WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental pain models

  1. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r...... ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 'pain' model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect......Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  2. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused...

  3. Mechanisms of Osteoarthritic Pain. Studies in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Eitner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain due to osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most frequent causes of chronic pain. However, the mechanisms of OA pain are poorly understood. This review addresses the mechanisms which are thought to be involved in OA pain, derived from studies on pain mechanisms in humans and in experimental models of OA. Three areas will be considered, namely local processes in the joint associated with OA pain, neuronal mechanisms involved in OA pain, and general factors which influence OA pain. Except the cartilage all structures of the joints are innervated by nociceptors. Although the hallmark of OA is the degradation of the cartilage, OA joints show multiple structural alterations of cartilage, bone and synovial tissue. In particular synovitis and bone marrow lesions have been proposed to determine OA pain whereas the contribution of the other pathologies to pain generation has been studied less. Concerning the peripheral neuronal mechanisms of OA pain, peripheral nociceptive sensitization was shown, and neuropathic mechanisms may be involved at some stages. Structural changes of joint innervation such as local loss and/or sprouting of nerve fibers were shown. In addition, central sensitization, reduction of descending inhibition, descending excitation and cortical atrophies were observed in OA. The combination of different neuronal mechanisms may define the particular pain phenotype in an OA patient. Among mediators involved in OA pain, nerve growth factor (NGF is in the focus because antibodies against NGF significantly reduce OA pain. Several studies show that neutralization of interleukin-1β and TNF may reduce OA pain. Many patients with OA exhibit comorbidities such as obesity, low grade systemic inflammation and diabetes mellitus. These comorbidities can significantly influence the course of OA, and pain research just began to study the significance of such factors in pain generation. In addition, psychologic and socioeconomic factors may aggravate

  4. Modelling concentration-analgesia relationships for morphine to evaluate experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Foster, David John Richard; Upton, Richard Neil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models for morphine in experimental pain induced by skin heat and muscle pressure, and to evaluate the experimental pain models with regard to assessment of morphine pharmacodynamics. In a randomized, double......-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 39 healthy volunteers received an oral dose of 30 mg morphine hydrochloride or placebo. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of morphine and metabolites, and the analgesic effect of morphine on experimental pain in skin...... and muscle. Baseline pain metrics varied between individuals and occasions, and were described with interindividual and interoccasion variability. Placebo-response did not change with time. For both pain metrics, morphine effect was proportional to baseline pain and was described with a linear model...

  5. Translational pain research: evaluating analgesic effect in experimental visceral pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    Deep visceral pain is frequent and presents major challenges in pain management, since its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. One way to optimize treatment of visceral pain is to improve knowledge of the mechanisms behind the pain and the mode of action of analgesic substances. This can ...... studies and clinical condition in patients suffering from visceral pain, and thus constitute the missing link in translational pain research.......Deep visceral pain is frequent and presents major challenges in pain management, since its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. One way to optimize treatment of visceral pain is to improve knowledge of the mechanisms behind the pain and the mode of action of analgesic substances. This can...... facilitate minimizing the gap between knowledge gained in animal and human clinical studies. Combining experimental pain studies and pharmacokinetic studies can improve understanding of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of analgesics and, thus, provide valuable insight into optimal clinical...

  6. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy.

  7. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy. PMID:16718803

  8. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sunil kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding.

  9. Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Placebo and Buprenorphine Effects on Event-Related Potentials in Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine...... in a cross-over study. Drug plasma concentrations and ERPs after electrical stimulation at the median nerve with intensity adjusted to pain detection threshold were recorded until 144 hrs after administration. Placebo and concentration-effect models were fitted to data using non-linear mixed......, pharmacodynamic modelling was successfully implemented to allow for placebo and variability correction in ERP of experimental pain. Improved outcome of ERP studies can be expected if variation between subjects and study occasions can be identified and described....

  10. Inflammatory pain in experimental burns in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    stimuli may be more reproducible. A methodological study also demonstrated that habituation to experimental pain developed as the study proceeded. Habituation is common in experimental pain models, and dividing analgesics and placebo evenly between the study days is one way of eliminating the effects......Human experimental pain models are important tools in pain research. The primary aims of pain research in normal man is 1) to provide insight in pain mechanisms, 2) to provide a rational basis for clinical trials of pain relieving interventions, and 3) to confirm the anti-nociceptive effects...... demonstrated in animal models. Most often clinical pain is due to tissue damage leading to acute inflammation and hyperalgesia, but only few human pain models have examined pain responses in injured tissues. Therefore, models with controlled and reversible tissue trauma are needed. The human burn model...

  11. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of patholo...

  12. Bone hyperalgesia after mechanical impact stimulation: a human experimental pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Hyperalgesia in different musculoskeletal structures including bones is a major clinical problem. An experimental bone hyperalgesia model was developed in the present study. Hyperalgesia was induced by three different weights impacted on the shinbone in 16 healthy male and female subjects. The mechanical impact pain threshold (IPT) was measured as the height from which three weights (165, 330, and 660 g) should be dropped to elicit pain at the shinbone. Temporal summation of pain to repeated impact stimuli was assessed. All these stimuli caused bone hyperalgesia. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was assessed by a computerized pressure algometer using two different probes (1.0 and 0.5 cm(2)). All parameters were recorded before (0), 24, 72, and 96 h after the initial stimulations. The IPTs were lowest 24 h after hyperalgesia induction for all three weights and the effect lasted up to 72 h (p pain and hyperalgesia model may provide the basis for studying this fundamental mechanism of bone-related hyperalgesia and be used for profiling compounds developed for this target.

  13. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Nakae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  14. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models. PMID:21436995

  15. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden knowledge of pain mechanisms in myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). The specific aims were to: Develop a quality assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies (study I). Investigate proprioceptive allodynia after experimental tooth clenching exercises (study II). Evaluate the release of serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate in healthy subjects (study III) and in patients with M-TMD (study IV), after experimental tooth clenching exercises. In (I), tool development comprised 5 steps: (i) preliminary decisions, (ii) item generation, (iii) face-validity assessment, (iv) reliability and discriminative validity testing, and (v) instrument refinement. After preliminary decisions and a literature review, a list of 52 items to be considered for inclusion in the tool was generated. Eleven experts were invited to participate on the Delphi panel, of which 10 agreed. After four Delphi rounds, 8 items remained and were included in the Quality Assessment Tool for Experimental Bruxism Studies (Qu-ATEBS). Inter-observer reliability was acceptable (k = 0.77), and discriminative validity high (phi coefficient 0.79; P < 0.01). During refinement, 1 item was removed; the final tool comprised 7 items. In (II), 16 healthy females participated in three 60-min sessions, each with 24- and 48-h follow-ups. Participants were randomly assigned to a repetitive experimental tooth clenching task with a clenching level of 10%, 20%, or 40% of maximal voluntary clenching force (MVCF). Pain intensity, fatigue, perceived intensity of vibration (PIV), perceived discomfort (PD), and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured throughout. A significant increase in pain intensity and fatigue but not in PD was observed over time. A significant increase in PIV was only observed at 40 min, and PPT decreased significantly over time at 50 and 60 min compared to baseline. In (III), 30 healthy subjects (16 females, and 14 males

  16. Modelling the PKPD of oxycodone in experimental pain - impact of opioid receptor polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in the opioid receptor genes may affect the pharmacodynamics (PD) of oxycodone and be part of the reason behind the diversity in clinical response. The aim of the analysis was to model the exposure-response profile of oxycodone for three different pain variables and search...... for genetic covariates. Model simulations were used to predict how population and effect-size impact the power to detect clinical significant SNPs. METHOD: The population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model of oral single-dosed oxycodone was based on pooled data from three published studies...... in healthy volunteers. Pain tolerance data from muscle pressure (n=36), visceral pressure (n=54) and skin pinch (n=34) were included. Genetic associations with 18 opioid-receptor SNPs were explored using a stepwise covariate approach. Model simulations were performed using the estimated model parameters...

  17. Differential effects of repeated low dose treatment with the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in experimental models of bone cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Ding, Ming; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme

    2008-01-01

    Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment with can......Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment...... with cannabinoid agonists. However, the use of cannabinoid agonists in humans may be hampered by CNS related side effects and development of tolerance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of repeated low dose administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 on bone cancer pain...... and neuropathic pain in mice. In addition, we investigated the development of CNS related side effects and tolerance. We found that 0.5 mg/kg/day for 18 days reduced pain related behavior and expression of spinal glial fibrillary acidic protein in the bone cancer pain model but not in the neuropathic pain model...

  18. The hypoalgesic effect of oxycodone in human experimental pain models in relation to the CYP2D6 oxidation polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Stine T; Enggaard, Thomas P; Noehr-Jensen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    , extensive metabolizers (EM). The objective of the study was to determine if the analgesic effect of oxycodone in human experimental pain depends on its metabolism to oxymorphone. The analgesic effect of oxycodone was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, crossover experiment...... including 33 (16 EM and 17 PM) healthy volunteers. Pain tests were performed before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 hr after medication and included pain detection and tolerance thresholds to single electrical sural nerve stimulation, pain summation threshold to repetitive electrical sural nerve stimulation and the cold...... pressor test with rating of discomfort and pain-time area under curve (AUC(0-2 min.)). For single sural nerve stimulation, there was a less pronounced increase in thresholds on oxycodone in pain detection (9% vs. 20%, P = 0.02, a difference of 11%, CI: 2%-20%) and pain tolerance thresholds (15% vs. 26%, P...

  19. Effects of gabapentin on experimental somatic pain and temporal summation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Staahl, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    at 2 Hz); (2) stimulus-response function relating pain intensity scores (visual analog scale, VAS) to increasing current intensities for electrical skin and muscle stimuli (single and repeated, determined at baseline); and (3) the pain intensity (VAS) and pain areas after intramuscular injection......, was to examine the effect of a single dose of 1200 mg gabapentin on multi-modal experimental cutaneous and muscle pain models. METHODS: The following pain models were applied: (1) pain thresholds to single and repeated cutaneous and intramuscular electrical stimulation (temporal summation to 5 stimuli delivered...... reduced the area under the pain intensity curve to hypertonic saline injections in the muscle (P = .02); and (3) significantly reduced the area of pain evoked by hypertonic saline (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Gabapentin reduces temporal summation of skin stimuli at pain threshold intensities; this may have...

  20. Experimental knee pain evoke spreading hyperalgesia and facilitated temporal summation of pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the deep-tissue pressure pain sensitivity and temporal summation of pain within and around healthy knees exposed to experimental pain. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized crossover trial, with each subject tested on 1 day. SETTING: All tests were carried...... occasions: baseline, immediately after the injection, and when pain had vanished. Assessments sites were located in the peripatellar region, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles. RESULTS: The experimental knee pain model demonstrated 1) hyperalgesia to pressure stimulation on the infrapatellar...... fat pad during experimental pain, and 2) facilitated temporal summation of pressure pain at the infrapatellar fat pad and knee-related muscles. CONCLUSION: The increased sensitivity and temporal summation found in this study were exclusive to deep -tissue with no contralateral decreased pain...

  1. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  2. [Pain in humans: experimental facts and hypotheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P

    1994-09-15

    The description of painful phenomena in humans has to take into account its different components: sensory component (relevant to nociception), affective and emotional components. Nociceptor's (physiology is best understood with electrophysiological and neurochemical methods allowing a clear description of hyperalgesia, with its peripheral and spinal mechanisms. A functional model is partly available to explain allodynia, spontaneous burning pain and lightning pain, the three main consequences following deafferentation. At the thalamo-cortical level, one can describe nociceptive pathways and other pathways or neuronal networks involved in the affective and emotional components of pain.

  3. Masseter motor unit recruitment is altered in experimental jaw muscle pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minami, I.; Akhter, R.; Albersen, I.; Burger, C.; Whittle, T.; Lobbezoo, F.; Peck, C.C.; Murray, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Some management strategies for chronic orofacial pain are influenced by models (e.g., Vicious Cycle Theory, Pain Adaptation Model) proposing either excitation or inhibition within a painful muscle. The aim of this study was to determine if experimental painful stimulation of the masseter muscle

  4. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the exercise are affected by Achilles tendon pain. Objective The authors aimed to determine the effects of experimental Achilles tendon pain on motor function during one-legged weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsal flexion exercises. Methods In a crossover study, with 16 healthy subjects tested on two......Background Achilles tendinopathies are characterised by pain and reduced function, and heavy-load exercises have been shown to be effective in the treatment of painful chronic Achilles tendinopathies. However, basic information is needed on how the biomechanics and neuromuscular control...... different days separated by 1 week, three-dimensional ground reaction forces, ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg muscles were recorded during one-legged full weight-bearing ankle plantar (concentric) and dorsal (eccentric) flexion exercises. Measurements were done...

  5. The Effect of a Combination of Diclofenac and Methadone Applied as Gel in a Human Experimental Pain Model- A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Isabelle M; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Olesen, Anne E

    2018-01-01

    should be low. We hypothesized that anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Diclometh could be demonstrated in a human experimental pain model, and that Diclometh would be safe to administer. Thus, the aims were: 1) To compare two doses of Diclometh versus placebo; 2) To assess the safety profile...... of Diclometh. The study was a cross-over, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of two doses of Diclometh gel (0.1% and 0.2%) administered topically in healthy participants. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and capsaicin intradermal injections were used as human pain models. Pressure stimulation...... of anti-allodynic effect of Diclometh 0.2% was found. Additionally, it was demonstrated that Diclometh was safe to use. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  6. A dyadic analysis of siblings' relationship quality, behavioural responses, and pain experiences during experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Meghan G; Chambers, Christine T; Corkum, Penny; Jacques, Sophie

    2018-04-16

    Research on family factors in paediatric pain has primarily focused on parents; the role of siblings has been largely ignored. This study examined whether sibling relationship quality was related to siblings' behaviours during experimental pain, and whether the behaviours of an observing sibling were related to children's pain outcomes. Ninety-two sibling dyads between 8-12 years old completed both observational and questionnaire measures of sibling relationship quality. Children took turns completing the cold pressor task (CPT) in a counterbalanced order with their sibling present. Pain outcomes (intensity, fear, tolerance) were recorded for each sibling, and the behaviour of the observing and participating siblings during the CPT were coded as attending, non-attending, and coping/encouragement. Structural equation modelling, using the actor-partner interdependence model, was conducted to analyse the dyadic data. While participating in the CPT with their sibling present, greater levels of warmth and positivity in the sibling relationship were related to children engaging in more non-attending behaviours and less attending behaviours. Greater levels of attending behaviours by the observing child was related to the sibling having a lower pain tolerance, and greater levels of coping/encouragement behaviours by the observing child was related to the sibling reporting greater pain intensity and fear during the CPT. Children with warmer/positive sibling relationships were more likely to respond to acute pain by shifting the focus away from their pain experience (e.g., through distraction) when a sibling was present. Pain-focused behaviours by an observing sibling are related to greater child pain and fear during experimental pain.

  7. IL17 Mediates Pelvic Pain in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F Murphy

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS is the most common form of prostatitis, accounting for 90-95% of all diagnoses. It is a complex multi-symptom syndrome with unknown etiology and limited effective treatments. Previous investigations highlight roles for inflammatory mediators in disease progression by correlating levels of cytokines and chemokines with patient reported symptom scores. It is hypothesized that alteration of adaptive immune mechanisms results in autoimmunity and subsequent development of pain. Mouse models of CPPS have been developed to delineate these immune mechanisms driving pain in humans. Using the experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP in C57BL/6 mice model of CPPS we examined the role of CD4+T-cell subsets in the development and maintenance of prostate pain, by tactile allodynia behavioral testing and flow cytometry. In tandem with increased CD4+IL17A+ T-cells upon EAP induction, prophylactic treatment with an anti-IL17 antibody one-day prior to EAP induction prevented the onset of pelvic pain. Therapeutic blockade of IL17 did not reverse pain symptoms indicating that IL17 is essential for development but not maintenance of chronic pain in EAP. Furthermore we identified a cytokine, IL7, to be associated with increased symptom severity in CPPS patients and is increased in patient prostatic secretions and the prostates of EAP mice. IL7 is fundamental to development of IL17 producing cells and plays a role in maturation of auto-reactive T-cells, it is also associated with autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes. More recently a growing body of research has pointed to IL17's role in development of neuropathic and chronic pain. This report presents novel data on the role of CD4+IL17+ T-cells in development and maintenance of pain in EAP and CPPS.

  8. IL17 Mediates Pelvic Pain in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Done, Joseph; Wong, Larry; Bell-Cohn, Ashlee; Roman, Kenny; Cashy, John; Ohlhausen, Michelle; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is the most common form of prostatitis, accounting for 90-95% of all diagnoses. It is a complex multi-symptom syndrome with unknown etiology and limited effective treatments. Previous investigations highlight roles for inflammatory mediators in disease progression by correlating levels of cytokines and chemokines with patient reported symptom scores. It is hypothesized that alteration of adaptive immune mechanisms results in autoimmunity and subsequent development of pain. Mouse models of CPPS have been developed to delineate these immune mechanisms driving pain in humans. Using the experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) in C57BL/6 mice model of CPPS we examined the role of CD4+T-cell subsets in the development and maintenance of prostate pain, by tactile allodynia behavioral testing and flow cytometry. In tandem with increased CD4+IL17A+ T-cells upon EAP induction, prophylactic treatment with an anti-IL17 antibody one-day prior to EAP induction prevented the onset of pelvic pain. Therapeutic blockade of IL17 did not reverse pain symptoms indicating that IL17 is essential for development but not maintenance of chronic pain in EAP. Furthermore we identified a cytokine, IL7, to be associated with increased symptom severity in CPPS patients and is increased in patient prostatic secretions and the prostates of EAP mice. IL7 is fundamental to development of IL17 producing cells and plays a role in maturation of auto-reactive T-cells, it is also associated with autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes. More recently a growing body of research has pointed to IL17's role in development of neuropathic and chronic pain. This report presents novel data on the role of CD4+IL17+ T-cells in development and maintenance of pain in EAP and CPPS.

  9. The analgesic effect of diclofenac sodium administered via the epidural route in an experimental visceral pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilci, O; Demir, T; Günbey, M; Kara, C; Bayazit, D; Ornek, D; Baydar, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the analgesic effect of diclofenac sodium injected epidurally in single or repeated doses and whether tolerance develops in long-term use. A total of 30 rats were included in the study. The rats were anesthetized using intraperitoneal ketamine hydrochloride and an epidural catheter (EC) was inserted at the level of 13th dorsal thoraco-lumbar vertebrae (T13). Eleven rats were excluded from the study. The remaining 19 rats were randomly divided into three groups; Group Control (Group C) (n = 6) received 20 μL normal saline solution (NS) via EC for 10 days; Group Single Dose (Group SD) (n = 6) received 20 μL NS for 9 days and 6 μg diclofenac via EC on 10th day; Group Ten Doses (Group TDs) (n = 7) received 6 μg diclofenac via EC in 20 μL NS for 10 days. On the 10th day, 30 min after epidural diclofenac sodium, 300 mg/kg of 3% acetic acid was injected via intraperitoneal route, and the rats were observed for 30 min and number of writhing reflex (WR) was recorded. The values of total number of Writhing Reflex (WRT) and Writhing reflex per minute(WR/min) were found to be significantly higher in Group C compared with Groups SD and TD (P = 0.009). Single and repeated doses of diclofenac sodium via epidural route have an analgesic effect in a visceral pain model in rats without developing tolerance.

  10. Bilateral experimental neck pain reorganize axioscapular muscle coordination and pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-04-01

    Neck pain is a large clinical problem where reorganized trunk and axioscapular muscle activities have been hypothesised contributing to pain persistence and pain hypersensitivity. This study investigated the effects of bilateral experimental neck pain on trunk and axioscapular muscle function and pain sensitivity. In 25 healthy volunteers, bilateral experimental neck pain was induced in the splenius capitis muscles by hypertonic saline injections. Isotonic saline was used as control. In sitting, subjects performed slow, fast and slow-resisted unilateral arm movements before, during and after injections. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from eight shoulder and trunk muscles bilaterally. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed bilaterally at the neck, head and arm. Data were normalized to the before-measures. Compared with control and post measurements, experimental neck pain caused (1) decreased EMG activity of the ipsilateral upper trapezius muscles during all but slow-resisted down movements (p neck pain reorganized axioscapular and trunk muscle activity together with local hyperalgesia and widespread hypoalgesia indicating that acute neck pain immediately affects trunk and axioscapular function which may affect both assessment and treatment. Bilateral clinical neck pain alters axioscapular muscle coordination but only effects of unilateral experimental neck pain has been investigated. Bilateral experimental neck pain causes task-dependent reorganized axioscapular and trunk muscle activity in addition to widespread decrease in pressure pain sensitivity. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  11. Patterns of experimentally induced pain in pericranial muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Peter Thede; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    into the masseter muscle (anova: P pain areas (anova: P cervically innervated muscles had significantly different patterns of spread and referral of pain according to trigeminally vs....... cervically innervated dermatomes (P pain patterns and pain sensitivity in different craniofacial muscles in healthy volunteers, which may be of importance for further research on different craniofacial pain conditions.......Nociceptive mechanisms in the craniofacial muscle tissue are poorly understood. The pain pattern in individual pericranial muscles has not been described before. Experimental muscle pain was induced by standardized infusions of 0.2 ml 1 m hypertonic saline into six craniofacial muscles (masseter...

  12. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  13. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...

  14. Adaptations in the gait pattern with experimental hamstring pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, J

    2011-01-01

    and little attention has been given to how pain in other muscles affects functional movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in the gait patterns of healthy subjects that occur during experimental muscle pain in the biceps femoris. In a cross-over study design, 14 healthy volunteers...... underwent EMG assisted 3D gait analyses before, during and after experimental biceps femoris pain induced by intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline. Isotonic saline injections were administered as a non-painful control. The experimental biceps femoris pain led to reductions in hip extensor moments......, knee flexor and lateral rotator moments. No changes in lower extremity kinematics and EMG activity in any of the recorded muscles were observed. It is concluded that experimental muscle pain in the biceps femoris leads to changes in the gait pattern in agreement with unloading of the painful muscle...

  15. Association between Gene Polymorphisms and Pain Sensitivity Assessed in a Multi-Modal Multi-Tissue Human Experimental Model - An Explorative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe

    2016-01-01

    The genetic influence on sensitivity to noxious stimuli (pain sensitivity) remains controversial and needs further investigation. In the present study, the possible influence of polymorphisms in three opioid receptor (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK) genes and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene...... on pain sensitivity in healthy participants was investigated. Catechol-O-methyltransferase has an indirect effect on the mu opioid receptor by changing its activity through an altered endogenous ligand effect. Blood samples for genetic analysis were withdrawn in a multi-modal and multi-tissue experimental......, electrical and thermal visceral stimulations. A cold pressor test was also conducted. DNA was available from 38 of 40 participants. Compared to non-carriers of the COMT rs4680A allele, carriers reported higher bone pressure pain tolerance threshold (i.e. less pain) by up to 23.8% (p

  16. Prediction of postoperative pain: a systematic review of predictive experimental pain studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mjöbo, Helena N; Nielsen, Per R

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative testing of a patient's basal pain perception before surgery has the potential to be of clinical value if it can accurately predict the magnitude of pain and requirement of analgesics after surgery. This review includes 14 studies that have investigated the correlation between...... preoperative responses to experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain and demonstrates that the preoperative pain tests may predict 4-54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience depending on the stimulation methods and the test paradigm used. The predictive strength is much higher than...

  17. Rat Experimental Model of Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: An Ethical Approach to Set up the Analgesic Management of Acute Post-Surgical Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Tolva, Valerio; Casana, Renato; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Vanoli, Emilio; Spazzolini, Carla; Roughan, John; Calvillo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Rationale During the past 30 years, myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rodents became one of the most commonly used model in cardiovascular research. Appropriate pain-prevention appears critical since it may influence the outcome and the results obtained with this model. However, there are no proper guidelines for pain management in rats undergoing thoracic surgery. Accordingly, we evaluated three analgesic regimens in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study was strongly focused on 3R’s ethic principles, in particular the principle of Reduction. Methods Rats undergoing surgery were treated with pre-surgical tramadol (45 mg/kg intra-peritoneal), or carprofen (5 mg/kg sub-cutaneous), or with pre-surgical administration of carprofen followed by 2 post-surgery tramadol injections (multi-modal group). We assessed behavioral signs of pain and made a subjective evaluation of stress and suffering one and two hours after surgery. Results Multi-modal treatment significantly reduced the number of signs of pain compared to carprofen alone at both the first hour (61±42 vs 123±47; pCarprofen alone was more effective at the second hour post-surgery when signs of pain reduced to 74±24 from 113±40 in the first hour (pcarprofen and tramadol groups, respectively (pcarprofen and tramadol was more effective in preventing pain during the second hour after surgery compared with both tramadol or carprofen. Our results suggest that the combination of carprofen and tramadol represent the best therapy to prevent animal pain after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We obtained our results accordingly with the ethical principle of Reduction. PMID:24756074

  18. Manipulation of pain catastrophizing: An experimental study of healthy participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E Bialosky

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Joel E Bialosky1*, Adam T Hirsh2,3, Michael E Robinson2,3, Steven Z George1,3*1Department of Physical Therapy; 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology; 3Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAAbstract: Pain catastrophizing is associated with the pain experience; however, causation has not been established. Studies which specifically manipulate catastrophizing are necessary to establish causation. The present study enrolled 100 healthy individuals. Participants were randomly assigned to repeat a positive, neutral, or one of three catastrophizing statements during a cold pressor task (CPT. Outcome measures of pain tolerance and pain intensity were recorded. No change was noted in catastrophizing immediately following the CPT (F(1,84 = 0.10, p = 0.75, partial η2 < 0.01 independent of group assignment (F(4,84 = 0.78, p = 0.54, partial η2 = 0.04. Pain tolerance (F(4 = 0.67, p = 0.62, partial η2 = 0.03 and pain intensity (F(4 = 0.73, p = 0.58, partial η2 = 0.03 did not differ by group. This study suggests catastrophizing may be difficult to manipulate through experimental pain procedures and repetition of specific catastrophizing statements was not sufficient to change levels of catastrophizing. Additionally, pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ by group assignment. This study has implications for future studies attempting to experimentally manipulate pain catastrophizing.Keywords: pain, catastrophizing, experimental, cold pressor task, pain catastrophizing scale

  19. Periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Lina; Gao, Meiya; Ma, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    Calcitonin-related gene peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in orofacial inflammatory pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Closed coil springs were used to deliver forces. Rats were euthanized on 0d, 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 14d following experimental tooth movement. Then, alveolar bones were obtained for immunostaining of periodontal tissues against CGRP. Two hours prior to euthanasia on each day, orofacial pain levels were assessed through rat grimace scale. CGRP and olcegepant (CGRP receptor antagonist) were injected into periodontal tissues to verify the roles of periodontal CGRP in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Periodontal CGRP expression levels and orofacial pain levels were elevated on 1d, 3d, 5d, and 7d following experimental tooth movement. The two indices were significantly correlated with each other and fitted into a dose-response model. Periodontal administration of CGRP could elevate periodontal CGRP expressions and exacerbate orofacial pain. Moreover, olcegepant administration could decrease periodontal CGRP expressions and alleviate orofacial pain. Therefore, periodontal CGRP plays an important role in pain transmission and modulation following experimental tooth movement. We suggest that it may participate in a positive feedback aiming to amplify orofacial pain signals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressure-pain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. METHODS: Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. RESULTS: Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76% and no change (24% on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. CONCLUSION: The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls.

  1. Experimental knee pain impairs submaximal force steadiness in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N; Mannion, Jamie

    2015-09-12

    Populations with knee joint damage, including arthritis, have noted impairments in the regulation of submaximal muscle force. It is difficult to determine the exact cause of such impairments given the joint pathology and associated neuromuscular adaptations. Experimental pain models that have been used to isolate the effects of pain on muscle force regulation have shown impaired force steadiness during acute pain. However, few studies have examined force regulation during dynamic contractions, and these findings have been inconsistent. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of experimental knee joint pain on submaximal quadriceps force regulation during isometric and dynamic contractions. The study involved fifteen healthy participants. Participants were seated in an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee extensor force matching tasks were completed in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle contraction conditions. The target force was set to 10 % of maximum for each contraction type. Hypertonic saline was then injected into the infrapatella fat pad to generate acute joint pain. The force matching tasks were repeated during pain and once more 5 min after pain had subsided. Hypertonic saline resulted in knee pain with an average peak pain rating of 5.5 ± 2.1 (0-10 scale) that lasted for 18 ± 4 mins. Force steadiness significantly reduced during pain across all three muscle contraction conditions. There was a trend to increased force matching error during pain but this was not significant. Experimental knee pain leads to impaired quadriceps force steadiness during isometric, eccentric, and concentric contractions, providing further evidence that joint pain directly affects motor performance. Given the established relationship between submaximal muscle force steadiness and function, such an effect may be detrimental to the performance of tasks in daily life. In order to restore motor performance in people with painful arthritic conditions of the

  2. Rat experimental model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: an ethical approach to set up the analgesic management of acute post-surgical pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Ciuffreda

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: During the past 30 years, myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rodents became one of the most commonly used model in cardiovascular research. Appropriate pain-prevention appears critical since it may influence the outcome and the results obtained with this model. However, there are no proper guidelines for pain management in rats undergoing thoracic surgery. Accordingly, we evaluated three analgesic regimens in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study was strongly focused on 3R's ethic principles, in particular the principle of Reduction. METHODS: Rats undergoing surgery were treated with pre-surgical tramadol (45 mg/kg intra-peritoneal, or carprofen (5 mg/kg sub-cutaneous, or with pre-surgical administration of carprofen followed by 2 post-surgery tramadol injections (multi-modal group. We assessed behavioral signs of pain and made a subjective evaluation of stress and suffering one and two hours after surgery. RESULTS: Multi-modal treatment significantly reduced the number of signs of pain compared to carprofen alone at both the first hour (61±42 vs 123±47; p<0.05 and the second hour (43±21 vs 74±24; p<0.05 post-surgery. Tramadol alone appeared as effective as multi-modal treatment during the first hour, but signs of pain significantly increased one hour later (from 66±72 to 151±86, p<0.05. Carprofen alone was more effective at the second hour post-surgery when signs of pain reduced to 74±24 from 113±40 in the first hour (p<0.05. Stress behaviors during the second hour were observed in only 20% of rats in the multimodal group compared to 75% and 86% in the carprofen and tramadol groups, respectively (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-modal treatment with carprofen and tramadol was more effective in preventing pain during the second hour after surgery compared with both tramadol or carprofen. Our results suggest that the combination of carprofen and tramadol represent the best therapy to prevent animal pain after

  3. Vicarious pain experiences while observing another in pain: an experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eVandenbroucke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed at developing an experimental paradigm to assess vicarious pain experiences. We further explored the putative moderating role of observer’s characteristics such as hypervigilance for pain and dispositional empathy. Methods: Two experiments are reported using a similar procedure. Undergraduate students were selected based upon whether they reported vicarious pain in daily life, and categorized into a pain responder group or a comparison group. Participants were presented a series of videos showing hands being pricked whilst receiving occasionally pricking (electrocutaneous stimuli themselves. In congruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were applied to the same spatial location. In incongruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were in the opposite spatial location. Participants were required to report on which location they felt a pricking sensation. Of primary interest was the effect of viewing another in pain upon vicarious pain errors, i.e., the number of trials in which an illusionary sensation was reported. Furthermore, we explored the effect of individual differences in hypervigilance to pain, dispositional empathy and the rubber hand illusion (RHI upon vicarious pain errors. Results: Results of both experiments indicated that the number of vicarious pain errors was overall low. In line with expectations, the number of vicarious pain errors was higher in the pain responder group than in the comparison group. Self-reported hypervigilance for pain lowered the probability of reporting vicarious pain errors in the pain responder group, but dispositional empathy and the RHI did not. Conclusion: Our paradigm allows measuring vicarious pain experiences in students. However, the prevalence of vicarious experiences of pain is low, and only a small percentage of participants display the phenomenon. It remains however unknown which variables affect its occurrence.

  4. Experimental quadriceps muscle pain impairs knee joint control during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a cardinal symptom in musculoskeletal diseases involving the knee joint, and aberrant movement patterns and motor control strategies are often present in these patients. However, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms linking pain to movement and motor control are unclear. To investigate...... the functional significance of muscle pain on knee joint control during walking, three-dimensional gait analyses were performed before, during, and after experimentally induced muscle pain by means of intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline (5.8%) into vastus medialis (VM) muscle of 20 healthy subjects....... Isotonic saline (0.9%) was used as control. Surface electromyography (EMG) recordings of VM, vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris, and semitendinosus muscles were synchronized with the gait analyses. During experimental muscle pain, the loading response phase peak knee extensor moments were attenuated...

  5. Masseter motor unit recruitment is altered in experimental jaw muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, I; Akhter, R; Albersen, I; Burger, C; Whittle, T; Lobbezoo, F; Peck, C C; Murray, G M

    2013-02-01

    Some management strategies for chronic orofacial pain are influenced by models (e.g., Vicious Cycle Theory, Pain Adaptation Model) proposing either excitation or inhibition within a painful muscle. The aim of this study was to determine if experimental painful stimulation of the masseter muscle resulted in only increases or only decreases in masseter activity. Recordings of single-motor-unit (SMU, basic functional unit of muscle) activity were made from the right masseters of 10 asymptomatic participants during biting trials at the same force level and direction under infusion into the masseter of isotonic saline (no-pain condition), and in another block of biting trials on the same day, with 5% hypertonic saline (pain condition). Of the 36 SMUs studied, 2 SMUs exhibited a significant (p units were present only during the no-pain block and 10 units during the pain block only. The findings suggest that, rather than only excitation or only inhibition within a painful muscle, a re-organization of activity occurs, with increases and decreases occurring within the painful muscle. This suggests the need to re-assess management strategies based on models that propose uniform effects of pain on motor activity.

  6. The influence of working memory capacity on experimental heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Endo, Kaori; Adachi, Tomonori; Ikeda, Takashi; Hagihira, Satoshi; Mashimo, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2013-10-01

    Pain processing and attention have a bidirectional interaction that depends upon one's relative ability to use limited-capacity resources. However, correlations between the size of limited-capacity resources and pain have not been evaluated. Working memory capacity, which is a cognitive resource, can be measured using the reading span task (RST). In this study, we hypothesized that an individual's potential working memory capacity and subjective pain intensity are related. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated 31 healthy participants' potential working memory capacity using the RST, and then applied continuous experimental heat stimulation using the listening span test (LST), which is a modified version of the RST. Subjective pain intensities were significantly lower during the challenging parts of the RST. The pain intensity under conditions where memorizing tasks were performed was compared with that under the control condition, and it showed a correlation with potential working memory capacity. These results indicate that working memory capacity reflects the ability to process information, including precise evaluations of changes in pain perception. In this work, we present data suggesting that changes in subjective pain intensity are related, depending upon individual potential working memory capacities. Individual working memory capacity may be a phenotype that reflects sensitivity to changes in pain perception. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perineural pretreatment of bee venom attenuated the development of allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation injured neuropathic pain model; an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Won Uk; Choi, Seong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Lee, So Hee; Lee, Sun Kyung; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Leem, Jeong Gil; Song, Jun Gol; Shin, Jin Woo

    2014-11-04

    Diluted bee venom (BV) is known to have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore assessed whether perineural bee venom pretreatment could attenuate the development of neuropathic pain in the spinal nerve ligation injured animal model. Neuropathic pain was surgically induced in 30 male Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves, with 10 rats each treated with saline and 0.05 and 0.1 mg BV. Behavioral testing for mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia was conducted on postoperative days 3 to 29. Three rats in each group and 9 sham operated rats were sacrificed on day 9, and the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) receptors in the ipsilateral L5 dorsal root ganglion was analyzed. The perineural administration of BV to the spinal nerves attenuated the development of mechanical, thermal, and cold allodynia, and the BV pretreatment reduced the expression of TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPM8 and c - Fos in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion. The current study demonstrates that the perineural pretreatment with diluted bee venom before the induction of spinal nerve ligation significantly suppresses the development of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, this bee venom induced suppression was strongly related with the involvement of transient receptor potential family members.

  8. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper......-105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...... trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows...

  9. Pain and executive functions: A unique relationship between Stroop task and experimentally induced pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bjekic, J.; Zivanovic, M.; Puric, D.; Oosterman, J.M.; Filipovic, S.R.

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that a higher level of cognitive inhibition is associated with lower experimental pain sensitivity. However, a systematic examination of the association between executive functions, which include not only inhibition but also updating and shifting, and experimental

  10. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: nonparallel antinociceptive effects on chronic clinical pain and acute experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheing, G L; Hui-Chan, C W

    1999-03-01

    To investigate to what extent a single 60-minute session of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) would modify chronic clinical pain, acute experimental pain, and the flexion reflex evoked in chronic low back pain patients. Thirty young subjects with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups, receiving either TENS or placebo stimulation to the lumbosacral region for 60 minutes. The flexion reflex was elicited by an electrical stimulation applied to the subject's right sole and recorded electromyographically from the biceps femoris and the tibialis anterior muscles. Subjective sensation of low back pain and the electrically induced pain were measured by two separate visual analog scales, termed VAS(LBP) and VAS(FR), respectively. Data obtained before, during, and 60 minutes after TENS and placebo stimulations were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. The VAS(LBP) score was significantly reduced to 63.1% of the prestimulation value after TENS (pTENS protocol had different degrees of antinociceptive influence on chronic and acute pain in chronic low back pain patients.

  11. Uso do laser, 670 nm, no quadro álgico de ratos submetidos à modelo experimental de ciatalgia Use of laser, 670 nm, in painful episodes of rats submitted to experimental model of sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Broetto Cunha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A ciatalgia deve-se a compressão do nervo isquiático em algum ponto de seu trajeto, e seu tratamento consiste em solucionar a causa da compressão nervosa, seja por tratamento cirúrgico ou conservador. Alguns recursos fisioterapêuticos atuam basicamente na redução dos sintomas ocasionados por este distúrbio. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a eficácia do laser 670 nm, em duas diferentes densidades de energia, na redução do quadro álgico, em ratos submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram utilizados 18 ratos, divididos em 3 grupos: G1 (n=6 submetidos à ciatalgia e simulado o tratamento (grupo placebo, G2 (n=6 submetido à ciatalgia e tratados com laser 2 J/cm², G3 (n=6 submetidos à ciatalgia e irradiados com laser 4 J/cm². O nervo isquiático do membro posterior direito dos animais foi exposto e compressão com fio catgut em 4 pontos ao redor do nervo foi realizada. No 3° dia pós-operatório, iniciou-se o tratamento com laser na região do procedimento cirúrgico do membro posterior direito durante 10 dias consecutivos. Verificou-se por meio da marcha, o tempo em que o membro permanecia no ar nos períodos: anterior à ciatalgia, pré e pós-tratamento. Os resultados demonstraram que o laser não foi eficaz na redução do quadro álgico, porém com 4 J/cm² houve efeito positivo, sem restabelecimento completo da funcionalidade.Sciatica is caused by the sciatic nerve compression in some point of its course, and its treatment consists of solving the nervous compression cause, either by surgical or conservative treatment. Some physiotherapeutic resources act basically in the reduction of the symptoms caused by this disturbance. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of the laser 670 nm, in two different energy densities, in the pain reduction, in rats submitted to a sciatica experimental model. Eighteen rats, divided in 3 groups were used: G1 (n=6 submitted to sciatica and simulated treatment (placebo

  12. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM.

  13. Functional resonance magnetic imaging (fMRI) in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain: a paradigm of experimental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Juliana; Amaro, Edson; da Rocha, Liana Guerra Sanches; Jorge, Liliana; Santos, Flavia Heloisa; Len, Claudio A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that adults with musculoskeletal pain syndromes tolerate smaller amount of pressure (pain) as well as differences in brain activation patterns in areas related to pain.The objective of this study was to evaluate, through fMRI, the brain activation in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain (IMP) while performing an experimental paradigm of pain. Methods The study included 10 consecutive adolescents with idi...

  14. Effects of ethnicity and gender role expectations of pain on experimental pain: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Johnson, M I

    2013-05-01

    Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) have been shown to mediate sex differences in experimental pain. Few studies have investigated the role of ethnicity in shaping GREP. The aim of this study was to examine interactions between ethnicity and GREP on experimentally induced pressure and ischaemic pain in Libyan and white British students in their respective countries. Libyan (n = 124) and white British (n = 51) students completed a GREP questionnaire and their response to experimental pain was measured. Blunt pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured over the 1st interosseous muscle using algometry. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness (100 mm visual analogue scale) were measured at 1-min intervals during a submaximal effort tourniquet test on the forearm. Multivariate analysis of variance detected significant effects for Sex and Ethnicity on pain measurements. Men had higher PPTs than women (p 0.05). Libyan participants had higher pain intensity (p < 0.01) and pain unpleasantness (p < 0.05) ratings compared with white British participants. There were effects for Sex and Ethnicity for all GREP dimensions. Libyan participants exhibited stronger stereotypical views in GREP than white British participants (p < 0.001). GREP was the mediator of sex but not ethnic differences in pain report, suggesting that gender stereotypical attitudes to pain account for differences in pain expression between men and women. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  15. The genetic influence on the cortical processing of experimental pain and the moderating effect of pain status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Vossen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research suggests that the COMT Val(158Met, BDNF Val(66Met and OPRM1 A(118G polymorphisms moderate the experience of pain. In order to obtain experimental confirmation and extension of findings, cortical processing of experimentally-induced pain was used. METHOD: A sample of 78 individuals with chronic low back pain complaints and 37 healthy controls underwent EEG registration. Event-Related Potentials were measured in response to electrical nociceptive stimuli and moderation by COMT Val(158Met, BDNF Val(66Met and OPRM1 A(118G polymorphisms was assessed. RESULTS: Genetic variation did not have a direct effect on cortical processing of experimental pain. However, genetic effects (COMT Val(158Met and BDNF Val(66Met on experimental pain were moderated by the presence of chronic pain. In the presence of chronic pain, the COMT Met allele and the BDNF Met allele augmented cortical pain processing, whilst reducing pain processing in pain-free controls. No significant effects were found concerning the OPRM1 A(118G polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggests that chronic experience of pain enhances genetic sensitivity to experimentally induced mildly painful stimuli, possibly through a process of epigenetic modification.

  16. Beyond pain: modeling decision-making deficits in chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Leonardo Emanuel; Haimovici, Ariel; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Montoya, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Risky decision-making seems to be markedly disrupted in patients with chronic pain, probably due to the high cost that impose pain and negative mood on executive control functions. Patients’ behavioral performance on decision-making tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is characterized by selecting cards more frequently from disadvantageous than from advantageous decks, and by switching often between competing responses in comparison with healthy controls (HCs). In the present study, we developed a simple heuristic model to simulate individuals’ choice behavior by varying the level of decision randomness and the importance given to gains and losses. The findings revealed that the model was able to differentiate the behavioral performance of patients with chronic pain and HCs at the group, as well as at the individual level. The best fit of the model in patients with chronic pain was yielded when decisions were not based on previous choices and when gains were considered more relevant than losses. By contrast, the best account of the available data in HCs was obtained when decisions were based on previous experiences and losses loomed larger than gains. In conclusion, our model seems to provide useful information to measure each individual participant extensively, and to deal with the data on a participant-by-participant basis. PMID:25136301

  17. Beyond pain: modeling decision-making deficits in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Emanuel Hess

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Risky decision-making seems to be markedly disrupted in patients with chronic pain, probably due to the high cost that impose pain and negative mood on executive control functions. Patients’ behavioral performance on decision-making tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT is characterized by selecting cards more frequently from disadvantageous than from advantageous decks, and by switching often between competing responses in comparison with healthy controls. In the present study, we developed a simple heuristic model to simulate individuals’ choice behavior by varying the level of decision randomness and the importance given to gains and losses. The findings revealed that the model was able to differentiate the behavioral performance of patients with chronic pain and healthy controls at the group, as well as at the individual level. The best fit of the model in patients with chronic pain was yielded when decisions were not based on previous choices and when gains were considered more relevant than losses. By contrast, the best account of the available data in healthy controls was obtained when decisions were based on previous experiences and losses loomed larger than gains. In conclusion, our model seems to provide useful information to measure each individual participant extensively, and to deal with the data on a participant-by-participant basis.

  18. Beyond pain: modeling decision-making deficits in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Leonardo Emanuel; Haimovici, Ariel; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Montoya, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Risky decision-making seems to be markedly disrupted in patients with chronic pain, probably due to the high cost that impose pain and negative mood on executive control functions. Patients' behavioral performance on decision-making tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is characterized by selecting cards more frequently from disadvantageous than from advantageous decks, and by switching often between competing responses in comparison with healthy controls (HCs). In the present study, we developed a simple heuristic model to simulate individuals' choice behavior by varying the level of decision randomness and the importance given to gains and losses. The findings revealed that the model was able to differentiate the behavioral performance of patients with chronic pain and HCs at the group, as well as at the individual level. The best fit of the model in patients with chronic pain was yielded when decisions were not based on previous choices and when gains were considered more relevant than losses. By contrast, the best account of the available data in HCs was obtained when decisions were based on previous experiences and losses loomed larger than gains. In conclusion, our model seems to provide useful information to measure each individual participant extensively, and to deal with the data on a participant-by-participant basis.

  19. Characterization of a novel model of tonic heat pain stimulation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naert, Arne L G; Kehlet, Henrik; Kupers, Ron

    2008-08-15

    The vast majority of the experimental pain studies have used acute, phasic heat stimuli to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms of pain. However, the validity of these models for understanding clinical forms of pain is questionable. We here describe the characteristics of a model of prolonged tonic heat pain stimulation and compared the responses on this test with other measures of pain. In 58 normal volunteers, we applied a 7-min lasting contact heat stimulation of 47 degrees C to the upper leg while participants constantly rated their pain. Average pain rating during the 7-min period was 6.2+/-0.4, females scoring higher than men (7.4+/-0.5 vs. 5.2+/-0.5; pPain ratings showed a steady increase during the first half of the stimulation period after which they stabilized. A strong interindividual variability was observed in the time profiles of the pain ratings over the course of the 7-min stimulation period. The model showed a good test-retest reproducibility. Tonic heat pain ratings only correlated moderately with the pain threshold while stronger correlations were observed with pain tolerance and ratings of suprathreshold phasic heat pain. We conclude that the tonic heat model is a suitable model that can be applied without excessive discomfort in the majority of subjects and offers a valuable addition to the armamentarium of experimental pain models. The model can be particularly suitable for brain imaging receptor binding studies which require long stimulation periods.

  20. Healthy volunteers can be phenotyped using cutaneous sensitization pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Petersen, Karin; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following repe...... repeated measurements. The aim of this study was to determine if the areas of secondary hyperalgesia were consistently robust to be useful for phenotyping subjects, based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat pain models.......Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following...

