the following key subsystem upgrades from C-2U: (i) higher injected power, optimum energies, and extended pulse duration of the NBI system; (ii) installation of inner divertors with upgraded edge-biasing systems; (iii) fast external equilibrium/mirror-coil current ramp-up capability; and (iv) installation of trim/saddle coils for active feedback control of the FRC plasma. This paper will review highlights of the C-2W program.

  15. Capabilities of the WinLTP data acquisition program extending beyond basic LTP experimental functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William W; Collingridge, Graham L

    2007-05-15

    WinLTP is a Windows data acquisition program designed for the investigation of long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and synaptic responses in general. The capabilities required for basic LTP and LTD experiments include alternating two-input extracellular pathway stimulation, LTP induction by single train, theta burst, and primed burst stimulation, and LTD induction by low frequency stimulation. WinLTP provides on-line analyses of synaptic waveforms including measurement of slope, peak amplitude, population-spike amplitude, average amplitude, area, rise time, decay time, duration, cell input resistance, and series resistance. WinLTP also has many advanced capabilities that extend beyond basic LTP experimental capabilities: (1) analysis of all the evoked synaptic potentials individually within a sweep, and the analysis of the entire train-evoked synaptic response as a single entity. (2) Multitasking can be used to run a Continuous Acquisition task (saving data to a gap-free Axon Binary File), while concurrently running the Stimulation/Acquisition Sweeps task. (3) Dynamic Protocol Scripting can be used to make more complicated protocols involving nested Loops (with counters), Delays, Sweeps (with various stimulations), and Run functions (which execute a block of functions). Protocol flow can be changed while the experiment is running. WinLTP runs on National Instruments M-Series and Molecular Devices Digidata 132x boards, and is available at www.winltp.com.

  16. The CABRI fast neutron Hodoscope: Renovation, qualification program and first results following the experimental reactor restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, V.; Mirotta, S.; Guillot, J.; Biard, B.

    2018-01-01

    The CABRI experimental pulse reactor, located at the Cadarache nuclear research center, southern France, is devoted to the study of Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA). For the purpose of the CABRI International Program (CIP), managed and funded by IRSN, in the framework of an OECD/NEA agreement, a huge renovation of the facility has been conducted since 2003. The Cabri Water Loop was then installed to ensure prototypical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions for testing irradiated fuel rods. The hodoscope installed in the CABRI reactor is a unique online fuel motion monitoring system, operated by IRSN and dedicated to the measurement of the fast neutrons emitted by the tested rod during the power pulse. It is one of the distinctive features of the CABRI reactor facility, which is operated by CEA. The system is able to determine the fuel motion, if any, with a time resolution of 1 ms and a spatial resolution of 3 mm. The hodoscope equipment has been upgraded as well during the CABRI facility renovation. This paper presents the main outcomes achieved with the hodoscope since October 2015, date of the first criticality of the CABRI reactor in its new Cabri Water Loop configuration. Results obtained during reactor commissioning phase functioning, either in steady-state mode (at low and high power, up to 23 MW) or in transient mode (start-up, possibly beyond 20 GW), are discussed.

  17. Experimental program of the Super-FRS Collaboration at FAIR and developments of related instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Äystö, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Behr, K.-H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Benlliure, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bracco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Egelhof, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fomichev, A. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Galès, S. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire Orsay, 91406 Orsay (France); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG6, Bucharest (Romania); Geissel, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universität, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Grahn, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland); Grigorenko, L.V. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Harakeh, M.N. [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Technology, University of Groningen, 9700 Groningen (Netherlands); Hayano, R. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Heinz, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Itahashi, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jokinen, A. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland); and others

    2016-06-01

    The physics program at the super-conducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR, being operated in a multiple-stage, high-resolution spectrometer mode, is discussed. The Super-FRS will produce, separate and transport radioactive beams at high energies up to 1.5 AGeV, and it can be also used as a stand-alone experimental device together with ancillary detectors. Various combinations of the magnetic sections of the Super-FRS can be operated in dispersive, achromatic or dispersion-matched spectrometer ion-optical modes, which allow measurements of momentum distributions of secondary-reaction products with high resolution and precision. A number of unique experiments in atomic, nuclear and hadron physics are suggested with the Super-FRS as a stand-alone device, in particular searches for new isotopes, studies of hypernuclei, delta-resonances in exotic nuclei and spectroscopy of atoms characterized by bound mesons. Rare decay modes like multiple-proton or neutron emission and the nuclear tensor force observed in high-momentum regime can be also addressed. The in-flight radioactivity measurements as well as fusion, transfer and deep-inelastic reaction mechanisms with the slowed-down and energy-bunched fragment beams are proposed for the high-resolution and energy buncher modes at the Super-FRS.

  18. A Novel Large-scale Mentoring Program for Medical Students based on a Quantitative and Qualitative Needs Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Borch, Philip; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Tekian, Ara; Fischer, Martin R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Mentoring plays an important role in students' performance and career. The authors of this study assessed the need for mentoring among medical students and established a novel large-scale mentoring program at Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich School of Medicine. Methods: Needs assessment was conducted using a survey distributed to all students at the medical school (n=578 of 4,109 students, return rate 14.1%). In addition, the authors held focus groups with selected medical students (n=24) and faculty physicians (n=22). All students signing up for the individual mentoring completed a survey addressing their expectations (n=534). Results: Needs assessment revealed that 83% of medical students expressed overall satisfaction with the teaching at LMU. In contrast, only 36.5% were satisfied with how the faculty supports their individual professional development and 86% of students voiced a desire for more personal and professional support. When asked to define the role of a mentor, 55.6% "very much" wanted their mentors to act as counselors, arrange contacts for them (36.4%), and provide ideas for professional development (28.1%). Topics that future mentees "very much" wished to discuss included research (56.6%), final year electives (55.8%) and experiences abroad (45.5%). Conclusions: Based on the strong desire for mentoring among medical students, the authors developed a novel two-tiered system that introduces one-to-one mentoring for students in their clinical years and offers society-based peer mentoring for pre-clinical students. One year after launching the program, more than 300 clinical students had experienced one-to-one mentoring and 1,503 students and physicians were involved in peer mentoring societies. PMID:21818236

  19. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional

  20. Addressing life long learning needs of neurologist in the emerging world: a case study of an innovative CME program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriharan, Abi

    2008-03-15

    What leadership roles can transnational medical professional societies play in addressing the life long learning needs of health professionals in emerging world? The World Federation of Neurology (WFN) provides neurological education programme in countries with unmet neurological training needs, in an effort to improve the knowledge and skills of neurologists. The WFN's experience provides a unique study to exemplify how global stakeholders collaborate with each other to deliver CME and to improve the quality of health care services. A multi-stage programme evaluation was undertaken to explore the WFN CME, in an effort to: a) understand how global CME programmes are organized, and b) understand the success factors and the challenges of delivering global CME. The programme evaluation was conducted between June 2005 and March 2006. The preliminary results were shared with the WFN education committee and national coordinators and international experts to check and confirm the findings from the study. The study results reveal that global CME programmes could be designed effectively with minimum costs. These programmes contribute to meeting the continued learning needs of neurologists in resource poor settings. Further, the WFN initiative provides, some initial evidence that these programs can contribute to systems level improvements.

  1. The harmony of programs package: Quasi-experimental evidence on deworming and canteen interventions in rural Senegal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azomahou, T.T.; Diallo, F.L.; Raymond, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a unique and large-scale quasi-experimental data to study the effect of deworming and school meals programs as a package on educational outcomes (pupils' test scores: aggregate, French or math; enrollment, promotion or dropout rates) in rural Senegal. We extend the endogenous

  2. How needs and preferences of employees influence participation in health promotion programs: a six-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan J W; van Ginkel, Wouter; Lindeboom, Dennis; Pet, Martin; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-12-15

    Low participation in health promotion programs (HPPs) might hamper their effectiveness. A potential reason for low participation is disagreement between needs and preferences of potential participants and the actual HPPs offered. This study aimed to investigate employees' need and preferences for HPPs, whether these are matched by what their employers provide, and whether a higher agreement enhanced participation. Employees of two organizations participated in a six-month follow-up study (n = 738). At baseline, information was collected on employees' needs and preferences for the topic of the HPP (i.e. physical activity, healthy nutrition, smoking cessation, stress management, general health), whether they favored a HPP via their employer or at their own discretion, and their preferred HPP regarding three components with each two alternatives: mode of delivery (individual vs. group), intensity (single vs. multiple meetings), and content (assignments vs. information). Participation in HPPs was assessed at six-month follow-up. In consultation with occupational health managers (n = 2), information was gathered on the HPPs the employers provided. The level of agreement between preferred and provided HPPs was calculated (range: 0-1) and its influence on participation was studied using logistic regression analyses. Most employees reported needing a HPP addressing physical activity (55%) and most employees preferred HPPs organized via their employer. The mean level of agreement between the preferred and offered HPPs ranged from 0.71 for mode of delivery to 0.84 for intensity, and was 0.47 for all three HPP components within a topic combined. Employees with a higher agreement on mode of delivery (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 0.87-3.39) and all HPP components combined (OR: 2.36, 95% CI: 0.68-8.17) seemed to be more likely to participate in HPPs, but due to low participation these associations were not statistically significant. HPPs aimed at physical activity were most needed by

  3. Large Engine Technology Program. Task 21: Rich Burn Liner for Near Term Experimental Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautman, D. J.; Padget, F. C.; Kwoka, D.; Siskind, K. S.; Lohmann, R. P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the task reported herein, which was conducted as part of the NASA sponsored Large Engine Technology program, was to define and evaluate a near-term rich-zone liner construction based on currently available materials and fabrication processes for a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor. This liner must be capable of operation at the temperatures and pressures of simulated HSCT flight conditions but only needs sufficient durability for limited duration testing in combustor rigs and demonstrator engines in the near future. This must be achieved at realistic cooling airflow rates since the approach must not compromise the emissions, performance, and operability of the test combustors, relative to the product engine goals. The effort was initiated with an analytical screening of three different liner construction concepts. These included a full cylinder metallic liner and one with multiple segments of monolithic ceramic, both of which incorporated convective cooling on the external surface using combustor airflow that bypassed the rich zone. The third approach was a metallic platelet construction with internal convective cooling. These three metal liner/jacket combinations were tested in a modified version of an existing Rich-Quench-Lean combustor rig to obtain data for heat transfer model refinement and durability verification.

  4. The Impact of Vocational Education and Training Programs on Recidivism: A Systematic Review of Current Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Danielle; Day, Andrew; Giles, Margaret; Wodak, Joanne; Graffam, Joe; Baldry, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Although the association between unemployment and offending is well established, relatively little is known about the impact of vocational education and training programs on re-offending, with much of the previous work in this area failing to control for, or correct, selection bias. This article reports the findings of a systematic review, which considers the findings of only those studies that have used experimental or quasi-experimental designs to evaluate vocational training and employment program outcomes for adult offenders. The analysis identifies key features, based on these studies, of those programs associated with the best outcomes and recommends selection criteria for those who are most likely to benefit from prison vocational education and training.

  5. PrEP for Africa: What we have learnt and what is needed to move to program implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugo, Nelly R; Ngure, Kenneth; Kiragu, Michael; Irungu, Elizabeth; Kilonzo, Nduku

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An investment in PrEP delivery must have public health impact in reducing HIV infections. Sustainable delivery of PrEP requires policy, integration of services and synergy with other existing HIV prevention programs. This review discusses key policy and programmatic considerations for implementation and scale up of PrEP in Africa. Recent Findings PrEP delivery has been delayed by concerns about adherence and delivery in ‘real world’ settings. Demonstration projects and clinical service delivery models are providing evidence of PrEP effectiveness with an impact much higher than that found in randomized clinical trials. Data confirm that PrEP uptake, adherence and retention has been high, more so by persons who perceive themselves at high risk for HIV infection, and PrEP is well tolerated. PrEP delivery is more than dispensation of a pill and programs should address other risk drivers, which differ by population. In Africa, barriers to PrEP uptake and adherence include stigma among MSM and low HIV risk perception among young women. Additional data have provided insight into optimal points of service delivery, provider training requirements and quality assurance needs. Of the 2 million new HIV infections in 2014, 70% were in Africa. PrEP use is not lifelong and use limited to periods of risk may be both effective and cost-effective for the continent. Summary HIV prevention programs should determine strategies to identify those at substantial risk for HIV infection, formulate and deliver PrEP in combination with interventions that target social drivers of HIV vulnerability specific to each population. Policy guidance for optimal combination of interventions and service delivery avenues, clinical protocols, health infrastructure requirements are required. Cost-effectiveness and efficiency data are essential for policy guidance to navigate ethical questions over use of antiretroviral therapy for HIV negative individuals when treatment coverage has not been

  6. Anger & Aggression Management in Young Adolescents: An Experimental Validation of the SCARE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, D. Scott; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the validity of the SCARE program; an anger management program developed with high school students. Adolescents (n=207) exposed to the SCARE program had significantly lower levels of anger and aggression, slightly higher anger control, and lower scores on aggressive and violent attitudes a year after exposure. (Contains…

  7. Effects of a multidisciplinary care program on disability, autonomy, and nursing needs in subjects recovering from acute respiratory failure in a chronic ventilator facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vitacca, Michele; Paneroni, Mara; Peroni, Roberta; Barbano, Luca; Dodaj, Valmira; Piaggi, Giancarlo; Vanoglio, Fabio; Luisa, Alberto; Giordano, Amerigo; Ceriana, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a multidisciplinary program carried out in a chronic ventilator facility on disability, autonomy, and nursing needs of patients after a prolonged ICU stay...

  8. Fetal programming as a predictor of adult health or disease: the need to reevaluate fetal heart function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Joana O; Ramalho, Carla; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Areias, José Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that adverse stimuli during critical periods in utero permanently alters organ structure and function and may have persistent consequences for the long-term health of the offspring. Fetal hypoxia, maternal malnutrition, or ventricular overloading are among the major adverse conditions that can compromise cardiovascular development in early life. With the heart as a central organ in fetal adaptive mechanisms, a deeper understanding of the fetal cardiovascular physiology and of the echocardiographic tools to assess both normal and stressed pregnancies would give precious information on fetal well-being and hopefully may help in early identification of special risk groups for cardiovascular diseases later in life. Assessment of cardiac function in the fetus represents an additional challenge when comparing to children and adults, requiring advanced training and a critical approach to properly acquire and interpret functional parameters. This review summarizes the basic fetal cardiovascular physiology and the main differences from the mature postnatal circulation, provides an overview of the particularities of echocardiographic evaluation in the fetus, and finally proposes an integrated view of in utero programming of cardiovascular diseases later in life, highlighting priorities for future clinical research.

  9. Effects of a Whole-Class Reading Program Designed for Different Reading Levels and the Learning Needs of L1 and L2 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Susanne; Schwab, Susanne; Gasteiger-Klicpera, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the whole-class reading program Language And Reading Skills (LARS) and its effects on the decoding, reading comprehension, and language abilities of 1st-language (L1) and 2nd-language (L2) German 2nd graders. The program consisted of teacher training and differentiated reading materials adapted to the needs of both L1…

  10. Identfying the Needs of Pre-Service Classroom Teachers about Science Teaching Methodology Courses in Terms of Parlett's Illuminative Program Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaliskan, Ilke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the needs of third grade classroom teaching students about science teaching course in terms of Parlett's Illuminative program evaluation model. Phenomographic research design was used in this study. Illuminative program evaluation model was chosen for this study in terms of its eclectic and process-based…

  11. Identfying the Needs of Pre-Service Classroom Teachers about Science Teaching Methodology Course in Terms of Parlett's Illuminative Program Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaliskan, Ilke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the needs of third grade classroom teaching students about science teaching course in terms of Parlett's Illuminative program evaluation model. Phenomographic research design was used in this study. Illuminative program evaluation model was chosen for this study in terms of its eclectic and process-based…

  12. SENSITIVE COMMUNICATION AND INTERACTION SKILLS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION NEEDS USING THE PRINCIPLE’S OF THE ICDP PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis RAMO AKGJUN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the earliest stages, sensitive special educators interpret a child’s activities as he or she expresses his or her will, purpose, emotions, and desires. The child is participating in a dialogue with the special educator, based on the educator’s interpretative reactions. In this way, the child gradually enters the world of common human values, intentions, wishes, and emotions.The basic aim of the master thesis, presented in 227 pages, is to realize the necessity of implementing more sensitive communication techniques and interaction skills with pupils in special schools and institutions, according to the principles of ICDP program. This was accomplished through self-evaluation questionnaires given to special educators, asking them to make an evaluation of their own communication skills with pupils in special schools and institutions. Consideration was also made toward the need for establishing sensitive communication skills between the special education teacher and the child, as collected from the responses given by pupils and their parents.The thesis contains the following parts: introduction, theoretical approach to the research problem, research methodology, research results, discussion, conclusion, proposal recommendations, and bibliography, along with the data from questionnaires and surveys used for the research. The introduction highlights the need for research in assessing the importance of implementing sensitive communication techniques and interaction skills for special educators who work with children who have intellectual disabilities in special institutions.The theoretical approach to the research problem describes the intellectual disability by defining the concept, etiology of intellectual disability, classification, prevalence and characteristics of children with mild, medium, severe and profound intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, this section makes a detailed description of the ICDP program’s aims, tasks, and

  13. Promoting resilience in youth from divorced families: lessons learned from experimental trials of the New Beginnings Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolchik, Sharlene A; Schenck, Clorinda E; Sandler, Irwin N

    2009-12-01

    This article focuses on the contributions that the program of research on the New Beginnings Program (NBP) has made to understanding pathways to resilience in youth who experience parental divorce. First, the research demonstrating that divorce increases risk for mental health, physical health, and social adaptation problems is reviewed. Next, theory and research linking social environmental-level and youth-level modifiable risk factors and resilience resources to youth's postdivorce adjustment are presented. The conceptual framework underlying the NBP and the risk factors and resilience resources targeted in this program are described next. The short-term and long-term results of two experimental, randomized efficacy trials of the NBP and moderators and mediators of its effects are then presented. Analyses that examine whether youth self-systems beliefs account for the links between program-induced changes in family-level resilience resources and positive long-term program on adaptation outcomes are presented and how experimental trials can be used to further theories of resilience for youth facing adversities is discussed. The final section describes directions for future research on the NBP.

  14. Changes in physical activity and sedentary time in the Finnish Schools on the Move program : a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Haapala, Henna; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Kulmala, Janne; Hakonen, Harto; Kankaanpää, Anna; Laine, Kaarlo; Laakso, Lauri; Tammelin, Tuija H.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the Finnish Schools on the Move program is to create a more active and pleasant school day through physical activity (PA). In this quasi-experimental design, we compared changes in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time (ST) during the school day and outside school hours for Grades 1–9 over two academic years in four program schools and two reference schools. Altogether 319 girls and boys aged 7–15 participated in the study between 2010 and 2012....

  15. What Works for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Publication #2014-64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Heather; Manlove, Jennifer; Moore, Kristen Anderson; Mass, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The United States continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates in the developed world, and adolescent rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are also high. These factors highlight the need to identify effective evidence-based programs to improve adolescent reproductive health. This brief synthesizes findings from 118 experimental…

  16. Experimental program to stimulate competitive energy research in North Dakota: Summary and significance of DOE Trainee research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjouk, Philip

    1999-07-01

    The general goals of the North Dakota DOE/EPSCoR Program are to enhance the capabilities of North Dakota's researchers to conduct nationally competitive energy-related research and to develop science and engineering human resources to meet current and future needs in energy-related areas. Doctoral students were trained and energy research was conducted.

  17. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Bushra Farah; Hides, Leanne; Kisely, Steve; Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Black, Emma; Gill, Neeraj; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Toombs, Maree

    2016-10-21

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: 'suicide', 'gatekeeper', 'training', 'suicide prevention training', 'suicide intervention training' and 'Indigenous'. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword "Indigenous" (e.g. "Maori", "First Nations", "Native American", "Inuit", "Metis" and "Aboriginal") were also used. Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  18. Analysis of individualized education programs to quantify long-term educational needs following surgical intervention for single-suture craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshier, Laura J; Muzaffar, Arshad R; Deidrick, Kathleen Km; Rice, Gale B

    2015-01-01

    Single-suture craniosynostosis (SSC) is a common craniofacial condition with potential neurocognitive sequelae. To quantify any long-term functional academic and behavioural difficulties of children with SSC as indicated by the need for individualized education programs (IEPs), despite having undergone surgical treatment. Records of all school-age patients from 1992 to 2011 who underwent operative intervention for SSC were identified. Fifty-nine patients' guardians were contacted by telephone to provide informed consent for completion of a mailed standardized questionnaire querying demographic information as well as information regarding the patient's health, family and educational history; specifically whether the patient had ever been provided educational support as delineated in an IEP. The primary outcome measure was the history of the patient being assigned educational support as delineated in an IEP. Thirty-seven consenting guardians completed and returned the standardized questionnaire (response rate 62.7%). Twenty-one patients were male and 16 were female, with an age range of five to 14 years (mean age 10.2 years). Eleven (29.7%) patients had a previous history of or currently were receiving educational support delineated in an IEP. A higher proportion of school-age patients with a history of SSC (status postsurgical intervention) in the present study received educational support delineated in an IEP than the proportion of IEPs in the general student population of the United States (11.3%).

  19. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Farah Nasir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Method Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: ‘suicide’, ‘gatekeeper’, ‘training’, ‘suicide prevention training’, ‘suicide intervention training’ and ‘Indigenous’. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword “Indigenous” (e.g. “Maori”, “First Nations”, “Native American”, “Inuit”, “Metis” and “Aboriginal” were also used. Results Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Conclusion Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  20. Psychology Doctoral Program Admissions: What Master's and Undergraduate-Level Students Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleford, Linh Nguyen; Buxton, Kim; Bucher, Meredith A.; Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.; Yang, Kao Lee

    2018-01-01

    What do psychology doctorate programs require and prefer in their master's level applicants? Do the programs value students' graduate experiences during and postadmission? Doctoral programs' (n = 221) responses to an online survey showed that most required letters of recommendation, personal statements, Graduate Records Examination scores, and…

  1. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  2. Designing an Effective Environmental Education Program that Meets the Needs of Stakeholders: A Case Study of the High Lonesome Ranch in DeBeque, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Bethany M.

    A successful environmental education (EE) program is one that supports the mission of the parent organization, meets the needs of its audiences, and is effective at increasing environmental literacy. The High Lonesome Ranch (HLR), a private corporation that operates according to a mixed-use landscape model inspired by Aldo Leopold's land ethic, intends to develop an EE program that will operate within an associated nonprofit organization, the High Lonesome Institute (HLI), to further the mission of promoting a contemporary land ethic. Although HLR owners and staff are motivated to develop an EE program, there is currently no clear consensus regarding an overall vision for the program. The purpose of my thesis is to provide HLR owners and their advisors with a recommended design for the education program based on the missions of the HLR and HLI, sound EE theory, stakeholder feedback, and feasibility within the environment of the HLR. To accomplish this, I reviewed pertinent EE literature, reviewed the models used by existing EE programs, and undertook a two-pronged qualitative case study that gathered feedback from the major stakeholders in the HLR/HLI program. The case study included stakeholder interviews and a one-day facilitated charrette. Although feedback from stakeholders on specific program elements ranged widely, there was widespread support for an EE program at the HLR. From this research, I made a series of recommendations regarding how the HLR/HLI should proceed in development, specific program elements, and next steps in the process.

  3. Effects of a multidisciplinary care program on disability, autonomy, and nursing needs in subjects recovering from acute respiratory failure in a chronic ventilator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, Michele; Paneroni, Mara; Peroni, Roberta; Barbano, Luca; Dodaj, Valmira; Piaggi, Giancarlo; Vanoglio, Fabio; Luisa, Alberto; Giordano, Amerigo; Ceriana, Piero

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a multidisciplinary program carried out in a chronic ventilator facility on disability, autonomy, and nursing needs of patients after a prolonged ICU stay. Secondary outcome measures were survival, weaning rate, chronic ventilator facility stay, and discharge destination. Multidisciplinary assessment, clinical stabilization, weaning attempts, and a new Disabled Patients Autonomy Planning tool to assess daily care needs were investigated in 240 subjects in a chronic ventilator facility (52 subjects after cardiovascular surgery, 60 subjects with acute respiratory failure, 71 subjects with COPD, and 57 subjects with neurological disease). At admission, nursing needs, disability, and autonomy differed according to diagnosis (P nursing needs (P nursing needs increased as disability increased (r = 0.59, P nursing needs significantly improved (all, P nursing homes presented mainly neurological diseases, being more disabled and less autonomous, with higher nursing needs (all, P nursing home (odds ratio [OR] of 1.84, P = .04; OR 2.47, P = .003, respectively). Mortality was higher in subjects who were ventilated (OR 8.44, P nursing needs (P = .002), and more severe disabilities (P = .04). A specialized tailored multidisciplinary program in subjects after an ICU stay contributed to recovery from disability, autonomy, and fewer nursing needs irrespective of diagnosis. Subjects discharged to a nursing home were the most severely disabled. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Valores, Creencias Y Objectivos: Base del programa de la Escuela Experimental P.K. Yonge. (Values, Beliefs and Objectives: The Basis of Experimental Schools P.K. Yonge's Program.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    The values, beliefs, and objectives that form the core of the program at the Experimental School P.K. Yonge in the University of Florida are presented in this paper which is written in Spanish. This experimental school serves approximately 900 students from grades one through twelve. The function of the school is to conduct research to solve…

  5. A Brief History of the NPS Field Experimentation Program: Spanning STAN, TNT, and JIFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    funded by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics & Technology ASA(ALT), and executed by the UMC. ART/TSOA stil l...and flew the Dakota UAV regularly. Additionally, the NPS Frog and UCLA’s Mule RPV Flight programs utilized McMillan around the same time frame . In

  6. Experimentally induced testicular dysgenesis syndrome originates in the masculinization programming window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Wagner, Ida Wagner

    2017-01-01

    suppresses testosterone production by the fetal testis. We evaluated if induction of TDS via testosterone suppression is restricted to the "masculinization programming window" (MPW), as indicated by reduction in anogenital distance (AGD). We show that DBP suppresses fetal testosterone equally during...

  7. Pattern of Plagiarism in Novice Students' Generated Programs: An Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Marzieh; Mahmoudabadi, Elham; Khodadadi, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence shows that in computer programming courses plagiarism is a widespread problem. With the growing number of students in such courses, manual plagiarism detection is impractical. This requires instructors to use one of the many available plagiarism detection tools. Prior to choosing one of such tools, a metric that assures the…

  8. Program manager perspectives on the service system to meet the needs of youth with concurrent disorders: findings from a Canadian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joanna L; Chaim, Gloria; Luca, Stephanie; Brownlie, E B; Rosenkranz, Susan; Skilling, Tracey A; Beitchman, Joseph H

    2015-09-18

    Concurrent mental health and substance use issues are a serious problem for adolescents and transition-aged youth. Service providers across sectors must be involved in informing system change to meet youth needs. This study examines stakeholder perspectives on services for youth with concurrent disorders including 1) clinical issues in youth services; 2) priority system issues; and 3) optimal knowledge translation strategies to enhance researcher-stakeholder communication. A database of youth clinical services across Canada was developed. Program managers (n = 481) at cross-sectoral (mental health, addictions, justice, child welfare, advocacy, and outreach) youth-serving (aged 12-24) programs were invited to complete an online survey; 232 responded. Survey questions concerned youth needs, program characteristics, priorities for service system enhancement; and usual and preferred knowledge translation methods. Across service sectors, the mean estimated proportion of youth using services with concurrent mental health and substance use problems was 55%. Program managers reported routine screening for mental health and substance use concerns (66%), referring to other agencies to meet the concurrent disorder needs of youth (54%), offering specific programming for concurrent disorders (42%), and program evaluation (48%). Notably, mental health programs were significantly less likely to offer concurrent disorders services than addictions programs. Where services do exist, most are targeted at youth aged 12-18 years, with fewer services available for transition-aged youth. Endorsement of various system change goals exceeded 80%, with a particular emphasis on improving access to services (49%), ensuring a continuum of services for varying levels of severity (37%), and improved integration across sectors (36%). Preferred knowledge exchange methods were workshops and websites for receiving information; and focus groups or surveys, rather than intensive participation on

  9. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program]. [Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac[endash]Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  10. Top Textbooks on Reserve: Creating, Promoting, and Assessing a Program to Help Meet Students' Need for Affordable Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hilary H.; Cotton, Jennifer E. M.

    2017-01-01

    In Fall 2014 the University of Maryland Libraries launched a textbook reserves program to help relieve the burden of high textbook costs on students. Although its initial performance was lackluster, workflow refinements and expanded promotion greatly improved usage, resulting in a tenfold increase in circulation and expansion of the program. This…

  11. Psych NP-NC: a benchmark graduate nurse practitioner program for meeting the mental health needs in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    UNC-Chapel Hill's Psych NP-NC program prepares clinically and culturally proficient nurse practitioners to provide psychiatric and mental health care in North Carolina areas that are medically underserved and have a greater number of health disparities. This article reviews the program and the role of its graduates and makes policy recommendations for improving mental health care in the state.

  12. The Southern Rural Access Program and Alabama's Rural Health Leaders Pipeline: a partnership to develop needed minority health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackley, Benjamin P; Wheat, John R; Moore, Cynthia E; Garner, Robert G; Harrell, Barbara W

    2003-01-01

    Rural Health Leaders Pipeline programs are intended to increase the number of youth interested in and pursuing health professions in rural communities. This paper presents 2 complementary approaches to Rural Health Leaders Pipeline programs. Two different organizations in Alabama recruit students from 18 specified counties. One organization is a rural, community-based program with college freshmen and upperclassmen from rural communities. Students shadow health professionals for 6 weeks, attend classes, visit medical schools, complete and present health projects, and receive support from online tutors. The second organization is a university-based program that supplements an existing 11th grade-medical school rural medicine pipeline with 10 minority students from rural communities who have graduated from high school and plan to enter college as premedical students in the following academic year. Students participate in classes, tutorials, seminars, and other activities. Students earn college credits during the 7-week program, maintain contact with program staff during the school year, and by performance and interest can continue in this pipeline program for a total of 4 consecutive summers, culminating in application to medical school. Each organization provides stipends for students. Early experiences have been positive, although Rural Health Leaders Pipeline programs are expensive and require long-term commitments.

  13. What works in implementation of integrated care programs for older adults with complex needs? A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Maritt; Im, Jennifer; Burns, Tim; Baker, G Ross; Goldhar, Jodeme; O'Campo, Patricia; Wojtak, Anne; Wodchis, Walter P

    2017-10-01

    A realist review of the evaluative evidence was conducted on integrated care (IC) programs for older adults to identify key processes that lead to the success or failure of these programs in achieving outcomes such as reduced healthcare utilization, improved patient health, and improved patient and caregiver experience. International academic literature was searched in 12 indexed, electronic databases and gray literature through internet searches, to identify evaluative studies. Inclusion criteria included evaluative literature on integrated, long-stay health and social care programs, published between January 1980 and July 2015, in English. Data were extracted on the study purpose, period, setting, design, population, sample size, outcomes, and study results, as well as explanations of mechanisms and contextual factors influencing outcomes. A total of 65 articles, representing 28 IC programs, were included in the review. Two context-mechanism-outcome configurations (CMOcs) were identified: (i) trusting multidisciplinary team relationships and (ii) provider commitment to and understanding of the model. Contextual factors such as strong leadership that sets clear goals and establishes an organizational culture in support of the program, along with joint governance structures, supported team collaboration and subsequent successful implementation. Furthermore, time to build an infrastructure to implement and flexibility in implementation, emerged as key processes instrumental to success of these programs. This review included a wide range of international evidence, and identified key processes for successful implementation of IC programs that should be considered by program planners, leaders and evaluators.

  14. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm, and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the “hafnium” configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations. Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  15. Spike-train acquisition, analysis and real-time experimental control using a graphical programming language (LabView).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, M A; Mapletoft, E A; Miles, T S

    1995-11-01

    A solution is described for the acquisition on a personal computer of standard pulses derived from neuronal discharge, measurement of neuronal discharge times, real-time control of stimulus delivery based on specified inter-pulse interval conditions in the neuronal spike train, and on-line display and analysis of the experimental data. The hardware consisted of an Apple Macintosh IIci computer and a plug-in card (National Instruments NB-MIO16) that supports A/D, D/A, digital I/O and timer functions. The software was written in the object-oriented graphical programming language LabView. Essential elements of the source code of the LabView program are presented and explained. The use of the system is demonstrated in an experiment in which the reflex responses to muscle stretch are assessed for a single motor unit in the human masseter muscle.

  16. Understanding Complexity and Self-Organization in a Defense Program Management Organization (Experimental Design)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-18

    material capability and services. The DoD’s track record with regard to maximizing value from this investment has been poor, to say the least, and...behavior variation will support organizational and process changes to improve program value and return on investment  Phase 5: Conduct demonstration to...by the color green to show the central tendency of instrumental ties within the organization during key decision periods.) Expressive Communications

  17. A linear programming approach to characterizing norm bounded uncertainty from experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, R. E.; Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The linear programming spectral overbounding and factorization (LPSOF) algorithm, an algorithm for finding a minimum phase transfer function of specified order whose magnitude tightly overbounds a specified nonparametric function of frequency, is introduced. This method has direct application to transforming nonparametric uncertainty bounds (available from system identification experiments) into parametric representations required for modern robust control design software (i.e., a minimum-phase transfer function multiplied by a norm-bounded perturbation).

  18. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M. Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with oth...

  19. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  20. A Quasi-Experimental Study of a Movement and Preliteracy Program for 3- and 4-Year-Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Bedard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveApproximately 28% of children are not ready for kindergarten, 91% are inactive according to current guidelines, and 21% are overweight/obese. Early intervention to strengthen movement and preliteracy skills may help to curb the concerning rates of poor school readiness, inactivity, obesity, and subsequently positively impact health across the lifespan. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a motor and preliteracy skill program for a community sample of 3- to 4-year-old children.MethodsA quasi-experimental study design was used. The program was run for 1 h/week for 10 weeks and consisted of movement skill instruction, free play, and an interactive reading circle with care-giver involvement throughout each session. Movement and preliteracy skills were assessed in all children pre- and post-intervention using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2nd edition, the Preschool Word and Print Awareness tool, and the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening tool.ResultsNineteen families (experimental group, n = 8; control group, n = 11 were recruited (mean age = 3 years, 8 m; 47% male. There was a significant effect of group on gross motor raw scores overall [F(1, 16 = 4.67, p < 0.05; ωp2=0.16] and print-concept knowledge [F(1, 16 = 11.9, p < 0.05; ωp2=0.38].ConclusionThis study was one of the first to examine the impact of a community-based movement skill and preliteracy program with care-giver involvement in preschool children. Future research should continue to explore the effects of the program with larger and more diverse samples on multiple health and developmental outcomes.Clinical Trial RegistrationPlay and Preliteracy among Young Children (PLAY NCT02432443.

  1. Analysis of requirements and the necessary investments in the railway station adjustment program for persons with special needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Predrag

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available People with special needs from the standpoint of social communities have specific requirements for access, mobility, entry and exit of railway vehicles designated to transport passengers. The EU has defined standards and requirements related to persons with special needs. The aim of this paper is to analyze the technical requirements of equipment and identify the necessary investment funds related to the increasing mobility of persons with special needs in the rail transportation system. This analysis would be one of the initial steps approaching the conditions and requirements that apply in the EU in adapting the system of transport for people with special needs.

  2. Report: EPA Needs Accurate Data on Results of Pollution Prevention Grants to Maintain Program Integrity and Measure Effectiveness of Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0276, September 4, 2015. Inaccurate reporting of results misrepresents the impacts of pollution prevention activities provided to the public, and misinforms EPA management on the effectiveness of its investment in the program.

  3. Strengthening Clinical Specialty Training (Internships, Residencies, and Professional Master's Degree Programs) to Better Meet the Needs of the Veterinary Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cello, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author suggests that attempts to strengthen clinical specialty training must begin with a coordinated effort on the part of all schools to establish graduate clinical education as a fundamental, important and independent element of their academic programs. (LBH)

  4. Horizon's patient-centered medical home program shows practices need much more than payment changes to transform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Urvashi B; Rathjen, Carl; Rubin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    ...' accountability for care coordination and outcomes. Horizon Healthcare Services, Inc., New Jersey's oldest and largest health insurance company, developed medical home programs that include financial incentives with essential support tools...