  1. Psychophysics, flare, and neurosecretory function in human pain models: capsaicin versus electrically evoked pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Christian; Fondel, Ricarda; Krämer, Heidrun H; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolfe-Detlef; Sommer, Claudia; Birklein, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Intradermal capsaicin injection (CAP) and electrical current stimulation (ES) are analyzed in respect to patterns and test-retest reliability of pain as well as sensory and neurosecretory changes. In 10 healthy subjects, 2x CAP (50 microg) and 2x ES (5 to 30 mA) were applied to the volar forearm. The time period between 2 identical stimulations was about 4 months. Pain ratings, areas of mechanical hyperalgesia, and allodynia were assessed. The intensity of sensory changes was quantified by using quantitative sensory testing. Neurogenic flare was assessed by using laser Doppler imaging. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release was quantified by dermal microdialysis in combination with an enzyme immunoassay. Time course and peak pain ratings were different between CAP and ES. Test-retest correlation was high (r > or = 0.73). Both models induced primary heat hyperalgesia and primary plus secondary pin-prick hyperalgesia. Allodynia occurred in about half of the subjects. Maximum flare sizes did not differ between CAP and ES, but flare intensities were higher for ES. Test-retest correlation was higher for flare sizes than for flare intensity. A significant CGRP release could only be measured after CAP. The different time courses of pain stimulation (CAP: rapidly decaying pain versus ES: pain plateau) led to different peripheral neurosecretory effects but induced similar central plasticity and hyperalgesia. The present study gives a detailed overview of psychophysical and neurosecretory characteristics induced by noxious stimulation with capsaicin and electrical current. We describe differences, similarities, and reproducibility of these human pain models. These data might help to interpret past and future results of human pain studies using experimental pain.

  2. Antinociceptive Interaction of Tramadol with Gabapentin in Experimental Mononeuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Zanetta, Pilar; Castillo, Rodrigo; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of injury to the nervous system, and different animal models have been established to meet the manifestations of neuropathy. The pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes gabapentin and tramadol, but these are only partially effective when given alone. The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between both drugs using the isobolographic analysis and changes of the IL-1β concentration in a mouse model of neuropathic pain (partial sciatic nerve ligation or PSNL). The i.p. administration of gabapentin (5-100 mg/kg) or tramadol (12.5-100 mg/kg) displayed a dose-dependent antinociception in the hot plate assay of PSNL mice, and effects induced by gabapentin with tramadol were synergistic. Administration of gabapentin or tramadol reversed significantly the increase in the concentration of IL-1β induced by PSNL after either 7 or 14 days and their combination was significantly more potent in reversing the elevated concentration of IL-1β. The synergism obtained by the co-administration of gabapentin and tramadol is proposed to result from action on different mechanisms in pain pathways. Gabapentin or tramadol or their combination modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, in a model of mice PSNL which could be due to an inhibition of glial function. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Hemorrhoids: an experimental model in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plapler Hélio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids are a matter of concern due to a painful outcome. We describe a simple, easy and reliable experimental model to produce hemorrhoids in monkeys. METHODS: 14 monkeys (Cebus apella were used. After general anesthesia, hemorrhoids were induced by ligation of the inferior hemorrhoidal vein, which is very alike to humans. The vein was located through a perianal incision, dissected and ligated with a 3-0 vicryl. The skin was sutured with a 4-0 catgut thread. Animals were kept in appropriate cages and evaluated daily. RESULTS: Nine days later there were hemorrhoidal piles in the anus in fifty percent (50% of the animals. Outcome was unremarkable. There was no bleeding and all animals showed no signs of pain or suffering. CONCLUSION: This is an affordable and reliable experimental model to induce hemorrhoids for experimental studies.

  4. The Modulation of Pain by Circadian and Sleep-Dependent Processes: A Review of the Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenauer, Megan; Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena

    2017-01-01

    conditions, pain sensitivity varies across the 24 h day, with highest sensitivity occurring during the evening in humans. Pain sensitivity is also modulated by sleep behavior, with pain sensitivity increasing in response to the build-up of homeostatic sleep pressure following sleep deprivation or sleep...... of physiologically meaningful stimulation levels. Following this normalization, we find that the estimated impact of the daily rhythm and of sleep deprivation on experimental pain measurements is surprisingly consistent across different pain modalities. We also review evidence documenting the impact of circadian...... rhythms and sleep deprivation on the neural circuitry in the spinal cord underlying pain sensation. The characterization of sleep-dependent and circadian influences on pain sensitivity in this review paper is used to develop and constrain the mathematical models introduced in the two companion articles....

  5. The effect of electroacupuncture and tramadol on experimental tourniquet pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Frauke; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gabriel, Tim; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-03-01

    The hypoalgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with the analgesic effect of pharmacological interventions using the submaximum effort tourniquet technique (SETT). 125 healthy subjects (mean age 24.44±4.46 years; 62.4% female, 37.6% male) performed SETT at baseline and under one of five experimental conditions (n=25 per group): EA (2 Hz with burst pulses in alternating one-phase-square wave pulses; burst length 180 μs, burst frequency 80 Hz, stimulation time/pulse width 3 s), tramadol (50 mg), ibuprofen (400 mg), placebo pill or non-treatment control. EA was performed at LI4 and LI10 contralaterally with stimulation beginning 20 min before SETT and lasting throughout SETT. The pharmacological interventions were given in a double-blind design 1 h before the SETT assessment. Subjects showed a hypoalgesic effect of the opiate and of the EA for subjective pain rating (EA p=0.0051; tramadol p=0.0299), and pain tolerance index (time/rating) (EA p=0.043; tramadol p=0.047) analysed using analysis of covariance. More subjects reached the strict time limit of 30 min (analysed by logistic regression and adjusted OR as a post-hoc analysis) under EA compared with most other experimental conditions. Only EA and tramadol were not significantly different (95% Wald confidence limits: non-treatment control vs EA 0.011 to 0.542; placebo pill vs EA 0.009 to 0.438; ibuprofen vs EA 0.021 to 0.766; tramadol vs EA 0.065 to 1.436). In a laboratory setting, an EA procedure was as effective as a single dose of an orally administered opiate in reducing experimentally induced ischaemic pain.

  6. Neuropathic pain in experimental autoimmune neuritis is associated with altered electrophysiological properties of nociceptive DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Omneya; Opitz, Thoralf; Mueller, Marcus; Pitsch, Julika; Becker, Albert; Evert, Bernd Oliver; Beck, Heinz; Jeub, Monika

    2017-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy characterized by rapidly progressive paresis and sensory disturbances. Moderate to severe and often intractable neuropathic pain is a common symptom of GBS, but its underlying mechanisms are unknown. Pathology of GBS is classically attributed to demyelination of large, myelinated peripheral fibers. However, there is increasing evidence that neuropathic pain in GBS is associated with impaired function of small, unmyelinated, nociceptive fibers. We therefore examined the functional properties of small DRG neurons, the somata of nociceptive fibers, in a rat model of GBS (experimental autoimmune neuritis=EAN). EAN rats developed behavioral signs of neuropathic pain. This was accompanied by a significant shortening of action potentials due to a more rapid repolarization and an increase in repetitive firing in a subgroup of capsaicin-responsive DRG neurons. Na + current measurements revealed a significant increase of the fast TTX-sensitive current and a reduction of the persistent TTX-sensitive current component. These changes of Na + currents may account for the significant decrease in AP duration leading to an overall increase in excitability and are therefore possibly directly linked to pathological pain behavior. Thus, like in other animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, Na + channels seem to be crucially involved in the pathology of GBS and may constitute promising targets for pain modulating pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose-specific effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on experimental pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica S; Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Sim, Julius

    2011-09-01

    To determine the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) parameter combinations on experimental models in healthy humans. Searches were performed using the electronic databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, and Web of Science (from inception to December 2009). Manual searches of journals and reference lists of retrieved trials were also performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review if they compared the hypoalgesic effect of TENS relative with placebo and control, using an experimental pain model in healthy human participants. Two reviewers independently selected the trials, assessed their methodologic quality and extracted data. Forty-three RCTs were eligible for inclusion. A best evidence synthesis revealed: Overall "conflicting" (inconsistent findings in multiple RCTs) evidence of TENS efficacy on experimental pain irrespective of TENS parameters used. Overall intense TENS has "moderate" evidence of efficacy (1 high-quality and 2 low-quality trials). Conventional TENS has overall conflicting evidence of efficacy, this is derived from "strong" evidence of efficacy (generally consistent findings in multiple high-quality RCTs) on pressure pain but strong evidence of inefficacy on other pain models. "Limited" evidence (positive findings from 1 RCT) of hypoalgesia exists for some novel parameters. Low-intensity, low-frequency, local TENS has strong evidence of inefficacy. Inappropriate TENS (using "barely perceptible" intensities) has moderate evidence of inefficacy. The level of hypoalgesic efficacy of TENS is clearly dependent on TENS parameter combination selection (defined in terms of intensity, frequency, and stimulation site) and experimental pain model. Future clinical RCTs may consider these TENS dose responses.

  8. Biopsychosocial model of chronic recurrent pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Rakovec-Felser

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain is not merely a symptom of disease but a complex independent phenomenon where psychological factors are always present (Sternberg, 1973. Especially by chronic, recurrent pain it's more constructive to think of chronic pain as a syndrome that evolves over time, involving a complex interaction of physiological/organic, psychological, and behavioural processes. Study of chronic recurrent functional pain covers tension form of headache. 50 suffering persons were accidentally chosen among those who had been seeking medical help over more than year ago. We tested their pain intensity and duration, extent of subjective experience of accommodation efforts, temperament characteristics, coping strategies, personal traits, the role of pain in intra- and interpersonal communication. At the end we compared this group with control group (without any manifest physical disorders and with analyse of variance (MANOVA. The typical person who suffers and expects medical help is mostly a woman, married, has elementary or secondary education, is about 40. Pain, seems to appear in the phase of stress-induced psychophysical fatigue, by persons with lower constitutional resistance to different influences, greater irritability and number of physiologic correlates of emotional tensions. Because of their ineffective style of coping, it seems they quickly exhausted their adaptation potential too. Through their higher level of social–field dependence, reactions of other persons (doctor, spouse could be important factors of reinforcement and social learning processes. In managing of chronic pain, especially such as tension headache is, it's very important to involve bio-psychosocial model of pain and integrative model of treatment. Intra- and inter-subjective psychological functions of pain must be recognised as soon as possible.

  9. Multiple sites and actions of gabapentin-induced relief of ongoing experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Kirsty; Qu, Chaoling; Navratilova, Edita; Oyarzo, Janice; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; King, Tamara; Dickenson, Anthony H; Porreca, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Gabapentin (GBP) is a first-line therapy for neuropathic pain, but its mechanisms and sites of action remain uncertain. We investigated GBP-induced modulation of neuropathic pain following spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. Intravenous or intrathecal GBP reversed evoked mechanical hypersensitivity and produced conditioned place preference (CPP) and dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) selectively in SNL rats. Spinal GBP also significantly inhibited dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range neuronal responses to a range of evoked stimuli in SNL rats. By contrast, GBP microinjected bilaterally into the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), produced CPP, and elicited NAc DA release selectively in SNL rats but did not reverse tactile allodynia and had marginal effects on wide-dynamic-range neuronal activity. Moreover, blockade of endogenous opioid signaling in the rACC prevented intravenous GBP-induced CPP and NAc DA release but failed to block its inhibition of tactile allodynia. Gabapentin, therefore, can potentially act to produce its pain relieving effects by (a) inhibition of injury-induced spinal neuronal excitability, evoked hypersensitivity, and ongoing pain and (b) selective supraspinal modulation of affective qualities of pain, without alteration of reflexive behaviors. Consistent with previous findings of pain relief from nonopioid analgesics, GBP requires engagement of rACC endogenous opioid circuits and downstream activation of mesolimbic reward circuits reflected in learned pain-motivated behaviors. These findings support the partial separation of sensory and affective dimensions of pain in this experimental model and suggest that modulation of affective-motivational qualities of pain may be the preferential mechanism of GBP's analgesic effects in patients.

  10. A practical guide and perspectives on the use of experimental pain modalities with children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Caes, Line; Wilson, Anna C; Williams, Sara E; Chambers, Christine T

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Use of experimental pain is vital for addressing research questions that would otherwise be impossible to examine in the real world. Experimental induction of pain in children is highly scrutinized given the potential for harm and lack of direct benefit to a vulnerable population. However, its use has critically advanced our understanding of the mechanisms, assessment and treatment of pain in both healthy and chronically ill children. This article introduces various experimental pain modalities, including the cold pressor task, the water load symptom provocation test, thermal pain, pressure pain and conditioned pain modulation, and discusses their application for use with children and adolescents. It addresses practical implementation and ethical issues, as well as the advantages and disadvantages offered by each task. The incredible potential for future research is discussed given the array of experimental pain modalities now available to pediatric researchers. PMID:24641434

  11. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  12. Self-reported pain and disability outcomes from an endogenous model of muscular back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steven Z

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to develop an induced musculoskeletal pain model of acute low back pain and examine the relationship among pain, disability and fear in this model. Methods Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in 52 healthy volunteers (23 women, 17 men; average age 22.4 years; average BMI 24.3 using fatiguing trunk extension exercise. Measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and location, and disability, were tracked for one week after exercise. Results Pain intensity ranged from 0 to 68 with 57.5% of participants reporting peak pain at 24 hours and 32.5% reporting this at 48 hours. The majority of participants reported pain in the low back with 33% also reporting pain in the legs. The ratio of unpleasantness to intensity indicated that the sensation was considered more unpleasant than intense. Statistical differences were noted in levels of reported disability between participants with and without leg pain. Pain intensity at 24 hours was correlated with pain unpleasantness, pain area and disability. Also, fear of pain was associated with pain intensity and unpleasantness. Disability was predicted by sex, presence of leg pain, and pain intensity; however, the largest amount of variance was explained by pain intensity (27% of a total 40%. The second model, predicting pain intensity only included fear of pain and explained less than 10% of the variance in pain intensity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a significant association between pain and disability in this model in young adults. However, the model is most applicable to patients with lower levels of pain and disability. Future work should include older adults to improve the external validity of this model.

  13. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  14. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik B.; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PCPM and facilitated TSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  15. Psychological resilience, pain catastrophizing, and positive emotions: perspectives on comprehensive modeling of individual pain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a complex construct that contributes to profound physical and psychological dysfunction, particularly in individuals coping with chronic pain. The current paper builds upon previous research, describes a balanced conceptual model that integrates aspects of both psychological vulnerability and resilience to pain, and reviews protective and exacerbating psychosocial factors to the process of adaptation to chronic pain, including pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and positive psychological resources predictive of enhanced pain coping. The current paper identifies future directions for research that will further enrich the understanding of pain adaptation and espouses an approach that will enhance the ecological validity of psychological pain coping models, including introduction of advanced statistical and conceptual models that integrate behavioral, cognitive, information processing, motivational and affective theories of pain.

  16. Increased circulating rather than spinal cytokines accompany chronic pain behaviors in experimental bone cancer and arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Pourtau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral cytokines contribute to arthritis and bone cancer pain through sensory nerve actions. However, increased spinal cytokine and glial filament expression, coined neuroinflammation, has also been proposed to play a part in chronic pain. Therefore, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and circulating cytokines were compared in murine arthritis and bone cancer models in relationship to behavioral signs of pain. Methods: Exploratory behaviors were studied after intra-articular complete Freund's adjuvant or bone intramedullary sarcoma cell injection. Nervous tissue and blood cytokine expression were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and multiplex immunoassays, respectively. Results: PCR analysis did not reveal any hallmark of spinal neuroinflammation in spontaneously-behaving mice with cartilage or bone lesions. However, imposed paw stimulation during joint inflammation increased spinal interleukin-1β (IL-1β expression. Spontaneous paw guarding during rearing was displayed by animals with joint inflammation and bone destruction and was accompanied by increased circulating IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, respectively. In addition, dorsal root ganglia were found to constitutively express receptors for this chemotactic cytokine. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that spinal neuroinflammation is not a necessary condition for chronic pain and suggest that circulating cytokine action in dorsal root ganglia may contribute to experimental joint inflammation and bone cancer pain.

  17. Reliability of four experimental mechanical pain tests in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Ann-Britt Langager; Thomsen, Lise L; Tornoe, Birte

    2013-01-01

    In order to study pain in children, it is necessary to determine whether pain measurement tools used in adults are reliable measurements in children. The aim of this study was to explore the intrasession reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in healthy children. Furthermore, the aim was a...... was also to study the intersession reliability of the following four tests: (1) Total Tenderness Score; (2) PPT; (3) Visual Analog Scale score at suprapressure pain threshold; and (4) area under the curve (stimulus-response functions for pressure versus pain).......In order to study pain in children, it is necessary to determine whether pain measurement tools used in adults are reliable measurements in children. The aim of this study was to explore the intrasession reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in healthy children. Furthermore, the aim...

  18. Identifying experimental methods to determine the effect of pain on attention: a review of pain, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    To review published studies of the effects that pain and common psychopharmacological substances have on the attentional performance of healthy adults. To identify which attentional tasks have the greatest potential to investigate the effect of pain on attention and provide recommendations for future research. A search was conducted for reports of experimental studies of attention in the context of pain. This was supplemented with studies on attention and caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Studies were included if they used a healthy adult sample, used experimental or quasi-experimental methods, were relevant to the study of attention or interruption of pain and/or examined the acute effects of a substance on attention. Thirty-two papers, with 49 different experimental studies were identified (12 pain, 21 nicotine, 7 caffeine, 9 alcohol). Fourteen different tasks were reviewed across six domains of attention. The most promising measures of attention were the continuous performance task, flanker task, endogenous pre-cuing task, n-back task, inhibition task and dual task. There are reliable tasks that could be used to determine the effects of pain on attention. Future research is required that develops the utility of these tasks to improve our understanding of the effects pain and analgesia have on attentional performance. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Reorganized trunk muscle activity during multidirectional floor perturbations after experimental low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain changes the trunk muscle activity after external perturbations but the relationship between pain intensities and distributions and their effect on the trunk muscle activity remains unclear. The effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity w...

  20. Analyzing musculoskeletal neck pain, measured as present pain and periods of pain, with three different regression models: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagberg Mats

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the literature there are discussions on the choice of outcome and the need for more longitudinal studies of musculoskeletal disorders. The general aim of this longitudinal study was to analyze musculoskeletal neck pain, in a group of young adults. Specific aims were to determine whether psychosocial factors, computer use, high work/study demands, and lifestyle are long-term or short-term factors for musculoskeletal neck pain, and whether these factors are important for developing or ongoing musculoskeletal neck pain. Methods Three regression models were used to analyze the different outcomes. Pain at present was analyzed with a marginal logistic model, for number of years with pain a Poisson regression model was used and for developing and ongoing pain a logistic model was used. Presented results are odds ratios and proportion ratios (logistic models and rate ratios (Poisson model. The material consisted of web-based questionnaires answered by 1204 Swedish university students from a prospective cohort recruited in 2002. Results Perceived stress was a risk factor for pain at present (PR = 1.6, for developing pain (PR = 1.7 and for number of years with pain (RR = 1.3. High work/study demands was associated with pain at present (PR = 1.6; and with number of years with pain when the demands negatively affect home life (RR = 1.3. Computer use pattern (number of times/week with a computer session ≥ 4 h, without break was a risk factor for developing pain (PR = 1.7, but also associated with pain at present (PR = 1.4 and number of years with pain (RR = 1.2. Among life style factors smoking (PR = 1.8 was found to be associated to pain at present. The difference between men and women in prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was confirmed in this study. It was smallest for the outcome ongoing pain (PR = 1.4 compared to pain at present (PR = 2.4 and developing pain (PR = 2.5. Conclusion By using different regression models different

  1. The contribution of spinal glial cells to chronic pain behaviour in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical studies of osteoarthritis (OA suggest central sensitization may contribute to the chronic pain experienced. This preclinical study used the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA model of OA joint pain to investigate the potential contribution of spinal sensitization, in particular spinal glial cell activation, to pain behaviour in this model. Experimental OA was induced in the rat by the intra-articular injection of MIA and pain behaviour (change in weight bearing and distal allodynia was assessed. Spinal cord microglia (Iba1 staining and astrocyte (GFAP immunofluorescence activation were measured at 7, 14 and 28 days post MIA-treatment. The effects of two known inhibitors of glial activation, nimesulide and minocycline, on pain behaviour and activation of microglia and astrocytes were assessed. Results Seven days following intra-articular injection of MIA, microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord were activated (p Conclusions Here we provide evidence for a contribution of spinal glial cells to pain behaviour, in particular distal allodynia, in this model of osteoarthritic pain. Our data suggest there is a potential role of glial cells in the central sensitization associated with OA, which may provide a novel analgesic target for the treatment of OA pain.

  2. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  3. Healthy volunteers can be phenotyped using cutaneous sensitization pain models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads U Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following repeated measurements. The aim of this study was to determine if the areas of secondary hyperalgesia were consistently robust to be useful for phenotyping subjects, based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat pain models. METHODS: We performed post-hoc analyses of 10 completed healthy volunteer studies (n = 342 [409 repeated measurements]. Three different models were used to induce secondary hyperalgesia to monofilament stimulation: the heat/capsaicin sensitization (H/C, the brief thermal sensitization (BTS, and the burn injury (BI models. Three studies included both the H/C and BTS models. RESULTS: Within-subject compared to between-subject variability was low, and there was substantial strength of agreement between repeated induction-sessions in most studies. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC improved little with repeated testing beyond two sessions. There was good agreement in categorizing subjects into 'small area' (1(st quartile [75%] responders: 56-76% of subjects consistently fell into same 'small-area' or 'large-area' category on two consecutive study days. There was moderate to substantial agreement between the areas of secondary hyperalgesia induced on the same day using the H/C (forearm and BTS (thigh models. CONCLUSION: Secondary hyperalgesia induced by experimental heat pain models seem a consistent measure of sensitization in pharmacodynamic and physiological research. The analysis indicates that healthy volunteers can be phenotyped based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat [and heat plus capsaicin] pain models.

  4. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...... development: Grounding We develop an empirically based conceptualization of modelling and use of models in system development projects characterized by a high degree of uncertainty in requirements and point to implications for tools and techniques for modelling in such a setting. Techniques We introduce......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...

  5. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulls HW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hailey W Bulls,1 Emily L Freeman,1 Austen JB Anderson,2 Meredith T Robbins,3 Timothy J Ness,3 Burel R Goodin1,3 1Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Biology, Samford University, Birmingham, AL, USA; 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST, while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24 and women (n=24 each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional

  6. Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Thapa, Tribikram

    2018-01-01

    Objective.:  To examine the effect of motor activity on the magnitude and duration of altered corticomotor output following experimental muscle pain. Design. : Experimental, pre-post test. Setting. : University laboratory. Subjects. : Twenty healthy individuals. Methods.:  Participants were rando....... Understanding corticomotor depression in the postpain period and what factors promote recovery has relevance for clinical pain syndromes where ongoing motor dysfunction, in the absence of pain, may predispose to symptom persistence or recurrence....

  7. [Neither Descartes nor Freud? current pain models in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, N; Egle, U T; von Känel, R

    2008-05-14

    Models explaining chronic pain based on the mere presence or absence of peripheral somatic findings or which view pain of psychological origin when there is no somatic explanation, have their shortcomings. Current scientific knowledge calls for distinct pain concepts, which integrate neurobiological and neuropsychological aspects of pain processing.

  8. Involvement of TRPM2 in a wide range of inflammatory and neuropathic pain mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako So

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests a role of transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 in immune and inflammatory responses. We previously reported that TRPM2 deficiency attenuated inflammatory and neuropathic pain in some pain mouse models, including formalin- or carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain, and peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models, while it had no effect on the basal mechanical and thermal nociceptive sensitivities. In this study, we further explored the involvement of TRPM2 in various pain models using TRPM2-knockout mice. There were no differences in the chemonociceptive behaviors evoked by intraplantar injection of capsaicin or hydrogen peroxide between wildtype and TRPM2-knockout mice, while acetic acid-induced writhing behavior was significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. In the postoperative incisional pain model, no difference in mechanical allodynia was observed between the two genotypes. By contrast, mechanical allodynia in the monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis pain model and the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model were significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. Furthermore, mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy and streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy models were significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TRPM2 plays roles in a wide range of pathological pain models based on peripheral and central neuroinflammation, rather than physiological nociceptive pain.

  9. Topical acetylsalicylic, salicylic acid and indomethacin suppress pain from experimental tissue acidosis in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, K H; Reeh, P W; Kreysel, H W

    1995-09-01

    Topically applied acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylic acid (SA) and indomethacin were tested in an experimental pain model that provides direct nociceptor excitation through cutaneous tissue acidosis. In 30 volunteers, sustained burning pain was produced in the palmar forearm through a continuous intradermal pressure infusion of a phosphate-buffered isotonic solution (pH 5.2). In 5 different, double-blind, randomized cross-over studies with 6 volunteers each, the flow rate of the syringe pump was individually adjusted to result in constant pain ratings of around 20% (50% in study 4) on a visual analog scale (VAS). The painful skin area was then covered with either placebo or the drugs which had been dissolved in diethylether. In the first study on 6 volunteers, ASA (60 mg/ml) or lactose (placebo) in diethylether (10 ml) was applied, using both arms at 3-day intervals. Both treatments resulted in sudden and profound pain relief due to the cooling effect of the evaporating ether. With lactose, however, the mean pain rating was restored close to the baseline within 6-8 min while, with ASA, it remained significantly depressed for the rest of the observation period (another 20 min). This deep analgesia was not accompanied by a loss of tactile sensation. The further studies served to show that indomethacin (4.5 mg/ml) and SA (60 mg/ml) were equally effective as ASA (each 92-96% pain reduction) and that the antinociceptive effects were due to local but not systemic actions, since ASA and SA dis not reach measurable plasma levels up to 3 h after topical applications. With a higher flow rate of acid buffer producing more intense pain (VAS 50%). ASA and SA were still able to significantly reduce the ratings by 90% or 84%, respectively. On the other hand, by increasing the flow rate by a factor of 2 on average, during the period of fully developed drug effect it was possible to overcome the pain suppression, which suggests a competitive mechanism of (acetyl-) salicylic

  10. Functional resonance magnetic imaging (fMRI) in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain: a paradigm of experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Juliana; Amaro, Edson; da Rocha, Liana Guerra Sanches; Jorge, Liliana; Santos, Flavia Heloisa; Len, Claudio A

    2017-11-14

    Studies on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that adults with musculoskeletal pain syndromes tolerate smaller amount of pressure (pain) as well as differences in brain activation patterns in areas related to pain.The objective of this study was to evaluate, through fMRI, the brain activation in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain (IMP) while performing an experimental paradigm of pain. The study included 10 consecutive adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain (average age 16.3±1.0) and 10 healthy adolescents age-matched. fMRI exams were performed in a 3 T scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens) using an event-related design paradigm. Pressure stimuli were performed in the nondominant hand thumb, divided into two stages, fixed pain and variable pain. The two local Research Ethics Committees (Ethics Committee from Universidade Federal de São Paulo- Brazil, process number 0688/11, on July 1st, 2011 and Ethics Committee from Hospital Israelita Albert Einsten - Brazil, process number 1673, on October 19th, 2011) approved the study. The idiopathic musculoskeletal pain (IMP) group showed a reduced threshold for pain (3.7 kg/cm 2 versus 4.45 kg/cm 2 , p = 0.005). Control group presented increased bain activation when compared to IMP group in the following areas: thalamus (p = 0.00001), precentral gyrus (p = 0.0004) and middle frontal gyrus (p = 0.03). In intragroup analysis, IMP group showed greater brain activation during the unpredictable stimuli of the variable pain stage, especially in the lingual gyrus (p = 0.0001), frontal lobe (p = 0.0001), temporal gyrus (p = 0.0001) and precentral gyrus (p = 0.03), when compared to predictable stimulus of fixed pain. The same intragroup analysis with the control group showed greater activation during the unpredictable stimuli in regions of the precentral gyrus (p = 0.0001), subcallosal area (p = 0.0001), right and left occipital fusiform gyrus (p

  11. Are preoperative experimental pain assessments correlated with clinical pain outcomes after surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangesland, Anders; Støren, Carl; Vaegter, Henrik B.

    2017-01-01

    of surgery, QST variables, clinical pain outcome measure and main result. Results Most studies showed moderate to high risk of bias. Type of surgery investigated include 7 studies on total knee replacement, 5 studies on caesarean section, 4 studies on thoracic surgery, 2 studies on herniotomy, 2 studies......Background Pain after surgery is not uncommon with 30% of patients reporting moderate to severe postoperative pain. Early identification of patients prone to postoperative pain may be a step forward towards individualized pain medicine providing a basis for improved clinical management through......, and (3) the association between QST and pain after surgery was investigated. Forty-four unique studies were identified, with 30 studies on 2738 subjects meeting inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the include studies was assessed and data extraction included study population, type...

  12. Towards a new model of attentional biases in the development, maintenance, and management of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jemma; Sharpe, Louise; Johnson, Ameika; Nicholson Perry, Kathryn; Colagiuri, Ben; Dear, Blake F

    2015-09-01

    Individuals with chronic pain demonstrate attentional biases (ABs) towards pain-related stimuli. However, the clinical importance of these biases is yet to be determined and a sound theoretical model for explaining the role of ABs in the development and maintenance of pain is lacking. Within this article, we (1) systematically review prospective and experimental research exploring ABs and pain outcomes in light of current theoretical models and (2) propose a theoretical framework for understanding AB in pain. Across prospective research, an attentional pattern of vigilance-avoidance was observed. Interventions targeting ABs were less consistent; however, there were promising findings among studies that found attentional training effects, particularly for laboratory research. The proposed Threat Interpretation Model suggests a relationship between threat, interpretation, and stimuli in determining attentional processes, which while tentative generates important testable predictions regarding the role of attention in pain and builds on previous theoretical and empirical work in this area.

  13. Reliability of four experimental mechanical pain tests in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soee AL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ann-Britt L Soee,1 Lise L Thomsen,2 Birte Tornoe,1,3 Liselotte Skov11Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Headache Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Department of Neuropediatrics, Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, København Ø, Denmark; 3Department of Physiotherapy, Medical Department O, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, DenmarkPurpose: In order to study pain in children, it is necessary to determine whether pain measurement tools used in adults are reliable measurements in children. The aim of this study was to explore the intrasession reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPT in healthy children. Furthermore, the aim was also to study the intersession reliability of the following four tests: (1 Total Tenderness Score; (2 PPT; (3 Visual Analog Scale score at suprapressure pain threshold; and (4 area under the curve (stimulus–response functions for pressure versus pain.Participants and methods: Twenty-five healthy school children, 8–14 years of age, participated. Test 2, PPT, was repeated three times at 2 minute intervals on the same day to estimate PPT intrasession reliability using Cronbach’s alpha. Tests 1–4 were repeated after median 21 (interquartile range 10.5–22 days, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to describe the intersession reliability.Results: The PPT test was precise and reliable (Cronbach’s alpha ≥ 0.92. All tests showed a good to excellent correlation between days (intersessions r = 0.66–0.81. There were no indications of significant systematic differences found in any of the four tests between days.Conclusion: All tests seemed to be reliable measurements in pain evaluation in healthy children aged 8–14 years. Given the small sample size, this conclusion needs to be confirmed in future studies.Keywords: repeatability, intraindividual reliability, pressure pain threshold, pain measurement, algometer

  14. Body awareness and responses to experimentally Induced pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of this study is to discuss personal and demographic factors that influence the relationship between physical activity and awareness of one's own body, as well as the pain response (threshold and tolerance of pain, situational anxiety and personality. In the study 38 healthy individual- volunteers, students in Trakia University - Stara Zagora were selected. All participants were divided into two groups: actively involved in individual or team sport (n = 19 and healthy normaly active subjects (non-athletes, n = 19. The age of the study participants ranged between 18 and 39 years, while the gender breakdown was as follows: men - 22 women – 16. Methods: Psychological Questionnaires: Body Awareness Questionnaire that asks subjects to rate, on a 4 point scale, the degree to which they were currently experiencing symptoms of sympathetic arousal, State Trait Anger Scale, and State Trait Anxiety Scale. Objective methods (cold pressure test are used only to determine the pain sensation and pain tolerance thresholds. The results of investigation support significant differences between athletes and non-athletes in pain thershold, body awareness and anxiety. The study conclusions discuss body awareness as an increasing factor for pain resistance in athletes and as an integral part of the learning process among them.

  15. Sex differences in pain: a brief review of clinical and experimental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, E J; Fillingim, R B

    2013-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed substantially increased research regarding sex differences in pain. The expansive body of literature in this area clearly suggests that men and women differ in their responses to pain, with increased pain sensitivity and risk for clinical pain commonly being observed among women. Also, differences in responsivity to pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain interventions have been observed; however, these effects are not always consistent and appear dependent on treatment type and characteristics of both the pain and the provider. Although the specific aetiological basis underlying these sex differences is unknown, it seems inevitable that multiple biological and psychosocial processes are contributing factors. For instance, emerging evidence suggests that genotype and endogenous opioid functioning play a causal role in these disparities, and considerable literature implicates sex hormones as factors influencing pain sensitivity. However, the specific modulatory effect of sex hormones on pain among men and women requires further exploration. Psychosocial processes such as pain coping and early-life exposure to stress may also explain sex differences in pain, in addition to stereotypical gender roles that may contribute to differences in pain expression. Therefore, this review will provide a brief overview of the extant literature examining sex-related differences in clinical and experimental pain, and highlights several biopsychosocial mechanisms implicated in these male-female differences. The future directions of this field of research are discussed with an emphasis aimed towards further elucidation of mechanisms which may inform future efforts to develop sex-specific treatments.

  16. Voluntary wheel running delays disease onset and reduces pain hypersensitivity in early experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Curtis; Paylor, John W; Tenorio, Gustavo; Winship, Ian; Baker, Glen; Kerr, Bradley J

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is classically defined by motor deficits, but it is also associated with the secondary symptoms of pain, depression, and anxiety. Up to this point modifying these secondary symptoms has been difficult. There is evidence that both MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, can be modulated by exercise. To examine whether limited voluntary wheel running could modulate EAE disease progression and the co-morbid symptoms of pain, mice with EAE were allowed access to running wheels for 1h every day. Allowing only 1h every day of voluntary running led to a significant delay in the onset of clinical signs of the disease. The development of mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey hairs and indicated that wheel running had a modest positive effect on the pain hypersensitivity associated with EAE. These behavioral changes were associated with reduced numbers of cFOS and phosphorylated NR1 positive cells in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to no-run EAE controls. In addition, within the dorsal horn, voluntary wheel running reduced the number of infiltrating CD3(+) T-cells and reduced the overall levels of Iba1 immunoreactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we observed that wheel-running lead to significant changes in the spinal cord levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Oxidative stress has separately been shown to contribute to EAE disease progression and neuropathic pain. Together these results indicate that in mice with EAE, voluntary motor activity can delay the onset of clinical signs and reduce pain symptoms associated with the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidimensional study of orofacial chronic neuropathic pain: An experimental study in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Daniela Montes-Angeles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial neuropathic chronic pain (NCP is frequently attributed to lesions caused by orofacial surgeries and dental treatments. There are many experimental models available to study orofacial NCP, however, many are extremely painful for the animal due to the amplitude of the innervated region. A previously proposed mental nerve constriction model, mNC, was used in this project. Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: one group included rats with mNC (n=20, and another rats with sham lesions (n=20. Through the use of the fixed ratio program and the progressive program, a decrease of motivation for a sweet substance, caused by the lesion, was evaluated. The possibility of alterations in cognitive learning and adaptation abilities was also assessed using the go/no-go behavioral task. The mNC group showed low induced and spontaneously evoked pain responses, as well as a decrease in the motivation for sucrose, a sign of anhedonia. This decrease does not depend on taste processing. Finally, although no alterations in the learning-memory process were observed, the mNC group did show alterations when adapting to a new rule.

  18. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  19. Analgesic effect of clobazam in chronic low-back pain but not in experimentally induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliessbach, J; Vuilleumier, P H; Siegenthaler, A; Bütikofer, L; Limacher, A; Juni, P; Zeilhofer, H U; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Curatolo, M

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pain is frequently associated with hypersensitivity of the nervous system, and drugs that increase central inhibition are therefore a potentially effective treatment. Benzodiazepines are potent modulators of GABAergic neurotransmission and are known to exert antihyperalgesic effects in rodents, but translation into patients are lacking. This study investigates the effect of the benzodiazepine clobazam in chronic low-back pain in humans. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of GABA modulation on chronic low-back pain and on quantitative sensory tests. In this double-blind cross-over study, 49 patients with chronic low-back pain received a single oral dose of clobazam 20 mg or active placebo tolterodine 1 mg. Pain intensity on the 0-10 numeric rating scale and quantitative sensory tests were assessed during 2 h after drug intake. Pain intensity in the supine position was significantly reduced by clobazam compared to active placebo (60 min: 2.9 vs. 3.5, p = 0.008; 90 min: 2.7 vs. 3.3, p = 0.024; 120 min: 2.4 vs. 3.1, p = 0.005). Pain intensity in the sitting position was not significantly different between groups. No effects on quantitative sensory tests were observed. This study suggests that clobazam has an analgesic effect in patients with chronic low-back pain. Muscle relaxation or sedation may have contributed to the effect. Development of substances devoid of these side effects would offer the potential to further investigate the antihyperalgesic action of GABAergic compounds. Modulation of GABAergic pain-inhibitory pathways may be a potential future therapeutic target. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  20. The Effect of Parental Modeling on Child Pain Responses: The Role of Parent and Child Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; LoLordo, Vincent; Uher, Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    Social modeling is a process by which pain behaviors are learned, and research has found parents act as models for their children's behavior. Despite social learning theory predicting that same-sex models have greater effect, no experimental investigation to date has examined the role of sex of the model or observer in social learning of pediatric pain. The present study recruited 168 parent-child dyads (equal father-son, father-daughter, mother-son, and mother-daughter dyads) in which children were generally healthy and 6 to 8 years old. Unbeknownst to their child, parents were randomly assigned to exaggerate their expression of pain, minimize their expression of pain, or act naturally during the cold pressor task (CPT). Parents completed the CPT while their child observed, then children completed the CPT themselves. Children whose parents were in the exaggerate condition reported higher anxiety than children of parents in the minimize condition. Additionally, girls in the exaggerate condition rated their overall pain intensity during the CPT significantly higher than boys in the same condition. No child sex differences were observed in pain intensity for the control or minimize conditions. Parent expressions of pain affects children's anxiety, and sex-specific effects of parental exaggerated pain expression on children's own subsequent pain experience are present. This article describes how parental expressions of pain influence children's pain and anxiety, specifically examining the relevance of parent and child sex in this process. These findings have implications for children of parents with chronic pain, or situations in which parents experience pain in the presence of their child (eg, vaccinations). Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Objective Markers of the analgesic response to morphine in experimental pain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokjær, Anne; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In experimental pain research the effect of opioids is normally assessed by verbal subjective response to analgesia. However, as many confounders in pain assessment exist, objective bed-side assessment of the effect is highly warranted. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect...

  2. The genetic influences on oxycodone response characteristics in human experimental pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia M

    2015-01-01

    Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic respon......; therefore, variation in opioid receptor genes may partly explain responder characteristics to oxycodone....

  3. Psychological Factors Predict Local and Referred Experimental Muscle Pain: A Cluster Analysis in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer E.; Watson, David; Frey-Law, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an underlying three- or four-factor structure explains the conceptual overlap and distinctiveness of several negative emotionality and pain-related constructs. However, the validity of these latent factors for predicting pain has not been examined. Methods A cohort of 189 (99F; 90M) healthy volunteers completed eight self-report negative emotionality and pain-related measures (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised; Positive and Negative Affect Schedule; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Pain Catastrophizing Scale; Fear of Pain Questionnaire; Somatosensory Amplification Scale; Anxiety Sensitivity Index; Whiteley Index). Using principal axis factoring, three primary latent factors were extracted: General Distress; Catastrophic Thinking; and Pain-Related Fear. Using these factors, individuals clustered into three subgroups of high, moderate, and low negative emotionality responses. Experimental pain was induced via intramuscular acidic infusion into the anterior tibialis muscle, producing local (infusion site) and/or referred (anterior ankle) pain and hyperalgesia. Results Pain outcomes differed between clusters (multivariate analysis of variance and multinomial regression), with individuals in the highest negative emotionality cluster reporting the greatest local pain (p = 0.05), mechanical hyperalgesia (pressure pain thresholds; p = 0.009) and greater odds (2.21 OR) of experiencing referred pain compared to the lowest negative emotionality cluster. Conclusion Our results provide support for three latent psychological factors explaining the majority of the variance between several pain-related psychological measures, and that individuals in the high negative emotionality subgroup are at increased risk for (1) acute local muscle pain; (2) local hyperalgesia; and (3) referred pain using a standardized nociceptive input. PMID:23165778

  4. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  5. Social Modeling Influences on Pain Experience and Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Kenneth D.

    The impact of exposure to social models displaying variably tolerant pain behaviour on observers' expressions of pain is examined. Findings indicate substantial effects on verbal reports of pain, avoidance behaviour, psychophysiological indices, power function parameters, and sensory decision theory indices. Discussion centers on how social models…

  6. Gender role affects experimental pain responses: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Tabasam, G; Johnson, M I

    2012-10-01

    Gender role refers to the culturally and socially constructed meanings that describe how women and men should behave in certain situations according to feminine and masculine roles learned throughout life. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between gender role and experimental pain responses in healthy human participants. We searched computerized databases for studies published between January 1950 and May 2011 that had measured gender role in healthy human adults and pain response to noxious stimuli. Studies were entered into a meta-analysis if they calculated a correlation coefficient (r) for gender role and experimental pain. Searches yielded 4465 'hits' and 13 studies were eligible for review. Sample sizes were 67-235 participants and the proportion of female participants was 45-67%. Eight types of gender role instrument were used. Meta-analysis of six studies (406 men and 539 women) found a significant positive correlation between masculine and feminine personality traits and pain threshold and tolerance, with a small effect size (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Meta-analysis of four studies (263 men and 297 women) found a significant negative correlation between gender stereotypes specific to pain and pain threshold and tolerance, with a moderate effect size (r = -0.41, p Gender stereotypes specific to pain scales showed stronger associations with sex differences in pain sensitivity response than masculine and feminine personality trait scales. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  7. The effects of experimental pain and induced optimism on working memory task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselie, Jantine J L M; Vancleef, Linda M G; Peters, Madelon L

    2016-07-01

    Pain can interrupt and deteriorate executive task performance. We have previously shown that experimentally induced optimism can diminish the deteriorating effect of cold pressor pain on a subsequent working memory task (i.e., operation span task). In two successive experiments we sought further evidence for the protective role of optimism on pain-induced working memory impairments. We used another working memory task (i.e., 2-back task) that was performed either after or during pain induction. Study 1 employed a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain)×2 (pre-score vs. post-score) mixed factorial design. In half of the participants optimism was induced by the Best Possible Self (BPS) manipulation, which required them to write and visualize about a life in the future where everything turned out for the best. In the control condition, participants wrote and visualized a typical day in their life (TD). Next, participants completed either the cold pressor task (CPT) or a warm water control task (WWCT). Before (baseline) and after the CPT or WWCT participants working memory performance was measured with the 2-back task. The 2-back task measures the ability to monitor and update working memory representation by asking participants to indicate whether the current stimulus corresponds to the stimulus that was presented 2 stimuli ago. Study 2 had a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain) mixed factorial design. After receiving the BPS or control manipulation, participants completed the 2-back task twice: once with painful heat stimulation, and once without any stimulation (counter-balanced order). Continuous heat stimulation was used with temperatures oscillating around 1°C above and 1°C below the individual pain threshold. In study 1, the results did not show an effect of cold pressor pain on subsequent 2-back task performance. Results of study 2 indicated that heat pain impaired concurrent 2-back task performance. However, no evidence was found

  8. Placebo effect of an inert gel on experimentally induced leg muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Hopker

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available James G Hopker1, Abigail J Foad2, Christopher J Beedie2, Damian A Coleman2, Geoffrey Leach11Centre for Sports Studies, University of Kent, Chatham, Kent, UK; 2Department of Sports Science, Tourism and Leisure, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UKPurpose: This study examined the therapeutic effects of an inert placebo gel on experimentally induced muscle pain in a sports therapy setting. It aimed to investigate the degree to which conditioned analgesia, coupled with an expectation of intervention, was a factor in subsequent analgesia.Methods: Participants were sixteen male and eight female sports therapy students at a UK University. With institutional ethics board approval and following informed consent procedures, each was exposed to pain stimulus in the lower leg in five conditions, ie, conditioning, prebaseline, experimental (two placebo gel applications, and postbaseline. In conditioning trials, participants identified a level of pain stimulus equivalent to a perceived pain rating of 6/10. An inert placebo gel was then applied to the site with the explicit instruction that it was an analgesic. Participants were re-exposed to the pain stimulus, the level of which, without their knowledge, had been decreased, creating the impression of an analgesic effect resulting from the gel. In experimental conditions, the placebo gel was applied and the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 recorded.Results: Following application of the placebo gel, the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 increased by 8.2%. Application of the placebo gel significantly decreased participant’s perceptions of muscle pain (P = 0.001.Conclusion: Subjects’ experience and expectation of pain reduction may be major factors in the therapeutic process. These factors should be considered in the sports therapeutic environment.Keywords: conditioning, expectation, perception, positive belief, sports therapy

  9. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit alpha(2)delta-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C. S.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Jefferys, J. G. R.; Dolphin, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 283, Dec (2014), s. 124-137 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14489 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium channel * dorsal root ganglion (DRG) * alpha2delta subunit * epilepsy * neuropathic pain * reactive gliosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.357, year: 2014

  10. The role of periodontal ASIC3 in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiya; Long, Hu; Ma, Wenqiang; Liao, Lina; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Shan, Di; Huang, Renhuan; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the roles of Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the experimental group (40g, n = 30) and the sham group (0g, n = 30). Closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary incisor and molars to achieve experimental tooth movement. Rat grimace scale (RGS) scores were assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the placement of the springs. ASIC3 immunostaining was performed and the expression levels of ASIC3 were measured through integrated optical density/area in Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Moreover, 18 rats were divided into APETx2 group (n = 6), amiloride group (n = 6), and vehicle group (n = 6), and RGS scores were obtained compared among them to verify the roles of ASIC3 in orofacial pain following tooth movement. ASIC3 expression levels became significantly higher in the experimental group than in sham group on 1, 3, and 5 days and became similar on 7 and 14 days. Pain levels (RGS scores) increased in both groups and were significantly higher in the experimental group on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days and were similar on 14 days. Periodontal ASIC3 expression levels were correlated with orofacial pain levels following experimental tooth movement. Periodontal administrations of ASIC3 antagonists (APETx2 and amiloride) could alleviate pain. This study needs to be better evidenced by RNA interference of ASIC3 in periodontal tissues in rats following experimental tooth movement. Moreover, we hope further studies would concentrate on the pain perception of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3 -/- ) mice. Our results suggest that periodontal ASIC3 plays an important role in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  12. Effect of experimental stress in 2 different pain conditions affecting the facial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Alain; L'heveder, Gildas; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Bodéré, Céline

    2013-05-01

    Chronic facial muscle pain is a common feature in both fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial (MF) pain conditions. In this controlled study, a possible difference in the mode of deregulation of the physiological response to a stressing stimulus was explored by applying an acute mental stress to FM and MF patients and to controls. The effects of the stress test were observed on pain, sympathetic variables, and both tonic and reflex electromyographic activities of masseteric and temporal muscles. The statistical analyses were performed through a generalized linear model including mixed effects. Painful reaction to the stressor was stronger (P < .001) and longer (P = .011) in FM than in MF independently of a higher pain level at baseline. The stress-induced autonomic changes only seen in FM patients did not reach significance. The electromyographic responses to the stress test were strongest for controls and weakest for FM. The stress test had no effect on reflex activity (area under the curve [AUC]) or latency, although AUC was high in FM and latencies were low in both pain groups. It is suggested that FM is characterized by a lower ability to adapt to acute stress than MF. This study showed that an acute psychosocial stress triggered several changes in 2 pain conditions including an increase in pain of larger amplitude in FM than in MF pain. Similar stress-induced changes should be explored as possible mechanisms for differentiation between dysfunctional pain conditions. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  14. Influence of intramuscular granisetron on experimentally induced muscle pain by acidic saline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, S; Ernberg, M; Christidis, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intramuscular administration of the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist granisetron reduces experimental muscle pain induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline into the masseter muscles. Twenty-eight healthy and pain-free volunteers, fourteen women and fourteen men participated in this randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study. After a screening examination and registration of the baseline pressure-pain threshold (PPT), the first simultaneous bilateral injections of 0·5 mL acidic saline (9 mg mL(-1) , pH 3·3) into the masseter muscles were performed. Two days later, PPT and pain (VAS) were re-assessed. The masseter muscle was then pre-treated with 0·5 mL granisetron (Kytril(®) 1 mg mL(-1) pH 5·3) on one side and control substance (isotonic saline, 9 mg mL(-1) pH 6) on the contralateral side. Two minutes thereafter a bilateral simultaneous injection of 0·5 mL acidic saline followed. The evoked pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and PPT were assessed. The volunteers returned 1 week later to re-assess VAS and PPT. On the side pre-treated with granisetron, the induced pain had significantly lower intensity and shorter duration (P granisetron on pain duration was significant only in women (P granisetron has a pain-reducing effect on experimentally induced muscle pain by repeated acidic saline injection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Brain Network Response to Acupuncture Stimuli in Experimental Acute Low Back Pain: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can significantly modulate brain activation patterns in healthy subjects, while only a few studies have examined clinical pain. In the current study, we combined an experimental acute low back pain (ALBP model and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to explore the neural mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia. All ALBP subjects first underwent two resting state fMRI scans at baseline and during a painful episode and then underwent two additional fMRI scans, once during acupuncture stimulation (ACUP and once during tactile stimulation (SHAM pseudorandomly, at the BL40 acupoint. Our results showed that, compared with the baseline, the pain state had higher regional homogeneity (ReHo values in the pain matrix, limbic system, and default mode network (DMN and lower ReHo values in frontal gyrus and temporal gyrus; compared with the OFF status, ACUP yielded broad deactivation in subjects, including nearly all of the limbic system, pain status, and DMN, and also evoked numerous activations in the attentional and somatosensory systems; compared with SHAM, we found that ACUP induced more deactivations and fewer activations in the subjects. Multiple brain networks play crucial roles in acupuncture analgesia, suggesting that ACUP exceeds a somatosensory-guided mind-body therapy for ALBP.