  5. Training Program for Louisiana Correctional, Probation and Parole Personnel; A Study of Present and Future Needs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. Div. of Continuing Education.

    Training needs of probation and parole officers and personnel in penal institutions of Louisiana were determined by surveys of personnel background, education, age, experience, and expressed needs, in order to determine subject matter and potential enrollment of inservice classes. Questionnaires collected information from 53 probation and parole…

  6. A 6-Week Web-Based Osteoarthritis Treatment Program: Observational Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Håkan; Dahlberg, Jakob; Dahlberg, Leif E

    2017-12-18

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, with a burden of disease estimated to increase over time. Joint Academy, a Web-based treatment for individuals with clinically verified knee or hip OA, was developed to increase access to and facilitate implementation of evidence-based nonsurgical OA treatment in accordance with international guidelines. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate joint pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time of users of the Joint Academy program. We enrolled 350 patients who were recruited online and completed the initial health journal in the 6-week program. We asked patients to complete an eHealth journal and e-questionnaires, including pain level assessed by a numerical rating scale, as well as a physical function evaluation using the 30-second chair-stand test. In addition, we assessed HRQoL using the 3-level version of the EQ-5D. We also asked participants whether they experienced difficulty walking and were afraid of physical activity due to their OA and their desire for surgery. We collected descriptive data and compared pre- versus postintervention data. As a reference group, we included results retrieved from the Swedish well-structured face-to-face self-supportive OA management program Better Management of Patients With Osteoarthritis (BOA). Of the study cohort (n=350 patients; 239 women, mean age 62 years, mean body mass index 27 kg/m2), 71.4% (n=250) completed the program and were included in the study. We used the questionnaires to secure a clinical diagnosis of OA and to establish baseline study values. After 6 weeks of treatment, the change in mean numerical rating scale was larger than the minimal clinical difference (5.4 vs 4.1; P<.001), while physical function increased (from 10.88 to 13.14; P<.001). The percentage of participants having walking difficulties decreased from 81.7% (196/240) to 62.1% (149/240; P<.001), those afraid of being physically active

  7. Inclusion of Students with Special Education Needs in French as a Second Language Programs: A Review of Canadian Policy and Resource Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhling, Stefanie; Mady, Callie

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a document analysis of policy and resource documents pertaining to inclusion of students with special education needs (SSEN) in Canadian French as a Second Language (FSL) programs. By recognizing gaps and acknowledging advancements, we aim to inform current implementation and future development of inclusive policy. Document…

  8. Needs Assessment for the Establishment of a Masters of Arts Program in International Studies with a Concentration in International Security and a Specialization in International Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Since the attacks of September 11, national and international security has been driven to the center stage of our present-day society, thus becoming a primary concern and focus in the United States. The purpose of this study was to conduct an instructional needs assessment for the establishment of a Masters of Arts program in International Studies…

  9. Quality in-training initiative--a solution to the need for education in quality improvement: results from a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelz, Rachel R; Sellers, Morgan M; Reinke, Caroline E; Medbery, Rachel L; Morris, Jon; Ko, Clifford

    2013-12-01

    The Next Accreditation System and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program will emphasize practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice. We present the results of a survey of general surgery program directors to characterize the current state of quality improvement in graduate surgical education and introduce the Quality In-Training Initiative (QITI). In 2012, a 20-item survey was distributed to 118 surgical residency program directors from ACS NSQIP-affiliated hospitals. The survey content was developed in collaboration with the QITI to identify program director opinions regarding education in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, to investigate the status of quality improvement education in their respective programs, and to quantify the extent of resident participation in quality improvement. There was a 57% response rate. Eighty-five percent of program directors (n = 57) reported that education in quality improvement is essential to future professional work in the field of surgery. Only 28% (n = 18) of programs reported that at least 50% of their residents track and analyze their patient outcomes, compare them with norms/benchmarks/published standards, and identify opportunities to make practice improvements. Program directors recognize the importance of quality improvement efforts in surgical practice. Subpar participation in basic practice-based learning and improvement activities at the resident level reflects the need for support of these educational goals. The QITI will facilitate programmatic compliance with goals for quality improvement education. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of WHO Hand Hygiene Improvement Program Implementation: A Quasi-Experimental Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhoudi, Farinaz; Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Hoshangi Davani, Minoo; Ghalebi, Nadiyeh; Sajadi, Golnar; Taghizadeh, Raziyeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives . As affirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), hand hygiene is the most powerful preventive measure against healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) and, thus, it has become one of the five key elements of patient safety program. The aim is to assess the effect of implementation of the WHO's Multimodal Hand Hygiene Improvement Strategy among healthcare workers of a tertiary teaching hospital in a developing country. Methods . Hand hygiene compliance was assessed among healthcare workers, according to five defined moments for hand hygiene of the WHO, before and after implementation of the WHO's Multimodal Hand Hygiene Improvement Strategy in fourteen wards of a tertiary teaching hospital in Shiraz, Iran. We used direct observation method and documented the results in WHO hand hygiene observation forms. Results . There was a significant change in compliance before and after implementation of WHO's Multimodal HH Improvement Strategy (29.8% and 70.98%, resp.). Conclusions . Implementing WHO hand hygiene program can significantly improve hand hygiene compliance among nurses.

  11. Need for redefining needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Packham Chris

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Defining needs is difficult due to the inherent complexity of the concept of 'need', so it is not surprising that numerous definitions have been proposed. 'Health' consists of a wide range of characteristics so 'health needs' ought to include personal and social care, health care, accommodation, finance, education, employment and leisure, transport and access. Target-driven standards in areas of health care with a high political profile appear to be replacing the concept of universal provision and clinical need; this major change in clinical care warrants a re-evaluation of health care outcomes. Identifying who might benefit from this new approach to health care is equally important if scarce resources are to be fully and appropriately utilised. If the goal of care is 'optimal health', the key marker of success ought to be to ascertain individual patients' health care needs (HCN and tailor services accordingly. Wide variation in the description of 'needs' directly affects policies and services intended to meet a population's health care needs. Consequently, the definition of 'needs' has important implications for healthcare provision- the more constrained the definition, the less healthcare will be made available and vice versa. This paper describes some common definitions of needs and discusses their respective benefits and disadvantages in terms of health care provision and their potential impact on health policy.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing nonproprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for opensource research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM1) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM2) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  14. Effectiveness of a role-play simulation program involving the sbar technique: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi; Kang, Kyung Ja

    2017-06-01

    Accurate, skilled communication in handover is of high priority in maintaining patients' safety. Nursing students have few chances to practice nurse-to-doctor handover in clinical training, and some have little knowledge of what constitutes effective handover or lack confidence in conveying information. This study aimed to develop a role-play simulation program involving the Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation technique for nurse-to-doctor handover; implement the program; and analyze its effects on situation, background, assessment, recommendation communication, communication clarity, handover confidence, and education satisfaction in nursing students. Non-equivalent control-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental. A convenience sample of 62 senior nursing students from two Korean universities. The differences in SBAR communication, communication clarity, handover confidence, and education satisfaction between the control and intervention groups were measured before and after program participation. The intervention group showed higher Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation communication scores (t=-3.05, p=0.003); communication clarity scores in doctor notification scenarios (t=-5.50, pcommunicative competence in nursing students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Program Aerothermodynamics- Transition And Steps And Gaps Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verand, Jean-Luc; Pelissier, Christian; Sourgen, Frederic; Fontaine, Joelle; Garcon, Francois; Spel, Martin; van Hauwaert, Pierre; Charbonnier, Dominique; Vos, Jan; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Pibarot, Julien; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniella; Rufolo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project objectives are the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, which is highly flexible and manoeuvrable. The IXV vehicle is a flying test bed for securing the next step of operational space vehicle development by supporting technology demonstration and system concept through the following objectives: a) Aerothermodynamics b) Advanced In Flight Experiments c) Thermal Protection System d) Guidance Navigation and Control e) System design The assessment of the general aerothermodynamic environment of IXV vehicle is mainly performed considering a smooth simplified geometry. However, the thermal protection system of IXV includes a mono-block ceramic matrix composite nose and an assembly of shingles between which steps and gaps are generated. From an aerothermodynamic point of view, such a distributed roughness layout cannot be ignored in terms of modification of the interaction between the flow and the body. To assess this effect, dedicated Mach number 5.5 wind tunnel tests (ONERA, S3MA facility) and numerical simulations (RTECH and CFS Engineering) have been performed during the phase C2 of the project. The paper presents the general logic of the work, with emphasis on the wind tunnel model design, tests involving infrared thermal measurements as well as the CFD rebuilding of the flow in the wind tunnel and the extrapolation from ground-to-flight.

  16. Using an experimental manipulation to determine the effectiveness of a stock enhancement program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    We used an experimental manipulation to determine the impact of stocking 178 mm channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in six impoundments. The study design consisted of equal numbers (two) of control, ceased-stock, and stocked treatments that were sampled one year before and two years after stocking. Relative abundance, growth, size structure, and average weight significantly changed over time based on samples collected with hoop nets. Catch rates decreased at both ceased-stock lakes and increased for one stocked lake, while growth rates changed for at least one ceased-stock and stocked lake. The average weight of channel catfish in the ceased-stock treatment increased by 6% and 25%, whereas weight decreased by 28% and 78% in both stocked lakes. The variability in observed responses between lakes in both ceased-stock and stocked treatments indicates that a one-size-fits-all stocking agenda is impractical, suggesting lake specific and density-dependent mechanisms affect channel catfish population dynamics.

  17. Jamie's Ministry of Food: quasi-experimental evaluation of immediate and sustained impacts of a cooking skills program in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Flego

    Full Text Available To evaluate the immediate and sustained effectiveness of the first Jamie's Ministry of Food Program in Australia on individuals' cooking confidence and positive cooking/eating behaviours.A quasi- experimental repeated measures design was used incorporating a wait-list control group. A questionnaire was developed and administered at baseline (T1, immediately post program (T2 and 6 months post completion (T3 for participants allocated to the intervention group, while wait -list controls completed it 10 weeks prior to program commencement (T1 and just before program commencement (T2. The questionnaire measured: participants' confidence to cook, the frequency of cooking from basic ingredients, and consumption of vegetables, vegetables with the main meal, fruit, ready-made meals and takeaway. Analysis used a linear mixed model approach for repeated measures using all available data to determine mean differences within and between groups over time.All adult participants (≥18 years who registered and subsequently participated in the program in Ipswich, Queensland, between late November 2011- December 2013, were invited to participate.In the intervention group: 694 completed T1, 383 completed T1 and T2 and 214 completed T1, T2 and T3 assessments. In the wait-list group: 237 completed T1 and 149 completed T1 and T2 assessments. Statistically significant increases within the intervention group (P<0.001 and significant group*time interaction effects (P<0.001 were found in all cooking confidence measures between T1 and T2 as well as cooking from basic ingredients, frequency of eating vegetables with the main meal and daily vegetable intake (0.52 serves/day increase. Statistically significant increases at T2 were sustained at 6 months post program in the intervention group.Jamie's Ministry of Food Program, Australia improved individuals' cooking confidence and cooking/eating behaviours contributing to a healthier diet and is a promising community

  18. Connected Code: Why Children Need to Learn Programming. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Burke, Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Coding, once considered an arcane craft practiced by solitary techies, is now recognized by educators and theorists as a crucial skill, even a new literacy, for all children. Programming is often promoted in K-12 schools as a way to encourage "computational thinking"--which has now become the umbrella term for understanding what computer…

  19. A STUDY OF CONTINUING EDUCATION NEEDS OF SELECTED PROFESSIONAL GROUPS AND UNIVERSITY EXTENSION CONTRACT PROGRAMS IN WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NICHOLAS, ROBERT A.

    THIS STUDY AIMED TO DEVELOP PRINCIPLES FOR A MODEL PROGRAM OF CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR THE PROFESSIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING. THE AUTHOR REVIEWED THE LITERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF THE PROFESSIONS AND ON CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE PROFESSIONS GENERALLY, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ARCHITECTURE, DENTISTRY, LAW, MEDICINE, AND PHARMACY. FROM THIS…

  20. Military Personnel: DOD Needs More Complete Data on Active-Duty Servicemembers Use of Food Assistance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    component military personnel, military retired members, DOD civilian personnel (including foreign -national direct and indirect hires, as well as...1) limited awareness of some food assistance programs (2) stigma associated with receiving food assistance; and (3) misconceptions about military...that they believe a societal stigma exists generally for those who use food assistance. Officials at one installation added that the self- sufficient

  1. Psychology Students' Interest in Graduate Training: A Need for Partnership among Undergraduate Psychology and Graduate School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    An initial point of contact for recruitment of qualified persons into school psychology is undergraduate psychology degree programs. Unfortunately, the discipline of school psychology appears to receive at best only cursory coverage in undergraduate psychology texts, curriculum, and discussion by psychology department faculty even though school…

  2. Do You See What I See? Understanding Filipino Elderly's Needs, Benefits, and Expectations from an Adult Continuing Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolar Chua, Rowena L.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    As the elderly population increases, encouraging older adults to participate in lifelong learning has become a priority for many countries. Properly structured lifelong learning programs have consistently yielded numerous benefits to older adults; therefore, careful attention and effort should be exerted to ensure its effectiveness by involving…

  3. Survey of Need for an Educational Program for Cardiac Exercise Technicians and Leaders. Vol. VIII, No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Elizabeth R.; Lucas, John A.

    To determine the feasibility of establishing a program for training cardiac exercise technicians and leaders at William Rainey Harper College, a survey instrument was mailed to 901 organizations who were potential employers. No follow-up was used and 85 questionnaires were returned (9.4%). It was assumed that none of the non-respondents were…

  4. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter: Continued Oversight Needed as Program Plans to Begin Development of New Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Report to Congressional Committees April 2016 GAO-16-390 United States Government Accountability Office United States Government... Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-390, a report to congressional committees April 2016 F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER Continued Oversight...program, transparency will be limited. Therefore, it will be difficult for Congress to hold it accountable for achieving its cost, schedule, and

  5. We Need More Evidence in Order to Create Effective Pre-K Programs. Evidence Speaks Reports, Vol 1, #11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Dale C.

    2016-01-01

    The proposition that expanding pre-K will improve later achievement for children from low-income families is premature. Premature as well is the presumption that solid research exists to guide the content and structure of pre-K programs. Despite more than 50 years of preliminary work on pre-K as an early intervention for young children from poor…

  6. In need of an audience: Sensationalism in Dutch Public Service News and Current Affairs Programs in the 1990's

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Nuijten, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a number of questions concerning the more or less sensationalist character of PSB news and current affairs programs in the Netherlands over the past decades. First, three categories of sensationalist stories are distinguished, which are connected to theoretical ideas of

  7. Meeting the Needs of Career and Technical Education: Observations from Graduates of a High School Health Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avey, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Career and Technical education has been around for some time, and has often been shaped by the current economic landscape of the country. While current evolving trends focus on relevance for students in the school setting, a coexistence with college preparation curriculum is now the new trend in modern technical education. New programs have…

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL)

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor cross flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.43m and rotor height, hT = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2. 35m3s-1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1. 2 ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec = 6 .1x104. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order

  9. Draft program plan for TNS: The Next Step after the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Part II. R and D needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-12-01

    The information contained in this document represents the brief but intensive efforts of the Oak Ridge TNS Program Team to answer the following questions: (1) Is there an adequate basis of R and D support for the TNS program as a central, ambitious goal for the fusion program. (2) What are the principal gaps in the current and projected R and D program. (3) What must be done to permit operation of TNS in the mid 1980s. The findings of our preliminary study provide these answers to the questions: (1) The physics and technology base does exist from which to start the TNS design as a central fusion program goal. (2) We have specific recommendations for new emphasis in certain physics and technology areas to minimize R and D program gaps. (3) TNS conceptual design must be started now, and a close look at organizing the fusion program around a TNS project is an essential need to support operation in the mid 1980s.

  10. ARSH 6: Reproductive health needs assessment of adolescents and young people (15-24 y): a qualitative study on 'perceptions of program managers and health providers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; Leena, M L; George, Babu; Thankachi, Yamini; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2013-11-01

    To understand the perceptions of program managers and service providers using in depth interview technique, a well-accepted qualitative research that can also offer semi quantitative input. Need assessment was done qualitatively using in-depth interviews, among program managers of health care system including District Medical Officers and RCH Officers and program service providers, both in rural and urban areas. In total 34 in-depth interviews were conducted. Nearly half (2+) of the program managers and service providers of adolescent programs opined that the important problems faced by adolescents were issues related to sexuality, psychosocial conflict, identity crisis, adjustment problems and scholastic problems. Approximately half of them thought that improper parenting, negative attitude of parents, separated parents, ignorance of parents, family background, nuclear family setup etc. are the most important factors, which influence adolescent problems and that friends and media are their major source of reproductive sexual health information. Nearly half of them pointed out that pain and psychological disturbances like anxiety, tension and anger were the important menstrual problems faced by adolescents. Again nearly half of them, felt that FLE (Family Life Education) should be given at school and ARSH services at PHCs, but there was little consensus on provision of contraceptive service and abortion services to adolescents. All the service providers and program managers are ready to cooperate but they had varied opinions about who should impart adolescent reproductive sexual health education and how the program should be done.

  11. Needed Computations Shortcutting Needed Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoy, Sergio; Johannsen, Jacob; Libby, Steven

    We define a compilation scheme for a constructor-based strongly-sequential graph rewriting system which shortcuts some needed steps. The result of this compilation is another constructor-based graph rewriting system that is normalizing for the original system when using an innermost strategy. We...... then modify the resulting rewrite sytem in a way that avoids totally or partially the construction of the contracta of some needed steps of a computation. The resulting rewrite system can be easily implemented by eager functions in a variety of programming languages. When computing normal forms in this way...

  12. High- and Low-Level Dissonance-Based Eating Disorder Prevention Programs with Young Women with Body Image Concerns: An Experimental Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Method: Female…

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of Programed Instruction as One of Two Review Techniques for Two-Year College Students Concerned with Solving Acid-Base Chemical Equilibrium Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Jared Bear

    The major purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a programed instructional unit for a first year college chemistry course. The topic of the unit was the categorization and solution of acid-base equilibria problems. The experimental programed instruction text was used by 41 students and the fifth edition of Schaum's Theory and Problems of…

  14. Experimental but not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodán-González

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation (MR training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21 compared to a control group (n = 24. Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes.