  16. Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, S; Avidon, I; Baker, F C

    2015-07-01

    Monthly primary dysmenorrhoeic pain is associated with increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, particularly in deep tissue. We investigated whether women with dysmenorrhoea, compared with controls, have increased sensitivity to experimentally induced deep-tissue muscle ischaemia in a body area distant from that of referred menstrual pain. The sub-maximal effort tourniquet test was used to induce forearm ischaemia in 11 women with severe dysmenorrhoea and in nine control women both during menstruation and in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Von Frey hair assessments confirmed the presence of experimental ischaemia. Women rated the intensity of menstrual and ischaemic pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Women with dysmenorrhoea [mean (SD): 68 (20) mm] reported significantly greater menstrual pain compared with controls [mean (SD): 2 (6) mm; p = 0.0001] during the menstruation phase. They also rated their forearm ischaemic pain as significantly greater than the controls during the menstruation [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 58 (19) mm vs. 31 (21) mm, p menstruation phase and pain-free follicular phase. These findings suggest the presence of long-lasting changes in muscle pain sensitivity in women with dysmenorrhoea. Our findings that dysmenorrhoeic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep-muscle ischaemic pain in areas outside of referred menstrual pain confirm other studies showing long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  17. The rat intervertebral disk degeneration pain model: relationships between biological and structural alterations and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Li, Xin; An, Howard S; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Yan, Dongyao; Tuman, Kenneth J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Chen, Di; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of the interverterbral disk is as a cause of low-back pain is increasing. To gain insight into relationships between biological processes, structural alterations and behavioral pain, we created an animal model in rats. Disk degeneration was induced by removal of the nucleus pulposus (NP) from the lumbar disks (L4/L5 and L5/L6) of Sprague Dawley rats using a 0.5-mm-diameter microsurgical drill. The degree of primary hyperalgesia was assessed by using an algometer to measure pain upon external pressure on injured lumbar disks. Biochemical and histological assessments and radiographs of injured disks were used for evaluation. We investigated therapeutic modulation of chronic pain by administering pharmaceutical drugs in this animal model. After removal of the NP, pressure hyperalgesia developed over the lower back. Nine weeks after surgery we observed damaged or degenerated disks with proteoglycan loss and narrowing of disk height. These biological and structural changes in disks were closely related to the sustained pain hyperalgesia. A high dose of morphine (6.7 mg/kg) resulted in effective pain relief. However, high doses of pregabalin (20 mg/kg), a drug that has been used for treatment of chronic neuropathic pain, as well as the anti-inflammatory drugs celecoxib (50 mg/kg; a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)) and ketorolac (20 mg/kg; an inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2), did not have significant antihyperalgesic effects in our disk injury animal model. Although similarities in gene expression profiles suggest potential overlap in chronic pain pathways linked to disk injury or neuropathy, drug-testing results suggest that pain pathways linked to these two chronic pain conditions are mechanistically distinct. Our findings provide a foundation for future research on new therapeutic interventions that can lead to improvements in the treatment of patients with back pain due to disk degeneration.

  18. A quantitative review of ethnic group differences in experimental pain response: do biology, psychology, and culture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Riley, Joseph L; Williams, Ameenah K K; Fillingim, Roger B

    2012-04-01

    Pain is a subjectively complex and universal experience. We examine research investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain response and factors contributing to group differences. We conducted a systematic literature review and analysis of studies using experimental pain stimuli to assess pain sensitivity across multiple ethnic groups. Our search covered the period from 1944 to 2011, and used the PubMed bibliographic database; a reference source containing over 17 million citations. We calculated effect sizes; identified ethnic/racial group categories, pain stimuli, and measures; and examined findings regarding biopsychosociocultural factors contributing to ethnic/racial group differences. We found 472 studies investigating ethnic group differences and pain. Twenty-six of these met our review inclusion criteria of investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain. The majority of studies included comparisons between African Americans (AA) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). There were consistently moderate to large effect sizes for pain tolerance across multiple stimulus modalities; AA demonstrated lower pain tolerance. For pain threshold, findings were generally in the same direction, but effect sizes were small to moderate across ethnic groups. Limited data were available for suprathreshold pain ratings. A subset of studies comparing NHW and other ethnic groups showed a variable range of effect sizes for pain threshold and tolerance. There are potentially important ethnic/racial group differences in experimental pain perception. Elucidating ethnic group differences has translational merit for culturally competent clinical care and for addressing and reducing pain treatment disparities among ethnically/racially diverse groups. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The necessity of animal models in pain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Jeffrey S; Davis, Karen D; Derbyshire, Stuart W

    2010-10-01

    There exists currently a fair degree of introspection in the pain research community about the value of animal research. This review represents a defense of animal research in pain. We discuss the inherent advantage of animal models over human research as well as the crucial complementary roles animal studies play vis-à-vis human imaging and genetic studies. Finally, we discuss recent developments in animal models of pain that should improve the relevance and translatability of findings using laboratory animals. We believe that pain research using animal models is a continuing necessity-to understand fundamental mechanisms, identify new analgesic targets, and inform, guide and follow up human studies-if novel analgesics are to be developed for the treatment of chronic pain. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of anti-hyperalgesic and analgesic effects of two benzodiazepines in human experimental pain: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal H Vuilleumier

    Full Text Available Compounds that act on GABA-receptors produce anti-hyperalgesia in animal models, but little is known on their effects in humans. The aim of this study was to explore the potential usefulness of GABA-agonism for the control of pain in humans. Two agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA-receptors (clobazam and clonazepam were studied using multiple experimental pain tests. Positive results would support further investigation of GABA agonism for the control of clinical pain.In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 16 healthy male volunteers received clobazam 20 mg, clonazepam 1 mg and tolterodine 1 mg (active placebo. The area of static hyperalgesia after intradermal capsaicin injection was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were: area of dynamic hyperalgesia, response to von Frey hair stimulation, pressure pain thresholds, conditioned pain modulation, cutaneous and intramuscular electrical pain thresholds (1, 5 and 20 repeated stimulation, and pain during cuff algometry.For the primary endpoint, an increase in the area of static hyperalgesia was observed after administration of placebo (p<0.001, but not after clobazam and clonazepam. Results suggestive for an anti-hyperalgesic effect of the benzodiazepines were obtained with all three intramuscular pain models and with cuff algometry. No effect could be detected with the other pain models employed.Collectively, the results are suggestive for a possible anti-hyperalgesic effect of drugs acting at the GABAA-receptors in humans, particularly in models of secondary hyperalgesia and deep pain. The findings are not conclusive, but support further clinical research on pain modulation by GABAergic drugs. Because of the partial results, future research should focus on compounds acting selectively on subunits of the GABA complex, which may allow the achievement of higher receptor occupancy than unselective drugs. Our data also provide information on the most suitable experimental

  1. Historical development of epistemology and the study of pain: Place of neuromodulation of electroacupuncture in the experimental pain research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara B. Garrido-Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the diffusion of acupuncture and its related techniques in Cuba and the World, its mechanism of action is still controversial, being considered by the most sceptics as placebo or some kind oriental myth, and it only should by related to this subjects as a matter of cultural-historical elements and not to science. The purpose of this revision is to characterize the pain sensation, after a critical analysis of the different philosophical streams related to the human knowledge and its expression in the historical evolution of the algology. On the other hand, to emphasize the importance of electroacupuncture-induced neuro-modulation in the field of experimental pain researches. In this content will be analyzed the concept of Khun paradigm and his ideas about the structure of scientific revolution in the theory of gates control and the explosion of pain researches in the last decades. It will related the introduction to acupuncture and its techniques in pain clinics, with scientific context of the historical moment. In addition, a space will be dedicated to the topic of complementary and alternative medicine on the century of evidence based medicine, given its scientific needs of validation in ours times.

  2. Comparison of acceptance and distraction strategies in coping with experimentally induced pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hazel Moore,1 Ian Stewart,1 Dermot Barnes-Holmes,2 Yvonne Barnes-Holmes,2 Brian E McGuire1,31School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, 2Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 3Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland, Galway, IrelandBackground: This study compared an acceptance-based strategy with a control-based strategy (distraction in terms of the ability of participants to tolerate a painful stimulus, across two experiments. In addition, participants were either actively encouraged, or not, to link pain tolerance with pursuit of valued goals to examine the impact of pursuing a personally meaningful goal or value on the extent to which pain will be tolerated.Methods: Participants in experiment 1 (n=41 and experiment 2 (n=52 were equally assigned to acceptance or distraction protocols. Further, half the participants in each group generated examples from their own lives in which they had pursued a valued objective, while the other half did not. In experiment 2, the values focus was enhanced to examine the impact on pain tolerance.Results: There were no significant differences overall between the acceptance and distraction groups on pain tolerance in either experiment. However, in experiment 2, individuals classified as accepting in terms of general coping style and who were assigned to the acceptance strategy showed significantly better pain tolerance than accepting individuals who were in the distraction condition. Across both experiments, those with strong goal-driven values in both protocols were more tolerant of pain. Participants appeared to have more difficulty adhering to acceptance than to distraction as a strategy.Conclusion: Acceptance may be associated with better tolerance of pain, but may also be more difficult to operationalize than distraction in experimental studies. Matching coping style and coping strategy may be most effective, and enhancement of goal

  3. Preliminary findings of cerebral responses on transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation on experimental heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usichenko, Taras; Laqua, René; Leutzow, Bianca; Lotze, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation (TVNS) is a promising complementary method of pain relief. However, the neural networks associated with its analgesic effects are still to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, in a randomized order, with twenty healthy subjects who were exposed to experimental heat pain stimulation applied to the right forearm using a Contact Heat-Evoked Potential Stimulator. While in one session TVNS was administered bilaterally to the concha auriculae with maximal, non-painful intensity, the stimulation device was switched off in the other session (placebo condition). Pain thresholds were measured before and after each session. Heat stimulation elicited fMRI activation in cerebral pain processing regions. Activation magnitude in the secondary somatosensory cortex, posterior insula, anterior cingulate and caudate nucleus was associated with heat stimulation without TVNS. During TVNS, this association was only seen for the right anterior insula. TVNS decreased fMRI signals in the anterior cingulate cortex in comparison with the placebo condition; however, there was no relevant pain reducing effect over the group as a whole. In contrast, TVNS compared to the placebo condition showed an increased activation in the primary motor cortex, contralateral to the site of heat stimulation, and in the right amygdala. In conclusion, in the protocol used here, TVNS specifically modulated the cerebral response to heat pain, without having a direct effect on pain thresholds.

  4. PAIN IN A PARKINSON`S DISEASE RODENT ANIMAL MODEL INDUCED WITH 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antioch, I

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain phenomenon, the unpleasant sensory and emotional event, appears to evidently intrude in Parkinson disease (PD, a disease formally considered to be restricted only to motor deficits. Although over a half of persons with PD suffer from pain manifestations, there are very few reports targeting this issue. Considering the cases when motor symptoms of PD are eclipsed by severe pain disclosure, there is an obvious need of clarifying the intricate implications of pain in PD context. Because there are few studies researching the link between pain and PD in clinical context, but as well in animal models we chose to explore the effects of pain stimuli on a rodent model of PD. Materials and methods: We experimentally induced a PD model in Wistar rats (n=12 by injecting in the substantia nigra, a brain area known to be involved in PD occurrence, one dose of a 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA solution (8µm 6-OHDA base and 4µm physiological saline, utilizing neurosurgery, while their control peers received same dose of saline solution. Two weeks after the intervention the animals were subjected to the hot-plate test, a behavioral task for acquiring pain sensitivity. Results: There was noticed a statistical significant (F(1,10 = 5.67, p=0.038 sensibility of the 6-OHDA rats to thermal pain stimuli (8.2 s ± 0.8 s in 6-OHDA group as compared to their peers (13.8 s ± 1.6 s in controls. Conclusions: The involvement of pain in PD animal models is demonstrated raising questions of how it influences PD evolution. Moreover, this result increases awareness of deficient diagnostic methods of pain in PD and as a consequence, poor treatment of pain manifestations.

  5. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of ketamine-induced pain relief of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Albert; Olofsen, Erik; Sigtermans, Marnix; Noppers, Ingeborg; Niesters, Marieke; Aarts, Leon; Bauer, Martin; Sarton, Elise

    2011-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of chronic (neuropathic) pain is often disappointing. In order to enhance our insight in the complex interaction between analgesic drug and chronic pain relief, we performed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling study on the effect of S(+)-ketamine on pain scores in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) patients. Sixty CRPS-1 patients were randomly allocated to received a 100-h infusion of S(+)-ketamine or placebo. The drug infusion rate was slowly increased from 5 mg/h (per 70 kg) to 20 mg/h based upon the effect/side effect profile. Pain scores and drug blood samples were obtained during the treatment phase and pain scores were further obtained weekly for another 11 weeks. A population PK-PD model was developed to analyze the S(+)-ketamine-pain data. Plasma concentrations of S(+)-ketamine and its metabolite decreased rapidly upon the termination of S(+)-ketamine infusion. The chance for an analgesic effect from ketamine and placebo treatment was 67±10% and 23±9% (population value±SE), respectively. The pain data were well described by the PK-PD model with parameters C(50)=10.5±4.8 ng/ml (95% ci 4.37-21.2 ng/ml) and t½ for onset/offset=10.9±4.0 days (5.3-20.5 days). Long-term S(+)-ketamine treatment is effective in causing pain relief in CRPS-1 patients with analgesia outlasting the treatment period by 50 days. These data suggest that ketamine initiated a cascade of events, including desensitization of excitatory receptor systems in the central nervous system, which persisted but slowly abated when ketamine molecules were no longer present. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low-back pain on trunk muscle activity during stair walking in healthy and recurrent low-back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    Aim To explore the trunk muscle activity in healthy and recurrent low back pain (R-LBP) patients with no present pain during stair ascent and descent before and after unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain (LBP). Methods Twenty-five healthy controls and 25 pain-free R-LBP patients wi...... in the physical examination, but it remains unknown if the observed changes are appropriate strategies in relation to the pain condition. Acknowledgement The study was supported by CNAP, Aalborg University and UCN Department of physiotherapy, Denmark....

  7. TOLERANCE TIME OF EXPERIMENTAL THERMAL PAIN (COLD INDUCED) IN VOLUNTEERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, V N; Wilkhoo, N S; Jain, A K

    1998-10-01

    Perception of thermal pain (cold induced) was studied in 106 volunteers from troops and civilians deployed in J & K. Thermal stimulus devised was "holding ice". Tolerance time of holding ice was taken to be a measure of thermal sensitivity, volunteers were classified based on their native areas, addiction habits and socio-economic status, out of 106 volunteers, 81 could & 25 could not hold ice over 10 min. Sixteen out of 40 from coastline States and 9 out of 66 from non-coast line States failed to hold ice over 10 min. In "below average" "average" and "high average" socio-economic groups, three out of 27, 19 out of 73 and 03 out of 6 failed to hold ice over 10 min respectively. Fifteen out of 64 from "addiction habit group" and 10 out of 42 from "no addiction habit group" failed to hold ice over 10 min. Statistically no classification used in the study revealed significant difference in "tolerance times" of volunteers except the one based on coastline and non-coastline States.

  8. Experimental pain leads to reorganisation of trapezius electromyography during computer work with active and passive pauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate acute effects of experimental muscle pain on spatial electromyographic (EMG) activity of the trapezius muscle during computer work with active and passive pauses. Twelve healthy male subjects performed four sessions of computer work for 2 min...... in one day, with passive (relax) and active (30% maximum voluntary contraction of shoulder elevation) pauses given every 40 s without and with presence of experimental pain. Surface EMG signals were recorded from four parts of the trapezius. The centroid of exposure variation analysis along the time axis...... was lower during computer work with active pauses when compared with passive one in all muscle parts (P

  9. Attenuation of Experimental Pain by Vibro-Tactile Stimulation in Patients with Chronic Local or Widespread Musculoskeletal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Staud, Roland; Robinson, Michael E.; Goldman, Casey T.; Price, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain syndromes, like fibromyalgia (FM) complain of widespread pain and tenderness, as well as non-refreshing sleep, cognitive dysfunction, and negative mood. Several lines of evidence implicate abnormalities of central pain processing as contributors for chronic pain, including dysfunctional descending pain inhibition. One form of endogenous pain inhibition, diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), has been found to be abnormal in some chronic pain patients and eviden...

  10. The dynamics of the pain system is intact in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Klokker, Louise; Ellegaard, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-12-29

    Background and aims Despite the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) it remains one of the most frequent knee disorders without a cure. Pain and disability are prominent clinical features of knee OA. Knee OA pain is typically localized but can also be referred to the thigh or lower leg. Widespread hyperalgesia has been found in knee OA patients. In addition, patients with hyperalgesia in the OA knee joint show increased pain summation scores upon repetitive stimulation of the OA knee suggesting the involvement of facilitated central mechanisms in knee OA. The dynamics of the pain system (i.e., the adaptive responses to pain) has been widely studied, but mainly from experiments on healthy subjects, whereas less is known about the dynamics of the pain system in chronic pain patients, where the pain system has been activated for a long time. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the nociceptive system quantitatively in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients before and after induction of experimental knee pain. Methods Ten knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients participated in this randomized crossover trial. Each subject was tested on two days separated by 1 week. The most affected knee was exposed to experimental pain or control, in a randomized sequence, by injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad and a control injection of isotonic saline. Pain areas were assessed by drawings on anatomical maps. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the knee, thigh, lower leg, and arm were assessed before, during, and after the experimental pain and control conditions. Likewise, temporal summation of pressure pain on the knee, thigh and lower leg muscles was assessed. Results Experimental knee pain decreased the PPTs at the knee (P system in individuals with knee OA can be affected even after many years of nociceptive input. This study indicates that the adaptability in the pain system is intact in patients with knee OA, which opens for opportunities to

  11. Experimental models of developmental hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argumedo, G S; Sanz, C R; Olguín, H J

    2012-02-01

    Hypothyroidism is a systemic disease resulting from either thyroid gland's anatomical and functional absence or lack of hypophyseal stimulation, both of which can lead to deficiency in thyroid hormone (TH) production. TH is essential for human and animal development, growth, and function of multiple organs. Children with deficient TH can develop alterations in central nervous system (CNS), striated muscle, bone tissue, liver, bone marrow, and cardiorespiratory system. Among the clinical outlook are signs like breathing difficulty, cardiac insufficiency, dysphagia, and repeated bronchial aspiration, constipation, muscle weakness, cognitive alterations, cochlear dysfunction, reduced height, defects in temperature regulation, anaemia, jaundice, susceptibility to infection, and others. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that TH is very essential for normal brain development. Other research work based on mice pointed out that a reduced level of TH in pregnant mother leads to congenital hypothyroidism in animal models and it is associated with mental retardation, deep neurologic deficiency that impacts on cognitive, learning, and memory functions. The principal experimental model studies that have focused on hypothyroidism are reviewed in this study. This is important on considering the fact that almost all animal species require thyroid hormones for their metabolism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Suprathreshold Heat Pain Response Predicts Activity-Related Pain, but Not Rest-Related Pain, in an Exercise-Induced Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Simon, Corey B.; Valencia, Carolina; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Borsa, Paul A.; George, Steven Z.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-induced injury models are advantageous for studying pain since the onset of pain is controlled and both pre-injury and post-injury factors can be utilized as explanatory variables or predictors. In these studies, rest-related pain is often considered the primary dependent variable or outcome, as opposed to a measure of activity-related pain. Additionally, few studies include pain sensitivity measures as predictors. In this study, we examined the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors, including pain sensitivity, for induced rest and activity-related pain following exercise induced muscle injury. The overall goal of this investigation was to determine if there were convergent or divergent predictors of rest and activity-related pain. One hundred forty-three participants provided demographic, psychological, and pain sensitivity information and underwent a standard fatigue trial of resistance exercise to induce injury of the dominant shoulder. Pain at rest and during active and resisted shoulder motion were measured at 48- and 96-hours post-injury. Separate hierarchical models were generated for assessing the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors on 48- and 96-hour rest-related and activity-related pain. Overall, we did not find a universal predictor of pain across all models. However, pre-injury and post-injury suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR), a pain sensitivity measure, was a consistent predictor of activity-related pain, even after controlling for known psychological factors. These results suggest there is differential prediction of pain. A measure of pain sensitivity such as SHPR appears more influential for activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, and may reflect different underlying processes involved during pain appraisal. PMID:25265560

  13. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  14. The Effect of Experimental Parkinson on Formalin-Induced Pain in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sofiabadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Pain is one of the preceding claims of Parkinson's disease (PD, that its mechanisms have not been fully identified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical pain responses induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin in male parkinsonized rats.   Method : In this experimental study, 40 Wistar male rats were used and PD was established by stereotaxic injection of 6-OHDA toxin into the striatum. Parkinson's disease severity determined by apomorphine-induced rotation test and then the pain response of 4 groups, the control, sham and 2 weak or full Parkinson groups, were evaluated using formalin test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test.   Results : In both acute and chronic phases of the formalin test, the symptoms of pain in different groups were same, but at the interphase stage, pain intensity increased more in Parkinson 's rats, especially in full PD group compared to control (p<0.01.   Conclusion: These results suggest that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway have important modulating role on chronic pain.

  15. Kinesthetic illusions attenuate experimental muscle pain, as do muscle and cutaneous stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, André; Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Roll, Jean-Pierre; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2015-07-30

    In the present study, muscle pain was induced experimentally in healthy subjects by administrating hypertonic saline injections into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. We first aimed at comparing the analgesic effects of mechanical vibration applied to either cutaneous or muscle receptors of the TA or to both types simultaneously. Secondly, pain alleviation was compared in subjects in whom muscle tendon vibration evoked kinesthetic illusions of the ankle joint. Muscle tendon vibration, which primarily activated muscle receptors, reduced pain intensity by 30% (p<0.01). In addition, tangential skin vibration reduced pain intensity by 33% (p<0.01), primarily by activating cutaneous receptors. Concurrently stimulating both sensory channels induced stronger analgesic effects (-51%, p<0.01), as shown by the lower levels of electrodermal activity. The strongest analgesic effects of the vibration-induced muscle inputs occurred when illusory movements were perceived (-38%, p=0.01). The results suggest that both cutaneous and muscle sensory feedback reduce muscle pain, most likely via segmental and supraspinal processes. Further clinical trials are needed to investigate these new methods of muscle pain relief. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling subjective well-being in individuals with chronic pain and a physical disability: the role of pain control and pain catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Angela; Michel, Gisela; Terrill, Alexandra L; Jensen, Mark P; Müller, Rachel

    2017-10-23

    To investigate the associations between subjective well-being and pain intensity, pain interference, and depression in individuals with physical disabilities. We hypothesized that (1) pain control and (2) pain catastrophizing mediate the effects of subjective well-being on pain intensity, pain interference, and depression. Analyses of cross-sectional data from 96 individuals diagnosed with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, neuromuscular disease, or post-polio syndrome, with average pain intensity of ≥4 (0-10) on at least half the days in the past month. Two models tested study hypotheses using structural equation. Both models showed acceptable model fit. Pain catastrophizing significantly mediated the effect of subjective well-being on pain intensity and pain interference, but not on depression. Pain control did not significantly mediate the effect of subjective well-being on pain intensity, pain interference, or depression. Path coefficients showed significant direct effects of subjective well-being on pain control (β = 0.39), pain catastrophizing (β = -0.61), pain interference (β = -0.48; -0.42), and depression (β = -0.75; -0.78). This study supports the potential of enhancing subjective well-being and lowering pain catastrophizing for reducing pain intensity, pain interference, and depressive symptoms in individuals with chronic pain and a physical disability. The findings indicate that true experiments to test for causal associations are warranted. Implications for rehabilitation The majority of individuals with physical disabilities report having persistent moderate-to-severe pain that may negatively limit daily activities and quality of life. The present cross-sectional study indicates that individuals who reported greater subjective well-being showed significantly lower pain intensity via the mediating effect of lower pain catastrophizing. Since sample size and respective power are low, these findings should be taken as first

  17. Viewing pictures of a romantic partner reduces experimental pain: involvement of neural reward systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Jarred; Aron, Arthur; Parke, Sara; Chatterjee, Neil; Mackey, Sean

    2010-10-13

    The early stages of a new romantic relationship are characterized by intense feelings of euphoria, well-being, and preoccupation with the romantic partner. Neuroimaging research has linked those feelings to activation of reward systems in the human brain. The results of those studies may be relevant to pain management in humans, as basic animal research has shown that pharmacologic activation of reward systems can substantially reduce pain. Indeed, viewing pictures of a romantic partner was recently demonstrated to reduce experimental thermal pain. We hypothesized that pain relief evoked by viewing pictures of a romantic partner would be associated with neural activations in reward-processing centers. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined fifteen individuals in the first nine months of a new, romantic relationship. Participants completed three tasks under periods of moderate and high thermal pain: 1) viewing pictures of their romantic partner, 2) viewing pictures of an equally attractive and familiar acquaintance, and 3) a word-association distraction task previously demonstrated to reduce pain. The partner and distraction tasks both significantly reduced self-reported pain, although only the partner task was associated with activation of reward systems. Greater analgesia while viewing pictures of a romantic partner was associated with increased activity in several reward-processing regions, including the caudate head, nucleus accumbens, lateral orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex--regions not associated with distraction-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the activation of neural reward systems via non-pharmacologic means can reduce the experience of pain.

  18. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo P Calado

    Full Text Available The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA, characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA. The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24: clean (C, negative control (CTL-, positive control (CTL+, HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA (8 mg/kg on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity. On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor.

  19. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  20. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Moini Zanjani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Moini Zanjani T, Saghaei E, Ameli H, Sabetkasaei M. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain. Novel Biomed 2013;1:16-22.Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain due to a disorder in the peripheral or central nervous system with different pathophysiological mechanisms. Current treatments are not effective. Here we compared the analgesic effect of nefopam, and morphine in chronic constriction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain.Methods: Male wistar rat (150-200g, n=8 were divided into 3 different groups: 1- Saline-treated CCI group, 2- Saline-treated sham group, and 3- Drug-treated CCI groups. In CCI model of neuropathic pain, the left sciatic nerve was exposed and 4 loose chromic gut ligatures were placed around the nerve proximal to the trifurcation. Ketamine 60mg/kg and xylazine 10 mg/kg were used for anesthesia. Nefopam (10, 20, 30mg/kg, and morphine (1, 3, 5mg/kg were injected 30 minutes before surgery and continued daily to day 14 post-ligation. Von Frey filaments for mechanical allodynia and acetone test for cold allodynia were respectively used as pain behavioral tests. Experiments were performed on day 0 (before surgery and days 1, 3, 5,7,10 and 14 post injury. Behavioral studies were performed in a quiet room between 9:00 to 11:00 AM. All experiments followed the IASP guidelines on ethical standards for investigation of experimental pain in animals.Results: Nefopam (20 and 30mg/kg blocked mechanical and cold allodynia during the experimental period, but the analgesic effects of morphine (5mg/kg lasted for 7 days.Conclusions: It seems that nefopam could effectively reduce pain behavior compared to morphine with reduced adverse effects.

  1. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: peculiarities of pain-relieving therapy and place of anticonvulsants as analgetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nefyodov O.O.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common demyelinating disease affecting mainly young people of the working age (16-45 years and quickly leading to disability. Available data constitute that up to 80% of MS patients suffer from pain at different disease periods. Pain management and the analgesic drug choice in MS patients may be difficult. Anticonvulsant drugs possess an analgesic activity and are widely used in patients presenting painful neuropathic symptoms. Based on that, we aimed to investigate the nociceptive potential changes as well as the research-oriented behavior using the "open field" test in rat. An experimental animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis has been modeled, based on the methylprednisolone (M administration. Animals were also administered anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, topiramate, sodium volproat, pregabalin and gabapentin. The stu­dy showed advantages of gabapentin and pregabalin use in simulated disease treatment. This statement is based on the "open field" test results, where the motor-oriented rats’ behavior was evaluated. Administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin showed positive dynamics of the motor activity: the number of squares crossed increased by 80.86% (p<0.05 and 81.73% (р<0.05 respectively. Maximum recovery of the research activity (peeking in "mink" was re­gis­tered in animals administered M+pregabalin: the increase rate was 300% (r<0.05 comparing with the 12th day of ex­periment. It was shown, that 5-days administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin caused muscle tone impro­ve­ment by 190% (p<0.05 and 200% (p<0.05 respectively, comparing with animals with untreated multiple sclerosis. A sig­ni­fi­cant increase of analgesic activity of M+pregabalin and M+gabapentin combinations used together with me­thyl­pred­nisolone by 4.1 (p<0.05 and 3.6 (p<0.05 times was registered comparing with the initial methylprednisolone background.

  2. Asymmetric dimethylarginine may mediate increased heat pain threshold in experimental chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielstein, Jan T; Suntharalingam, Mayuren; Perthel, Ronny; Rong, Song; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Jäger, Kristin; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Nave, Heike

    2012-03-01

    Thermal sensitivity in uraemia is decreased. Non-selective synthetic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors significantly attenuate thermal hyperalgesia in preclinical models. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of experimental uraemia, which is associated with an increase of the endogenous NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), on thermal sensitivity in rats. Furthermore, we intended to study the effect of chronic ADMA infusion alone on thermal sensitivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 54), 10 weeks old, weight 370-430 g, were randomly assigned to three groups receiving either (i) isotonic saline or (ii) ADMA via osmotic mini pumps or (iii) underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). After 14 days, 50% of all animals from all groups underwent thermal sensitivity testing and terminal blood draw. After 28 days, the remaining animals underwent the same procedures. Thermal sensitivity examination was performed by the hot-plate test, measuring time from heat exposition to first paw licking or jumping of the animal. While the median [interquartile range] latency time between heat exposition to first paw licking or jumping of the animal in the NaCl infusion group remained unchanged between Day 14 (8.4 [6.75-11.50] s) and Day 28 (7.35 [6.10-7.90] s) both, ADMA infusion and 5/6 nephrectomy tended to increase the thermal pain threshold at Day 14 (9.25 [6.55-12.18] s) and (9.50 [5.8 ± 11.0] s), respectively, compared to NaCl on Day 14 (8.4 [6.75-11.50] s). This difference became statistical significant at Day 28 where the median latency time in the ADMA group (13.10 [11.85-15.95] s) and in the 5/6 Nx group (13.50 [10.85-17.55] s) were significantly higher than in the NaCl group (7.35 [6.10-7.90] s). Induction of progressive renal failure in rats by 5/6 nephrectomy, which is accompanied by a marked increase of the serum levels of the endogenous NOS inhibitor ADMA, leads to a significantly increased heat pain threshold at 28 days. The sole infusion of ADMA into

  3. Using an experimental model for the study of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniella Soares; Marta, Ilda Estéfani Ribeiro; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; de Quadros, Andreza Urba; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2013-02-01

    to verify whether the Paw Edema Model can be used in investigations about the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation by measuring the variables pain, edema and neutrophil migration. this is a pilot and experimental study, involving ten male mice of the same genetic strain and divided into experimental and control group, submitted to the chemical induction of local inflammation in the right back paw. The experimental group received a daily administration of Therapeutic Touch for 15 minutes during three days. the data showed statistically significant differences in the nociceptive threshold and in the paw circumference of the animals from the experimental group on the second day of the experiment. the experiment model involving animals can contribute to study the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation, and adjustments are suggested in the treatment duration, number of sessions and experiment duration.

  4. Rethinking the Psychogenic Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Somatoform Disorders and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Renee J.; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology. PMID:24223338

  5. Complex muscular adaptation to perturbations after induction of experimental low back pain in healthy participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Spine stability is affected in low back (LB) pain and potentially by muscle fatigue and soreness. This study assessed motor control responses to unexpected surface perturbations during stance during experimental LB muscle pain combined with fatigue and muscle soreness. Methods...... Nineteen healthy participants were examined day 1-3 before and after bilateral injections of hypertonic saline into m. longissimus. Pain intensity was scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Day 2 included injections during post-exercise LB muscle fatigue and day 3 during delayed onset back muscle...... soreness (DOMS). Twenty perturbations were conducted randomly with tilts in sagittal and frontal plane or displacements in the frontal plane. Bilateral electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 12 trunk muscles. The root-mean-square (RMS-EMG) was extracted. Changes (DeltaRMS) and absolute changes (Delta...

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or continuous unilateral distal experimental pain stimulation in healthy subjects does not bias visual attention towards one hemifield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippopulos, Filipp M; Grafenstein, Jessica; Straube, Andreas; Eggert, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In natural life pain automatically draws attention towards the painful body part suggesting that it interacts with different attentional mechanisms such as visual attention. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients who typically report on chronic distally located pain of one extremity may suffer from so-called neglect-like symptoms, which have also been linked to attentional mechanisms. The purpose of the study was to further evaluate how continuous pain conditions influence visual attention. Saccade latencies were recorded in two experiments using a common visual attention paradigm whereby orientating saccades to cued or uncued lateral visual targets had to be performed. In the first experiment saccade latencies of healthy subjects were measured under two conditions: one in which continuous experimental pain stimulation was applied to the index finger to imitate a continuous pain situation, and one without pain stimulation. In the second experiment saccade latencies of patients suffering from CRPS were compared to controls. The results showed that neither the continuous experimental pain stimulation during the experiment nor the chronic pain in CRPS led to an unilateral increase of saccade latencies or to a unilateral increase of the cue effect on latency. The results show that unilateral, continuously applied pain stimuli or chronic pain have no or only very limited influence on visual attention. Differently from patients with visual neglect, patients with CRPS did not show strong side asymmetries of saccade latencies or of cue effects on saccade latencies. Thus, neglect-like clinical symptoms of CRPS patients do not involve the allocation of visual attention.

  7. Experimental orofacial pain and sensory deprivation lead to perceptual distortion of the face in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsdóttir, Lilja Kristín; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Patients suffering from persistent orofacial pain may sporadically report that the painful area feels "swollen" or "differently," a phenomenon that may be conceptualized as a perceptual distortion because there are no clinical signs of swelling present. Our aim was to investigate whether standardized experimental pain and sensory deprivation of specific orofacial test sites would lead to changes in the size perception of these face areas. Twenty-four healthy participants received either 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (HS) or local anesthetics (LA) into six regions (buccal, mental, lingual, masseter muscle, infraorbital and auriculotemporal nerve regions). Participants estimated the perceived size changes in percentage (0 % = no change, -100 % = half the size or +100 % = double the size), and somatosensory function was checked with tactile stimuli. The pain intensity was rated on a 0-10 Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS), and sets of psychological questionnaires were completed. HS and LA were associated with significant self-reported perceptual distortions as indicated by consistent increases in perceived size of the adjacent face areas (P ≤ 0.050). Perceptual distortion was most pronounced in the buccal region, and the smallest increase was observed in the auriculotemporal region. HS was associated with moderate levels of pain VNRS = 7.3 ± 0.6. Weak correlations were found between HS-evoked perceptual distortion and level of dissociation in two regions (P pain and transient sensory deprivation evoked perceptual distortions in all face regions and overall demonstrated the importance of afferent inputs for the perception of the face. We propose that perceptual distortion may be an important phenomenon to consider in persistent orofacial pain conditions.

  8. Prices need no preferences: social trends determine decisions in experimental markets for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaev, Ivo; Seymour, Ben; Chater, Nick; Winston, Joel S; Yoshida, Wako; Wright, Nicholas; Symmonds, Mkael; Dolan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A standard view in health economics is that, although there is no market that determines the "prices" for health states, people can nonetheless associate health states with monetary values (or other scales, such as quality adjusted life year [QALYs] and disability adjusted life year [DALYs]). Such valuations can be used to shape health policy, and a major research challenge is to elicit such values from people; creating experimental "markets" for health states is a theoretically attractive way to address this. We explore the possibility that this framework may be fundamentally flawed-because there may not be any stable values to be revealed. Instead, perhaps people construct ad hoc values, influenced by contextual factors, such as the observed decisions of others. The participants bid to buy relief from equally painful electrical shocks to the leg and arm in an experimental health market based on an interactive second-price auction. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to two experimental conditions where the bids by "others" were manipulated to follow increasing or decreasing price trends for one, but not the other, pain. After the auction, a preference test asked the participants to choose which pain they prefer to experience for a longer duration. Players remained indifferent between the two pain-types throughout the auction. However, their bids were differentially attracted toward what others bid for each pain, with overbidding during decreasing prices and underbidding during increasing prices. Health preferences are dissociated from market prices, which are strongly referenced to others' choices. This suggests that the price of health care in a free-market has the capacity to become critically detached from people's underlying preferences. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Psychosocial Pain Management Moderation: The Limit, Activate, and Enhance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Melissa A; Ehde, Dawn M; Jensen, Mark P

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing emphasis in the pain literature on understanding the following second-order research questions: Why do psychosocial pain treatments work? For whom do various treatments work? This critical review summarizes research that addresses the latter question and proposes a moderation model to help guide future research. A theoretical moderation framework for matching individuals to specific psychosocial pain interventions has been lacking. However, several such frameworks have been proposed in the broad psychotherapy and implementation science literature. Drawing on these theories and adapting them specifically for psychosocial pain treatment, here we propose a Limit, Activate, and Enhance model of pain treatment moderation. This model is unique in that it includes algorithms not only for matching treatments on the basis of patient weaknesses but also for directing patients to interventions that build on their strengths. Critically, this model provides a basis for specific a priori hypothesis generation, and a selection of the possible hypotheses drawn from the model are proposed and discussed. Future research considerations are presented that could refine and expand the model based on theoretically driven empirical evidence. The Limit, Activate, and Enhance model presented here is a theoretically derived framework that provides an a priori basis for hypothesis generation regarding psychosocial pain treatment moderators. The model will advance moderation research via its unique focus on matching patients to specific treatments that (1) limit maladaptive responses, (2) activate adaptive responses, and (3) enhance treatment outcomes based on patient strengths and resources. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Traumatization and chronic pain: a further model of interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egloff N

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Niklaus Egloff,1 Anna Hirschi,2 Roland von Känel1 1Department of General Internal Medicine, Division of Psychosomatic Medicine, Inselspital, University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland; 2Outpatient Clinic for Victims of Torture and War, Swiss Red Cross, Bern-Wabern, Switzerland Abstract: Up to 80% of patients with severe posttraumatic stress disorder are suffering from “unexplained” chronic pain. Theories about the links between traumatization and chronic pain have become the subject of increased interest over the last several years. We will give a short summary about the existing interaction models that emphasize particularly psychological and behavioral aspects of this interaction. After a synopsis of the most important psychoneurobiological mechanisms of pain in the context of traumatization, we introduce the hypermnesia–hyperarousal model, which focuses on two psychoneurobiological aspects of the physiology of learning. This hypothesis provides an answer to the hitherto open question about the origin of pain persistence and pain sensitization following a traumatic event and also provides a straightforward explanatory model for educational purposes. Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, hypermnesia, hypersensitivity, traumatization

  12. Do intensity ratings and skin conductance responses reliably discriminate between different stimulus intensities in experimentally induced pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breimhorst, Markus; Sandrock, Stephan; Fechir, Marcel; Hausenblas, Nadine; Geber, Christian; Birklein, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the question whether pain-intensity ratings and skin conductance responses (SCRs) are able to detect different intensities of phasic painful stimuli and to determine the reliability of this discrimination. For this purpose, 42 healthy participants of both genders were assigned to either electrical, mechanical, or laser heat-pain stimulation (each n = 14). A whole range of single brief painful stimuli were delivered on the right volar forearm of the dominant hand in a randomized order. Pain-intensity ratings and SCRs were analyzed. Using generalizability theory, individual and gender differences were the main contributors to the variability of both intensity ratings and SCRs. Most importantly, we showed that pain-intensity ratings are a reliable measure for the discrimination of different pain stimulus intensities in the applied modalities. The reliability of SCR was adequate when mechanical and heat stimuli were tested but failed for the discrimination of electrical stimuli. Further studies are needed to reveal the reason for this lack of accuracy for SCRs when applying electrical pain stimuli. Our study could help researchers to better understand the relationship between pain and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Pain researchers are furthermore encouraged to consider individual and gender differences when measuring pain intensity and the concomitant SCRs in experimental settings. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Length of perineal pain relief after ice pack application: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Bosco Paiva, Caroline; Junqueira Vasconcellos de Oliveira, Sonia Maria; Amorim Francisco, Adriana; da Silva, Renata Luana; de Paula Batista Mendes, Edilaine; Steen, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Ice pack is effective for alleviating postpartum perineal pain in primiparous women while multiparous women's levels of perineal pain appear to be poorly explored. Ice pack is a low-cost non-invasive localised treatment that can be used with no impact on breastfeeding. However, how long perineal analgesia persists after applying an ice pack is still unknown. To evaluate if perineal analgesia is maintained up to 2h after applying an ice pack to the perineum for 20min. A quasi-experimental study, using a pre and post-test design, was undertaken with a sample size of 50 multiparous women in Brazil. Data was collected by structured interview. The intervention involved a single application of an ice pack applied for 20min to the perineal area of women who reported perineal pain ≥3 by use of a numeric rating scale (0-10), with intact perineum, 1st or 2nd degree lacerations or episiotomy, between 6 and 24h after spontaneous vaginal birth. Perineal pain was evaluated at three points of time: before, immediately after and 2h after applying an ice pack. Immediately after applying an ice pack to the perineal area, there was a significant reduction in the severity of perineal pain reported (5.4 vs. 1.0, p<0.0005), which continued for 1h 35min up to 2h after the local application. Ice pack application for 20min is effective for alleviating postpartum perineal pain and continues to be effective between 1h 35min for up to 2h. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Animal models of pain and migraine in drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munro, Gordon; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    of the most commonly used models and methods employed within 'pain and migraine' drug development will be presented. Recent advances within these disciplines suggest that, with the addition of a few extra carefully chosen ancillary models and/or endpoints, the relative value in terms of resources used...

  15. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT, ANALYSIS AND MODELLING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2010 ... We obtain a good agreement between the resolution of the nonlinear equation of heat and the results obtained by the experimentation. . Keywords: Emissivity, Température, optimal Linearisation, finite elements. 1. ..... basse température, Rapport de Stage de D.E.A, Université Paris 12 – Val de Marne.

  16. Numbness in clinical and experimental pain--a cross-sectional study exploring the mechanisms of reduced tactile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Christian; Magerl, Walter; Fondel, Ricarda; Fechir, Marcel; Rolke, Roman; Vogt, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Birklein, Frank

    2008-09-30

    Pain patients often report distinct numbness of the painful skin although no structural peripheral or central nerve lesion is obvious. In this cross-sectional study we assessed the reduction of tactile function and studied underlying mechanisms in patients with chronic pain and in healthy participants exposed to phasic and tonic experimental nociceptive stimulation. Mechanical detection (MDT) and pain thresholds (MPT) were assessed in the painful area and the non-painful contralateral side in 10 patients with unilateral musculoskeletal pain. Additionally, 10 healthy participants were exposed to nociceptive stimulation applied to the volar forearms (capsaicin; electrical stimulation, twice each). Areas of tactile hypaesthesia and mechanical hyperalgesia were assessed. MDT and MPT were quantified adjacent to the stimulation site. Tactile hypaesthesia in pain patients and in experimental pain (MDT-z-scores: -0.66+/-0.30 and -0.42+/-0.15, respectively, both p<0.01) was paralleled by mechanical hyperalgesia (MPT-z-scores: +0.51+/-0.27, p<0.05; and +0.48+/-0.10, p<0.001). However, hypaesthesia and hyperalgesia were not correlated. Although 9 patients reported numbness, only 3 of them were able to delineate circumscript areas of tactile hypaesthesia. In experimental pain, the area of tactile hypaesthesia could be mapped in 31/40 experiments (78%). Irrespective of the mode of nociceptive stimulation (phasic vs. tonic) tactile hypaesthesia and hyperalgesia developed with a similar time course and disappeared within approximately 1 day. Hypaesthesia (numbness) often encountered in clinical pain can be reproduced by experimental nociceptive stimulation. The time course of effects suggests a mechanism involving central plasticity.

  17. Concept priming and pain: an experimental approach to understanding gender roles in sex-related pain differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Stephanie L; Rasinski, Heather M; Geers, Andrew L; Helfer, Suzanne G; France, Christopher R

    2011-04-01

    Prior research has found that sex differences in pain are partially due to individual variations in gender roles. In a laboratory study, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of covert gender role cues can also moderate the extent to which women and men experience pain. Specifically, we varied gender role cues by asking male and female participants to write about instances in which they behaved in a stereotypically feminine, masculine, or neutral manner. Pain and cardiovascular reactivity to the cold pressor task were then assessed. Results revealed that, when primed with femininity, men reported less pain and anxiety from the cold pressor task than women. However, no differences existed between the sexes in the masculine or neutral prime conditions. The results indicate that covert gender cues can alter pain reports. Further, at least in some situations, feminine role cues may be more influential on pain reports than masculine role cues.

  18. Pain Relief in Nonhuman Primate Models of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierboom, Michel P M; Breedveld, Elia; Keehnen, Merei; Klomp, Rianne; Bakker, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis are important in the elucidation of etiopathogenic mechanisms of the disease and for the development of promising new therapies. Species specificity of new biological compounds and their mode of action preclude safety and efficacy testing in rodent models of disease. Nonhuman primates (NHP) can fill this niche and provide the only relevant model. Over the last two decades models of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were developed in the rhesus monkey and the common marmoset. However, NHP are higher-order animals and complex sentient beings. So especially in models where pain is an intricate part of the disease, analgesia needs to be addressed because of ethical considerations. In our model, a morphine-based pain relief was used that does not interfere with the normal development of disease allowing us to evaluate important mechanistic aspects of the arthritis.