  15. Results from phase 2 of the radioiodine test facility experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.M.; Kupferschmid, W.C.H.; Wren, J.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    A series of intermediate-scale experiments were conducted in the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) in a vinyl-painted, zinc-primer coated, carbon steel vessel in order to assess the effects of vinyl surfaces on iodine volatility in both the presence and absence of radiation. This test series, Phase 2 of a larger, comprehensive program assessing a variety of containment surfaces, also examined the effects of organic (i.e., methyl ethyl ketone) and inorganic (i.e., hydrazine) additives, pH, and venting on the aqueous chemistry and volatility of solutions initially containing cesium iodide. These tests have clearly demonstrated that organics are released to the aqueous phase from the vinyl coating and that, under radiation conditions, these organics can have a significant effect on the formation of volatile iodine species. In particular, the RTF results suggest that radiolytic decomposition of the released organics results in dramatic reductions in pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, which in turn are responsible for increased formation of molecular iodine and organic iodides. When the pH was maintained at 10 (Test 3), much lower iodine volatility was observed; low iodine volatility was also observed in the absence of radiation. This test series also demonstrated that vinyl surfaces, particularly those in contact with the gas phase, were a sink for iodine. (author) 4 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs.

  16. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes.

  17. [Current status on management and needs related to education and training programs set for new employees at the provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Meng, X D; Luo, H M; Zhou, H C; Qu, S L; Liu, X T; Dai, Z

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the current management status on education/training and needs for training among new employees working at the provincial CDC in China during 2012-2014, so as to provide basis for setting up related programs at the CDC levels. Based on data gathered through questionnaire surveys run by CDCs from 32 provincial and 5 specifically-designated cities, microsoft excel was used to analyze the current status on management of education and training, for new employees. There were 156 management staff members working on education and training programs in 36 CDCs, with 70% of them having received intermediate or higher levels of education. Large differences were seen on equipment of training hardware in different regions. There were 1 214 teaching staff with 66 percent in the fields or related professional areas on public health, in 2014. 5084 new employees conducted pre/post training programs, from 2012 to 2014 with funding as 750 thousand RMB Yuan. 99.5% of the new employees expressed the needs for further training while. 74% of the new staff members expecting a 2-5 day training program to be implemented. 79% of the new staff members claimed that practice as the most appropriate method for training. Institutional programs set for education and training at the CDCs need to be clarified, with management team organized. It is important to provide more financial support on both hardware, software and human resources related to training programs which are set for new stuff members at all levels of CDCs.

  18. Effects of an Updated Preventive Home Visit Program Based on a Systematic Structured Assessment of Care Needs for Ambulatory Frail Older Adults in Japan: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Ayumi; Izumi, Kyoko; Yoshiyuki, Noriko; Kanaya, Yukiko; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects on functional parameters of an updated preventive home visit program for frail older adults in the Japanese Long-term Care Insurance (LTCI) system. The program included home visits by nurses or care managers every 3 months for 24 months, with a systematic assessment of care needs to prevent functional decline. Eligible participants (N = 360) were randomly assigned to the visit (VG: n = 179) or control group (CG: n = 181). Functional parameters were gathered via mail questionnaires at baseline and at 12- and 24-month follow-ups. Care-need levels in the LTCI were obtained at 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-ups and the utilization of the LTCI service through 36 months. Participants in VG were significantly more likely to maintain their activities of daily living (ADL) functioning (p = .0113) and less likely to increase care-needs level, compared with CG participants, over 24 months. A generalized linear model showed that the estimate of the effect on increase in care-needs level (ie, functional decline) was -0.53 (p = .042) over 36 months. These results suggest that the updated preventive home visit program could be effective for the prevention of ADL and care-needs deterioration, and these effects could continue up to 1 year after program completion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Understanding needs is important for assessing the impact of food assistance program participation on nutritional and health status in U.S. elderly persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Frongillo, E A

    2001-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of food assistance programs on nutritional and health status of nutritionally needy elderly persons. Two cross-sectional and one longitudinal data sets were used: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-94), Nutrition Survey of the Elderly in New York State (1994) and Longitudinal Study of Aging (1984-1990). Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine whether food assistance participants among food insecure elderly (i.e., those whose needs for food assistance programs are met) have better nutrient intake, skinfold thickness and self-reported health status and less nutritional risk, hospitalization and mortality than nonparticipants (i.e., those whose needs are unmet) and whether the benefit is larger than that among food secure elderly persons. Across three data sets, food insecure elderly persons had poorer nutritional and health status than food secure elderly persons. Contrary to the hypotheses, among food insecure elderly persons, food assistance participants had similar or poorer nutrient intakes, skinfold thickness, nutritional risk, self-reported health status, hospitalization and mortality than nonparticipants. Food secure participants had similar nutritional and health status as food secure nonparticipants. Lack of information on the dynamic nature and changes in needs with program participation in the three data sets likely did not allow accurate estimation of the impact of food assistance participation. Different study designs, as well as theory and knowledge of needs that clarifies need status and its change within each older individual across an appropriate time interval, are necessary to accurately assess impacts of food assistance programs.

  20. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J. (eds.)

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  1. A look at a community coming together to meet the needs of older adults: an evaluation of the neighbors Helping Neighbors program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickey, Rebecca; Kelley-Gillespie, Nancy; Farley, O William

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Neighbors Helping Neighbors program. The study included surveys of 49 community-residing older adults and 26 community volunteers. Results showed that older adults perceived their quality of life to have improved after receiving social and environmental services; volunteers felt that their contributions to the program had made a significant difference in their community. This exploratory, descriptive study is only a beginning effort, but it holds great promise for suggesting ways to address the needs of the burgeoning aging population in our society.

  2. CLIC TWO-BEAM MODULE FOR THE CLIC CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND RELATED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM*

    CERN Document Server

    Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Riddone, G

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) study is a site independent study exploring technological developments to extend linear colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range. The two-beam linear accelerator being studied at CERN involves the design and integration of many different technical systems, tightly bound and influencing each other. For the construction of two linacs it has been decided to proceed with a modular design, and repetitive two-beam modules of a few types were defined. The modules consist of micron-level precision components operating under ultra-high vacuum as required by the beam physics. For the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, the development and system integration is mainly focused on the most complex module type containing the highest number of components and technical systems. For proving the proper functioning of the needed technical systems and confirming their feasibility it has been decided to build four prototype modules and test them without beam. In addition, three module...

  3. CLIC Two-Beam Module for the CLIC Conceptual Design and related experimental program

    CERN Document Server

    Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Riddone, G

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) study is a site independent study exploring technological developments to extend linear colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range. The two-beam linear accelerator being studied at CERN involves the design and integration of many different technical systems, tightly bound and influencing each other. For the construction of two linacs it has been decided to proceed with a modular design, and repetitive two-beam modules of a few types were defined. The modules consist of micron-level precision components operating under ultra-high vacuum as required by the beam physics. For the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, the development and system integration is mainly focused on the most complex module type containing the highest number of components and technical systems. For proving the proper functioning of the needed technical systems and confirming their feasibility it has been decided to build four prototype modules and test them without beam. In addition, three module...

  4. Minutes from Department of Energy/Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program, research and development technology needs assessment review meeting for FY 1990, September 1989, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    On September 20--21, 1989, representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Operations Offices, DOE contractors, and the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program met in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to select and prioritize candidate waste problems in need of research and development. The information gained will be used in planning for future research and development tasks and in restructuring current research activities to address the priority needs. Consistent with the ongoing reevaluation of DOE's plans for environmental restoration and waste management, an attempt was made to relate the needs developed in this meeting to the needs expressed in the draft Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Plan. Operations Offices were represented either by DOE staff or by contractor delegates from the area. This document summarizes the results of the meeting and lists the priority waste problems established.

  5. The need of a weight management control program in judo: a proposal based on the successful case of wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterkowicz Stanislaw

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Judo competitions are divided into weight classes. However, most athletes reduce their body weight in a few days before competition in order to obtain a competitive advantage over lighter opponents. To achieve fast weight reduction, athletes use a number of aggressive nutritional strategies so many of them place themselves at a high health-injury risk. In collegiate wrestling, a similar problem has been observed and three wrestlers died in 1997 due to rapid weight loss regimes. After these deaths, the National Collegiate Athletic Association had implemented a successful weight management program which was proven to improve weight management behavior. No similar program has ever been discussed by judo federations even though judo competitors present a comparable inappropriate pattern of weight control. In view of this, the basis for a weight control program is provided in this manuscript, as follows: competition should begin within 1 hour after weigh-in, at the latest; each athlete is allowed to be weighed-in only once; rapid weight loss as well as artificial rehydration (i.e., saline infusion methods are prohibited during the entire competition day; athletes should pass the hydration test to get their weigh-in validated; an individual minimum competitive weight (male athletes competing at no less than 7% and females at no less than 12% of body fat should be determined at the beginning of each season; athletes are not allowed to compete in any weight class that requires weight reductions greater than 1.5% of body weight per week. In parallel, educational programs should aim at increasing the athletes', coaches' and parents' awareness about the risks of aggressive nutritional strategies as well as healthier ways to properly manage body weight.

  6. Defense Logistics Agency Energy Needs to Improve Oversight of the Aviation Into Plane Reimbursement Card Program (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Systems Enterprise Server (FES). However, AIR Card transaction data are provided electronically to FES by KHI. Program officials stated that FES...KHI to negotiate, obtain, and pass on fuel discounts or savings, but KHI “shall never act or presume [ sic ] the responsibilities of pricing or...Fuels Automated Systems Enterprise Server KHI Kropp Holdings, Inc. MSC Multi Service Corporation SEA Ship Bunkers Easy Acquisition FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

  7. The need of a weight management control program in judo: a proposal based on the successful case of wrestling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Judo competitions are divided into weight classes. However, most athletes reduce their body weight in a few days before competition in order to obtain a competitive advantage over lighter opponents. To achieve fast weight reduction, athletes use a number of aggressive nutritional strategies so many of them place themselves at a high health-injury risk. In collegiate wrestling, a similar problem has been observed and three wrestlers died in 1997 due to rapid weight loss regimes. After these deaths, the National Collegiate Athletic Association had implemented a successful weight management program which was proven to improve weight management behavior. No similar program has ever been discussed by judo federations even though judo competitors present a comparable inappropriate pattern of weight control. In view of this, the basis for a weight control program is provided in this manuscript, as follows: competition should begin within 1 hour after weigh-in, at the latest; each athlete is allowed to be weighed-in only once; rapid weight loss as well as artificial rehydration (i.e., saline infusion) methods are prohibited during the entire competition day; athletes should pass the hydration test to get their weigh-in validated; an individual minimum competitive weight (male athletes competing at no less than 7% and females at no less than 12% of body fat) should be determined at the beginning of each season; athletes are not allowed to compete in any weight class that requires weight reductions greater than 1.5% of body weight per week. In parallel, educational programs should aim at increasing the athletes', coaches' and parents' awareness about the risks of aggressive nutritional strategies as well as healthier ways to properly manage body weight. PMID:20441594

  8. Workshop on Education and Training Needs for Philippine Environmental Programs (Manila, Philippines, May 27-31, 1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The workshop was designed to bring together Philippine and American scientists, engineers, educators, and administrators for collaborative identification of problems and issues relevant to environmental education and training needs, development of possible alternative solutions to the problems, and consideration of ways to strengthen the host…

  9. The Pink Lesson Plan: Addressing the Emotional Needs of Gay and Lesbian Students in Canadian Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The history of civil rights in Canada illustrates a growing trend by the government to support the physical, emotional, mental, legal, and financial needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. However, the education system presents a slightly different climate. Despite numerous policies and initiatives, gay and lesbian students…

  10. Developing Needs Analysis-Based Reading Comprehension Learning Materials: A Study on the Indonesian Language Study Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe the need of development of "Reading Comprehension" teaching materials to students and lecturers of Indonesian Language and Literature Education Department, Gorontalo. This research is included in the research and development to develop educational products in the form of teaching materials.…

  11. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Altered States: Encouraging Preparation for Learning in the Classroom for Students with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudliskis, Voldis

    2013-01-01

    In seeking to identify the processes associated with the immediate engagement of learning for students with mild special educational needs, this study examined the responses of an extraction group (n = 7) of 11- to 13-year-old students who participated in a number of lessons in which the opening episode involved the use of visualisation techniques…

  12. Serving the Needs of Separating and Divorcing Families: A National Survey of Extension Parenting Education Programs and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Maureen T.; Riffe, Jane; Brandon, Denise; Lo, Yi-An; Vaidyanath, Harini

    2013-01-01

    An online survey was developed to map Extension's presence in divorce education initiatives and to catalogue the amount, type, and availability of resources that each state has dedicated to meeting the needs of this parent audience. Requests for participation were sent to members on the National Extension Human Service listserv and resulted…

  13. An Assessment of Agriculture and Natural Resource Extension Program Needs on American Indian Reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Hill, George

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a needs assessment involving American Indians and outreach professionals on reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The survey featured 36 questions about agricultural and natural resource issues that may pose challenges on reservation lands. A comparison between reservation residents and…

  14. A controlled trial of the SibworkS group program for siblings of children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M; Ejova, Anastasia; Giallo, Rebecca; Strohm, Kate; Lillie, Meredith; Fuss, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Siblings of children with a disability are an at risk group for emotional and behavioral problems. This study evaluated an intervention to promote the emotional and behavioral functioning of siblings of children with disabilities and chronic health conditions. SibworkS is a six-week manual-based, cognitive-behavioral group support program focussed on strengthening siblings' perceived social support, self-esteem, problem-solving skills, adaptive coping behaviors and positive sibling relationships. Fifty-six children aged 7-12 were allocated to either the SibworkS program (n=30) or waitlist control (n=26) in alternating sequence. The primary outcome was siblings' emotional and behavioral functioning. Additional outcomes were self-esteem, perceived social support, the sibling relationship and coping behaviors. Siblings were followed-up immediately after the intervention and at 3-months. Siblings participating in the SibworkS intervention were reported to have fewer emotional and behavioral difficulties than siblings in the control group immediately following the intervention and at the 3-month follow-up. Participation in SibworkS was associated with fewer emotional and behavioral difficulties for siblings. Implications for practice and future research include recommendations for improving program participation. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Military Emergency Medical Service System Assessment: Application of the National Park Service Needs Assessment and Program Audit to Objectively Evaluate the Military EMS System of Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elliot M; Harper, Stephen A; Cunningham, Cord; Walrath, Benjamin D; DeMers, Gerard; Kharod, Chetan U

    2017-03-01

    As part of a Military Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system process improvement initiative, the authors sought to objectively evaluate the U.S. military EMS system for the island of Okinawa. They applied a program evaluation tool currently utilized by the U.S. National Park Service (NPS). A comprehensive needs assessment was conducted to evaluate the current Military EMS system in Okinawa, Japan. The NPS EMS Program Audit Worksheet was used to get an overall "score" of our assessment. After all the data had been collected, a joint committee of Military EMS physicians reviewed the findings and made formal recommendations. From 2011 to 2014, U.S. military EMS on Okinawa averaged 1,345 ± 137 patient transports annually. An advanced life support (ALS) provider would have been dispatched on 558 EMS runs (38%) based on chief complaint in 2014 had they been available. Over 36,000 man-hours were expended during this period to provide National Registry Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-accredited instruction to certify 141 Navy Corpsman as EMT Basics. The NPS EMS Program Audit Worksheet was used and the program scored a total of 31, suggesting the program is well planned and operating within standards. This evaluation of the Military EMS system on Okinawa using the NPS program assessment and audit worksheet demonstrates the NPS evaluation instruments may offer a useful assessment tool for the evaluation of Military EMS systems. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  17. Development and validation of a need-based integrated yoga program for cancer patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Amritanshu; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Rao, Raghavendra M; Bhargav, Hemant; Koka, Prasad S; Tripathi, Satyam; Nelamangala, Raghuram V; Kodaganur, Gopinath S; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) are gaining popularity amongst patients as add on to conventional medicine. Yoga stands third amongst all CAM that is being used by cancer patients today. Different schools of yoga use different sets of practices, with some using a more physical approach and many using meditation and/or breathing. All these modules are developed based on the needs of the patient. This paper is an attempt to provide the basis for a comprehensive need based integrative yoga module for cancer patients at different stages of treatment and follow up. In this paper, the holistic modules of the integrated approach of yoga therapy for cancer (IAYTC) have been developed based on the patient needs, as per the observations by the clinicians and the caregivers. Authors have attempted to systematically create holistic modules of IAYTC for various stages of the disease and treatment. These modules have been used in randomized trials to evaluate its efficacy and have shown to be effective as add-on to conventional management of cancer. Thus, the objective of this effort was to present the theoretical basis and validate the need based holistic yoga modules for cancer patients. Literature from traditional texts including Vedas, Ayurveda, Upanishads, Bhagavat Gita, Yoga Vasishtha etc. and their commentaries were looked into for references of cancer and therapeutic directives. Present day scientific literature was also explored with regards to defining cancer, its etiopathology and its management. Results of studies done using CAM therapies were also looked at, for salient findings. Focused group discussions (FGD) amongst researchers, experienced gurus, and medical professionals involved in research and clinical cancer practice were carried out with the objectives of determining needs of the patient and yoga practices that could prove efficient. A list of needs at different stages of conventional therapies (surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy) was

  18. Self-reported information needs of anesthesia residency applicants and analysis of applicant-related web sites resources at 131 United States training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Young, Chelsea A; Zamora, Abby K; Lowe, Derek; Hoang, Dan B; Pearl, Ronald G; Macario, Alex

    2011-02-01

    Despite the use of web-based information resources by both anesthesia departments and applicants, little research has been done to assess these resources and determine whether they are meeting applicant needs. Evidence is needed to guide anesthesia informatics research in developing high-quality anesthesia residency program Web sites (ARPWs). We used an anonymous web-based program (SurveyMonkey, Portland, OR) to distribute a survey investigating the information needs and perceived usefulness of ARPWs to all 572 Stanford anesthesia residency program applicants. A quantitative scoring system was then created to assess the quality of ARPWs in meeting the information needs of these applicants. Two researchers independently analyzed all 131 ARPWs in the United States to determine whether the ARPWs met the needs of applicants based on the scoring system. Finally, a qualitative assessment of the overall user experience of ARPWs was developed to account for the subjective elements of the Web site's presentation. Ninety-eight percent of respondents reported having used ARPWs during the application process. Fifty-six percent reported first visiting the Stanford ARPW when deciding whether to apply to Stanford's anesthesia residency program. Multimedia and Web 2.0 technologies were "very" or "most" useful in "learning intangible aspects of a program, like how happy people are" (42% multimedia and Web 2.0 versus 14% text and photos). ARPWs, on average, contained only 46% of the content items identified as important by applicants. The average (SD) quality scores among all ARPWs was 2.06 (0.59) of 4.0 maximum points. The mean overall qualitative score for all 131 ARPWs was 4.97 (1.92) of 10 points. Only 2% of applicants indicated that the majority (75%-100%) of Web sites they visited provided a complete experience. Anesthesia residency applicants rely heavily on ARPWs to research programs, prepare for interviews, and formulate a rank list. Anesthesia departments can improve their

  19. Developing Needs Analysis Based-Reading Comprehension Learning Materials: A Study on the Indonesian Language Study Program Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to describe the need of development of 'Reading Comprehension' teaching materials to students and lecturers of Indonesian Language and Literature Education Department, Gorontalo. This research is included in the research and development to develop educational products in the form of teaching materials. Mixed research design was used in this study to explore the data needs of the development of reading materials learning. Quantitative data was obtained from the responses of 36 respondents and 2 lecturers of the Reading subjects on the questionnaire needs analysis and questionnaire of teaching material analysis that is being used today. Likert Scale was used in questionnaire of needs analysis seen from 7 aspects, namely: content of teaching material, reading strategy, text type, text genre, text topic, learning activity, and evaluation of learning (81 items and questionnaire of teaching material analysis that was being used that amounted to 5 aspects, namely: the content of teaching materials, organization of teaching materials, language, layout, and completeness of teaching material support (31 items. Qualitative data were obtained from open questions about the experiences of students and lecturers in reading learning in the same questionnaire, as well as content analysis of the material being used. The results showed that the requirement of development of teaching materials, students and lecturers assessed 63 items (77.78% in the required category, and 18 items (22.22% with the required categories. Then, the teaching materials currently in use still lack the aspects of the content, the text type, the text genre, the text topic, and the evaluation of each learning unit. Details of the results obtained 4 items (12.90% as low category, 22 items (70.97% as enough category, and 5 items (16.13% as high category.

  20. IT Workforce: Key Practices Help Ensure Strong Integrated Program Teams; Selected Departments Need to Assess Skill Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    leadership retirements and had not identified gaps in future skill areas.26 We recommended that the department track and review...Page 11 GAO-17-8 IT Workforce historical workforce data and projections related to leadership retirements and identify IT skills needed...that they are in the process of establishing methods to gather, assess, and report information on IT skill gaps. Report to agency leadership on

  1. Drinking water quality and public health in Southwestern Saudi Arabia: The need for a national monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Jobran M; Asaad, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Essam M; Qureshi, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the bacteriological quality of drinking water, and explore the factors involved in the knowledge of the public about the quality of drinking water in Najran region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A total of 160 water samples were collected. Total coliforms, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococci were counted using Most Probable Number method. The bacterial genes lacZ and uidA specific to total coliforms and Escherichia coli, respectively, were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. An interview was conducted with 1200 residents using a questionnaire. Total coliforms were detected in 8 (20%) of 40 samples from wells, 13 (32.5%) of 40 samples from tankers, and 55 (68.8%) of 80 samples from roof tanks. Twenty (25%) and 8 (10%) samples from roof tanks were positive for E. coli and Streptococcus faecalis, respectively. Of the 1200 residents participating in the study, 10%, 45.5%, and 44.5% claimed that they depended on municipal water, bottled water, and well water, respectively. The majority (95.5%) reported the use of roof water tanks as a source of water supply in their homes. Most people (80%) believed that drinking water transmitted diseases. However, only 25% of them participated in educational programs on the effect of polluted water on health. Our results could help health authorities consider a proper regular monitoring program and a sustainable continuous assessment of the quality of well water. In addition, this study highlights the importance of the awareness and educational programs for residents on the effect of polluted water on public health.

  2. Drinking water quality and public health in Southwestern Saudi Arabia: The need for a national monitoring program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobran M Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim was to investigate the bacteriological quality of drinking water, and explore the factors involved in the knowledge of the public about the quality of drinking water in Najran region, Saudi Arabia. Study Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 water samples were collected. Total coliforms, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococci were counted using Most Probable Number method. The bacterial genes lacZ and uidA specific to total coliforms and Escherichia coli, respectively, were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. An interview was conducted with 1200 residents using a questionnaire. Results: Total coliforms were detected in 8 (20% of 40 samples from wells, 13 (32.5% of 40 samples from tankers, and 55 (68.8% of 80 samples from roof tanks. Twenty (25% and 8 (10% samples from roof tanks were positive for E. coli and Streptococcus faecalis, respectively. Of the 1200 residents participating in the study, 10%, 45.5%, and 44.5% claimed that they depended on municipal water, bottled water, and well water, respectively. The majority (95.5% reported the use of roof water tanks as a source of water supply in their homes. Most people (80% believed that drinking water transmitted diseases. However, only 25% of them participated in educational programs on the effect of polluted water on health. Conclusions: Our results could help health authorities consider a proper regular monitoring program and a sustainable continuous assessment of the quality of well water. In addition, this study highlights the importance of the awareness and educational programs for residents on the effect of polluted water on public health.

  3. Are promotion programs needed to establish off-grid solar energy markets? Evidence from rural Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Bensch, Gunther; Grimm, Michael (University of Passau, Germany); Peters, Jörg (RWI Essen, Germany); Huppertz, Max; Langbein, Jörg; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Off-grid solar electric power is a promising technology for remote regions in rural Africa where expansion of the electricity grids is prohibitively expensive. Using household data from a target region of an off-grid solar promotion program in Burkina Faso, this paper explores the role of quality-verified branded solar home systems (SHS) versus non-branded ones. We find that the adoption rate of non-branded SHS is considerably higher at 36 percent compared to eight percent for branded SHS. We...

  4. Nurse practitioners’ attitudes to nutritional challenges dealing with the patients’ nutritional needs and ability to care for themselves in a fast track program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nutrition plays an important role to the success of fast track programs, but under nutrition are still reported. Nutritional care seems to be a low priority among nurses even though it is well-known that insufficient nutrition has severe consequences for the patients. The aim...... is to report to what extent a training program has made Nutritional Nurse Practitioners aware of the nutritional care for short-term hospitalized patients, and how they deal with patients’ nutritional needs and ability to provide self-care in the context of a fast track program. Methods: Deductive content...... analysis was used to analyse data from four focus group interviews. Sixteen Nutritional Nurse Practitioners from either medical or surgery wards participated. The Nutritional Nurse Practitioners were interviewed twice. The interviews were recorded and verbally transcribed. Results: In the Nutritional Nurse...

  5. Teacher Training and Professional Development Needs in the Literacy Field: Implications of the New Spanish Programs for Elementary Education in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Hernández-Segura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the training and professional development of teachers in the literacy field, in order to analyze the implications of implementing the new Spanish program for Elementary Education in Costa Rica. For this purpose, the results obtained from questionnaires completed by current elementary teachers are shared, in order to get firsthand knowledge of their professional training and experience, as well as their training and pedagogical needs in the literacy field. Among the main findings of the research, it is considered as critical that the teachers’ own training and professional development regarding the initial processes of reading and writing allow them to fully comprehend the theoretical background of the Elementary Level Spanish Program; otherwise, there is a risk of misinterpretations and incorrect practices that might jeopardize the Program´s approach.

  6. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Duff, M.J. [Consolidated Technical Services, Inc., Walkersville, MD (United States)

    1992-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  7. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Courtney, J.C. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)); Duff, M.J. (Consolidated Technical Services, Inc., Walkersville, MD (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  8. Federal Food Programs-1975. Hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session. Part 8--Administrative Failure of Food Stamp Program. Hearings held Detroit, Michigan, Februrary 6, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    These hearings before the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs focused on the Food Stamp Programs problems in Detroit, Michigan. Testimony was heard from such witnesses as the following: Coleman Young, Mayor of the City of Detroit; Eleanor Josatis, Chairwoman; Mayor-Common Council's Task Force on Hunger and Malnutrition; Muriel…

  9. Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act: What do Geriatrics Healthcare Professionals Need to Know About the Quality Payment Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Hollmann, Peter A; Goldstein, Alanna C; Malone, Michael L

    2017-04-01

    Commencing in 2017, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 will change how Medicare pays health professionals. By enacting MACRA, Congress brought an end to the (un)sustainable growth rate formula while also setting forth a vision for how to transform the U.S. healthcare system so that clinicians deliver higher-quality care with smarter spending by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In October 2016, CMS released the first of what stakeholders anticipate will be a number of (annual) rules related to implementation of MACRA. CMS received extensive input from stakeholders including the American Geriatrics Society. Under the Quality Payment Program, CMS streamlined multiple Medicare value-based payment programs into a new Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). CMS also outlined how it will provide incentives for participation in Advanced Alternative Payment Models (called APMs). Although Medicare payments to geriatrics health professionals will not be based on the new MIPS formula until 2019, those payments will be based upon performance during a 90-day period in 2017. This article defines geriatrics health professionals as clinicians who care for a predominantly older adult population and who are eligible to bill under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Given the current paucity of eligible APMs, this article will focus on MIPS while providing a brief overview of APMs. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. The need for supplemental breast cancer screening modalities: a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening programs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for younger women with dense breasts from a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening program in Japan. Supplemental breast cancer screening modalities have been proposed to increase the sensitivity and detection rates of early stage breast cancer in women with dense breasts; however, there are no global guidelines that recommend the use of supplemental breast cancer screening modalities in such women. Also, no criterion standard exists for breast density assessment. Based on the current situation of breast imaging in Japan, the possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities are ultrasonography, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging. An appropriate population-based breast cancer screening program based on the balance between cost and benefit should be a high priority. Further research based on evidence-based medicine is encouraged. It is very important that the ethnicity, workforce, workflow, and resources for breast cancer screening in each country should be considered when considering supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for women with dense breasts.

  11. Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010: need, the process, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsubuga, Peter; Johnson, Kenneth; Tetteh, Christopher; Oundo, Joseph; Weathers, Andrew; Vaughan, James; Elbon, Suzanne; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Ndugulile, Faustine; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Evering-Watley, Michele; Mosha, Fausta; Oleribe, Obinna; Nguku, Patrick; Davis, Lora; Preacely, Nykiconia; Luce, Richard; Antara, Simon; Imara, Hiari; Ndjakani, Yassa; Doyle, Timothy; Espinosa, Yescenia; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Ngulefac, John; Njenga, Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    As of 2010 sub-Saharan Africa had approximately 865 million inhabitants living with numerous public health challenges. Several public health initiatives [e.g., the United States (US) President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the US President's Malaria Initiative] have been very successful at reducing mortality from priority diseases. A competently trained public health workforce that can operate multi-disease surveillance and response systems is necessary to build upon and sustain these successes and to address other public health problems. Sub-Saharan Africa appears to have weathered the recent global economic downturn remarkably well and its increasing middle class may soon demand stronger public health systems to protect communities. The Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been the backbone of public health surveillance and response in the US during its 60 years of existence. EIS has been adapted internationally to create the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) in several countries. In the 1990s CDC and the Rockefeller Foundation collaborated with the Uganda and Zimbabwe ministries of health and local universities to create 2-year Public Health Schools Without Walls (PHSWOWs) which were based on the FETP model. In 2004 the FETP model was further adapted to create the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) in Kenya to conduct joint competency-based training for field epidemiologists and public health laboratory scientists providing a master's degree to participants upon completion. The FELTP model has been implemented in several additional countries in sub-Saharan Africa. By the end of 2010 these 10 FELTPs and two PHSWOWs covered 613 million of the 865 million people in sub-Saharan Africa and had enrolled 743 public health professionals. We describe the process that we used to develop 10 FELTPs covering 15 countries in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010 as a

  12. Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010: need, the process, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsubuga, Peter; Johnson, Kenneth; Tetteh, Christopher; Oundo, Joseph; Weathers, Andrew; Vaughan, James; Elbon, Suzanne; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Ndugulile, Faustine; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Evering-Watley, Michele; Mosha, Fausta; Oleribe, Obinna; Nguku, Patrick; Davis, Lora; Preacely, Nykiconia; Luce, Richard; Antara, Simon; Imara, Hiari; Ndjakani, Yassa; Doyle, Timothy; Espinosa, Yescenia; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Ngulefac, John; Njenga, Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    As of 2010 sub-Saharan Africa had approximately 865 million inhabitants living with numerous public health challenges. Several public health initiatives [e.g., the United States (US) President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the US President's Malaria Initiative] have been very successful at reducing mortality from priority diseases. A competently trained public health workforce that can operate multi-disease surveillance and response systems is necessary to build upon and sustain these successes and to address other public health problems. Sub-Saharan Africa appears to have weathered the recent global economic downturn remarkably well and its increasing middle class may soon demand stronger public health systems to protect communities. The Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been the backbone of public health surveillance and response in the US during its 60 years of existence. EIS has been adapted internationally to create the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) in several countries. In the 1990s CDC and the Rockefeller Foundation collaborated with the Uganda and Zimbabwe ministries of health and local universities to create 2-year Public Health Schools Without Walls (PHSWOWs) which were based on the FETP model. In 2004 the FETP model was further adapted to create the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) in Kenya to conduct joint competency-based training for field epidemiologists and public health laboratory scientists providing a master's degree to participants upon completion. The FELTP model has been implemented in several additional countries in sub-Saharan Africa. By the end of 2010 these 10 FELTPs and two PHSWOWs covered 613 million of the 865 million people in sub-Saharan Africa and had enrolled 743 public health professionals. We describe the process that we used to develop 10 FELTPs covering 15 countries in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010 as a

  13. Managing control programs for ovine caseous lymphadenitis and paratuberculosis in Australia, and the need for persistent vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windsor PA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter Andrew WindsorFaculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Ovine caseous lymphadenitis (CLA and ovine Johne's disease (OJD or paratuberculosis have been serious diseases in the Australian sheep industry, mainly causing losses from abattoir condemnations from CLA or mortalities on the farm from OJD. CLA is now a disease of minimal concern, with clinical cases reported rarely. Although OJD continues to spread through parts of the sheep population, the catastrophic losses in flocks occurring prior to the introduction of vaccination are now uncommon. Change-management factors relevant to the improvements in both prevalence and producer concerns for CLA and OJD were examined, including drivers and motivation for change, resistance to change, knowledge management, farming system dimensions and leadership. Although extension programs addressing disease risk factors are likely to be of relevance to improved knowledge and attitudes towards disease risk management of producers, improvements in disease-control practices were considered largely attributable to the introduction of vaccination programs for CLA in 1983 and OJD in 2002. Inclusion of the CLA antigen within clostridial vaccines (“6 in 1” vaccine enabled routine annual CLA vaccination to occur in an increasing proportion of the national flock, with estimates of CLA prevalence suggesting a decline from 26% in 1995 to 5.2% in 2009. Encouraging the routine vaccination of lambs for OJD (Gudair vaccine in infected flocks to reduce or avoid losses significantly reduced the within-flock prevaccination–postvaccination median prevalence from 2.72% to 0.72%, based on estimated shedding rates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis determined by pooled fecal culture in 37 infected flocks vaccinating for at least 5 years. Although persistent use of CLA vaccine is a convenient intervention for producers, promoting the persistent use of OJD vaccination

  14. Assisting persons with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in their leisure engagement and communication needs with a basic technology-aided program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Simone, Isabella L; De Caro, Maria F; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Zullo, Valeria; Schirone, Simona; Denitto, Floriana; Zonno, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Eye-tracking communication devices and brain-computer interfaces are the two resources available to help people with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) avoid isolation and passivity. This study was aimed at assessing a technology-aided program (i.e., a third possible resource) for five patients with advanced ALS who needed support for communication and leisure activities. The participants were exposed to baseline and intervention conditions. The technology-aided program, which was used during the intervention, (a) included the communication and leisure options that each participant considered important for him or her (e.g., music, videos, statements/requests, and text messaging) and (b) allowed the participant to access those options with minimal responses (e.g., finger movement or eyelid closure) monitored via microswitches. The participants started leisure and communication engagement independently only during the intervention (i.e., when the program was used). The mean percentages of session time spent in those forms of engagement were between about 60 and 80. Preference checks and brief interviews indicated that participants and families liked the program. The program might be viewed as an additional approach/resource for patients with advanced ALS.

  15. Is there a need to include HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the Saudi premarital screening program on the basis of their prevalence and transmission risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alswaidi, F M; O'Brien, S J

    2010-11-01

    In January 2008, the Saudi Arabian health authority included mandatory testing for HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the premarital screening program. Epidemiologically, there were few justifications for their inclusion as disease prevalences and distributions are poorly understood in the population. This study aims to provide information about HBV, HCV and HIV prevalences and risk factors for disease transmission and so produce evidence for informed decision-making on the inclusion of these infectious diseases in the screening program. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study embedded in the existing national premarital screening program for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV infections (n=74,662 individuals), followed by a case-control study to identify risk factors responsible for infection transmission (n=540). The average HIV prevalence is 0.03%, 1.31% for HBV and 0.33% for HCV. Sharing personal belongings particularly razors, blood transfusions, cuts at barbershops and extramarital relationships showed the highest significant associations with the transmission of these viruses. The prevalences of HIV, HBV and HCV in Saudi Arabia are among the lowest worldwide. However, all the important risk factors associated with transmitting these viruses are significantly present in the Saudi community. Saudi Arabia is financially capable of screening for these infections in the mandatory premarital program and of providing medical care for the discovered cases, but focusing on the health education programs may offset the need to mandatory testing.