  19. Pain management: a review of organisation models with integrated processes for the management of pain in adult cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink-Huis, Anita; van Achterberg, Theo; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports a review of the literature conducted to identify organisation models in cancer pain management that contain integrated care processes and describe their effectiveness. Pain is experienced by 30-50% of cancer patients receiving treatment and by 70-90% of those with advanced disease. Efforts to improve pain management have been made through the development and dissemination of clinical guidelines. Early improvements in pain management were focussed on just one or two single processes such as pain assessment and patient education. Little is known about organisational models with multiple integrated processes throughout the course of the disease trajectory and concerning all stages of the care process. Systematic review. The review involved a systematic search of the literature, published between 1986-2006. Subject-specific keywords used to describe patients, disease, pain management interventions and integrated care processes, relevant for this review were selected using the thesaurus of the databases. Institutional models, clinical pathways and consultation services are three alternative models for the integration of care processes in cancer pain management. A clinical pathway is a comprehensive institutionalisation model, whereas a pain consultation service is a 'stand-alone' model that can be integrated in a clinical pathway. Positive patient and process outcomes have been described for all three models, although the level of evidence is generally low. Evaluation of the quality of pain management must involve standardised measurements of both patient and process outcomes. We recommend the development of policies for referrals to a pain consultation service. These policies can be integrated within a clinical pathway. To evaluate the effectiveness of pain management models standardised outcome measures are needed.

  20. Remote Effects of Electromagnetic Millimeter Waves on Experimentally Induced Cold Pain: A Double-Blinded Crossover Investigation in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyla, Tomasz; Hacker, Henriette; Edinger, Hardy; Leutzow, Bianca; Lange, Joern; Usichenko, Taras

    2017-03-01

    The hypoalgesic effect of electromagnetic millimeter waves (MW) is well studied in animal model; however, the results of human research are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various frequency ranges of MW on hypoalgesia using the cold pressor test (CPT). Experimental pain was induced using standardized CPT protocols in 20 healthy male volunteers. The skin of the lower part of sternum was exposed to MW with a frequency of 42.25 GHz (active generator); MW within 50-75 GHz frequency range (noise generator); or an inactive MW device (placebo generator) in a random crossover double-blinded manner. Pain threshold, measured using the CPT, was the primary outcome. Other CPT parameters, heart rate, blood pressure, incidence of subjective sensations (paresthesia) during exposure, as well as quality of volunteers' blinding were also recorded. The end points of the condition with exposure to 42.25 GHz, were compared with baseline; exposure to noise 50-75 GHz; and placebo generators. Pain threshold increased during exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline: median difference (MD), 1.97 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-3.73) and noise generator: MD, 1.27 seconds (95% CI, 0.05-2.33) but not compared with the placebo generator. Time to onset of cold and increasing pain sensations as well as diastolic blood pressure increased under the exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline and noise generator. Other outcome measures were comparable among the study conditions. We were able to partially confirm the previously suggested hypoalgesic effects of low-intensity electromagnetic MW. However, the effect was indistinguishable from the placebo condition in our investigation.

  1. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain...... intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe...... the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold...

  2. Sacroiliac joint pain: Prospective, randomised, experimental and comparative study of thermal radiofrequency with sacroiliac joint block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas Martínez, L; Orduña Valls, J; Paramés Mosquera, E; Lamelas Rodríguez, L; Rojas Gil, S; Domínguez García, M

    2016-05-01

    To compare the analgesic effects between the blockade and bipolar thermal radiofrequency in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain. Prospective, randomised and experimental study conducted on 60 patients selected in the two hospitals over a period of nine months, who had intense sacroiliac joint pain (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]>6) that lasted more than 3 months. Patients were randomised into three groups (n=20): Group A (two intra-articular sacroiliac injections of local anaesthetic/corticosteroid guided by ultrasound in 7 days). Group B: conventional bipolar radiofrequency "palisade". Target points were the lateral branch nerves of S1, S2, and S3, distance needles 1cm. Group C: modified bipolar radiofrequency "palisade" (needle distance >1cm). Patients were evaluated at one month, three months, and one year. Demographic data, VAS reduction, and side effects of the techniques were assessed. One month after the treatment, pain reduction was >50% in the three groups PDolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Stress and visceral pain: from animal models to clinical therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larauche, Muriel; Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated stress (psychosocial and physical) as a trigger of first onset or exacerbation of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms of which visceral pain is an integrant landmark. A number of experimental acute or chronic exteroceptive or interoceptive stressors induce visceral hyperalgesia in rodents although recent evidence also points to stress-related visceral analgesia as established in the somatic pain field. Underlying mechanisms of stress-related visceral hypersensitivity may involve a combination of sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization in response to input from the viscera and dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate spinal nociceptive transmission or analgesic response. Biochemical coding of stress involves the recruitment of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways. Experimental studies established that activation of brain and peripheral CRF receptor subtype 1 plays a primary role in the development of stress-related delayed visceral hyperalgesia while subtype 2 activation induces analgesic response. In line with stress pathways playing a role in IBS, non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment modalities aimed at reducing stress perception using a broad range of evidence-based mind-body interventions and centrally-targeted medications to reduce anxiety impact on brain patterns activated by visceral stimuli and dampen visceral pain. PMID:21575632

  4. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  5. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  6. Symptoms of Fibromyalgia According to the 2016 Revised Fibromyalgia Criteria in Chronic Pain Patients Referred to Multidisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation: Influence on Clinical and Experimental Pain Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Karin Bruun; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition with chronic widespread pain and signs of generalized pain hypersensitivity. FM has previously been classified according to the ACR1990 criteria, where the presence of hypersensitivity is estimated by a tender point examination. Due to the limitations of these classifi......Fibromyalgia is a condition with chronic widespread pain and signs of generalized pain hypersensitivity. FM has previously been classified according to the ACR1990 criteria, where the presence of hypersensitivity is estimated by a tender point examination. Due to the limitations...... of these classification criteria, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed, abandoning this examination. This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence of FM according to the revised 2016 FM criteria in a large cohort of chronic pain patients. Pain drawings, the Fibromyalgia Symptom Severity Scale...

  7. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental pain processing in individuals with cognitive impairment: current state of the science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Defrin, R; Amanzio, Martina; de Tomasso, M

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) can develop during the course of ageing and is a feature of many neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Many individuals with CI have substantial, sustained and complex healthcare needs which frequently include pain. However, individuals with CI can have difficulty...... of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders in which CI is typically present. Overall, the existing data suggest that pain processing is altered in most individuals with CI compared to cognitively intact matched controls. The precise nature of these alterations varies with the type of CI (or associated...... to cognitively unimpaired individuals. Our current understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning these alterations is limited, but may be enhanced through the use of animal models of CI which also exhibit alterations in nociceptive responding. Further research employing additional behavioural...

  9. Pain

    OpenAIRE

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-01-01

    The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  10. Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  11. Electrical stimulation of the insular cortex as a novel target for the relief of refractory pain: An experimental approach in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Luiz Fabio; Toniolo, Elaine Flamia; Alonso-Matielo, Heloísa; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Ballester, Gerson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Dale, Camila Squarzoni

    2018-07-02

    Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has shown to be an effective therapeutic alternative for neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. The primary motor cortex(M1) was the main cortical target used in the vast majority of both invasive and non-invasive studies. Despite positive results M1-based approaches still fail to relieve pain in a significant proportion of individuals. It has been advocated that the direct stimulation of cortical areas directly implicated in the central integration of pain could increase the efficacy of analgesic brain stimulation. Here, we evaluated the behavioral effects of electrical stimulation of the insular cortex (ESI) on pain sensitivity in an experimental rat model of peripheral neuropathy, and have described the pathways involved. Animals underwent chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve in the right hind limb and had concentric electrodes implanted in the posterior dysranular insular cortex. Mechanical nociception responses were evaluated before and at the end of a 15-min session of ESI (60Hz, 210μs, 1V). ESI reversed mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw contralateral to the brain hemisphere stimulated, without inducing motor impairment in the open-field test. Pharmacological blockade of μ-opioid (MOR) or type 1-cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) abolished ESI-induced antinociceptive effects. Evaluation of CB1R and MOR spatial expression demonstrated differential modulation of CB1R and MOR in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) of ESI-treated rats in sub-areas involved in pain processing/modulation. These results indicate that ESI induces antinociception by functionally modulating opioid and cannabinoid systems in the PAG pain circuitry in rats with experimentally induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (Ppain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Masticatory sensory-motor changes after an experimental chewing test influenced by pain catastrophizing and neck-pain-related disability in patients with headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Touche, Roy; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Pardo-Montero, Joaquín; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2015-03-05

    Recent research has shown a relationship of craniomandibular disability with neck-pain-related disability has been shown. However, there is still insufficient information demonstrating the influence of neck pain and disability in the sensory-motor activity in patients with headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of neck-pain-related disability on masticatory sensory-motor variables. An experimental case-control study investigated 83 patients with headache attributed to TMD and 39 healthy controls. Patients were grouped according to their scores on the neck disability index (NDI) (mild and moderate neck disability). Initial assessment included the pain catastrophizing scale and the Headache Impact Test-6. The protocol consisted of baseline measurements of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain-free maximum mouth opening (MMO). Individuals were asked to perform the provocation chewing test, and measurements were taken immediately after and 24 hours later. During the test, patients were assessed for subjective feelings of fatigue (VAFS) and pain intensity. VAFS was higher at 6 minutes (mean 51.7; 95% CI: 50.15-53.26) and 24 hours after (21.08; 95% CI: 18.6-23.5) for the group showing moderate neck disability compared with the mild neck disability group (6 minutes, 44.16; 95% CI 42.65-45.67/ 24 hours after, 14.3; 95% CI: 11.9-16.7) and the control group. The analysis shows a decrease in the pain-free MMO only in the group of moderate disability 24 hours after the test. PPTs of the trigeminal region decreased immediately in all groups, whereas at 24 hours, a decrease was observed in only the groups of patients. PPTs of the cervical region decreased in only the group with moderate neck disability 24 hours after the test. The strongest negative correlation was found between pain-free MMO immediately after the test and NDI in both the mild (r = -0.49) and moderate (r = -0.54) neck disability

  15. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  16. Experimentally induced masseter-pain changes masseter but not sternocleidomastoid muscle-related activity during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of induced masseter-muscle pain on the amplitude of muscle activation, symmetry and coactivation of jaw- and neck-muscles during mastication. Twenty-eight male volunteers, mean age±SD 20.6±2.0years, participated in this study. Surface electromyography of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles was performed bilaterally during mastication of a gummy candy before and after injections of monosodium glutamate solution and isotonic saline solution. As a result, we observed a decrease in the amplitude of activation of the masseter muscle on the working side (p=0.009; d=0.34) and a reduction in the asymmetry between the working and the balancing side during mastication (p=0.007; d=0.38). No changes were observed either on the craniocervical electromyographic variables. In conclusion, experimentally induced pain reduced the masseter muscle activation on the working side, thereby reducing the physiological masseters' recruitment asymmetry between the two sides during mastication. No effects on SCM activity were detected. These results may partly explain the initial maladaptative changes underlying TMD conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a “pain-protective” (PP) haplotype of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH1 gene results in decreased basal GCH1 expression, and is associated with DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). So far it is unknown if such mutations affect acute and inflammatory pain. Results In the current study, we examined the involvement of the GCH1 gene in pain models using the hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mouse, a genetic model for DRD, with only 10% basal GTP-CH1 activity compared to wild type mice. The study included assays for determination of acute nociception as well as models for pain after sensitisation. Pain behavioural analysis of the hph-1 mice showed reduced pain-like responses following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate novel evidence that genetic mutations in the GCH1 gene modulate pain-like hypersensitivity. Together, the present data suggest that BH4 is not important for basal heat and mechanical pain, but they support the hypothesis that BH4 plays a role in inflammation-induced hypersensitivity. Our studies suggest that the BH4 pathway could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain conditions. Moreover, the hph-1 mice provide a valid model to

  18. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorida Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ. Methods: The present experimental study was conducted among 30 participants between the age of 21 to 55 years with chronic non-specific LBP. The participants were given a hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise. Pre-interventional and 3rd day Post-interventional outcome measurements were taken using VAS, FEV1 and FEV6 and MODQ. Results: The difference between pre-and post of VAS was statistically highly significant (p=0.0001. The p value of FEV6 and MODQ by paired t test was statistically significant with p value of 0.02 and 0.0007 respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is an immediate effect of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, FEV6 and functional ability in patients with chronic LBP.

  19. The effect of Cordia platythyrsa on various experimental models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ned

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... investigating the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of C. platythyrsa using various animal models: writhing test ... inhibited acetic acid-induced pain though these effects were weaker than the effects of morphine. Although, the ..... visceral pain model is used generally for screening compounds for ...

  20. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Experimental Rats via Inhibiting Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojian Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP is a common and intractable complication of diabetes. Conventional therapies are always not ideal; development of novel drugs is still needed to achieve better pain relief. Recent evidences have demonstrated that inflammation is involved in the onset and maintenance of DPNP. The anti-inflammatory property of Tanshinone IIA (TIIA makes it a promising candidate to block or alter the pain perception. This study was conducted to investigate whether TIIA could attenuate DPNP in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced rats model and its potential mechanisms. TIIA was administered to STZ-induced diabetic rats at the dose of 40 mg/kg once a day for 3 weeks. The effects of TIIA on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were investigated using behavioral tests. The mRNA level and expression of interleukin- (IL- 1β, interleukin- (IL- 6, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, and interleukin- (IL- 10 in the fourth to sixth segments of the dorsal root ganglion (L4–6 DRG were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and Western blot. TIIA treatment significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. In addition, the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α was inhibited, and the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased by TIIA. This study demonstrated that TIIA has significant antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in a rat model of STZ-induced DPNP, and the effect may be associated with its anti-inflammation property.

  1. Spinal cord stimulation of dorsal columns in a rat model of neuropathic pain: evidence for a segmental spinal mechanism of pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, H; van Kleef, M; Joosten, E A

    2012-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) of the dorsal columns is an established method for treating chronic neuropathic pain, patients still suffer from a substantial level of pain. From a clinical perspective it is known that the location of the SCS is of pivotal importance, thereby suggesting a segmental spinal mode of action. However, experimental studies suggest that SCS acts also through the modulation of supraspinal mechanisms, which might suggest that the location is unimportant. Here we investigated the effect of the rostrocaudal location of SCS stimulation and the effectiveness of pain relief in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain. Adult male rats (n=45) were submitted to a partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. The majority of animals developed tactile hypersensitivity in the nerve lesioned paw. All allodynic rats were submitted to SCS (n=33) for 30 minutes (f=50 Hz; pulse width 0.2 ms). In one group (n=16) the electrodes were located at the level where the injured sciatic nerve afferents enter the spinal cord (T13), and in a second group (n=17) the electrodes were positioned at more rostral levels (T11) as verified by X-ray. A repositioning experiment of electrodes from T12 to T13 was performed in 2 animals. Our data demonstrate that SCS of the dorsal columns at the level where the injured fibers enter the spinal cord dorsal horn result in a much better pain-relieving effect than SCS at more rostral levels. From this we conclude that SCS in treatment of neuropathic pain acts through a segmental spinal site of action. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of patient-professional partnerships on the self-management and health outcomes for patients with chronic back pain: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Yu, Ge; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; José Closs, S

    2016-07-01

    Self-management may be a lifelong task for patients with chronic back pain. Research suggests that chronic pain self-management programmes have beneficial effects on patients' health outcome. Contemporary pain management theories and models also suggest that a good patient-professional partnership enhances patients' ability to self-manage their condition. (1) To investigate whether there is a reciprocal relationship between self-management of chronic back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQoL); (2) to examine the impact of a good patient-professional partnership on HRQoL, either directly, or indirectly via change in the ability to self-manage pain. This quasi-experimental study was designed to take place during routine service appointments and conducted in a community-based pain management service in the United Kingdom. A patient-professional partnership was established in which patients were actively involved in setting up goals and developing individualised care plans. Through this, health professionals undertook patients' health needs assessment, collaborated with patients to identify specific problems, provided written materials and delivered individualised exercise based on patients' life situation. Patients were recruited following initial consultation and followed up three months later. A total of 147 patients (65% female) with a mean age of 48 years (standard deviation (SD): 14 years) were enrolled in the study. Of these, 103 subjects completed the study. Patients were included if they were aged 18 and over, suffered from chronic back pain, had opted in to the clinic and had sufficient ability to read and understand English. Patients were excluded if they opted out this service after the initial assessment, suffered from malignant pain or required acute medical interventions for their pain relief. Self-reported measures of HRQoL, patient-professional partnerships and self-management ability were collected at baseline and three months later

  3. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF THE PRIMARY MALE HYPOGONADISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kulikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of the new methods of treatment of primary male hypogonadism is an urgent medical problem. Its solution requires a suitable experimental model of the disease. Aim: The creation of new experimental model of primary male hypogonadism. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on the male Wistar rats, hypogonadism was modeled by temporary ligation of the distal part of the spermatic cord. Results: It was shown that three-day ligation of the spermatic cord led to persistent disturbance of the testosterone-producing and reproductive functions. These manifestations were reversible at shorter duration of the exposure. Conclusion: The created model of primary male hypogonadism is characterized by the persistent testosterone-producing and reproductive functions disturbance, technical availability, non-toxicity to the other organs and systems. Availability of the model provides new opportunities for the development of approaches to treating diseases of the reproductive organs in men.

  4. Investigating Circadian Rhythmicity in Pain Sensitivity Using a Neural Circuit Model for Spinal Cord Processing of Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena; Booth, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Primary processing of painful stimulation occurs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In this article, we introduce mathematical models of the neural circuitry in the dorsal horn responsible for processing nerve fiber inputs from noxious stimulation of peripheral tissues and generating the resu......Primary processing of painful stimulation occurs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In this article, we introduce mathematical models of the neural circuitry in the dorsal horn responsible for processing nerve fiber inputs from noxious stimulation of peripheral tissues and generating...... the resultant pain signal. The differential equation models describe the average firing rates of excitatory and inhibitory interneuron populations, as well as the wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons whose output correlates with the pain signal. The temporal profile of inputs on the different afferent nerve fibers...

  5. Characterization of a novel model of tonic heat pain stimulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naert, A.L.; Kehlet, H.; Kupers, R.

    2008-01-01

    .2+/-0.4, females scoring higher than men (7.4+/-0.5 vs. 5.2+/-0.5; pstimulation period after which they stabilized. A strong interindividual variability was observed in the time profiles of the pain ratings over the course of the 7-min...... tonic heat pain stimulation and compared the responses on this test with other measures of pain. In 58 normal volunteers, we applied a 7-min lasting contact heat stimulation of 47 degrees C to the upper leg while participants constantly rated their pain. Average pain rating during the 7-min period was 6...... stimulation period. The model showed a good test-retest reproducibility. Tonic heat pain ratings only correlated moderately with the pain threshold while stronger correlations were observed with pain tolerance and ratings of suprathreshold phasic heat pain. We conclude that the tonic heat model is a suitable...

  6. Toward the development of a motivational model of pain self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Nielson, Warren R; Kerns, Robert D

    2003-11-01

    Adaptive management of chronic pain depends to a large degree on how patients choose to cope with pain and its impact. Consequently, patient motivation is an important factor in determining how well patients learn to manage pain. However, the role of patient motivation in altering coping behavior and maintaining those changes is seldom discussed, and theoretically based research on motivation for pain treatment is lacking. This article reviews theories that have a direct application to understanding motivational issues in pain coping and presents a preliminary motivational model of pain self-management. The implications of this model for enhancing engagement in and adherence to chronic pain treatment programs are then discussed. The article ends with a call for research to better understand motivation as it applies to chronic pain self-management. In particular, there is a need to determine whether (and which) motivation enhancement interventions increase active participation in self-management treatment programs for chronic pain.

  7. Effects of experimental muscle pain on muscle activity and co-ordination during static and dynamic motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1997-04-01

    The relation between muscle pain, muscle activity, and muscle co-ordination is still controversial. The present human study investigates the influence of experimental muscle pain on resting, static, and dynamic muscle activity. In the resting and static experiments, the electromyography (EMG) activity and the contraction force of m. tibialis anterior were assessed before and after injection of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) into the same muscle. In the dynamic experiment, injections of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) were performed into either m. tibialis anterior (TA) or m. gastrocnemius (GA) and the muscle activity and co-ordination were investigated during gait on a treadmill by EMG recordings from m. TA and m. GA. At rest no evidence of EMG hyperactivity was found during muscle pain. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during muscle pain was significantly lower than the control condition (P Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1993, pp. 311-327.) which predicts increased activity of antagonistic muscle and decreased activity of agonistic muscle during experimental and clinical muscle pain.

  8. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  9. Proteomic identification of altered cerebral proteins in the complex regional pain syndrome animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Park, Zee-Yong; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  10. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  11. A review of the evidence regarding associations between attachment theory and experimentally induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela Joy

    2013-04-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that adult attachment and pain-related variables are predictably and consistently linked, and that understanding these links may guide pain intervention and prevention efforts. In general, insecure attachment has been portrayed as a risk factor, and secure attachment as a protective factor, for people with chronic pain conditions. In an effort to better understand the relationships among attachment and pain variables, these links have been investigated in pain-free samples using induced-pain techniques. The present paper reviews the available research linking adult attachment and laboratory-induced pain. While the diverse nature of the studies precludes definitive conclusions, together these papers offer support for associations between insecure attachment and a more negative pain experience. The evidence presented in this review highlights areas for further empirical attention, as well as providing some guidance for clinicians who may wish to employ preventive approaches and other interventions informed by attachment theory.

  12. Intradiscal electrothermal treatment for discogenic back pain: experimental investigation and preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Wen; Teng Gaojun; He Shicheng; Guo Jinhe; Deng Gang; Zhu Guangyu; Li Guozhao; Ding Huijuan; Shen Zhiping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness and the safety of IDET for chronic discogenic low back pain. Methods: Standard intradiscal electrothermal treatment were performed in two adjacent disc levels (L3-4, L4-5) of two domestic pigs. MRI were available at pretreatment, posttreatment of 1,2 weeks, and then the two animals were killed respectively at 1,2 weeks after the procedure. The specimens were then undergone thin sectioned and subjected to humatoxylin and eosin staining for histological investigation. 23 patients (totally 29 discs, including L2-3 to L5-S1) with chronic symptoms underwent IDET for clinical study. VAS (Visual Analog Scale) pain scores were collected before the treatment, 1 week and 3 months after the procedure. One way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results: 4 discs of standard IDET models have been set up in two pigs showing normal MRI T2W1 signal of nucleus pulposus immediately after the procedure, but the high signal extent of the central part of the nucleo pulposus shrinked with conspicuous peripheral low signal changes during the following 1-2 W. Degeneration and shrinkage of nucleo-pulposus with lecolized fibrous ring thickening were found pathologically but without damage to nurve roots and epidural sac. 29 discs in 23 patients were performed successfully, without complication. The follow-up evaluation of 1 week and 3 months after the treatment showing significant differences with those before the treatment on was scores 65.3% and 78.9% respectively (P<0.0001). Conclusions: IDET is safe and effective for chronic discogenic low back pain. (authors)

  13. Comparison of burrowing and stimuli-evoked pain behaviors as end-points in rat models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun eMuralidharan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Establishment and validation of ethologically-relevant, non-evoked behavioral end-points as surrogate measures of spontaneous pain in rodent pain models has been proposed as a means to improve preclinical to clinical research translation in the pain field. Here, we compared the utility of burrowing behavior with hypersensitivity to applied mechanical stimuli for pain assessment in rat models of chronic inflammatory and peripheral neuropathic pain. Briefly, groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated to the burrowing environment and trained over a 5-day period. Rats that burrowed ≤450g of gravel on any two days of the individual training phase were excluded from the study. The remaining rats received either a unilateral intraplantar injection of Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA or saline, or underwent unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve- or sham-surgery. Baseline burrowing behavior and evoked pain behaviors were assessed prior to model induction, and twice-weekly until study completion on day 14. For FCA- and CCI-rats, but not the corresponding groups of sham-rats, evoked mechanical hypersensitivity developed in a temporal manner in the ipsilateral hindpaws. Although burrowing behavior also decreased in a temporal manner for both FCA- and CCI-rats, there was considerable inter-animal variability. By contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral hindpaws of FCA- and CCI-rats respectively, exhibited minimal inter-animal variability. Our data collectively show that burrowing behavior is altered in rodent models of chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. However, large group sizes are needed to ensure studies are adequately powered due to considerable inter-animal variability.

  14. Characterisation of tramadol, morphine and tapentadol in an acute pain model in Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel, Babette; Terlinden, Rolf; Schneider, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the analgesic potential of the centrally acting analgesics tramadol, morphine and the novel analgesic tapentadol in a pre-clinical research model of acute nociceptive pain, the tail-flick model in dogs. Prospective part-randomized pre-clinical research trial. Fifteen male Beagle dogs (HsdCpb:DOBE), aged 12-15 months. On different occasions separated by at least 1 week, dogs received intravenous (IV) administrations of tramadol (6.81, 10.0 mg kg(-1) ), tapentadol (2.15, 4.64, 6.81 mg kg(-1) ) or morphine (0.464, 0.681, 1.0 mg kg(-1) ) with subsequent measurement of tail withdrawal latencies from a thermal stimulus (for each treatment n = 5). Blood samples were collected immediately after the pharmacodynamic measurements of tramadol to determine pharmacokinetics and the active metabolite O-demethyltramadol (M1). Tapentadol and morphine induced dose-dependent antinociception with ED50-values of 4.3 mg kg(-1) and 0.71 mg kg(-1) , respectively. In contrast, tramadol did not induce antinociception at any dose tested. Measurements of the serum levels of tramadol and the M1 metabolite revealed only marginal amounts of the M1 metabolite, which explains the absence of the antinociceptive effect of tramadol in this experimental pain model in dogs. Different breeds of dogs might not or only poorly respond to treatment with tramadol due to low metabolism of the drug. Tapentadol and morphine which act directly on μ-opioid receptors without the need for metabolic activation are demonstrated to induce potent antinociception in the experimental model used and should also provide a reliable pain management in the clinical situation. The non-opioid mechanisms of tramadol do not provide antinociception in this experimental setting. This contrasts to many clinical situations described in the literature, where tramadol appears to provide useful analgesia in dogs for post-operative pain relief and in more chronically pain states. © 2014 Association of Veterinary

  15. Chronic Low Back Pain: Toward an Integrated Psychosocial Assessment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Jenny; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Integrated six dimensions of chronic low back pain (pain intensity, functional disability, attitudes toward pain, pain coping strategies, depression, illness behavior) to provide multidimensional patient profile. Data from 100 patients revealed presence of three distinct patient groups: patients who were in control, patients who were depressed and…

  16. Pregabalin reduces acute inflammatory and persistent pain associated with nerve injury and cancer in rat models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummig, Wagner; Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias

    2014-01-01

    To assess the analgesic effect of pregabalin in orofacial models of acute inflammatory pain and of persistent pain associated with nerve injury and cancer, and so determine its effectiveness in controlling orofacial pains having different underlying mechanisms. Orofacial capsaicin and formalin tests were employed in male Wistar rats to assess the influence of pregabalin (or vehicle) pretreatment in acute pain models, and the results from these experiments were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Newman Keuls post-hoc test. Pregabalin (or vehicle) treatment was also tested on the facial heat hyperalgesia that was evaluated in rats receiving injection of the inflammatory irritant carrageenan into the upper lip, as well as after constriction of the infraorbital nerve (a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain), or after inoculation of tumor cells into the facial vibrissal pad; two-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Newman-Keuls post-hoc test was used to analyze data from these experiments. Facial grooming induced by capsaicin was abolished by pretreatment with pregabalin at 10 and 30 mg/kg. However, pregabalin failed to modify the first phase of the formalin response, but reduced the second phase at both doses (10 and 30 mg/kg). In addition, treatment of rats with pregabalin reduced the heat hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, as well as by nerve injury and facial cancer. Pregabalin produced a marked antinociceptive effect in rat models of facial inflammatory pain as well as in facial neuropathic and cancer pain models, suggesting that it may represent an important agent for the clinical control of orofacial pain.

  17. The effects of blocking N/OFQ receptors on orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Di; He, Yuwei; Long, Hu; Zhou, Yang; Liu, He; Xu, Rui; Huang, Renhuan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptor (N/OFQ receptor) antagonist on orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. A total of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-300 g were divided into six groups: a control group, force group, force+saline intraperitoneal group, force+saline periodontal group, force+UFP-101 ([Nphe¹,Arg¹⁴,Lys¹⁵]N/OFQ-NH ₂ antagonist for N/OFQ receptor) intraperitoneal group, and force+UFP-1 01 periodontal group. Closed coil springs were ligated between the upper incisors and first molar to exert an orthodontic force (40 g) between the teeth. Injectable administration dosages were 30 μl saline or 30 μl saline containing 0.03 mg/kg UFP-1 01. Following the injections, orofacial pain levels were assessed through directed face grooming (mouth wiping). Statistical analyses were performed in SPSS 17.0 (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) and p values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Orofacial pain levels were significantly higher in the force group than in the control group. Orofacial pain levels differed significantly between the force)group, force+saline periodontal group and force+UFP-101 periodontal group, but were similar between the control group, force+UFP-101 intraperitoneal group and force+saline intraperitoneal group. Moreover, orofacial pain levels did not differ between the force group, force+saline intraperitoneal group and force+UFP-1 01 intraperitoneal group. Periodontal, but not intraperitoneal, administration of UFP-101 could alleviate orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats, suggesting that periodontal N/OFQ receptors participate in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement.

  18. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  19. Risk prediction model for knee pain in the Nottingham community: a Bayesian modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Bhattacharya, A; McWilliams, D F; Ingham, S L; Doherty, M; Zhang, W

    2017-03-20

    Twenty-five percent of the British population over the age of 50 years experiences knee pain. Knee pain can limit physical ability and cause distress and bears significant socioeconomic costs. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate the first risk prediction model for incident knee pain in the Nottingham community and validate this internally within the Nottingham cohort and externally within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. A total of 1822 participants from the Nottingham community who were at risk for knee pain were followed for 12 years. Of this cohort, two-thirds (n = 1203) were used to develop the risk prediction model, and one-third (n = 619) were used to validate the model. Incident knee pain was defined as pain on most days for at least 1 month in the past 12 months. Predictors were age, sex, body mass index, pain elsewhere, prior knee injury and knee alignment. A Bayesian logistic regression model was used to determine the probability of an OR >1. The Hosmer-Lemeshow χ 2 statistic (HLS) was used for calibration, and ROC curve analysis was used for discrimination. The OAI cohort from the United States was also used to examine the performance of the model. A risk prediction model for knee pain incidence was developed using a Bayesian approach. The model had good calibration, with an HLS of 7.17 (p = 0.52) and moderate discriminative ability (ROC 0.70) in the community. Individual scenarios are given using the model. However, the model had poor calibration (HLS 5866.28, p prediction model for knee pain, regardless of underlying structural changes of knee osteoarthritis, in the community using a Bayesian modelling approach. The model appears to work well in a community-based population but not in individuals with a higher risk for knee osteoarthritis, and it may provide a convenient tool for use in primary care to predict the risk of knee pain in the general population.

  20. Nursing students' assessment of pain and decision of triage for different ethnic groups: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Hamamura, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Pain management is a priority in nursing care but little is known about the factors that affect nursing students' assessment of pain expressed by patients of different ethnic backgrounds. This study examined undergraduate nursing students' assessment of pain and decision of triage when pain was expressed in different languages and their relation to students' empathy and social identity. Comparison between students with and without clinical experience was also carried out. This is a cross-sectional quantitative design. This study took place at a university in Hong Kong. 74 female undergraduate nursing students. Students listened to eight audio recordings in which an individual expressed pain in one of the two dialects of Chinese, either Cantonese or Putonghua. For each dialect, two recordings depicted mild pain and two depicted severe pain. After listening to each recording, students rated the pain level and indicated their decision of triage. Subsequently, students completed a questionnaire that measured their empathy and social identity and reported their demographics. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, and t-tests. Severe pain described in Putonghua was rated as more intense than that described in Cantonese but it was not classified as more urgent. Students with clinical experience tended to perceive mild pain as less painful and less urgent than those without clinical experience. For mild pain described in Cantonese, students with clinical experience evaluated it as more urgent than those without such experience. The empathy level of students with and without clinical experience was comparable. Students with more empathy, especially those without clinical experience, reported heightened perceived intensity of severe pain described in Putonghua. Nurse educators should note that empathy, social identity, and clinical experience may alter students' pain assessment of patients from different ethnicities. Pain education needs to

  1. A comparative behavioural study of mechanical hypersensitivity in 2 pain models in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Marie-Céline; Hrncic, Dragan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Caspani, Ombretta

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of pain sensitivity in humans has been standardized using quantitative sensory testing, whereas in animals mostly paw withdrawal thresholds to diverse stimuli are measured. This study directly compares tests used in quantitative sensory testing (pinpricks, pressure algometer) with tests used in animal studies (electronic von Frey test: evF), which we applied to the dorsal hind limbs of humans after high frequency stimulation and rats after tibial nerve transection. Both experimental models induce profound mechanical hypersensitivity. At baseline, humans and rats showed a similar sensitivity to evF with 0.2 mm diameter tips, but significant differences for other test stimuli (all P pain models (P pain sensitivity, but probe size and shape should be standardized. Hypersensitivity to blunt pressure-the leading positive sensory sign after peripheral nerve injury in humans-is a novel finding in the tibial nerve transection model. By testing outside the primary zone of nerve damage (rat) or activation (humans), our methods likely involve effects of central sensitization in both species.

  2. Effects of experimental muscle pain on shoulder-abduction force steadiness and muscle activity in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the steadiness of shoulder abduction is reduced in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), which might be related to shoulder pain associated with the SIS. The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of experimental shoulder muscle p...

  3. Promoting culturally competent chronic pain management using the clinically relevant continuum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    This article reviews the culture of biomedicine and current practices in pain management education, which often merge to create a hostile environment for effective chronic pain care. Areas of cultural tensions in chronic pain frequently involve the struggle to achieve credibility regarding one's complaints of pain (or being believed that the pain is real) and complying with pain medication protocols. The clinically relevant continuum model is presented as a framework allowing providers to approach care from an evidence-based, culturally appropriate (patient centered) perspective that takes into account the highest level of evidence available, provider expertise, and patient preferences and values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  5. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  6. Experimental Gene Therapy with Serine-Histogranin and Endomorphin 1 for the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Jergova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The insufficient pain relief provided by current pharmacotherapy for chronic neuropathic pain is a serious medical problem. The enhanced glutamate signaling via NMDA receptors appears to be one of the key events in the development of chronic pain. Although effective, clinical use of systemic NMDA antagonists is limited by adverse effects such as hallucinations and motor dysfunction. Opioids are also potent analgesics but their chronic use is accompanied by tolerance and risk of addiction. However, combination of NMDA antagonists and opioids seems to provide a stable pain relieve at subthreshold doses of both substances, eliminating development of side effects. Our previous research showed that combined delivery of NMDA antagonist Serine histrogranin (SHG and endomorphin1 (EM1 leads to attenuation of acute and chronic pain. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate an analgesic potency of the gene construct encoding SHG and EM1. Constructs with 1SHG copy in combination with EM1, 1SHG/EM1, and 6SHG/EM1 were intraspinally injected to animals with peripheral nerve injury-induced pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI or spinal cord injury induced pain (clip compression model, SCI and tactile and cold allodynia were evaluated. AAV2/8 particles were used for gene delivery. The results demonstrated 6SHG/EM1 as the most efficient for alleviation of pain-related behavior. The effect was observed up to 8 weeks in SCI animals, suggesting the lack of tolerance of possible synergistic effect between SHG and EM1. Intrathecal injection of SHG antibody or naloxone attenuated the analgesic effect in treated animals. Biochemical and histochemical evaluation confirmed the presence of both peptides in the spinal tissue. The results of this study showed that the injection of AAV vectors encoding combined SHG/EM constructs can provide long term attenuation of pain without overt adverse side effects. This approach may provide better treatment options for

  7. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  8. Huntington disease: Experimental models and therapeutic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Sanchez, Teresa; Blanco Lezcano, Lisette; Garcia Minet, Rocio; Alberti Amador, Esteban; Diaz Armesto, Ivan and others

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a degenerative dysfunction of hereditary origin. Up to date there is not, an effective treatment to the disease which having lapsed 15 or 20 years advances inexorably, in a slow form, toward the total inability or death. This paper reviews the clinical and morphological characteristics of Huntington's disease as well as the experimental models more commonly used to study this disease, having as source the articles indexed in Medline data base, published in the last 20 years. Advantages and disadvantages of all experimental models to reproduce the disease as well as the perspectives to therapeutic assay have been also considered. the consent of outline reported about the toxic models, those induced by neurotoxins such as quinolinic acid, appears to be the most appropriate to reproduce the neuropathologic characteristic of the disease, an genetic models contributing with more evidence to the knowledge of the disease etiology. Numerous treatments ameliorate clinical manifestations, but none of them has been able to stop or diminish the affectations derived from neuronal loss. At present time it is possible to reproduce, at least partially, the characteristics of the disease in experimentation animals that allow therapy evaluation in HD. from the treatment view point, the more promissory seems to be transplantation of no neuronal cells, taking into account ethical issues and factibility. On the other hand the new technology of interference RNA emerges as a potential therapeutic tool for treatment in HD, and to respond basic questions on the development of the disease.

  9. Pulsed magnetic field enhances therapeutic efficiency of mesenchymal stem cells in chronic neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Tufan; Kurt, Akif Hakan; Altun, İdiris; Celik, Ahmet; Baran, Furkan; Gunay, Ismail

    2017-05-01

    Cell-based or magnetic field therapies as alternative approaches to pain management have been tested in several experimental pain models. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the actions of the cell-based therapy (adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells; ADMSC) or pulsed magnetic field (PMF) therapy and magneto-cell therapy (combination of ADMSC and PMF) in chronic constriction nerve injury model (CCI). The actions of individual ADMSC (route dependent [systemic or local], time-dependent [a day or a week after surgery]), or PMF and their combination (magneto-cell) therapies on hyperalgesia and allodynia were investigated by using thermal plantar test and a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer, respectively. In addition, various cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10) of rat sciatic nerve after CCI were analyzed. Following the CCI, both latency and threshold significantly decreased. ADMSC or PMF significantly increased latencies and thresholds. The combination of ADMSC with PMF even more significantly increased latency and threshold when compared with ADMSC alone. However, ADMSC-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory or increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines levels were partially prevented by PMF treatments. Present findings may suggest that both cell-based and magnetic therapies can effectively attenuate chronic neuropathic pain symptoms. Combined magneto-cell therapy may also efficiently reverse neuropathic signs. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:255-264, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Antinociception induced by atorvastatin in different pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G G; Miranda, H F; Noriega, V; Sierralta, F; Olavarría, L; Zepeda, R J; Prieto, J C

    2011-11-01

    Atorvastatin is a statin that inhibits the 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Several landmark clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of statin therapy for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is assumed that the beneficial effects of statin therapy are entirely due to cholesterol reduction. Statins have an additional activity (pleiotropic effect) that has been associated to their anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to assess the antinociceptive activity of atorvastatin in five animal pain models. The daily administration of 3-100mg/kg of atorvastatin by oral gavage induced a significant dose-dependent antinociception in the writhing, tail-flick, orofacial formalin and formalin hind paw tests. However, this antinociceptive activity of atorvastatin was detectable only at high concentrations in the hot plate assay. The data obtained in the present study demonstrates the effect of atorvastatin to reduce nociception and inflammation in different animal pain models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adjustment model of thermoluminescence experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno y Moreno, A.; Moreno B, A.

    2002-01-01

    This model adjusts the experimental results for thermoluminescence according to the equation: I (T) = I (a i * exp (-1/b i * (T-C i )) where: a i , b i , c i are the i-Th peak adjusted to a gaussian curve. The adjustments of the curve can be operated manual or analytically using the macro function and the solver.xla complement installed previously in the computational system. In this work it is shown: 1. The information of experimental data from a LiF curve obtained from the Physics Institute of UNAM which the data adjustment model is operated in the macro type. 2. A LiF curve of four peaks obtained from Harshaw information simulated in Microsoft Excel, discussed in previous works, as a reference not in macro. (Author)

  12. Effect of Experimental Hand Pain on Training-Induced Changes in Motor Performance and Corticospinal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mavromatis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pain influences plasticity within the sensorimotor system and the aim of this study was to assess the effect of pain on changes in motor performance and corticospinal excitability during training for a novel motor task. A total of 30 subjects were allocated to one of two groups (Pain, NoPain and performed ten training blocks of a visually-guided isometric pinch task. Each block consisted of 15 force sequences, and subjects modulated the force applied to a transducer in order to reach one of five target forces. Pain was induced by applying capsaicin cream to the thumb. Motor performance was assessed by a skill index that measured shifts in the speed–accuracy trade-off function. Neurophysiological measures were taken from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Overall, the Pain group performed better throughout the training (p = 0.03, but both groups showed similar improvements across training blocks (p < 0.001, and there was no significant interaction. Corticospinal excitability in the NoPain group increased halfway through the training, but this was not observed in the Pain group (Time × Group interaction; p = 0.01. These results suggest that, even when pain does not negatively impact on the acquisition of a novel motor task, it can affect training-related changes in corticospinal excitability.

  13. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs

  14. Intervertebral Foramen Injection of Ozone Relieves Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances Analgesic Effect of Gabapentin in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Jun; Yang, Fan; Yang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Jiang-Lin; Wang, Jia-Shuang; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In a 5-year follow-up study in a hospital in southern China, it was shown that intervertebral foramen (IVF) injection of ozone at the involved segmental levels could significantly alleviate paroxysmal spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in patients with chronic, intractable postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and improve the quality of life. However, so far no proof-of-concept studies in animals have been available. This study was designed to investigate whether IVF ozone has an analgesic effect on animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Experimental trial in rats. Institute for Biomedical Sciences of Pain. By IVF injection, a volume of 50 µl containing 30 µg/mL ozone-oxygen mixture or 50 µl air was carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats of naïve, inflammatory pain states produced by injections of either bee venom or complete Freud's adjuvant, and neuropathic pain state produced by spared nerve injury, respectively. The effects of IVF ozone on pain-related behaviors were evaluated for 2 weeks or one month. Then combined use of gabapentin (100 mg/1 kg body weight) with IVF ozone was evaluated in rats with neuropathic pain by intraperitoneal administration 5 days after the ozone treatment. Finally, the analgesic effects of another 4 drugs, AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), A-803467 (a selective Nav1.8 blocker), rapamycin (the mTOR inhibitor), and MGCD0103 (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) were evaluated for long term through IVF injection, respectively. (1) IVF injection of ozone at L4-5 was only effective in suppression of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain but not with inflammatory pain; (2) the analgesic effects of IVF ozone lasted much longer (> 14 days) than other selective molecular target drugs (bee venom, complete Freud's adjuvant.

  15. Experimental In Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  16. Experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, W.R.; Clark, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities based upon the use of liquid mercury samples designed to represent metal components containing discontinuities. A brief summary of past work with mercury modeling and a detailed discussion of recent experiments designed to further evaluate the technique are presented. The main disadvantages of the mercury modeling concept are that mercury is toxic and must be handled carefully, liquid mercury can only be used to represent nonferromagnetic materials, and wetting and meniscus problems can distort the effective size of artificial discontinuities. Artificial discontinuities placed in a liquid mercury sample can be used to represent discontinuities in solid metallic structures. Discontinuity size and type cannot be characterized from phase angle and signal amplitude data developed with a surface scanning, pancake-type eddy current probe. It is concluded that the mercury model approach can greatly enhance the overall understanding and applicability of eddy current inspection techniques

  17. Language and the pain experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dianne; Williams, Marie; Butler, David

    2009-03-01

    People in persistent pain have been reported to pay increased attention to specific words or descriptors of pain. The amount of attention paid to pain or cues for pain (such as pain descriptors), has been shown to be a major factor in the modulation of persistent pain. This relationship suggests the possibility that language may have a role both in understanding and managing the persistent pain experience. The aim of this paper is to describe current models of neuromatrices for pain and language, consider the role of attention in persistent pain states and highlight discrepancies, in previous studies based on the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), of the role of attention on pain descriptors. The existence of a pain neuromatrix originally proposed by Melzack (1990) has been supported by emerging technologies. Similar technologies have recently allowed identification of multiple areas of involvement for the processing of auditory input and the construction of language. As with the construction of pain, this neuromatrix for speech and language may intersect with neural systems for broader cognitive functions such as attention, memory and emotion. A systematic search was undertaken to identify experimental or review studies, which specifically investigated the role of attention on pain descriptors (as cues for pain) in persistent pain patients. A total of 99 articles were retrieved from six databases, with 66 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. After duplicated articles were eliminated, the remaining 41 articles were reviewed in order to support a link between persistent pain, pain descriptors and attention. This review revealed a diverse range of specific pain descriptors, the majority of which were derived from the MPQ. Increased attention to pain descriptors was consistently reported to be associated with emotional state as well as being a significant factor in maintaining persistent pain. However, attempts to investigate the attentional bias of specific pain

  18. The role of executive functioning in children's attentional pain control: an experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Katrien; Dick, Bruce; Eccleston, Christopher; Goubert, Liesbet; Crombez, Geert

    2014-02-01

    Directing attention away from pain is often used in children's pain treatment programs to control pain. However, empirical evidence concerning its effectiveness is inconclusive. We therefore sought to understand other influencing factors, including executive function and its role in the pain experience. This study investigates the role of executive functioning in the effectiveness of distraction. School children (n=164) completed executive functioning tasks (inhibition, switching, and working memory) and performed a cold-pressor task. One half of the children simultaneously performed a distracting tone-detection task; the other half did not. Results showed that participants in the distraction group were engaged in the distraction task and were reported to pay significantly less attention to pain than controls. Executive functioning influenced distraction task engagement. More specifically, participants with good inhibition and working memory abilities performed the distraction task better; participants with good switching abilities reported having paid more attention to the distraction task. Furthermore, distraction was found to be ineffective in reducing pain intensity and affect. Executive functioning did not influence the effectiveness of distraction. However, a relationship was found between executive functioning and pain affect, indicating that participants with good inhibition and working memory abilities experienced the cold-pressor task as less stressful and unpleasant. Our findings suggest that distraction as a process for managing pain is complex. While it appears that executive function may play a role in adult distraction, in this study it did not direct attention away from pain. It may instead be involved in the overall pain experience. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A review of the evidence linking adult attachment theory and chronic pain: presenting a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Ownsworth, Tamara; Strong, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    It is now well established that pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, affected by a gamut of psychosocial and biological variables. According to diathesis-stress models of chronic pain, some individuals are more vulnerable to developing disability following acute pain because they possess particular psychosocial vulnerabilities which interact with physical pathology to impact negatively upon outcome. Attachment theory, a theory of social and personality development, has been proposed as a comprehensive developmental model of pain, implicating individual adult attachment pattern in the ontogenesis and maintenance of chronic pain. The present paper reviews and critically appraises studies which link adult attachment theory with chronic pain. Together, these papers offer support for the role of insecure attachment as a diathesis (or vulnerability) for problematic adjustment to pain. The Attachment-Diathesis Model of Chronic Pain developed from this body of literature, combines adult attachment theory with the diathesis-stress approach to chronic pain. The evidence presented in this review, and the associated model, advances our understanding of the developmental origins of chronic pain conditions, with potential application in guiding early pain intervention and prevention efforts, as well as tailoring interventions to suit specific patient needs.