  16. Needs Assessment to Define the Training Requirements for a Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) Curriculum Development. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    found In !,-c!,’,jp sts scF -tmi:7nc these enabling exercises as a source of * i r auw taks -- to replace the deadspaice now, ;f orvvsistd in deleting... Scf !’s manpower needs. Finally, a checklist was created to be given to each SME prior to coming to the interview. The checklist contained a brief...O ’o I 0 c wc 0 <-C< LMJ 0 c -h r 0I ~ -54 -c -. Vc to a aX c. c0 ~c a-- c. o o 2 lbc wt cE7 ’ - to o 2 - it~~v cc Ccc 091 ’: *’ a ~ IC M c C r- -e

  17. Education and psychological support meet the supportive care needs of Taiwanese women three months after surgery for newly diagnosed breast cancer: a non-randomised quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mei-Nan; Chen, Shin-Cheh; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chen, Miin-Fu; Wang, Chao-Hui; Jane, Sui-Whi

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have comprehensively examined the effectiveness of information and psychosocial support on all dimensions of cancer patients' supportive care needs. To investigate the effects of education and psychological support on anxiety, symptom distress, social support, and unmet supportive care needs of Taiwanese women newly diagnosed with breast cancer over 3 months after surgery. Two-group, non-randomised quasi-experimental design. The general surgical outpatient department of the largest teaching medical centre in northern Taiwan. Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer (N=80) were divided into experimental (n=40) and control (n=40) groups. The experimental group received education and psychological support in the form of individual face-to-face and telephone follow-up sessions; the control group received routine care. Data were collected during the patients' first postoperative visit (baseline), 1 month after surgery, and 3 months after surgery. After adjusting for covariates, the levels of symptom distress and unmet needs for participants in the experimental group were lower at 1 and 3 months after surgery than for those in the control group, with the results at 3 months achieving significance. However, the sexuality needs for both groups were not significantly different at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, levels of state anxiety were significantly lower for the experimental group at 1 and 3 months than for the control group. The education and psychological support components of our intervention programme effectively improved the unmet supportive care needs of patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer 3 months after surgery. Following prolonged treatment, women with breast cancer still have physical, psychological, and information care needs. Thus, clinical healthcare personnel should continually and actively provide culturally sensitive, individualised, and accessible information and psychological support to these patients. Crown Copyright © 2013

  18. Program and plans of the U.S. Geological Survey for producing information needed in National Seismic hazards and risk assessment, fiscal years 1980-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Walter W.

    1979-01-01

    In accordance with the provisions of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-124), the U.S. Geological Survey has developed comprehensive plans for producing information needed to assess seismic hazards and risk on a national scale in fiscal years 1980-84. These plans are based on a review of the needs of Federal Government agencies, State and local government agencies, engineers and scientists engaged in consulting and research, professional organizations and societies, model code groups, and others. The Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act provided an unprecedented opportunity for participation in a national program by representatives of State and local governments, business and industry, the design professions, and the research community. The USGS and the NSF (National Science Foundation) have major roles in the national program. The ultimate goal of the program is to reduce losses from earthquakes. Implementation of USGS research in the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program requires the close coordination of responsibility between Federal, State and local governments. The projected research plan in national seismic hazards and risk for fiscal years 1980-84 will be accomplished by USGS and non-USGS scientists and engineers. The latter group will participate through grants and contracts. The research plan calls for (1) national maps based on existing methods, (2) improved definition of earthquake source zones nationwide, (3) development of improved methodology, (4) regional maps based on the improved methodology, and (5) post-earthquake investigations. Maps and reports designed to meet the needs, priorities, concerns, and recommendations of various user groups will be the products of this research and provide the technical basis for improved implementation.

  19. Addressing the Health and Wellness Needs of Vulnerable Rockaway Residents in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy: Findings From a Health Coaching and Community Health Worker Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Oberlink, Mia R; Shah, Shivani; Evans, Lauren; Bassuk, Karen

    To describe the design and participants of a program that employed health coaches and community health workers to address the social, health, and long-term disaster recovery needs of Rockaway residents roughly 2 years after Hurricane Sandy made landfall. Baseline and exit questionnaires, containing demographic, health, and health care utilization measures, were administered to participants at the start and end of the program. Enrollment and encounter information was captured in program administrative records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize participant characteristics, personal goals, referrals to local organizations and agencies, and outcomes. Qualitative analyses were used to identify recurring themes in challenges faced by participants and barriers to health and wellness. The program served 732 community residents, of whom 455 (62%) completed baseline and exit questionnaires. Participants were directly and/or indirectly impacted by Hurricane Sandy through property damage, closures of health care facilities, limited employment opportunities, and trouble securing affordable housing. Furthermore, many participants faced considerable adversities and struggled to manage chronic health conditions. Personal goals set by participants included locating health care and other resources (44%), weight management and healthy eating (35%), and self-management of chronic conditions (24%). Health coaches and community health workers engaged participants an average of 4 times-providing counseling and referrals to local organizations and services, including medical and dental services (29%), city-issued identification cards (27%), and health insurance and other entitlements (23%). Comparisons of baseline and exit surveys indicated significant improvements in self-reported health, health care utilization, and confidence managing health issues. No significant improvement was observed in the use of preventive health care services. The program represents a model for

  20. [On the way to becoming an MD (Dr. med.): What kind of support do doctoral students need? Part 1: Survey and development of a program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, Monika; Paulitsch, Michael A; Broermann, Marischa; Klingebiel, Thomas; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, medical doctorates are regularly criticized for their insufficient quality. In order to improve the quality of doctorates and to support doctoral candidates, a department-wide doctoral research program was established at the Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main in 2011 taking into account the practical needs of doctoral students at the School of Medicine. The program development proceeded in several steps: in the first step (2009/2010), a pilot study with eleven doctoral candidates was carried out at the Institute of General Practice. Their ratings of the perceived relevance and their own knowledge of 15 topics of scientific work were used to identify a provisional need for support. Subsequently an interdisciplinary panel of experts established the program throughout the faculty. Since its implementation, a requirements analysis in the form of questionnaires has been continuously carried out in order to assess the doctoral students' prior knowledge and their preferences expressed. At the same time, systematic searches for support programs in other medical fields have been conducted throughout Germany on several occasions. On the basis of the pilot study, the research results and the expert panel discussions the following topics were found to be particularly relevant: principles of good scientific practice, literature search, reference management, organization and structure of a doctoral thesis, formatting of Word documents, clinical epidemiology and data management. A specific, stepwise development process was used to design a concept for the faculty of medicine that pays close attention to the knowledge and interests of doctoral candidates. The establishment of the doctoral research program in Frankfurt and the results of its evaluation are presented in a second article (Paulitsch et al., 2016). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Needs assessment of science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana: A basis for in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Alexander

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it identified the priority needs common to all science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana. Second, it investigated the relationship existing between the identified priority needs and the teacher demographic variables (type of school, teacher qualification, teaching experience, subject discipline, and sex of teacher) to be used as a basis for implementing in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers in Kumasi Ghana. An adapted version of the Moore Assessment Profile (MAP) survey instrument and a set of open-ended questions were used to collect data from the science teachers. The researcher handed out one hundred and fifty questionnaire packets, and all one hundred and fifty (100%) were collected within a period of six weeks. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics reported the frequency of responses, and it was used to calculate the Need Index (N) of the identified needs of teachers. Sixteen top-priority needs were identified, and the needs were arranged in a hierarchical order according to the magnitude of the Need Index (0.000 ≤ N ≤ 1.000). Content analysis was used to analyze the responses to the open-ended questions. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses of the study on each of the sixteen identified top-priority needs and the teacher demographic variables. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) The science teachers identified needs related to "more effective use of instructional materials" as a crucial area for in-service training. (2) Host and Satellite schools exhibited significant difference on procuring supplementary science books for students. Subject discipline of teachers exhibited significant differences on utilizing the library and its facilities by students, obtaining information on where to get help on effective science teaching

  2. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  3. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  4. Infrastructure and Educational Needs of Newborn Screening Short-Term Follow-Up Programs within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative: A Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia A. Bellcross

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Newborn screening (NBS follow-up protocols vary significantly by state, and there is a need to better understand the infrastructure and communication flow of NBS programs. In addition, assessment of the educational needs of families and providers with regard to the implications of NBS results is required to inform the development of appropriate informational resources and training opportunities. To begin to address these issues, we administered a web-based survey to state NBS coordinators within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative (SERC. Fourteen coordinators responded to the survey, including at least one from each of the 10 SERC states/territories. Over one-third of respondents had never received formal training regarding the metabolic conditions identified on NBS. Most communicated results via telephone or fax, though two centers indicated use of a web-based platform. Only two programs were involved in directly reporting results to the family. Four programs reported a long-term follow-up protocol. Deficits were noted for primary care provider (PCP knowledge of metabolic disorders identified on NBS, and how to inform parents of abnormal results. Close to half indicated that the adequacy of the number of genetic counselors, dietitians, and medical/biochemical geneticists was minimal to insufficient. Respondents uniformly recognized the importance of providing additional educational and informational resources in multiple categories to NBS staff, PCPs, and families.

  5. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE.

  6. Gamma Ray Shielding Study of Barium–Bismuth–Borosilicate Glasses as Transparent Shielding Materials using MCNP-4C Code, XCOM Program, and Available Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, linear and mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density, mean free paths, and half value layer and 10th value layer values of barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses were obtained for 662 keV, 1,173 keV, and 1,332 keV gamma ray energies using MCNP-4C code and XCOM program. Then obtained data were compared with available experimental data. The MCNP-4C code and XCOM program results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses have good gamma ray shielding properties from the shielding point of view.

  7. Influence of the Expression of Inflammatory Markers on Kidney after Fetal Programming in an Experimental Model of Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Donizete Pereira Júnior

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the expression of inflammatory markers in experimental renal failure after fetal programming. Methods. The offspring aged two and five months were divided into four groups: CC (control dams, control offspring; DC (diabetic dams, control offspring; CFA (control dams, folic acid offspring, 250 mg/Kg; and DFA (diabetic dams, folic acid offspring. Gene expression of inflammatory markers MCP-1, IL-1, NOS3, TGF-β, TNF-α, and VEGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results. MCP-1 was increased in the CFA and DFA groups at two and five months of age, as well as in DC5 when compared to CC5. There was a higher expression of IL-1 in the CFA2, DFA2, and DC2 groups. There was a decrease in NOS3 and an increase in TNF-α in DFA5 in relation to CFA5. The gene expression of TGF-β increased in cases that had received folic acid at two and five months, and VEGF decreased in the CFA5 and DFA5 groups. DC5 showed increased VEGF expression in comparison with CC5. Conclusions. Gestational diabetes mellitus and folic acid both change the expression of inflammatory markers, thus demonstrating that the exposure to harmful agents in adulthood has a more severe impact in cases which underwent fetal reprogramming.

  8. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gude Tore

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Methods Two hundred and twenty seven (94% of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Results Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Conclusion Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate

  9. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rø, Karin E Isaksson; Gude, Tore; Aasland, Olaf G

    2007-03-16

    Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Two hundred and twenty seven (94%) of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach) compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate treatment.

  10. The Need for Social Ethics in Interdisciplinary Environmental Science Graduate Programs: Results from a Nation-Wide Survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Troy E; Engebretson, Jesse; O'Rourke, Michael; Piso, Zach; Whyte, Kyle; Valles, Sean

    2017-04-01

    Professionals in environmental fields engage with complex problems that involve stakeholders with different values, different forms of knowledge, and contentious decisions. There is increasing recognition of the need to train graduate students in interdisciplinary environmental science programs (IESPs) in these issues, which we refer to as "social ethics." A literature review revealed topics and skills that should be included in such training, as well as potential challenges and barriers. From this review, we developed an online survey, which we administered to faculty from 81 United States colleges and universities offering IESPs (480 surveys were completed). Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that IESPs should address values in applying science to policy and management decisions. They also agreed that programs should engage students with issues related to norms of scientific practice. Agreement was slightly less strong that IESPs should train students in skills related to managing value conflicts among different stakeholders. The primary challenges to incorporating social ethics into the curriculum were related to the lack of materials and expertise for delivery, though challenges such as ethics being marginalized in relation to environmental science content were also prominent. Challenges related to students' interest in ethics were considered less problematic. Respondents believed that social ethics are most effectively delivered when incorporated into existing courses, and they preferred case studies or problem-based learning for delivery. Student competence is generally not assessed, and respondents recognized a need for both curricular materials and assessment tools.

  11. Experimental facilities for the research on fire hazard and the programs carried out at the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN); Les dispositifs experimentaux pour la recherche sur l'incendie et les programmes menes a l'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavaleta, P.; Such, J.M.; Le Saux, W.; Pretrel, H.; Coutin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Lab. d' Experimentation des Feux (SEREA/LEF), 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    The French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) owns several experimental facilities of various capacities devoted to research programs for the needs of safety evaluation of nuclear facilities. This paper presents the different facilities that IRSN has acquired during the last years for the large scale experimental researches on fire hazards. The research topics concern the fires in confined and ventilated environments, the study of smokes propagation and the fires inside electrical cabinets. These topics are illustrated with some examples of completed research programs. (J.S.)

  12. The current status of autologous blood transfusion in Japan--the importance of pre-deposit autologous blood donation program and the needs to achieve patient blood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, Nelson Hirokazu; Nagura, Yutaka; Kawabata, Michiru; Matsuhashi, Mika; Sone, Shinji; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Okochi, Naoko; Takahashi, Koki

    2013-12-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is currently considered the safest transfusion, since the risks of allogeneic immunological reaction and viral transmission are theoretically null. Although its use has declined in Western countries in the recent decade, it has been progressively expanded in Japan. With the widening of the concept of patient blood management (PBM), which aims to prevent the harmful adverse effects of the exposure to allogeneic blood, the importance of the ABT has once again gained interest. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the cases pre-depositing autologous blood for an elective surgery in the period of January 2000 to December 2010 in our hospital, where a pre-deposit autologous blood donation (PAD) program has been established in 2006, in an attempt to analyze the improvements achieved, and the problems remaining to achieve patient blood management. The PAD program contributed for the further improvement of ABT, and the number of participating patients increased, especially in the period 2002-2003, when the idea of PAD program implementation came out. By simple extrapolation of the ABT data to allogeneic blood, ABT was found to be superior in terms of cost-effectiveness. However, problems such as the high wastage rate, and the inappropriate transfusion triggers remain to be solved. ABT plays the central role in PBM, but to achieve the real PBM, there is need to indicate ABT appropriately, according to the individual needs, and use it adequately, without discarding. Our present data reflect the present status of the ABT performance in Japan, and will serve as the basis for the development of strategies to achieve safe and appropriate performance of ABT, and consequently, achieve PBM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Within a smoking-cessation program, what impact does genetic information on lung cancer need to have to demonstrate cost-effectiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Louisa G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many smoking-cessation programs and pharmaceutical aids demonstrate substantial health gains for a relatively low allocation of resources. Genetic information represents a type of individualized or personal feedback regarding the risk of developing lung cancer, and hence the potential benefits from stopping smoking, may motivate the person to remain smoke-free. The purpose of this study was to explore what the impact of a genetic test needs to have within a typical smoking-cessation program aimed at heavy smokers in order to be cost-effective. Methods Two strategies were modelled for a hypothetical cohort of heavy smokers aged 50 years; individuals either received or did not receive a genetic test within the course of a usual smoking-cessation intervention comprising nicotine replacement therapy (NRT and counselling. A Markov model was constructed using evidence from published randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses for estimates on 12-month quit rates and long-term relapse rates. Epidemiological data were used for estimates on lung cancer risk stratified by time since quitting and smoking patterns. Extensive sensitivity analyses were used to explore parameter uncertainty. Results The discounted incremental cost per QALY was AU$34,687 (95% CI $12,483, $87,734 over 35 years. At a willingness-to-pay of AU$20,000 per QALY gained, the genetic testing strategy needs to produce a 12-month quit rate of at least 12.4% or a relapse rate 12% lower than NRT and counselling alone for it to be equally cost-effective. The likelihood that adding a genetic test to the usual smoking-cessation intervention is cost-effective was 20.6% however cost-effectiveness ratios were favourable in certain situations (e.g., applied to men only, a 60 year old cohort. Conclusions The findings were sensitive to small changes in critical variables such as the 12-month quit rates and relapse rates. As such, the cost-effectiveness of the genetic testing

  14. The Surface UV Environment on Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry and the Need for Experimental Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Wordsworth, Robin; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2017-07-01

    Potentially habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs are of intense astrobiological interest because they are the only rocky worlds accessible to biosignature search over the next 10+ years because of a confluence of observational effects. Simultaneously, recent experimental and theoretical work suggests that UV light may have played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, especially the origin of RNA. Characterizing the UV environment on M-dwarf planets is important for understanding whether life as we know it could emerge on such worlds. In this work, we couple radiative transfer models to observed M-dwarf spectra to determine the UV environment on prebiotic Earth-analog planets orbiting M dwarfs. We calculate dose rates to quantify the impact of different host stars on prebiotically important photoprocesses. We find that M-dwarf planets have access to 100-1000 times less bioactive UV fluence than the young Earth. It is unclear whether UV-sensitive prebiotic chemistry that may have been important to abiogenesis, such as the only known prebiotically plausible pathways for pyrimidine ribonucleotide synthesis, could function on M-dwarf planets. This uncertainty affects objects like the recently discovered habitable-zone planets orbiting Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1, and LHS 1140. Laboratory studies of the sensitivity of putative prebiotic pathways to irradiation level are required to resolve this uncertainty. If steady-state M-dwarf UV output is insufficient to power these pathways, transient elevated UV irradiation due to flares may suffice; laboratory studies can constrain this possibility as well.

  15. A Case Study on the Implementation of a Positive Youth Development Program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: Learning from the Experimental Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation of the implementation of a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. was part of a large study undertaken comprehensively to explore how effective the Tier 1 Program was in practice and how the results can shed light on future developments. Utilizing a case study approach, individual and focus group interviews were conducted in 2007 to examine the factors that influence the process and quality of implementation of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The focus of this study was on how the implementers of a school made use of the experience gained in the Experimental Implementation Phase (EIP in 2005/06 to improve the program implementation quality in the Full Implementation Phase (FIP in 2006/07. Results showed that the program implementation in the FIP was generally high and the program was well received by the implementers. Factors that facilitated the implementation of the program were identified, including the adoption of an incremental change strategy, the incorporation of the program into both formal and informal curricula, positive perceptions of the program among staff and agency social workers, sufficient school administrative support, excellent cooperation between the school and the social work agency, presence of a dedicated school contact person and instructors who engaged themselves in continuous quality improvement of the implementation, and an emphasis on application of what had been learned. Difficulties encountered by the school in the process of implementation were also observed. Based on the present findings, key process variables that facilitate or impede the implementation of positive youth development programs are discussed. Implications for future program implementation are also discussed.

  16. Experimental and numerical validation of a fuzzy intermittence programming system; Validation experimentale et numerique d`un programmateur d`intermittence flou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraisse, G.; Virgone, J. [Centre de Thermiquede Lyon, CETHIL (CNRS), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, a new intermittence programming system using fuzzy logic for heating systems is presented. Its originality concerns the consideration of the thermal state of the building in addition to the external temperature. The experimentation of a prototype of this regulator during mid-time season has shown its good adaptability to climate and to the building-heating system ensemble. Also, numerical simulations of the experimentation site have allowed to study the behaviour of both the Honeywell and the prototype regulators during cold season and to evaluate the energy consumption. Both regulators show close regulation performances but the prototype allows to greatly reduce the energy consumption. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  17. Meeting the online educational needs of international health promoters: an evaluation of a comprehensive, multilingual global training program in tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Mark; Cohen, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    An evaluation of a global online training program in tobacco control offered in multiple languages was conducted to identify ways in which the varied online educational needs of its international participants could be more effectively met. An online survey was administered to a sample of training participants to solicit feedback regarding course content and delivery. In addition, participants' training site usage patterns were examined. Findings showed high levels of satisfaction with training content and delivery, as well as of knowledge acquisition and utilization. Respondents indicated that it was important that course content be current and relevant to their practice. Although findings are consistent with best practices for online continuing education, in practice it is challenging to keep material updated, incorporate examples and case studies from the participants' countries, and integrate adequate opportunities for interactivity when a course has geographically and linguistically diverse participants. Low-cost, technologically appropriate solutions should be developed to maximize the effectiveness of similar continuing education programs for health promoters worldwide. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Organizational aspects of an experimental program for physical education with a strengthened course in professional and applied physical training of future electrical engineers in the railway sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Yefremova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop an optimized program for physical education with a strengthened course in professional and applied physical training (PAPT for students of railway universities. Material & Methods: analysis and generalization of scientific sources and program-normative documentation on physical education of the higher educational institution of railway transport, survey. Results: the results of the survey of railroad specialists are given. Pilot studies have determined the nature and conditions of professional activity of electrical engineers of railway transport. The experimental program on physical education with the strengthened course of the PAPT of students of railway universities was developed and theoretically justified. Conclusion: structure of the experimental program on physical education with the strengthened course of the PAPT included a theoretical section (8 hours, methodical and practical exercises (6 hours, a practical section (114 hours and a control section (12 hours. The program focuses on improving professionally important physical and psycho-physiological qualities and functions, psychomotor skills and physical performance. The basis of the practical section was the physical exercises from different sections of the current basic curriculum.

  19. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions.

  20. Perceived needs for the information communication technology (ICT)-based personalized health management program, and its association with information provision, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decisional conflict in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jin Ah; Chang, Yoon Jung; Shin, Aesun; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Young Tae; Jeong, Seoung-Yong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yoon Jun; Heo, Daesuk; Kim, Tae-You; Oh, Do-Youn; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Hak Jae; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Yun, Young Ho

    2017-11-01

    The use of information communication technology (ICT)-based tailored health management program can have significant health impacts for cancer patients. Information provision, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decision conflicts were analyzed for their relationship with need for an ICT-based personalized health management program in Korean cancer survivors. The health program needs of 625 cancer survivors from two Korean hospitals were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the need for an ICT-based tailored health management system. Association of the highest such need with medical information experience, HRQOL, and decision conflicts was determined. Furthermore, patient intentions and expectations for a web- or smartphone-based tailored health management program were investigated. Cancer survivors indicated high personalized health management program needs. Patients reporting the highest need included those with higher income (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.70; 95% [confidence interval] CI, 1.10-2.63), those who had received enough information regarding helping themselves (aOR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.09-2.66), and those who wished to receive more information (aOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 0.97-2.61). Participants with cognitive functioning problems (aOR, 2.87; 95%CI, 1.34-6.17) or appetite loss (aOR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.07-2.93) indicated need for a tailored health care program. Patients who perceived greater support from the decision-making process also showed the highest need for an ICT-based program (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.30-0.82). We found that higher income, information provision experience, problematic HRQOL, and decisional conflicts are significantly associated with the need for an ICT-based tailored self-management program. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolchik, S A; West, S G; Sandler, I N; Tein, J Y; Coatsworth, D; Lengua, L; Weiss, L; Anderson, E R; Greene, S M; Griffin, W A

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 theory-based preventive interventions for divorced families: a program for mothers and a dual component mother-child program. The mother program targeted mother-child relationship quality, discipline, interparental conflict, and the father-child relationship. The child program targeted active coping, avoidant coping, appraisals of divorce stressors, and mother-child relationship quality. Families with a 9- to 12-year-old child (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the mother, dual-component, or self-study program. Postintervention comparisons showed significant positive program effects of the mother program versus self-study condition on relationship quality, discipline, attitude toward father-child contact, and adjustment problems. For several outcomes, more positive effects occurred in families with poorer initial functioning. Program effects on externalizing problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up. A few additive effects of the dual-component program occurred for the putative mediators; none occurred for adjustment problems.

  2. Systematic Review of Programs Treating High-Need and High-Cost People With Multiple Chronic Diseases or Disabilities in the United States, 2008–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Sara N.; Sherrod, Cheryl; Chiang, Anne; Boyd, Cynthia; Wolff, Jennifer; DuGoff, Eva; Salzberg, Claudia; Anderson, Keely; Leff, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Finding ways to provide better and less expensive health care for people with multiple chronic conditions or disability is a pressing concern. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate different approaches for caring for this high-need and high-cost population. Methods We searched Medline for articles published from May 31, 2008, through June 10, 2014, for relevant studies. Articles were considered eligible for this review if they met the following criteria: included people with multiple chronic conditions (behavioral or mental health) or disabilities (2 or more); addressed 1 or more of clinical outcomes, health care use and spending, or patient satisfaction; and compared results from an intervention group with a comparison group or baseline measurements. We extracted information on program characteristics, participant characteristics, and significant (positive and negative) clinical findings, patient satisfaction, and health care use outcomes. For each outcome, the number of significant and positive results was tabulated. Results Twenty-seven studies were included across 5 models of care. Of the 3 studies reporting patient satisfaction outcomes, 2 reported significant improvements; both were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 14 studies reporting clinical outcomes, 12 reported improvements (8 were RCTs). Of the 13 studies reporting health care use and spending outcomes, 12 reported significant improvements (2 were RCTs). Two models of care — care and case management and disease management — reported improvements in all 3 outcomes. For care and case management models, most improvements were related to health care use. For the disease management models, most improvements were related to clinical outcomes. Conclusions Care and case management as well as disease management may be promising models of care for people with multiple chronic conditions or disabilities. More research and consistent methods are needed to understand the

  3. Systematic Review of Programs Treating High-Need and High-Cost People With Multiple Chronic Diseases or Disabilities in the United States, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Sara N; Sherrod, Cheryl; Chiang, Anne; Boyd, Cynthia; Wolff, Jennifer; DuGoff, Eva; Chang, Eva; Salzberg, Claudia; Anderson, Keely; Leff, Bruce; Anderson, Gerard

    2015-11-12

    Finding ways to provide better and less expensive health care for people with multiple chronic conditions or disability is a pressing concern. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate different approaches for caring for this high-need and high-cost population. We searched Medline for articles published from May 31, 2008, through June 10, 2014, for relevant studies. Articles were considered eligible for this review if they met the following criteria: included people with multiple chronic conditions (behavioral or mental health) or disabilities (2 or more); addressed 1 or more of clinical outcomes, health care use and spending, or patient satisfaction; and compared results from an intervention group with a comparison group or baseline measurements. We extracted information on program characteristics, participant characteristics, and significant (positive and negative) clinical findings, patient satisfaction, and health care use outcomes. For each outcome, the number of significant and positive results was tabulated. Twenty-seven studies were included across 5 models of care. Of the 3 studies reporting patient satisfaction outcomes, 2 reported significant improvements; both were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 14 studies reporting clinical outcomes, 12 reported improvements (8 were RCTs). Of the 13 studies reporting health care use and spending outcomes, 12 reported significant improvements (2 were RCTs). Two models of care - care and case management and disease management - reported improvements in all 3 outcomes. For care and case management models, most improvements were related to health care use. For the disease management models, most improvements were related to clinical outcomes. Care and case management as well as disease management may be promising models of care for people with multiple chronic conditions or disabilities. More research and consistent methods are needed to understand the most appropriate care for these high-need and

  4. Experimental verification of the program of improvement of physical training of officers-instructors at higher educational establishment of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Bezpaliy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grounded, developed and tested efficiency of the program of officers-teachers’ improvement in physical training. Borne change in organization of physical training, correlation of volumes of general and special physical training is changed, entered readings with a prophylactic and training orientation. The level of physical preparedness of teaching staff of higher institutes is investigational. In research took part 62 officers-teacher under the age of 40 years. The level of physical preparedness was determined on results at run on 100 meters, undercuttings on a cross-beam and runs on 1000 meters. It is set that employments on the experimental program were instrumental in more expressed growth of level of physical preparedness of teachers. A difference between the indexes of officers of experimental and control groups in speed qualities makes 0,12 seconds, in power qualities - 1,8 times, in endurance - 40,5 seconds.

  5. Electro-acupuncture reduces the need for additional anesthetics in experimental studies Eletroacupuntura reduz a necessidade de doses adicionais de anestésicos em estudos experimentais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agamenon Honório Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the possible beneficial effects of electro-acupuncture in rats subjected to ketamine/xylazine (KX intra-peritoneal (i.p. anesthesia. METHODS: Forty-eight male Wistar rats were distributed in four equal groups. All rats received i.p. injections of ketamine (90 mg/kg +xylazine (10 mg/kg anesthesia. Basal values group (control rats (BV received no additional treatment. The equivalent of the human right ST36 (Zusanli and CV-12(Zhongwan acupoints were chosen for needling and electrical stimulation. AC rats were needled with sterilized disposable stainless steel needles at right ST36 and CV12 acupoints; needles were retained for 30 minutes. EAC10 rats, after needle insertion as described, had electrodes connected to both needles and to an electro stimulator model NKL EL-608; pulsed square waves, 10 Hz, 10 mA, was applied for 30 minutes. EAC100 rats were submitted to EA as described. However, a greater frequency (100 Hz was used. RESULTS: Thirty-seven rats remained under adequate anesthetic level during the experiment. However, maintenance anesthesia was required by 11 rats. Need for additional anesthesia decreased to 9.1% in EAC100 rats compared to BV (36.3%. CONCLUSION: Both the AC and the EAC10/100 prolong the anesthetic effect of the combination Ketamine-xylazine in rats, allowing longer duration of anesthesia with a lower dose of anesthetic, thereby reducing the occurrence of complications.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os possíveis efeitos benéficos da eletroacupuntura em ratos submetidos à anestesia intraperitoneal (i.p. com ketamina / xilazina. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e oito ratos Wistar foram randomizados em quatro grupos iguais. Todos os ratos receberam injeções i.p. de ketamina (90 mg / kg + xilazina (10 mg / kg. Os ratos do grupo Valores Basais (controle - BV não receberam nenhum tratamento adicional. Os acupontos equivalentes aos humanos E-36 (Zusanli e VC-12 (Zhongwan foram escolhidos para inserção de agulhas e estimulação el

  6. Systematic Instruction for Retarded Children: The Illinois Program - Experimental Edition. Part IV: Motor Performance and Recreation Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Anthony G.; Jeanrenaud, Claudine Y.

    The manual of programed instruction for motor skills and recreational activities for trainable mentally handicapped children includes guidelines on basic recreation movements, rhythm in music, handicrafts, and miscellaneous activities. The guidelines employ principles of behavior change and direct instruction. Detailed programed instruction lists…

  7. Promoting Child Development through Group-Based Parent Support within a Cash Transfer Program: Experimental Effects on Children's Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Lia C. H.; Kagawa, Rose M. C.; Knauer, Heather A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined effects on child development of a group-based parenting support program ("Educación Inicial" - EI) when combined with Mexico's conditional cash transfer (CCT) program ("Prospera," originally 'Oportunidades" and "Progresa"). This cluster-randomized trial included 204 communities (n = 1,113 children in…

  8. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to…

  9. Experimental Impacts of a Teacher Professional Development Program in Chile on Preschool Classroom Quality and Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E.; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M. Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J.; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found…

  10. Exploring the Complexities of Experimental Design: Using an On-line Reaction Time Program as a Teaching Tool for Diverse Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Alexia E

    2010-01-01

    Students are rarely given an opportunity to think deeply about experimental design or asked to develop experimental protocols on their own. Without participating in these endeavors, they are often unaware of the many decisions necessary to construct a precise methodology. This article describes an on-line reaction time program, and how I have used this program as a teaching tool for students to explore experimental design. This approach can be tailored to meet the level of any undergraduate student - from non-science majors to upper-level biology/psychology/neuroscience majors, affording all students the opportunity to think like a scientist. Described is how I use the reaction time program for a whole class demonstration and discussion, as well as, how it can be used for a written assignment in which each student designs and conducts his/her own experiment outside of the classroom. Comments from several students, who did the written assignment, are included to provide a sense of their thoughts and considerations. When students are given a simple method, such as the measurement of reaction time, it allows them to focus exclusively on developing precise methodology, which taps into types of thinking that they are not often asked to exhibit in other science classes.

  11. HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program cores 9 & 10: columnar hexagonal point-on-point packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  12. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  13. HEALTH NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Radulovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human needs are of great interest to different scientific fields: sociology, anthropology, psychology, medicine, economy… Malinowski, Maslow, Adler and From have largely contributed to studying the needs. While trying to define the need concept, not only one definition is acceptable. In psychology, need is defined as a lack or disorder, i.e. the necessity to dislodge this lack. It was Maslow who gave the fullest classification and explanation of human needs. If we start from the fact that need represents the lack or deficit of something, in this context health needs would indicate the lack of health, and the measurement of health needs would be the same as the measurement of health. Therefore, almost all human needs can be enumerated as health needs, i.e. those which, after being satisfied, can lead to physical, psychical and social welfare. According to WHO, health needs can be defined as scientifically settled evasions from health which require preventive, curative and probably regulative and eradicative measurements. According to the medical method used by the health service while regarding the needs, the emphasis is on morbidity, mortality, incidence, prevalence, inability, etc. Usually, when we have very low level of health culture, and the responsibility for personal health is in most of the cases unacceptable, for the health service user the curative services will have priority over preventive ones. The measurement of health needs is a complex task. The needs can be regarded through medical documentation and by perception of the needs by people in the community.

  14. Meeting the needs of parents around the time of diagnosis of disability among their children: evaluation of a novel program for information, support, and liaison by key workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, Jugnoo S; Manaras, Irene; Tuomainen, Helena; Hundt, Gillian Lewando

    2004-10-01

    Key worker programs for families of children with disabilities, to promote information provision, emotional support, and liaisons among different agencies, have long been advocated but not extensively implemented. We report the impact on the experiences of parents and the practices of health care professionals of a novel, hospital-based, key worker service (Community Link Team [CLT]), implemented in the pediatric ophthalmology department of Great Ormond Street Hospital (London, United Kingdom). The CLT included 2 members, 1 of whom was present during the first outpatient assessment by the consultant ophthalmologist of any child newly diagnosed as visually impaired (corrected acuity of 6/18 or worse in the better eye) and accompanied the family during other assessments performed during that visit. A dedicated room was used by the CLT members to spend time with each family after completion of the clinical assessments. The CLT members reiterated and/or clarified clinical information already provided, specifically advised the families about visual stimulation programs and the benefits and purpose of visual impairment certification, and provided information about educational and social services. The same CLT member met the family at subsequent visits to the department and acted as the first point of contact for parents. Parents of children newly diagnosed with visual impairment and/or ophthalmic disorders at Great Ormond Street Hospital participated in a 2-stage study to assess their needs, their views about the processes of care, and their overall satisfaction. The study included a questionnaire survey with 2 standard instruments, ie, the Measure of Processes of Care, specifically developed and used to assess parents' views of the degree to which health services for a range of childhood disorders are family-centered, and the short form of the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, used to assess overall parental satisfaction or dissatisfaction with services in the

  15. Teacher Education Program Learning Technologies and Knowledge (Tac at the Pedagogical University Experimental Libertador Core Barinas (Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to propose a teacher training program of Learning Technologies and Knowledge (TAC at the Pedagogic University Libertador Barinas centre (Venezuela. This work is framed as a feasible project, supported by a descriptive field research. It was determined that teacher training programs Learning Technologies and Communication require an organizational structure, which should be under the figure of a coordination that is responsible for organizing everything related to the development of these projects.

  16. Reducing HIV risk among transgender women in Thailand: a quasi-experimental evaluation of the sisters program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangta Pawa

    Full Text Available Transgender women are particularly at risk of HIV infection, but little evidence exists on effective HIV prevention strategies with this population. We evaluated whether Sisters, a peer-led program for transgender women, could reduce HIV risks in Pattaya, Thailand. The study used time-location sampling to recruit 308 transgender women in Pattaya into a behavioral survey in 2011. Coarsened exact matching was used to create statistically equivalent groups of program participants and non-participants, based on factors influencing likelihood of program participation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated effects of any program participation and participation by delivery channel on: condom use at last sex; consistent condom and condom/water-based lubricant use in the past 3 months with commercial, casual, and regular partners; and receipt of HIV testing in the past 6 months. Program coverage reached 75% of the population. In a matched sub-sample (n = 238, participation in outreach was associated with consistent condom/water-based lubricant use with commercial partners (AOR 3.22, 95% CI 1.64-6.31. Attendance at the Sisters drop-in center was associated with receiving an HIV test (AOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.47-4.52. Dedicated transgender-friendly programs are effective at reducing HIV risks and require expansion to better serve this key population and improve HIV prevention strategies.