  20. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: divulgar a metodologia da indução de endometriose experimental em animais de laboratório. Método: utilizamos ratas albinas, virgens, adultas de aproximadamente três meses de idade, que foram inicialmente anestesiadas pelo éter etílico. Aberta a cavidade abdominal, identificamos os cornos uterinos e retiramos um fragmento de aproximadamente 4 cm do corno uterino direito. Esse fragmento foi mergulhado em solução fisiológica e sob lupa estereoscópica foi separado o endométrio do miométrio e feitos retângulos de aproximadamente 4 por 5 mm. Esses foram fixados por meio de fio de sutura, sobre vasos sangüíneos visíveis a olho nu, na parede lateral do abdômen, tomando-se sempre o cuidado de manter a porção do endométrio livre voltada para a luz da cavidade abdominal. Após 21 dias os animais foram novamente operados para verificarmos o tamanho dos implantes e para retirada do endométrio ectópico para análise histológica. Resultados: macroscopicamente observamos crescimento significativo dos implantes endometriais. Ao exame microscópico pudemos observar a presença de epitélio glandular e estroma semelhantes ao do endométrio tópico. Conclusões: o modelo utilizado reproduz a doença, em ratas, sendo método auxiliar de valia para estudar esta afecção, principalmente a ação de medicamentos sobre esses implantes.Purpose: to demonstrate the experimental endometriosis induction in animals. Method: we used adult female Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g anesthetized with ethyl ether to open the abdominal cavity. After identifying the uterine horns, we removed an approximately 4 cm fragment from the right uterine horn. This fragment was placed in physiological saline and, with the aid of a stereoscopic magnifying glass, the endometrium was separated from the myometrium and cut into rectangles of approximately 4 x 5 mm. These rectangles were fastened to the lateral abdominal wall near great blood vessels, taking care

  1. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...

  2. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  3. Experimental pain in human temporal muscle induced by hypertonic saline, potassium and acidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Norup, M

    1992-01-01

    chloride (n = 12) induced significantly more pain than isotonic saline (ANOVA, p less than 0.0001). Compared to control injections, hypertonic saline and potassium chloride induced a significant reduction in pressure-pain threshold (ANOVA, p less than 0.0001 and p less than 0.05). Forty-eight percent...

  4. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  5. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  6. Can multivariate models based on MOAKS predict OA knee pain? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Gómez, Carlos D.; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in the world. Knee pain is the most disabling symptom in the disease, the prediction of pain is one of the targets in preventive medicine, this can be applied to new therapies or treatments. Using the magnetic resonance imaging and the grading scales, a multivariate model based on genetic algorithms is presented. Using a predictive model can be useful to associate minor structure changes in the joint with the future knee pain. Results suggest that multivariate models can be predictive with future knee chronic pain. All models; T0, T1 and T2, were statistically significant, all p values were 0.60.

  7. Experimental data and dose-response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response relationships for radiation carcinogenesis have been of interest to biologists, modelers, and statisticians for many years. Despite his interest there are few instances in which there are sufficient experimental data to allow the fitting of various dose-response models. In those experimental systems for which data are available the dose-response curves for tumor induction for the various systems cannot be described by a single model. Dose-response models which have been observed following acute exposures to gamma rays include threshold, quadratic, and linear models. Data on sex, age, and environmental influences of dose suggest a strong role of host factors on the dose response. With decreasing dose rate the effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation tends to decrease in essentially every instance. In those cases in which the high dose rate dose response could be described by a quadratic model, the effect of dose rate is consistent with predictions based on radiation effects on the induction of initial events. Whether the underlying reasons for the observed dose-rate effect is a result of effects on the induction of initial events or is due to effects on the subsequent steps in the carcinogenic process is unknown. Information on the dose response for tumor induction for high LET (linear energy transfer) radiations such as neutrons is even more limited. The observed dose and dose rate data for tumor induction following neutron exposure are complex and do not appear to be consistent with predictions based on models for the induction of initial events

  8. Surface physics theoretical models and experimental methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mamonova, Marina V; Prudnikova, I A

    2016-01-01

    The demands of production, such as thin films in microelectronics, rely on consideration of factors influencing the interaction of dissimilar materials that make contact with their surfaces. Bond formation between surface layers of dissimilar condensed solids-termed adhesion-depends on the nature of the contacting bodies. Thus, it is necessary to determine the characteristics of adhesion interaction of different materials from both applied and fundamental perspectives of surface phenomena. Given the difficulty in obtaining reliable experimental values of the adhesion strength of coatings, the theoretical approach to determining adhesion characteristics becomes more important. Surface Physics: Theoretical Models and Experimental Methods presents straightforward and efficient approaches and methods developed by the authors that enable the calculation of surface and adhesion characteristics for a wide range of materials: metals, alloys, semiconductors, and complex compounds. The authors compare results from the ...

  9. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on experimentally induced heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaksen, Per M; Vasylenko, Olena; Fagerlund, Asbjørn J

    2014-06-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulatory technique that can affect human pain perception. Placebo effects are present in most treatments and could therefore also interact with treatment effects in tDCS. The present study investigated whether short-term tDCS reduced heat pain intensity, stress, blood pressure and increased heat pain thresholds in healthy volunteers when controlling for placebo effects. Seventy-five (37 females) participants were randomized into three groups: (1) active tDCS group receiving anodal tDCS (2 mA) for 7 min to the primary motor cortex (M1), (2) placebo group receiving the tDCS electrode montage but only active tDCS stimulation for 30 s and (3) natural history group that got no tDCS montage but the same pain stimulation as the active tDCS and the placebo group. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode attached to the left forearm. Pain intensity was significantly lower in the active tDCS group when examining change scores (pretest-posttest) for the 47 °C condition. The placebo group displayed lower pain compared with the natural history group, displaying a significant placebo effect. In the 43 and 45 °C conditions, the effect of tDCS could not be separated from placebo effects. The results revealed no effects on pain thresholds. There was a tendency that active tDCS reduced stress and systolic blood pressure, however, not significant. In sum, tDCS had an analgesic effect on high-intensity pain, but the effect of tDCS could not be separated from placebo effects for medium and low pain.

  10. Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Toward Animal Models of Irritable-Bowel Syndrome and Associated Comorbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Rachel D.; O’Mahony, Siobhain M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent. PMID:25762939

  11. Alteration of cancer pain-related signals by radiation: Proteomic analysis in an animal model with cancer bone invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jinsil; An, Jung Hee; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Un Jung; Lee, Bae Whan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Although radiotherapy is highly effective in relieving bone pain due to cancer invasion, its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore this mechanism in an animal model system. Methods and Materials: A hind paw model of cancer pain was developed by transplanting a murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-1, into the periosteal membrane of the foot dorsum of C3H/HeJ mice. Bone invasion from HCa-1 was histopathologically confirmed from sequential tumor sampling. For three experimental groups, a control (N), tumor without radiation (T), and tumor with radiation (TR), the development and level of pain were objectively examined in mice with a growing tumor by assessing pain-associated behavior. The differential expression of pain-related signals in the spinal cord was analyzed by proteomic analysis using high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry, and those of proteins by Western blotting. The pain-mediating neurotransmitters in the spinal cord were also examined by immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Results: In the histopathologic examinations, bone invasion from HCa-1 was seen from Day 7 and was evident at Day 14 after transplantation, and measurable pain-associated behaviors were developed from Day 7. After 25 Gy of radiation to the tumors, the objective level of pain in the TR group decreased, with higher thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimulation than in the T group. From the 2-DE of spinal cord, 107 spots were identified; 12 proteins were changed more than fivefold because of tumor formation but then reversed after radiation in the tumor-bearing mice. The proteins involved included secretagogin, syntenin, P2X purinoreceptor 6 (P2X6), and Ca 2+ /Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CaM kinase 1), the functions of which have been known to be involved in the Ca 2+ -signaling cascade, ATP-mediated fast synaptic transmission, or control of vesicular

  12. Alteration of cancer pain-related signals by radiation: Proteomic analysis in an animal model with cancer bone invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Jung Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Un Jung [Yonsei Medical Research Center, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bae Whan [Yonsei Medical Research Center, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Although radiotherapy is highly effective in relieving bone pain due to cancer invasion, its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore this mechanism in an animal model system. Methods and Materials: A hind paw model of cancer pain was developed by transplanting a murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-1, into the periosteal membrane of the foot dorsum of C3H/HeJ mice. Bone invasion from HCa-1 was histopathologically confirmed from sequential tumor sampling. For three experimental groups, a control (N), tumor without radiation (T), and tumor with radiation (TR), the development and level of pain were objectively examined in mice with a growing tumor by assessing pain-associated behavior. The differential expression of pain-related signals in the spinal cord was analyzed by proteomic analysis using high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry, and those of proteins by Western blotting. The pain-mediating neurotransmitters in the spinal cord were also examined by immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Results: In the histopathologic examinations, bone invasion from HCa-1 was seen from Day 7 and was evident at Day 14 after transplantation, and measurable pain-associated behaviors were developed from Day 7. After 25 Gy of radiation to the tumors, the objective level of pain in the TR group decreased, with higher thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimulation than in the T group. From the 2-DE of spinal cord, 107 spots were identified; 12 proteins were changed more than fivefold because of tumor formation but then reversed after radiation in the tumor-bearing mice. The proteins involved included secretagogin, syntenin, P2X purinoreceptor 6 (P2X6), and Ca{sup 2+}/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CaM kinase 1), the functions of which have been known to be involved in the Ca{sup 2+}-signaling cascade, ATP-mediated fast synaptic transmission, or control of

  13. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  14. Experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasteghin K.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Propose a new experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits after partial bladder obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty North Folk male rabbits, weighting 1,700 to 2,820 g (mean: 2,162 g were studied. The animals were distributed in 2 experimental groups, formed by 15 rabbits each: Group 1 - clinical control. In this group there was no surgical intervention; Group 2 - bladder outlet obstruction. In this group, after anesthetizing the animal, urethral cannulation with Foley catheter 10F was performed and then an adjustable plastic bracelet was passed around the bladder neck. It was then adjusted in order to not constrict the urethra. The following parameters were studied in M1 - pre-operative period; M2 - 4 weeks post-operatively moments: 1- urine culture; 2- cystometric study; 3- serum creatinine and BUN. RESULTS: Bladder weight was 2.5 times larger in the group with obstruction than in the control group. Cystometric evaluation showed a significant increase in maximal vesical volume in the final moment at Group G2. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups studied. There was no statistically significant difference between maximal detrusor pressure and vesical compliance in the different moments or in the studied groups. There was an absence of uninhibited detrusor contractions in all the animals in group 1, and involuntary contractions were detected in 93% of group 2 animals. There was no significant variation in BUN and serum creatinine either among the groups or in the same group. CONCLUSIONS: We observed in the group with obstruction a bladder weight 2.5 higher than normal bladders. We detected involuntary contractions in 93% of the animals in group 2, establishing this experimental model as appropriate to secondary bladder instability and partial bladder outlet obstruction.

  15. The effects of patient-professional partnerships on the self-management and health outcomes for patients with chronic back pain : a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yu; Yu, Ge; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kath; Closs, S. José

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-management may be a lifelong task for patients with chronic back pain. Research suggests that chronic pain self-management programmes have beneficial effects on patients? health outcome. Contemporary pain management theories and models also suggest that a good patient-professional partnership enhances patients? ability to self-manage their condition.

  16. Efficacy and safety of PPC-5650 on experimental rectal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine

    2015-01-01

    PPC-5650 is a new pharmacological agent that can modulate acid-sensing ion channel activity, leading to a reduction in the pain signal under up-regulated conditions. The non-clinical programme for PPC-5650 supported a role for this novel agent in the treatment of pain in patients with irritable...... bowel syndrome (IBS). In patients with IBS, the aims of the study were: (1) to assess the efficacy of a single bolus of PPC-5650 locally applied in the rectum using multi-modal stimulations of the recto sigmoid and (2) to assess the safety profile of PPC-5650. The study was a randomized, double......-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in patients with IBS, excluding females of child-bearing potential. The study consisted of a training visit, study visit 1 and 2 and a follow-up visit. Rectosigmoid electrical, thermal and mechanical stimulations were performed, pain perception was rated on a pain...

  17. The Effect of Intrathecal Administration of Muscimol on Modulation of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Resulting from Spinal Cord Injury; an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Hosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuropathic pain can be very difficult to treat and it is one of the important medical challenging about pain treatments. Muscimol as a new agonist of gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAA have been introduced for pain management. Thus, the present study was performed to evaluate the pain alleviating effect of intrathecal injection of different doses of muscimol as GABAA receptor agonist in spinal cord injury (SCI model of neuropathic pain. Methods: In the present experimental study male Wistar rats were treated by muscimol 0.01, 0.1 or 1 µg/10ul, intrathecally (i.t. three weeks after induction of spinal cord injury using compression injury model. Neuropathic pain symptoms were assessed at before treatment, 15 minutes, one hour and three hours after muscimol administration. The time of peak effect and optimum dosage was assessed by repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance, respectively. Results: Muscimol with the dose of 0.01 µg in 15 minutes caused to improve the thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.6; p<0.001, mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 7.8; p<0.001, cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.96; p<0.001, and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 15.7; p<0.001. The effect of doses of 0.1 µg and 1 µg were also significant. In addition, the efficacy of different doses of muscimol didn't have difference on thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.52; p= 0.24, mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.3; p= -0.75, cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.8; p= -0.56, and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.75; p= 0.86. Conclusion: The finding of the present study revealed that using muscimol with doses of 0.01µg, 0.1µg, and 1 µg reduces the symptoms of neuropathic pain. Also the effect of GABAA agonist is short term and its effectiveness gradually decreases by time.

  18. The role of pain behaviour and family caregiver responses in the link between pain catastrophising and pain intensity : A moderated mediation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the mediating role of pain behaviours in the association between pain catastrophising and pain intensity and explored the moderating role of family caregivers’ responses to pain in the link between pain behaviours and pain intensity. Methods: The sample consisted

  19. The role of pain behaviour and family caregiver responses in the link between pain catastrophising and pain intensity : A moderated mediation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the mediating role of pain behaviours in the association between pain catastrophising and pain intensity and explored the moderating role of family caregivers' responses to pain in the link between pain behaviours and pain intensity. Methods: The sample consisted

  20. The β-lactam clavulanic acid mediates glutamate transport-sensitive pain relief in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P J; Gegelashvili, G; Munro, G

    2017-01-01

    -regulates glutamate transporters both in vitro and in vivo. Crucially, a similar up-regulation of glutamate transporters in human spinal astrocytes by clavulanic acid supports the development of novel β-lactam-based analgesics, devoid of antibacterial activity, for the clinical treatment of chronic pain.......BACKGROUND: Following nerve injury, down-regulation of astroglial glutamate transporters (GluTs) with subsequent extracellular glutamate accumulation is a key factor contributing to hyperexcitability within the spinal dorsal horn. Some β-lactam antibiotics can up-regulate GluTs, one of which......, ceftriaxone, displays analgesic effects in rodent chronic pain models. METHODS: Here, the antinociceptive actions of another β-lactam clavulanic acid, which possesses negligible antibiotic activity, were compared with ceftriaxone in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain...

  1. Experimental Oral Candidiasis in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Yuthika H.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2001-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkeys with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral candidiasis. Nonetheless, an ideal, relatively inexpensive model representative of the human oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data. PMID:11292645

  2. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  3. Hypnosis and Local Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief-Alternative or Adjunct Therapy?-A Randomized, Clinical-Experimental Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Callaway, Angelika; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical crossover trial was designed to compare hypnosis and local anesthesia for experimental dental pain relief. Pain thresholds of the dental pulp were determined. A targeted standardized pain stimulus was applied and rated on the Visual Analogue Scale (0-10). The pain threshold was lower under hypnosis (58.3 ± 17.3, p local anesthesia. The pain stimulus was scored higher under hypnosis (3.9 ± 3.8) than with local anesthesia (0.0, p Local anesthesia was superior to hypnosis and is a safe and effective method for pain relief in dentistry. Hypnosis seems to produce similar effects observed under sedation. It can be used in addition to local anesthesia and in individual cases as an alternative for pain control in dentistry.

  4. Pediatric Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain: Foundation, Application and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon JG Asmundson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fear-avoidance model of chronic musculoskeletal pain has become an increasingly popular conceptualization of the processes and mechanisms through which acute pain can become chronic. Despite rapidly growing interest and research regarding the influence of fear-avoidance constructs on pain-related disability in children and adolescents, there have been no amendments to the model to account for unique aspects of pediatric chronic pain. A comprehensive understanding of the role of fear-avoidance in pediatric chronic pain necessitates understanding of both child/adolescent and parent factors implicated in its development and maintenance. The primary purpose of the present article is to propose an empirically-based pediatric fear-avoidance model of chronic pain that accounts for both child/adolescent and parent factors as well as their potential interactive effects. To accomplish this goal, the present article will define important fear-avoidance constructs, provide a summary of the general fear-avoidance model and review the growing empirical literature regarding the role of fear-avoidance constructs in pediatric chronic pain. Assessment and treatment options for children with chronic pain will also be described in the context of the proposed pediatric fear-avoidance model of chronic pain. Finally, avenues for future investigation will be proposed.

  5. Experimental and theoretical requirements for fuel modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatesoupe, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    From a scientific point of view it may be considered that any event in the life of a fuel pin under irradiation should be perfectly well understood and foreseen from that deterministic point of view, the whole behaviour of the pin maybe analysed and dismantled with a specific function for every component part and each component part related to one basic phenomenon which can be independently studied on pure physical grounds. When extracted from the code structure the subroutine is studied for itself by specialists who try to keep as close as possible to the physics involved in the phenomenon; that often leads to an impressive luxury in details and a subsequent need for many unavailable input data. It might seem more secure to follow that approach since it tries to be firmly based on theoretical grounds. One should think so if the phenomenological situation in the pin were less complex than it is. The codes would not be adequate for off-normal operating conditions since for the accidental transient conditions the key-phenomena would not be the same as for steady-state or slow transient conditions. The orientation given to fuel modelling is based on our two main technological constraints which are: no fuel melting; no cladding failure; no excessive cladding deformation. In this context, the only relevant models are those which have a significant influence on the maximum temperatures in the fuel or on the cladding damage hence the selection between key models and irrelevant models which will next be done. A rather pragmatic view is kept on codification with a special focus on a few determinant aspects of fuel behaviour and no attention to models which are nothing but decorative. Fuel modeling is merely considered as a link between experimental knowledge; it serves as a guide for further improvements in fuel design and as so happens to be quite useful. On this basis the main lacks in of fuel behaviour is described. These are mainly concerning: thermal transfer through

  6. Experimental study and modelling of transient boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A failure in the control system of the power of a nuclear reactor can lead to a Reactivity Initiated Accident in a nuclear power plant. Then, a power peak occurs in some fuel rods, high enough to lead to the coolant film boiling. It leads to an important increase of the temperature of the rod. The possible risk of the clad failure is a matter of interest for the Institut de Radioprotection et de Securite Nucleaire. The transient boiling heat transfer is not yet understood and modelled. An experimental set-up has been built at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT). Subcooled HFE-7000 flows vertically upward in a semi annulus test section. The inner half cylinder simulates the clad and is made of a stainless steel foil, heated by Joule effect. Its temperature is measured by an infrared camera, coupled with a high speed camera for the visualization of the flow topology. The whole boiling curve is studied in steady state and transient regimes: convection, onset of boiling, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, film boiling and rewetting. The steady state heat transfers are well modelled by literature correlations. Models are suggested for the transient heat flux: the convection and nucleate boiling evolutions are self-similar during a power step. This observation allows to model more complex evolutions, as temperature ramps. The transient Hsu model well represents the onset of nucleate boiling. When the intensity of the power step increases, the film boiling begins at the same temperature but with an increasing heat flux. For power ramps, the critical heat flux decreases while the corresponding temperature increases with the heating rate. When the wall is heated, the film boiling heat transfer is higher than in steady state but it is not understood. A two-fluid model well simulates the cooling film boiling and the rewetting. (author)

  7. Longitudinal Structural and Functional Brain Network Alterations in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Falfán-Melgoza, Claudia; Leixner, Sarah; Becker, Robert; Singaravelu, Sathish Kumar; Sack, Markus; Sartorius, Alexander; Spanagel, Rainer; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang

    2018-04-22

    Neuropathic pain affects multiple brain functions, including motivational processing. However, little is known about the structural and functional brain changes involved in the transition from an acute to a chronic pain state. Here we combined behavioral phenotyping of pain thresholds with multimodal neuroimaging to longitudinally monitor changes in brain metabolism, structure and connectivity using the spared nerve injury (SNI) mouse model of chronic neuropathic pain. We investigated stimulus-evoked pain responses prior to SNI surgery, and one and twelve weeks following surgery. A progressive development and potentiation of stimulus-evoked pain responses (cold and mechanical allodynia) were detected during the course of pain chronification. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated striking decreases in volume following pain induction in all brain sites assessed - an effect that reversed over time. Similarly, all global and local network changes that occurred following pain induction disappeared over time, with two notable exceptions: the nucleus accumbens, which played a more dominant role in the global network in a chronic pain state and the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, which showed lower connectivity. These changes in connectivity were accompanied by enhanced glutamate levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex. We suggest that hippocampal hyperexcitability may contribute to alterations in synaptic plasticity within the nucleus accumbens, and to pain chronification. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing a model for measuring fear of pain in Norwegian samples: The Fear of Pain Questionnaire Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vambheim, Sara M; Lyby, Peter Solvoll; Aslaksen, Per M

    2017-01-01

    Fear of pain is highly correlated with pain report and physiological measures of arousal when pain is inflicted. The Fear of Pain Questionnaire III (FPQ-III) and The Fear of Pain Questionnaire Short Form (FPQ-SF) are self-report inventories developed for assessment of fear of pain (FOP). A previous...

  9. Comparison of QuadrapolarTM radiofrequency lesions produced by standard versus modified technique: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safakish R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramin Safakish Allevio Pain Management Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Lower back pain (LBP is a global public health issue and is associated with substantial financial costs and loss of quality of life. Over the years, different literature has provided different statistics regarding the causes of the back pain. The following statistic is the closest estimation regarding our patient population. The sacroiliac (SI joint pain is responsible for LBP in 18%–30% of individuals with LBP. Quadrapolar™ radiofrequency ablation, which involves ablation of the nerves of the SI joint using heat, is a commonly used treatment for SI joint pain. However, the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency procedure is not always effective at ablating all the sensory nerves that cause the pain in the SI joint. One of the major limitations of the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency procedure is that it produces small lesions of ~4 mm in diameter. Smaller lesions increase the likelihood of failure to ablate all nociceptive input. In this study, we compare the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency ablation technique to a modified Quadrapolar ablation technique that has produced improved patient outcomes in our clinic. The methodology of the two techniques are compared. In addition, we compare results from an experimental model comparing the lesion sizes produced by the two techniques. Taken together, the findings from this study suggest that the modified Quadrapolar technique provides longer lasting relief for the back pain that is caused by SI joint dysfunction. A randomized controlled clinical trial is the next step required to quantify the difference in symptom relief and quality of life produced by the two techniques. Keywords: lower back pain, radiofrequency ablation, sacroiliac joint, Quadrapolar radiofrequency ablation

  10. Effects of perceived and exerted pain control on neural activity during pain relief in experimental heat hyperalgesia: a fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, C; Leyendecker, S; Petersen, D; Helmchen, C

    2012-04-01

    Perceived control over pain can attenuate pain perception by mechanisms of endogenous pain control and emotional reappraisal irrespective of whether this control is exerted or only perceived. Self-initiated termination of pain elicits different expectations of subsequent pain relief as compared to perceived pain control. It is unknown whether and how this perceived vs. exerted control on pain differs and affects subsequent pain relief. Using fMRI, we studied two factors of pain control on pain relief: the (i) sense of control (perceived control but no execution) and (ii) the execution of control (exerted control). To account for the impact of factual execution of pain control on pain relief we applied bearable short and hardly bearable long contact-heat stimuli which were applied either controllable or not. Using controllability as factor, there was dissociable neural activity during pain relief: following the perceived control condition neural activity was found in the orbitofrontal and mediofrontal cortex and, following the exerted control condition, in the anterolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. We conclude that (i) pain controllability has an impact on pain relief and (ii) the prefrontal cortex shows dissociable neural activity during pain relief following exerted vs. perceived pain control. This might reflect the higher grade of uncertainty during pain relief following perceived pain control mediated by the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex and processes of working memory and updating expectations during pain relief following exerted control mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  11. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  12. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  13. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown

  14. Abnormal muscle afferent function in a model of Taxol chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite muscle pain being a well-described symptom in patients with diverse forms of peripheral neuropathy, the role of neuropathic mechanisms in muscle pain have received remarkably little attention. We have recently demonstrated in a well-established model of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy (CIPN) that the anti-tumor drug paclitaxel (Taxol) produces mechanical hyperalgesia in skeletal muscle, of similar time course to and with shared mechanism with cutaneous symptoms. In the present...

  15. Gastroprotective effect of Senecio candicans DC on experimental ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasath, Lakshmanan; Raman, Jegadeesh; Nanjian, Raaman

    2012-03-06

    Senecio candicans DC (Asteraceae) is used as a remedy for gastric ulcer and stomach pain in the Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu for which no scientific evidence exists. The present study was performed to evaluate the gastroprotective effects and acute oral toxicity of aqueous leaf extract of Senecio candicans (AESC) in experimental models. The antiulcerogenic activity of AESC was performed in two different ulcer models viz., pylorus-ligated model and ethanol-induced model using Wistar albino rats. Acute toxicity study was also performed to get information on the admissible dose for treatment of ulcer. Preliminary phytochemical screening of AESC was performed to find the active principles present, which are thus responsible for the antiulcerogenic activity. DPPH assay was performed to confirm the antioxidant activity of AESC. The acute toxicity study did not show any mortality up to 2500mg/kg b.w. of AESC. Both the ulcer models showed gastroprotective effect comparable to that of the standard Omeprazole. The results of antioxidant enzymes, histopathology sections, ATPase and mucus content of gastric secretion showed that several mechanisms are involved in the gastroprotective effect. The preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and steroids in AESC. The DPPH assay confirmed the antioxidant activity of AESC. The traditional consumption of AESC for the treatment of gastric ulcer is thus true, the antioxidant constituents present in the extract plays a major role in the gastroprotective activity, but since Senecio species are known for the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, a detailed study in future is required to describe the safe dose for a prolonged period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison of the antinociceptive effects of xylazine, detomidine and romifidine on experimental pain in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Yves; Lanz, Francisca; Doherr, Marcus G; Schatzmann, Urs

    2003-07-01

    To study the analgesic potency of the alpha2-agonist romifidine in the horse using both an electrical current and a mechanical pressure model for nociceptive threshold testing. In addition, a comparison was made with doses of detomidine and xylazine that produce equivalent degrees of sedation. Randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded cross-over study. Six adult Swiss warmblood horses, one mare and five geldings, weighing from 530 to 650 kg and aged 6-15 years. Nociceptive thresholds were measured using an electrical stimulus applied to the coronary band and using a pneumatically operated pin pressing on the cannon bone. Measurements were made immediately before and every 15 minutes for 2 hours after IV injection of the test substances. Lifting of the foot indicated the test end point. The three alpha2-agonists caused a temporary increase in nociceptive thresholds with a maximal effect within 15 minutes and a return to baseline levels within 1 hour. Using electrical current testing nociceptive thresholds were significantly different from placebo (mean +/- SD) for detomidine at 15 minutes (from control 5.8 +/- 0.9 to 23.3 +/- 3.9 mA, p = 0.0066) and 30 minutes (from control 6.6 +/- 1.1 to 18.8 +/- 3.3 mA, p = 0.0091). The difference was significant for romifidine at 15 minutes only (from control 5.8 +/- 0.9 to 18.7 +/- 3.8 mA, p = 0.0066). With mechanical pressure testing nociceptive thresholds were significantly different from control for detomidine at 15 minutes (from 3.2 +/- 0.2 to 6.2 +/- 0.5 N, p = 0.00076) and 30 minutes (from 3.2 +/- 0.7 to 5.7 +/- 0.8 N, p = 0.0167). The difference was significant for xylazine at 15 minutes (from control 3.2 +/- 0.2 to 5.6 +/- 0.7 N, p = 0.0079). At 15 minutes the order of magnitude of the measured antinociceptive effect was significantly different between the two pain tests for both romifidine and detomidine, but not for xylazine. For romifidine, the increase of mean thresholds compared to placebo was 4.0 +/- 1.3 times

  17. Behavioral, medical imaging and histopathological features of a new rat model of bone cancer pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Doré-Savard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pre-clinical bone cancer pain models mimicking the human condition are required to respond to clinical realities. Breast or prostate cancer patients coping with bone metastases experience intractable pain, which affects their quality of life. Advanced monitoring is thus required to clarify bone cancer pain mechanisms and refine treatments. In our model of rat femoral mammary carcinoma MRMT-1 cell implantation, pain onset and tumor growth were monitored for 21 days. The surgical procedure performed without arthrotomy allowed recording of incidental pain in free-moving rats. Along with the gradual development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, behavioral signs of ambulatory pain were detected at day 14 by using a dynamic weight-bearing apparatus. Osteopenia was revealed from day 14 concomitantly with disorganization of the trabecular architecture (µCT. Bone metastases were visualized as early as day 8 by MRI (T(1-Gd-DTPA before pain detection. PET (Na(18F co-registration revealed intra-osseous activity, as determined by anatomical superimposition over MRI in accordance with osteoclastic hyperactivity (TRAP staining. Pain and bone destruction were aggravated with time. Bone remodeling was accompanied by c-Fos (spinal and ATF3 (DRG neuronal activation, sustained by astrocyte (GFAP and microglia (Iba1 reactivity in lumbar spinal cord. Our animal model demonstrates the importance of simultaneously recording pain and tumor progression and will allow us to better characterize therapeutic strategies in the future.

  18. An improved model of heat-induced hyperalgesia--repetitive phasic heat pain causing primary hyperalgesia to heat and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and light touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Tim P; Sawatzki, Alexander; Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (-31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (-59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (-59%) were significantly reduced (all pheat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input.

  19. Quantifying and Characterizing Tonic Thermal Pain Across Subjects From EEG Data Using Random Forest Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Vishal; Case, Michelle; Shirinpour, Sina; He, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Effective pain assessment and management strategies are needed to better manage pain. In addition to self-report, an objective pain assessment system can provide a more complete picture of the neurophysiological basis for pain. In this study, a robust and accurate machine learning approach is developed to quantify tonic thermal pain across healthy subjects into a maximum of ten distinct classes. A random forest model was trained to predict pain scores using time-frequency wavelet representations of independent components obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) data, and the relative importance of each frequency band to pain quantification is assessed. The mean classification accuracy for predicting pain on an independent test subject for a range of 1-10 is 89.45%, highest among existing state of the art quantification algorithms for EEG. The gamma band is the most important to both intersubject and intrasubject classification accuracy. The robustness and generalizability of the classifier are demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the potential of this tool to be used clinically to help us to improve chronic pain treatment and establish spectral biomarkers for future pain-related studies using EEG.

  20. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  1. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53–3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall. (paper)

  2. The effect of spinal manipulation on deep experimental muscle pain in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Søvde, Beate

    2015-01-01

    individuals. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Local, para-spinal muscle pain was induced by injection of 0.5 ml sterile, hyper-tonic saline on two separate occasions 1 week apart. Immediately following the injection, treatment was administered as either a) HVLA-manipulation or b) placebo treatment, in a randomized...

  3. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Secher, EL; Skram, U

    2013-01-01

    Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than μ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore...... to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending...... pain modulation....

  4. Addicted to Pain: A Preliminary Model of Sexual Masochism as Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Holly; Ronel, Natti

    2017-11-01

    An exploratory, qualitative, phenomenological study focused on the experience of pain while participating in sexual masochistic acts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine individuals (four female, five male) who regularly participate in sexually masochistic acts and point to pain as central to their experience. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed several key characteristics of the participant's experience: the first time, intoxication, craving and withdrawal, tolerance, pain as control, and the pain inducing partner. The findings indicate that the way pain is experienced while mitigated through masochistic behavior creates an addictive process that coincides with a chronic behavioral spin contextualization. This article presents a preliminary model of addiction to physical pain in light of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) definition of substance-related and addictive disorders and the behavioral spin theory.

  5. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  6. Jaw-motor effects of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress in patients with deep bite and matched control subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    clenching, during evoked pain and stress between deep bite patients and controls was investigated. DESIGN: In 30 deep bite patients and in 30 sex-/age-matched controls with neutral occlusion EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from masseter and anterior temporalis muscles before and during evoked pain......OBJECTIVE: The effect of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress on masticatory muscle activity in TMD-patients has been discussed. Furthermore, associations between TMD and deep bite patients have been studied. Accordingly in the present study, comparison of EMG responses at rest, maximal...... and before and during a stress task. Evoked pain was induced by injections of glutamate into the masseter (local pain) and brachioradialis (remote pain) muscles and resting EMG activity was recorded before and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10min. A precision task was used to simulate a stressful condition and EMG...

  7. Patient-Clinician Communication About Pain: A Conceptual Model and Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Matthias, Marianne S

    2018-02-01

    Productive patient-clinician communication is an important component of effective pain management, but we know little about how patients and clinicians actually talk about pain in clinical settings and how it might be improved to produce better patient outcomes. The objective of this review was to create a conceptual model of patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain, review and synthesize empirical research in this area, and identify priorities for future research. A conceptual model was developed that drew on existing pain and health communication research. CINAHL, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched to find studies reporting empirical data on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain; results were supplemented with manual searches. Studies were categorized and analyzed to identify crosscutting themes and inform model development. The conceptual model comprised the following components: contextual factors, clinical interaction, attitudes and beliefs, and outcomes. Thirty-nine studies met inclusion criteria and were analyzed based on model components. Studies varied widely in quality, methodology, and sample size. Two provisional conclusions were identified: contrary to what is often reported in the literature, discussions about analgesics are most frequently characterized by patient-clinician agreement, and self-presentation during patient-clinician interactions plays an important role in communication about pain and opioids. Published studies on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain are few and diverse. The conceptual model presented here can help to identify knowledge gaps and guide future research on communication about pain. Investigating the links between communication and pain-related outcomes is an important priority for future research. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Standard Model theory calculations and experimental tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.

    2015-01-01

    To present knowledge, all the physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be described in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed the newly discovered Higgs boson with a mass close to 125 GeV seems to confirm the predictions of the SM. Thus, besides looking for direct manifestations of the physics beyond the SM, one of the primary missions of the LHC is to perform ever more stringent tests of the SM. This requires not only improved theoretical developments to produce testable predictions and provide experiments with reliable event generators, but also sophisticated analyses techniques to overcome the formidable experimental environment of the LHC and perform precision measurements. In the first section, we describe the state of the art of the theoretical tools and event generators that are used to provide predictions for the production cross sections of the processes of interest. In section 2, inclusive cross section measurements with jets, leptons and vector bosons are presented. Examples of differential cross sections, charge asymmetries and the study of lepton pairs are proposed in section 3. Finally, in section 4, we report studies on the multiple production of gauge bosons and constraints on anomalous gauge couplings

  9. IVIM: modeling, experimental validation and application to animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournet, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis is centered on the study of the IVIM ('Intravoxel Incoherent Motion') MRI sequence. This sequence allows for the study of the blood microvasculature such as the capillaries, arterioles and venules. To be sensitive only to moving groups of spins, diffusion gradients are added before and after the 180 degrees pulse of a spin echo (SE) sequence. The signal component corresponding to spins diffusing in the tissue can be separated from the one related to spins travelling in the blood vessels which is called the IVIM signal. These two components are weighted by f IVIM which represents the volume fraction of blood inside the tissue. The IVIM signal is usually modelled by a mono-exponential (ME) function and characterized by a pseudo-diffusion coefficient, D*. We propose instead a bi-exponential IVIM model consisting of a slow pool, characterized by F slow and D* slow corresponding to the capillaries as in the ME model, and a fast pool, characterized by F fast and D* fast, related to larger vessels such as medium-size arterioles and venules. This model was validated experimentally and more information was retrieved by comparing the experimental signals to a dictionary of simulated IVIM signals. The influence of the pulse sequence, the repetition time and the diffusion encoding time was also studied. Finally, the IVIM sequence was applied to the study of an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. (author) [fr

  10. Motivational and behavioural models of change: A longitudinal analysis of change among men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, J; Richardson, C; Morris, J; Robinson, G; Schofield, M B

    2017-09-01

    Motivational and behavioural models of adjustment to chronic pain make different predictions about change processes, which can be tested in longitudinal analyses. We examined changes in motivation, coping and acceptance among 78 men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain. Using cross-lagged regression analyses of changes from baseline to 6 months as predictors of changes from 6 to 12 months, with supplementary structural equation modelling, we tested two models in which motivational changes influence behavioural changes, and one in which behavioural changes influence motivational changes. Changes in motivation to self-manage pain influenced later changes in pain coping, consistent with the motivational model of pain self-management, and also influenced later changes in activity engagement, the behavioural component of pain acceptance. Changes in activity engagement influenced later changes in pain willingness, consistent with the behavioural model of pain acceptance. Based on the findings, a combined model of changes in pain self-management and acceptance is proposed, which could guide combined interventions based on theories of motivation, coping and acceptance in chronic pain. This study adds longitudinal evidence about sequential change processes; a test of the motivational model of pain self-management; and tests of behavioural versus motivational models of pain acceptance. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  11. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L.S.; Christiansen, P.; Raundahl, U.

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...... and serum cortisol did not increase at all in any of the groups. As a measure of parasympathetic neural activity, independent of sympathetic neural activity, the beat-to-beat variation of the heart rate was calculated. The functional patients had a significantly higher beat-to-beat variation expressed...... as the mean square successive differences of the R-R intervals (MSSD), indicating a higher basal parasympathetic neural activity (mean MSSD +/- SEM = 64 +/- 6 msec in the functional group, 46 +/- 6 msec in the healthy group, and 49 +/- 6 msec in the organic group; P = 0.03). A reduced sympathetic neural...

  12. The effects of anger and sadness on clinical pain reports and experimentally-induced pain thresholds in women with and without fibromyalgia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, H. van; Lumley, M.A.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Geenen, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Negative emotions are commonly experienced in fibromyalgia and may affect pain. This study examined the effects of anger and sadness on clinical pain reports and on pain threshold and tolerance in response to electrical stimulation in women with and without fibromyalgia. METHODS: In an

  13. The structural model of pain, cognitive strategies, and negative emotions in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Mazaheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs may use specific coping strategies. We intend to provide a mediating role of the relationship between pain (intensity and acceptance, cognitive emotion regulation strategies, and negative emotions in patients with FGIDs. Materials and Methods: Participants were 176 inpatients, all experiencing significant FGIDs symptomatology as confirmed by gastroenterologists. Patients completed data on cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire, short form of depression, anxiety, stress scale, chronic pain acceptance questionnaire-revised, and pain intensity scale. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling method. Results: The pain intensity had significantly direct effect on cognitive emotion regulation strategies and indirect effect on negative emotions. Besides, the mediating role of negative emotions in the relationship between the strategies and pain acceptance were supported, whereas indirect relationships between pain intensity and acceptance through cognitive strategies were not confirmed. Conclusion: The results of the study emphasize the role of pain intensity in the development of negative emotions through cognitive strategies and the role of the strategies in pain acceptance through negative emotions. In fact, cognitive strategies to be related to pain and emotions.

  14. Pain Intervention for people with Dementia in nursing homes (PID): study protocol for a quasi-experimental nurse intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppitz, Andrea; Bosshard, Georg; Blanc, Geneviève; Hediger, Hannele; Payne, Sheila; Volken, Thomas

    2017-04-21

    It is estimated that 19 to 83% of people with dementia suffer from pain that is inadequately treated in the last months of life. A large number of healthcare workers who care for these people in nursing homes lack appropriate expertise and may therefore not always recognise, assess and treat pain in those with dementia who have complex problems on time, properly and efficiently. The aim of this intervention trial is to identify care needs of people with dementia suffering from pain living in a nursing home. A quasi-experimental nurse-led intervention trial based on a convenience sample of four nursing homes in the Swiss Canton of Zurich examines the effects on dementia patients (n = 411), the healthcare institution and the qualification level of the healthcare workers compared to historical controls, using an event analysis and a multilevel analysis. Healthcare workers will be individually trained how to assess, intervene and evaluate acute and chronic pain. There are three data-monitoring cycles (T0, T1, T2) and two intervention cycles (I1, I2) with a total study duration of 425 days. There is also a process evaluation based on Dobbins analyses that analyse in particular the potentials for change in clinical practice of change agents. The aim of the intervention trial is to improve pain management strategies in older people with dementia in nursing homes. Clinically significant findings will be expected that will help reduce suffering in the sense of "total pain" for people with dementia. The joint intra- and interdisciplinary collaboration between practice and supply-oriented (nursing) research will have both a lasting effect on the efficiency measurement and provide scientifically sound results. Nursing homes can integrate the findings from the intervention trial into their internal quality control process. The potential for improvements can be directly influenced by the nursing home itself. Registration trial number: DRKS00009726 on DRKS, registered 10

  15. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  16. Multivariate prognostic modeling of persistent pain following lumbar discectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2013-03-04

    Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) affects between 10% and 50% of surgical patients, the development of which is a complex and poorly understood process. To date, most studies on PPSP have focused on specific surgical procedures where individuals do not suffer from chronic pain before the surgical intervention. Individuals who have a chronic nerve injury are likely to have established peripheral and central sensitization which may increase the risk of developing PPSP. Concurrent analyses of the possible factors contributing to the development of PPSP following lumbar discectomy have not been examined.

  17. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca Jounger, Sofia; Christidis, Nikolaos; Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Schalling, Martin; Ernberg, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613) and HTR3B (rs1176744). First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL) into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL) and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline) followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL). Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023), but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A) (P = 0.015) and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B) (P = 0.019). Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A) genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041) and area (P = 0.005), and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B) had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030), duration (P = 0.030) and area compared to men (P = 0.017). In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

  18. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Louca Jounger

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613 and HTR3B (rs1176744. First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL. Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023, but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A (P = 0.015 and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B (P = 0.019. Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P < 0.05, but the SNPs did not in general influence the efficacy of granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041 and area (P = 0.005, and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030, duration (P = 0.030 and area compared to men (P = 0.017. In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

  19. A theory-based educational intervention targeting nurses' attitudes and knowledge concerning cancer-related pain management: A study protocol of a quasi-experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Markus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most frequent problems among patients diagnosed with cancer. Despite the availability of effective pharmacological treatments, this group of patients often receives less than optimal treatment. Research into nurses' pain management highlights certain factors, such as lack of knowledge and attitudes and inadequate procedures for systematic pain assessment, as common barriers to effective pain management. However, educational interventions targeting nurses' pain management have shown promise. As cancer-related pain is also known to have a negative effect on vital aspects of the patient's life, as well as being commonly associated with problems such as sleep, fatigue, depression and anxiety, further development of knowledge within this area is warranted. Methods/design A quasi-experimental study design will be used to investigate whether the implementation of guidelines for systematic daily pain assessments following a theory-based educational intervention will result in an improvement in knowledge and attitude among nurses. A further aim is to investigate whether the intervention that targets nurses' behaviour will improve hospital patients' perception of pain. Data regarding nurses' knowledge and attitudes to pain (primary outcome, patient perception regarding pain (secondary outcome, together with socio-demographic variables, will be collected at baseline and at four weeks and 12 weeks following the intervention. Discussion Nursing care is nowadays acknowledged as an increasingly complicated activity and "nursing complexity is such that it can be seen as the quintessential complex intervention." To be able to change and improve clinical practice thus requires multiple points of attack appropriate to meet complex challenges. Consequently, we expect the theory-based intervention used in our quasi-experimental study to improve care as well as quality of life for this group of patients and we also envisage that

  20. A theory-based educational intervention targeting nurses' attitudes and knowledge concerning cancer-related pain management: a study protocol of a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borglin, Gunilla; Gustafsson, Markus; Krona, Hans

    2011-09-23

    Pain is one of the most frequent problems among patients diagnosed with cancer. Despite the availability of effective pharmacological treatments, this group of patients often receives less than optimal treatment. Research into nurses' pain management highlights certain factors, such as lack of knowledge and attitudes and inadequate procedures for systematic pain assessment, as common barriers to effective pain management. However, educational interventions targeting nurses' pain management have shown promise. As cancer-related pain is also known to have a negative effect on vital aspects of the patient's life, as well as being commonly associated with problems such as sleep, fatigue, depression and anxiety, further development of knowledge within this area is warranted. A quasi-experimental study design will be used to investigate whether the implementation of guidelines for systematic daily pain assessments following a theory-based educational intervention will result in an improvement in knowledge and attitude among nurses. A further aim is to investigate whether the intervention that targets nurses' behaviour will improve hospital patients' perception of pain. Data regarding nurses' knowledge and attitudes to pain (primary outcome), patient perception regarding pain (secondary outcome), together with socio-demographic variables, will be collected at baseline and at four weeks and 12 weeks following the intervention. Nursing care is nowadays acknowledged as an increasingly complicated activity and "nursing complexity is such that it can be seen as the quintessential complex intervention." To be able to change and improve clinical practice thus requires multiple points of attack appropriate to meet complex challenges. Consequently, we expect the theory-based intervention used in our quasi-experimental study to improve care as well as quality of life for this group of patients and we also envisage that evidence-based guidelines targeting this patient group's pain

  1. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  2. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Since then, the theory has been experimentally verified to a ... Despite the fact that SM has unravelled the gauge origin of fundamental forces and the structure of Universe while successfully confronting numerous ...

  3. Evaluation of the Effect of Duration on the Efficacy of Pulsed Radiofrequency in an Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzy, Eiad A; Khalil, Khaled I; Nour, Eman M; Hamed, Mohammed F; Taha, Mohamed A

    2018-03-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is increasingly used in clinical practice, especially in neuropathic pain disorders. Although PRF is not new to clinical use, there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding its effectiveness. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of duration of application of PRF on its analgesic efficacy in improvement of neuropathic pain. A randomized experimental trial. An animal research facility at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Mansoura University in Egypt. Chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats was performed to induce neuropathic pain. The rats were divided into 6 groups (6 rats each) in which PRF was applied for 2, 4, 6, or 8 minutes or not at all. In one group, RF cannula was applied without performing PRF intervention. The pain was assessed through observation of resting paw posture (RPP) at 3, 10, and 21 days. Nerve damage was assessed by histopathological evaluation of the sciatic nerve. Immunohistochemical localization of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) was also done. RPP was improved in rats treated with PRF. This improvement was significant only in rats treated for 8 minutes. Increased duration for PRF application was associated with a significant decrease in IL-6 and TNF-alpha contents in all groups when compared with the control group. Histopathological evaluation of the constricted sciatic nerve revealed no statistical significance among the different study groups. The study was limited by the lack of measurement of other inflammatory markers that may help elucidate other relevant mechanisms. Increased duration of PRF application resulted in better analgesic efficacy without any increase in tissue injury in an animal model of neuropathic pain. This effect may be attributed to decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Pulsed radiofrequency, analgesic, rats, sciatic nerve, duration, neuropathic pain.

  4. Effect of sex in the MRMT-1 model of cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Al-Dihaissy, Tamara; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    An overwhelming amount of evidence demonstrates sex-induced variation in pain processing, and has thus increased the focus on sex as an essential parameter for optimization of in vivo models in pain research. Mammary cancer cells are often used to model metastatic bone pain in vivo......, and are commonly used in both males and females. Here we demonstrate that compared to male rats, female rats have an increased capacity for recovery following inoculation of MRMT-1 mammary cells, thus potentially causing a sex-dependent bias in interpretation of the data....