  17. Design Skills Education for Students of Advanced Course in College of Technology in Cooperation with the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoyuki; Sakabe, Toshiya; Koshiba, Takashi; Ishitobi, Manabu

    Since 2004, Nara National College of Technology has been conducting “The Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project”, in which the staff of our college visit elementary or junior high schools to provide special classes on science, technology or other subjects. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. To provide education on design skills for students in the advanced mechanical engineering course and advanced electronic and information engineering course of the faculty of advanced engineering of our college, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been conducted with the cooperation of the Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project. In the PBL, students developed the teaching materials and experiments for science and technology lessons of elementary or junior high school students. In addition, the design skills of the students were evaluated by the reports on design skills, the demonstration of the delivery lecture and the records of the their efforts. From the results of the student questionnaire on this PBL, it is clear that most of the students understood “what are the design skills?” and acquired design skills.

  18. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Needs assessment for the proposed masters degree program in environmental science at the Medical University of South Carolina: EHAP Volume 1, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoomani, J.

    1993-05-01

    There will be a critical shortage of professionals who are educated to deal with environmental problems by 1997. This was the major finding of a 1992 study conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Incorporated and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Publication Number PAL-8171, CU-700). The study was done to determine the manpower needs of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management in the US Department of Energy (DOE). Although the focus of the study was the 19 sites of the DOE complex, including the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, the study documented that such shortages will affect other major agencies and organizations including the US Department of Interior, the US Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governmental agencies, private agencies, and manufacturing enterprises throughout the State of South Carolina and the National. The Oak Ridge Study also documented that a variety of professional positions requiring environmental expertise are difficult to fill because traditional educational programs in physical science, engineering, health science, public policy, and administration have not adequately responded to the unique nature of these emerging specialities. This lack of educational preparation has necessitated extensive on-site training of new employees before they can become productive members of the environmental work force. Unique educational initiatives such as the Environmental Studies program proposed here are vital to address the long-term demand for environmental professionals.

  19. Investigation of Neutron-induced Reactions at n_TOF: an Overview of the 2009-2012 Experimental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, C.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Pignatari, M.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T. J.; Žugec, P.

    2014-05-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF is operating at CERN (Switzerland) since 2001, having started in 2009 a new campaign with an upgraded spallation target. The ambitious program carried out includes a large number of experiments in nuclear technology, astrophysics, basic physics, detector development and medical applications. This paper is devoted to the physics program at n_TOF and the measurements performed between 2009 and 2012. Special attention is given to those experiments that have been most challenging, are more important for a particular field, have reached unprecedented levels of accuracy, or have been carried out for the first time ever.

  20. Investigation of Neutron-induced Reactions at n_TOF: an Overview of the 2009–2012 Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, C; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n\\_TOF is operating at CERN (Switzerland) since 2001, having started in 2009 a new campaign with an upgraded spallation target. The ambitious program carried out includes a large number of experiments in nuclear technology, astrophysics, basic physics, detector development and medical applications. This paper is devoted to the physics program at n\\_TOF and the measurements performed between 2009 and 2012. Special attention is given to those experiments that have been most challenging, are more important for a particular field, have reached unprecedented levels of accuracy, or have been carried out for the first time ever.

  1. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  2. Learning for Living: A Program Prepared for Use in a Group Home for Children. Leader's Guide (Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marlene

    This report describes an Education for Parenthood demonstration program developed by the Salvation Army for teenagers living at a Salvation Army children's home in Philadelphia. Weekly sessions, held over a 6-month period, emphasized self-esteem, knowledge about children, and career development in the child care field. Firsthand experience in a…

  3. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  4. 'Learn Young, Learn Fair', a stress management program for fifth and sixth graders: longitudinal results from an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraag, G.C; Breukelen, G.J.P. van; Kok, G.J.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background - This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods - Fiftytwo schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was

  5. Using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 Program, to Teach Single-Subject Experimentation with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Marshall Lev

    2004-01-01

    Students enrolled in a single-subject design course studied the repeated acquisition of response sequences by using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 program, which runs in DOS or Windows. For about 2 months, students examined the learning of such sequences as a function of various treatments. Each week students graphed their data, discussed their…

  6. Python to learn programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanchikov, A.; Zhaparov, M.; Suliyev, R.

    2013-04-01

    Today we have a lot of programming languages that can realize our needs, but the most important question is how to teach programming to beginner students. In this paper we suggest using Python for this purpose, because it is a programming language that has neatly organized syntax and powerful tools to solve any task. Moreover it is very close to simple math thinking. Python is chosen as a primary programming language for freshmen in most of leading universities. Writing code in python is easy. In this paper we give some examples of program codes written in Java, C++ and Python language, and we make a comparison between them. Firstly, this paper proposes advantages of Python language in relation to C++ and JAVA. Then it shows the results of a comparison of short program codes written in three different languages, followed by a discussion on how students understand programming. Finally experimental results of students' success in programming courses are shown.

  7. Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS. An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories’ (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone #3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3-year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

  8. Effectiveness of a diabetes mellitus pictorial diary handbook program for middle-aged and elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a quasi-experimental study at Taladnoi Primary Care Unit, Saraburi, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eknithiset R

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapat Eknithiset, Ratana Somrongthong College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok, Thailand Aim: The research question is “How does a diabetes mellitus (DM pictorial diary handbook (PDHB affect the knowledge, practice, and HbA1c among patients with DM type 2?” The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a PDHB program among middle-aged and elderly patients with DM type 2 in primary care units in Thailand. Patients and methods: A quasi-experimental study design was applied. DM type 2 patients were recruited in the PDHB program by a simple random sampling method. The 3-month program consisted of a weekly health education structured for ~20 minutes, a 15-minute group activity training, a 10-minute individual record of participants’ knowledge and practice regarding diet control, exercise, oral hypoglycemic drug taking, diet, self-care, alcohol consumption, smoking, weight management, and HbA1c, and a 15- to 30-minute home visit as well as the PDHB for recording self-care behavior daily. The control group received only the usual diabetes care. The primary expected outcomes were changes in HbA1c from the baseline data to 3 months after the program compared between the intervention and control groups. The secondary expected outcomes were compared within the intervention group. The third expected outcomes were changes in the mean score of knowledge and practice from baseline to 3 months after the program within and between the intervention and control groups. Results: Compared with the baseline data, there was no significant difference in HbA1c, knowledge, and practice mean score between the intervention and control groups. However, there was a significant difference in HbA1c, knowledge, and practice mean score in the intervention group after they received a 3-month PDHB program and within the intervention group (p-value =0.00. Conclusion: The PDHB program was effective in lowering HbA1c while also

  9. Effectiveness of a diabetes mellitus pictorial diary handbook program for middle-aged and elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a quasi-experimental study at Taladnoi Primary Care Unit, Saraburi, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknithiset, Rapat; Somrongthong, Ratana

    2017-01-01

    The research question is "How does a diabetes mellitus (DM) pictorial diary handbook (PDHB) affect the knowledge, practice, and HbA1c among patients with DM type 2?" The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a PDHB program among middle-aged and elderly patients with DM type 2 in primary care units in Thailand. A quasi-experimental study design was applied. DM type 2 patients were recruited in the PDHB program by a simple random sampling method. The 3-month program consisted of a weekly health education structured for ~20 minutes, a 15-minute group activity training, a 10-minute individual record of participants' knowledge and practice regarding diet control, exercise, oral hypoglycemic drug taking, diet, self-care, alcohol consumption, smoking, weight management, and HbA1c, and a 15- to 30-minute home visit as well as the PDHB for recording self-care behavior daily. The control group received only the usual diabetes care. The primary expected outcomes were changes in HbA1c from the baseline data to 3 months after the program compared between the intervention and control groups. The secondary expected outcomes were compared within the intervention group. The third expected outcomes were changes in the mean score of knowledge and practice from baseline to 3 months after the program within and between the intervention and control groups. Compared with the baseline data, there was no significant difference in HbA1c, knowledge, and practice mean score between the intervention and control groups. However, there was a significant difference in HbA1c, knowledge, and practice mean score in the intervention group after they received a 3-month PDHB program and within the intervention group (p-value =0.00). The PDHB program was effective in lowering HbA1c while also improving the mean score of knowledge and practice among elderly patients with DM type 2. However, larger and longer trial studies will be needed to evaluate the sustainability of this program.

  10. Effectiveness of an aquatic exercise program and low-level laser therapy on articular cartilage in an experimental model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milares, Luiz Paulo; Assis, Lívia; Siqueira, Amanda; Claudino, Vitoria; Domingos, Heloisa; Almeida, Thais; Tim, Carla; Renno, Ana Claudia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an aquatic exercise program and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) (associated or not) on degenerative modifications and inflammatory mediators on the articular cartilage using an experimental model of knee OA. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: knee OA - without treatment (OA); OA plus exercise program group (OAE); OA plus LLLT (OAL); OA plus exercise program associated with LLLT (OAEL). Trained rats performed a water-jumping program carrying a load equivalent to 50-80 % of their body mass strapped to their chest. The laser irradiation was used either as the only method or after the exercise training had been performed, at 2 points contact mode (medial and lateral side of the left joint). The treatments started 4 weeks after the surgery, 3 days/week for 8 weeks. The results revealed that all treated groups (irradiated or not) exhibited a better pattern of tissue organization, with less fibrillation and irregularities along the articular surface and improved chondrocytes organization. Also, a lower cellular density and structural damage (OARSI score) and higher thickness values were observed in all treated groups. Additionally, OAE and OAEL showed a reduced expression in IL-1β and caspase-3 as compared with OA. Furthermore, a statistically lower MMP-13 expression was only observed in OAEL as compared with OA. These results suggest that aquatic exercise program and LLLT were effective in preventing cartilage degeneration. Also, physical exercise program presented anti-inflammatory effects in the knees in OA rats.

  11. Prediction of thinning of the sheet metal in the program AutoForm and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorko, M.; Urbánek, M.; Rund, M.

    2017-02-01

    The manufacture of press-formed parts often involves deep-drawing operations. Deep drawing, however, can be deemed an industrial branch in its own right. Today, many experimental as well as numerical methods are available for designing and optimizing deep drawing operations. The best option, however, is to combine both approaches. The present paper describes one such investigation. Here, measurements and numerical simulation were used for mapping the impact of anisotropy on thickness variation in a spherical-shaped drawn part of DC01 steel. Variation in sheet thickness was measured on spherical-shaped drawn parts of various geometries by means of two cameras, and evaluated with digital image correlation using the ARAMIS software from the company GOM. The forming experiment was carried out on an INOVA 200 kN servohydraulic testing machine in which the force vs. piston displacement curve was recorded. The same experiment was then numerically simulated and analyzed using the AUTOFORM software. Various parameters were monitored, such as thinning, strain magnitude, formability, and others. For the purpose of this simulation, a series of mechanical tests was conducted to obtain descriptions of the experimental material of 1.5 mm thickness. A material model was constructed from the tests data involving the work-hardening curve, the impact of anisotropy, and the forming limit diagram. Specifically, these tests included tensile tests, the Nakajima test, and the stacked test, which were carried out to determine materials data for the model. The actual sheet thickness was measured on a sectioned spherical-shaped drawn part using a NIKON optical microscope. The variations in thickness along defined lines on the sectioned drawn part were compared with the numerical simulations data using digital image correlation. The above-described experimental programme is suitable for calibrating a material model for any computational software and can correctly solve deep-drawing problems.

  12. AMPS data management requirements study, appendix 1. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Flow charts and display formats for the simulation of five experiments are given. The experiments are: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observations of ambient plasma; (3) ionospheric measurements with subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustical gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A detailed explanation of the simulation procedure, definition of variables, and an explanation of how the experimenter makes display choices is also presented. A functional description is included on each flow chart and the assumptions and definitions of terms and scope of the flow charts and displays are presented.

  13. Does aging need its own program, or is the program of development quite sufficient for it? Stationary cell cultures as a tool to search for anti-aging factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, Alexander N

    2013-02-01

    According to our conception, the aging process is caused by cell proliferation restriction-induced accumulation of various macromolecular defects (mainly DNA damage) in cells of a mature organism or in a cell population. In the case of cell cultures, the proliferation restriction is related to so-called contact inhibition and to the Hayflick's limit, while in the case of multicellular organisms, it is related to the appearance, in the process of differentiation, of organs and tissues consisting of postmitotic and very slowly dividing cells. It is assumed that the proliferation of intact cells prevents accumulation of various errors in a cell population. However, the continuous propagation of all the cells in a multicellular organism is absolutely incompatible with its normal functioning. Thus, the program of development, when it generates postmitotic or slowly dividing cells, automatically leads also to the onset of the aging process (mortality increase with age). Therefore, any additional special program for aging simply becomes unnecessary. This, however, doesn't reject, for some organisms, the reasonability of programmed death, which makes possible the elimination of harmful, from the species point of view, individuals. It is also very important to emphasize that increase or decrease of an organism's lifespan under the effects of various external factors is not always necessarily related to modification of the aging process, though the experimental results in the field are usually interpreted in just this way. I called the experimental-gerontological models similar to the Hayflick's model "correlative", since they are based on some correlations only and not related necessarily to the gist of the aging phenomenon. So, for the Hayflick's model, it is the relationship between population doubling level and donor age, between population doubling potential and species lifespan, between some cell changes in vivo and in vitro, and so forth. If the rationale of the

  14. Change urgent adaptation reaction cardiorespiratory system under the influence of experimental program of the training means in sport dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Bo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of increase of function of cardiorespiratory system of dancers are rotined. 24 sportsmen took part in research (12 pair. Directions of strengthening the function of aerobic energy-supply, optimizations of physiological properties of the cardiorespiratory system of organism, are set. The terms of increase of the special capacity are formed. The terms of activation of function of indemnification of increasing acidemia changes and developing on this basis fatigue are offered. Application of the program of trainings facilities specifies on the increase of kinetics and stability of reaction of frequency of heart-throbs.

  15. National Postirradiation Examination Workshop Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not listed

    2011-09-01

    The development of nuclear fuels and materials requires a clear understanding of irradiation effects on the materials performance. Development of this understanding at present relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted phenomenology to integral effects under both prototypic and off-normal conditions. Within the new DOE paradigm of a science-based approach aimed at more fundamental understanding of fuel performance, more specialized experiments and measurements are needed. To support the development of such fuels and materials, especially under a science-based development strategy, the nation needs a consolidated, state-of-the-art, post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability that can reliably extract the needed data from the experimental programs. In some cases, new capabilities beyond the current state-of-the art need to be developed and implemented to perform measurements that were not needed in the more empirically based approaches used in earlier fuel development and qualification programs. A national PIE workshop was held in March 2011 which solicited the PIE needs that are necessary to support both DOE and U.S. goals for nuclear energy. These needs recognize that significant capability already exists that must be maintained, upgraded and continued while bringing online new capabilities that support research on highly irradiated fuels and materials. Further, these needs mostly focus on the reducing the time and length scales in which materials can be examined and coupling these measurements with a robust modeling capability within an infrastructure that can meet the needs of higher demand and a variety of customers. A consolidated capability where a comprehensive set of measurements can be simultaneously performed is essential for efficiently implementing fuel and materials development programs in a cost effective manner. This document captures the national PIE needs necessary to support current and future research, and where

  16. A multicenter, prospective, quasi-experimental evaluation study of a patient education program to foster multiple sclerosis self-management competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feicke, Janine; Spörhase, Ulrike; Köhler, Jürgen; Busch, Claudia; Wirtz, Markus

    2014-12-01

    To determine the impact of the self-management training program "S.MS" for new multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Multicenter, prospective, quasi-experimental study with 31 MS patients in the intervention group (training program) and 33 participants in the control group (CG) (brochures). Data were collected before, after and 6 months after the interventions. Analysis of change was done by ANCOVA with repeated measurements. At baseline, participants in CG were younger at the time of diagnosis, suffered more frequently from relapsing-remitting MS and took more MS-medication on a permanent basis. The intervention had a stable significant effect on each dimension of self-management ability, on total self-management ability (ES=0.194, pmanagement abilities, anxiety and disease-specific quality of life in a quasi-experimental study design. Using RCT or CRT-designs would be desirable to further improve the evidence of treatment effectiveness. This study provides substantial evidence that "S.MS" fosters patients' self-management ability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of maternal overnutrition and gestational diabetes on the programming of metabolic health outcomes in the offspring: experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Troy J; Moyce, Brittany L; Kereliuk, Stephanie M; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have risen across the world during the past few decades and has also reached an alarming level among children. In addition, women are currently more likely than ever to enter pregnancy obese. As a result, the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is also on the rise. While diet and lifestyle contribute to these trends, population health data show that maternal obesity and diabetes during pregnancy during critical stages of development are major factors that contribute to the development of chronic disease in adolescent and adult offspring. Fetal programming of metabolic function, through physiological and (or) epigenetic mechanisms, may also have an intergenerational effect, and as a result may perpetuate metabolic disorders in the next generation. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that characterizes how maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in the offspring. In particular, we focus on animal studies that investigate the molecular mechanisms that are programmed by the gestational environment and lead to disease phenotypes in the offspring. We also review interventional studies that prevent disease with a developmental origin in the offspring.

  18. Do We Need to Understand the Technology to Get to the Science? A Systematic Review of the Concept of Computer Literacy in Preventive Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Gregory M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review definitions and descriptions of computer literacy as related to preventive health education programs. Method: A systematic review of the concept of computer literacy as related to preventive health education was conducted. Empirical studies published between 1994 and 2007 on prevention education programs with a…

  19. Project Apache: A Reservation, Community-Based Early Intervention Program for Apache Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Joanne C.

    This final report describes the outcomes of Project Apache, a reservation, community-based early intervention program designed to develop comprehensive services to Apache infants and toddlers who are at risk of developing a disability and their families. The project uses a home-based service delivery program with paraprofessional aides to assist…

  20. Montgomery Blair Science, Mathematics and Computer Science Magnet Program: A Successful Model for Meeting the Needs of Highly Able STEM Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David; Ostrander, Peter; Lee, G. Maie

    2016-01-01

    The Magnet Program at Montgomery Blair High School is an application-based magnet program utilizing a curriculum focused on science, mathematics, and computer science catering to interested, talented, and eager to learn students in Montgomery County, Maryland. This article identifies and discusses some of the unique aspects of the Magnet Program…