  5. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II following a trial of hypnosis: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Design Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII). Results Compared to the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22233394

  6. Relevance of physical fitness levels and exercise-related beliefs for self-reported and experimental pain in fibromyalgia: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Saskia T; van Wijck, Albert J M; Geenen, Rinie; Snijders, Tom J; van der Meulen, Wout J T M; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke Swaantje

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that low physical fitness is a contributor to pain in fibromyalgia and that exercise-related beliefs play a role in the persistence of this association. Yet the association between physical fitness and pain is hardly explored in detail. The aim of this exploratory study in patients with fibromyalgia was to investigate the association of physical fitness levels with self-reported and experimental pain as well as with pain catastrophizing and activity-avoidance beliefs. Physical fitness of 18 patients with fibromyalgia was examined using maximal ergocycling and the 6-minute walking test (6MWT). Pain intensity was assessed using self-report scales and quantitative sensory testing. A reduced walking distance on the 6MWT was correlated with more severe self-reported pain on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (r = -0.52, P physically fit and experienced more severe pain. The results demonstrate some associations between physical fitness and pain in fibromyalgia and point to the importance of activity avoidance. Although the causal directionality of the associations needs substantiation in clinical research, the findings support the notion that low fitness and activity-avoidance beliefs should be targeted while treating pain in fibromyalgia.

  7. Can a theory-based educational intervention change nurses' knowledge and attitudes concerning cancer pain management? A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Markus; Borglin, Gunilla

    2013-08-19

    Registered Nurses (RNs) play an important role in caring for patients suffering from cancer pain. A lack of knowledge regarding pain management and the RNs' own perception of cancer pain could act as barriers to effective pain management. Educational interventions that target RNs' knowledge and attitudes have proved promising. However, an intervention consisting of evidence-based practice is a multifaceted process and demands behavioural and cognitive changes to sustain the effects of the intervention. Therefore, our study aimed to investigate if a theory-based educational intervention could change RNs' knowledge and attitudes to cancer pain and pain management, both four and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention. A quasi-experimental design with non-equivalent control groups was used. The primary outcome was measured using a modified version of the instrument Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (NKAS) at baseline, four weeks and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention to evaluate its persistence. The intervention's educational curriculum was based on the principles of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour and consisted of interactive learning activities conducted in workshops founded on evidence-based knowledge. The RN's own experiences from cancer pain management were used in the learning process. The theory-based educational intervention aimed at changing RNs knowledge and attitudes regarding cancer pain management measured by primary outcome NKAS resulted in a statistical significant (presearched and needs to be evaluated further in larger projects. Clinical Trials. Gov: NCT01313234.

  8. A surgical ankle sprain pain model in the rat: Effects of morphine and indomethacin

    OpenAIRE

    Young Kim, Hee; Wang, Jigong; Chung, Kyungsoon; Mo Chung, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a frequent injury in humans that results in pain, swelling and difficulty in walking on the affected ankle. Currently a suitable animal model resembling human ankle sprain is lacking. Here, we describe an animal ankle sprain model induced by ankle ligament injury (ALI) in rats. Cutting combinations of the lateral ankle ligament complex produced pain, edema and difficulty of weight bearing, thereby mimicking severe (grade III) ankle sprain in humans. Analgesic compounds, morphi...

  9. Computational Modeling and Analysis of Mechanically Painful Stimulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manafi Khanian, Bahram

    Cuff algometry is used for quantitative assessment of deep-tissue sensitivity. The main purpose of this PhD dissertation is to provide a novel insight into the intrinsic and extrinsic factors which are involved in mechanically induced pain during cuff pressure algometry. A computational 3D finite...

  10. The Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib delays pain-related behaviour and conserves bone in a rat model of cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Camilla Kristine; Gallego-Pedersen, Simone; Andersen, Line

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a severe and debilitating complication of metastatic bone cancer. Current analgesics do not provide sufficient pain relief for all patients, creating a great need for new treatment options. The Src kinase, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, is implicated in processes involved in cancer......-induced bone pain, including cancer growth, osteoclastic bone degradation and nociceptive signalling. Here we investigate the role of dasatinib, an oral Src kinase family and Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in an animal model of cancer-induced bone pain. Daily administration of dasatinib (15 mg/kg, p...

  11. Perceiving pain in others: validation of a dual processing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrystal, Kalie N; Craig, Kenneth D; Versloot, Judith; Fashler, Samantha R; Jones, Daniel N

    2011-05-01

    Accurate perception of another person's painful distress would appear to be accomplished through sensitivity to both automatic (unintentional, reflexive) and controlled (intentional, purposive) behavioural expression. We examined whether observers would construe diverse behavioural cues as falling within these domains, consistent with cognitive neuroscience findings describing activation of both automatic and controlled neuroregulatory processes. Using online survey methodology, 308 research participants rated behavioural cues as "goal directed vs. non-goal directed," "conscious vs. unconscious," "uncontrolled vs. controlled," "fast vs. slow," "intentional (deliberate) vs. unintentional," "stimulus driven (obligatory) vs. self driven," and "requiring contemplation vs. not requiring contemplation." The behavioural cues were the 39 items provided by the PROMIS pain behaviour bank, constructed to be representative of the diverse possibilities for pain expression. Inter-item correlations among rating scales provided evidence of sufficient internal consistency justifying a single score on an automatic/controlled dimension (excluding the inconsistent fast vs. slow scale). An initial exploratory factor analysis on 151 participant data sets yielded factors consistent with "controlled" and "automatic" actions, as well as behaviours characterized as "ambiguous." A confirmatory factor analysis using the remaining 151 data sets replicated EFA findings, supporting theoretical predictions that observers would distinguish immediate, reflexive, and spontaneous reactions (primarily facial expression and paralinguistic features of speech) from purposeful and controlled expression (verbal behaviour, instrumental behaviour requiring ongoing, integrated responses). There are implicit dispositions to organize cues signaling pain in others into the well-defined categories predicted by dual process theory. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by

  12. The role of fluoxetine on macrophage function in chronic pain (Experimental study in Balb/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Pudjonarko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain raises stress conditions such as depression that can lower the cellular immunity. Fluoxetine is an antidepressant  used as an adjuvant in pain management but no one has been linked it with the body immune system. The objectives of this research were to proof the benefits of fluoxetine in  preventing degradation of macrophage function in chronic pain by measuring the macrophage phagocytic index , macrophage NO levels and the liver bacterial count in BALB/c mice infected with Listeria Monocytogenes.A Post Test - Only Control Group Design was conducted using 28 male mice strain BALB /c, age 8-10 weeks. The control group (C, mice got the same standard feed as the other groups. Chronic pain group (P, mice were injected with 20μL intraplantar CFA on day-1. Pain + fluoxetine early group (PFE were treated with P + fluoxetine 5 mg / kg ip day-1, the 4th, the 7th and the 10th, while the Pain + fluoxetine late group (PFL were treated with P + fluoxetine 5 mg / kg ip on day 7th and 10th. All mice were injected with 104 live Listeria monocytogenes iv on day 8th. Termination was performed on day 13th. Differences within groups  were analyzed using  One-way ANOVA and Kruskall Wallis, whereas the correlation of variables were analyzed using  Pearson's product moment. The experimental results showed that The macrophage phagocytic index and NO macrophage level (pg/mL in PFE group(2,24±1,013; 0,24±0,239 was higher than than P group (1,68±0,920; 0,21±0,263 and there was no different in the macrophage phagocytic index of PFE group compared to C group (p=0,583; p=0,805. In PFL group (4,32±1,459; 0,54±0,294 the macrophage phagocytic index as well as NO macrophage level (pg/mL was higher than P group (1,68±0,920; 0,21±0,263 with p=0,002; p=0,017. P group Bacterial count (log cfu/gram (2,30±0,849 was significantly higher than C group(1,15±0,223 (p=0,007, while PFE group bacterial count (1,96±0,653 and PFL group bacterial count (1,84±0

  13. The Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib delays pain-related behaviour and conserves bone in a rat model of cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Camilla Kristine; Gallego-Pedersen, Simone; Andersen, Line

    2017-01-01

    -induced bone pain, including cancer growth, osteoclastic bone degradation and nociceptive signalling. Here we investigate the role of dasatinib, an oral Src kinase family and Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in an animal model of cancer-induced bone pain. Daily administration of dasatinib (15 mg/kg, p...

  14. Chronic Pelvic Pain Development and Prostate Inflammation in Strains of Mice With Different Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breser, Maria L; Motrich, Ruben D; Sanchez, Leonardo R; Rivero, Virginia E

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the prostate characterized by peripheral prostate-specific autoimmune responses associated with prostate inflammation. EAP is induced in rodents upon immunization with prostate antigens (PAg) plus adjuvants and shares important clinical and immunological features with the human disease chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). EAP was induced in young NOD, C57BL/6, and BALB/c male mice by immunization with PAg plus complete Freund́s adjuvant. Tactile allodynia was assessed using Von Frey fibers as a measure of pelvic pain at baseline and at different time points after immunization. Using conventional histology, immunohistochemistry, FACS analysis, and protein arrays, an interstrain comparative study of prostate cell infiltration and inflammation was performed. Chronic pelvic pain development was similar between immunized NOD and C57BL/6 mice, although the severity of leukocyte infiltration was greater in the first case. Coversely, minimal prostate cell infiltration was observed in immunized BALB/c mice, who showed no pelvic pain development. Increased numbers of mast cells, mostly degranulated, were detected in prostate samples from NOD and C57BL/6 mice, while lower total counts and resting were observed in BALB/c mice. Prostate tissue from NOD mice revealed markedly increased expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, vascular endothelial growth factor, and metalloproteinases. Similar results, but to a lesser extent, were observed when analyzing prostate tissue from C57BL/6 mice. On the contrary, the expression of the above mediators was very low in prostate tissue from immunized BALB/c mice, showing significantly slight increments only for CXCL1 and IL4. Our results provide new evidence indicating that NOD, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice develop different degrees of chronic pelvic pain, type, and amount of prostate cell infiltration

  15. Radiation-induced relief of pain in an animal model with bone invasion from cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, U.J.; Lee, B.W.

    2003-01-01

    In clinic, local radiation is effective for relief of pain from cancer invasion into the bones. This effect is usually observed before the regression of tumor occurs, which implies radiation-induced pain relief by mechanisms other than tumor irradication. In this study, possible mechanisms were explored in animal model system. To establish an animal model, syngeneic hepatocarcinoma, HCa-I was transplanted on femoral periosteum of C3H/HeJ male mice and bone-invasive tumor growth was identified through the histological analysis. Development of tumor-induced pain was assessed by von Frey filament test, acetone test, and radiant heat test. Animals were also irradiated for their tumors. Any change in pain was analyzed by above tests for the quantitative change and by immunohistochemical stain for the expression of molecules such as c-fos, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in lumbar spinal cord. Cancer invasion into the bone was started from 7th day after transplantation and became evident at day 14. Objective increase of pain in the ipsilateral thigh was observed at day 14 on von Frey filament test and acetone test, while there was no remarkable regression of the tumors. In this model system, local radiation of tumor resulted in decrease in objective pain on von Frey filament test and acetone test. In the immunohistochemical stain for lumbar spinal cord, the expression of substance P and CGRP but not c-fos increased in tumor-bearing animal compared to the control. The expression of these molecules decreased in animals given local radiation. In summary, an animal model system was established for objective pain from cancer invasion into the bones. Local radiation of tumor induced objective pain relief and this effect seems to be mediated not by tumor regression but through altered production of pain-related molecules

  16. Radiation-induced relief of pain in an animal model with bone invasion from cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, J; Kim, J; Kim, K H; Kim, U J; Lee, B W [Yonsei University Medical College, (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In clinic, local radiation is effective for relief of pain from cancer invasion into the bones. This effect is usually observed before the regression of tumor occurs, which implies radiation-induced pain relief by mechanisms other than tumor irradication. In this study, possible mechanisms were explored in animal model system. To establish an animal model, syngeneic hepatocarcinoma, HCa-I was transplanted on femoral periosteum of C3H/HeJ male mice and bone-invasive tumor growth was identified through the histological analysis. Development of tumor-induced pain was assessed by von Frey filament test, acetone test, and radiant heat test. Animals were also irradiated for their tumors. Any change in pain was analyzed by above tests for the quantitative change and by immunohistochemical stain for the expression of molecules such as c-fos, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in lumbar spinal cord. Cancer invasion into the bone was started from 7th day after transplantation and became evident at day 14. Objective increase of pain in the ipsilateral thigh was observed at day 14 on von Frey filament test and acetone test, while there was no remarkable regression of the tumors. In this model system, local radiation of tumor resulted in decrease in objective pain on von Frey filament test and acetone test. In the immunohistochemical stain for lumbar spinal cord, the expression of substance P and CGRP but not c-fos increased in tumor-bearing animal compared to the control. The expression of these molecules decreased in animals given local radiation. In summary, an animal model system was established for objective pain from cancer invasion into the bones. Local radiation of tumor induced objective pain relief and this effect seems to be mediated not by tumor regression but through altered production of pain-related molecules.

  17. Prolonged amelioration of experimental postoperative pain by bupivacaine released from microsphere-coated hernia mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachit; Wang, Jeffery Chi-Fei; Pham, Lan; Blaskovich, Phillip D; Costa, Daniel; Nichols, Gary; Hildebrand, William; Scarborough, Nelson; Herman, Clifford; Strichartz, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pain alters physiological functions and delays discharge. Perioperative local anesthetics are effective analgesics in the immediate 1- to 2-day postoperative period, but acute pain often lasts longer. The goal of this work was to develop a local anesthetic formulation adhering to an intraoperative implanted device that reduces pain for at least 3 days after surgery. Six groups, each with 8 rats, were studied. In a control group (group I), one 1.2-cm-long incision of the skin was followed by blunt dissection to separate the skin away from the underlying tissues and closing with 2 sutures. In 3 of the treatment groups, the same surgical procedure was used, with the subcutaneous space formed by the blunt dissection lined with a 1-cm square patch of hernia mesh coated with poly lactide co-glycolic acid microspheres containing approximately 17 mg of bupivacaine (group II), no drug (placebo; group III), or bupivacaine free-base powder (group IV). Uncoated mesh implants (group V) served as a secondary control. A standard bupivacaine solution (0.4 mL, 0.5%; 2-mg dose) was infiltrated subcutaneously 30 minutes before the surgery and served as a standard control (group VI). Mechanosensitivity of the skin was tested by the local subcutaneous muscle responses to cutaneous tactile stimulation by von Frey hairs with forces of 4 g (for allodynia) and 15 g (for hyperalgesia) preoperatively and for 7 postoperative days. Control rats (group I) showed mechanohypersensitivity, indicative of postoperative allodynia and hyperalgesia, for all 7 postoperative days. Mechanohyperalgesia in rats that received mesh coated with bupivacaine-releasing microspheres (group II) was reduced during this period to 13% of control postoperative values (P < 0.001); mesh coated with bupivacaine base (group IV) reduced it by 50% (P = 0.034). The placebo mesh (group III) and uncoated mesh (group V) caused no significant reduction of mechanohypersensitivity, and bupivacaine solution infiltrated

  18. Uncovering the influence of social skills and psychosociological factors on pain sensitivity using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoichi; Nishi, Yuki; Nishi, Yuki; Osumi, Michihiro; Morioka, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a subjective emotional experience that is influenced by psychosociological factors such as social skills, which are defined as problem-solving abilities in social interactions. This study aimed to reveal the relationships among pain, social skills, and other psychosociological factors by using structural equation modeling. A total of 101 healthy volunteers (41 men and 60 women; mean age: 36.6±12.7 years) participated in this study. To evoke participants' sense of inner pain, we showed them images of painful scenes on a PC screen and asked them to evaluate the pain intensity by using the visual analog scale (VAS). We examined the correlation between social skills and VAS, constructed a hypothetical model based on results from previous studies and the current correlational analysis results, and verified the model's fit using structural equation modeling. We found significant positive correlations between VAS and total social skills values, as well as between VAS and the "start of relationships" subscales. Structural equation modeling revealed that the values for "start of relationships" had a direct effect on VAS values (path coefficient =0.32, p social support. The results indicated that extroverted people are more sensitive to inner pain and tend to get more social support and maintain a better psychological condition.

  19. High-frequency electroacupuncture versus carprofen in an incisional pain model in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, F.M.; Castro, L.L.; Ferreira, R.T.; Pires, P.A.; Vanderlinde, F.A.; Medeiros, M.A. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-24

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) and carprofen (CP) on postoperative incisional pain using the plantar incision (PI) model in rats. A 1-cm longitudinal incision was made through skin, fascia and muscles of a hind paw of male Wistar rats and the development of mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was determined over 4 days using the von Frey and Hargreaves methods, respectively. Based on the experimental treatments received on the third postoperative day, the animals were divided into the following groups: PI+CP (CP, 2 mg/kg, po); PI+EAST36 (100-Hz EA applied bilaterally at the Zusanli point (ST36)); PI+EANP (EA applied to a non-acupoint region); PI+IMMO (immobilization only); PI (vehicle). In the von Frey test, the PI+EAST36 group had higher withdrawal force thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli than the PI, PI+IMMO and PI+EANP groups at several times studied. Furthermore, the PI+EAST36 group showed paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli that were similar to those of the PI+CP group. In the Hargreaves test, all groups had latencies higher than those observed with PI. The PI+EAST36 group was similar to the PI+IMMO, PI+EANP and PI+CP groups. We conclude that 100-Hz EA at the ST36 point, but not at non-acupoints, can reduce mechanical nociception in the rat model of incisional pain, and its effectiveness is comparable to that of carprofen.

  20. High-frequency electroacupuncture versus carprofen in an incisional pain model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of electroacupuncture (EA and carprofen (CP on postoperative incisional pain using the plantar incision (PI model in rats. A 1-cm longitudinal incision was made through skin, fascia and muscles of a hind paw of male Wistar rats and the development of mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was determined over 4 days using the von Frey and Hargreaves methods, respectively. Based on the experimental treatments received on the third postoperative day, the animals were divided into the following groups: PI+CP (CP, 2 mg/kg, po; PI+EAST36 (100-Hz EA applied bilaterally at the Zusanli point (ST36; PI+EANP (EA applied to a non-acupoint region; PI+IMMO (immobilization only; PI (vehicle. In the von Frey test, the PI+EAST36 group had higher withdrawal force thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli than the PI, PI+IMMO and PI+EANP groups at several times studied. Furthermore, the PI+EAST36 group showed paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli that were similar to those of the PI+CP group. In the Hargreaves test, all groups had latencies higher than those observed with PI. The PI+EAST36 group was similar to the PI+IMMO, PI+EANP and PI+CP groups. We conclude that 100-Hz EA at the ST36 point, but not at non-acupoints, can reduce mechanical nociception in the rat model of incisional pain, and its effectiveness is comparable to that of carprofen.

  1. High-frequency electroacupuncture versus carprofen in an incisional pain model in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, F.M.; Castro, L.L.; Ferreira, R.T.; Pires, P.A.; Vanderlinde, F.A.; Medeiros, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) and carprofen (CP) on postoperative incisional pain using the plantar incision (PI) model in rats. A 1-cm longitudinal incision was made through skin, fascia and muscles of a hind paw of male Wistar rats and the development of mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was determined over 4 days using the von Frey and Hargreaves methods, respectively. Based on the experimental treatments received on the third postoperative day, the animals were divided into the following groups: PI+CP (CP, 2 mg/kg, po); PI+EAST36 (100-Hz EA applied bilaterally at the Zusanli point (ST36)); PI+EANP (EA applied to a non-acupoint region); PI+IMMO (immobilization only); PI (vehicle). In the von Frey test, the PI+EAST36 group had higher withdrawal force thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli than the PI, PI+IMMO and PI+EANP groups at several times studied. Furthermore, the PI+EAST36 group showed paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli that were similar to those of the PI+CP group. In the Hargreaves test, all groups had latencies higher than those observed with PI. The PI+EAST36 group was similar to the PI+IMMO, PI+EANP and PI+CP groups. We conclude that 100-Hz EA at the ST36 point, but not at non-acupoints, can reduce mechanical nociception in the rat model of incisional pain, and its effectiveness is comparable to that of carprofen

  2. High-frequency electroacupuncture versus carprofen in an incisional pain model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, F M; Castro, L L; Ferreira, R T; Pires, P A; Vanderlinde, F A; Medeiros, M A

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) and carprofen (CP) on postoperative incisional pain using the plantar incision (PI) model in rats. A 1-cm longitudinal incision was made through skin, fascia and muscles of a hind paw of male Wistar rats and the development of mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was determined over 4 days using the von Frey and Hargreaves methods, respectively. Based on the experimental treatments received on the third postoperative day, the animals were divided into the following groups: PI+CP (CP, 2 mg/kg, po); PI+EAST36 (100-Hz EA applied bilaterally at the Zusanli point (ST36)); PI+EANP (EA applied to a non-acupoint region); PI+IMMO (immobilization only); PI (vehicle). In the von Frey test, the PI+EAST36 group had higher withdrawal force thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli than the PI, PI+IMMO and PI+EANP groups at several times studied. Furthermore, the PI+EAST36 group showed paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimuli that were similar to those of the PI+CP group. In the Hargreaves test, all groups had latencies higher than those observed with PI. The PI+EAST36 group was similar to the PI+IMMO, PI+EANP and PI+CP groups. We conclude that 100-Hz EA at the ST36 point, but not at non-acupoints, can reduce mechanical nociception in the rat model of incisional pain, and its effectiveness is comparable to that of carprofen.

  3. Bridging the gap between mind and body: a biobehavioral model of the effects of guided imagery on pain, pain disability, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Wendy; Jacobson, Ann

    2013-12-01

    Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is a common and complex disorder associated with declines in physical health and functional status, emotional well-being, and quality of life. To best address the complexity of this condition, research and clinical practice for CNCP should be guided by a framework incorporating both biologic and psychologic factors. This article presents a biobehavioral model of chronic pain that hypothesizes mechanisms related to the effectiveness of a complementary therapy, guided imagery (GI), for this population. Using the research-to-model/theory strategy, we mapped findings from published reports of interdisciplinary research into physiologic and psychologic aspects of the nature and mechanisms of pain, as well as the use of GI for pain, to build the model of GI's effects on pain, pain disability, and depression. In the model, these outcomes of GI for persons experiencing CNCP are mediated by psychologic (pain self-efficacy and pain beliefs) and physiologic (immune-mediated analgesia and sickness response) variables. A biobehavioral approach to nursing phenomena will advance understanding of health and health-related issues and has the potential to improve outcomes through delineation of mechanisms underlying relationships between psychologic and biologic factors. Increased consumer use of complementary therapies to treat pain, the current cost-driven health care system, and the mandate for evidence-based practice support the need to validate the efficacy of such therapies. This empirically derived model provides a framework for practice and research for nurses and other health care providers to promote health, function, and well-being in persons with CNCP. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analgesic efficacy of CR4056, a novel imidazoline-2 receptor ligand, in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Flora Ferrari1, Simonetta Fiorentino1, Laura Mennuni1, Paolo Garofalo1, Ornella Letari1, Stefano Mandelli2, Antonio Giordani3, Marco Lanza1, Gianfranco Caselli11Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry; 3R&D Chemistry Drug Development and OS, Rottapharm S.p.A., Monza (MB, ItalyAbstract: Two decades of investigations have failed to unequivocally clarify the functions and the molecular nature of imidazoline-2 receptors (I2R. However, there is robust pharmacological evidence for the functional modulation of monoamino oxidase (MAO and other important enzyme activities by I2 site ligands. Some compounds of this class proved to be active experimental tools in preventing both experimental pain and opioid tolerance and dependence. Unfortunately, even though these compounds bind with high potency to central I2 sites, they fail to represent a valid clinical opportunity due to their pharmacokinetic, selectivity or side-effects profile. This paper presents the preclinical profile of a novel I2 ligand (2-phenyl-6-(1H-imidazol-1ylquinazoline; [CR4056] that selectively inhibits the activity of human recombinant MAO-A in a concentration-dependent manner. A sub-chronic four day oral treatment of CR4056 increased norepinephrine (NE tissue levels both in the rat cerebral cortex (63.1% ± 4.2%; P<0.05 and lumbar spinal cord (51.3% ± 6.7%; P < 0.05. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA rat model of inflammatory pain, CR4056 was found to be orally active (ED50 = 5.8 mg/kg, by mouth [p.o.]. In the acute capsaicin model, CR4056 completely blocked mechanical hyperalgesia in the injured hind paw (ED50 = 4.1 mg/kg, p.o.; ED100 = 17.9 mg/kg, p.o.. This effect was dose-dependently antagonized by the non-selective imidazoline I2/α2 antagonist idazoxan. In rat models of neuropathic pain, oral administration of CR4056 significantly attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. In summary, the present study suggests a novel

  5. Validation and Refinement of a Pain Information Model from EHR Flowsheet Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Bonnie L; Johnson, Steven G; Ali, Samira; Bavuso, Karen M; Cruz, Christopher A; Collins, Sarah; Furukawa, Meg; Hook, Mary L; LaFlamme, Anne; Lytle, Kay; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Rajchel, Tari; Settergren, Theresa Tess; Westman, Kathryn F; Whittenburg, Luann

    2018-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data can reduce costs of research and quality reporting. However, EHR data must be consistent within and across organizations. Flowsheet data provide a rich source of interprofessional data and represents a high volume of documentation; however, content is not standardized. Health care organizations design and implement customized content for different care areas creating duplicative data that is noncomparable. In a prior study, 10 information models (IMs) were derived from an EHR that included 2.4 million patients. There was a need to evaluate the generalizability of the models across organizations. The pain IM was selected for evaluation and refinement because pain is a commonly occurring problem associated with high costs for pain management. The purpose of our study was to validate and further refine a pain IM from EHR flowsheet data that standardizes pain concepts, definitions, and associated value sets for assessments, goals, interventions, and outcomes. A retrospective observational study was conducted using an iterative consensus-based approach to map, analyze, and evaluate data from 10 organizations. The aggregated metadata from the EHRs of 8 large health care organizations and the design build in 2 additional organizations represented flowsheet data from 6.6 million patients, 27 million encounters, and 683 million observations. The final pain IM has 30 concepts, 4 panels (classes), and 396 value set items. Results are built on Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) pain assessment terms and extend the need for additional terms to support interoperability. The resulting pain IM is a consensus model based on actual EHR documentation in the participating health systems. The IM captures the most important concepts related to pain. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  6. Participation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in experimental neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chacur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to a neuropathic pain state that results from central sensitization. This phenomenom is mediated by NMDA receptors and may involve the production of nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we investigated the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS in the spinal cord of 3-month-old male, Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection (SNT. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L3-L5 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve. SNT resulted in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms confirmed by evaluating mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall and Selitto test and allodynia (von Frey hair test. Control animals did not present any alteration (sham-animals. The selective inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (0.2 and 2 µg in 50 µL, blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by SNT. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that nNOS was increased (48% by day 30 in the lumbar spinal cord after SNT. This increase was observed near the central canal (Rexed’s lamina X and also in lamina I-IV of the dorsal horn. Real-time PCR results indicated an increase of nNOS mRNA detected from 1 to 30 days after SNT, with the highest increase observed 1 day after injury (1469%. Immunoblotting confirmed the increase of nNOS in the spinal cord between 1 and 15 days post-lesion (20%, reaching the greatest increase (60% 30 days after surgery. The present findings demonstrate an increase of nNOS after peripheral nerve injury that may contribute to the increase of NO production observed after peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and the diathesis-stress model of chronic pain and disability in patients undergoing major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrea L; Halket, Eileen; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Flora, David B; Katz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    To (1) use structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine relationships proposed in Turk's diathesis-stress model of chronic pain and disability as well as (2) investigate what role, if any, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) play in predicting pain disability, relative to some of the other factors in the model. The study sample consisted of 208 patients scheduled for general surgery, 21 to 60 years of age (mean age=47.18 y, SD=9.72 y), who reported experiencing persistent pain for an average of 5.56 years (SD=7.90 y). At their preadmission hospital visit, patients completed the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20, Pain Disability Index, posttraumatic stress disorder Checklist, and rated the average intensity of their pain (0 to 10 numeric rating scale). SEM was used to test a model of chronic pain disability and to explore potential relationships between PTSS and factors in the diathesis-stress model. SEM results provided support for a model in which anxiety sensitivity predicted fear of pain and catastrophizing, fear of pain predicted escape/avoidance, and escape/avoidance predicted pain disability. Results also provided support for a feedback loop between disability and fear of pain. SEM analyses provided preliminary support for the inclusion of PTSS in the diathesis-stress model, with PTSS accounting for a significant proportion of the variance in pain disability. Results provide empirical support for aspects of Turk's diathesis-stress model in a sample of patients with persistent pain. Findings also offer preliminary support for the role of PTSS in fear-avoidance models of chronic pain.

  8. Models of experimental saccular aneurysms of carotid arteries in canine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haixia; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the availability by making experimental saccular aneurysm models of carotid arteries in canine similar to human intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Twenty healthy canines with experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully by surgery. Results: Forty experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully with 36 aneurysms and parent arteries maintaining patency with each other and four spontaneously occluded confirmed by angiography. Model successful rate reached 90%. Conclusions: Experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries in canines were one of best models created for simulating human intracranial aneurysms. (authors)

  9. Bisphosphonates Inhibit Pain, Bone Loss, and Inflammation in a Rat Tibia Fracture Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Hou, Saiyun; Wei, Tzuping; Li, Wen-Wu; Shi, Xiaoyou; Clark, J David; Kingery, Wade S

    2016-10-01

    Bisphosphonates are used to prevent the bone loss and fractures associated with osteoporosis, bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and osteogenesis deformans. Distal limb fractures cause regional bone loss with cutaneous inflammation and pain in the injured limb that can develop into complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Clinical trials have reported that antiresorptive bisphosphonates can prevent fracture-induced bone loss, inhibit serum inflammatory cytokine levels, and alleviate CRPS pain. Previously, we observed that the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines or adaptive immune responses attenuated the development of pain behavior in a rat fracture model of CRPS, and we hypothesized that bisphosphonates could prevent pain behavior, trabecular bone loss, postfracture cutaneous cytokine upregulation, and adaptive immune responses in this CRPS model. Rats underwent tibia fracture and cast immobilization for 4 weeks and were chronically administered either subcutaneously perfused alendronate or oral zoledronate. Behavioral measurements included hindpaw von Frey allodynia, unweighting, warmth, and edema. Bone microarchitecture was measured by microcomputed tomography, and bone cellular activity was evaluated by static and dynamic histomorphometry. Spinal cord Fos immunostaining was performed, and skin cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Skin and sciatic nerve immunoglobulin levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Rats with tibia fractures developed hindpaw allodynia, unweighting, warmth, and edema, increased spinal Fos expression and trabecular bone loss in the lumbar vertebra and bilateral distal femurs as measured by microcomputed tomography, increased trabecular bone resorption and osteoclast surface with decreased bone formation rates, increased cutaneous inflammatory cytokine and NGF expression, and elevated immunocomplex deposition in skin and nerve

  10. Predictive models of pain following root canal treatment: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, A; de la Macorra, J C; Hidalgo, J J; Azabal, M

    2013-08-01

    To determine the probability of the incidence, intensity, duration and triggering of post-endodontic pain, considering factors related to the patient (age, gender, medical evaluation) and to the affected tooth (group, location, number of canals, pulp vitality, preoperative pain, periapical radiolucencies, previous emergency access, presence of occlusal contacts with antagonist). A total of 500 one-visit root canal treatments (RCTs) were performed on patients referred to an endodontist. Shaping of root canals was performed manually with Gates-Glidden drills and K-Flexofiles, and apical patency was maintained with a size 10 file. A 5% NaOCl solution was used for irrigation, and canals were filled with lateral compaction and AH-Plus sealer. Independent factors were recorded during the treatment, and characteristics of post-endodontic pain (incidence, intensity, type and duration) were later surveyed through questionnaires. Of the 500 questionnaires, 374 were properly returned and split in two groups for two different statistical purposes: 316 cases were used to adjust the logistic regression models to predict each characteristic of post-endodontic pain using predictive factors, and the remaining 58 cases were used to test the validity of each model. The predictive models showed that the incidence of post-endodontic pain was significantly lower when the treated tooth was not a molar (P = 0.003), demonstrated periapical radiolucencies (P = 0.003), had no history of previous pain (P = 0.006) or emergency endodontic treatment (P = 0.045) and had no occlusal contact (P endodontic pain were generated and validated taking account of the interrelation of multiple concomitant clinical factors. A predictive model for triggering post-endodontic pain could not be established. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses.......We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  12. Experimental modeling of swirl flows in power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtork, S. I.; Litvinov, I. V.; Gesheva, E. S.; Tsoy, M. A.; Skripkin, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents an overview of the methods and approaches to experimental modeling of various thermal and hydropower units - furnaces of pulverized coal boilers and flow-through elements of hydro turbines. The presented modeling approaches based on a combination of experimentation and rapid prototyping of working parts may be useful in optimizing energy equipment to improve safety and efficiency of industrial energy systems.

  13. Effect of family presence on pain and anxiety during invasive nursing procedures in an emergency department: A randomized controlled experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşlekdemir, Burcu; Kaya, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Patients generally prefer to have their family present during medical or nursing interventions. Family presence is assumed to reduce anxiety, especially during painful interventions. This study employed a randomized controlled experimental design to determine the effects of family presence on pain and anxiety during invasive nursing procedures. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized in the observation unit of the internal medicine section in the emergency department of a university hospital. The sample comprised 138 patients assigned into the experimental and control groups by drawing lots. The invasive nursing procedure was carried out in the presence of family members, for members of the experimental group, and without family members, for members of the control group. Thus, the effects of family presence on pain and anxiety during the administration of an invasive nursing procedure to patients were analyzed. The results showed that members of the experimental and control groups did not differ with respect to the pain and state anxiety scores during the intervention. Family presence does not influence the participants' pain and anxiety during an invasive nursing procedure. Thus, the decision regarding family presence during such procedures should be based on patient preference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Prediction Model and Tool for Assessing Risk of Persistent Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meretoja, Tuomo J; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Bruce, Julie

    2017-01-01

    are missing. The aim was to develop a clinically applicable risk prediction tool. Methods The prediction models were developed and tested using three prospective data sets from Finland (n = 860), Denmark (n = 453), and Scotland (n = 231). Prediction models for persistent pain of moderate to severe intensity......), high body mass index ( P = .039), axillary lymph node dissection ( P = .008), and more severe acute postoperative pain intensity at the seventh postoperative day ( P = .003) predicted persistent pain in the final prediction model, which performed well in the Danish (ROC-AUC, 0.739) and Scottish (ROC......-AUC, 0.740) cohorts. At the 20% risk level, the model had 32.8% and 47.4% sensitivity and 94.4% and 82.4% specificity in the Danish and Scottish cohorts, respectively. Conclusion Our validated prediction models and an online risk calculator provide clinicians and researchers with a simple tool to screen...

  15. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  16. Experimental models of the gut microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Abbeele, P. van den

    2013-01-01

    The human gut contains a diverse microbiota with large potential to influence health. Given the difficulty to access the main sites of the gut, in vitro models have been developed to dynamically monitor microbial processes at the site of metabolic activity. These models range from simple batch

  17. The empathy impulse: A multinomial model of intentional and unintentional empathy for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C Daryl; Spring, Victoria L; Todd, Andrew R

    2017-04-01

    Empathy for pain is often described as automatic. Here, we used implicit measurement and multinomial modeling to formally quantify unintentional empathy for pain: empathy that occurs despite intentions to the contrary. We developed the pain identification task (PIT), a sequential priming task wherein participants judge the painfulness of target experiences while trying to avoid the influence of prime experiences. Using multinomial modeling, we distinguished 3 component processes underlying PIT performance: empathy toward target stimuli (Intentional Empathy), empathy toward prime stimuli (Unintentional Empathy), and bias to judge target stimuli as painful (Response Bias). In Experiment 1, imposing a fast (vs. slow) response deadline uniquely reduced Intentional Empathy. In Experiment 2, inducing imagine-self (vs. imagine-other) perspective-taking uniquely increased Unintentional Empathy. In Experiment 3, Intentional and Unintentional Empathy were stronger toward targets with typical (vs. atypical) pain outcomes, suggesting that outcome information matters and that effects on the PIT are not reducible to affective priming. Typicality of pain outcomes more weakly affected task performance when target stimuli were merely categorized rather than judged for painfulness, suggesting that effects on the latter are not reducible to semantic priming. In Experiment 4, Unintentional Empathy was stronger for participants who engaged in costly donation to cancer charities, but this parameter was also high for those who donated to an objectively worse but socially more popular charity, suggesting that overly high empathy may facilitate maladaptive altruism. Theoretical and practical applications of our modeling approach for understanding variation in empathy are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. [An experimental model of transgastric ooforectomy using a porcine model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, V; Gheorghe, C; Piţigoi, D; Kosa, A; Ciocarlan, M; Pietrăreanu, D; Turcu, F; Copăescu, C; Droc, G; Popescu, H; Grigorescu, B; Stănciulea, O; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2010-01-01

    Transabdominal routes for surgery entail general anaesthesia with its inherent risks and complications (prolonged hospital stay, abdominal incisions that may be difficult in obese patients). Minimally invasive procedures require shorter hospitalization, have shorter recovery periods, less postoperative discomfort, and lower morbidity and complications. The purpose of this study was to use a porcine model to determine the feasibility and the safety of organ resection (oophorectomy and tubectomy). 10 Big White pigs between 25-30 kg underwent transgastric ooforectomy. The first 5 cases were performed in a hybrid procedure (laparoscopic-NOTES) in order to have a better control and supervise the maneuvers done by the mobile endoscope and to guide in the abdominal cavity. Adnexectomy was possible in all ten experiments. Full operative time (from starting endoscopy to complete gastrectomy closing) was 180 min to 270 min. The gastric defect closing was the most difficult manoever lasting from 10 min with OTSC clips to 100 using endoloops and clips. The animals have tolerated well the experiments and there have been no remarkable incidents during our 10 experments. In only one case a bleeding from gastotomy required electric coagulation. Transgastric ooforectomy in an experimental model is a procedure that requires advanced laparoscopical and endoscopical skills. Our early results are promissing. Its application in humans needs further confirmation of the method.

  19. Influência da naloxona e metisergida sobre o efeito analgésico do laser em baixa intensidade em modelo experimental de dor Influencia de la naloxona y la metisergida sobre el efecto analgésico del láser en baja intensidad en modelo experimental de dolor Influence of naloxone and methysergide on the analgesic effects of low-level laser in an experimental pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Peres e Serra

    2010-06-01

    ; Luz no coherente; LPT + Naloxona y LPT + Metisergida. RESULTADOS: La fototerapia con láser en baja intensidad demostró ser un método analgésico eficaz, mientras que el uso de la fuente de luz no coherente no demostró poseer ningún efecto analgésico. El uso de naloxona bloqueó el efecto analgésico del LPT, mientras que el uso de metisergida no afectó la analgesia del LPT. CONCLUSIONES: La LPT en los parámetros utilizados tuvo un efecto analgésico. La analgesia de la LPT es mediada por receptores opióides periféricos. La LPT parece que no interactúa con los receptores serotoninérgicos periféricos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although the mechanism of action of laser phototherapy (LPT is not known, it is a promising analgesic method. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the action of LPT depends on the activation of peripheral opioid or serotonergic receptors. METHOD: Inflammatory pain was induced through the injection of carrageenin in the left posterior paw of male Wistar rats. The InGaAIP visible laser diode (660 nm with fluency of 2.5 J.cm-2 was used. Von Frey filaments were used to analyze mechanical hyperalgesia. Animals were separated into five groups: Carrageenin; Laser (LPT; Non-coherent light; LPT + Naloxone; and LPT + Methysergide. RESULTS: Low-Level Laser phototherapy proved to be an effective analgesic method, while non-coherent light did not show a similar effect. The use of naloxone blocked the analgesic effect of LPT, while methysergide did not affect LPT-induced analgesia. CONCLUSIONS: According to the parameter used in this study, LPT produced analgesia. Analgesia induced by laser phototherapy is mediated by peripheral opioid receptors. Laser phototherapy does not seem to interact with peripheral serotonergic receptors.

  20. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  1. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  2. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  3. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  4. Analgesic effects of lappaconitine in leukemia bone pain in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone pain is a common and severe symptom in cancer patients. The present study employed a mouse model of leukemia bone pain by injection K562 cells into tibia of mouse to evaluate the analgesic effects of lappacontine. Our results showed that the lappaconitine treatment at day 15, 17 and 19 could effectively reduce the spontaneous pain scoring values, restore reduced degree in the inclined-plate test induced by injection of K562 cells, as well as restore paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency induced by injection of K562 cells to the normal levels. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of lappaconitine’s analgesic effects may be related to affect the expression levels of endogenous opioid system genes (POMC, PENK and MOR, as well as apoptosis-related genes (Xiap, Smac, Bim, NF-κB and p53. Our present results indicated that lappaconitine may become a new analgesic agent for leukemia bone pain management.

  5. Experimental Verification of the Transient Model in an Enrichment Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandino, Maria; Brasnarof, Daniel; Delmastro, Dario

    2003-01-01

    In the present work an experimental closed loop representing a single stage of an uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment cascade is described, loop that is used to experimentally validate an analytical model that describes the dynamics inside such a loop.The conditions established inside the experimental loop after a few working hours were reproduced by the analytical model, leaving the slower thermal phenomena taking place for future studies.Two kinds of perturbations were experimentally introduced: a change in the range of operation of one of the compressors and the addition of mass into the loop.Numerical and experimental results are compared and presented in this work. The analytical model proposed was verified against these two changes, with very good agreement in the time response and measured values.This analytical model allows us to determine the characteristic time response of the system

  6. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  7. Experimental modeling of a deoiling hydrocyclone system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bram, Mads Valentin; Hassan, Abdiladif Ahmed; Hansen, Dennis Severin

    2015-01-01

    responses of PDR via dedicated experiments a set of first-order-plus-dead-time (FOPDT) models that represent the main characteristics of the concerned hydrocyclone system is developed and analyzed for the entire operating range. The obtained multiple FOPDT models can illustrate the system performance...... acrylic hydrocyclone was tested as proof of concept for obtaining its steady-state and dynamic performances. The steady-state performance is able to provide the proportional correlation between PDR and flow split which is essential for optimizing steady-state separation efficiency. By analyzing step...

  8. Experimental and modelling studies of infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes a study of infiltration in the unsaturated soil with the objective of estimating the recharge to a phreatic aquifer. The study area is at the border of the city of Milan (Northern Italy), which draws water for both domestic and industrial purposes from ground water resources located beneath the urban area. The rate of water pumping from the aquifer system has been varying during the XX century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. This caused variations with time of the depth of the water table below the ground surface and in turn some emergencies: the two most prominent episodes correspond to the middle '70s, when the water table in the city centre was about 30 m below the undisturbed natural conditions, and to the last decade, when the water table has raised at a rate of approximately 1 m/year and caused infiltrations in deep constructions (garages and building foundations, the underground railways, etc.). We have developed four ground water flow models at different scales, which share some characteristics: they are based on quasi-3D approximation (horizontal flow in the aquifers and vertical flow in the aquitards), conservative finite-differences schemes for regular grid with square cells in the horizontal plane and are implemented with proprietary computer codes. Among the problems that were studied for the development of these models, I recall some numerical problems, related to the behaviour of the phreatic aquifer under conditions of strong exploitation. Model calibration and validation for ModMil has been performed with a two-stage process, i.e., using some of the available data for model calibration and the remaining data for model validation. The application of geophysical exploration techniques, in particular seismic and geo-electrical prospecting, has been very useful to complete the data and information on the hydro-geological structure obtained from stratigraphic logs

  9. Mechanisms of Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation in Pain Suppression: A Computational Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Alexander R; Min, Xiaoyi; Hogan, Quinn H; Kramer, Jeffery M

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation for chronic pain remain unclear. The objective of this work was to explore the neurophysiological effects of DRG stimulation using computational modeling. Electrical fields produced during DRG stimulation were calculated with finite element models, and were coupled to a validated biophysical model of a C-type primary sensory neuron. Intrinsic neuronal activity was introduced as a 4 Hz afferent signal or somatic ectopic firing. The transmembrane potential was measured along the neuron to determine the effect of stimulation on intrinsic activity across stimulation parameters, cell location/orientation, and membrane properties. The model was validated by showing close correspondence in action potential (AP) characteristics and firing patterns when compared to experimental measurements. Subsequently, the model output demonstrated that T-junction filtering was amplified with DRG stimulation, thereby blocking afferent signaling, with cathodic stimulation at amplitudes of 2.8-5.5 × stimulation threshold and frequencies above 2 Hz. This amplified filtering was dependent on the presence of calcium and calcium-dependent small-conductance potassium channels, which produced a hyperpolarization offset in the soma, stem, and T-junction with repeated somatic APs during stimulation. Additionally, DRG stimulation suppressed somatic ectopic activity by hyperpolarizing the soma with cathodic or anodic stimulation at amplitudes of 3-11 × threshold and frequencies above 2 Hz. These effects were dependent on the stem axon being relatively close to and oriented toward a stimulating contact. These results align with the working hypotheses on the mechanisms of DRG stimulation, and indicate the importance of stimulation amplitude, polarity, and cell location/orientation on neuronal responses. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  10. Lung cancer risk models from experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present analyses of data based on methods that adequately account for time-related factors and competiting risks, and that yield results that are expressed in a form comparable to results obtained from recent analyses of epidemiological studies of humans exposed to radon and radon daughters. These epidemiological analyses have modeled the hazard, or age-specific death rates, as a function of factors such as dose and dose rate, time from exposure, and time from cessation of exposure. The starting point for many of the analyses of human data has been the constant relative risk modeling which the age-specific death rates are assumed to be a function of cumulative dose, and the risks due to exposure are assumed to be proportional to the age-specific baseline death rates. However, departures from this initial model, such as dependence of risks on age at risk and/or time from exposure, have been investigated. These analyses have frequently been based on a non-parametric model that requires minimal assumptions regarding the baseline risks and their dependence on age

  11. Isothermal coarse mixing: experimental and CFD modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, M.A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Hall, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A plane, two-dimensional flow apparatus has been built which uses a jet of solid 6mm diameter balls to model a jet of molten drops falling into a tank of water to study premixing prior to a vapour explosion. Preliminary experiments with unheated stainless steel balls are here compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations by the code CHYMES. (6 figures) (Author)

  12. New experimental model of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, G B; Kalinina, A R; Ponomarenko, N A; Ovsepyan, A A; Smirnov, S V; Tsybenko, V V; Homeriki, S G

    2001-06-01

    NSO/1 (P3x63Ay 8Ut) and SP20 myeloma cells were inoculated to BALB/c OlaHsd mice. NSO/1 cells allowed adequate stage-by-stage monitoring of tumor development. The adequacy of this model was confirmed in experiments with conventional cytostatics: prospidium and cytarabine caused necrosis of tumor cells and reduced animal mortality.

  13. Effect of static magnetic field on pain level and expression of P2X3 receptors in the trigeminal ganglion in mice following experimental tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yafen; Wang, Shengguo; Long, Hu; Zhu, Jingyi; Jian, Fan; Ye, Niansong; Lai, Wenli

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that static magnetic fields (SMF) can generate an analgesic effect in different conditions. The present study explored effects of SMF on pain levels and expressions of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglion (TG) in mice after experimental tooth movement (tooth movement induced by springs between teeth). Experiments were performed in male mice (body mass: 25-30 g) and divided into SMF + force group, force group, and no force group. Exposure time was over 22 h per day. Mouse Grimace Scale was used for evaluating orofacial pain levels during experimental tooth movement at 4 h and 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Meanwhile, expression levels of P2X3 receptors in the TG were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting at same time points. We finally found that during experimental tooth movement, pain levels of mice peaked at 3 days, and then decreased. While pain levels of mice were reduced in the SMF environment at 4 h, 1 and 3 days, there was a significant difference at 1 and 3 days. Meanwhile, under the action of SMF, expression levels of P2X3 receptors in TG were significantly lower at 4 h, 3 and 7 days. These results suggest that SMF can reduce pain levels in mice, and down-regulate P2X3 receptors in TG. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:22-30, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Localized Sympathectomy Reduces Mechanical Hypersensitivity by Restoring Normal Immune Homeostasis in Rat Models of Inflammatory Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenrui; Chen, Sisi; Strong, Judith A; Li, Ai-Ling; Lewkowich, Ian P; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2016-08-17

    Some forms of chronic pain are maintained or enhanced by activity in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), but attempts to model this have yielded conflicting findings. The SNS has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on immunity, confounding the interpretation of experiments using global sympathectomy methods. We performed a "microsympathectomy" by cutting the ipsilateral gray rami where they entered the spinal nerves near the L4 and L5 DRG. This led to profound sustained reductions in pain behaviors induced by local DRG inflammation (a rat model of low back pain) and by a peripheral paw inflammation model. Effects of microsympathectomy were evident within one day, making it unlikely that blocking sympathetic sprouting in the local DRGs or hindpaw was the sole mechanism. Prior microsympathectomy greatly reduced hyperexcitability of sensory neurons induced by local DRG inflammation observed 4 d later. Microsympathectomy reduced local inflammation and macrophage density in the affected tissues (as indicated by paw swelling and histochemical staining). Cytokine profiling in locally inflamed DRG showed increases in pro-inflammatory Type 1 cytokines and decreases in the Type 2 cytokines present at baseline, changes that were mitigated by microsympathectomy. Microsympathectomy was also effective in reducing established pain behaviors in the local DRG inflammation model. We conclude that the effect of sympathetic fibers in the L4/L5 gray rami in these models is pro-inflammatory. This raises the possibility that therapeutic interventions targeting gray rami might be useful in some chronic inflammatory pain conditions. Sympathetic blockade is used for many pain conditions, but preclinical studies show both pro- and anti-nociceptive effects. The sympathetic nervous system also has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on immune tissues and cells. We examined effects of a very localized sympathectomy. By cutting the gray rami to the spinal nerves near the lumbar sensory

  15. Spontaneous behavioral responses in the orofacial region: A model of trigeminal pain in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Akerman, Simon; Nguyen, Elaine; Vijjeswarapu, Alice; Hom, Betty; Dong, Hong-Wei; Charles, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop a translational mouse model for the study and measurement of non-evoked pain in the orofacial region by establishing markers of nociceptive-specific grooming behaviors in the mouse. BACKGROUND Some of the most prevalent and debilitating conditions involve pain in the trigeminal distribution. Although there are current therapies for these pain conditions, for many patients they are far from optimal. Understanding the pathophysiology of pain disorders arising from structures innervated by the trigeminal nerve is still limited and most animal behavioral models focus on the measurement of evoked pain. In patients, spontaneous (non-evoked) pain responses provide a more accurate representation of the pain experience than do responses that are evoked by an artificial stimulus. Therefore, the development of animal models that measure spontaneous nociceptive behaviors may provide a significant translational tool for a better understanding of pain neurobiology. METHODS C57BL/6 mice received either an injection of 0.9% Saline solution or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the right masseter muscle. Animals were video recorded and then analyzed by an observer blind to the experiment group. The duration of different facial grooming patterns performed in the area of injection were measured. After 2 hrs, mice were euthanized, perfused and the brainstem was removed. Fos protein expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis was quantified using immunohistochemistry to investigate nociceptive-specific neuronal activation. A separate group of animals was treated with morphine sulfate, to determine the nociceptive-specific nature of their behaviors. RESULTS We characterized and quantified 3 distinct patterns of acute grooming behaviors: fore-paw rubbing, lower lip skin/cheek rubbing against enclosure floor and hind paw scratching. These behaviors occurred with a reproducible frequency and time course, and were inhibited by the analgesic morphine. CFA

  16. A review of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide's pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships in experimental and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is a widely used opioid for treatment of moderate to severe pain, but large interindividual variability in patient response and no clear guidance on how to optimise morphine dosage regimen complicates treatment strategy for clinicians. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models can...... a detailed overview of the published human population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies for morphine analgesia in addition to basic drug disposition and pharmacological properties of morphine and its analgesic active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide, that may help identify future covariates....... Furthermore, based on simulations from key pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models, the contribution of morphine-6-glucuronide to the analgesic response in patients with renal insufficiency was investigated. Simulations were also used to examine the impact of effect-site equilibration half-life on time course...

  17. Behavioral cues to expand a pain model of the cognitively impaired elderly in long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burfield AH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allison H Burfield,1 Thomas TH Wan,2 Mary Lou Sole,3 James W Cooper41School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, 2Administration, and Medical Education, Doctoral Program in Public Affairs, College of Health and Public Affairs, 3College of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 4College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hypothesized pain behaviors in the elderly and a measurement model of pain derived from the Minimum Data Set-Resident Assessment Instrument (MDS-RAI 2.0 items.Methods: This work included a longitudinal cohort recruited from Medicare-certified long-term care facilities across the United States. MDS data were collected from 52,996 residents (mean age 83.7 years. Structural equation modeling was used to build a measurement model of pain to test correlations between indicators and the fit of the model by cognitive status. The model evaluates the theoretical constructs of pain to improve how pain is assessed and detected within cognitive levels.Results: Using pain frequency and intensity as the only indicators of pain, the overall prevalence of pain was 31.2%; however, analysis by cognitive status showed that 47.7% of the intact group was in pain, while only 18.2% of the severely, 29.4% of the moderately, and 39.6% of the mildly cognitively impaired groups were experiencing pain. This finding supports previous research indicating that pain is potentially under-reported in severely cognitively impaired elderly nursing home residents. With adjustments to the measurement model, a revised format containing affective, behavioral, and inferred pain indicates a better fit of the data to include these domains, as a more complete measure of the pain construct.Conclusion: Pain has a significant effect on quality of life and long-term health outcomes in nursing home

  18. No effect of experimental occlusal interferences on pressure pain thresholds of the masseter and temporalis muscles in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelotti, A; Farella, M; Steenks, MH; Gallo, LM; Palla, S

    It has been suggested that occlusal interferences may lead to pain and tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Tender jaw muscles are more sensitive to pressure pain, as assessed by means of pressure algometry. We tested the effects of occlusal interferences on the pressure pain threshold of the jaw

  19. The Web-Based Osteoarthritis Management Resource My Joint Pain Improves Quality of Care: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathy, Hema; Bennell, Kim; Dickson, Chris; Dobson, Fiona; Fransen, Marlene; Jones, Graeme; Hunter, David J

    2015-07-07

    Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for conservative treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), management is often confined to the use of analgesics and waiting for eventual total joint replacement. This suggests a gap in knowledge for persons with OA regarding the many different treatments available to them. Our objective was to evaluate outcomes after usage of a Web-based resource called My Joint Pain that contains tailored, evidence-based information and tools aimed to improve self-management of OA on self-management and change in knowledge. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the My Joint Pain website intervention over a 12-month period. The intervention provided participants with general and user-specific information, monthly assessments with validated instruments, and progress-tracking tools. A nationwide convenience sample of 195 participants with self-assessed hip and/or knee OA completed both baseline and 12-month questionnaires (users: n=104; nonusers: n=91). The primary outcome measure was the Health Evaluation Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) to evaluate 8 different domains (health-directed activity, positive and active engagement in life, emotional distress, self-monitoring and insight, constructive attitudes and approaches, skill and technique acquisition, social integration and support, health service navigation) and the secondary outcome measure was the 17-item Osteoarthritis Quality Indicator (OAQI) questionnaire to evaluate the change in appropriateness of care received by participants. Independent t tests were used to compare changes between groups for the heiQ and chi-square tests to identify changes within and between groups from baseline to 12 months for each OAQI item. Baseline demographics between groups were similar for gender (152/195, 77.9% female), age (mean 60, SD 9 years) and body mass index (mean 31.1, SD 6.8 kg/m(2)). With the exception of health service navigation, mean effect sizes from all other heiQ domains

  20. An Improved Model of Heat-Induced Hyperalgesia—Repetitive Phasic Heat Pain Causing Primary Hyperalgesia to Heat and Secondary Hyperalgesia to Pinprick and Light Touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (−31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (−59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (−59%) were significantly reduced (all pheat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input. PMID:24911787

  1. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  2. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  3. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, Ω b , remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that Ω b ∼ 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming Ω total = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since Ω visible b . Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M x approx-gt 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z 0 coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for ν-masses may imply that the ν τ is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs

  5. Experimental modeling methods in Industrial Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Trebuňa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic approaches to a management system of the present industrial practice, forcing businesses to address management issues in-house continuous improvement of production and non-production processes. Experience has repeatedly demonstrated the need for a system approach not only in analysis but also in the planning and actual implementation of these processes. Therefore, the contribution is focused on the description of the modeling in industrial practice by a system approach, in order to avoid erroneous application of the decision to the implementation phase, and thus prevent any longer applying methods "attempt - fallacy".

  6. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  7. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  8. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-01-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model

  9. Systemic synergism between codeine and morphine in three pain models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Zepeda, Ramiro J; Sierralta, Fernando; Prieto, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The combination of two analgesic agents offers advantages in pain treatment. Codeine and morphine analgesia is due to activation of opioid receptor subtypes. This study, performed in mice using isobolographic analysis, evaluated the type of interaction in intraperitoneal (ip) or intrathecal (it) coadministration of codeine and morphine, in three nociceptive behavioral models. Intrathecal morphine resulted to be 7.5 times more potent than ip morphine in the writhing test, 55.6 times in the tail flick test and 1.7 times in phase II of the orofacial formalin test; however, in phase I of the same test ip was 1.2 times more potent than it morphine. Intrathecal codeine resulted being 3.4 times more potent than ip codeine in the writhing test, 1.6 times in the tail flick test, 2.5 times in phase I and 6.7 times in phase II of the orofacial formalin test. Opioid coadministration had a synergistic effect in the acute tonic pain (acetic acid writhing test), acute phasic pain (tail flick test) and inflammatory pain (orofacial formalin test). The interaction index ranged between 0.284 (writhing ip) and 0.440 (orofacial formalin phase II ip). This synergy may relate to the different pathways of pain transmission and to the different intracellular signal transduction. The present findings also raise the possibility of potential clinical advantages in combining opioids in pain management.

  10. Nerve Regenerative Effects of GABA-B Ligands in a Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Magnaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral somatosensory system. It may be associated with allodynia and increased pain sensitivity. Few studies correlated neuropathic pain with nerve morphology and myelin proteins expression. Our aim was to test if neuropathic pain is related to nerve degeneration, speculating whether the modulation of peripheral GABA-B receptors may promote nerve regeneration and decrease neuropathic pain. We used the partial sciatic ligation- (PSL- induced neuropathic model. The biochemical, morphological, and behavioural outcomes of sciatic nerve were analysed following GABA-B ligands treatments. Simultaneous 7-days coadministration of baclofen (10 mg/kg and CGP56433 (3 mg/kg alters tactile hypersensitivity. Concomitantly, specific changes of peripheral nerve morphology, nerve structure, and myelin proteins (P0 and PMP22 expression were observed. Nerve macrophage recruitment decreased and step coordination was improved. The PSL-induced changes in nociception correlate with altered nerve morphology and myelin protein expression. Peripheral synergic effects, via GABA-B receptor activation, promote nerve regeneration and likely ameliorate neuropathic pain.

  11. Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy Is Associated With Offspring's Musculoskeletal Pain in Adolescence: Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Anni-Julia; Paananen, Markus; Marttila, Riikka; Auvinen, Juha; Miettunen, Jouko; Karppinen, Jaro

    2017-07-01

    Smoking and behavioral problems are related to musculoskeletal (MS) pain in adolescence. Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) is associated with offspring's behavioral problems but its relation to MS pain in adolescence is unknown. Our purpose was to investigate whether there is an association between MSDP, the number of pain sites in adolescence, and the factors that potentially mediate this relationship. We evaluated the association of MSDP with offspring's MS pain at 16 years among participants of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n = 6436, 3360 girls, 68% of all births) using Chi-square test and independent samples t test. We used structural equation modeling to assess the mediating factors stratified by gender. MSDP was frequent (22%) associating with paternal smoking (p adolescents whose mothers had smoked during pregnancy than among those whose mothers were nonsmokers (p = .002 boys, p = .012 girls). The association between MSDP and MS pain at 16 years was mediated by externalizing problems at 8 years (p adolescence, and the association was mediated by offspring's externalizing problems during childhood and early adolescence. This study indicates that MSDP increases the risk of MS pain in adolescence and the effect is mediated by externalizing problems. Our results add to the evidence on harmfulness of MSDP for offspring, and can be used as additional information in interventions aiming to influence MSDP. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Trigger Points of Myofascial Pain Syndrome in a Rabbit Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Kyung Mi; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Sang Heon; Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Han Kyum

    2005-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) have been repeatedly described by numerous authors. However, there have been few studies in which their existence and behavior was supported and their location confirmed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diagnostic ultrasonography is an objective diagnostic tool which is able to significantly identify or detect the soft tissue changes in the region of clinically identified active MTrPs by using a rabbit experimental model. Ten MPS model rabbits were used in this study. We made an MPS animal model by causing the rabbits to overuse one leg for 3 weeks by cutting the contralateral L4 spinal nerve root. We compared the ultrasonographic findings of the taut band at pre-OP with those at post-OP during the consecutive three week period. To find the taut bands of the muscle, after skin exposure, the muscles were gently rubbed or pinched with the thumb and index finger on the two opposing surfaces of the muscle across the direction of the fibers. Then, the muscle was held in the same way, but with a 5-8 MHz stick probe being used in place of the thumb. After the palpation of various muscles, we selected the hardest and largest myofascial trigger nodule, in order to observe the ultrasonographic and power Doppler findings of the MPS. The size, shape, echogenecity and vascularity of the MTrPs were observed. The analysis of the results of the ultrasonography revealed that all MTrPs have a hyperechoic area. The mean thickness of the hyperechoic lesion in the biceps was 0.96±0.14 cm in the MPS site (at pre-OP?), and 0.49±0.12 cm at post-OP 3weeks (p < 0.01). The hyperechoic lesions in all of the studied biceps femoris of the rabbits were observed by high resolution ultrasonography. No definitively decreased vascularity was observed within the hyperechoic area by power Doppler imaging. Until now, there has been no objective method for the diagnosis of MPS

  13. Modeling the onset and offset of dental pain relief by ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanbin; Mandema, Jaap; Wada, Russell; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Desjardins, Paul; Doyle, Geraldine; Kellstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Onset and offset of dental pain relief by ibuprofen following third molar extraction were modeled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, 8-hour study of patients receiving either a novel effervescent ibuprofen tablet (400 mg; N = 30), standard ibuprofen tablets (Nurofen(®) 2 × 200 mg; N = 22), or placebo (N = 37). An Emax model was fit to pain relief scores. Linear hazard models were used to analyze the time to first perceptible relief (TFPR), the time to meaningful pain relief (TMPR), and time to remedication (REMD). Nomograms were created to correlate TFPR, TMPR, and REMD with different ibuprofen pharmacokinetic profiles. Effervescent ibuprofen was absorbed rapidly with 95% completion within 15 minutes. Maximum pain relief score by ibuprofen was 1.8 units greater than placebo, with an EC50 (effect-site) for ibuprofen concentration of 10.2 µg·mL(-1). The likelihood to achieve TFPR and TMPR was doubled for every 10 µg·mL(-1) increase in ibuprofen plasma concentration. REMD risk decreased 40-fold as the categorical pain relief score increased from 0 to 3. Rapid absorption of ibuprofen effervescent resulted in an earlier TFPR and TMPR, and a lower REMD rate than standard ibuprofen. The nomograms may be useful in predicting the onset and offset of new faster acting ibuprofen formulations, based on pharmacokinetic profiles.

  14. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  15. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, E.; Lormand, G.; Gobin, P.F.; Fougeres, R.

    1993-01-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.)

  16. Experimental Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2018-02-01

    The Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) of Bijker and Iachello that was proposed already in 2000 has been recently applied to 12C and 16O with much success. We review the current status in 12C with the outstanding observation of the ground state rotational band composed of the spin-parity states of: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4± and 5-. The observation of the 4± parity doublet is a characteristic of (tri-atomic) molecular configuration where the three alpha- particles are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration of a symmetric spinning top. We discuss future measurement with electron scattering, 12C(e,e’) to test the predicted B(Eλ) of the ACM.

  17. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  18. Comparison of Repeated Measurement Design and Mixed Models in Evaluation of the Entonox Effect on Labor Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Karimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In many medical studies, the response variable is measured repeatedly over time to evaluate the treatment effect that is known as longitudinal study. The analysis method for this type of data is repeated measures ANOVA that uses only one correlation structure and the results are not valid with inappropriate correlation structure. To avoid this problem, a convenient alternative is mixed models. So, the aim of this study was to compare of mixed and repeated measurement models for examination of the Entonox effect on the labor pain. Methods: This experimental study was designed to compare the effect of Entonox and oxygen inhalation on pain relief between two groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement and mixed models with different correlation structures. Selection and comparison of proper correlation structures performed using Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion and restricted log-likelihood. Data were analyzed using SPSS-22. Results: Results of our study showed that all variables containing analgesia methods, labor duration of the first and second stages, and time were significant in these tests. In mixed model, heterogeneous first-order autoregressive, first-order autoregressive, heterogeneous Toeplitz and unstructured correlation structures were recognized as the best structures. Also, all variables were significant in these structures. Unstructured variance covariance matrix was recognized as the worst structure and labor duration of the first and second stages was not significant in this structure. Conclusions: This study showed that the Entonox inhalation has a significant effect on pain relief in primiparous and it is confirmed by all of the models.

  19. Multiphysics modelling and experimental validation of high concentration photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theristis, Marios; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Sumner, Mike; O'Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A multiphysics modelling approach for concentrating photovoltaics was developed. • An experimental campaign was conducted to validate the models. • The experimental results were in good agreement with the models. • The multiphysics modelling allows the concentrator’s optimisation. - Abstract: High concentration photovoltaics, equipped with high efficiency multijunction solar cells, have great potential in achieving cost-effective and clean electricity generation at utility scale. Such systems are more complex compared to conventional photovoltaics because of the multiphysics effect that is present. Modelling the power output of such systems is therefore crucial for their further market penetration. Following this line, a multiphysics modelling procedure for high concentration photovoltaics is presented in this work. It combines an open source spectral model, a single diode electrical model and a three-dimensional finite element thermal model. In order to validate the models and the multiphysics modelling procedure against actual data, an outdoor experimental campaign was conducted in Albuquerque, New Mexico using a high concentration photovoltaic monomodule that is thoroughly described in terms of its geometry and materials. The experimental results were in good agreement (within 2.7%) with the predicted maximum power point. This multiphysics approach is relatively more complex when compared to empirical models, but besides the overall performance prediction it can also provide better understanding of the physics involved in the conversion of solar irradiance into electricity. It can therefore be used for the design and optimisation of high concentration photovoltaic modules.

  20. Experimental tests of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-01-01

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of α EM in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G F , most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered

  1. The Development of a Technology-Based Hierarchy to Assess Chronic Low Back Pain and Pain-Related Anxiety From a Fear-Avoidance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen S; George, Steven Z; Robinson, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have not examined the assessment of chronic low back pain (CLBP) and pain-related anxiety from a fear avoidance model through the use of motion-capture software and virtual human technologies. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an interactive, technologically based hierarchy that can be used to assess patients with pain and pain-related anxiety. We enrolled 30 licensed physical therapists and 30 participants with CLBP. Participants rated 21 video clips of a 3-D animated character (avatar) engaging in activities that are typically feared by patients with CLBP. The results of the study indicate that physical therapists found the virtual hierarchy clips acceptable and depicted realistic patient experiences. Most participants with CLBP reported at least 1 video clip as being sufficiently anxiety-provoking for use clinically. Therefore, this study suggests a hierarchy of fears can be created out of 21 virtual patient video clips paving the way for future clinical use in patients with CLBP. This report describes the development of a computer-based virtual patient system for the assessment of back pain-related fear and anxiety. Results show that people with back pain as well as physical therapists found the avatar to be realistic, and the depictions of behavior anxiety- and fear-provoking. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutant mice: experimental organisms as materialised models in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Lara; Keuck, Lara K

    2013-09-01

    Animal models have received particular attention as key examples of material models. In this paper, we argue that the specificities of establishing animal models-acknowledging their status as living beings and as epistemological tools-necessitate a more complex account of animal models as materialised models. This becomes particularly evident in animal-based models of diseases that only occur in humans: in these cases, the representational relation between animal model and human patient needs to be generated and validated. The first part of this paper presents an account of how disease-specific animal models are established by drawing on the example of transgenic mice models for Alzheimer's disease. We will introduce an account of validation that involves a three-fold process including (1) from human being to experimental organism; (2) from experimental organism to animal model; and (3) from animal model to human patient. This process draws upon clinical relevance as much as scientific practices and results in disease-specific, yet incomplete, animal models. The second part of this paper argues that the incompleteness of models can be described in terms of multi-level abstractions. We qualify this notion by pointing to different experimental techniques and targets of modelling, which give rise to a plurality of models for a specific disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nursing patients with acute chest pain: practice guided by the Prince Edward Island conceptual model for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Janelle F; Murnaghan, Donna A

    2010-01-01

    Current research suggests that pain is a relatively common phenomenon with 60-90% of patients presenting to emergency departments reporting pain (e.g., chest pain, trauma, extremity fractures and migraine headache) that require treatment [Hogan, S.L., 2005. Patient satisfaction with pain management in the emergency department. Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal 27(4), 284-294]. This article explores the use of conceptual theoretical empirical (C-T-E) framework to guide a senior nursing student in a case study of patient with chest pain. The Middle Range Theory of Pain described by Good [Good, M., 1998. A middle-range theory of acute pain management: use in research. Nursing Outlook 46(3), 120-124] and Melzack's [Melzack, R., 1987. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire. Pain, 30, 191-197] short form McGill pain questionnaire were applied along with the Prince Edward Island conceptual model (PEICM) for nursing. Results indicate that the nursing student increased her ability to work in partnership, assess relevant and specific information, and identify a number of strategies to help the patient achieve pain control by using a complement of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Moreover, the C-T-E approach provided an organized and systematic theoretical approach for the nursing student to assist a patient in pain control.

  4. Short-Term Sensorimotor Effects of Experimental Occlusal Interferences on the Wake-Time Masseter Muscle Activity of Females with Masticatory Muscle Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Farella, Mauro; Festa, Paola; Martina, Roberto; Palla, Sandro; Michelotti, Ambrosina

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the application of an acute alteration of the occlusion (ie, interference) on the habitual masseter electromyographic (EMG) activity of females with temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related muscular pain during wakefulness. Seven female volunteers with masticatory myofascial pain participated in a crossover randomized clinical trial. Gold foils were glued on an occlusal contact area (active occlusal interference, AI) or on the vestibular surface of the same molar (dummy interference, DI) and left for 8 days. The masseter electromyogram was recorded during wakefulness in the natural environment by portable recorders under interference-free, dummy-interference, and active-interference conditions. The number, amplitude, and duration of EMG signal fractions with amplitudes above 10% of the maximum voluntary contraction (activity periods, APs) were computed in all experimental conditions. Muscle pain, headache, and perceived stress were each assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS), and an algometer was used to assess masseter and temporalis pressure pain thresholds. Data were analyzed by means of analysis of variance. The frequency and duration of the recorded APs did not differ significantly between the experimental conditions (P>.05), but a small and significant reduction of the EMG mean amplitude of the APs occurred with AI (P.05). An active occlusal interference in female volunteers with masticatory muscle pain had little influence on the masseter EMG activity pattern during wakefulness and did not affect the pressure tenderness of the masseter and temporalis.

  5. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  6. The experimental and shell model approach to 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Maier, K.H.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Heese, J.; Spohr, K.; Schubart, R.; Gorska, M.; Rejmund, M.

    1995-01-01

    The present status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and its shell model structure is given. New developments in experimental techniques, such as low background isomer spectroscopy and charged particle detection in 4π are surveyed. Based on recent experimental data shell model calculations are used to predict the structure of the single- and two-nucleon neighbours of 100 Sn. The results are compared to the systematic of Coulomb energies and spin-orbit splitting and discussed with respect to future experiments. (author). 51 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  7. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Pain Responses and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Acute Gout Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Chai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute gout arthritis is one of the most painful inflammatory conditions. Treatments for gout pain are limited to colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids, which oftentimes result in severe adverse effects. Electroacupuncture (EA has been proved to be effective in relieving many inflammatory pain conditions with few side effects. Here, we aim to investigate the therapeutic potentials of EA on pain and inflammation of a rat model of acute gout arthritis and underlying mechanisms. We found that 2/100 Hz EA produced the most robust analgesic effect on mechanical hyperalgesia of acute gout arthritis rat model compared with 2 and 100 Hz. EA produced similar analgesic effect compared with indomethacin. 2/100 Hz EA also significantly alleviates the ongoing pain behavior, thermal hyperalgesia, and ankle edema. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor antagonists but not adenosine A1 receptor antagonist significantly abolished the analgesic effect of EA. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor agonists produced significant antiallodynia on acute gout arthritis rats, mimicking EA. Furthermore, 2/100 Hz EA upregulated β-endorphin expression in inflamed ankle skin tissue. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that EA can be used for relieving acute gout arthritis with effect dependent on peripheral opioid system and comparable with the one obtained with indomethacin.

  8. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  9. An experimental examination of catastrophizing-related interpretation bias for ambiguous facial expressions of pain using an incidental learning task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eKHATIBI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with pain-related concerns are likely to interpret ambiguous pain-related information in a threatening manner. It is unknown whether this interpretation bias also occurs for ambiguous pain-related facial expressions. This study examined whether individuals who habitually attach a catastrophic meaning to pain are characterized by negative interpretation bias for ambiguous pain-related facial expressions. Sixty-four female undergraduates completed an incidental learning task during which pictures of faces were presented, each followed by a visual target at one of two locations. Participants indicated target location by pressing one of two response keys. During the learning phase, happy and painful facial expressions predicted target location. During two test phases, morphed facial expressions of pain and happiness were added, equally often followed by a target at either location. Faster responses following morphs to targets at the location predicted by painful expressions compared to targets at the location predicted by happy expressions were taken to reflect pain-related interpretation bias. During one test phase, faces were preceded by either a safe or threatening context cue. High, but not low, pain-catastrophizers responded faster following morphs to targets at the location predicted by painful expressions than to targets at the other location (when participants were aware of the contingency between expression type and target location. When context cues were presented, there was no indication of interpretation bias. Participants were also asked to directly classify the facial expressions that were presented during the incidental learning task. Participants classified morphs more often as happy than as painful, independent of their level of pain catastrophizing. This observation is discussed in terms of differences between indirect and direct measures of interpretation bias.

  10. Effects of low energy shock wave therapy on inflammatory moleculars, bladder pain, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Lee, Wei-Chia; Tyagi, Pradeep; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    Low energy shock wave (LESW) is known to facilitate tissue regeneration with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We examined the effects of LESW on the expression of inflammatory molecules, pain behavior, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model. Control and experimental animals were injected with saline or cyclophosphamide (CYP; 75 mg/kg intraperitoneally) on day 1 and 4. After lower midline incision, the bladders were exposed to LESW (300 pulses, 0.12 mJ/mm 2 ) or sham operation on day 2. In study 1 (N = 12, 4 for each group), the nociceptive effects of CYP were evaluated for 30 min by behavioral assessment on day 4 one hour after CYP injection. In study 2 (N = 21, 7 for each group), continuous cystometry (CMG) was performed on day 8. The bladder was harvested after behavioral assessment or CMG for histology and Western blotting. CYP-induced upregulation of COX2 and IL6 expression, caused pain behavior (eye closing and hypolocomotion), and bladder inflammation was noted on days 4 and 8 along with bladder hyperactivity. LESW treatment reduced pain behavior and downregulated the NGF expression (33.3%, P < 0.05) on day 4 and IL6 (40.9%, P < 0.05). LESW treatment suppressed bladder overactivity (intercontraction interval 77.8% increase, P < 0.05) by decreasing inflammation and COX2 (38.6%, P < 0.05) expression and NGF expression (25.2%, P = 0.0812). CYP-induced bladder pain, inflammation, and overactivity involves activation of IL6, NGF, and COX2 expression. These changes are suppressed by LESW, indicating it as a potential candidate for relieving bladder inflammatory conditions and overactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Investigation into the effects of using two or four acupuncture needles with bidirectional rotation on experimentally-induced contact heat pain in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Carole A; Johnson, Mark I

    2015-02-01

    There is growing evidence from experimental studies that the acupuncture dose or technique influences the speed of onset of hypoalgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture using two or four needles on experimental contact thermal pain in healthy volunteers. Forty two participants were randomised into three groups: four-needle group (LI4, LI11, LI10, TE5), two-needle group (verum at LI4, LI11 and mock at LI10, TE5) and mock acupuncture group (LI4, LI11, LI10, TE5). Each participant rated pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS) to a series of noxious stimuli administered to the forearm 2°C above the heat pain threshold during needling and immediately after removal of the needles. Experimentally-induced heat pain intensity (VAS) during and after the intervention was lower than pre-intervention but there were no statistically significant differences in this change between groups. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in the time taken for pain intensity to decrease by 33% from pre-intervention. However, a 33% decrease in pain intensity within 3 min of needle insertion was observed for 13 participants (92.9%) in the four-needle group compared with 66.7% of participants in the two-needle group and 57.1% in the mock acupuncture group. There was less variance in VAS in the four-needle group, suggesting more consistency in hypoalgesic response when using more needles. There is tentative evidence that four needles may be superior to two needles in generating rapid onset hypoalgesia. The findings suggest that further investigation is warranted. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslaksen PM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Per M Aslaksen,1 Peter S Lyby2 1Department of Psychology, Research Group for Cognitive Neuroscience, The Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 2Catosenteret Rehabilitation Center, Son, Norway Abstract: Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality

  13. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagen J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Sagen, Daniel A Castellanos,† Aldric T Hama The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA †Daniel A Castellanos passed away on April 14, 2010 Background: A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain.Methods: The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks.Results: By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the

  14. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Analgesic effect of the neuropeptide cortistatin in murine models of arthritic inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Souza-Moreira, Luciana; Caro, Marta; O'Valle, Francisco; Forte-Lago, Irene; de Lecea, Luis; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role of the antiinflammatory neuropeptide cortistatin in chronic pain evoked by joint inflammation. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked in mouse knee joints by intraplantar injection of tumor necrosis factor α and intraarticular infusion of Freund's complete adjuvant, and the analgesic effects of cortistatin, administered centrally, peripherally, and systemically, were assessed. In addition, the effects of cortistatin on the production of nociceptive peptides and the activation of pain signaling were assayed in dorsal root ganglion cultures and in inflammatory pain models. The role of endogenous cortistatin in pain sensitization and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory states was evaluated in cortistatin-deficient mice. Finally, the effect of noxious/inflammatory stimuli in the production of cortistatin by the peripheral nociceptive system was assayed in vitro and in vivo. Expression of cortistatin was observed in peptidergic nociceptors of the peripheral nociceptive system, and endogenous cortistatin was found to participate in the tuning of pain sensitization, especially in pathologic inflammatory conditions. Results showed that cortistatin acted both peripherally and centrally to reduce the tactile allodynia and heat hyperalgesia evoked by arthritis and peripheral tissue inflammation in mice, via mechanisms that were independent of its antiinflammatory action. These mechanisms involved direct action on nociceptive neurons and regulation of central sensitization. The analgesic effects of cortistatin in murine arthritic pain were linked to binding of the neuropeptide to somatostatin and ghrelin receptors, activation of the G protein subunit Gαi , impairment of ERK signaling, and decreased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide in primary nociceptors. These findings indicate that cortistatin is an antiinflammatory factor with potent analgesic effects that may offer a new approach to pain therapy in pathologic inflammatory

  16. The role of G-protein receptor 84 in experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Louise S C; Dawes, John M; La Russa, Federica; Didangelos, Athanasios; Clark, Anna K; Gentry, Clive; Grist, John; Davies, John B; Malcangio, Marzia; McMahon, Stephen B

    2015-06-10

    G-protein receptor 84 (GPR84) is an orphan receptor that is induced markedly in monocytes/macrophages and microglia during inflammation, but its pathophysiological function is unknown. Here, we investigate the role of GPR84 in a murine model of traumatic nerve injury. Naive GPR84 knock-out (KO) mice exhibited normal behavioral responses to acute noxious stimuli, but subsequent to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PNL), KOs did not develop mechanical or thermal hypersensitivity, in contrast to wild-type (WT) littermates. Nerve injury increased ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and phosphorylated p38 MAPK immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn and Iba1 and cluster of differentiation 45 expression in the sciatic nerve, with no difference between genotypes. PCR array analysis revealed that Gpr84 expression was upregulated in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve of WT mice. In addition, the expression of arginase-1, a marker for anti-inflammatory macrophages, was upregulated in KO sciatic nerve. Based on this evidence, we investigated whether peripheral macrophages behave differently in the absence of GPR84. We found that lipopolysaccharide-stimulated KO macrophages exhibited attenuated expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Forskolin-stimulated KO macrophages also showed greater cAMP induction, a second messenger associated with immunosuppression. In summary, our results demonstrate that GPR84 is a proinflammatory receptor that contributes to nociceptive signaling via the modulation of macrophages, whereas in its absence the response of these cells to an inflammatory insult is impaired. Copyright © 2015 Nicol et al.

  17. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, A.; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Heegaard, A.-M.

    2013-01-01

    following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms......Background: GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a " pain-protective" (PP) haplotype...... of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH...

  18. Effect of tramadol on pain-related behaviors and bladder overactivity in rodent cystitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Tatsuya; Homan, Takashi; Kyotani, Junko; Oka, Michiko

    2012-02-15

    Tramadol is a widely used analgesic that stimulates the μ opioid receptor and inhibits serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake. There have been studies on the analgesic effects of tramadol based on the tail-flick test, the formalin test, and the induction of allodynia by sciatic-nerve ligation. However, the effects of tramadol on behaviors related to bladder pain and bladder overactivity induced by cystitis have not been reported. To investigate the usefulness of tramadol for patients with cystitis, we investigated these effects of tramadol in rodent cystitis models. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide caused bladder-specific inflammation and increases in pain-related behaviors, the number of voids and bladder weight in mice. Tramadol suppressed the cyclophosphamide-induced pain-related behaviors but did not affect the number of voids or the bladder weight. During continuous-infusion cystometrograms in anesthetized rats, cyclophosphamide shortened the intercontraction interval, indicating bladder overactivity. Tramadol significantly prolonged the intercontraction interval, and the effect was partially blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone. This finding indicates that μ opioid receptors may be involved in the action of tramadol. In conclusion, tramadol ameliorated cyclophosphamide-induced bladder-pain-related behaviors and bladder overactivity in rodents. These findings suggest that tramadol might be a treatment option for cystitis-induced bladder pain and bladder overactivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxun Lei

    Full Text Available Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct "knock-in" strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain.

  20. Review for 'Nattoh' model and experimental findings during cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki

    1993-01-01

    A review is described for the Nattoh model that provides the framework of the mechanisms of cold fusion. The model classifies the reactions into two categories: fundamental and associated reactions. The former involves the new 'hydrogen-catalyzed' fusion reaction and the chain-reactions of hydrogens. And extremely exciting physics are involved in the latter. Furthermore experimental findings are described. (author)

  1. Antinociceptive effect of intrathecal microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cell in a rat model of bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Li, Guoqi; Wu, Shaoling; Zhang, Baiyu; Wan, Qing; Yu, Ding; Zhou, Ruijun; Ma, Chao

    2014-07-08

    Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l) lysine-alginate (APA) microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain.

  2. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Microencapsulated Human Pheochromocytoma Cell in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l lysine-alginate (APA microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain.

  3. Using zero-inflated models to explain chronic illness, pain, and complementary and alternative medicine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Stephanie L; Kronenfeld, Jennie J

    2011-07-01

    To extend knowledge of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by understanding how poor health influences both trying CAM and number of CAM types used. Using the 2002 National Health Interview Survey's Supplemental Section, zero-inflated models were employed to examine CAM use across 5 domains. Results indicate that level of pain is the only consistent predictor of both the likelihood of trying CAM and how many types of CAM are used. Pain increased the odds ratio and number of CAM types used across all domains. Findings, however, were mixed for health status and chronic conditions. Only prayer was associated with higher odds ratio (OR=1.705, PCAM types used for chronic illnesses (OR=1.024, PCAM use behaviors. Pain is the only consistent predictor of both trying CAM and the number of CAM types used. Chronic illness is only consistently influential for prayer.

  4. Experimental study and modeling of a novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Li, Weihua; Sun, Shuaishuai; Du, Haiping; Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Deng, H X

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental setup aiming at evaluating the performance of a newly designed magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) seismic isolator. As a further effort to explore the field-dependent stiffness/damping properties of the MRE isolator, a series of experimental testing were conducted. Based upon the analysis of the experimental responses and the characteristics of the MRE isolator, a new model that is capable of reproducing the unique MRE isolator dynamics behaviors is proposed. The validation results verify the model’s effectiveness to portray the MRE isolator. A study on the field-dependent parameters is then provided to make the model valid with fluctuating magnetic fields. To fully explore the mechanism of the proposed model, an investigation relating the dependence of the proposed model on every parameter is carried out. (technical note)

  5. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Michaël [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vinken, Mathieu, E-mail: mvinken@vub.ac.be [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. - Highlights: • The murine APAP model is very close to what is observed in patients. • The Gal/ET model is useful to study TNFα-mediated apoptotic signaling mechanisms. • Fas receptor activation is an effective model of apoptosis and secondary necrosis. • The ConA model is a relevant model of auto-immune hepatitis and viral hepatitis. • Multiple time point evaluation needed in experimental models of acute liver injury.

  6. Local ASIC3 modulates pain and disease progression in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Masashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data have suggested a relationship between acute arthritic pain and acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 on primary afferent fibers innervating joints. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of ASIC3 in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA which is considered a degenerative rather than an inflammatory disease. Methods We induced OA via intra-articular mono-iodoacetate (MIA injection, and evaluated pain-related behaviors including weight bearing measured with an incapacitance tester and paw withdrawal threshold in a von Frey hair test, histology of affected knee joint, and immunohistochemistry of knee joint afferents. We also assessed the effect of ASIC3 selective peptide blocker (APETx2 on pain behavior, disease progression, and ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents. Results OA rats showed not only weight-bearing pain but also mechanical hyperalgesia outside the knee joint (secondary hyperalgesia. ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents was significantly upregulated approximately twofold at Day 14. Continuous intra-articular injections of APETx2 inhibited weight distribution asymmetry and secondary hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents. Histology of ipsilateral knee joint showed APETx2 worked chondroprotectively if administered in the early, but not late phase. Conclusions Local ASIC3 immunoreactive nerve is strongly associated with weight-bearing pain and secondary hyperalgesia in MIA-induced OA model. APETx2 inhibited ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents regardless of the time-point of administration. Furthermore, early administration of APETx2 prevented cartilage damage. APETx2 is a novel, promising drug for OA by relieving pain and inhibiting disease progression.

  7. Stage-dependent analgesia of electro-acupuncture in a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Cui, Ke-Mi; Liu, Qiong; Dong, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Sha, Hong; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2006-11-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most effective alternative medical treatments in pain management with the advantages of simple application, low cost and minimal side effects. However its scientific evidence and laws of action are not very clear in cancer pain relieving. The aim of this study was to examine the immediate and therapeutic anti-hyperalgesic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain. B16-BL6 melanoma cells were inoculated into the plantar region of unilateral hind paw and the thermal hyperalgesia was measured by using radiant heat test and hot plate test. C57BL/6 mice showed moderate and marked hyperalgesia during days 8-12 and from day 14 after the orthotopic inoculation of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into the hind paw. Single EA on day 8 after inoculation showed significant analgesic effect immediately after the treatment, the analgesic effect reached its maximum within 15-30min and declined to its minimum at 50min after EA treatment. Single EA treatment on day 20 showed no significant analgesic effect; Repeated EA treatments (started from day 8, once every other day) showed therapeutic analgesic effect, while it showed no therapeutic effect when started from day 16, a relatively late stage of this cancer pain model. The results demonstrated that EA had anti-hyperalgesic effect on early stage of cutaneous cancer pain but not on late stage. These results indicated a tight correlation of EA anti-hyperalgesic effects with the time window of cancer pain.

  8. Possible analgesic effect of vigabatrin in animal experimental chronic neuropathic pain Possível efeito analgésico da vigabatrina na dor neuropática crônica experimental animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NILZA D. ALVES

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Since anticonvulsants have been used for treating neuralgias, an interest has arisen to experimentally test vigabatrin for its gabaergic mechanism of action. For this, 41 Wistar rats were used, and in 25 of them a constrictive sciatic neuropathy was induced (Bennet & Xie model. For testing pain symptoms, spontaneous (scratching and evoked behaviors to noxious (46o C and non-noxious (40o C thermal stimuli were quantified. Moreover, a comparative pharmacological study of vigabatrin with other analgesic anticonvulsant drugs was also performed. The results showed a possible dose-dependent analgesic effect of vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl-GABA on experimental neuropathic pain, as shown by the significant (pO uso de anticonvulsivantes no tratamento de neuralgias despertou um interesse em testar novas drogas anticonvulsivantes, e dentre essas a vigabatrina por possuir mecanismo de ação gabaérgico. Para isso, foram usados 41 ratos Wistar e em 25 deles induziu-se neuropatia ciática constritiva (modelo de Bennett & Xie. Para testar sintomas de dor, foram quantificados comportamentos espontâneos (coçar-se e evocados, por meio de estímulos térmicos nocivos (46oC e não-nocivos (40oC. Além disso, realizou-se estudo comparativo da vigabatrina com outros anticonvulsivantes analgésicos. Os resultados mostraram um possível efeito analgésico, dose-dependente, de vigabatrina (gama-vinil-GABA em dor neuropática experimental. Isso foi evidenciado pela diminuição significativa (p<0,05 do comportamento de coçar-se e pelo aumento significativo (p<0,05 da latência de retirada da pata posterior direita a estímulos térmicos nocivos. Isso foi corroborado por achados semelhantes em experimentos com anticonvulsivantes (carbamazepina, fenitoína e ácido valpróico analgésicos. Esse possível efeito analgésico da vigabatrina (ainda não descrito na literatura não é mediado pelo sistema opióide.

  9. Preventive Treatment with Ketamine Attenuates the Ischaemia-Reperfusion Response in a Chronic Postischaemia Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryamin Liman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia and inflammation may be pathophysiological mechanisms of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. Ketamine has proposed anti-inflammatory effects and has been used for treating CRPS. This study aimed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ketamine after ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a chronic postischaemia pain (CPIP model of CRPS-I. Using this model, ischemia was induced in the hindlimbs of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Ketamine, methylprednisolone, or saline was administered immediately after reperfusion. Physical effects, (oedema, temperature, and mechanical and cold allodynia in the bilateral hindpaws, were assessed from 48 hours after reperfusion. Fewer (56% rats in the ketamine group developed CPIP at the 48th hour after reperfusion (nonsignificant. Ketamine treated rats showed a significantly lower temperature in the ischaemic hindpaw compared to saline (P<0.01 and methylprednisolone (P<0.05 groups. Mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly lower in the ischaemic side in the ketamine group (P<0.05. Proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-2 were significantly lower at the 48th hour after reperfusion in ketamine and methylprednisolone groups, compared to saline (all P<0.05. In conclusion, immediate administration of ketamine after an ischaemia-reperfusion injury can alleviate pain and inflammation in the CPIP model and has potential to treat postischaemic pain.

  10. A mouse model for chronic pain-induced increase in ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ryan K; Knapp, Darin J; Ulici, Veronica; Longobardi, Lara; Loeser, Richard F; Breese, George R

    2017-03-01

    Chronic pain conditions are often comorbid with alcohol abuse. "Self-medication" with alcohol introduces a host of problems associated with the abuse of alcohol which over time has the potential of exacerbating the painful condition. Despite the prevalence of chronic pain being associated with alcohol abuse, rodent models which mimic the comorbid conditions are lacking. In this study, we model osteoarthritis (OA) in C57BL/6J mice by surgically destabilizing the medial meniscus (DMM). Sham-operated mice served as controls. Thirteen weeks after surgery, DMM but not sham-operated mice exhibited pronounced incapacitance of the surgically manipulated hind limb compared with the nonsurgically manipulated hind limb. At this time, the mice were exposed to the 2-bottle ethanol choice, beginning with 2.5% with a gradual increasing to 20%. Compared with sham controls, DMM mice consumed more EtOH and preferred EtOH over water at the 20% EtOH concentration. Histological analysis verified that the DMM mice exhibited significant damage to the articular cartilage and osteophyte growth compared with sham controls and these measures of the severity of OA correlated with the amount of ethanol intake. Thus, the combination of the DMM model of OA with the enhanced two-bottle ethanol choice is a potential preclinical approach in mice by which the basis of the comorbid association of alcohol abuse and chronic pain conditions can be explored.

  11. Dynamic changes to the endocannabinoid system in models of chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Sagar, Devi; Burston, James J.; Woodhams, Stephen G.; Chapman, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The analgesic effects of cannabinoid ligands, mediated by CB1 receptors are well established. However, the side-effect profile of CB1 receptor ligands has necessitated the search for alternative cannabinoid-based approaches to analgesia. Herein, we review the current literature describing the impact of chronic pain states on the key components of the endocannabinoid receptor system, in terms of regionally restricted changes in receptor expression and levels of key metabolic enzymes that influence the local levels of the endocannabinoids. The evidence that spinal CB2 receptors have a novel role in the modulation of nociceptive processing in models of neuropathic pain, as well as in models of cancer pain and arthritis is discussed. Recent advances in our understanding of the spinal location of the key enzymes that regulate the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG are discussed alongside the outcomes of recent studies of the effects of inhibiting the catabolism of 2-AG in models of pain. The complexities of the enzymes capable of metabolizing both anandamide (AEA) and 2-AG have become increasingly apparent. More recently, it has come to light that some of the metabolites of AEA and 2-AG generated by cyclooxygenase-2, lipoxygenases and cytochrome P450 are biologically active and can either exacerbate or inhibit nociceptive signalling. PMID:23108548

  12. Cost-effectiveness modeling for neuropathic pain treatments: investigating the relative importance of parameters using an open-source model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Matthew; Bending, Matthew W; Baio, Gianluca; Yesufu-Udechuku, Amina; Dunlop, William C N

    2018-06-08

    The study objective was to develop an open-source replicate of a cost-effectiveness model developed by National Institute for Health and Care (NICE) in order to explore uncertainties in health economic modeling of novel pharmacological neuropathic pain treatments. The NICE model, consisting of a decision tree with branches for discrete levels of pain relief and adverse event (AE) severities, was replicated using R and used to compare a hypothetical neuropathic pain drug to pregabalin. Model parameters were sourced from NICE's clinical guidelines and associated with probability distributions to account for underlying uncertainty. A simulation-based scenario analysis was conducted to assess how uncertainty in efficacy and AEs affected the net monetary benefit (NMB) for the hypothetical treatment at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per QALY. Relative to pregabalin, an increase in efficacy was associated with greater NMB than an improvement in tolerability. A greater NMB was observed when efficacy was marginally higher than that of pregabalin while maintaining the same level of AEs than when efficacy was equivalent to pregabalin but with a more substantial reduction in AEs. In the latter scenario, the NMB was only positive at a low cost-effectiveness threshold. The replicate model shares the limitations described in the NICE guidelines. There is a lack of support in scientific literature for the assumption that increased efficacy is associated with a greater reduction in tolerability. The replicate model also included a single comparator, unlike the NICE model. Pain relief is a stronger driver of NMB than tolerability at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per QALY. Health technology assessment decisions which are influenced by NICE's model may reward efficacy gains even if they are associated with more severe AEs. This contrasts with recommendations from clinical guidelines for neuropathic pain which place more equal weighting on improvements in

  13. Cognitive bias in back pain patients attending osteopathy: testing the enmeshment model in reference to future thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jessica; Pincus, Tamar

    2004-12-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in chronic pain. Previous research has found differences in information-processing biases in depressed pain patients and depressed people without pain. The schema enmeshment model of pain (SEMP) has been proposed to explain chronic pain patients' information-processing biases. Negative future thinking is common in depression but has not been explored in relation to chronic pain and information-processing models. The study aimed to test the SEMP with reference to future thinking. An information-processing paradigm compared endorsement and recall bias between depressed and non-depressed chronic low back pain patients and control participants. Twenty-five depressed and 35 non-depressed chronic low back pain patients and 25 control participants (student osteopaths) were recruited from an osteopathy practice. Participants were asked to endorse positive and negative ill-health, depression-related, and neutral (control) adjectives, encoded in reference to either current or future time-frame. Incidental recall of the adjectives was then tested. While the expected hypothesis of a recall bias by depressed pain patients towards ill-health stimuli in the current condition was confirmed, the recall bias was not present in the future condition. Additionally, patterns of endorsement and recall bias differed. Results extend understanding of future thinking in chronic pain within the context of the SEMP.

  14. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  15. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  16. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  17. Pain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foulkes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which afflicts up to 20% of the population at any time, provides both a massive therapeutic challenge and a route to understanding mechanisms in the nervous system. Specialised sensory neurons (nociceptors signal the existence of tissue damage to the central nervous system (CNS, where pain is represented in a complex matrix involving many CNS structures. Genetic approaches to investigating pain pathways using model organisms have identified the molecular nature of the transducers, regulatory mechanisms involved in changing neuronal activity, as well as the critical role of immune system cells in driving pain pathways. In man, mapping of human pain mutants as well as twin studies and association studies of altered pain behaviour have identified important regulators of the pain system. In turn, new drug targets for chronic pain treatment have been validated in transgenic mouse studies. Thus, genetic studies of pain pathways have complemented the traditional neuroscience approaches of electrophysiology and pharmacology to give us fresh insights into the molecular basis of pain perception.

  18. Experimental integrative muscular movement technique enhances cervical range of motion in patients with chronic neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohe, Benjamin G; Carter, Ronald; Thompson, William R; Duncan, Randall L; Cooper, Carlton R

    2015-04-01

    Neck pain presents a tremendous physical and financial burden. This study compared the efficacy of the complementary and alternative medical treatments of integrative muscular movement technique (IMMT) and Swedish massage on neck pain in women of occupation age, the largest demographic group with neck pain. A total of 38 women were assigned to IMMT (n=28) or Swedish massage (n=10) in a blinded manner. Both groups received eight 30-minute treatments over 4 weeks. Cervical range of motion (ROM) in flexion, extension, sidebending, and rotation was measured before and after treatment. Each patient's pain was assessed by using an analogue pain scale of 0-10. Compared with the Swedish massage group, patients receiving IMMT experienced a significant increase in ROM in cervical flexion (ppain for IMMT was -1.75 units compared with -0.3 units for Swedish massage (pcervical ROM in every movement measured compared with Swedish massage. Inclusion of the IMMT in a treatment regimen for chronic neck pain may lead to decreased pain and increased cervical ROM. These positive effects of the IMMT intervention may have a role in enhancing functional outcomes in patients with neck pain.

  19. No effect of experimental occlusal interferences on pressure pain thresholds of the masseter and temporalis muscles in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, A; Farella, M; Steenks, M H; Gallo, L M; Palla, S

    2006-04-01

    It has been suggested that occlusal interferences may lead to pain and tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Tender jaw muscles are more sensitive to pressure pain, as assessed by means of pressure algometry. We tested the effects of occlusal interferences on the pressure pain threshold of the jaw muscles by means of a double-blind randomized crossover experiment carried out on 11 young healthy females. Golden strips were glued either to an occlusal contact area (active interference) or to the vestibular surface of the same tooth (dummy interference) and left for 8 d each. Pressure pain thresholds of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed under interference-free, dummy-interference and active-interference conditions. The results indicated that the application of an active occlusal interference, as used in this study, did not influence significantly the pressure pain thresholds of these muscles in healthy individuals.

  20. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, J. J.; Wang, I.-N.

    2010-01-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimen...

  1. Confrontation of thermoluminescence models in lithium fluoride with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewiadomski, T.

    1976-12-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of lithium fluoride depend on numerous factors and are much more complex than those of other phosphors. The so far developed fragmentary models are meant to explain the relationships between crystal defect structure and the processes involved in TL. An attempt has been made to compare these models with the veryfied experimental data and to point out the observations which are inconsistant with the models. (author)

  2. Topical combinations aimed at treating microvascular dysfunction reduce allodynia in rat models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavendran, J Vaigunda; Laferrière, André; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J; Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Zhang, Ji; Coderre, Terence J

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that various chronic pain syndromes exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvasculature dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle, or nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in animal models of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) and neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α(2)-adrenergic (α(2)A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors combined with either phosphodiesterase (PDE) or phosphatidic acid (PA) inhibitors would effectively reduce allodynia in these animal models of chronic pain. Single topical agents produced significant dose-dependent antiallodynic effects in rats with chronic postischemia pain, and the antiallodynic dose-response curves of PDE and PA inhibitors were shifted 2.5- to 10-fold leftward when combined with nonanalgesic doses of α(2)A receptor agonists or NO donors. Topical combinations also produced significant antiallodynic effects in rats with sciatic nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. These effects were shown to be produced by a local action, lasted up to 6 hours after acute treatment, and did not produce tolerance over 15 days of chronic daily dosing. The present results support the hypothesis that allodynia in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain is effectively relieved by topical combinations of α(2)A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors. This suggests that topical treatments aimed at improving microvascular function may reduce allodynia in patients with CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. This article presents the synergistic antiallodynic effects of combinations of α(2)A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. The data suggest that effective clinical treatment of chronic neuropathic pain may be achieved by therapies that alleviate microvascular dysfunction in affected

  3. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design.

  4. Experimental Validation of a Dynamic Model for Lightweight Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gasparetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the main topics in robotics research is dynamic performance improvement by means of a lightening of the overall system structure. The effective motion and control of these lightweight robotic systems occurs with the use of suitable motion planning and control process. In order to do so, model-based approaches can be adopted by exploiting accurate dynamic models that take into account the inertial and elastic terms that are usually neglected in a heavy rigid link configuration. In this paper, an effective method for modelling spatial lightweight industrial robots based on an Equivalent Rigid Link System approach is considered from an experimental validation perspective. A dynamic simulator implementing the formulation is used and an experimental test-bench is set-up. Experimental tests are carried out with a benchmark L-shape mechanism.

  5. A sEMG model with experimentally based simulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Katherine A; Shimada, Hiroshima; Kumar, Dinesh K; Arjunan, Sridhar P

    2010-01-01

    A differential, time-invariant, surface electromyogram (sEMG) model has been implemented. While it is based on existing EMG models, the novelty of this implementation is that it assigns more accurate distributions of variables to create realistic motor unit (MU) characteristics. Variables such as muscle fibre conduction velocity, jitter (the change in the interpulse interval between subsequent action potential firings) and motor unit size have been considered to follow normal distributions about an experimentally obtained mean. In addition, motor unit firing frequencies have been considered to have non-linear and type based distributions that are in accordance with experimental results. Motor unit recruitment thresholds have been considered to be related to the MU type. The model has been used to simulate single channel differential sEMG signals from voluntary, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle. The model has been experimentally verified by conducting experiments on three subjects. Comparison between simulated signals and experimental recordings shows that the Root Mean Square (RMS) increases linearly with force in both cases. The simulated signals also show similar values and rates of change of RMS to the experimental signals.

  6. Development Of A Multivariate Prognostic Model For Pain And Activity Limitation In People With Low Back Disorders Receiving Physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jon J; Richards BPhysio, Matt C; Surkitt BPhysio, Luke D; Chan BPhysio, Alexander Yp; Slater, Sarah L; Taylor, Nicholas F; Hahne, Andrew J

    2018-05-28

    To identify predictors for back pain, leg pain and activity limitation in patients with early persistent low back disorders. Prospective inception cohort study; Setting: primary care private physiotherapy clinics in Melbourne, Australia. 300 adults aged 18-65 years with low back and/or referred leg pain of ≥6-weeks and ≤6-months duration. Not applicable. Numerical rating scales for back pain and leg pain as well as the Oswestry Disability Scale. Prognostic factors included sociodemographics, treatment related factors, subjective/physical examination, subgrouping factors and standardized questionnaires. Univariate analysis followed by generalized estimating equations were used to develop a multivariate prognostic model for back pain, leg pain and activity limitation. Fifty-eight prognostic factors progressed to the multivariate stage where 15 showed significant (pduration, high multifidus tone, clinically determined inflammation, higher back and leg pain severity, lower lifting capacity, lower work capacity and higher pain drawing percentage coverage). The preliminary model identifying predictors of low back disorders explained up to 37% of the variance in outcome. This study evaluated a comprehensive range of prognostic factors reflective of both the biomedical and psychosocial domains of low back disorders. The preliminary multivariate model requires further validation before being considered for clinical use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Attenuation of TRPV1 and TRPV4 Expression and Function in Mouse Inflammatory Pain Models Using Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pain is a major human affliction, our understanding of pain mechanisms is limited. TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 and TRPV4 are two crucial receptors involved in inflammatory pain, but their roles in EA- (electroacupuncture- mediated analgesia are unknown. We injected mice with carrageenan (carra or a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA to model inflammatory pain and investigated the analgesic effect of EA using animal behavior tests, immunostaining, Western blotting, and a whole-cell recording technique. The inflammatory pain model mice developed both mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Notably, EA at the ST36 acupoint reversed these phenomena, indicating its curative effect in inflammatory pain. The protein levels of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in DRG (dorsal root ganglion neurons were both increased at day 4 after the initiation of inflammatory pain and were attenuated by EA, as demonstrated by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. We verified DRG electrophysiological properties to confirm that EA ameliorated peripheral nerve hyperexcitation. Our results indicated that the AP (action potential threshold, rise time, and fall time, and the percentage and amplitude of TRPV1 and TRPV4 were altered by EA, indicating that EA has an antinociceptive role in inflammatory pain. Our results demonstrate a novel role for EA in regulating TRPV1 and TRPV4 protein expression and nerve excitation in mouse inflammatory pain models.

  8. Randomised trial of the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered flunixin, carprofen and ketoprofen in a pain model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, D; Pippia, J; Colditz, I G; Hinch, G; Petherick, J C; Lee, C

    2015-08-01

    To determine the efficacy and bioavailability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when administered orally to sheep. Randomised experimental design with four treatment groups: three NSAID groups and one control group (n = 10/group). The study animals were 40 18-month-old Merino ewes with an average weight of 31.4 ± 0.5 kg. Treatment was given orally at 24 h intervals for 6 days at dose rates expected to achieve therapeutic levels in sheep: carprofen (8.0 mg/kg), ketoprofen (8.0 mg/kg) and flunixin (4.0 mg/kg). Oil of turpentine (0.1 mL) was injected into a forelimb of each sheep to induce inflammation and pain; responses (force plate pressure, skin temperature, limb circumference, haematology and plasma cortisol) were measured at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection. NSAID concentrations were determined by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. The NSAIDs were detectable in ovine plasma 2 h after oral administration, with average concentrations of 4.5-8.4 µg/mL for ketoprofen, 2.6-4.1 µg/mL for flunixin and 30-80 µg/mL for carprofen. NSAID concentrations dropped 24 h after administration. Pain response to an oil of turpentine injection was assessed using the measures applied but no effect of the NSAIDs was observed. Although this pain model has been previously validated, the responses observed in this study differed from those in the previous study. The three NSAIDs reached inferred therapeutic concentrations in blood at 2 h after oral administration. The oil of turpentine lameness model may need further validation. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Antinociceptive and anti-exudative synergism between dexketoprofen and tramadol in a model of inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Romero, Maria Asunción; Puig, Margarita M

    2012-06-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated antinociceptive synergism between dexketoprofen (DEX) and tramadol (TRM) in acute animal models of nociception. The aim of the present study was to investigate the type of interaction between DEX and TRM in a chronic musculoskeletal pain model in mice, which fairly replicates the characteristics of chronic osteoarticular pain in humans. Inflammation was induced by a subplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in male CF1 mice. Nociceptive thresholds were evaluated using the hot plate, the nocifensive spontaneous behavior and the acetone tests, while plasma extravasation (PE) was assessed with Evan's blue. We used the following experimental groups: control (no inflammation), acute (1 day after CFA injection), and chronic inflammation (7 days after CFA). Dose-response curves for DEX and TRM, individually and combined in a 1 : 1 proportion based on their potency were obtained, and the doses that produced a 50% inhibition calculated. The isobolographic analysis revealed that in all groups of study (no inflammation, acute, and chronic inflammation), the combination of DEX : TRM was synergistic, for both the inhibition of nociception and the PE. The results suggest that the DEX : TRM (1 : 1) combination could be useful in the management of acute and chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal pains in humans; in addition, the synergistic interaction between the drugs observed both during acute and chronic inflammation suggests that less doses would be required of each drug to obtain effective analgesia. © 2011 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  10. Melatonin Alters the Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia Induced by Orofacial Pain Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Oliveira, Carla; Adachi, Lauren Naomi Spezia; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Cioato, Stefania Giotti; de Freitas, Joice S; de Souza, Andressa; Quevedo, Alexandre; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone that presents a wide range of physiological functions including regulating circadian rhythms and sleep, enhancing immune function, sleep improvement, and antioxidant effects. In addition, melatonin has received special attention in pain treatment since it is effective and presents few adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute dose of melatonin upon hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in a chronic orofacial pain model in Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive behavior was assessed by facial Von Frey and the hot plate tests at baseline and thereafter 30, 60, and 120 min, 24 h, and 7 days after melatonin treatment. We demonstrated that acute melatonin administration alters mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by an orofacial pain model (TMD), highlighting that the melatonin effect upon mechanical hyperalgesia remained until 7 days after its administration. Besides, we observed specific tissue profiles of neuroimmunomodulators linked to pain conditions and/or melatonin effect (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and interleukins 6 and 10) in the brainstem levels, and its effects were state-dependent of the baseline of these animals.

  11. Experimental modeling of injectivity loss; Modelagem experimental da perda de injetividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, Adriano Jose do Amaral Mello; Silva, Pedro Glauto de Farias e; Gomes, Vanessa Limeira Azevedo; Santos, Adriano dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Produced water reinjection, suspended particles are retained in the porous media causing formation damage and injectivity decline. In general the retention of the particles occurs near the side of injection, this fact occurs in most cases, due to the size exclusion. The modeling of filtration and the consequent formation damage is essential to the project management of water injection in oil reservoirs. Thus, mathematical models are studied to better predict the distribution of particles throughout the porous media and determine the parameters of adjustment to injectivity decline. Among these models, there is the classic model which consists in determining these parameters (coefficient of filtration and formation damage). The methodology used in modeling is given from the equations the mass conservation, kinetic particle retention, the modified Darcy equation and the function formation damage. This study aimed to improve experimental modeling, including development of software for acquisition and processing of experimental data, considering the variable number of pressure measurements along the sample. The software was developed using the Labview 2011 platform and allows the determination of relevant parameters to predict injectivity loss in water injection wells. Furthermore, based on the traditional model of filtration in porous media (including depth filtration and formation of the external plaster), the software was applied to predict injectivity loss in addition to the properties of the grout. Finally, the classical models for transporting suspensions and damage to the formation were observed. (author)

  12. Investigation of approximate models of experimental temperature characteristics of machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, I. V.; Polyakov, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of various approaches to the approximation of experimental data and the creation of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machines with the aim of finding ways to reduce the time of their field tests and reducing the temperature error of the treatments. The main methods of research which the authors used in this work are: the full-scale thermal testing of machines; realization of various approaches at approximation of experimental temperature characteristics of machine tools by polynomial models; analysis and evaluation of modelling results (model quality) of the temperature characteristics of machines and their derivatives up to the third order in time. As a result of the performed researches, rational methods, type, parameters and complexity of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machine tools are proposed.

  13. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  14. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J J; Wang, I-N

    2010-09-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimental context with a well-researched organism allows dissection of the evolutionary process to identify causes of model failure--whether the model is wrong about genetics or selection. Second, optimality models provide a meaningful context for the process and mechanics of evolution, and thus may be used to elicit realistic genetic bases of adaptation--an especially useful augmentation to well-researched genetic systems. A few studies of microbes have begun to pioneer this new direction. Incompatibility between the assumed and actual genetics has been demonstrated to be the cause of model failure in some cases. More interestingly, evolution at the phenotypic level has sometimes matched prediction even though the adaptive mutations defy mechanisms established by decades of classic genetic studies. Integration of experimental evolutionary tests with genetics heralds a new wave for optimality models and their extensions that does not merely emphasize the forces driving evolution.

  15. The effect of deep and slow breathing on pain perception, autonomic activity, and mood processing--an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Kern, Uwe; Haas, Joachim; Hajak, Göran; Eichhammer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Deep and slow breathing (DSB) techniques, as a component of various relaxation techniques, have been reported as complementary approaches in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes, but the relevance of relaxation for alleviating pain during a breathing intervention was not evaluated so far. In order to disentangle the effects of relaxation and respiration, we investigated two different DSB techniques at the same respiration rates and depths on pain perception, autonomic activity, and mood in 16 healthy subjects. In the attentive DSB intervention, subjects were asked to breathe guided by a respiratory feedback task requiring a high degree of concentration and constant attention. In the relaxing DSB intervention, the subjects relaxed during the breathing training. The skin conductance levels, indicating sympathetic tone, were measured during the breathing maneuvers. Thermal detection and pain thresholds for cold and hot stimuli and profile of mood states were examined before and after the breathing sessions. The mean detection and pain thresholds showed a significant increase resulting from the relaxing DSB, whereas no significant changes of these thresholds were found associated with the attentive DSB. The mean skin conductance levels indicating sympathetic activity decreased significantly during the relaxing DSB intervention but not during the attentive DSB. Both breathing interventions showed similar reductions in negative feelings (tension, anger, and depression). Our results suggest that the way of breathing decisively influences autonomic and pain processing, thereby identifying DSB in concert with relaxation as the essential feature in the modulation of sympathetic arousal and pain perception. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Team Modelling: Review of Experimental Scenarios and Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    les auteurs ont réuni et examiné des scénarios ayant servi dans le cadre d’études antérieures sur les équipes, ils ont développé d’importants...cognition, perception, sensation, motor action and knowledge, that embody a principled underlying theory or framework for human information...Processing) integrates Qinetiq’s (POP) model with DRDC’s IP/PCT (Perceptual Control Theory ) models. In particular, the POP/IP model includes the

  17. "The empathy impulse: A multinomial model of intentional and unintentional empathy for pain": Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Reports an error in "The empathy impulse: A multinomial model of intentional and unintentional empathy for pain" by C. Daryl Cameron, Victoria L. Spring and Andrew R. Todd ( Emotion , 2017[Apr], Vol 17[3], 395-411). In this article, there was an error in the calculation of some of the effect sizes. The w effect size was manually computed incorrectly. The incorrect number of total observations was used, which affected the final effect size estimates. This computing error does not change any of the results or interpretations about model fit based on the G² statistic, or about significant differences across conditions in process parameters. Therefore, it does not change any of the hypothesis tests or conclusions. The w statistics for overall model fit should be .02 instead of .04 in Study 1, .01 instead of .02 in Study 2, .01 instead of .03 for the OIT in Study 3 (model fit for the PIT remains the same: .00), and .02 instead of .03 in Study 4. The corrected tables can be seen here: http://osf.io/qebku at the Open Science Framework site for the article. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2017-01641-001.) Empathy for pain is often described as automatic. Here, we used implicit measurement and multinomial modeling to formally quantify unintentional empathy for pain: empathy that occurs despite intentions to the contrary. We developed the pain identification task (PIT), a sequential priming task wherein participants judge the painfulness of target experiences while trying to avoid the influence of prime experiences. Using multinomial modeling, we distinguished 3 component processes underlying PIT performance: empathy toward target stimuli (Intentional Empathy), empathy toward prime stimuli (Unintentional Empathy), and bias to judge target stimuli as painful (Response Bias). In Experiment 1, imposing a fast (vs. slow) response deadline uniquely reduced Intentional Empathy. In Experiment 2, inducing imagine-self (vs. imagine

  18. The effect of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and pain-related cellular reactions in the spinal cord and midbrain in a rat sciatic nerve injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumizono M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Sumizono,1,2 Harutoshi Sakakima,1 Shotaro Otsuka,1 Takuto Terashi,1 Kazuki Nakanishi,1,2 Koki Ueda,1,2 Seiya Takada,1,2 Kiyoshi Kikuchi3 1Course of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Kirishima Orthopedics, Kirishima, Japan; 3Division of Brain Science, Department of Physiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Background: Exercise regimens are established methods that can relieve neuropathic pain. However, the relationship between frequency and intensity of exercise and multiple cellular responses of exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain is still unclear. We examined the influence of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and the intracellular responses in a sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI model. Materials and methods: Rats were assigned to four groups as follows: CCI and high-frequency exercise (HFE group, CCI and low-frequency exercise (LFE group, CCI and no exercise (No-Ex group, and naive animals (control group. Rats ran on a treadmill, at a speed of 20 m/min, for 30 min, for 5 (HFE or 3 (LFE days a week, for a total of 5 weeks. The 50% withdrawal threshold was evaluated for mechanical sensitivity. The activation of glial cells (microglia and astrocytes, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and μ-opioid receptor in the spinal dorsal horn and endogenous opioid in the midbrain were examined using immunohistochemistry. Opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone were administered using intraperitoneal injection. Results: The development of neuropathic pain was related to the activation of glial cells, increased BDNF expression, and downregulation of the μ-opioid receptor in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. In the No-Ex group, neuropathic pain showed the highest level of mechanical hypersensitivity at 2 weeks, which improved slightly until 5 weeks after CCI. In both exercise groups, the alleviation of

  19. Relationships between craniofacial pain and bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, P; Jadidi, F; Arima, T; Baad-Hansen, L; Sessle, B J

    2008-07-01

    A still commonly held view in the literature and clinical practice is that bruxism causes pain because of overloading of the musculoskeletal tissue and craniofacial pain, on the other hand, triggers more bruxism. Furthermore, it is often believed that there is a dose-response gradient so that more bruxism (intensity, duration) leads to more overloading and pain. Provided the existence of efficient techniques to treat bruxism, it would be straightforward in such a simple system to target bruxism as the cause of pain and hence treat the pain. Of course, human biological systems are much more complex and therefore, it is no surprise that the relationship between bruxism and pain is far from being simple or even linear. Indeed, there are unexpected relationships, which complicate the establishment of adequate explanatory models. Part of the reason is the complexity of the bruxism in itself, which presents significant challenges related to operationalized criteria and diagnostic tools and underlying pathophysiology issues, which have been dealt with in other reviews in this issue. However, another important reason is the multifaceted nature of craniofacial pain. This review will address our current understanding of classification issues, epidemiology and neurobiological mechanisms of craniofacial pain. Experimental models of bruxism may help to further the understanding of the relationship between craniofacial pain and bruxism in addition to insights from intervention studies. The review will enable clinicians to understand the reasons why simple cause-effect relationships between bruxism and craniofacial pain are inadequate and the current implications for management of craniofacial pain.

  20. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  1. The analgesic effect of tramadol in animal models of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kumi; Umehara, Masato; Homan, Takashi; Okamoto, Ken; Oka, Michiko; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2014-03-06

    (±)-Tramadol hydrochloride (tramadol) is a widely used analgesic for the treatment of cancer pain and chronic pain. Although many animal studies have shown antinociceptive effects of tramadol in both acute and chronic pain, little is known about the effect of tramadol in putative animal models of fibromyalgia. In this study, we compared the antiallodynic effects of oral administration of tramadol in two kinds of rat chronic pain models, neuropathic pain induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) and reserpine-induced myalgia (RIM). In PSL rats, the threshold for responses induced by tactile stimulation with von Frey filaments was significantly decreased seven days after the operation, suggesting that the operation induced tactile allodynia. Orally administered tramadol showed a potent and dose-dependent antiallodynic effect on PSL-induced allodynia. In RIM rats, the threshold was significantly decreased five days after reserpine treatment. Orally administered tramadol also attenuated reserpine-induced tactile allodynia. To explore the mechanism of the antiallodynic effect of tramadol in RIM rats, we investigated the effect of the opioid antagonist naloxone on the tramadol-induced analgesic effect in these rats. The effect of tramadol was partially antagonized by naloxone, suggesting that the opioid receptor is involved at least in part in the antiallodynic effect of tramadol in RIM rats. These data indicate that orally administered tramadol produced improvement in both PSL rats and RIM rats at similar doses and provide evidence that the opioid system is partly involved in the analgesic effect of tramadol in RIM rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a mouse model of neuropathic pain following photochemically induced ischemia in the sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J X; Blakeman, K H; Yu, W; Hultenby, K; Xu, X J; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    2000-05-01

    A mouse model of neuropathic pain was developed by a photochemically induced ischemic nerve injury in normal male C57/BL6 mice. The ischemia was induced by unilateral irradiation of the sciatic nerve with an argon ion laser after intravenous administration of a photosensitizing dye, erythrosin B. The nerve injury resulted in a significant decrease in withdrawal threshold of the hindpaws to mechanical stimulation with von Frey hairs, as well as increased responsiveness to cold and heat stimulation. The mice, however, did not exhibit overt spontaneous pain-like behaviors. The evoked pain-related behaviors were observed bilaterally, although the ipsilateral changes were greater than on the contralateral side. The extent and time course of the behavioral changes were related to the duration of laser irradiation, with 1-min exposure producing the most consistent effect. Morphological examination at the light microscopic level revealed partial demyelination and axonal degeneration of the large myelinated fibers at the epicenter of the lesion 1 week postirradiation. The extent of the damage was correlated with the duration of irradiation. Injury and loss of unmyelinated fibers were also observed at the electronmicroscopic level. We conclude that an intravascular photochemical reaction leading to ischemia results in graded damage to the sciatic nerve in mice. Moreover, the nerve injury is associated with the development of abnormal pain-related behaviors. Both the behavioral and the morphological changes are correlated with the duration of irradiation. These results establish a mouse model of partial nerve injury with neuropathic pain-like behaviors which may be useful in studies using genetically modified mice. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Effects of Danggui Sini decoction on neuropathic pain: experimental studies and clinical pharmacological significance of inhibiting glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Qiang, Qiu Hong; Ling, Qian; Yu, Chang Xi; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Suhuan; Yang, Shuyu

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments. Partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Danggui Sini decoction (DSD), an aqueous extract of Angelica sinensis, Ramulus Cinnamomi, and Radix Puerariae, has been used extensively in China to treat inflammatory and ischemic diseases. The current study examined the putative effects of DSD on neuropathic pain. We used two commonly-used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI) and diabetic neuropathy for the study. And we examined effects of DSD on pain response, activation of microglia and astroglia in spinal dorsal horn, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. Consecutive intragastric administration of DSD (25 - 100 mg/kg) for 10 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models, DSD inhibited the over-expression of specific markers for microglia (Iba-1) and astroglia (GFAP) activation in the spinal dorsal horn. DSD also reduced the elevated nuclear NF-κB level and inhibited the up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. DSD can alleviate CCI and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn. The anti-inflammation effect of DSD may be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines expression.
.

  5. Constitutive Model Calibration via Autonomous Multiaxial Experimentation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-17

    ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current...Abstract Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current methods. Additional...complexity, is a difficult and time consuming process that has historically be a separate process from the experimental testing. As such, additional

  6. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  7. Capillary microreactors for lactic acid extraction: experimental and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important biobased chemical and, among others, is used for the production of poly-lactic acid. Down-stream processing using state of the art technology is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. In this presentation, experimental and modeling studies

  8. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  9. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  10. Novel sensors for food inspection modelling, fabrication and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd Syaifudin; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses presents recent developments of novel planar interdigital sensors for food inspection. It covers the fundamentals of sensors, their design, modelling and simulations, fabrications, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses. This book will be useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Electromagnetic Sensors.

  11. Hyperalgesia in a human model of acute inflammatory pain: a methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    as significant for all variables with fewer than 12 subjects in a cross-over design (2alpha = 5% and power = 80%). Between-day comparisons demanded up to 25 subjects to detect changes of the same magnitude. The burns caused mild to moderate pain (VAS: mean 29, SD 14) and the subjects (all right-handed) were more......The aim of the study was to examine reproducibility of primary and secondary hyperalgesia in a psychophysical model of human inflammatory pain. Mild burns were produced on the crura of 12 volunteers with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min). Assessments of (i) cold and warm detection...... thresholds, (ii) mechanical and heat pain thresholds, (iii) pain to heat (43 degrees C and 45 degrees C, 5 s), (iv) secondary hyperalgesia, and (v) skin erythema were made 1.75 and 0.5 h before, and 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after a burn injury. Sensory thresholds and hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli...

  12. A novel model of inflammatory pain in human skin involving topical application of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Lyngholm, A M; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2010-09-01

    Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a known irritant. It releases pro-inflammatory mediators considered pivotal in inflammatory pain. The sensory effects of SLS in the skin remain largely unexplored. In this study, SLS was evaluated for its effect on skin sensory functions. Eight healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Skin sites were randomized to topical SLS 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2% and vehicle for 24 h. Topical capsaicin 1% was applied for 30 min at 24 h after SLS application. Assessments included laser Doppler imaging of local vasodilation and flare reactions, rating of spontaneous pain, assessment of primary thermal and tactile hyperalgesia, and determination of secondary dynamic and static hyperalgesia. SLS induced significant and dose-dependent local inflammation and primary hyperalgesia to tactile and thermal stimulation at 24 h after application, with SLS 2% treatment eliciting results comparable to those observed following treatment with capsaicin 1%. SLS induced no spontaneous pain, small areas of flare, and minimal secondary hyperalgesia. The primary hyperalgesia vanished within 2-3 days, whereas the skin inflammation persisted and was only partly normalized by Day 6. SLS induces profound perturbations of skin sensory functions lasting 2-3 days. SLS-induced inflammation may be a useful model for studying the mechanisms of inflammatory pain.

  13. Mind-body dualism and the biopsychosocial model of pain: what did Descartes really say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, G

    2000-08-01

    In the last two decades there have been many critics of western biomedicine's poor integration of social and psychological factors in questions of human health. Such critiques frequently begin with a rejection of Descartes' mind-body dualism, viewing this as the decisive philosophical moment, radically separating the two realms in both theory and practice. It is argued here, however, that many such readings of Descartes have been selective and misleading. Contrary to the assumptions of many recent authors, Descartes' dualism does attempt to explain the union of psyche and soma - with more depth than is often appreciated. Pain plays a key role in Cartesian as well as contemporary thinking about the problem of dualism. Theories of the psychological origins of pain symptoms persisted throughout the history of modern medicine and were not necessarily discouraged by Cartesian mental philosophy. Moreover, the recently developed biopsychosocial model of pain may have more in common with Cartesian dualism than it purports to have. This article presents a rereading of Descartes' mental philosophy and his views on pain. The intention is not to defend his theories, but to re-evaluate them and to ask in what respect contemporary theories represent any significant advance in philosophical terms.

  14. Impact of Psychological Stress on Pain Perception in an Animal Model of Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Siomara; Cruz, Myrella L; Seguinot, Inevy I; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2017-10-01

    Pain in patients with endometriosis is considered a significant source of stress but does not always correlate with severity of the condition. We have demonstrated that stress can worsen endometriosis in an animal model. Here, we tested the impact of a psychological stress protocol on pain thresholds and pain receptors. Endometriosis was induced in female rats by suturing uterine horn tissue next to the intestinal mesentery. Sham rats had sutures only. Rats were exposed to water avoidance stress for 7 consecutive days or handled for 5 minutes (no stress). Fecal pellets and serum corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured as an index of anxiety. Pain perception was assessed using hot plate and Von Frey tests. Substance P, enkephalin, endomorphin-2, Mu opioid receptor (MOR), and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in the spinal cord were measured by immunohistochemistry. Fecal pellets and CORT were significantly higher in the endo-stress (ES) group than endo-no stress (ENS; P stress groups (SNS; P stress reversed the allodynic effect caused by endo ( P stress develop more severe symptoms but interestingly stress seems to have beneficial effects on abdominal allodynia, which could be a consequence of the stress-induced analgesia phenomenon.

  15. Prior stress exposure increases pain behaviors in a rat model of full thickness thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, Jennifer E; McLean, Samuel A; Averitt, Dayna L

    2015-12-01

    Thermal burns among individuals working in highly stressful environments, such as firefighters and military Service Members, are common. Evidence suggests that pre-injury stress may exaggerate pain following thermal injury; however current animal models of burn have not evaluated the potential influence of pre-burn stress. This sham-controlled study evaluated the influence of prior stress exposure on post-burn thermal and mechanical sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were exposed to 20 min of inescapable swim stress or sham stress once per day for three days. Exposure to inescapable swim stress (1) increased the intensity and duration of thermal hyperalgesia after subsequent burn and (2) accelerated the onset of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after subsequent burn. This stress-induced exacerbation of pain sensitivity was reversed by pretreatment and concurrent treatment with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine. These data suggest a better understanding of mechanisms by which prior stress augments pain after thermal burn may lead to improved pain treatments for burn survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Robust Bayesian Experimental Design for Conceptual Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H. V.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2015-12-01

    A robust Bayesian optimal experimental design under uncertainty is presented to provide firm information for model discrimination, given the least number of pumping wells and observation wells. Firm information is the maximum information of a system can be guaranteed from an experimental design. The design is based on the Box-Hill expected entropy decrease (EED) before and after the experiment design and the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) framework. A max-min programming is introduced to choose the robust design that maximizes the minimal Box-Hill EED subject to that the highest expected posterior model probability satisfies a desired probability threshold. The EED is calculated by the Gauss-Hermite quadrature. The BMA method is used to predict future observations and to quantify future observation uncertainty arising from conceptual and parametric uncertainties in calculating EED. Monte Carlo approach is adopted to quantify the uncertainty in the posterior model probabilities. The optimal experimental design is tested by a synthetic 5-layer anisotropic confined aquifer. Nine conceptual groundwater models are constructed due to uncertain geological architecture and boundary condition. High-performance computing is used to enumerate all possible design solutions in order to identify the most plausible groundwater model. Results highlight the impacts of scedasticity in future observation data as well as uncertainty sources on potential pumping and observation locations.

  17. Administration of a co-crystal of tramadol and celecoxib in a 1:1 molecular ratio produces synergistic antinociceptive effects in a postoperative pain model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlos, Manuel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Brenchat, Alex; Aubel, Bertrand; Buxens, Jordi; Fisas, Angels; Codony, Xavier; Romero, Luz; Zamanillo, Daniel; Vela, José Miguel

    2018-06-19

    Drug combination for the treatment of pain is common clinical practice. Co-crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib (CTC) consists of two active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), namely the atypical opioid tramadol and the preferential cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib, at a 1:1 molecular ratio. In this study, a non-formulated 'raw' form of CTC administered in suspension (referred to as ctc susp ) was compared with both tramadol and celecoxib alone in a rat plantar incision postoperative pain model. For comparison, the strong opioids morphine and oxycodone, and a tramadol plus acetaminophen combination at a molecular ratio of 1:17 were also tested. Isobolographic analyses showed that ctc susp exerted synergistic mechanical antiallodynic (experimental ED 50 =2.0±0.5mg/kg, i.p.; theoretical ED 50 =3.8±0.4mg/kg, i.p.) and thermal (experimental ED 50 =2.3±0.5mg/kg, i.p.; theoretical ED 50 =9.8±0.8mg/kg, i.p.) antihyperalgesic effects in the postoperative pain model. In contrast, the tramadol and acetaminophen combination showed antagonistic effects on both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. No synergies between tramadol and celecoxib on locomotor activity, motor coordination, ulceration potential and gastrointestinal transit were observed after the administration of ctc susp . Overall, rat efficacy and safety data revealed that ctc susp provided synergistic analgesic effects compared with each API alone, without enhancing adverse effects. Moreover, ctc susp showed similar efficacy but improved safety ratio (80, measured as gastrointestinal transit vs postoperative pain ED 50 ratios) compared with the strong opioids morphine (2.5) and oxycodone (5.8). The overall in vivo profile of ctc susp supports the further investigation of CTC in the clinical management of moderate-to-severe acute pain as an alternative to strong opioids. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The Effectiveness of Self Management Program on Pain, Fatigue, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Sickle Cell Patients: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with sickle cell disease, who must manage serious and unpredictable complications related to their disease, particularly chronic pain, suffer from numerous psychosocial problems such as depression, anxiety, stress, and disruption of interpersonal relationships; these problems often lead to fatigue and poor quality of life. Objectives This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of self-management programs targeting pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress in sickle cell patients. Patients and Methods This was a quasi-experimental study; participants were 53 patients with sickle cell disease who were referred to the Thalassemia Clinic of Ahvaz Shafa Hospital. Participants were recruited by census in 2013. Participants received a self-management program that was implemented in five sessions over 12 weeks. Levels of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress were assessed before and 24 weeks after the intervention; pain was assessed during the intervention and at a 24 week post-intervention follow-up using the fatigue severity scale (FSS, DASS21, and a pain record. Descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, Chi-square, independent t-tests, paired t-tests, repeated measures tests and correlations were used to analyze the data. Results Scores for fatigue, anxiety, depression, and stress after the intervention were significantly decreased compared to before the intervention (P < 0.001. Repeated measures testing showed that mean scores for frequency and duration of pain decreased significantly during the 12 weeks of intervention, as well as during the 24 weeks of follow-up (P < 0.001. Conclusions The results suggest the effectiveness of self-management programs on the reduction of pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and stress in sickle cell patients. Therefore, self-management programs are advisable in order to empower patients and assist their management of health-related problems.

  19. Behavioral testing in rodent models of orofacial neuropathic and inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Avendaño, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial pain conditions are often very debilitating to the patient and difficult to treat. While clinical interest is high, the proportion of studies performed in the orofacial region in laboratory animals is relatively low, compared with other body regions. This is partly due to difficulties in testing freely moving animals and therefore lack of reliable testing methods. Here we present a comprehensive review of the currently used rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain adapted to the orofacial areas, taking into account the difficulties and drawbacks of the existing approaches. We examine the available testing methods and procedures used for assessing the behavioral responses in the face in both mice and rats and provide a summary of some pharmacological agents used in these paradigms to date. The use of these agents in animal models is also compared with outcomes observed in the clinic. PMID:23139912

  20. Effects of an intervention based on the Transtheoretical Model on back muscle endurance, physical function and pain in rice farmers with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawat, Thanakorn; Nualnetr, Nomjit

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) can be managed by exercises which should be tailored to an individual's readiness to behavioral change. To evaluate the effects of an intervention program based on the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change (TTM) on back muscle endurance, physical function and pain in rice farmers with chronic LBP. In a 32-week study, 126 rice farmers were allocated to the TTM (n= 62) and non-TTM (n= 64) groups. Modified Biering-Sorensen test, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire and visual analogue scale were used for evaluating back muscle endurance, physical function and severity of pain, respectively. The evaluations were performed at baseline and at weeks 8, 20 and 32 of the study. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. The back muscle endurance was significantly greater in the TTM group than in the non-TTM group at week 32 (p= 0.025). Physical function and severity of pain were significantly improved in the TTM group when compared with the non-TTM group at weeks 20 and 32 (pback muscle endurance and physical function, and reduce the pain in rice farmers with LBP. Further studies should be considered to explore the long-term effects of this intervention.

  1. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peter; Dada, Joseph O; Jameson, Daniel; Spasic, Irena; Swainston, Neil; Carroll, Kathleen; Dunn, Warwick; Khan, Farid; Malys, Naglis; Messiha, Hanan L; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Weichart, Dieter; Winder, Catherine; Wishart, Jill; Broomhead, David S; Goble, Carole A; Gaskell, Simon J; Kell, Douglas B; Westerhoff, Hans V; Mendes, Pedro; Paton, Norman W

    2010-11-29

    The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  2. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  3. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  4. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model

  5. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  6. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  7. Synergistic interactions between paracetamol and oxcarbazepine in somatic and visceral pain models in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Maja A; Vucković, Sonja M; Stepanović-Petrović, Radica M; Ugresić, Nenad D; Prostran, Milica S; Bosković, Bogdan

    2010-04-01

    Combination therapy is a valid approach in pain treatment, in which a reduction of doses could reduce side effects and still achieve optimal analgesia. We examined the effects of coadministered paracetamol, a widely used non-opioid analgesic, and oxcarbazepine, a relatively novel anticonvulsant with analgesic properties, in a rat model of paw inflammatory hyperalgesia and in a mice model of visceral pain and determined the type of interaction between components. The effects of paracetamol, oxcarbazepine, and their combinations were examined in carrageenan-induced (0.1 mL, 1%) paw inflammatory hyperalgesia in rats and in an acetic acid-induced (10 mg/kg, 0.75%) writhing test in mice. In both models, drugs were coadministered in fixed-dose fractions of the 50% effective dose (ED(50)), and type of interaction was determined by isobolographic analysis. Paracetamol (50-200 mg/kg peroral), oxcarbazepine (40-160 mg/kg peroral), and their combination (1/8, 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2 of a single drug ED(50)) produced a significant, dose-dependent antihyperalgesia in carrageenan-injected rats. In the writhing test in mice, paracetamol (60-180 mg/kg peroral), oxcarbazepine (20-80 mg/kg peroral), and their combination (1/16, 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 of a single drug ED(50)) significantly and dose dependently reduced the number of writhes. In both models, isobolographic analysis revealed a significant synergistic interaction between paracetamol and oxcarbazepine, with a >4-fold reduction of doses of both drugs in combination, compared with single drugs ED(50). The synergistic interaction between paracetamol and oxcarbazepine provides new information about combination pain treatment and should be explored further in patients, especially with somatic and/or visceral pain.

  8. Evaluation of Pain Assessment Techniques and Analgesia Efficacy in a Female Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) Model of Surgical Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Vanessa L; Athavale, Stephanie; Simon, Katherine E; Kendall, Lon V; Nemzek, Jean A; Lofgren, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) are a frequently used species in research, often involving potentially painful procedures. Therefore, evidence-based recommendations regarding analgesia are critically needed to optimize their wellbeing. Our laboratory examined the efficacy of carprofen and extended-release (ER) buprenorphine, alone and as a multimodal combination, for relieving postsurgical pain in guinea pigs. Animals were assessed by using evoked (mechanical hypersensitivity), nonevoked (video ethogram, cageside ethogram, time-to-consumption test), and clinical (weight loss) measurements for 96 h during baseline, anesthesia–analgesia, and hysterectomy conditions. In addition, ER buprenorphine was evaluated pharmacologically. Guinea pigs treated with a single analgesic showed increased mechanical sensitivity for at least 96 h and indices of pain according to the video ethogram for as long as 8 h, compared with levels recorded during anesthesia–analgesia. In contrast, animals given both analgesics demonstrated increased mechanical sensitivity and behavioral evidence of pain for only 2 h after surgery compared with anesthesia–analgesia. The cageside ethogram and time-to-consumption tests failed to identify differences between conditions or treatment groups, highlighting the difficulty of identifying pain in guinea pigs without remote observation. Guinea pigs treated with multimodal analgesia or ER buprenorphine lost at least 10% of their baseline weights, whereas weight loss in carprofen animals was significantly lower (3%). Plasma levels for ER buprenorphine exceeded 0.9 ng/mL from 8 to 96 h after injection. Of the 3 analgesia regimens evaluated, multimodal analgesia provided the most effective pain control in guinea pigs. However the weight loss in the ER buprenorphine–treated animals may need to be considered during analgesia selection. PMID:28724492

  9. Modeling RERTR experimental fuel plates using the PLATE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Brazener, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling results using the PLATE dispersion fuel performance code are presented for the U-Mo/Al experimental fuel plates from the RERTR-1, -2, -3 and -5 irradiation tests. Agreement of the calculations with experimental data obtained in post-irradiation examinations of these fuels, where available, is shown to be good. Use of the code to perform a series of parametric evaluations highlights the sensitivity of U-Mo dispersion fuel performance to fabrication variables, especially fuel particle shape and size distributions. (author)

  10. Physics of human cooperation: experimental evidence and theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Angel

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, many physicists have used evolutionary game theory combined with a complex systems perspective in an attempt to understand social phenomena and challenges. Prominent among such phenomena is the issue of the emergence and sustainability of cooperation in a networked world of selfish or self-focused individuals. The vast majority of research done by physicists on these questions is theoretical, and is almost always posed in terms of agent-based models. Unfortunately, more often than not such models ignore a number of facts that are well established experimentally, and are thus rendered irrelevant to actual social applications. I here summarize some of the facts that any realistic model should incorporate and take into account, discuss important aspects underlying the relation between theory and experiments, and discuss future directions for research based on the available experimental knowledge.

  11. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  12. A multilevel structural equation modeling analysis of vulnerabilities and resilience resources influencing affective adaptation to chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J; Arewasikporn, Anne

    2014-02-01

    The processes of individual adaptation to chronic pain are complex and occur across multiple domains. We examined the social, cognitive, and affective context of daily pain adaptation in individuals with fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis. By using a sample of 260 women with fibromyalgia or osteoarthritis, we examined the contributions of pain catastrophizing, negative interpersonal events, and positive interpersonal events to daily negative and positive affect across 30days of daily diary data. Individual differences and daily fluctuations in predictor variables were estimated simultaneously by utilizing multilevel structural equation modeling techniques. The relationships between pain and negative and positive affect were mediated by stable and day-to-day levels of pain catastrophizing as well as day-to-day positive interpersonal events, but not negative interpersonal events. There were significant and independent contributions of pain catastrophizing and positive interpersonal events to adaptation to pain and pain-related affective dysregulation. These effects occur both between persons and within a person's everyday life. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of experimental alloxan model of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Semenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes that lead to the disability of diabetic patients is diabetic retinopathy (DR. The relevance of the problem of DR necessitates the development of optimal experimental models on experimental animals to find effective ways of correcting this pathology. The purpose of our work was to develop an experimental alloxan model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM for the study of DR, which would not result in the lethal outcome of experimental animals under the action of alloxan; histological examination of changes in the tissues of the eyeball in the reproduction of the DM model for the selection of new effective methods for the metabolic treatment of DR in the early stages. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out on white outbred Wistar rats weighing 180–200 g. The first group consisted of 20 animals that were not subjected to any influence, served as a control; second group — 30 animals, in which DM was modeled by administration of alloxan and fructose. Results. When modeling DR, vessel changes in the form of wall fibrosis, edema of the endothelium and vasospasm were found. There was also a decrease in the amount of pigment granules, dystrophic changes in the cells of the ganglionic layer and a layer of retinal rods and cones, which coincides with the descriptions of damage to the coats of the eyeball in patients with DM. Conclusions. In our studies, we have calculated the optimal dose of alloxan administration, which does not lead to the death of rats (the lethality of rats was absent and is an effective model not only of DM in general, but also of DR.